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Sample records for aegir ridge norwegian

  1. Evidence for Thin Oceanic Crust on the Extinct Aegir Ridge, Norwegian Basin, N.E. Atlantic Derived from Satellite Gravity Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, E. E.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    Satellite gravity inversion incorporating a lithosphere thermal gravity correction has been used to map crustal thickness and lithosphere thinning factor for the N.E. Atlantic. The inversion of gravity data to determine crustal thickness incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction for both oceanic and continental margin lithosphere. Predicted crustal thicknesses in the Norwegian Basin are between 7 and 4 km on the extinct Aegir oceanic ridge which ceased sea-floor spreading in the Oligocene. Crustal thickness estimates do not include a correction for sediment thickness and are upper bounds. Crustal thicknesses determined by gravity inversion for the Aegir Ridge are consistent with recent estimates derived using refraction seismology by Breivik et al. (2006). Failure to incorporate a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction produces an over-estimate of crustal thickness. Oceanic crustal thicknesses within the Norwegian Basin are predicted by the gravity inversion to increase to 9-10 km eastwards towards the Norwegian (Moere) and westwards towards the Jan Mayen micro-continent, consistent with volcanic margin continental breakup at the end of the Palaeocene. The observation (from gravity inversion and seismic refraction studies) of thin oceanic crust produced by the Aegir ocean ridge in the Oligocene has implications for the temporal evolution of asthenosphere temperature under the N.E. Atlantic during the Tertiary. Thin Oligocene oceanic crust may imply cool (normal) asthenosphere temperatures during the Oligocene in contrast to elevated asthenosphere temperatures in the Palaeocene and Miocene-Recent as indicated by volcanic margin formation and the formation of Iceland respectively. Gravity inversion also predicts a region of thin oceanic crust to the west of the northern part of the Jan Mayen micro-continent and to the east of the thicker oceanic crust currently being formed at the Kolbeinsey Ridge. Thicker crust (c.f. ocean basins) is

  2. Neogene magmatism northeast of the Aegir and Kolbeinsey ridges, NE Atlantic: Spreading ridge-mantle plume interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, AsbjøRn Johan; Faleide, Jan Inge; Mjelde, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    According to mantle plume theory the Earth's interior cools partly by localized large vertical mass transport, causing extensive decompression melting. The Iceland melt anomaly is regarded as a typical example of a mantle plume. However, there are centers of Miocene to recent magmatism in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea not easily explained by the plume theory. Here we present new data to document diffuse late Miocene magmatic underplating of older oceanic crust located mostly north of the Aegir Ridge, an extinct seafloor spreading axis in the Norway Basin. There is also a region with similar magmatism northeast of the presently spreading Kolbeinsey Ridge north of Iceland. Intraplate magmatism in these locations is not easily explained by local plume models, edge-driven convection, or by asthenosphere flow-lithosphere thickness interaction. On the basis of correlation between the magmatism and the active or extinct spreading ridges, we propose the mid-ocean ridge basalt-capture model, in which this magmatism can be understood through plume-spreading ridge interaction: The asthenosphere flow out from Iceland captures deeper, low-degree partially molten asthenospheric regions from underneath the spreading ridges and carry these across the terminating fracture zones, to subsequently underplate oceanic crust or to intrude and build seamounts. This model is similar to lithospheric cracking models for intraplate magmatism in requiring that low-degree partial melt can be retained in the asthenosphere over time but differ in that the magma is extracted by internal magma movement processes and not by external tectonic forces.

  3. Analysis of converted S-waves and gravity anomaly along the Aegir Ridge: implications for crustal lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A. K.; Breivik, A. J.; Mjelde, R.; Hanan, B. B.; Ito, G.; Sayit, K.; Howell, S.; Vogt, P. R.; Pedersen, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Aegir Ridge is an extinct spreading ridge in North-East Atlantic ocean. A thinner than normal crust around the Aegir Ridge appears as a hole in the extensively magmatic surroundings. Its proximity to the Iceland hot-spot makes it particularly important for understanding the changing dynamics of hotspot-ridge interaction. An integrated seismic and dredging experiment was conduced during the summer of 2010 with the primary aim to understand the nature of magmatism along the ridge shortly before cessation of seafloor spreading through variations of sub-seafloor lithological properties. Here, we present results of analysis of converted shear-waves recorded on OBS-sesimic data, and ship-gravity data. The shear-wave study enables us to quantify the variation of Vp/Vs in the sediments, crust and the upper-most mantle. We also inverted the gravity data to determine the sub-seafloor density distribution. The P- to S- converted shear-waves were identified on 20 OBSs along a profile with a total length of 550 km parallel to the ridge-axis. The sedimentary section on top of the crystalline crust is well illuminated in the streamer data. The forward modelling of the OBS data reveals that the Vp/Vs ratio in sediments are as high as 4.8, decreasing rapidly to a value of 3.00, primarily due to compaction of sediments with depth. Identification of sufficient PnS and PSn phases enable us to model the crustal and upper-most mantle Vp/Vs. The upper crystalline crust requires a Vp/Vs value of 1.99 and 1.89 for the southern and the northern profiles respectively, to fit the observations. The lower crust and upper-most part of the mantle have a Vp/Vs of ~1.82 and 1.795 respectively. Slightly lower Vp and moderate increase in Vp/Vs in parts of the crust and upper mantle presumably indicate presence of faulting, fracturing in the crust and moderate degree of serpentinization of the upper mantle. A sub-seafloor density model is derived by non-linear inversion of the gravity anomaly. The

  4. Crustal Structure of the Northern and Southern Jan Mayen Ridge Segments, Norwegian Sea, Based on Ocean Bottom Seismometer Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Mjelde, R.; Shimamura, H.; Murai, Y.; Nishimura, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The Jan Mayen Ridge (JMR) is a submarine ridge trending south from the volcanic Jan Mayen island in the Norwegian Sea, towards Iceland. In the north, it is a distinct, single ridge, but in the south it is divided into several smaller ridges. JMR is interpreted as a micro-continent, being part of Greenland during the volcanically active rifting off Norway in the latest Paleocene. In the late Oligocene, JMR was rifted off Greenland when seafloor spreading shifted from the now extinct Aegir Ridge, to the presently active Kolbeinsey Ridge. The southern termination of the micro-continent is uncertain, though it may extend into the Icelandic shelf. Earlier studies of the northern ridge found extrusive volcanism, and an asymmetrical crustal root, displaced to the east. Two OBS profiles were shot across the northern and southern part in year 2000. The northern ( ˜69° N) terminates in the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone, and the southern ( ˜66.5° N) crosses the Aegir Ridge. The vertical and horizontal components were modeled by ray-tracing into two-dimensional velocity transects. In the north, a maximum crustal thickness of 16 km was found in a narrow root below the eastern part of the ridge. The P-wave velocity at the bottom of the eastern part of the root (7-7.2 km/s) indicates igneous rocks, while the western part (6.8 km/s) is typical for continental rocks, with a 40 km wide transition zone between. The supposed extrusive basalts do not stand out in the data, but may have a low velocity contrast to underlying pre-breakup sedimentary strata. The top oceanic basement is very rough near the Jan Mayen Fracture Zone, with upper basement P-wave velocity of 3.5-4 km/s. A slight increase in the Vp/Vs ratios indicates an increase in fracturing of the deep crust here. Adjacent to the JMR, the top oceanic basement becomes very smooth, and the velocity increases to 5.5 km/s. Average oceanic crustal thickness is 5.3 km. For the southern profile, the average thickness is 5.2 km around

  5. Melt Flux Around Iceland: The Kolbeinsey Ridge Seismic Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdóttir, B.; Hooft, E. E.

    2007-12-01

    Seafloor spreading within the Iceland region has been complex since the opening of the North Atlantic in late Paleocene-early Eocene. Whereas symmetric magnetic anomalies can be traced parallel to the Reykjanes Ridge and Mohns Ridge back to chrons 23-24, anomalies within the Iceland Plateau and Aegir Ridge in the Norwegian Sea, as well as along the Greenland-Iceland-Faeroe Ridge reflect plate-boundary irregularities associated with multiple-branched crustal accretion zones, rift jumps and plate boundary segmentation (volcanic systems). We observe large variations in crustal structure along two refraction/reflection/gravity profiles, a 700 km EW-profile straddling 66.5°N between the Aegir and Kolbeinsey Ridges and a 225 km NS-profile along the southern Kolbeinsey Ridge. These profiles enable us to quantify how melt flux at the N-Atlantic spreading center has been influenced by the Iceland hotspot from the initiation of spreading to present time. The westernmost 300 km of the EW profile lies across the Iceland shelf, considered to have formed by rifting at the Kolbeinsey Ridge whereas the easternmost 400 km lie across the Iceland Plateau and Norway Basin, a region formed by rifting at the Aegir Ridge and possibly containing slivers of older crust rifted off the east Greenland margin along with the Jan Mayen Ridge. Crustal thickness varies from 4-5 km across the Aegir Ridge, 12 km just east of the Iceland shelf, and 24-28 km beneath the outer shelf, to 12-13 km near the southern tip of the Kolbeinsey Ridge and 9-10 km further north along the ridge axis. Pronounced undulations in lower crustal structure across the Iceland Plateau are most likely associated with extinct spreading centers indicating that branched crustal accretion zones existed west of the Aegir Ridge prior to the westward ridge jump forming the KR at 26 Ma. Crustal thickness at the Kolbeinsey and Reykjanes Ridges support the asymmetry in plume-ridge interaction north and south of Iceland that has been

  6. Water mass exchanges between the Norwegian and Iceland seas over the Jan Mayen Ridge using in-situ current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mork, Kjell Arne; Drinkwater, Kenneth F.; Jónsson, Steingrímur; Valdimarsson, Héðinn; Ostrowski, Marek

    2014-11-01

    The Jan Mayen Ridge, with bottom depths of 1000 m and less, runs southwards from Jan Mayen and separates the warmer and saltier Atlantic Water in the Norwegian Sea from the colder and fresher Arctic water in the Iceland Sea. During the International Polar Year (IPY, 2007-2008), three current meter moorings were deployed with the purpose to investigate water mass exchanges between the Norwegian and Iceland seas over the Ridge and their forcing mechanisms. These are the first in-situ current measurements for this region. The results showed relatively weak currents on the Ridge that frequently shifted direction except near-bottom and at the western slope of the Ridge. All current measurements showed low eddy activity and tidal velocities (less than 0.05 ms- 1). Wind-forced near-inertial motion generated from transient atmospheric low pressure systems were observed in the mixed layer being strongest during autumn and winter when ocean velocities reached 0.7 ms- 1. Near surface currents on the Ridge are influenced by local winds on a time scale of 6 days and longer, but during the two-year deployment no pronounced seasonal variation was observed, mainly due to a lack of seasonality in the local winds. In a 2000 m deep channel that cuts the Ridge, there was pronounced seasonal variation in the currents at all depths below 40 m with stronger flow toward the Iceland Sea during winter compared to summer. The variability of the deep current was found to be influenced by the large-scale wind stress curl. There was a weak net flow with averaged velocities of ~ 0.01 ms- 1 over the Ridge that was directed westward in the upper layer, signifying a small net transport of modified Atlantic Water into the Iceland Sea.

  7. Conjugate volcanic rifted margins, spreading and micro-continent: Lessons from the Norwegian-Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernigon, L.; Blischke, A.; Nasuti, A.; Sand, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have acquired and processed new aeromagnetic data that covers the entire Norway Basin oceanic spreading system located between the Møre volcanic rifted margin and its (intermediate) conjugate system, the Jan Mayen microcontinent (JMMC). The new compilation allows us to revisit its entire structure and spreading evolution from the Early Eocene breakup to the Late Oligocene abortion of the Aegir Ridge. We here discuss the dynamics of conjugate volcanic (rifted) margin formation and reconstruct the subsequent spreading evolution of the Norway Basin until its abortion. We have estimated a new set of Euler poles of rotation for the Norway Basin derived from more than 88,000 km of new magnetic profiles. The new compilation confirms that a fan-shaped spreading evolution of the Norway Basin was particularly active before the cessation of seafloor spreading and abortion of the Aegir Ridge. The Norway Basin shows a more complex system of micro-plates and asymmetric segments locally affected by episodic ridge jumps. The new observations have implications for the syn- and post-breakup stratigraphic and rifted-margin tectonic development of the JMMC and its conjugate margins. In particular, an important Mid-Eocene geodynamic event at around magnetic chron C21r is recognized in the Norway Basin. This event coincides with the onset of diking and rifting between the proto-JMMC and the East Greenland margin, leading to a second phase of breakup in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea ~26 My later in the Oligocene. Restored in its pre-breakup configuration, the new surveys also allow us to discuss further the tectonic and crustal evolution of the conjugate volcanic rifted margins and associated transform and oblique segments. The applicability of magma-poor concepts, off Norway, for example, remains questionable for us. The significant amount of breakup magmatism, the huge amount of pre-breakup sag sedimentation and the presence of thinned and preserved continental crust without the

  8. Lithospheric flexure across an extremely stretched and detached transform margin: Example from the East Greenland Ridge and Greenland FZ in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Døssing, A.; Watts, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    The 250 km long East Greenland Ridge (EGR) is located along the Greenland Fracture Zone (GFZ), which is part of a first-order plate tectonic feature in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea that formed when Eocene seafloor spreading was translated along the De Geer megashear region between Greenland and Svalbard to the Arctic Ocean. The EGR rises abruptly about 250 km west from the Mohns-Knipovich Ridge axis in Chron 13 (33.3 Ma) crust and continues to Chron 24 (54.4 Ma) crust. Results of recently acquired wide-angle and MCS seismic data have shown that the EGR and an adjacent faulted basin province to the north of the ridge represent a continental sliver detached from the incipient NE Greenland and SW Barents Sea margins. Crustal thicknesses were found to be around 10 km (Døssing et al., 2008). The EGR-GFZ tectonic setting can therefore be rendered as an extremely stretched transform margin. A strong asymmetry is observed across the GFZ going from south to north with (i) a long wave-length downwards deflection of the oceanic crust, (ii) a steep southern flank of the EGR reaching more than 4 km above the predicted lithospheric thermal contraction level, and (iii) a gentle northern flank of the ridge dipping towards the faulted basin province. Hence, the ridge resembles the characteristics of other anomalously shallow, FZ parallel, transverse ridges. We propose a model in which flexural response of the lithosphere to normal faulting is responsible for the formation of the ridge. Interpretations of three, ~250 km long, seismic profiles normal to the GFZ are used to model the across-strike basement geometry. The results indicate that the observed lithospheric flexure was formed due to ~20 km extension normal to the GFZ along low-angle faults. Ref: Døssing, A., T. Dahl-Jensen, H. Thybo, R. Mjelde, and Y. Nishimura (2008), East Greenland Ridge in the North Atlantic Ocean: An integrated geophysical study of a continental sliver in a boundary transform fault setting, J. Geophys

  9. Norwegian Aerospace Activities: an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnesen, T. (Editor); Rosenberg, G. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Excerpts from a Governmental Investigation concerning Norwegian participation in the European Space Organization (ESA) is presented. The implications and advantages of such a move and a suggestion for the reorganization of Norwegian Aerospace activity is given.

  10. Norwegian petroleum guide

    SciTech Connect

    Christie, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    This is about the comprehensive guide to Norwegian oil and gas activities, very useful to anyone in the industry. Material includes political guidelines, control institutions, work possibilities and licenses, working environment law, employer and employee organizations, national insurance, taxes, communication, rescue operations and standby. Contents: Oil and the economy; Petroleum technology research; Responsibilities of different authorities; The Labour Inspection Directorate; The Health Directorate Offshore Office; The Coastal Directorate; Helicopter traffic; The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate; The Maritime Directorate; Det norske Veritas; The Norwegian Waterways and Electricity Board; The State Institute for Radiation Hygiene; The State Explosive Inspection; Work possibilities in the North Sea; Working environment legislation on the Continental Shelf; Collective bargaining agreements, labor conflicts and the right to organize; Taxation Rules; National health insurance and the petroleum activity; Occupational injuries on the Norwegian Continental Shelf; Company insurances; The private pension scheme; Other types of insuracne common among oil companies; The rescue service in Norway; Oganizations within the oil industry offshore and onshore; and Law of aliens admission to the Kindgom.

  11. Norwegian mastitis control programme

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methods and results of the Norwegian Mastitis Control Program implemented in 1982. The program has formed an integral part of the Norwegian Cattle Health Services (NCHS) since 1995. The NCHS also have specific programs for milk fever, ketosis, reproduction and calf diseases. The goal of the program is to improve udder health by keeping the bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) low, to reduce the use of antibiotics, to keep the cost of mastitis low at herd level and improve the consumers' attitude to milk products. In 1996, a decision was made to reduce the use of antibiotics in all animal production enterprises in Norway by 25% within five years. Relevant data has been collected through the Norwegian Cattle Herd Recording System (NCHRS); including health records since 1975 and somatic cell count (SCC) data since 1980. These data have been integrated within the NCHRS. Since 2000, mastitis laboratory data have also been included in the NCHRS. Data on clinical disease, SCC and mastitis bacteriology have been presented to farmers and advisors in monthly health periodicals since 1996, and on the internet since 2005. In 1996, Norwegian recommendations on the treatment of mastitis were implemented. Optimal milking protocols and milking machine function have been emphasised and less emphasis has been placed on dry cow therapy. A selective dry cow therapy program (SDCTP) was implemented in 2006, and is still being implemented in new areas. Research demonstrates that the rate of clinical mastitis could be reduced by 15% after implementing SDCTP. The results so far show a 60% reduction in the clinical treatment of mastitis between 1994 and 2007, a reduction in BMSCC from 250,000 cells/ml to 114,000 cells/ml, and a total reduction in the mastitis cost from 0.23 NOK to 0.13 NOK per litre of milk delivered to the processors, corresponding to a fall from 9.2% to 1.7% of the milk price, respectively. This reduction is attributed to changes in attitude and

  12. The Norwegian Naval Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Bjørn Ragnvald

    2007-07-01

    Archival material has revealed milestones and new details in the history of the Norwegian Naval Observatories. We have identified several of the instrument types used at different epochs. Observational results have been extracted from handwritten sources and an extensive literature search. These allow determination of an approximate location of the first naval observatory building (1842) at Fredriksvern. No physical remains exist today. A second observatory was established in 1854 at the new main naval base at Horten. Its location is evident on military maps and photographs. We describe its development until the Naval Observatory buildings, including archives and instruments, were completely demolished during an allied air bomb raid on 23 February 1945. The first director, C.T.H. Geelmuyden, maintained scientific standards at the the Observatory between 1842 and 1870, and collaborated with university astronomers to investigate, develop, and employ time-transfer by telegraphy. Their purpose was accurate longitude determination between observatories in Norway and abroad. The Naval Observatory issued telegraphic time signals twice weekly to a national network of sites, and as such served as the first national time-service in Norway. Later the Naval Observatory focused on the particular needs of the Navy and developed into an internal navigational service.

  13. Norwegian petroleum resources with focus on challenges and opportunities in the Barents Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, F.R.

    1995-12-31

    The Norwegian Continental Shelf can be subdivided into 3 different petroleum provinces: (1) the North Sea, (2) the Norwegian Sea including the Jan Mayen ridge, and (3) the Barents Sea including the islands of Svalbard. The majority of the fields and discoveries and most of the resources are located in the mature North Sea Basin. Significant resources are however also discovered in the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea. 39 fields are in production or decided to be developed while 3 fields are closed down. Approximately 70% of the discovered resources are located in these fields, of which some are gigantic in size (Statfjord, Ekofisk, Gullfaks, Oseberg, Troll and Snorre). Most of the remaining discoveries (134) are smaller in size and approximately 2/3 of the resources are gas. According to a recent study carried out by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate the expected undiscovered Norwegian Petroleum Resources are assessed to be on the order of 3,5 billion Sm{sup 3} o.e. with a level of uncertainty ranging from 2 to 6 billion Sm{sup 3} o.e. 40% of the undiscovered petroleum resources are expected to be found as oil. These are the perspectives of the Norwegian Petroleum Resources. The resources of the Barents Sea is included in this perspective. The significance of the Barents Sea resources is not particularly important in the short-medium term perspective, but will be important in the longer perspective.

  14. Tularaemia in Norwegian dogs.

    PubMed

    Nordstoga, Anne; Handeland, Kjell; Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Iversen, Lena; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Mattsson, Roland; Wik-Larssen, Kjersti; Afset, Jan Egil; Næverdal, Rune; Lund, Arve

    2014-10-10

    We describe tularaemia in a Norwegian dog caused by Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica. A Hamilton Hound and his owner developed tulaeremia after hunting an infected mountain hare (Lepus timidus). The dog showed signs of lethargy, anorexia and fever during a period two to four days after hunting and thereafter fully recovered. Its antibody titers increased 32-fold from one to three weeks post exposure. Thereafter, the titer declined and leveled off at moderate positive values up to one year after exposure (end of study). This is believed to be the first case report of clinical F. tularensis subspecies holarctica infection in a European dog. In 2011, enormous numbers of Norway lemmings (Lemmus lemmus) occurred in Finnmark, the northernmost county of Norway and many dogs caught and swallowed lemmings. Some of these dogs developed non-specific signs of disease and the owners consulted a veterinary surgeon, who suspected tularaemia. In order to investigate this hypothesis, serum samples from 33 dogs were examined for antibodies to F. tularensis. The dogs were allocated into three groups: Dogs from Finnmark that became sick (Group 1) or remained healthy following contact with lemmings (Group 2), and healthy control dogs from Oslo without known contact with lemmings (Group 3). All the serum samples were analyzed with a tube agglutination assay. Among dogs exposed to lemmings, 10/11 and 3/12 were antibody positive in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively, whereas none of the control dogs (n=10) were positive for antibodies against F. tularensis. These results strongly indicate that the non-specific disease seen in the dogs in Finnmark was linked to F. tularensis infection acquired through contact with lemmings.

  15. Metopic ridge

    MedlinePlus

    ... infant is made up of bony plates. The gaps between the plates allow for growth of the skull. The places where these plates connect are called sutures or suture lines. They do not fully close until the 2nd or 3rd year of life. A metopic ridge occurs when the ...

  16. Important Norwegian crude assays updated

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, R.A

    1990-03-12

    New assays on two important Norwegian North Sea crude oils, Statfjord and Gullfaks, are presented. Both are high-quality, low-sulfur crudes that will yield a full range of good-quality products. All assay data came from industry-standard test procedures. The Statfjord field is the largest in the North Sea. Production started in 1979. Statfjord is a typical North Sea crude, produced from three separate platforms and three separate loading buoys with interconnecting lines. Current production is about 700,000 b/d. Gullfaks is produced from a large field in Block 34/10 of the Norwegian sector of the North Sea production area. Gullfaks crude oil is more biodegraded than other crudes from the region. Biodegradation has removed most of the waxy normal paraffins, resulting in a heavier, more naphthenic and aromatic crude.

  17. Polar Ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03662 Polar Ridges

    This ridge system is located in the south polar region.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -81.7N, Longitude 296.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Homotolerance and Heteronormativity in Norwegian Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothing, Ase

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on classroom observations and discusses sexual education that addresses homosexuality. Tolerance of queer lifestyles as well as support for judicial equality between heterosexual and homosexual couples is generally perceived as being high in the Norwegian political context. Norwegian sexual politics is, however, based on a…

  19. Homotolerance and Heterosexuality as Norwegian Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothing, Ase; Svendsen, Stine Helena Bang

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, equality between homosexual and heterosexual relationships has increasingly been presented as a marker for Norwegian values. Norwegian schooling encourages tolerance toward homosexuals, and the state shows active interest in counteracting bullying against LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) youth by supporting research…

  20. Stereotypes of Norwegian social groups

    PubMed Central

    Bye, Hege H; Herrebrøden, Henrik; Hjetland, Gunnhild J; Røyset, Guro Ø; Westby, Linda L

    2014-01-01

    We present a pilot study and two main studies that address the nature of stereotypes of social groups in Norway within the framework of the Stereotype Content Model (SCM). The first study focused on stereotypes of a wide range of groups across categories such as gender, age, religious conviction, socioeconomic and health status. The second study focused on stereotypes of immigrant groups. Participants (n = 244 and n = 63, respectively) rated the groups on perceived warmth, competence, status, and competition. Results from both studies support the applicability of the SCM in Norway and provides a unique insight into stereotypes of Norwegian social groups. PMID:24975918

  1. Norwegian Offshore Stratigraphic Lexicon (NORLEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradstein, Felix M.; Hammer, Oyvind; Brunstad, Harald; Charnock, Mike; Hellem, Terje; Sigve Lervik, Kjell; Anthonissen, Erik

    2010-05-01

    The Norwegian Offshore Stratigraphic Lexicon (NORLEX) provides a relational stratigraphic database for the North Sea, Norwegian Sea, Barents Sea and Svalbard. Both regional lithostratigraphy and biostratigraphy are being substantially updated, following guidelines laid out in the International Stratigraphic Guide. The main body of information developed is available as a petroleum consortium (oracle-style) database, and the new lithostratigraphic definitions as a public domain (paper) document. NORLEX is presented as a browsing website via the internet at http://www.nhm.uio.no/norlex. Seismic cross-sections, core photographs, well logs, field outcrops, microfossil occurrences and other vital attributes are relationally cross-linked. In addition, there are menus for instantly finding updated formation and member tops or microfossil events in all wells, plus a map contouring routine for unit thicknesses and depths. Several new initiatives will expand data and user coverage: 1. Overhaul of Mesozoic stratigraphy, especially Triassic and Cretaceous, in the Barents Sea. 2. Coverage of East Greenland 3. Linkage to UK and Belgium and The Netherlands surface and subsurface stratigraphy 4. Creation of a Sequence Stratigraphic Framework for specific regions. 5. A national microfossil atlas to support zonations 6. Tight linkage to the basin datapacks in TimeScaleCreator Pro, as developed for Australia, New Zealand, Brasil, Gulf of Mexico, Canada and Russia. NORLEX may thus evolve to become STRATLEX, covering many basin regions.

  2. Experiences with the Norwegian nutrition policy.

    PubMed

    Kaernes, Unni

    2003-12-01

    Norwegian nutrition policy has received considerable attention. The distinguishing feature is its 'structural' orientation, i.e. towards production and market regulation, as opposed to individual, information-based strategies. This was possible first of all because of distinctive Norwegian political traditions, with a heavily regulated agricultural sector, combined with a welfare policy tradition emphasising influence on other sectors. While the institutionalisation of the Norwegian nutrition policy has been important for its political legitimacy and visibility, the paper discusses how this has also represented a challenge when problems and policy goals are to be altered. PMID:14637323

  3. Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Bénédicte; Mienert, Jürgen; Winther, Svein; Hageberg, Anne; Rune Godoe, Olav; Partners, Noon

    2010-05-01

    The Norwegian Ocean Observatory Network (NOON) is led by the University of Tromsø and collaborates with the Universities of Oslo and Bergen, UniResearch, Institute of Marine Research, Christian Michelsen Research and SINTEF. It is supported by the Research Council of Norway and oil and gas (O&G) industries like Statoil to develop science, technology and new educational programs. Main topics relate to ocean climate and environment as well as marine resources offshore Norway from the northern North Atlantic to the Arctic Ocean. NOON's vision is to bring Norway to the international forefront in using cable based ocean observatory technology for marine science and management, by establishing an infrastructure that enables real-time and long term monitoring of processes and interactions between hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere. This activity is in concert with the EU funded European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) roadmap and European Multidisciplinary Seafloor Observation (EMSO) project to attract international leading research developments. NOON envisions developing towards a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC). Beside, the research community in Norway already possesses a considerable marine infrastructure that can expand towards an international focus for real-time multidisciplinary observations in times of rapid climate change. PIC The presently established cable-based fjord observatory, followed by the establishment of a cable-based ocean observatory network towards the Arctic from an O&G installation, will provide invaluable knowledge and experience necessary to make a successful larger cable-based observatory network at the Norwegian and Arctic margin (figure 1). Access to large quantities of real-time observation from the deep sea, including high definition video, could be used to provide the public and future recruits to science a fascinating insight into an almost unexplored part of the Earth beyond the Arctic Circle

  4. Norwegian lottery winners: Cautious realists.

    PubMed

    Eckblad, G F; von der Lippe, A L

    1994-12-01

    The study investigated 261 lottery winners of prizes of NKR 1 million (US $150,000) or more in the years 1987-91 in a postal survey. The modal Norwegian winners were middle-aged married men of modest education, living in small communities. Emotional reactions to winning were few, aside from moderate happiness and relief. Winners emphasized caution, emotional control and unconspicuous spending, e.g. paying debts and sharing with children. There was only a slight increase in economic spending. A wish for anonymity was frequent, together with fear of envy from others. Betting was modest both before and after winning. Experiences with winning were predominantly positive. Life quality was stable or had improved. An age trend was observed, accounting for more variance than any other variable. The older winners seemed to represent a puritan subculture of caution, modesty and emotional restraint. A slightly more impatient pattern of spending was characteristic of younger winners. The results support Kaplan's 1987 and others' findings that lottery winners are not gamblers, but self-controlled realists and that tenacious, negative cultural expectations to the contrary are myths, but perhaps also deterrents of uncontrolled behavior.

  5. Oil and gas bearing in Norwegian Sea basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabanbark, A.

    2013-07-01

    The Norwegian passive continental margin is represented by an extensive gentle shelf and continental slope. On the continental slope, there are the isolated Vøring, Møre and Ras basins, the Halten Terrace is situated to the east of them at the shelf, then the Nordland submarine ridge and the Trondelag Platform at the seaboard. There are Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments in its sections. Two complex structures are clearly distinguished in the sedimentary section: the lower stage (up to the Upper Cretaceous), reflecting the rifting structure of the basins, broken by a system of dislocations to a series of horsts, grabens, and separated blocks; and the upper stage, poorly dislocated, like a mantle covering the lower stage, with erosion and sharp unconformity. The Halten Terrace is the principal oil and gas production basin. At present, there are more than 50 oil, gas, and condensate fields in it. The following particularities have been discovered: than the field lays in the deepwater, than the age of the hydrocarbon pay is younger. It is also interesting that all gas fields are situated in the Vøring and Møre basins and western part of the Halten Terrace; the oil and gas fields, mainly at the center of the Halten Terrace; but pure oil fields, in the north of the terrace. In conformity with discovering the particularities, it is possible to say that the prospects of oil and gas bearing in the Norwegian Sea are primarilyt related to the Halten Terrace and the Vøring and Møre basins, especially the territories situated at the boundary of the two basins, where it is possible to discover large hydrocarbon accumulations like the Ormen-Lange field, because the Paleocene-Upper Cretaceous productive turbidite thick at the boundary of these basins is on the continental slope, which is considered promising a priori.

  6. Grafts for Ridge Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Jamjoom, Amal; Cohen, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar ridge bone resorption is a biologic phenomenon that occurs following tooth extraction and cannot be prevented. This paper reviews the vertical and horizontal ridge dimensional changes that are associated with tooth extraction. It also provides an overview of the advantages of ridge preservation as well as grafting materials. A Medline search among English language papers was performed in March 2015 using alveolar ridge preservation, ridge augmentation, and various graft types as search terms. Additional papers were considered following the preliminary review of the initial search that were relevant to alveolar ridge preservation. The literature suggests that ridge preservation methods and augmentation techniques are available to minimize and restore available bone. Numerous grafting materials, such as autografts, allografts, xenografts, and alloplasts, currently are used for ridge preservation. Other materials, such as growth factors, also can be used to enhance biologic outcome. PMID:26262646

  7. Breivik--the Norwegian terrorist case.

    PubMed

    Syse, Aslak

    2014-01-01

    On July 22, 2011, there were two murderous attacks in Norway. Both assaults - the bombing of governmental buildings in Oslo City center and the lethal shooting down of young members of the Labour Party on an island - were planned and accomplished by a lone perpetrator. These episodes give rise to several interesting questions. What happened really, and how could it happen? Was the perpetrator sane or insane? What was the ideological background for the attacks? It is unnecessary to discuss in any detail whether or not these acts should be categorized as terrorism. However, there is good reason to consider what these terror attacks imply for Norwegian society at large. What significance did the attacks have for Norwegian democracy, and did they have any impact on the 2013 parliamentary elections? What will be the future for the offender, both in the short term and in years to come? What will happen to the Norwegian insanity defense? These questions are addressed in this article.

  8. The Literacy Achievement of Norwegian Minority Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hvistendahl, Rita; Roe, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    The article presents the literacy achievement of Norwegian minority students, their reading habits, and their enjoyment of reading based on the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2000 study. Aspects of their family background and attitudes towards school are related to literacy achievement results. A comparison between Denmark,…

  9. Worldbankification of Norwegian Development Assistance to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock-Utne, Birgit

    2007-01-01

    Norwegian official development assistance to education has been profoundly shaped by the political and ideological attitudes of successive national governments. Yet successive coalition governments of highly-contrastive kinds can alike be seen to have been strongly influenced by the policy content, language and underlying assumptions of World Bank…

  10. Norwegian Secondary School Teachers and ICT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wikan, Gerd; Molster, Terje

    2011-01-01

    ICT is meant to be integrated in all subjects in Norwegian schools; nevertheless many teachers are reluctant to use ICT in their own teaching. This paper explores to what extent teachers use ICT in their classroom teaching and what teacher-level factors influence the use of ICT. It draws on an analysis of 10 focus-group interviews with 10 teachers…

  11. Successful School Leadership: The Norwegian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moller, Jorunn; Eggen, Astrid; Fuglestad, Otto L.; Langfeldt, Gjert; Presthus, Anne-Marie; Skrovset, Siw; Stjernstrom, Else; Vedoy, Gunn

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify what counts as successful school leadership within a Norwegian context. Design/methodology/approach: The paper uses multi-site case study methods as a methodological approach. In selecting cases the first strategy included schools appointed as "good practice schools" by the Ministry of Education and Research.…

  12. Field development projects advance in Norwegian Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1992-03-30

    This paper reports on the Norwegian Sea, lying between the Norwegian North Sea and the western flank of the Barents Sea, which is set to become Norway's second oil and gas producing province. Oil is scheduled to start to flow near the end of next year when AS Norske Shell places on production 428 million bbl Draugen field in Block 6407/9, about 60 miles off the coast of mid-Norway in the frontier sea area known as Haltenbanken. Two years later, in 1995, Norske Conoco AS will add to the 95,000 b/d from Draugen when it commissions the world's first concrete hull tension leg platform (TLP) in Heidrun field. The TLP is expected to produce 200,000 b/d of oil and move associated gas by pipeline to the Norwegian mainland to feed a worldscale methanol plant planned for construction at Tjeldbergodden. The Norwegian government also has been asked to approve a gas pipeline link between Haltenbanken and the gas export infrastructure in the North Sea.

  13. Norwegian Superintendents as Mediators of Change Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Jan Merok

    2014-01-01

    The underlying theoretical argument in this article views municipal school superintendents in the Nordic context as middle managers in organizational theory terminology. Empirical support for this discussion emerges from national data collected among Norwegian school superintendents in 2009. Findings show that the actual work and leadership…

  14. Being "Neutral"? English Pronunciation among Norwegian Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindal, Ulrikke; Piercy, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the pronunciation of English among Norwegian adolescents by applying sociolinguistic methods in a second language context. Results from an auditory analysis of seven phonological variables show a blended use of linguistic features from American English and British English, with some additional pronunciations, forming a…

  15. FRAM-2012: Norwegians return to the High Arctic with a Hovercraft for Marine Geophysical Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, J. K.; Kristoffersen, Y.; Brekke, H.; Hope, G.

    2012-12-01

    After four years of testing methods, craft reliability, and innovative equipment, the R/H SABVABAA has embarked on its first FRAM-201x expedition to the highest Arctic. Named after the Inupiaq word for 'flows swiftly over it', the 12m by 6m hovercraft has been home-based in Longyearbyen, Svalbard since June 2008. In this, its fifth summer of work on the ice pack north of 81N, the craft is supported by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate (NPD) via the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC) in Bergen, and the Norwegian Scientific Academy for Polar Research. FRAM-2012 represents renewed Norwegian interest in returning to the highest Arctic some 116 years after the 1893-96 drift of Fridtjof Nansen's ship FRAM, the first serious scientific investigation of the Arctic. When replenished by air or icebreaker, the hovercraft Sabvabaa offers a hospitable scientific platform with crew of two, capable of marine geophysical, geological and oceanographic observations over long periods with relative mobility on the ice pack. FRAM-2012 is the first step towards this goal, accompanying the Swedish icebreaker ODEN to the Lomonosov Ridge, north of Greenland, as part of the LOMROG III expedition. The science plan called for an initial drive from the ice edge to Gakkel Ridge at 85N where micro-earthquakes would be monitored, and then to continue north to a geological sampling area on the Lomonosov Ridge at about 88N, 65W. The micro-earthquake monitoring is part of Gaute Hope's MSc thesis and entails five hydrophones in a WiFi-connected hydrophone array deployed over the Gakkel Rift Valley, drifting with the ice at up to 0.4 knots. On August 3 the hovercraft was refueled from icebreaker ODEN at 84-21'N and both vessels proceeded north. The progress of the hovercraft was hampered by insufficient visibility for safe driving and time consuming maneuvering in and around larger fields of rubble ice impassable by the hovercraft, but of little concern to the icebreaker. It

  16. On the origin of the Norwegian lemming.

    PubMed

    Lagerholm, Vendela K; Sandoval-Castellanos, Edson; Ehrich, Dorothee; Abramson, Natalia I; Nadachowski, Adam; Kalthoff, Daniela C; Germonpré, Mietje; Angerbjörn, Anders; Stewart, John R; Dalén, Love

    2014-04-01

    The Pleistocene glacial cycles resulted in significant changes in species distributions, and it has been discussed whether this caused increased rates of population divergence and speciation. One species that is likely to have evolved during the Pleistocene is the Norwegian lemming (Lemmus lemmus). However, the origin of this species, both in terms of when and from what ancestral taxon it evolved, has been difficult to ascertain. Here, we use ancient DNA recovered from lemming remains from a series of Late Pleistocene and Holocene sites to explore the species' evolutionary history. The results revealed considerable genetic differentiation between glacial and contemporary samples. Moreover, the analyses provided strong support for a divergence time prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), therefore likely ruling out a postglacial colonization of Scandinavia. Consequently, it appears that the Norwegian lemming evolved from a small population that survived the LGM in an ice-free Scandinavian refugium.

  17. Tanker spills Norwegian crude oil off Shetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-11

    This paper reports that crude oil was spilling last week from the U.S. owned Braer tanker after the 89,000 dwt vessel ran aground on the south end of Scotland's Shetland Islands. Workers were trying to assess the extent of damage to the tanker, shoreline, and wildlife after the January 5 accident. Braer's cargo amounted to 607,000 bbl of Norwegian oil bound for Canada. Braer loaded its cargo and sailed January 3 from Den norske stats oljeselskap AS's Mongstad, Norway, terminal with crude from Gullfaks field in the Norwegian North Sea. The $11 million shipment was destined for Ultramar Canada Inc.'s 125,000 b/d refinery at St. Romuald, Que.

  18. The Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skatteboe, Rolf

    2001-08-01

    The status and recent developments of the Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program are presented with focus on national activities and recent achievements. The main part of the Norwegian program is sounding rocket launches conducted by Andøya Rocket Range from the launch facilities on Andøya and at Svalbard. For the majority of the programs, the scientific goal is investigation of processes in the middle and upper atmosphere. The in situ measurements are supplemented by a large number of ground-based support instruments located at the ALOMAR Observatory. The ongoing and planned projects are described and the highlights of the latest completed projects are given. The scientific program for the period 2001-2003 will be reviewed. Several new programs have been started to improve the services available to the international science comunity. The Hotel Payload project and MiniDusty are important examples that will be introduced in the paper. Available space related infrastructure is summarized.

  19. Written Language Shift among Norwegian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özerk, Kamil; Todal, Jon

    2013-01-01

    In Norway there are two written Norwegian languages, Bokmâl and Nynorsk. Of these two written languages Bokmâl is being used by the majority of the people, and Bokmâl has the highest prestige in the society. This article is about the shift of written language from Nynorsk to Bokmâl among young people in a traditional Nynorsk district in the…

  20. Iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, R.

    1983-05-01

    This paper is a condensed version of parts of a Dr. ing. thesis to be presented during 1983. The first part of the paper deals with the regional distribution of iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf, and some general aspects related to it. The second part deals with iceberg scouring as a local phenomenon and its relation to the sea floor topography, sediment distribution, and geological and geotechnical properties of the sediments.

  1. First drilling in Norwegian sea off Norway yields encouraging results

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsager, E.

    1981-06-08

    Three exploratory wells drilled in the Norwegian Sea penetrated Jurassic sandstones with excellent reservoir qualities, rich source rock, and some evidence of hydrocarbons. Constituting the first wells drilled north of the 62nd parallel off Norway, they produced encouraging evidence of prospective structures. The Norwegian continental shelf north of the North Sea contains areas of thick sedimentary basins having an areal extent 8-9 times that of the Norwegian North Sea.

  2. Norne tests new Norwegian development technologies, philosophies

    SciTech Connect

    Adlam, J. )

    1994-08-01

    The world's largest ship-shaped floating production facility will mine hydrocarbons trapped below 1,246-ft, harsh Norwegian waters at the Norne field. An innovative development philosophy involving functional specifications and life-of-field bench marking will ensure costs and lead time to first oil are minimized. The Block 6608/10 Norne field is the largest discovery on the Norwegian continental shelf in more than a decade. The field extends for 6.2 miles, is 1.24 miles wide and sits 124 miles west of the mid-Norway coast in 1,246-ft waters. Well No. 6608/10-2 first penetrated the Norne reservoir in December 1991. Appraisal well 6608/10-3 was drilled in 1993 and proved the field's northerly extension. Based on results from those two wells, a development project began last year. To improve project economics and company performance, a clear objective was established to reduce investment costs by 25%--30% compared to the current established level in Norway. The Norne organization is working on a Plan for Development and Operation to be submitted to Norwegian authorities later this year so that final approval can be obtained in early 1995.

  3. Beverage Consumption Patterns among Norwegian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Mari Mohn; Myhre, Jannicke Borch; Andersen, Lene Frost

    2016-01-01

    Beverages may be important contributors for energy intake and dietary quality. The purpose of the study was to investigate how beverage consumption varies between different meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper/evening meal, snacks) and between weekdays and weekend-days in Norwegian adults. A cross-sectional dietary survey was conducted among Norwegian adults (n = 1787) in 2010–2011. Two telephone-administered 24 h recalls were used for dietary data collection. Breakfast was the most important meal for milk and juice consumption, dinner for sugar-sweetened beverages and wine, and snacks for water, coffee, artificially sweetened beverages, and beer. Consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages did not differ between weekdays and weekend-days among consumers. The average intake of wine and beer (men only) was higher on weekend-days. Higher age was positively associated with wine consumption and negatively associated with consumption of water, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened beverages. Higher education was associated with consumption of water, beer, and wine, whereas lower education was associated with sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Beverage consumption patterns among Norwegian adults vary between different meal types and in subgroups of the population. Alcohol consumption was higher on weekend-days. Knowledge regarding beverage consumption patterns in the population should be considered when revising dietary guidelines in the future. PMID:27649236

  4. Beverage Consumption Patterns among Norwegian Adults.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Mari Mohn; Myhre, Jannicke Borch; Andersen, Lene Frost

    2016-01-01

    Beverages may be important contributors for energy intake and dietary quality. The purpose of the study was to investigate how beverage consumption varies between different meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner, supper/evening meal, snacks) and between weekdays and weekend-days in Norwegian adults. A cross-sectional dietary survey was conducted among Norwegian adults (n = 1787) in 2010-2011. Two telephone-administered 24 h recalls were used for dietary data collection. Breakfast was the most important meal for milk and juice consumption, dinner for sugar-sweetened beverages and wine, and snacks for water, coffee, artificially sweetened beverages, and beer. Consumption of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened beverages did not differ between weekdays and weekend-days among consumers. The average intake of wine and beer (men only) was higher on weekend-days. Higher age was positively associated with wine consumption and negatively associated with consumption of water, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened beverages. Higher education was associated with consumption of water, beer, and wine, whereas lower education was associated with sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. Beverage consumption patterns among Norwegian adults vary between different meal types and in subgroups of the population. Alcohol consumption was higher on weekend-days. Knowledge regarding beverage consumption patterns in the population should be considered when revising dietary guidelines in the future. PMID:27649236

  5. Breivik--the Norwegian terrorist case.

    PubMed

    Syse, Aslak

    2014-01-01

    On July 22, 2011, there were two murderous attacks in Norway. Both assaults - the bombing of governmental buildings in Oslo City center and the lethal shooting down of young members of the Labour Party on an island - were planned and accomplished by a lone perpetrator. These episodes give rise to several interesting questions. What happened really, and how could it happen? Was the perpetrator sane or insane? What was the ideological background for the attacks? It is unnecessary to discuss in any detail whether or not these acts should be categorized as terrorism. However, there is good reason to consider what these terror attacks imply for Norwegian society at large. What significance did the attacks have for Norwegian democracy, and did they have any impact on the 2013 parliamentary elections? What will be the future for the offender, both in the short term and in years to come? What will happen to the Norwegian insanity defense? These questions are addressed in this article. PMID:24757013

  6. Ridge Regression Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhl, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    The introduction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) into the National Airspace System (NAS) necessitates the development of Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) techniques. In order to guarantee a certain level of integrity, a thorough understanding of modern estimation techniques applied to navigational problems is required. The extended Kalman filter (EKF) is derived and analyzed under poor geometry conditions. It was found that the performance of the EKF is difficult to predict, since the EKF is designed for a Gaussian environment. A novel approach is implemented which incorporates ridge regression to explain the behavior of an EKF in the presence of dynamics under poor geometry conditions. The basic principles of ridge regression theory are presented, followed by the derivation of a linearized recursive ridge estimator. Computer simulations are performed to confirm the underlying theory and to provide a comparative analysis of the EKF and the recursive ridge estimator.

  7. Topographic Analysis of Europa's Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, C. E.; Kattenhorn, S. A.; Schenk, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    Ridges are the most ubiquitous surface feature on Europa. Here we examine double ridges that have two parallel, raised flanks with a continuous axial trough (referred to as a ridge pair). Characterizing ridge edifices may help us better understand the processes that drive ridge formation and evolution. Because there is no global elevation map for Europa, topography was derived from high resolution (18 to 181 m/pixel) combined stereographic and photoclinometric images to create 265 topographic profiles across 24 features of interest. Ridge topography was examined across 22 ridge pairs (12 with apparent lateral offsets) and 2 ridge complexes, in the Bright Plains, Conamara Chaos, Cilix, Argadnel Regio, Rhadamanthys Linea, and the E17DISSTR01 (northwest of Katreus Linea) areas. Topographic profiles are oriented perpendicular to the strike of each ridge pair to capture height and width variations as well as to highlight asymmetry between adjacent ridges. We characterize ridges using ridge height and width (vertical and horizontal distance from the base of the ridge flank to the ridge peak), average ridge height (average of the individual peaks in a ridge pair), total ridge width (distance between the ridge's outer flanks), and peak-to-peak (PTP) width (distance between peaks in a ridge pair). Height-to-width ratios of 44 individual ridges fall within a wide range that never exceeds 0.53, implying a maximum outer slope of 28 degrees, slightly less than the suggested angle of repose of loose granular ice (~34 degrees). Most slopes are much gentler, between 10 and 20 degrees, which are significantly smaller than those presented in a prior study undertaken early in the Galileo imaging mission. In fact, we have found that ridges can be very wide and low with outer slopes of only a few degrees, implying that very few ridge morphologies are likely to be controlled by granular flow processes down their outer slopes. The ratio of average ridge height to total ridge width has a

  8. Numeracy Activities within VOX: The Norwegian Institute for Adult Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvalo, Svein

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces Vox, Norwegian Institute for Adult Learning, an agency of the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research that focuses mainly on improving basic skills in the adult population in the areas of literacy, numeracy and the use of Information Communication Technologies (ICT). Vox is responsible for curriculum…

  9. Habitat of hydrocarbons on the Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The text attempts to synthesize the details of specific Norwegian finds into a regional framework which not only will be an essential reference documentation for explorationists in the Norwegian sector, but also will provide valuable insights into the variety of habitats of oil and gas accumulations in a global context.

  10. Topicality and Complexity in the Acquisition of Norwegian Object Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderssen, Merete; Bentzen, Kristine; Rodina, Yulia

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the acquisition of object shift in Norwegian child language. We show that object shift is complex derivationally, distributionally, and referentially, and propose a new analysis in terms of IP-internal topicalization. The results of an elicited production study with 27 monolingual Norwegian-speaking children (ages…

  11. New Norwegian HSE standard for the offshore industry

    SciTech Connect

    Huse, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    NORSOK (The competitive standing of the Norwegian offshore sector) is the Norwegian industry initiative to add value, reduce cost and lead time and remove unnecessary activities in offshore field developments and operations. The NORSOK standards are developed by the Norwegian petroleum industry as a part of the NORSOK initiative and are jointly issued by the Norwegian Oil Industry Association and the Federation of Norwegian Engineering Industries. The purpose of the industry standard is to replace the individual oil company specifications for use in existing and future petroleum industry developments, subject to the individual company`s review and application. The NORSOK Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) standards covers: Technical Safety, Working Environment, Environmental Care, HSE during Construction. The standards are now being used in ongoing offshore development projects, and the experience with standards shows that the principle aim is being met. The development of standards continues, implementing experience gained.

  12. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification.

  13. Fingermark ridge drift.

    PubMed

    De Alcaraz-Fossoul, Josep; Roberts, Katherine A; Feixat, Carme Barrot; Hogrebe, Gregory G; Badia, Manel Gené

    2016-01-01

    Distortions of the fingermark topography are usually considered when comparing latent and exemplar fingerprints. These alterations are characterized as caused by an extrinsic action, which affects entire areas of the deposition and alters the overall flow of a series of contiguous ridges. Here we introduce a novel visual phenomenon that does not follow these principles, named fingermark ridge drift. An experiment was designed that included variables such as type of secretion (eccrine and sebaceous), substrate (glass and polystyrene), and degrees of exposure to natural light (darkness, shade, and direct light) indoors. Fingermarks were sequentially visualized with titanium dioxide powder, photographed and analyzed. The comparison between fresh and aged depositions revealed that under certain environmental conditions an individual ridge could randomly change its original position regardless of its unaltered adjacent ridges. The causes of the drift phenomenon are not well understood. We believe it is exclusively associated with intrinsic natural aging processes of latent fingermarks. This discovery will help explain the detection of certain dissimilarities at the minutiae/ridge level; determine more accurate "hits"; identify potentially erroneous corresponding points; and rethink identification protocols, especially the criteria of "no single minutiae discrepancy" for a positive identification. PMID:26646735

  14. Promoting coordination in Norwegian health care1

    PubMed Central

    Romøren, Tor Inge; Torjesen, Dag Olaf; Landmark, Brynjar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Norwegian health care system is well organized within its two main sectors—primary health and long-term care on the one hand, and hospitals and specialist services on the other. However, the relation between them lacks mediating structures. Policy practice Enhancing coordination between primary and secondary health care has been central in Norwegian health care policy in the last decade. In 2003 a committee was appointed to identify coordination problems and proposed a lot of practical and organisational recommendations. It relied on an approach challenging primary and secondary health care in shared geographical regions to take action. However, these proposals were not implemented. In 2008 a new Minister of Health and Care worked out plans under the key term “Coordination Reform”. These reform plans superseded and expanded the previous policy initiatives concerning cooperation, but represented also a shift in focus to a regulative and centralised strategy, including new health legislation, structural reforms and use of economic incentives that are now about to be implemented. Discussion The article analyses the perspectives and proposals of the previous and the recent reform initiatives in Norway and discusses them in relation to integrated care measures implemented in Denmark and Sweden. PMID:22128282

  15. Teachers at War: Norwegian Teachers during the German Occupation of Norway 1940-45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunseath, Tessa

    2002-01-01

    States Norwegian Nazi leader, Vidkun Quisling, attempted to control dissenting Norwegian teachers by developing a compulsory union. Reports Nazi beliefs centered on controlling teachers, curriculum, and textbooks as a key to success. Notes Norwegian teachers' refusal to comply with the union scheme stymied Norwegian Nazi leaders' plans for…

  16. Hydrate problems in pipelines: A study from Norwegian continental waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, D.; Larsen, R.; Lund, A.; Thomsen, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate and SINTEF to identify hydrate problems occurring in pipelines on the Norwegian continental shelf. A brief review of hydrate dissociation theory is given. Three major techniques for hydrate removal are discussed, as well as hazards related to hydrate plug removal. Questionnaire answers from 15 companies operating in Norwegian waters show three specific occurrences of hydrate plugs in the North Sea. Problems from other geographical areas are also discussed. Hydrate problems are reported for a wide variety of pipe lengths, diameters, profiles, insulations characteristics and fluids. Most problems occur during normal operation.

  17. Assessing a Norwegian translation of the Organizational Climate Measure.

    PubMed

    Bernstrøm, Vilde Hoff; Lone, Jon Anders; Bjørkli, Cato A; Ulleberg, Pål; Hoff, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the Norwegian translation of the Organizational Climate Measure developed by Patterson and colleagues. The Organizational Climate Measure is a global measure of organizational climate based on Quinn and Rohrbaugh's competing values model. The survey was administered to a Norwegian branch of an international service sector company (N = 555). The results revealed satisfactory internal reliability and interrater agreement for the 17 scales, and confirmatory factor analysis supported the original factor structure. The findings gave preliminary support for the Organizational Climate Measure as a reliable measure with a stable factor structure, and indicated that it is potentially useful in the Norwegian context.

  18. Lower Tertiary laterite on the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge and the Thulean land bridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    CORES of a lower Tertiary lateritic palaeosol resting on basalt were recovered1 from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 336 (Leg 38) on the north-east flank of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge (Fig. 1), a major aseismic oceanic ridge that, together with Iceland, forms the Icelandic transverse ridge 2. The transverse ridge extends from the West European continental margin to the East Greenland continental margin, forming the geographic boundary and a partial barrier to flow of water between the Norwegian-Greenland Sea to the north and the northern North Atlantic Ocean to the south. The palaeosol indicates that at least part of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge was above sea level during early Tertiary time3. Palaeogeographic and palaeooceanographic reconstructions suggest that it formed the main part of the Thulean land bridge that connected South-east Greenland and the Faeroe islands during the early Tertiary4. This report summarises the subsidence history of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge relative to early Tertiary seafloor spreading, basaltic volcanism, and the development of the proposed Thulean land bridge. ?? 1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  19. Norwegian scabies in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, K; Mahaldar, A R; Ramakrishnan, M; Prabahar, S

    2010-04-01

    A variety of skin infections are encountered in postrenal transplant setting. Though bacterial and fungal infections are more common, surprises are in store for us sometimes. We describe a patient who underwent renal transplant two years ago, presenting with a painless, mildly pruritic expanding skin rash over abdomen. Histological examination of the skin biopsy showed that stratum corneum had multiple burrows containing larvae and eggs of Sarcoptes scabiei. The patient was treated with ivermectin 12 mg weekly once for 2 doses along with topical 5% permethrin and permethrin soap bath. There was remarkable improvement in the skin lesions with complete resolution in two weeks. Norwegian or crusted scabies is caused by massive infestation with Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis. It can be rarely encountered in the post-transplant setting, which underscores the importance of early diagnosis and treatment before secondary bacterial infection sets in. PMID:20835323

  20. Dental health practices in Norwegian adults.

    PubMed

    Helöe, L A; Aarö, L E; Sögaard, A J

    1982-12-01

    A nationwide sample of 1511 Norwegian adults were interviewed in 1979-80 concerning health habits, including dental habits. While daily toothbrushing and regular treatment attendance appeared to have become the rule among young and middle aged individuals, use of dental floss and especially of fluoride tablets or rinses, still are the exception. Dental health habits were clustered around the variable treatment attendance with slightly different patterns for men and for women. Measures of sugar consumptions were only slightly correlated with background variables and dental health behavior. While the latter was socially dependent, consumption of sugar probably was attached to personal characteristics or situational factors. The correlations between dental health behavior and other health behavior practices were generally weak, and somewhat different for men and women. Two separate types of motives for preventive behavior were distinguished between: health motives and cosmetic motives.

  1. Food safety practices among Norwegian consumers.

    PubMed

    Røssvoll, Elin Halbach; Lavik, Randi; Ueland, Øydis; Jacobsen, Eivind; Hagtvedt, Therese; Langsrud, Solveig

    2013-11-01

    An informed consumer can compensate for several potential food safety violations or contaminations that may occur earlier in the food production chain. However, a consumer can also destroy the work of others in the chain by poor food handling practices, e.g., by storing chilled ready-to-eat foods at abusive temperatures. To target risk-reducing strategies, consumer groups with high-risk behavior should be identified. The aim of this study was to identify demographic characteristics associated with high-risk food handling practices among Norwegian consumers. More than 2,000 randomly selected Norwegian consumers were surveyed, and the results were analyzed with a risk-based grading system, awarding demerit points for self-reported food safety violations. The violations were categorized into groups, and an ordinary multiple linear regression analysis was run on the summarized demerit score for each group and for the entire survey group as a whole. Young and elderly men were identified as the least informed consumer groups with the most unsafe practices regarding food safety. Single persons reported poorer practices than those in a relationship. People with higher education reported poorer practices than those with lower or no education, and those living in the capital of Norway (Oslo) reported following more unsafe food practices than people living elsewhere in Norway. Men reported poorer food safety practices than women in all categories with two exceptions: parboiling raw vegetables before consumption and knowledge of refrigerator temperature. These findings suggest that risk-reducing measures should target men, and a strategy is needed to change their behavior and attitudes.

  2. Food safety practices among Norwegian consumers.

    PubMed

    Røssvoll, Elin Halbach; Lavik, Randi; Ueland, Øydis; Jacobsen, Eivind; Hagtvedt, Therese; Langsrud, Solveig

    2013-11-01

    An informed consumer can compensate for several potential food safety violations or contaminations that may occur earlier in the food production chain. However, a consumer can also destroy the work of others in the chain by poor food handling practices, e.g., by storing chilled ready-to-eat foods at abusive temperatures. To target risk-reducing strategies, consumer groups with high-risk behavior should be identified. The aim of this study was to identify demographic characteristics associated with high-risk food handling practices among Norwegian consumers. More than 2,000 randomly selected Norwegian consumers were surveyed, and the results were analyzed with a risk-based grading system, awarding demerit points for self-reported food safety violations. The violations were categorized into groups, and an ordinary multiple linear regression analysis was run on the summarized demerit score for each group and for the entire survey group as a whole. Young and elderly men were identified as the least informed consumer groups with the most unsafe practices regarding food safety. Single persons reported poorer practices than those in a relationship. People with higher education reported poorer practices than those with lower or no education, and those living in the capital of Norway (Oslo) reported following more unsafe food practices than people living elsewhere in Norway. Men reported poorer food safety practices than women in all categories with two exceptions: parboiling raw vegetables before consumption and knowledge of refrigerator temperature. These findings suggest that risk-reducing measures should target men, and a strategy is needed to change their behavior and attitudes. PMID:24215699

  3. Permian of Norwegian-Greenland sea margins: future exploration target

    SciTech Connect

    Surlyk, F.; Hurst, J.M.; Piasecki, S.; Rolle, F.; Stemmerik, L.; Thomsen, E.; Wrang, P.

    1984-09-01

    Oil and gas exploration in the northern North Sea and the southern Norwegian shelf has mainy been concentrated on Jurassic and younger reservoirs with Late Jurassic black shale source rocks. New onshore investigations in Jameson Land, central East Greenland, suggest that the Permian of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea margins contains relatively thick sequences of potential oil source rocks interbedded with carbonate reefs. The East Greenland, Upper Permian marine basin is exposed over a length of 400 km (250 mi) from Jameson Land in the south to Wollaston Forland in the north, parallel with the continental margin. The Upper Permian black shale is relatively thick, widely distributed, has a high organic carbon content, and a favorable kerogen type. Consequently, the possibilities for a Permian play in the northern part of the Norwegian shelf and along parts of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea margins are worth evaluating.

  4. World's largest TLP moves onto deepwater Norwegian location

    SciTech Connect

    Vielvoye, R.

    1992-05-04

    This paper reports that the world's largest and most sophisticated tension leg platform (TLP) was floated out to Snorre oil field in the Norwegian North Sea last month. The 78,000 ton unit built by Norwegian independent, Sega Petroleum AS, Oslo, was installed in the southern part of block 34/7 and should produce first oil in August, about a month ahead of schedule.

  5. Assessment of climate vulnerability in the Norwegian built environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hygen, H. O.; Øyen, C. F.; Almâs, A. J.

    2010-09-01

    The main trends expected for the change of Norwegian climate for this century are increasing temperatures, precipitation and wind. This indicates a probable increase of climate related risks to the Norwegian built environment. Previous assessments of climate vulnerability of the built environment have been based on general terms and experiences. The report "Climate and vulnerability analysis for Norwegian built environment; Basis elucidation for the Official Norwegian Report (NOU) on climate adaptation (in Norwegian only)" has used previously defined indexes to quantify the future vulnerability and thus estimated the impact of future climate strain to the existing built environment. The method used to do this assessment has been to create national geolocated maps of relevant climate indexes. Climate indexes for this analysis are: * Wood decay, * Temperature and heating degree days, * Snow load and wet winter precipitation, * Precipitation, flood and extreme precipitation * Wind and wind-driven rain * Frost decay * Frost amount * Perma frost Most of these indexes have been established both for the normal period 1961 - 1990 and projected climate of 2071 - 2100. To compensate for uncertainties in the projection, a set of three projections has been used. These indexes have been combined with geolocated information for Norway's 3.9 million buildings, by imposing GIS digitalized building information to the geolocated maps. The result of this combination is a synopsis of the number of buildings in Norway vulnerable to the displayed present climate parameters and to the projected changes. Consequenses for the Norwegian buildings stock and actions to be taken by the government are also discussed.

  6. Heat flow of the Norwegian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial heat flow influences a large collection of geological processes. Its determination is a requirement to assess the economic potential of deep sedimentary basins. Published heat flow calculations from e.g. major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. The Barents Shelf shows significantly high heat flow, suggesting lateral transfer of heat from the mantle of the adjacent young ocean. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and V

  7. Heat Flow of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial heat flow determination is of prime interest for oil industry because it impacts directly maturation histories and economic potential of oil fields. Published systematic heat flow determinations from major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. For the sake of comparison, we carefully review previous heat flow studies carried out both onshore and offshore Norway. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and Vøring basins. This latter

  8. The Norwegian system of compensation to patients.

    PubMed

    Jørstad, Rolf Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    In Norway we have come to the conclusion that a traditional compensation law based on negligence is not the right "tool" for handling difficult questions as to whether or not a patient shall get compensation if required after medical treatment or other forms of contact with the medical profession. The compensation scheme established in 1988 involving the public sector of the Norwegian health care system has received almost 18000 claims since Jan 1 1988, and has paid out more than 1.2 billion NOK (137 million US$) in compensation during these years. At the same time, the number of compensation claims brought before the courts has decreased. After 13 years of a provisional scheme dealing with patient injury compensation based on no-fault rules, we find that compensation claims indeed can be handled without focus on blame and negligence, and that this ensures both that the patients get equitable compensation and that unnecessary legal procedures are avoided. The system also has had a favourable impact on interaction within the health care sector and upon relationships between health care personnel and patients.

  9. The Norwegian immunisation register--SYSVAK.

    PubMed

    Trogstad, L; Ung, G; Hagerup-Jenssen, M; Cappelen, I; Haugen, I L; Feiring, B

    2012-04-19

    The Norwegian immunisation register, SYSVAK, is a national electronic immunisation register. It became nationwide in 1995. The major aim was to register all vaccinations in the Childhood Immunisation Programme to ensure that all children are offered adequate vaccination according to schedule in the programme, and to secure high vaccination coverage. Notification to SYSVAK is mandatory, based on personal identification numbers. This allows follow up of individual vaccination schedules and linkage of SYSVAK data to other national health registers for information on outcome diagnoses, such as the surveillance system for communicable diseases. Information from SYSVAK is used to determine vaccine coverage in a timely manner. Coverage can be broken down to regional/local levels and used for active surveillance of vaccination coverage and decisions about interventions. During the 2009 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, an adaptation of SYSVAK enabled daily surveillance of vaccination coverage on national and regional levels. Currently, data from SYSVAK are used, among others, in studies on adverse events related to pandemic vaccination. Future challenges include maximising usage of collected data in surveillance and research, and continued improvement of data quality. Immunisation registers are rich sources for high quality surveillance of vaccination coverage, effectiveness, vaccine failure and adverse events, and gold mines for research.

  10. 75 FR 74768 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Norwegian Painters”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Norwegian Painters'' SUMMARY: Notice..., I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Norwegian Painters... objects are imported pursuant to loan agreements with the foreign owners or custodians. I also...

  11. Categorization of speech sounds by Norwegian/English bilinguals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dypvik, Audny T.; Slawinski, Elzbieta B.

    2005-04-01

    Bilinguals who learned English late in life (late bilinguals) as opposed to those who learned English early in life (early bilinguals) differ in their perception of phonemic distinctions. Age of acquisition of a second language as well as depth of immersion into English is influenced by perceptual differences of phonemic contrasts between monolinguals and bilinguals, with consequences for speech production. The phonemes /v/ and /w/ are from the same category in Norwegian, rendering them perceptually indistinguishable to the native Norwegian listener. In English, /v/ and /w/ occupy two categories. Psychoacoustic testing on this phonemic distinction in the current study will compare perceptual abilities of monolingual English and bilingual Norwegian/English listeners. Preliminary data indicates that Norwegian/English bilinguals demonstrate varying perceptual abilities for this phonemic distinction. A series of speech sounds have been generated by an articulatory synthesizer, the Tube Resonance Model, along a continuum between the postures of /v/ and /w/. They will be presented binaurally over headphones in an anechoic chamber at a sound pressure level of 75 dB. Differences in the perception of the categorical boundary between /v/ and /w/ among English monolinguals and Norwegian/English bilinguals will be further delineated.

  12. Contextual view of Point Bonita Ridge, showing Bonita Ridge access ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Point Bonita Ridge, showing Bonita Ridge access road retaining wall and location of Signal Corps Radar (S.C.R.) 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation (see stake at center left), camera facing north - Fort Barry, Signal Corps Radar 296, Station 5, Transmitter Building Foundation, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  13. Food and Nutrient Intake among 12-Month-Old Norwegian-Somali and Norwegian-Iraqi Infants

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Navnit Kaur; Andersen, Lene Frost; Kolve, Cathrine Solheim; Kverndalen, Ingrid; Torheim, Liv Elin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to describe food and nutrient intake among 12-month-old Norwegian-Somali and Norwegian-Iraqi infants, with a focus on iron and vitamin D intake. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from August 2013 through September 2014. Eighty-nine mothers/infants of Somali origin and 77 mothers/infants of Iraqi origin residing in Eastern Norway participated in the study. Data were collected using two 24-h multiple-pass recalls. Forty percent of the Norwegian-Somali infants and 47% of the Norwegian-Iraqi infants were breastfed at 12 months of age (p = 0.414). Median energy percentages (E%) from protein, fat and carbohydrates were within the recommended intake ranges, except the level of saturated fats (12–13 E%). Median intakes of almost all micronutrients were above the recommended daily intakes. Most of the infants consumed iron-enriched products (81%) and received vitamin D supplements (84%). The median intakes of iron and vitamin D were significantly higher among infants receiving iron-enriched products and vitamin D supplements compared to infants not receiving such products (p < 0.001). The findings indicate that the food and nutrient intake of this group of infants in general seems to be in accordance with Norwegian dietary recommendations. Foods rich in iron and vitamin D supplements were important sources of the infants’ intake of iron and vitamin D and should continue to be promoted. PMID:27690092

  14. People of the Prairies: A Norwegian and German-Russian Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabbert, Jon Charles, Ed.; Peterson, Fredrick E., Ed.

    The guide presents secondary level units designed to promote understanding of the two largest ethnic groups in North Dakota, the Norwegians and the German-Russians. The book is presented in five parts. Part I provides an historical overview of the Norwegian and German-Russian migration to North Dakota. Part II presents three Norwegian units on…

  15. Language Planning Confronted by Everyday Communication in the International University: The Norwegian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ljosland, Ragnhild

    2014-01-01

    Having been the scene of language planning for more than a century in relation to the two competing written standards of Norwegian, Norwegian language planners are now facing a new challenge: how to deal with what has been termed "domain loss" where Norwegian is perceived as losing out to English in important sectors of society,…

  16. Centralized Decentralization or Decentralized Centralization? A Review of Newer Norwegian Research on Schools and Their Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvalsund, Rune

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Norwegian research on the relationship between the school and the local community during the past 30 years is reviewed. The Norwegian context of schooling is briefly described, pointing out the rural-urban conflict. The review is organized into two phases: research in the expansive and contractive phases of the Norwegian welfare…

  17. Grammatical Gender in American Norwegian Heritage Language: Stability or Attrition?

    PubMed

    Lohndal, Terje; Westergaard, Marit

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates possible attrition/change in the gender system of Norwegian heritage language spoken in America. Based on data from 50 speakers in the Corpus of American Norwegian Speech (CANS), we show that the three-gender system is to some extent retained, although considerable overgeneralization of the masculine (the most frequent gender) is attested. This affects both feminine and neuter gender forms, while declension class markers such as the definite suffix remain unaffected. We argue that the gender category is vulnerable due to the lack of transparency of gender assignment in Norwegian. Furthermore, unlike incomplete acquisition, which may result in a somewhat different or reduced gender system, attrition is more likely to lead to general erosion, eventually leading to complete loss of gender.

  18. Grammatical Gender in American Norwegian Heritage Language: Stability or Attrition?

    PubMed Central

    Lohndal, Terje; Westergaard, Marit

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates possible attrition/change in the gender system of Norwegian heritage language spoken in America. Based on data from 50 speakers in the Corpus of American Norwegian Speech (CANS), we show that the three-gender system is to some extent retained, although considerable overgeneralization of the masculine (the most frequent gender) is attested. This affects both feminine and neuter gender forms, while declension class markers such as the definite suffix remain unaffected. We argue that the gender category is vulnerable due to the lack of transparency of gender assignment in Norwegian. Furthermore, unlike incomplete acquisition, which may result in a somewhat different or reduced gender system, attrition is more likely to lead to general erosion, eventually leading to complete loss of gender. PMID:27014151

  19. Height ridges of oriented medialness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Jacob David

    Shape analysis of objects is an important aspect of medical image processing. Information gained from shape analysis can be used for object segmentation, object- based registration and object visualization. One shape analysis tool is the core, defined to be a height ridge of a medial strength measure made on an image. In this dissertation I present 3D cores, defined here to be optimal scale-orientation height ridges of oriented medial strength measurements. This dissertation covers (1)a medial strength measurement, Blum- like medialness, that is robust, efficient, and insensitive to intrafigural interference, (2)a new definition for a ridge, the optimal parameter height ridge, and its properties, and (3)an algorithm, Marching Ridges, for extracting cores. The medial strength measurement uses Gaussian derivatives, so is insensitive to noise, and responds to object boundaries at points rather than on entire spheres, so is faster to calculate and less sensitive to boundaries of other image figures. The Marching Ridges algorithm uses the grid structure of the image domain to identify ridge points as zero-crossings of first derivatives and to track ridges through the image domain. I include results of this algorithm on medical images of cerebral vasculature, a skull, kidneys, and brain ventricles.

  20. Polygonal Ridge Networks on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Laura; Dickson, James; Grosfils, Eric; Head, James W.

    2016-10-01

    Polygonal ridge networks, also known as boxwork or reticulate ridges, are found in numerous locations and geological contexts across Mars. While networks formed from mineralized fractures hint at hot, possibly life-sustaining circulating ground waters, networks formed by impact-driven clasting diking, magmatic dikes, gas escape, or lava flows do not have the same astrobiological implications. Distinguishing the morphologies and geological context of the ridge networks sheds light on their potential as astrobiological and mineral resource sites of interest. The most widespread type of ridge morphology is characteristic of the Nili Fossae and Nilosyrtis region and consists of thin, criss-crossing ridges with a variety of heights, widths, and intersection angles. They are found in ancient Noachian terrains at a variety of altitudes and geographic locations and may be a mixture of clastic dikes, brecciated dikes, and mineral veins. They occur in the same general areas as valley networks and ancient lake basins, but they are not more numerous where these features are concentrated, and can appear in places where they morphologies are absent. Similarly, some of the ridge networks are associated with hydrated mineral detections, but some occur in locations without detections. Smaller, light-toned ridges of variable widths have been found in Gale Crater and other rover sites and are interpreted to be smaller version of the Nili-like ridges, in this case formed by the mineralization of fractures. This type of ridge is likely to be found in many other places on Mars as more high-resolution data becomes available. Hellas Basin is host to a third type of ridge morphology consisting of large, thick, light-toned ridges forming regular polygons at several superimposed scales. While still enigmatic, these are most likely to be the result of sediment-filled fractures. The Eastern Medusae Fossae Formation contains large swaths of a fourth, previously undocumented, ridge network type

  1. Brain correlates of sentence translation in Finnish-Norwegian bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Minna H; Laine, Matti; Niemi, Jussi; Thomsen, Tormod; Vorobyev, Victor A; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2005-04-25

    We measured brain activation with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while Finnish-Norwegian bilinguals silently translated sentences from Finnish into Norwegian and decided whether a later presented probe sentence was a correct translation of the original sentence. The control task included silent sentence reading and probe sentence decision within a single language, Finnish. The translation minus control task contrast activated the left inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann's area 47) and the left basal ganglia. The left inferior frontal activation appears to be related to active semantic retrieval and the basal ganglia activation to a general action control function that works by suppressing competing responses.

  2. Temporal Variation of Mycotoxin Producing Fungi in Norwegian Cereals

    PubMed Central

    Sundheim, Leif; Brodal, Guro; Hofgaard, Inger S.; Rafoss, Trond

    2013-01-01

    Spring barley is grown on about half of the Norwegian cereal area. The rest of the area is equally divided between wheat and oats. Most years the domestic production provides 70%–80% of the domestic market for bread wheat. Barley and oats are mainly grown for animal feed. During the years 2008–2012, severe epidemics of Fusarium head blight have led to increased mycotoxin contamination of cereals. During that period, precipitation was above normal during anthesis and grain maturation. The most important mycotoxin producers have been F. avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. graminearum and F. langsethiae. Increased deoxynivalenol contamination of Norwegian cereals during recent years is due to severe F. graminearum epidemics.

  3. Effect of ridge-ridge interactions in crumpled thin sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Shiuan-Fan; Lo, Chun-Chao; Chou, Ming-Han; Hsiao, Pai-Yi; Hong, Tzay-Ming

    2014-02-01

    We study whether and how the energy scaling based on the single-ridge approximation is revised in an actual crumpled sheet, namely, in the presence of ridge-ridge interactions. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed for this purpose. In order to improve the data quality, modifications are introduced to the common protocol. As crumpling proceeds, we find that the average storing energy changes from being proportional to one-third of the ridge length to a linear relation, while the ratio of bending and stretching energies decreases from 5 to 2. The discrepancy between previous simulations and experiments on the material-dependence for the power-law exponent is resolved. We further determine the average ridge length to scale as 1/D1/3, the ridge number as D2/3, and the average storing energy per unit ridge length as D0.881 where D denotes the volume density of the crumpled ball. These results are accompanied by experimental proofs and are consistent with mean-field predictions. Finally, we extend the existent simulations to the high-pressure region and verify the existence of a scaling relation that is more general than the familiar power law at covering the whole density range.

  4. Learning experiences at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) of DOE has organized an Environmental Restoration Program to handle environmental cleanup activitis for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) following General Watkins' reorganization at DOE Headquarters. Based on the major facilities and locations of contamination sites, the Environmental Restoration Program is divided into five subprograms: Oak Ridge, National Laboatory (ORNL) sites, y-12 Plant sites, Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) sites, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) sites and off-site areas. The Office of Risk Analysis at ORNL was established under the auspices of the Environmental Restoration Program to implement Superfun legislation in the five subprograms of DOE-ORO. Risk assessment must examine protetial human health and ecological impacts from contaminant sources that range from highly radioactive materials to toxic chemicals and mixed wastes. The remedial alternatives we are evaluating need to reach acceptable levels of risk effectively while also being cost-efficient. The purpose of this paper is to highlight areas of particular interest and concern at Oak Ridge and to discuss, where possible, solutions implemented by the Oak Ridge Environmental Restoation Program.

  5. Ridge 2000 Data Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwillie, A. M.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Haxby, W. F.; Ryan, W. B.; Chayes, D. N.; Lehnert, K. A.; Shank, T. M.

    2005-12-01

    Hosted at Lamont by the marine geoscience Data Management group, mgDMS, the NSF-funded Ridge 2000 electronic database, http://www.marine-geo.org/ridge2000/, is a key component of the Ridge 2000 multi-disciplinary program. The database covers each of the three Ridge 2000 Integrated Study Sites: Endeavour Segment, Lau Basin, and 8-11N Segment. It promotes the sharing of information to the broader community, facilitates integration of the suite of information collected at each study site, and enables comparisons between sites. The Ridge 2000 data system provides easy web access to a relational database that is built around a catalogue of cruise metadata. Any web browser can be used to perform a versatile text-based search which returns basic cruise and submersible dive information, sample and data inventories, navigation, and other relevant metadata such as shipboard personnel and links to NSF program awards. In addition, non-proprietary data files, images, and derived products which are hosted locally or in national repositories, as well as science and technical reports, can be freely downloaded. On the Ridge 2000 database page, our Data Link allows users to search the database using a broad range of parameters including data type, cruise ID, chief scientist, geographical location. The first Ridge 2000 field programs sailed in 2004 and, in addition to numerous data sets collected prior to the Ridge 2000 program, the database currently contains information on fifteen Ridge 2000-funded cruises and almost sixty Alvin dives. Track lines can be viewed using a recently- implemented Web Map Service button labelled Map View. The Ridge 2000 database is fully integrated with databases hosted by the mgDMS group for MARGINS and the Antarctic multibeam and seismic reflection data initiatives. Links are provided to partner databases including PetDB, SIOExplorer, and the ODP Janus system. Improved inter-operability with existing and new partner repositories continues to be

  6. Implicit language learning: Adults’ ability to segment words in Norwegian*

    PubMed Central

    KITTLESON, MEGAN M.; AGUILAR, JESSICA M.; TOKERUD, GRY LINE; PLANTE, ELENA; ASBJØRNSEN, ARVE E.

    2010-01-01

    Previous language learning research reveals that the statistical properties of the input offer sufficient information to allow listeners to segment words from fluent speech in an artificial language. The current pair of studies uses a natural language to test the ecological validity of these findings and to determine whether a listener’s language background influences this process. In Study 1, the “guessibility” of potential test words from the Norwegian language was presented to 22 listeners who were asked to differentiate between true words and nonwords. In Study 2, 22 adults who spoke one of 12 different primary languages learned to segment words from continuous speech in an implicit language learning paradigm. The task consisted of two sessions, approximately three weeks apart, each requiring participants to listen to 7.2 minutes of Norwegian sentences followed by a series of bisyllabic test items presented in isolation. The participants differentially accepted the Norwegian words and Norwegian-like nonwords in both test sessions, demonstrating the capability to segment true words from running speech. The results were consistent across three broadly-defined language groups, despite differences in participants’ language background. PMID:21512605

  7. Possible Concepts for Waterproofing of Norwegian TBM Railway Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammyr, Øyvind; Nilsen, Bjørn; Thuro, Kurosch; Grøndal, Jørn

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate and compare the durability, life expectancy and maintenance needs of traditional Norwegian waterproofing concepts to the generally more rigid waterproofing concepts seen in other European countries. The focus will be on solutions for future Norwegian tunnel boring machine railway tunnels. Experiences from operation of newer and older tunnels with different waterproofing concepts have been gathered and analyzed. In the light of functional requirements for Norwegian rail tunnels, some preliminary conclusions about suitable concepts are drawn. Norwegian concepts such as polyethylene panels and lightweight concrete segments with membrane are ruled out. European concepts involving double shell draining systems (inner shell of cast concrete with membrane) and single shell undrained systems (waterproof concrete segments) are generally evaluated as favorable. Sprayable membranes and waterproof/insulating shotcrete are welcomed innovations, but more research is needed to verify their reliability and cost effectiveness compared to the typical European concepts. Increasing traffic and reliance on public transport systems in Norway result in high demand for durable and cost effective solutions.

  8. Social Capital and Student Achievement in Norwegian Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Lihong

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates student social capital in Norwegian secondary schools and its effects on student achievement. Using data from the national survey "Young in Norway 2002", it explores the concept and measurement of social capital in the school context by applying factor analysis. The paper also tests an analytical model that links student…

  9. Implementation of New Public Management in Norwegian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frolich, Nicoline

    2005-01-01

    This article analyses the implementation of market-type mechanisms in the management of universities. The question of which cultural biases have been used in the implementation of New Public Management (NPM) in Norwegian universities is discussed. Cultural theory, institutional theory, and public policy studies are applied to the analysis of a…

  10. Adapted Education: The Norwegian Pathway to Inclusive and Efficient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasting, Rolf B.

    2013-01-01

    Since the UNESCO conference in 1994, inclusion has been a major denominator in the educational debates of most OECD countries, focusing on how to facilitate education and social interaction for the diversity of pupils. By international standards, the Norwegian education system is regarded as inclusive, but the ongoing debate and political pressure…

  11. Writing in the Content Areas: A Norwegian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Frøydis; Roe, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Since 2006, literacy skills have been mandated as an integral part of all subject areas at all levels (grades 1-13) in Norwegian schools. With the exception of reading, evaluation reports show that teaching in general seems to be little affected by this reform. During the last few years, however, there has been a noticeable growth in interest in…

  12. Actual Leisure Participation of Norwegian Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolva, Anne-Stine; Kleiven, Jo; Kollstad, Marit

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the actual participation in leisure activities by a sample of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome aged 14. Representing a first generation to grow up in a relatively inclusive context, they live with their families, attend mainstream schools, and are part of common community life. Leisure information was obtained in…

  13. The Norwegian "Christianity, Religion and Philosophy" Subject "KRL" in Strasbourg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lied, Sidsel

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the judgement and dissent of the European Court of Human Rights in the "Case of Folgero and others v. Norway" regarding the subject "Christianity, Religion and Philosophy (KRL)" in Norwegian state schools. The verdict, reached with dissenting votes of 9-8, states that parents' freedom of ensuring their children an education…

  14. Forecasting the Norwegian Labour Market for Graduates Holding Higher Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naess, Terje

    2004-01-01

    This article investigates the phenomenon of long-term unemployed graduates of Norwegian higher education institutions over the period 1973-1999. The phenomenon was unexpected. One explanation for it is that the market for graduates was and remains in disequilibrium because wages are not sufficiently flexible downward. Thus unemployment would be…

  15. Teaching Immigrants Norwegian Culture to Support Their Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Awal Mohammed; Kuyini, Ahmed Bawa

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted with 48 adult immigrant students studying Norwegian under basic education program of the Ski Municipality Adult Education Unit between 2009-2011. Using the framework of Genc and Bada (2005), we tried to replicate their study in a new setting--Norway. The study investigated migrant students' perceptions learning Norwegian…

  16. Exploration of Norwegian Student Teachers' Relational Concerns during Internships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugan, Jan Arvid; Moen, Torill; Karlsdottir, Ragnheidur

    2012-01-01

    This study builds on and contributes to research on student teachers' relational concerns in teacher education, as four Grade 3 Norwegian student teachers were followed during their internship for two periods of two weeks each. The article presents and discusses data from interviews and student teachers' logs, while the aim of the study is to…

  17. Educating Voters: Political Education in Norwegian Upper-Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borhaug, Kjetil

    2008-01-01

    Research on political education in schools suggests that an emphasis on formal structure, constitutional principles, formal citizen rights, and debates on current issues is common. The Norwegian national curriculum on political education envisions a different political education emphasizing that students should be critical of political life and…

  18. The Broken Curve: Effects of the Norwegian Manifesto against Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Erling

    2011-01-01

    The first Norwegian Manifesto (Manifesto-I) Against Bullying was launched by the Prime Minister in autumn 2002 and lasted for 2 years. A background for Manifesto-I was that school bullying had increased almost linearly in Norway with over 60% more victims and bullies since 1995. During the manifest period, the percentage of victims and bullies…

  19. The Limitations of Multiculturalism in Norwegian Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovdelien, Olav

    2014-01-01

    In Norway, 9 out of 10 children between the ages of one and five participate in an educational formation programme which, despite around half of the kindergartens being privately owned, is regulated by a common law and relatively detailed regulations describing what the content of kindergartens should be. Norwegian kindergartens therefore…

  20. School Start Time, Sleepiness and Functioning in Norwegian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedaa, Oystein; Saxvig, Ingvild West; Wilhelmsen-Langeland, Ane; Bjorvatn, Bjorn; Pallesen, Stale

    2012-01-01

    The study's aim was to investigate how school start time affects sleepiness and functioning in Norwegian 10th grade students (N = 106). The intervention school started at 0930 hours on Mondays and 0830 hours the rest of the week. A control school started at 0830 hours all schooldays. The students were assessed on a reaction time test as well as…

  1. The Norwegian Principal: The Impact of National and Local Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moller, Jorunn

    This article provides a snapshot of educational administration and leadership in Norway. The article describes the Norwegian context and the country's educational system. It reports on a small study that was part of a cross-cultural exploration into the principalship, offering a discussion based on interviews of principals from four…

  2. The Prevalence and Nature of Intellectual Disability in Norwegian Prisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sondenaa, E.; Rasmussen, K.; Palmstierna, T.; Nottestad, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was to calculate the prevalence of inmates with intellectual disabilities (ID), and identify historical, medical and criminological characteristics of a certain impact. Methods: A random sample of 143 inmates from a Norwegian prison cross sectional sample was studied. The Hayes Ability Screening Index (HASI)…

  3. Bibliographies: Swedes, Danes, Finns, Icelanders, and Norwegians in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, Minn.

    Produced for college students, five bibliographies list emigration and immigration sources related to the peopling of Minnesota by Scandanavian groups (Swedes, Danes, Finns, Icelanders, and Norwegians). Over 400 citations identify books, articles, conference papers, diaries, personal papers of families, and historical society papers from the late…

  4. Deepwater cementing in the Norwegian Sea: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Helgesen, J.T.; Harestad, K.; Sorgaard, E.

    1999-04-01

    During Norway`s 15th licensing round in 1996, five deepwater areas were opened for exploration drilling. All blocks are situated outside the continental shelf in the Norwegian Sea, west of mid-Norway. The seabed and location conditions were studied by the Norwegian Deepwater Project, a joint venture of the operator companies who were awarded blocks in these new unexplored areas. Results of the study revealed that the weather and sea conditions in these remote areas would be among the toughest in the world. Strong return currents from the Arctic Ocean bring undercooled water to these locations, lowering the seabed temperature to as low as {minus}2 C. Because all the blocks are situated outside the Norwegian continental shelf, the water depth is in the range of 2,600--5,000 ft (800--1,600 m). Typical deepwater conditions are present in most of the deepwater locations in the Norwegian Sea. The conditions that posed additional challenges to the drilling operation were poorly consolidated sediments, shallow water flow zones, hydrate destabilization and ooze sediments. The paper describes sediment consolidation, shallow water flow, hydrates, development of deepwater cement slurries, a field case, and future cementing operations in Norway.

  5. Science Choices in Norwegian Upper Secondary School: What Matters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Maria Vetleseter

    2012-01-01

    There is international concern about young people's participation in science. This study investigated the relevant importance of various issues in 1628 Norwegian upper secondary students' choices of postcompulsory subject combinations: natural science and mathematics (henceforth Science) or languages, social science and economics (henceforth…

  6. Longitudinal Case-Studies of Developmental Dyslexia in Norwegian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nergard-Nilssen, Trude

    2006-01-01

    This study examined retrospectively the preschool cognitive and linguistic profiles and emergent literacy skills in four Norwegian dyslexic children. The aim was to identify prognostic indicators that were associated with the reading impairments observed in an earlier study of these children. In comparison to a control group of at-risk children…

  7. [Norwegian psychiatry and Nazism. A historical project of current interest].

    PubMed

    Lavik, N J

    1994-06-10

    In 1945 the Ministry of Justice appointed a committee to conduct a psychiatric examination of Norwegian Nazis. This was done after a proposal from the Norwegian Psychiatric Association on the initiative of Professor Langfeldt, who at that time was head of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Oslo. An investigation based on a crosscheck between membership of the Nazi party and the Norwegian case register for psychoses for the period 1926-1940 showed 30% more psychoses among the Nazis than in the population as a whole. Other studies tended to support the view that there was a high prevalence of deviant personalities among the Nazis. A study of 340 "front combatants" (not representative of the whole group of 8,000) showed no increase in psychopathology. They had a higher level of intelligence and education than the mean of young Norwegian males. Many of them belonged to strong pro-Nazi families. The studies of pro-Nazi women, especially the very young who had been involved in sexual relationships with German soldiers, are not representative. The findings seem to indicate that many of them lacked family support and had social problems. The studies are discussed in a historical perspective, with some comments about their relevance today.

  8. Predicting Intentions to Perform Protective Sexual Behaviours among Norwegian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklestad, Ingri; Rise, Jostein

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the socio-cognitive processes underlying intentions to use condoms and contraceptive pills, using the Theory of Planned Behaviour extended with prototypes in a group of young Norwegian adolescents. The data are derived from a questionnaire survey comprising all pupils in Grade Nine at three schools in Oslo (n = 196). Using…

  9. Challenges and Possibilities in Norwegian Classroom Drama Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebo, Aud Berggraf

    2009-01-01

    My specific teaching and research interest is drama in the classroom--drama as a teaching and learning medium to fulfil a curriculum demand for student-active, creative and aesthetic learning processes. In this article I will focus on the challenges and possibilities that exist in Norwegian classroom drama. The article is based on my latest…

  10. Ridges on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is the highest resolution picture ever taken of the Jupiter moon, Europa. The area shown is about 5.9 by 9.9 miles (9.6 by 16 kilometers) and the smallest visible feature is about the size of a football field. In this view, the ice-rich surface has been broken into a complex pattern by cross-cutting ridges and grooves resulting from tectonic processes. Sinuous rille-like features and knobby terrain could result from surface modifications of unknown origins. Small craters of possible impact origin range in size from less than 330 feet (100 meters) to about 1300 feet (400 meters) across are visible.

    This image was taken by the solid state imaging television camera aboard the Galileo during its fourth orbit around Jupiter, at a distance of 2060 miles (3340 kilometers). The picture is centered at 325 degrees West, 5.83 degrees North. North is toward the top of this image, with the sun shining from the right.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  11. The Mid-Ocean Ridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.; Fox, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Described are concepts involved with the formation and actions of the Mid-Ocean Ridge. Sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, discontinuities, off-axis structures, overlaps and deviation, and aquatic life are discussed. (CW)

  12. Growth of a tectonic ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R.W.; Messerich, J.A.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    The 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake of M 7.6 created an impressive record of surface rupture and ground deformation. Fractures extend over a length of more than 80 km including zones of right-lateral shift, steps in the fault zones, fault intersections and vertical changes. Among the vertical changes was the growth of a tectonic ridge described here. In this paper the authors describe the Emerson fault zone and the Tortoise Hill ridge including the relations between the fault zone and the ridge. They present data on the horizontal deformation at several scales associated with activity within the ridge and belt of shear zones and show the differential vertical uplifts. And, they conclude with a discussion of potential models for the observed deformation.

  13. The Rhetoric of the Norwegian Constitution Day: A Topos Analysis of Young Norwegian Students' May 17 Speeches, 2011 and 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tønnesson, Johan Laurits; Sivesind, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    National Day, or Constitution Day, in Norway, May 17, is often referred to as Children's Day. On this day, thousands of young Norwegian students march in parades and participate in celebrations in schoolyards and similar meeting places. Some students are selected to give speeches, performed in front of family members, neighbors, classmates, and…

  14. Exemplary Educational Programs in Norwegian Prisons: A Case Study of Norwegian Educators' Attitudes and Humanitarian Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettit, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how Norwegian correctional educators' attitudes and working environments influenced successful inmate outcomes. Success for incarcerated students was defined by the ability to enroll in and do well in prison classes, develop life skills, and gain the knowledge and skills to become productive members of…

  15. Carpenter Ridge Tuff, CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Olivier; Deering, Chad D.; Lipman, Peter W.; Plummer, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The ~1,000 km3 Carpenter Ridge Tuff (CRT), erupted at 27.55 Ma during the mid-tertiary ignimbrite flare-up in the western USA, is among the largest known strongly zoned ash-flow tuffs. It consists primarily of densely welded crystal-poor rhyolite with a pronounced, highly evolved chemical signature (high Rb/Sr, low Ba, Zr, Eu), but thickly ponded intracaldera CRT is capped by a more crystal-rich, less silicic facies. In the outflow ignimbrite, this upper zone is defined mainly by densely welded crystal-rich juvenile clasts of trachydacite composition, with higher Fe-Ti oxide temperatures, and is characterized by extremely high Ba (to 7,500 ppm), Zr, Sr, and positive Eu anomalies. Rare mafic clasts (51-53 wt% SiO2) with Ba contents to 4,000-5,000 ppm and positive Eu anomalies are also present. Much of the major and trace-element variations in the CRT juvenile clasts can be reproduced via in situ differentiation by interstitial melt extraction from a crystal-rich, upper-crustal mush zone, with the trachydacite, crystal-rich clasts representing the remobilized crystal cumulate left behind by the melt extraction process. Late recharge events, represented by the rare mafic clasts and high-Al amphiboles in some samples, mixed in with parts of the crystal cumulate and generated additional scatter in the whole-rock data. Recharge was important in thermally remobilizing the silicic crystal cumulate by partially melting the near-solidus phases, as supported by: (1) ubiquitous wormy/sieve textures and reverse zoning patterns in feldspars and biotites, (2) absence of quartz in this very silicic unit stored at depths of >4-5 km, and (3) heterogeneous melt compositions in the trachydacite fiamme and mafic clasts, particularly in Ba, indicating local enrichment of this element due mostly to sanidine and biotite melting. The injection of hot, juvenile magma into the upper-crustal cumulate also imparted the observed thermal gradient to the deposits and the mixing overprint that

  16. Global and regional ridge patterns on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicarro, A. F.; Schultz, P. H.; Masson, P.

    1985-01-01

    A systematic study of Martian wrinkle ridges was performed to synthesize a theory of the planetary interior forces which produced such surface features. The survey was carried out using Mariner-9 and Viking orbiter imagery. Attention was given to the global distributions of ridge types in terms of geologic and tectonic surrounds, and to the orientation of ridges relative to impact basins. High/low relief ridges, ridge wings and rectilinear ridges were examined. Ridge orientation and distribution were found to be controlled by the forces of formation and modification of impact basins. Several other conclusions were reached regarding basin-concentric ridge patterns, regional stress patterns, regions of the most numerous ridges, and the location of a major compressive zone.

  17. PROPAGATION AND LINKAGE OF OCEANIC RIDGE SEGMENTS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, David D.; Aydin, Atilla

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of spreading ridges and the development of structures that link ridge segments using an analogy between ridges and cracks in elastic plates. The ridge-propagation force and a path factor that controls propagation direction were calculated for echelon ridge segments propagating toward each other. The ridge-propagation force increases as ridge ends approach but then declines sharply as the ends pass, so ridge segments may overlap somewhat. The sign of the path factor changes as ridge ends approach and pass, so the overlapping ridge ends may diverge and then converge following a hook-shaped path. The magnitudes of shear stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of maximum shear planes between adjacent ridge segments were calculated to study transform faulting. For different loading conditions simulating ridge push, plate pull, and ridge suction, a zone of intense mechanical interaction between adjacent ridge ends in which stresses are concentrated was identified. The magnitudes of mean stresses in the plane of the plate and orientations of principal stress planes were also calculated.

  18. The linguistic milieu of Norwegian children with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Arnesen, Knut; Enerstvedt, Regi T; Engen, Elizabeth A; Engen, Trygg; Høie, Grete; Vonen, Arnfinn M

    2008-01-01

    The article is based on a national survey in Norway of the linguistic situation of deaf children. Parents, teachers, and children were asked to make judgments on topics related to the children's language milieu at home and at school by means of detailed questions using two response methods: a language inventory and rating scales. The inventory is more detailed than those in other studies and required all three groups to consider not only the use of the two native languages, Norwegian and Norwegian Sign Language, but other forms combining sign and speech. The data revealed that languages used with the children included both native languages as well as various mixtures depending on context, situation, and the nature and purpose of the communication. The results are considered from the perspective of the amount and quality of language input and intake necessary for language acquisition and literacy. PMID:18619070

  19. Hospital outbreak traced to a case of Norwegian scabies.

    PubMed

    Bannatyne, R M; Patterson, T A; Wells, B A; MacMillan, S A; Cunningham, G A; Tellier, R

    1992-01-01

    A hospital outbreak, traced to a case of Norwegian scabies, resulted in 45 and 32 symptomatic cases in staff and patients, respectively. A total of 228 asymptomatic in-patient contacts and over 500 staff required prophylactic treatment with either 1% gamma benzene hexachloride lotion or 5% permethrin cream. Recurrences occurred in seven staff members and five patients. The outbreak was contained within four months.

  20. Norwegian production to grow, but exploration is in a slump

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-21

    Exploration and production in Norwegian waters are moving in opposite directions. Oil production will rise over the next 3 years as new projects come on stream. Two major gas projects will also help gas output to recover from a downturn expected in the early 1990s. But exploration is depressed, with only seven rigs involved in exploration and appraisal work. The article is divided into the following areas: Heidrun poser; Sleipner/troll; other development work; exploration successes.

  1. A long-term perspective on Norwegian energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Schipper, L.; Howarth, R.; Wilson, D.

    1990-05-01

    Norway is the home country of the leader of Brundtland Commission, which recommended that nations reduce their energy use through increased energy efficiency. In order to better understand the potential for such a reduction in Norway, the Norwegian Oil and Energy Department, along with Oslo Lysvaerker, asked the International Energy Studies Group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze the changes in the level and structure of Norwegian energy demand that have developed since 1950. The long time horizon of our analysis allowed us to examine the evolution of the energy use of each major sector of the economy. The results of our analysis show that energy efficiency has not improved as much in Norway as in other countries since 1973. Two factors lie behind this finding. First, electricity and wood have been cheap and abundant in Norway, and oil, although priced for international markets, has not been perceived as a scarce fuel. Indeed, the burgeoning revenues from the oil sector provided Norwegians with access to more cars and more travel, larger and more comfortable homes, and other amenities so that energy use increased even after 1973 while the citizens of other nations were cutting back on energy use. The second, more subtle factor, is that the use of energy in Norway reached maturity only quite recently, as the ownership of the principal energy-using equipment of each sector began to approach saturation. The maturation of energy demand in Norway implies that the significant potential for energy resource conservation can now be exploited. If energy prices should rise significantly in Norway, we expect that the energy efficiency of the Norwegian economy could improve dramatically in the future. 39 refs., 37 figs.

  2. Joint probability of extreme waves and currents on Norwegian shelf--

    SciTech Connect

    Heideman, J.C. ); Hagen, O. )

    1989-07-01

    Simultaneous wave and current measurements on the Norwegian Shelf were used to estimate the appropriate current to associate with extreme waves in platform design. The primary data consisted of seven years of measurements at Tromsoflaket (71{degrees}30'N, 19{degrees}E, 230 m depth), including 38 storms with peak significant wave heights above 7 m. The maximum wave height and maximum current occurred simultaneously in only one of the 38 storms. The wave and current time-series data were used to calculate the time series of drag load on a simple structure and statistics of wave height and drag load were developed. The data showed that the in-line current that must be added to extreme waves in order to preserve the extreme loads approaches 25 cm/s asymptotically as storm severity increases. Sensitivity studies suggest that this limit is largely insensitive to reasonable variations in current profile, wave kinematics theory, structure geometry, tidal current removal, length of data base, or site location. These results show that the current specified by Norwegian regulatory authorities is conservative, and provide a basis for reducing the design hydrodynamic loads on drag-dominated offshore structures on the Norwegian shelf.

  3. Comparison of Ridges on Triton and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Pappalardo, R. .

    2003-01-01

    Triton and Europa each display a variety of ridges and associated troughs. The resemblance of double ridges on these two satellites has been previously noted [R. Kirk, pers. comm.], but as yet, the similarities and differences between these feature types have not been examined in any detail. Triton s ridges, and Europa s, exhibit an evolutionary sequence ranging from isolated troughs, through doublet ridges, to complex ridge swaths [1, 2]. Comparison of ridges on Europa to those on Triton may provide insight into their formation on both satellites, and thereby have implications for the satellites' histories.

  4. The Ridge, the Glasma and Flow

    SciTech Connect

    McLerran,L.

    2008-09-15

    I discuss the ridge phenomena observed in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. I argue that the ridge may be due to flux tubes formed from the Color Glass Condensate in the early Glasma phase of matter produced in such collisions.

  5. Oak Ridge callibration recall program

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, K.G.; Wright, W.E.; Pritchard, E.W.

    1996-12-31

    A development effort was initiated within the Oak Ridge metrology community to address the need for a more versatile and user friendly tracking database that could be used across the Oak Ridge complex. This database, which became known as the Oak Ridge Calibration Recall Program (ORCRP), needed to be diverse enough for use by all three Oak Ridge facilities, as well as the seven calibration organizations that support them. Various practical functions drove the initial design of the program: (1) accessible by any user at any site through a multi-user interface, (2) real-time database that was able to automatically generate e-mail notices of due and overdue measuring and test equipment, (3) large memory storage capacity, and (4) extremely fast data access times. In addition, the program needed to generate reports on items such as instrument turnaround time, workload projections, and laboratory efficiency. Finally, the program should allow the calibration intervals to be modified, based on historical data. The developed program meets all of the stated requirements and is accessible over a network of computers running Microsoft Windows software.

  6. Ridge Regression for Interactive Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory study of the value of ridge regression for interactive models is reported. Assuming that the linear terms in a simple interactive model are centered to eliminate non-essential multicollinearity, a variety of common models, representing both ordinal and disordinal interactions, are shown to have "orientations" that are favorable to…

  7. From Digital Divides to Digital Inequality -- The Emerging Digital Inequality in the Norwegian Unitarian School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumsvik, Rune J.

    2008-01-01

    This position paper highlights existing and emerging, prospective digital divides in Norwegian schools and asks whether we are now moving from traditional digital divides to digital inequality in our digitized society and schools. Despite very good technology density in Norwegian society and schools in general, there is the reason to pay attention…

  8. Infant Directed Speech in Natural Interaction--Norwegian Vowel Quantity and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englund, Kjellrun T.; Behne, Dawn M.

    2005-01-01

    An interactive face-to-face setting is used to study natural infant directed speech (IDS) compared to adult directed speech (ADS). With distinctive vowel quantity and vowel quality, Norwegian IDS was used in a natural quasi-experimental design. Six Norwegian mothers were recorded over a period of 6 months alone with their infants and in an adult…

  9. Work-Plan Heroes: Student Strategies in Lower-Secondary Norwegian Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalland, Cecilie P.; Klette, Kirsti

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how individualized teaching methods, such as the use of work plans, create new student strategies in Norwegian lower secondary classrooms. Work plans, which are frequently set up as instructional tools in Norwegian classrooms, outline different types of tasks and requirements that the students are supposed to do during a…

  10. Semantic Models of Host-Immigrant Relations in Norwegian Education Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garthus-Niegel, Kristian; Oppedal, Brit; Vike, Halvard

    2016-01-01

    Education has continuously been regarded as a vital tool in Norwegian policymakers' immigrant integration agendas. This study analyzes semantic structures substantiating the policy language of historical Norwegian immigrant education policies from their inception in 1973 until today (2013). The analysis is framed by Kronenfeld's linguistic…

  11. Cross-Validation of the Norwegian Teacher's Self-Efficacy Scale (NTSES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avanzi, Lorenzo; Miglioretti, Massimo; Velasco, Veronica; Balducci, Cristian; Vecchio, Luca; Fraccaroli, Franco; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2013-01-01

    The study assesses the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Norwegian Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale--NTSES. Multiple group confirmatory factor analysis was used to explore the measurement invariance of the scale across two countries. Analyses performed on Italian and Norwegian samples confirmed a six-factor structure of the scale…

  12. A Revised Version of the Norwegian Adaptation of the Test Anxiety Inventory in a Heterogeneous Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktedalen, Tuva; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis and Multiple Indicators, Multiple Causes (MIMIC) modeling were employed to investigate psychometric properties of a revised adaptation of the Norwegian version of the Test Anxiety Inventory (RTAIN) in a sample of 456 students. The study supported the Norwegian version as a useful inventory for measuring the components…

  13. Norway. A Guide to the Admission and Academic Placement of Norwegian Students in North American Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjogren, Clifford F.; Kerr, Lornie G.

    As part of the Projects for International Education Research, information is provided on Norwegian education and recommendations for admissions and academic placement of Norwegian students studying in U.S. colleges and universities. The overview on Norwegian education includes information on the structure of the system, the 9-year basic school,…

  14. The Norwegian Educational System, the Linguistic Diversity in the Country and the Education of Different Minority Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özerk, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    Linguistic diversity has always been and still is one of the current issues in the Norwegian educational system. Norwegian is the official language of the country, but, there have been several distinct dialects and two official written Norwegian languages in the country since 1885. One of them is "Bokmål" and the other is…

  15. Monitoring adverse events in Norwegian hospitals from 2010 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Deilkås, Ellen Tveter; Bukholm, Geir; Lindstrøm, Jonas Christoffer; Haugen, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe how adverse event (AE) rates were monitored and estimated nationally across all Norwegian hospitals from 2010 to 2013, and how they developed during the monitoring period. Monitoring was based on medical record review with Global Trigger Tool (GTT). Setting All publicly and privately owned hospitals were mandated to review randomly selected medical records to monitor AE rates. The initiative was part of the Norwegian patient safety campaign, launched by the Norwegian Ministry of Health and Care Services. It started in January 2011 and lasted until December 2013. 2010 was the baseline for the review. One of the main aims of the campaign was to reduce patient harm. Method To standardise the medical record reviews in all hospitals, GTT was chosen as a standard method. GTT teams from all hospitals reviewed 40 851 medical records randomly selected from 2 249 957 discharges from 2010 to 2013. Data were plotted in time series for local measurement and national AE rates were estimated, plotted and monitored. Results AE rates were estimated and published nationally from 2010 to 2013. Estimated AE rates in severity categories E-I decreased significantly from 16.1% in 2011 to 13.0% in 2013 (−3.1% (95% CI −5.2% to −1.1%)). Conclusions Monitoring estimated AE rates emerges as a potential element in national systems for patient safety. Estimated AE rates in the category of least severity decreased significantly during the first 2 years of the monitoring. PMID:26719311

  16. Norwegian remote sensing experiment in a marginal ice zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrelly, B.; Johannessen, J.A.; Svendsen, E.; Kloster, K.; Horjen, I.; Matzler, C.; Crawford, J.; Harrington, R.; Jones, L.; Swift, C.; Delnore, V.E.; Cavalieri, D.; Gloersen, P.; Hsiao, S.V.; Shemdin, O.H.; Thompson, T.W.; Ramseier, R.O.; Johannessen, O.M.; Campbell, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Norwegian Remote Sensing Experiment in the marginal ice zone north of Svalbard took place in fall 1979. Coordinated passive and active microwave measurements were obtained from shipborne, airborne, and satellite instruments together with in situ observations. The obtained spectra of emissivity (frequency range, 5 to 100 gigahertz) should improve identification of ice types and estimates of ice concentration. Mesoscale features along the ice edge were revealed by a 1.215-gigahertz synthetic aperture radar. Ice edge location by the Nimbus 7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer was shown to be accurate to within 10 kilometers.

  17. First oil pipeline to Norway crosses Norwegian trench

    SciTech Connect

    Johsrud, P.

    1988-05-02

    Norsk Hydro AS laid the first oil pipeline from North Sea fields to Norway last summer as part of the Oseberg transportation system. The line was hydrostatically tested last fall in preparation for start-up next year. After several appraisal wells and extensive evaluation work, the operator for the field, Norsk Hydro, presented a development plan which was approved by the Norwegian parliament in the spring of 1984. This article describes the development phases, the transportation system, and how the trench crossing was done.

  18. Seroprevalence of measles among Norwegian military conscripts in 2004.

    PubMed

    Vainio, K; Samdal, H H; Anestad, G; Skutlaberg, D H; Bransdal, K T; Mundal, R; Aaberge, I

    2007-03-01

    The study presented here was conducted in order to evaluate the impact of Norway's childhood immunization program against measles, which was implemented in 1969. In the study, the level of measles immunity was measured among 1,405 military conscripts belonging to the first childhood immunization cohorts that were offered two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine. The overall seroprevalence of measles antibodies in this cohort was 89.3%. Two commercially available antibody assays were used, and the discordance between the two assays was 10.5%. Similar levels of immunity to measles were detected in earlier studies of Norwegian conscripts belonging to different childhood immunization cohorts.

  19. Structural processes at slow-spreading ridges.

    PubMed

    Mutter, J C; Karson, J A

    1992-07-31

    Slow-spreading (<35 millimeters per year) mid-ocean ridges are dominated by segmented, asymmetric, rifted depressions like continental rifts. Fast-spreading ridges display symmetric, elevated volcanic edifices that vary in shape and size along axis. Deep earthquakes, major normal faults, and exposures of lower crustal rocks are common only along slow-spreading ridges. These contrasting features suggest that mechanical deformation is far more important in crustal formation at slow-spreading ridges than at fast-spreading ridges. New seismic images suggest that the nature and scale of segmentation of slow-spreading ridges is integral to the deformational process and not to magmatic processes that may control segmentation on fast-spreading ridges.

  20. Microwave ridged waveguide beam pickups

    SciTech Connect

    Suddeth, D.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive broad-band beam pickups are a prerequisite for improved stochastic beam cooling. The 2-4 GHz and the 4-8 GHz bands have been of particular interest for stochastic cooling applications. This report summarizes the striking results of an investigation of ridged waveguide pickups at Argonne. An upper-to-lower frequency ratio of 2.4:1 is readily obtained with a ridged waveguide as compared to 1.5:1 with a standard waveguide. Wire measurements and tests at the Argonne beam test facility indicate an approximate 20% increase in gain per unit over a stripline with comparable longitudinal spacing. Another advantage of waveguide pickups is construction simplicity. The output is easily coupled to a transmission line. Descriptions of the design, construction, and results are included in this report.

  1. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C.; Pearce, J.; Zucker, A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents brief descriptions of the following programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: The effects of pollution and climate change on forests; automation to improve the safety and efficiency of rearming battle tanks; new technologies for DNA sequencing; ORNL probes the human genome; ORNL as a supercomputer research center; paving the way to superconcrete made with polystyrene; a new look at supercritical water used in waste treatment; and small mammals as environmental monitors.

  3. Dynamic plumbing systems along the 100 km long Arctic Vestnesa Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Faverola, Andreia; Buenz, Stefan; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Mienert, Jurgen; Chand, Shyam; Johnson, Joel; Greinert, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Vestnesa is a ridge-like contour-current controlled sediment succession that lies above young oceanic crust created during the tectonic opening of Fram Strait. It is surrounded by the Molloy transform fault to the southwest, the Molloy deep to the north-west, the Knipovich oceanic ridge to the south-east, and the continental margin of Svalbard to the northeast. Although interrupted in places, a mostly continuous bottom simulating reflector (BSR), the seismic indicator for the base of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), extends for tens of kilometers from the crest of the ridge towards its northern and southern flanks. High-resolution P-Cable 2D seismic data show vertical fluid migration pathways, distributed in clusters along the 100 km long ridge, connecting the free gas system beneath the GHSZ through a 160-180 m thick hydrate stability zone to seabed pockmarks at the crest of the ridge. Among these clusters only those lying towards the easternmost end of the ridge have been documented to be periodically active in terms of present-day seafloor gas seepage. The methane release activity shows particularly well on 18 kHz echosounder data over a time period from 2008 to 2013. Gas hydrates have been recovered in shallow sediment cores (<6 mbsf) at the active seafloor seepage site. Gas analyses show heavier gases in addition to methane, as a hydrate-forming gas. Within the framework of CAGE - Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate, we are investigating the development of the plumbing systems of the Arctic Vestnesa Ridge in space and time domains. We compare the modeled base of the GHSZ for different gas compositions against the depth of the BSR in the region and discuss the elements of fluid migration systems that could explain observed lateral changes in BSR depths and the switching between active and inactive plumbing systems. The Centre of Excellence is funded by the Norwegian Research Council (grant No. 223259) over a period of ten years.

  4. Analysis of the petroleum resources of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Flertoft, I.P.; Kvadsheim, E.; Kalheim, J.E.

    1995-08-01

    The 1995 analysis of the petroleum resources of Norway is based on a play analysis. The input to the 1995 analysis is updated and refined compared with the analysis of 1993. The analysis makes a major distinction between unconfirmed play models and plays confirmed by discoveries. The unconfirmed plays have a higher risk and a greater range of uncertainty in the resource estimates compared to the confirmed plays. The effect of the unconfirmed plays on the estimates within different exploration areas is discussed. The unconfirmed play models are an important aspect of the exploration in the new exploration areas north of 62{degrees}N. The total estimate for the Norwegian Shelf is well within the estimate given in the 1993 analysis, but there are some adjustments in the relative importance of the different exploration provinces. Much emphasis is placed on incorporating historical exploration data and statistics to calibrate the play models. This includes rate of success and field size distributions of the individual play models and exploration provinces. Major confirmed plays in the North Sea have a rate of success of about 30% and show a good fit to a log normal field size distribution. Based on the log normal distribution it is possible to give prognosis for the size distribution of the undiscovered accumulation. This has made it possible to work out an economic analysis of the profitability of future exploration on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

  5. Structural evolution and petroleum potential of the Norwegian Barents Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, K.T.

    1995-08-01

    The tectonic history of the Norwegian Barents Sea has provided potential hydrocarbon traps in clastic reservoirs associated with rotated fault blocks, compressional anticlines and salt domes. Significant stratigraphic potential also resides in Paleozoic carbonates. Drilling in the Hammerfest Basin has yielded large gas discoveries in rotated fault blocks, but other trapping concepts remain relatively untested. The undrilled arm north of 74{degrees} 30 minutes N, currently being mapped by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate using exclusive seismic and geological data from shallow boreholes, represents a significant area for future exploration. Prospectivity is critically dependent on the scaling of traps following Neogene uplift of large areas of the Barents platform. The area is dominated by structural trends inherited from the Caledonian and older orogens. Carboniferous rifting established a system of half grabens and intervening highs, followed by late Permian faulting in the west which initiated regional subsidence continuing into the early Jurassic. Fault reactivation in early Triassic times triggered salt diapirism and provided structural control for the formation of Triassic shelf margins. During the late Jurassic-early Cretaceous western basins underwent tectonic subsidence, while the northeastern platform arm was subject to gentle compression. In the late Cretaceous salt was reactivated in the Nordkapp Basin and compressional structures developed west of the Loppa High. Further subsidence of the western basins was promoted by late Mesozoic and early Tertiary transtensional movements along the North Atlantic rift system. Subsequent regional compression in these basins, and basin inversion east of the Loppa High, are of post-Eocene age.

  6. Risk perception and safety in Norwegian offshore workers

    SciTech Connect

    Rundmo, T.

    1996-12-31

    The relationships between perception of risk, behavior and involvement in accidents are receiving increased attention in the offshore oil industry. How employees perceive the risk they are exposed to during the conduct of their work may contribute to an understanding of risk management and thereby to the safety of their working conditions. A self-completion questionnaire survey was carried out among employees on a representative sample of offshore oil installations in the Norwegian part of the North Sea in 1990. In 1994 a follow-up study was carried out. A total of 915 respondents replied to our questionnaire in 1990 and 1138 in 1994. The studies were financed by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate. There were significantly fewer of the personnel who felt at risk in 1994 compared to 1990 and a greater percentage of the personnel were satisfied with the safety and contingency measures and experienced job stress to a greater extent in 1990 than they did in 1994. Emotional reactions caused by potentially-hazardous risk sources were dependent on the respondents perceived controllability of the risk sources. The study also showed that there were significant positive correlations between organizational factors, safety status, perceived risk, and accidents. However, safety cannot be improved by changing risk perception. It is the factors that cause variations in risk perception as well as behavior and safety which should be the focus of safety promotion.

  7. Heteronormative consensus in the Norwegian same-sex adoption debate?

    PubMed

    Anderssen, Norman; Hellesund, Tone

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the Norwegian newspaper debate (1998-2002) on the right of homosexual couples to adopt children. It identifies two patterns of meaning within which both anti-adoption and pro-adoption sides of the debate were located: 1) the nuclear family as reference point; and 2) a focus on innate qualities. Parallell to a continuous liberalization of sexualities in Norway we seem to witness a consensus on heteronormativity in Norway on both sides of the debate as the basic axiom in public discussions on homosexuality and adoption. In this article, we explore the nature of the heteronormative arguments and the reason for their appearance in this particular debate. The two patterns of meaning reproduce a perception of lesbians and gays as either a worthy or unworthy minority. These findings may be seen as reflecting fundamental positions regarding the Norwegian modernization project, where both sides of the debate see homosexuality as a central symbol. State feminism may also have played the role of reinforcing gender categories and thereby served as an important condition of possibility for contemporary heteronormativity.

  8. Perceptions of Norwegian physiotherapy students: cultural diversity in practice.

    PubMed

    Fougner, Marit; Horntvedt, And Tone

    2012-01-01

    At the Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo University College there is a growing recognition of the need for cultural competency training among students at the bachelor programmes. At the Mensendieck-physiotherapy bachelor programme the students are engaged in leading physical activity groups for Muslim women. This qualitative study describes ethnically Norwegian students experiencing cultural diversity in practice. Twenty-two female physiotherapy students participated in the interviews; 6 students were interviewed individually by telephone, and 16 students were interviewed in person in 8 pairs. The students' framework for dealing with diversity is based on preconceived notions about Muslim women and is reflected in two particular ways. One is how the values and norms of Norwegian "ideology of sameness" are pursued by the students. The other is how the students constructed images of the women as "the others." The interview responses indicate difficulties in uniting the reality of diversity and the "need" for integration. The curriculum requires additional attention on cultural competency for health care professionals in a multicultural society. PMID:21682583

  9. Hearing status among Norwegian train drivers and train conductors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a general perception that train drivers and conductors may be at increased risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss. Aims To study job-related hearing loss among train drivers and train conductors. Methods Audiograms from train drivers and train conductors were obtained from the medical records of the occupational health service of the major Norwegian railway company. The results were compared with audiograms from an internal control group of railway workers and an external reference group of people not occupationally exposed to noise. The monaural hearing threshold level at 4kHz, the mean binaural value at 3, 4 and 6kHz and the prevalence of audiometric notches (≥25 dB at 4kHz) were used for comparison. Results Audiograms were available for 1567 drivers, 1565 conductors, 4029 railway worker controls and 15 012 people not occupationally exposed to noise. No difference in hearing level or prevalence of audiometric notches was found between study groups after adjusting for age and gender. Conclusions Norwegian train drivers and conductors have normal hearing threshold levels comparable with those in non-exposed groups. PMID:24204021

  10. Changing characteristics of arctic pressure ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, Peter; Toberg, Nick

    2012-04-01

    The advent of multibeam sonar permits us to obtain full three-dimensional maps of the underside of sea ice. In particular this enables us to distinguish the morphological characteristics of first-year (FY) and multi-year (MY) pressure ridges in a statistically valid way, whereas in the past only a small number of ridges could be mapped laboriously by drilling. In this study pressure ridge distributions from two parts of the Arctic Ocean are compared, in both the cases using mainly data collected by the submarine “Tireless” in March 2007 during two specific grid surveys, in the Beaufort Sea at about 75° N, 140° W (N of Prudhoe Bay), and north of Ellesmere Island at about 83° 20‧ N, 64° W. In the Beaufort Sea the ice was mainly FY, and later melted or broke up as this area became ice-free during the subsequent summer. N of Ellesmere Island the ice was mainly MY. Ridge depth and spacing distributions were derived for each region using the boat's upward looking sonar, combined with distributions of shapes of the ridges encountered, using the Kongsberg EM3002 multibeam sonar. The differing shapes of FY and MY ridges are consistent with two later high-resolution multibeam studies of specific ridges by AUV. FY ridges are found to fit the normal triangular shape template in cross-section (with a range of slope angles averaging 27°) with a relatively constant along-crest depth, and often a structure of small ice blocks can be distinguished. MY ridges, however, are often split into a number of independent solid, smooth blocks of large size, giving an irregular ridge profile which may be seemingly without linearity. Our hypothesis for this difference is that during its long lifetime an MY ridge is subjected to several episodes of crack opening; new cracks in the Arctic pack often run in straight lines across the ridges and undeformed ice alike. Such a crack will open somewhat before refreezing, interpolating a stretch of thin ice into the structure, and breaking up

  11. Characteristics of the Norwegian Coastal Current during Years with High Recruitment of Norwegian Spring Spawning Herring (Clupea harengus L.).

    PubMed

    Skagseth, Øystein; Slotte, Aril; Stenevik, Erling Kåre; Nash, Richard D M

    2015-01-01

    Norwegian Spring Spawning herring (NSSH) Clupea harengus L. spawn on coastal banks along the west coast of Norway. The larvae are generally transported northward in the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC) with many individuals utilizing nursery grounds in the Barents Sea. The recruitment to this stock is highly variable with a few years having exceptionally good recruitment. The principal causes of recruitment variability of this herring population have been elusive. Here we undertake an event analysis using data between 1948 and 2010 to gain insight into the physical conditions in the NCC that coincide with years of high recruitment. In contrast to a typical year when northerly upwelling winds are prominent during spring, the years with high recruitment coincide with predominantly southwesterly winds and weak upwelling in spring and summer, which lead to an enhanced northward coastal current during the larval drift period. Also in most peak recruitment years, low-salinity anomalies are observed to propagate northward during the spring and summer. It is suggested that consistent southwesterly (downwelling) winds and propagating low-salinity anomalies, both leading to an enhanced northward transport of larvae, are important factors for elevated recruitment. At the same time, these conditions stabilize the coastal waters, possibly leading to enhanced production and improved feeding potential along the drift route to Barents Sea. Further studies on the drivers of early life history mortality can now be undertaken with a better understanding of the physical conditions that prevail during years when elevated recruitment occurs in this herring stock.

  12. Characteristics of the Norwegian Coastal Current during Years with High Recruitment of Norwegian Spring Spawning Herring (Clupea harengus L.).

    PubMed

    Skagseth, Øystein; Slotte, Aril; Stenevik, Erling Kåre; Nash, Richard D M

    2015-01-01

    Norwegian Spring Spawning herring (NSSH) Clupea harengus L. spawn on coastal banks along the west coast of Norway. The larvae are generally transported northward in the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC) with many individuals utilizing nursery grounds in the Barents Sea. The recruitment to this stock is highly variable with a few years having exceptionally good recruitment. The principal causes of recruitment variability of this herring population have been elusive. Here we undertake an event analysis using data between 1948 and 2010 to gain insight into the physical conditions in the NCC that coincide with years of high recruitment. In contrast to a typical year when northerly upwelling winds are prominent during spring, the years with high recruitment coincide with predominantly southwesterly winds and weak upwelling in spring and summer, which lead to an enhanced northward coastal current during the larval drift period. Also in most peak recruitment years, low-salinity anomalies are observed to propagate northward during the spring and summer. It is suggested that consistent southwesterly (downwelling) winds and propagating low-salinity anomalies, both leading to an enhanced northward transport of larvae, are important factors for elevated recruitment. At the same time, these conditions stabilize the coastal waters, possibly leading to enhanced production and improved feeding potential along the drift route to Barents Sea. Further studies on the drivers of early life history mortality can now be undertaken with a better understanding of the physical conditions that prevail during years when elevated recruitment occurs in this herring stock. PMID:26636759

  13. Trace elements in ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, R. W.; Hubbard, N. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of the trace elements found in ocean ridge basalts. General assumptions regarding melting behavior, trace element fractionation, and alteration effects are presented. Data on the trace elements are grouped according to refractory lithophile elements, refractory siderophile elements, and volatile metals. Variations in ocean ridge basalt chemistry are noted both for regional and temporal characteristics. Ocean ridge basalts are compared to other terrestrial basalts, such as those having La/Yb ratios greater than those of chondrites, and those having La/Yb ratios less than those of chondrites. It is found that (1) as compared to solar or chondrite ratios, ocean ridge basalts have low ratios of large, highly-charged elements to smaller less highly-charged elements, (2) ocean ridge basalts exhibit low ratios of volatile to nonvolatile elements, and (3) the transition metals Cr through Zn in ocean ridge basalts are not fractionated more than a factor of 2 or 3 from the chondritic abundance ratios.

  14. The Mid-Ocean Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, K.C. ); Fox, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    The Mid-Ocean Ridge girdles the earth like the seam of a baseball. For more than 75,000 kilometers, this submerged range of razorback mountains--many higher than the greatest peaks on land--marks the restless boundary between continental plates. An analysis of this huge structure reveals a fascinating picture of how it is created by magma welling up as the plates pull apart. The paper discusses sea-floor spreading, the magma supply model, types of discontinuities, off-axis structures, small overlaps and DEVALs (slight DEViations in Axial Linearity), and aquatic life.

  15. Ridge effect and alignment phenomenon

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhtin, I. P. Managadze, A. K. Snigirev, A. M.

    2013-05-15

    It is assumed that the ridge effect observed by the CMS Collaboration in proton-proton collisions at the LHC and the phenomenon observed by the Pamir Collaboration in emulsion experiments with cosmic rays and characterized by the alignment of spots on a film is a manifestation of the same as-yet-unknown mechanism of the emergence of a coplanar structure of events. A large coplanar effect at the LHC in the region of forward rapidities is predicted on the basis of this hypothesis and an analysis of experimental data.

  16. Developing Electronic Cooperation Tools: A Case From Norwegian Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Mydske, Per Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Background Many countries aim to create electronic cooperational tools in health care, but the progress is rather slow. Objective The study aimed to uncover how the authoritys’ financing policies influence the development of electronic cooperational tools within public health care. Methods An interpretative approach was used in this study. We performed 30 semistructured interviews with vendors, policy makers, and public authorities. Additionally, we conducted an extensive documentation study and participated in 18 workshops concerning information and communication technology (ICT) in Norwegian health care. Results We found that the interorganizational communication in sectors like health care, that have undergone an independent development of their internal information infrastructure would find it difficult to create electronic services that interconnect the organizations because such connections would affect all interconnected organizations within the heterogenic structure. The organizations would, to a large extent, depend on new functionality in existing information systems. Electronic patient records play a central role in all parts of the health care sector and therefore dependence is established to the information systems and theirs vendors. The Norwegian government authorities, which run more than 80% of the Norwegian health care, have not taken extraordinary steps to compensate for this dependency–the government's political philosophy is that each health care institution should pay for further electronic patient record development. However, cooperational tools are complex due to the number of players involved and the way they are intertwined with the overall workflow. The customers are not able to buy new functionalities on the drawing table, while the electronic patient record vendors are not willing to take the economic risk in developing cooperational tools. Thus, the market mechanisms in the domain are challenged. We also found that public projects

  17. Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine and Norwegian spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, R.W. )

    1993-02-20

    Rates of monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norwegian spruce (Picea abies) have been measured at four sites in Sweden with a dynamic flow chamber technique. Forest floor emissions have been made in the pine forest with the static chamber technique. The compounds [Delta][sup 3]-carene and [alpha]-pinene were the predominant terpenes emitted from the crown and floor of the Scots pine forest. Alpha-pinene was the main terpene emitted from Norwegian spruce at the sites in southern and central Sweden, while [Delta][sup 3]-carene was predominant at the northern site. Emission rates, normalized to temperature, were seen to vary diurnally with a maximum at midday, and seasonally with maxima in early May and October, and a summer maximum in June-July. The possible dependence of the emission rate on needle growth rate and other plant-physiological processes is discussed. A higher emission rate and different relative composition of the emission was seen to occur when the vegetation was wet, as compared to dry vegetation. The emission from the pine forest floor was seen to have a composition different from that of the crown and a seasonality of the rate similar to that of the crown. The ground emission could not be explained by sources in the litter or ground vegetation alone, and it is suggested that the root system of the trees is also an emission source. The emission rate from the pine forest floor was of the order of 30% of the crown emission. The July rate of emission from the crown of Scots pine, normalized to 20[degrees]C and averaged over four sites in Sweden, was 0.8 [plus minus] 0.4 [mu]g (gdw (grams dry weight) h)[sup [minus]1], and for Norwegian spruce, 0.5 [plus minus] 0.7 [mu]g(gdw h)[sup [minus]1]. It would seem that previous regional and global estimates of hydrocarbon fluxes to the atmosphere have used emission factors which are too high for boreal coniferous forests. 52 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Horizontal Ridge Augmentation with Piezoelectric Hinge-Assisted Ridge Split Technique in the Atrophic Posterior Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Min-Sang; Lee, Ji-Hye; Lee, Sang-Woon; Cho, Lee-Ra; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Lee, You-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Onlay bone grafting, guided bone regeneration, and alveolar ridge split technique are considered reliable bone augmentation methods on the horizontally atrophic alveolar ridge. Among these techniques, alveolar ridge split procedures are technique-sensitive and difficult to perform in the posterior mandible. This case report describes successful implant placement with the use of piezoelectric hinge-assisted ridge split technique in an atrophic posterior mandible. PMID:27489822

  19. Geo-Morphological Analyses of the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorschel, B.; Schlindwein, V. S. N.; Eagles, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic Ocean and the Southwest Indian Ridge in the Southwest Indian Ocean between Africa and Antarctica are ultraslow-spreading (<20 mm yr-1) mid ocean ridges. This type of mid ocean ridge has distinct geo-morphologies that are influenced by the slow rate of plate divergence and by mantle potential temperature, which control the processes (peridotite diapirism and intersticial melt migration) by which material rises to fill the space vacated by plate divergence. These ridges are characterised by non-orthogonal spreading. Transform faults, typical of faster spreading mid ocean ridges, are far less common at ultraslow spreading mid ocean ridges. Thus in return, detailed geo-statistical analyses of the geo-morphology of ultraslow-spreading mid ocean ridges can provide valuable information towards a better understanding of these slowest of spreading ridges. We have generated high resolution bathymetric grids for the Gakkel and Southwest Indian ridges based on high resolution multibeam echosounder data from various expeditions with RV Polarstern. On the basis of these grids, geo-statistical analyses allow for an assessment of the geo-morphological elements of the ridges on various scales. The results of these analyses show that, approximately 200 km long medium-scale sections of the ridges can be characterised by the lengths and orientations of the short-scale (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres) ridges and troughs. The geomorphologies of short-scale ridges and troughs situated at the junctions between medium scale sections often exhibit a mixture of the geomorphological elements seen in the neighbouring sections. These geo-morphological patterns provide insights into the overall spreading-geometry along the Gakkel Ridge and the Southwest Indian Ridge.

  20. Norwegian words: A lexical database for clinicians and researchers.

    PubMed

    Lind, Marianne; Simonsen, Hanne Gram; Hansen, Pernille; Holm, Elisabeth; Mevik, Bjørn-Helge

    2015-04-01

    All words have properties linked to form, meaning and usage patterns which influence how easily they are accessed from the mental lexicon in language production, perception and comprehension. Examples of such properties are imageability, phonological and morphological complexity, word class, argument structure, frequency of use and age of acquisition. Due to linguistic and cultural variation the properties and the values associated with them differ across languages. Hence, for research as well as clinical purposes, language specific information on lexical properties is needed. To meet this need, an electronically searchable lexical database with more than 1600 Norwegian words coded for more than 12 different properties has been established. This article presents the content and structure of the database as well as the search options available in the interface. Finally, it briefly describes some of the ways in which the database can be used in research, clinical practice and teaching.

  1. Crusted (Norwegian) Scabies Following Systemic and Topical Corticosteroid Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janković, Aleksandar; Jovanović, Dragan; Ljubenović, Milanka

    2010-01-01

    It is a case study of a 62-yr-old female with crusted (Norwegian) scabies, which appeared during her treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroid therapy, under the diagnosis of erythroderma. In the same time, the patient had been suffered from hypothyoidism, and her skin changes were misdiagnosed, because it was thought that they are associated with her endocrine disorder. Suddenly, beside the erythema, her skin became hyperkeratotic, with widespread scaling over the trunk and limbs, and crusted lesions appeared on her scalp and ears. The microscopic examination of the skin scales with potassium hydroxide demonstrated numerous scabies mites and eggs. Repeated topical treatments with lindan, benzoyl benzoat and 10% precipitated sulphur ointment led to the complete resolution of her skin condition. PMID:20052371

  2. Personality types and risky health behaviors in Norwegian students.

    PubMed

    Vollrath, Margarete E; Torgersen, Svenn

    2008-06-01

    Typological research has received increasing interest in recent years, but is still regarded as substandard by personality psychologists. The current investigation shows how a typological approach can enhance our understanding of the influence of personality on risky health behaviors. We focused on Torgersen's eight personality types that represent unique configurations of high and low Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Constraint (Vollrath & Torgersen, 2000). Participants were 606 Norwegian university students. Measures assessed personality factors, smoking, abuse of drugs and alcohol, drunk driving, and risky sexual behaviors. Results replicated earlier research showing that types combining either high Extraversion and low Constraint (Hedonists, Impulsives) or high Neuroticism and low Constraint (Insecures) engage in more risky health behaviors. The discussion focuses on demonstrating that the study of types is a valuable supplement to the dimensional tradition in personality psychology.

  3. Antecedent reactivation by surface and deep anaphora in Norwegian

    PubMed Central

    HESTVIK, ARILD; NORDBY, HELGE; KARLSEN, GEIR

    2005-01-01

    Anaphora are expressions in language that depend on other linguistic entities for their full meaning. They can furthermore be divided into two types according to the level of representation where they find their antecedents: Surface anaphora, which resolve their reference at the sentence representation level, and deep anaphora, which resolve their reference at the non-grammatical level of discourse representation. The linguistic theory of these two anaphor types, and recent findings about processing differences at these two levels, combine to predict that surface anaphora should show fast and immediate reactivation of their antecedents, whereas deep anaphora should have a slower time course of antecedent reaccess. These predictions were confirmed with two lexical decision task experiments with Norwegian stimuli. PMID:15842413

  4. Factors affecting indoor radon concentration in Norwegian homes

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, T.

    1995-12-31

    The indoor radon concentration may vary by more than an order of magnitude over a few days period, and often there is a significant difference in the radon level between summer and winter. The variation pattern gives important information about the source characteristics which is often needed when remedial measures are introduced. Short-term and long-term variations of the radon concentration in twenty typical Norwegian single family houses were studied in detail by continuous measurements and monthly passive measurements by nuclear track detectors. The radon measurements were correlated with meteorological data, building characteristics and information from the householders about ventilation habits. The main results of these studies will be presented in this paper.

  5. Tracing recovery from acidification in the western Norwegian Nausta watershed.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Godtfred A; Heegaard, Einar; Fjellheim, Arne; Raddum, Gunnar G

    2003-04-01

    A novel method, redundancy analysis (RDA), has been used to examine whether chemical recovery from acidification in the western Norwegian Nausta watershed produces detectable recovery within the community structure of the macro-zoobenthos. The RDA results have been compared with measures of recovery based on the changes detected using highly specialized and regionally defined biological acidity indices. We found that the beginning of biological recovery in the Nausta watershed was recognizable during the period 1989-1998. Recovery occurred in the upper reaches and in the tributaries. The multivariate approach proved to complement the acidity indices approach, and much biological information can be gained by their combined use. The RDA method is conservative, i.e. does not overestimate biological recovery, and it is not geographically constrained as are the acidity indices. We also found that seasonal climatic factors strongly influence the benthic community, and may confound the detection of the biological recovery process.

  6. [Osteoporosis. Knowledge and attitudes of the Norwegian population].

    PubMed

    Joakimsen, R M; Søgaard, A J; Tollan, A; Magnus, J H

    1996-06-30

    In March 1994, a random sample of 1,514 Norwegians aged 16-79 years were interviewed about their knowledge of osteoporosis and their attitudes towards prevention of this disease. About 85% answered correctly that osteoporosis can be prevented, but only 57% knew that it cannot be cured. Women had better knowledge of osteoporosis than men had. Two thirds of the women were positive to the use of long-term hormone replacement therapy to prevent osteoporosis. The majority of women aged 60 years or more preferred walking to other physical activities to prevent the disease. Although the data demonstrated fairly good general knowledge of osteoporosis in the population, the oldest women, those at the highest risk of developing the disease, knew less about osteoporosis than the younger women did.

  7. Sounds produced by Norwegian killer whales, Orcinus orca, during capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Parijs, Sofie M.; Leyssen, Teo; Similä, Tiu

    2004-07-01

    To date very little is still known about the acoustic behavior of Norwegian killer whales, in particular that of individual whales. In this study a unique opportunity was presented to document the sounds produced by five captured killer whales in the Vestfjord area, northern Norway. Individuals produced 14 discrete and 7 compound calls. Two call types were used both by individuals 16178 and 23365 suggesting that they may belong to the same pod. Comparisons with calls documented in Strager (1993) showed that none of the call types used by the captured individuals were present. The lack of these calls in the available literature suggests that call variability within individuals is likely to be large. This short note adds to our knowledge of the vocal repertoire of this population and demonstrates the need for further studies to provide behavioural context to these sounds.

  8. Actual leisure participation of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dolva, Anne-Stine; Kleiven, Jo; Kollstad, Marit

    2014-02-01

    This article reports the actual participation in leisure activities by a sample of Norwegian adolescents with Down syndrome aged 14. Representing a first generation to grow up in a relatively inclusive context, they live with their families, attend mainstream schools, and are part of common community life. Leisure information was obtained in individual, structured parent interviews, and added to existing longitudinal data from a project following the sample. Generally, the leisure activity may be viewed as varying along a continuum-reaching from formal, organized, and assisted activity participation outside home, to informal, self-organized, and independent participation at home. Formal leisure activities were either organized "for all" or "adapted for disabled." The adolescents' leisure appears as active and social. However, social participation largely involved parents and family, while socializing with other adolescents mainly took place within formal activities adapted for disabled. Clearly, formal and informal activities provide rather different opportunities for social encounters and assistance. PMID:24515503

  9. Bilateral juvenile renal dysplasia in a Norwegian Forest Cat.

    PubMed

    Aresu, Luca; Zanatta, Renato; Pregel, Paola; Caliari, Diego; Tursi, Massimiliano; Valenza, Federico; Tarducci, Alberto

    2009-04-01

    Renal dysplasia is defined as a condition of disorganised development of renal parenchyma due to abnormal differentiation. The case of a 5-month-old intact male Norwegian Forest Cat with a history of polyuria and polydipsia is reported. Ultrasonographic examination showed a slight enlargement of kidneys. Biochemical parameters, haematological examinations and clinical signs were compatible with chronic renal failure (CRF). Histological examination was correlated with a primary tubular disorganisation and modification of glomerular compartment. The clinical history together with the histological lesions is consistent with bilateral juvenile renal dysplasia in this cat. To our knowledge, feline renal dysplasia has been reported in fetal infections with panleukopenia virus; no reports indicate the idiopathic origin in feline dysplastic lesions.

  10. Longitudinal case-studies of developmental dyslexia in Norwegian.

    PubMed

    Nergård-Nilssen, Trude

    2006-11-01

    This study examined retrospectively the preschool cognitive and linguistic profiles and emergent literacy skills in four Norwegian dyslexic children. The aim was to identify prognostic indicators that were associated with the reading impairments observed in an earlier study of these children. In comparison to a control group of at-risk children who were normal readers at age 10, three of the four dyslexic children exhibited either stagnation or a decline in speech accuracy in the presence of a vocabulary growth spurt at age 2-3 years. Skills in phonological awareness seemed to vary inconsistently with both early speech development and emergent literacy across the four cases. Delayed development in emergent literacy turned out to be the most potent prognostic indicator of later reading disorders. The study was guided by lexical restructuring theories of dyslexia. PMID:17152341

  11. Hearing loss in the Royal Norwegian Navy: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Irgens-Hansen, Kaja; Baste, Valborg; Bråtveit, Magne; Lind, Ola; Koefoed, Vilhelm F.; Moen, Bente E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to investigate a significant threshold shift (STS) among personnel working on board the Royal Norwegian Navy's (RNoN) vessels between 2012 and 2014 and to identify possible determinants of STS. Hearing thresholds were measured by pure tone audiometry in two consecutive examinations (n = 226). STS was defined as an average change in hearing thresholds ≥ + 10 dB at 2,000 Hz, 3,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz in either ear. Determinants of STS were assessed through a questionnaire. The incidence of STS was 23.0%. Significant determinants of STS were the number of episodes of temporary threshold shifts (TTS) in the Navy, exposure to continuous loud noise during work on board, and the number of gun shots (in the Navy, hunting, and sports). This study indicated a significant association between noise exposure on board Navy vessels and development of STS. PMID:27157689

  12. Ultrastructure of Frenkelia sp. from a Norwegian lemming in Finland.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, J; Henttonen, H

    2000-04-01

    An apparently healthy Norwegian lemming (Lemmus lemmus) caught in northern Finland was observed to have a whitish body 0.5 to 1.0 mm in diameter in the external layer of the cerebral cortex. By light microscopy a highly lobulated cyst of Frenkelia sp. was observed. By transmission electron microscopy lemmus) collected in the cyst wall was seen consisting of a parasitophorous vacuolar membrane, an underlying electron-dense layer and a granular layer. The membrane was only slightly convoluted. The protrusions of the cyst wall appeared round but were often not distinctive. A very thin septum divided the interior of the cyst into compartments packed with bradyzoites and maturing zoites. The bradyzoites were elongate measuring 5-8 x 1.5-2 microm. This is the first electron microscopical study of Frenkelia sp. from L. lemmus. PMID:10813619

  13. Local school policies increase physical activity in Norwegian secondary schools

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Ellen; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Samdal, Oddrun

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The implementation of school policies to support the adoption of physical activity is one of the main strategies recommended to increase physical activity levels among this age group. However, documentation of the effect of such policies is so far limited. The purpose of this study was to explore policy-related practices to support physical activity in Norwegian secondary schools and their association with recess physical activity. Emphasis was given to examine the association between policies and physical activity, over and beyond, individual level interests and environmental factors and to examine cross-level interaction effects. This cross-sectional study was based on a nationally representative sample of Norwegian secondary schools and grade 8 students who participated in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) 2005/06 study. The final sample comprised 68 schools and 1347 students. Data were collected through questionnaires. The results showed that schools with a written policy for physical activity and schools offering organized non-curricular physical activity several times a week had a higher proportion of students reporting daily participation in recess physical activity. Multilevel logistic regression analysis demonstrated a cross-level main effect of the policy index after controlling for sex, socio-economic status, individual-level interests and the physical environment. A significant contribution of adding the policy index to the prediction of recess physical activity above that provided by the individual-level interests and the physical environment was demonstrated. The results are encouraging and give scientific support to policy documents recommending the implementation of school policies to increase physical activity. PMID:19884244

  14. Emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Skipper, M.N.

    1990-03-01

    Emergency preparedness for industry was commonly believed to be an essential responsibility on the part of management. Therefore, this study was conducted to research and accumulate information and data on emergency preparedness at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of this study was to conduct a thorough evaluation of emergency preparedness knowledge among employees to determine if they were properly informed or if they needed more training. Also, this study was conducted to provide insight to management as to what their responsibility was concerning this training. To assess employee emergency preparedness knowledge, a questionnaire was developed and administered to 100 employees at ORNL. The data was analyzed using frequencies and percentages of response and was displayed through the use of graphs within the report. 22 refs., 22 figs.

  15. Psychometric properties of a four-component Norwegian Organizational Justice Scale.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Olav Kjellevold; Myrseth, Helga; Eidhamar, Are; Hystad, Sigurd W

    2012-04-01

    Organizational justice has attracted attention as a predictor of employees' mental and physical health as well as commitment and work outcomes. The lack of a Norwegian translation of an organizational justice scale has precluded its use in Norway. Four dimensions of the organizational justice construct were examined in a Norwegian military context, including facet measures of distributional, interpersonal, and informational justice developed by Colquitt in 2001, in addition to procedural justice developed by Moorman in 1991. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a four-dimensional structure with good internal consistency. Follow-up analyses have suggested that the four dimensions were nested beneath a general, latent organizational justice factor. A positive relationship between organizational justice and self-sacrificial behavior was found, indicating satisfactory construct validity. The results demonstrate that the Norwegian Organizational Justice Scale is a reliable and construct-valid measure of organizational justice in a Norwegian setting.

  16. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Approved Maps. The appropriate maps used to determine the boundaries of the Ribbon Ridge viticultural area are the following two United States Geological Survey (USGS), 1:24,000 scale, topographical maps (7.5..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in...

  17. Cedar Ridge Camp: Using the Local Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Grayson

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 Cedar Ridge Camp opened for its first season as a traditional co-ed summer camp and year-round outdoor education and recreation centre. The mission would centre on creating a program that would encourage personal development and growth through a shared outdoor experience. Cedar Ridge's main goals were to promote the formation of close…

  18. Ridges and tidal stress on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, G.D.; Turtle, E.P.; Jaeger, W.L.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Greenberg, R.

    2004-01-01

    Sets of ridges of uncertain origin are seen in twenty-nine high-resolution Galileo images, which sample seven locales on Io. These ridges are on the order of a few kilometers in length with a spacing of about a kilometer. Within each locale, the ridges have a consistent orientation, but the orientations vary from place to place. We investigate whether these ridges could be a result of tidal flexing of Io by comparing their orientations with the peak tidal stress orientations at the same locations. We find that ridges grouped near the equator are aligned either north-south or east-west, as are the predicted principal stress orientations there. It is not clear why particular groups run north-south and others east-west. The one set of ridges observed far from the equator (52?? S) has an oblique azimuth, as do the tidal stresses at those latitudes. Therefore, all observed ridges have similar orientations to the tidal stress in their region. This correlation is consistent with the hypothesis that tidal flexing of Io plays an important role in ridge formation. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Feeding Ecology of Northeast Atlantic Mackerel, Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring and Blue Whiting in the Norwegian Sea.

    PubMed

    Bachiller, Eneko; Skaret, Georg; Nøttestad, Leif; Slotte, Aril

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring (Clupea harengus), blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) and Northeast Atlantic (NEA) mackerel (Scomber scombrus) are extremely abundant pelagic planktivores that feed in the Norwegian Sea (NS) during spring and summer. This study investigated the feeding ecology and diet composition of these commercially important fish stocks on the basis of biological data, including an extensive set of stomach samples in combination with hydrographical data, zooplankton samples and acoustic abundance data from 12 stock monitoring surveys carried out in 2005-2010. Mackerel were absent during the spring, but had generally high feeding overlap with herring in the summer, with a diet mainly based on calanoid copepods, especially Calanus finmarchicus, as well as a similar diet width. Stomach fullness in herring diminished from spring to summer and feeding incidence was lower than that of mackerel in summer. However, stomach fullness did not differ between the two species, indicating that herring maintain an equally efficient pattern of feeding as mackerel in summer, but on a diet that is less dominated by copepods and is more reliant on larger prey. Blue whiting tended to have a low dietary overlap with mackerel and herring, with larger prey such as euphausiids and amphipods dominating, and stomach fullness and feeding incidence increasing with length. For all the species, feeding incidence increased with decreasing temperature, and for mackerel so did stomach fullness, indicating that feeding activity is highest in areas associated with colder water masses. Significant annual effects on diet composition and feeding-related variables suggested that the three species are able to adapt to different food and environmental conditions. These annual effects are likely to have an important impact on the predation pressure on different plankton groups and the carrying capacity of individual systems, and emphasise the importance of regular

  20. Feeding Ecology of Northeast Atlantic Mackerel, Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring and Blue Whiting in the Norwegian Sea.

    PubMed

    Bachiller, Eneko; Skaret, Georg; Nøttestad, Leif; Slotte, Aril

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring (Clupea harengus), blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) and Northeast Atlantic (NEA) mackerel (Scomber scombrus) are extremely abundant pelagic planktivores that feed in the Norwegian Sea (NS) during spring and summer. This study investigated the feeding ecology and diet composition of these commercially important fish stocks on the basis of biological data, including an extensive set of stomach samples in combination with hydrographical data, zooplankton samples and acoustic abundance data from 12 stock monitoring surveys carried out in 2005-2010. Mackerel were absent during the spring, but had generally high feeding overlap with herring in the summer, with a diet mainly based on calanoid copepods, especially Calanus finmarchicus, as well as a similar diet width. Stomach fullness in herring diminished from spring to summer and feeding incidence was lower than that of mackerel in summer. However, stomach fullness did not differ between the two species, indicating that herring maintain an equally efficient pattern of feeding as mackerel in summer, but on a diet that is less dominated by copepods and is more reliant on larger prey. Blue whiting tended to have a low dietary overlap with mackerel and herring, with larger prey such as euphausiids and amphipods dominating, and stomach fullness and feeding incidence increasing with length. For all the species, feeding incidence increased with decreasing temperature, and for mackerel so did stomach fullness, indicating that feeding activity is highest in areas associated with colder water masses. Significant annual effects on diet composition and feeding-related variables suggested that the three species are able to adapt to different food and environmental conditions. These annual effects are likely to have an important impact on the predation pressure on different plankton groups and the carrying capacity of individual systems, and emphasise the importance of regular

  1. Feeding Ecology of Northeast Atlantic Mackerel, Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring and Blue Whiting in the Norwegian Sea

    PubMed Central

    Bachiller, Eneko; Skaret, Georg; Nøttestad, Leif; Slotte, Aril

    2016-01-01

    The Norwegian spring-spawning (NSS) herring (Clupea harengus), blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) and Northeast Atlantic (NEA) mackerel (Scomber scombrus) are extremely abundant pelagic planktivores that feed in the Norwegian Sea (NS) during spring and summer. This study investigated the feeding ecology and diet composition of these commercially important fish stocks on the basis of biological data, including an extensive set of stomach samples in combination with hydrographical data, zooplankton samples and acoustic abundance data from 12 stock monitoring surveys carried out in 2005–2010. Mackerel were absent during the spring, but had generally high feeding overlap with herring in the summer, with a diet mainly based on calanoid copepods, especially Calanus finmarchicus, as well as a similar diet width. Stomach fullness in herring diminished from spring to summer and feeding incidence was lower than that of mackerel in summer. However, stomach fullness did not differ between the two species, indicating that herring maintain an equally efficient pattern of feeding as mackerel in summer, but on a diet that is less dominated by copepods and is more reliant on larger prey. Blue whiting tended to have a low dietary overlap with mackerel and herring, with larger prey such as euphausiids and amphipods dominating, and stomach fullness and feeding incidence increasing with length. For all the species, feeding incidence increased with decreasing temperature, and for mackerel so did stomach fullness, indicating that feeding activity is highest in areas associated with colder water masses. Significant annual effects on diet composition and feeding-related variables suggested that the three species are able to adapt to different food and environmental conditions. These annual effects are likely to have an important impact on the predation pressure on different plankton groups and the carrying capacity of individual systems, and emphasise the importance of regular

  2. Transverse dune trailing ridges and vegetation succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; ‘Marisa' Martinez, M. L.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the evolution of, and vegetation succession on, a previously undescribed landform: transverse dune trailing ridges at El Farallón transgressive dunefield in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. Three-dimensional clinometer/compass and tape topographic surveys were conducted in conjunction with 1 m 2 contiguous percent cover and presence/absence vegetation survey transects at eight locations across two adjacent trailing ridges. At the study site, and elsewhere, the transverse dune trailing ridges are formed by vegetation colonization of the lateral margins of active transverse, barchanoidal transverse, and aklé or network dunes. For simplicity, all trailing ridges formed from these dune types are referred to as transverse dune trailing ridges. Because there are several transverse dunes in the dunefield, multiple trailing ridges can be formed at one time. Two adjacent trailing ridges were examined. The shortest length ridge was 70 m long, and evolving from a 2.5 m-high transverse dune, while the longer ridge was 140 m long, and evolving from an 8 m-high dune. Trailing ridge length is a proxy measure of ridge age, since the longer the ridge, the greater the length of time since initial formation. With increasing age or distance upwind, species diversity increased, as well as species horizontal extent and percent cover. In turn, the degree of bare sand decreased. Overall, the data indicate a successional trend in the vegetation presence and cover with increasing age upwind. Those species most tolerant to burial ( Croton and Palafoxia) begin the process of trailing ridge formation. Ipomoea and Canavalia are less tolerant to burial and also are typically the next colonizing species. Trachypogon does not tolerate sand burial or deposition very well and only appears after significant stabilization has taken place. The ridges display a moderately defined successional sequence in plant colonization and percentage cover with time (and upwind distance). They are

  3. Hydroforming Applications at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    bird, e.l.; ludtka, g.m.

    1999-03-10

    Hydroforming technology is a robust forming process that produces components with high precision and complexity. The goal of this paper is to present a brief description of the sheet hydroforming process with respect to the authors' experience and capabilities. Following the authors' discussion of the sheet-metal forming application, the tubular hydroforming process is described in the context of one of our technology development programs with an automotive industrial partner. After that is a summary of the tubular hydroforming advisor (expert system) development activity, which was a significant part of this overall program based on previous experience in developing a design and manufacturing support hydroforming advisor for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's weapons-component manufacturing needs. Therefore, this paper is divided into three sections: (1) Hydroforming of Stainless Steel Parts, (2) Tubular Hydroforming, and (3) Components of a Tubular Hydroforming Advisor.

  4. Manastash Ridge Observatory Autoguider Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozo, Jason; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Armstrong, John; Davila, Adrian; Johnson, Courtney; McMaster, Alex; Olinger, Kyle

    2016-06-01

    The Astronomy Undergraduate Engineering Group (AUEG) at the University of Washington has designed and manufactured a novel autoguider system for the 0.8-meter telescope at the Manastash Ridge Observatory in Ellensburg, Washington. The system uses a pickoff mirror placed in the unused optical path, directing the outer field to the guide camera via a system of axi-symmetrically rotating relay mirrors (periscope). This allows the guider to sample nearly 7 times the area that would be possible with the same fixed detector. This system adds closed loop optical feedback to the tracking capabilities of the telescope. When tuned the telescope will be capable of acheiving 0.5 arcsecond tracking or better. Dynamic focusing of the primary optical path will also be an included feature of this system. This unique guider will be a much needed upgrade to the telescope allowing for increased scientific capability.

  5. Glacial survival of the Norwegian lemming (Lemmus lemmus) in Scandinavia: inference from mitochondrial DNA variation.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, V B; Stenseth, N C

    2001-04-22

    In order to evaluate the biogeographical hypothesis that the Norwegian lemming (Lemmus lemmus) survived the last glacial period in some Scandinavian refugia, we examined variation in the nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial control region (402 base pairs (bp)) and the cytochrome b (cyt b) region (633 bp) in Norwegian and Siberian (Lemmus sibiricus) lemmings. The phylogenetic distinction and cyt b divergence estimate of 1.8% between the Norwegian and Siberian lemmings suggest that their separation pre-dated the last glaciation and imply that the Norwegian lemming is probably a relic of the Pleistocene populations from Western Europe. The star-like control region phylogeny and low mitochondrial DNA diversity in the Norwegian lemming indicate a reduction in its historical effective size followed by population expansion. The average estimate of post-bottleneck time (19-21 kyr) is close to the last glacial maximum (18-22 kyr BP). Taking these findings and the fossil records into consideration, it seems likely that, after colonization of Scandinavia in the Late Pleistocene, the Norwegian lemming suffered a reduction in its population effective size and survived the last glacial maximum in some local Scandinavian refugia, as suggested by early biogeographical work.

  6. Threshold in North Atlantic-Arctic circulation controlled by the Oligocene-Miocene subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stärz, Michael; Jokat, Wilfried; Knorr, Gregor; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Changes in high latitude ocean gateways are thought to be main drivers of Cenozoic climate evolution. However, the link between global climate changes and the early ocean gateway formation between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean (incl. the Greenland and Norwegian Seas) controlled by the subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge is poorly understood. Here, we use a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model for Oligocene-Miocene boundary conditions to address a threshold behaviour for the ventilation of the Arctic Ocean controlled by the subsidence of the Greenland-Scotland Ridge. Our model simulations reveal that a deepening of the ridge from approx. 100 to 200 metres below sea-level forces major reorganizations in the North Atlantic-Arctic circulation associated with extreme salinity and temperature changes in the Arctic Ocean. These changes are induced by an abrupt regime shift from restricted estuarine conditions to a bi-directional flow regime similar to today. Taking uncertainties in timing into account this suggests that tectonic processes, which started at the late Eocene to Oligocene controlled the climate and circulation regime of the Arctic Ocean.

  7. Crustal structures of the Boreas Basin and the Knipovich Ridge, North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Tobias; Jokat, Wilfried

    2013-06-01

    The Boreas Basin is located in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea between Northeast Greenland and Svalbard. Towards the east, it is bounded by the ultraslow mid-ocean Knipovich Ridge. Here, we present a 340-km-long seismic refraction line acquired during the expedition ARK-XXIV/3 of research vessel Polarstern in 2009, using 18 ocean bottom seismometers. It crosses the central Boreas Basin from the Knipovich Ridge to the Northeast Greenland margin. Thus, the line provides the first reliable crustal structure information of this basin. In addition, the gravity data acquired parallel to the seismic refraction line are used to calculate a 2.5-D gravity model. The P-wave velocity model shows an unusual ˜3-km-thin oceanic crust with seismic velocities less than 6.3 km s-1, indicating the absence of a significant oceanic layer 3. Mantle velocities vary between 7.5 km s-1 in the uppermost mantle and 8.0 km s-1 at approximately 15 km depth. The low velocities within the upper mantle may be explained by 13 per cent serpentinisation, which is negligible at about 15 km depth. Furthermore, the S-wave velocity model shows low Vp/Vs ratios in the mantle, indicating a highly serpentinised mantle at shallow depths. The gravity model has crustal densities between 2.3 and 2.9 g cm-3, which also point towards the absence of a significant thick oceanic layer 3. The results of our seismic refraction line and other geophysical data indicate that the entire Boreas Basin opened at ultraslow spreading rates since at least ˜28 Ma. No evidence for an extinct spreading ridge in the centre of the Boreas Basin was found.

  8. The "pressures" of being a ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeman, K.; Scott, J. L.; Barton, M.

    2015-12-01

    As part of a larger project aimed at understanding the magma plumbing systems and magmatic processes responsible for crust formation at divergent plate margins, we have begun a study of the Galapagos Spreading Center (GSC), an intermediate spreading ridge off the west coast of South America and connected to the East Pacific Rise. This ridge is of interest because it passes close to the Galapagos Islands, allowing the effects of a mantle plume on sub-ridge processes and magma plumbing systems to be examined. In addition, the effects of ridge-ridge intersection, ridge propagation, and ridge offsets by transform faults on magma evolution can be examined. Published compositional data for glasses collected along the ridge were used to calculate pressures of partial crystallization and to examine variations in magma chemistry along the ridge. To aid interpretation of the results, the ridge was divided into 12 segments based on sample distribution and the occurrence of ridge offsets. Calculated pressures for most segments range from 100 and 300 MPa, and indicate depths of partial crystallization of ~3-9 km. This suggests that accretion occurs mostly near the base of the crust. However, the range of pressures for some segments is relatively large with maximum calculated values of 500-750 MPa. For example, near the major transform fault at ~85OW, the calculated maximum pressure is 741 MPa and the average pressure is ~ 300 MPa. We consider it unlikely that the calculated high pressures represent the true pressure of partial crystallization, and suggest that the compositions of some magmas result from processes other than simple crystallization. Correlations between Pressure and MgO, between Na2O and MgO, P2O5 and K2O, and between Na8 and longitude suggest that the processes operating beneath this ridge are complex. Near the transform fault for example, MgO vs Pressure shows a negative correlation with an R2 value of 0.546. Such trends are inconsistent with magma evolution

  9. Classification of the alveolar ridge width: implant-driven treatment considerations for the horizontally deficient alveolar ridges.

    PubMed

    Tolstunov, Len

    2014-07-01

    Among many techniques advocated for the horizontally deficient alveolar ridges, ridge-split has many advantages. Here, treatment management strategies of the horizontally collapsed ridges, especially the ridge-split approach, are discussed and a clinically relevant implant-driven classification of the alveolar ridge width is proposed, with the goal to assist an operator in choosing the proper bone augmentation technique. Comparison and advantages of two commonly used techniques, ridge-split and block bone graft, are presented.

  10. The character of the glaciated Mid-Norwegian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oline Hjelstuen, Berit; Haflidason, Haflidi; Petter Sejrup, Hans

    2010-05-01

    During Pleistocene the development of the NW European continental margin was strongly controlled by the variability in ocean circulation, glaciations and sea-level changes. Repeated occurrence of shelf edge glaciations, from Ireland to Svalbard, started at Marine Isotope Stage 12 (c. 0.5 Ma). During these periods, fast moving ice streams also crossed the Mid-Norwegian continental shelf on a number of locations, and a thick prograding wedge accumulated on the continental slope. During shelf edge glaciations and in early deglaciation phases high sedimentation rates (>2000 cm/ka) existed, and glacigenic debris flows and melt water plumes were deposited. Within these depositional environments we identify three slide events. These slides have affected an area between 2900 and 12000 km2 and involved 580-2400 km3 of sediments, noting that the slide debrites left by the failure events reach a maximum thickness of c. 150 m. The failures have occurred within an area dominated by gradients less than 1 degree, and observation of long run-out distances indicate that hydroplaning was important during slide development. Gas hydrate bearing sediments are identified on the mid-Norwegian continental margin, but appears to be absent in the slide scars. Thus, dissociation of gas hydrates may have promoted conditions for the failures to occur. Within the region of gas hydrate bearing Pleistocene sediments the Nyegga Pockmark Field is observed. This field contains more than 200 pockmarks and is located at a water depth of 600-800 m. The pockmarks identified are up to 15 m deep, between 30 m and 600 m across and reach a maximum area of c. 315 000 m2. The pockmarks are sediment-empty features and are restricted to a <16.2 cal ka BP old sandy mud unit. It seems that the Nyegga Pockmark Field does not show any strong relationship neither to seabed features, sub-seabed structures nor the glacial sedimentary setting. Thus, this implies a more complex development history for the Nyegga

  11. SRTM Anaglyph: Wheeler Ridge, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Wheeler Ridge and vicinity, California, is a site of major tectonic activity, both historically and over recent geologic time. The epicenter of the 7.5 magnitude Kern County earthquake occurred here on July 21,1952, and numerous geologic and topographic features indicate rapid geologic processes. The ridge itself (upper-right center) is a geologic fold that is growing out of the southern San Joaquin Valley. A prominent 'wind gap,' now used for passage of the California aquaduct (with the aid of a pumping station), is evidence that the ridge grew faster than tranversing streams could erode down. Nearby abrupt and/or landslid mountain fronts similarly indicate a vigorous tectonic setting here, just north of the San Andreas fault. The Interstate 5 freeway can be seen crossing agricultural fields on the right and entering the very rugged and steep Grapevine Canyon toward the bottom.

    This anaglyph was generated by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary topographic map from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30 meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect

  12. The structure of mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Toomey, Douglas R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research results on the structure of midocean ridges are reviewed. The new view of ridge-axis crustal structure obtained from high-resolution seismology is reviewed, emphasizing the variation of that structure with spreading rate and along-axis at a given spreading rate. Recent results on upper mantle structure beneath ridges are examined, including variations with seafloor age, indications from anisotropy for directions of mantle flow, and long-wavelength along-axis variations in structure and their implications for lateral heterogeneity in mantle temperature and composition.

  13. Controls on melting at spreading ridges from correlated abyssal peridotite - mid-ocean ridge basalt compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regelous, Marcel; Weinzierl, Christoph G.; Haase, Karsten M.

    2016-09-01

    Variations in the volume and major element composition of basalt erupted along the global mid-ocean ridge system have been attributed to differences in mantle potential temperature, mantle composition, or plate spreading rate and lithosphere thickness. Abyssal peridotites, the residues of mantle melting beneath mid-ocean ridges, provide additional information on the melting process, which could be used to test these hypotheses. We compiled a global database of abyssal peridotite compositions averaged over the same ridge segments defined by Gale et al. (2013). In addition, we calculated the distance of each ridge segment to the nearest hotspots. We show that Cr# in spinel in abyssal peridotites is negatively correlated with Na90 in basalts from the same ridge segments on a global scale. Ridge segments that erupt basalts apparently produced by larger degrees of mantle melting are thus underlain by peridotites from which large amounts of melt have been extracted. We find that near-ridge hotspots have a more widespread influence on mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) composition and ridge depth than previously thought. However, when these hotspot-influenced ridge segments are excluded, the remaining segments show clear relationships between MORB composition, peridotite composition, and ridge depth with spreading rate. Very slow-spreading ridges (<20 mm/yr) are deeper, erupt basalts with higher Na90, Al90, K90/Ti90, and lower Fe90, Ca90/Al90, and expose peridotites with lower Cr# than intermediate and fast-spreading ridges. We show that away from hotspots, the spreading-rate dependence of the maximum degree of mantle melting inferred from Cr# in peridotites (FM) and the bulk degree of melting inferred from Na90 in basalts (FB) from the same ridge segments is unlikely to be due to variations in mantle composition. Nor can the effects of dynamic mantle upwelling or incomplete melt extraction at low spreading rates satisfactorily explain the observed compositions of abyssal

  14. Diversity and significance of mold species in Norwegian drinking water.

    PubMed

    Hageskal, Gunhild; Knutsen, Ann Kristin; Gaustad, Peter; de Hoog, G Sybren; Skaar, Ida

    2006-12-01

    In order to determine the occurrence, distribution, and significance of mold species in groundwater- and surface water-derived drinking water in Norway, molds isolated from 273 water samples were identified. Samples of raw water, treated water, and water from private homes and hospital installations were analyzed by incubation of 100-ml membrane-filtered samples on dichloran-18% glycerol agar. The total count (number of CFU per 100 ml) of fungal species and the species diversity within each sample were determined. The identification of mold species was based on morphological and molecular methods. In total, 94 mold species belonging to 30 genera were identified. The mycobiota was dominated by species of Penicillium, Trichoderma, and Aspergillus, with some of them occurring throughout the drinking water system. Several of the same species as isolated from water may have the potential to cause allergic reactions or disease in humans. Other species are common contaminants of food and beverages, and some may cause unwanted changes in the taste or smell of water. The present results indicate that the mycobiota of water should be considered when the microbiological safety and quality of drinking water are assessed. In fact, molds in drinking water should possibly be included in the Norwegian water supply and drinking water regulations.

  15. Chemical composition of milk from a herd of Norwegian goats.

    PubMed

    Brendehaug, J; Abrahamsen, R K

    1986-05-01

    The chemical composition of Norwegian bulk collected goats' milk from the University herd was analysed during one lactation period (30 weeks, 20 samples during 1983). There was considerable variation in chemical composition during the year. Fat content decreased over the first 4 months of lactation and increased during the mountain pasture period. Protein concentration decreased during the first 4 months, and then increased until the end of lactation. Lactose concentration decreased throughout lactation. Casein nitrogen (casein N) was highest at mid lactation and lowest at the beginning and end of lactation. beta-Lactoglobulin N showed the opposite trend. Citrate content showed a significantly quadratic decrease and total ash content an increase with advancing lactation. Mutual significant correlations between total P, K, Na, Ca and Mg were calculated, and all increased throughout lactation. There was significant positive correlation between concentrations of individual medium-chain fatty acids and stage of lactation. They remained more or less constant during the first part of the lactation, decreased to minima when the goats were on pasture, and increased during the last phase of lactation. Concentration of C16 fatty acid was negatively correlated with C18 and C18:1. Goat flavour intensity score and quality flavour score were highest at mid lactation, and positively correlated with the acid degree value.

  16. Perceived barriers to consumption of fish among Norwegian women.

    PubMed

    Trondsen, Torbjørn; Scholderer, Joachim; Lund, Eiliv; Eggen, Anne E

    2003-12-01

    This study aimed to characterize constraints on consumption of fish perceived by consumers in Norway. A random sample of Norwegian women aged 45-69 years answered a self-administered mail questionnaire in 1996 about eating habits, perceived barriers to fish consumption, socioeconomic status, and questions related to health. Altogether, 9407 women answered the questionnaire (response rate: 52.5%). Data were analyzed by means of logistic regression. Limited supply of fish products that satisfy children's wishes reduce at-home fish consumption. People with health problems and those who wish to lose weight are dissatisfied with the range of products offered in the marketplace. Satisfaction with quality and availability of wild lean codfish, especially in inland regions, is lower than for aqua-cultured fat salmon. Neither income nor education or health factors were significantly associated with consumption levels among those who would like to eat more fish. Higher education and income were associated with increased dissatisfaction about fish consumption, but also with reduced perception of most barriers. It is concluded that improvements in the supply of high-quality fresh and processed fish products that satisfy (a) children's wishes, (b) health-oriented family members, and (c) convenience-oriented consumers, will significantly increase at-home consumption of fish.

  17. Diversity and Significance of Mold Species in Norwegian Drinking Water▿

    PubMed Central

    Hageskal, Gunhild; Knutsen, Ann Kristin; Gaustad, Peter; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Skaar, Ida

    2006-01-01

    In order to determine the occurrence, distribution, and significance of mold species in groundwater- and surface water-derived drinking water in Norway, molds isolated from 273 water samples were identified. Samples of raw water, treated water, and water from private homes and hospital installations were analyzed by incubation of 100-ml membrane-filtered samples on dichloran-18% glycerol agar. The total count (number of CFU per 100 ml) of fungal species and the species diversity within each sample were determined. The identification of mold species was based on morphological and molecular methods. In total, 94 mold species belonging to 30 genera were identified. The mycobiota was dominated by species of Penicillium, Trichoderma, and Aspergillus, with some of them occurring throughout the drinking water system. Several of the same species as isolated from water may have the potential to cause allergic reactions or disease in humans. Other species are common contaminants of food and beverages, and some may cause unwanted changes in the taste or smell of water. The present results indicate that the mycobiota of water should be considered when the microbiological safety and quality of drinking water are assessed. In fact, molds in drinking water should possibly be included in the Norwegian water supply and drinking water regulations. PMID:17028226

  18. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding) in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients' and staff's perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward. PMID:26682211

  19. [Herman W. Major--"father" of Norwegian psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Retterstøl, N

    2000-11-30

    Herman Wedel Major (1814-54) is clearly the founding father of Norwegian psychiatry. In 1844, he submitted a proposal for an insane asylum in Norway, emphasising that insanity was a curable disease, not possession by spirits. Included with the proposal were drawings by his brother-in-law, the well-known architect Heinrich Ernst Schirmer (1815-87). The proposal was soon supported by a statement from Peter Willers Jessen (1793-1875), professor and head of Europe's first new psychiatric hospital. Gaustad Hospital was opened in 1855. In 1846, Major submitted a report on the plight of the insane in Norway, and he was the driving force in the drafting of modern legislation on insanity in Norway, the "act relating to treatment and care for the insane", passed in 1848. This was the fourth modern insanity act in Europe, following those in France (1838), Switzerland (1838) and England (1842).--A great lifetime achievement, brought to an end in 1854 when Major, then 40, and his family died in a shipwreck.

  20. Cesium-137 body burdens in Norwegian Lapps, 1965-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Westerlund, E.A.; Berthelsen, T.; Berteig, L.

    1987-02-01

    Results of measurements of the whole-body contents of /sup 137/Cs during the period 1965-1983 in Lapps from the Kautokeino area in Norway are reported with measurements of /sup 137/Cs in reindeer meat during the period 1966-1983. By using available data on /sup 137/Cs in precipitation for the period 1950-1980, transfer coefficients from /sup 137/Cs in precipitation to reindeer meat have been assessed. A correlation between the /sup 137/Cs content in reindeer meat and the /sup 137/Cs content in Lapp reindeer breeders has been established. The average whole-body committed dose equivalent, H50, to the reindeer breeders from internally deposited /sup 137/Cs from intakes up to year 2000 was assessed to 13 mSv with a peak value of 30 mSv. In comparison, the corresponding committed dose equivalent to the Norwegian population from internally deposited /sup 137/Cs has been estimated to be about 1 mSv. The higher intake of /sup 137/Cs by reindeer breeders is due to the lichen-reindeer-man exposure pathway.

  1. Tobacco use among Norwegian adolescents: from cigarettes to snus

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Willy; von Soest, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    Aims To: (i) investigate the development of smoking and snus use among Norwegian adolescents, and (ii) describe the users in each group. Design Two population-based surveys with identical procedures in 2002 (response rate 91.0%) and 2010 (response rate 84.3%). Setting Norway. Participants A total of 6217 respondents, aged 16–17 years. Measurements Data were collected on smoking and snus use, socio-demographic factors, school adjustment, social network, sport activities, alcohol and cannabis use and depression symptoms. Findings Prevalence of daily smoking fell from 23.6% in 2002 to 6.8% in 2010 (P < 0.001), while the prevalence of daily snus use increased from 4.3 to 11.9% (P < 0.001). Dual daily use of cigarettes and snus remained at 1%. The relative proportion of non-daily smokers using snus increased steeply. Both snus users and smokers reported more adverse socio-economic backgrounds, less favourable school adjustment and higher levels of alcohol intoxication and cannabis use than non-users of tobacco. However, snus users were better adjusted to school and used cannabis less often than smokers. Conclusions Adolescent smoking prevalence has fallen dramatically in Norway, accompanied by a smaller increase in snus use. Young snus users in Norway have many of the same risk factors as smokers, but to a lesser degree. PMID:24521070

  2. Distribution of pharmaceuticals--a Norwegian logistic perspective.

    PubMed

    Grund, J; Vartdal, T E

    2000-06-01

    There is a general concern about rising costs of pharmaceutical expenses. One political measure is a more efficient distribution system, which can take the form of new channels for retailing. In Norway mail-order pharmacy (MOP) has been brought to the agenda due to the recently proposed law regulating pharmacies ("Apoteklov"), market developments abroad, demand for self-medication, the increase in OTC-products and advances in information technology. Mail-order pharmacy involves direct delivery of medications through postal mail to patients or those responsible for dispensing medication. With reference to the USA, mail-order pharmacy has filled a niche in the market and several other countries are following. We are convinced that it is possible to maintain a high level of service quality in the sense of safety, counselling and compliance, and that there is a potential to develop a model for this distribution form in Norway. We believe that the actors in the Norwegian pharmaceutical market are better served in taking a more active role in this area and where possible initiating pilot projects in mail-order distribution. The pharmacists will continue to play an important role as a retail outlet and should, with their influence over patients, their knowledge and experience, contribute towards developing MOP to be a safe and complementary sales outlet. Developing such a solution demands the right balance between performance and quality on the one hand and efficiency on the other; two criteria, which we believe, do not contradict each other. PMID:11028265

  3. What do Norwegian women and men know about osteoporosis?

    PubMed

    Magnus, J H; Joakimsen, R M; Berntsen, G K; Tollan, A; Søogaard, A J

    1996-01-01

    A survey of a random sample of 1514 Norwegian women and men aged 16-79 years was undertaken to investigate knowledge of osteoporosis and attitudes towards methods for preventing this disease. The interviews were carried out by Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway as part of their monthly national poll using a structured questionnaire. Women knew more about osteoporosis than did men (p < 0.001). In both men and women increased knowledge of osteoporosis was correlated to a high level of education. Furthermore it was clearly demonstrated that knowing someone with osteoporosis or suffering from it oneself increased the knowledge of osteoporosis significantly in both women and men. Multiple regression analysis confirmed the univariate analyses, and education was the strongest predictive factor for knowledge. To a hypothetical question as many as two-thirds of the women answered that they would use long-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to prevent osteoporosis on the recommendation of their general practitioner. Their attitudes towards the use of estrogen therapy did not show any significant relation to age, but their reluctance towards HRT increased with education (p < 0.001). When asked a question about their preferences regarding the use of physical activity as a means to prevent osteoporosis, older women preferred walking (p < 0.001), whereas younger women wanted more organized athletic activity (p < 0.001). The data demonstrated that there was a high degree of general knowledge of osteoporosis and its consequences in the general population.

  4. [Attendance in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme].

    PubMed

    Sebuødegård, Sofie; Sagstad, Silje; Hofvind, Solveig

    2016-09-01

    BACKGROUND A high rate of attendance among women invited to the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Programme (NBCSP) is essential to achieve optimal effect, including reduction in breast cancer mortality. This article describes attendance in the programme by county, period and women's age at invitation.MATERIAL AND METHOD All women in the age group 50 - 69 years who are registered in the National Population Register are invited to attend the NBCSP every second year. In the study period 2007 - 2014, 2 142 369 invitations were sent, and 1 600 293 screening examinations were performed for 710 169 women. Use of the data is pursuant to the Cancer Registry Regulations.RESULTS Altogether 84 % of the women invited attended at least once in the study period. The average attendance rate per screening round was 75 %. In Rogaland, Nordland and Sogn og Fjordane counties more than 80 % attended, while in Oslo the figure was 62 %. The highest rate of attendance recorded was for women in the age group 62 - 67 years. The attendance in the prior screening round was of influence for reattendance.INTERPRETATION The mammography screening programme has a high level of acceptance among women in the target group. Possible reasons for the variation in attendance among the county districts should be identified. PMID:27686204

  5. Social Variations in Perceived Parenting Styles among Norwegian Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Elstad, Jon Ivar; Stefansen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has documented the associations between parenting and parenting styles and child and adolescent outcomes. Little is known, however, about the social structuring of parenting in contemporary Nordic welfare states. A possible hypothesis is that socioeconomic variations in parenting styles in present-day Norway will be small because of material affluence, limited income inequality, and an active welfare state. This study examines social variations in parenting as perceived by Norwegian adolescents (N = 1362), with a focus on four parenting style dimensions: responsiveness, demandingness, neglecting, and intrusive. Responsiveness seems to capture major divisions in parenting. Adolescents in families with fewer economic resources experienced their parents as somewhat less responsive, but responsiveness was not related to parents' education. Low parental education was on the other hand associated with perceptions of parents as neglecting and intrusive. Viewing parents as demanding did neither vary with parental education nor with family economy. Substantial variations in parenting styles persist in present-day Norway, and these variations correspond moderately with the families' placement in the social structure. Indicators of parenting and parenting styles may be useful indicators of some aspects of child and adolescent well-being.

  6. Employee experience of structural change in two Norwegian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Roald, J; Edgren, L

    2001-01-01

    Advances in medical and technological procedures, together with changes in demography, demand structural changes in the Nordic health care systems. Few studies have focused on employee perceptions of these structural changes. This study aims to describe employee reactions following a merger between two Norwegian hospitals. A Grounded theory approach has been used in this study. The theoretical model is based on empirical data collected from employees directly affected by the structural change process. Employee resistance was found to be the core category. Three categories were found in relation to this core category; goal uncertainty, organizational culture and individual insecurity. Different perceptions and interpretations of vaguely formulated goals lead to employee resistance. The difference between the organizational cultures in the two hospitals impeded the merger according to the project plan, and very few positive results could be seen. Individual insecurity regarding the future was experienced in connection with the implementation of structural change. The authors propose a strategy to counteract resistance in similar mergers. PMID:11771150

  7. Integrated exploration study of Norwegian-Danish basin, northwestern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen, N.B.; Haselton, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    The Norwegian-Danish basin (NDB) extends from offshore Norway southeast through Denmark. This study, initiated by the Danish Energy Agency to evaluate hydrocarbon potential, consists of geophysical structural and stratigraphic mapping combined with geologic source rock and reservoir analysis. Approximately 25 wells and 15,000 km of seismic data were included. Formation of the NDB resulted from uplift of the Variscan foldbelt followed by subsidence of the foreland, i.e., the NDB and the North German basin. The Ringkoebing-Fyn High, a positive feature probably established in the late Precambrian and persisting to present, separates the basins, thus constituting the southern boundary of the NDB. Northeast the basin is bounded by the Fennoscandian shield and to the west by the North Sea graben system. Following deposition of Rotliegendes eolian and fluviatile sandstones, a major Late Permian marine transgression deposited up to 2000 m of evaporites and carbonates. Early Triassic regression resulted in thick red-bed deposits. Halokinesis commencing in the Upper Triassic dominated subsequent structural development. Continued subsidence led to deposition of Early Jurassic shelf mudstones overlain by deltaic sandstones. Rising seas during Late Cretaceous allowed widespread deposition of oceanic pelagic chalk. Early Paleocene wrench movements produced inversion. Basinal downwarping during the Tertiary was accompanied by progradation from the northeast. The complex tectonic history provides numerous different structural styles and a variety of depositional environments. To date only obvious structural features have been tested. This integrated basin study demonstrates that a number of other hydrocarbon plays remain to be explored.

  8. New technology is needed to develop Norwegian trench find

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, C.E.

    1983-01-01

    A/S NORSKE SHELL has found super giant reserves of oil and gas in Block 31/2 and adjacent blocks in the Norwegian North Sea. But development of the discovery poses staggering problems--the field lies in more than 1,000 ft of water in an area noted for violent weather. Even though conventional technology will be used wherever possible, Block 31/2 development involves severe technical and financial risk. Because of the areal extent of the reservoir and constraints on directional drilling, both template and satellite wells will be used. The choice between wireline and through flowline (TFL) servicing has not been finalized, but TFL completions seem to offer better flexibility. The choice of control systems is between the reliability inherent in completely hydraulic systems or the quick response time of electro-hydraulic controls. Underwater connections will be made without the aid of divers, possibly by using a surface-controlled sled, patterned after the one developed for the Shell Expro Cormorant UMC system. This two-part series is operator A/S Norske Shell's first official word on development of the field. Part 1 focuses upon fundamental decisions involving well location and subsea equipment. Part 2, which will be published next month, examines deepwater platform technology.

  9. Periodic bedrock ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David R.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Becker, Scott K.

    2012-03-01

    Evidence for sediment transport and erosion by wind is widespread over the surface of Mars today and was likely a major geomorphic process for much of its geological past. Although Martian surface features resembling aeolian dunes and ripples have been recognized since the Mariner and Viking missions, such features have been interpreted previously as active, indurated, or exhumed sedimentary forms. Here we report evidence based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images that show some megaripple forms are eroded into cohesive substrate rather than being composed of loose granular material or fossilized dunes. Exposure of stratigraphic continuity within layered, cohesive material extending crest to trough through features with mean wavelengths of 18 to 51 m demonstrates the primarily erosional formation of what we term periodic bedrock ridges (PBRs). Hence some surfaces on Mars previously considered to be covered by wind-deposited material are actually wind-carved exposures that offer windows into Martian history. PBRs lack the distinctive streamlining associated with wind-parallel yardangs and comparison of PBR orientation to yardangs, megayardangs, and active sedimentary dunes in the same vicinity confirm that these PBRs formed transverse to prevailing winds. Observed wavelengths of PBRs are comparable to those predicted by a simple model for erosional wavelengths of periodic transverse bed forms owing to the spacing of flow separations within the flow. Recognition of these transverse aeolian erosional forms brings up the question of how widespread Martian PBRs are and how many have been misinterpreted as active or indurated (fossilized) sedimentary dunes.

  10. Carlsberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Comparison of slow spreading centre analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Bramley J.; Rona, Peter A.

    2015-11-01

    Eighty per cent of all mid-ocean spreading centres are slow. Using a mixture of global bathymetry data and ship-board multibeam echosounder data, we explore the morphology of global mid-ocean ridges and compare two slow spreading analogues: the Carlsberg Ridge in the north-west Indian Ocean between 57°E and 60°E, and the Kane to Atlantis super-segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 21°N and 31°N. At a global scale, mid-ocean spreading centres show an inverse correlation between segment length and spreading rate with segmentation frequency. Within this context, both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge are similar: spreading at 22 and 26 mm/yr full rates respectively, being devoid of major transform faults, and being segmented by dextral, non-transform, second-order discontinuities. For these and other slow spreading ridges, we show that segmentation frequency varies inversely with flank height and ridge axis depth. Segments on both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge range in aspect ratio (ridge flank height/axis width), depth and symmetry. Segments with high aspect ratios and deeper axial floors often have asymmetric rift flanks and are associated with indicators of lower degrees of melt flux. Segments with low aspect ratios have shallower axial floors, symmetric rift flanks, and evidence of robust melt supply. The relationship between segmentation, spreading rate, ridge depth and morphology, at both a global and local scale, is evidence that rates of melting of the underlying mantle and melt delivery to the crust play a significant role in determining the structure and morphology of slow spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  11. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  12. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  13. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  14. 27 CFR 9.182 - Ribbon Ridge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Oregon, 1956, revised 1993. (c) Boundary. The Ribbon Ridge viticultural area is located in northern... Quadrangle map at the intersection of a light-duty road known locally as Albertson Road and Dopp Road...

  15. Stratigraphic evolution of Blake Outer Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Markl, R.G.; Bryan, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Multichannel seismic data from a reconnaissance survey of the Blake Outer Ridge reveal the seismic stratigraphy down to oceanic basement, as well as intracrustal and mantle reflections. The depositional history of the outer ridge can now be subdivided into four principal phases, based on seismic stratigraphic style: (1) Jurassic-Early Cretaceous sedimentation which filled in basement irregularities and leveled the sea floor by horizon ..beta.. (Barremian) time, (2) Early Cretaceous-Late Cretaceous deposition of a seaward-thinning wedge typical of Atlantic-type margins; its deeply eroded surface is probably equivalent to the Late Cretaceous-Miocene hiatus reflected by horizon A'', (3) earlies Miocene current-controlled deposits preferentially deposited along the axis of the incipient Blake Outer Ridge; these prograding strata, which thin and dip downridge and laterally away from the ridge axis, are attributed to the interaction of the Florida Current and Western Boundary Undercurrent, and (4) continuing early Miocene preferential deposition on the ridge axis and sculpting by the Western Boundary Undercurrent; this phase is characterized by strata thinning and dipping upridge and toward the ridge axis. The reversal of dip is explained to a first approximation by a steady-state contour-current model in which the current position is progressively shifted by the deposition. Five angular unconformities and associated bathymetric terraces west of the ridge crest are mapped using all Lamont-Doherty seismic data and interpreted as having formed penecontemporaneously during phase four. The areal extent of the gas hydrate (clathrate) horizon is also delineated; it is continuous across the northern Blake Outer Ridge, and the multichannel seismic data presented here show it to extend onto the shallow Blake Plateau as well.

  16. Dark and Bright Ridges on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This high-resolution image of Jupiter's moon Europa, taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft camera, shows dark, relatively smooth region at the lower right hand corner of the image which may be a place where warm ice has welled up from below. The region is approximately 30 square kilometers in area. An isolated bright hill stands within it. The image also shows two prominent ridges which have different characteristics; youngest ridge runs from left to top right and is about 5 kilometers in width (about 3.1 miles). The ridge has two bright, raised rims and a central valley. The rims of the ridge are rough in texture. The inner and outer walls show bright and dark debris streaming downslope, some of it forming broad fans. This ridge overlies and therefore must be younger than a second ridge running from top to bottom on the left side of the image. This dark 2 km wide ridge is relatively flat, and has smaller-scale ridges and troughs along its length.

    North is to the top of the picture, and the sun illuminates the surface from the upper left. This image, centered at approximately 14 degrees south latitude and 194 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 15 kilometers by 20 kilometers (9 miles by 12 miles). The resolution is 26 meters (85 feet) per picture element. This image was taken on December 16, 1997 at a range of 1300 kilometers (800 miles) by Galileo's solid state imaging system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  17. Realization of Ridge Regression in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, S.; Kovacheva, S.; Prodanova, K.

    2008-10-01

    The least square estimator (LSE) of the coefficients in the classical linear regression models is unbiased. In the case of multicollinearity of the vectors of design matrix, LSE has very big variance, i.e., the estimator is unstable. A more stable estimator (but biased) can be constructed using ridge-estimator (RE). In this paper the basic methods of obtaining of Ridge-estimators and numerical procedures of its realization in MATLAB are considered. An application to Pharmacokinetics problem is considered.

  18. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    PubMed

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching. PMID:23313600

  19. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R.

    1990-10-01

    This two-volume report, the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Report for 1989, is the nineteenth in an annual series that began in 1971. It reports the results of a comprehensive, year-round program to monitor the impact of operations at the three major US Department of Energy (DOE) production and research installations in Oak Ridge on the immediate areas' and surrounding region's groundwater and surface waters, soil, air quality, vegetation and wildlife, and through these multiple and varied pathways, the resident human population. Information is presented for the environmental monitoring Quality Assurance (QA) Program, audits and reviews, waste management activities, land special environmental studies. Data are included for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). Volume 1 presents narratives, summaries, and conclusions based on environmental monitoring at the three DOE installations and in the surrounding environs during calendar year (CY) 1989. Volume 1 is intended to be a stand-alone'' report about the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for the reader who does not want an in-depth review of 1989 data. Volume 2 presents the detailed data from which these conclusions have been drawn and should be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  20. The East Greenland Ridge - a continental sliver along the Greenland Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlings, Joanna; Funck, Thomas; Castro, Carlos F.; Hopper, John R.

    2014-05-01

    The East Greenland Ridge (EGR), situated along the Greenland Fracture Zone in the northern part of the Greenland-Norwegian Sea, is a NW-SE trending 250-km-long and up to 50-km-wide bathymetric high that separates the Greenland Basin in the south from the Boreas Basin in the north. Previous seismic work established that the EGR is primarily continental in nature. Detailed swath bathymetric data revealed a complex internal structure of the ridge with two main overstepping ridge segments. These segments were not adequately covered by the GEUS2002NEG seismic survey as the detailed structure was not known at that time. The crustal affinity of the northwestern, landward-most ridge segment, and how it is attached to the Northeast Greenland continental shelf, remained unclear. The GEUS-EAGER2011 survey was designed to address these issues and to provide further constraints on the structural development of the EGR. During the GEUS-EAGER2011 survey, additional seismic refraction and reflection data were acquired on the EGR and the Northeast Greenland shelf. The data set consists of two strike lines covering the seaward-most part of the Northeast Greenland shelf and the landward-most part of the EGR, and one cross line extending from the Boreas Basin, across the ridge and into the Greenland Basin. A total of 15 ocean bottom seismometers and 46 sonobuoys were deployed along the three seismic refraction lines. P-wave velocity models for the crust and upper mantle were derived by forward and inverse modelling of the travel times of the observed seismic phases using the raytracing algorithm RAYINVR. Seismic reflection data, coinciding with the seismic refraction data were used to guide the modelling of the sedimentary layers down to basement. The velocity models confirm that the crust has a continental nature along both ridge segments with a velocity structure that significantly differs from that of normal oceanic crust. The models also show that the crust of the EGR is linked to

  1. Young People and the European Dimension in a Norwegian Context. Migration and National Critical Events as Challenges to Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeie, Geir

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses the "European dimension" in a Norwegian context with focus on the relevance for young people in particular. Against a backdrop of literature discussing Norwegian majority self-understanding in relation to Europe, the article discusses some examples that are relevant for addressing the overall theme, namely recent…

  2. Goals, Outcomes, and Future Challenges for People with Intellectual Disabilities in a Noninstitutional Society: The Norwegian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The Norwegian Welfare System and how its programs support Norwegians with intellectual and developmental disabilities is described and proffered as a case example of how one nation's public policy shifted to provide community-invested services for people with lifelong disabilities. The foundation of Norway's shift to complete reliance on home and…

  3. Assessment Procedures of Norwegian PhD Theses as Viewed by Examiners from the USA, the UK and Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the assessment procedures of Norwegian PhD theses as viewed by external members of evaluation committees from three countries with different examination systems; the USA, the UK and Sweden. Their viewpoints give useful information not only on the pros and cons with the Norwegian system, but also on the strengths and…

  4. "Glocality" in Play: Efforts and Dilemmas in Changing the Model of the Teacher for the Norwegian National Framework for Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ødegaard, Elin Eriksen

    2016-01-01

    Norwegian society is becoming increasingly heterogeneous. In order to meet challenges and provide conditions for high quality kindergartens "The National Kindergarten Act" and the "Norwegian Framework Plan for Kindergartens" are under revision (period 2013 to 2016). A central challenge of this is how to formulate ideas that…

  5. Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey.

    PubMed

    Størmer, Carl Christian Lein; Laukli, Einar; Høydal, Erik Harry; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of TromsØ. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians. PMID:26572701

  6. Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey.

    PubMed

    Størmer, Carl Christian Lein; Laukli, Einar; Høydal, Erik Harry; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of TromsØ. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians.

  7. Hearing loss and tinnitus in rock musicians: A Norwegian survey

    PubMed Central

    Størmer, Carl Christian Lein; Laukli, Einar; Høydal, Erik Harry; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    Our focus in this study was to assess hearing thresholds and the prevalence and characteristics of tinnitus in a large group of rock musicians based in Norway. A further objective was to assess related factors such as exposure, instrument category, and the preventive effect of hearing protection. The study was a cross-sectional survey of rock musicians selected at random from a defined cohort of musicians. A random control group was included for comparison. We recruited 111 active musicians from the Oslo region, and a control group of 40 nonmusicians from the student population at the University of Tromsø. The subjects were investigated using clinical examination, pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and a questionnaire. We observed a hearing loss in 37.8% of the rock musicians. Significantly poorer hearing thresholds were seen at most pure-tone frequencies in musicians than controls, with the most pronounced threshold shift at 6 kHz. The use of hearing protection, in particular custom-fitted earplugs, has a preventive effect but a minority of rock musicians apply them consistently. The degree of musical performance exposure was inversely related to the degree of hearing loss in our sample. Bass and guitar players had higher hearing thresholds than vocalists. We observed a 20% prevalence of chronic tinnitus but none of the affected musicians had severe tinnitus symptomatology. There was no statistical association between permanent tinnitus and hearing loss in our sample. We observed an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus in our sample of Norwegian rock musicians but the causal relationship between musical exposure and hearing loss or tinnitus is ambiguous. We recommend the use of hearing protection in rock musicians. PMID:26572701

  8. Bacteriological Investigation of Infectious Keratoconjunctivitis in Norwegian Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Åkerstedt, J; Hofshagen, M

    2004-01-01

    Contagious keratoconjunctivitis is a rather common disease in Norwegian sheep. Since the knowledge of its aetiology is limited, the present study was performed to determine the microorganisms involved. Local veterinarians throughout the country collected conjunctival swabs from both sick (n = 43) and healthy (n = 42) sheep on 15 farms with outbreaks of ovine keratoconjunctivitis, and further from healthy sheep (n = 50) on 17 farms not showing any signs of conjunctival disease. All samples were cultivated for bacteria and mycoplasma. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from 3 cases (1%) in one single herd. Staphylococcus aureus (5%), Corynebacterium spp. (2%) and Escherichia coli (4%) were isolated only in herds with keratoconjunctivitis, but from both sick and healthy animals. Moraxella (Branhamella) ovis was isolated from 28% of sampled animals in affected herds and from 10% of sampled animals in healthy herds. The corresponding numbers for Moraxella spp. were 9%/12%, for Pseudomonas spp. 7%/8%, for Staphylococcus spp. 22%/22%, for Bacillus spp. 12%/14%, for Micrococcus spp. 6%/2% and for Streptococcus/Enterococcus spp. 2%/2%. Mycoplasma conjunctivae was isolated from 16 animals with keratoconjunctivitis (37%) and from 3 animals without clinical signs (7%) in farms with keratoconjunctivitis. In farms without clinical signs of keratoconjunctivitis, M. conjunctivae was isolated in 4 animals (8%). To our knowledge, this is the first time M. conjunctivae has been isolated in Norway. Other predisposing agents found were Moraxella (Branhamella) ovis and Listeria monocytogenes. The etiological importance of different microorganisms in ovine keratoconjunctivitis seems to vary; some are probably only present as secondary invaders. Other possible causes of ovine keratoconjunctivitis in Norway, such as Chlamydia psittaci, remain to be investigated. PMID:15535083

  9. Norwegian farmers ceasing certified organic production: characteristics and reasons.

    PubMed

    Flaten, Ola; Lien, Gudbrand; Koesling, Matthias; Løes, Anne-Kristin

    2010-12-01

    This article examines the characteristics of and reasons for Norwegian farmers' ceasing or planning to cease certified organic production. We gathered cross-sectional survey data in late 2007 from organic farmers deregistering between January 2004 and September 2007 (n=220), and similar data from a random sample of farmers with certified organic management in 2006 (n=407). Of the respondents deregistering by November 2007, 17% had quit farming altogether, 61% now farmed conventionally, and 21% were still farming by organic principles, but without certification. Nearly one in four organic farmers in 2007 indicated that they planned to cease certification within the next 5-10 years. From the two survey samples, we categorised farmers who expect to be deregistered in 5-10 years into three groups: conventional practices (n=139), continuing to farm using organic principles (uncertified organic deregistrants, n=105), and stopped farming (n=33). Of the numerous differences among these groups, two were most striking: the superior sales of uncertified organic deregistrants through consumer-direct marketing and the lowest shares of organic land among conventional deregistrants. We summarised a large number of reasons for deregistering into five factors through factor analysis: economics, regulations, knowledge-exchange, production, and market access. Items relating to economics and regulations were the primary reasons offered for opting out. The regression analysis showed that the various factors were associated with several explanatory variables. Regulations, for example, figured more highly among livestock farmers than crop farmers. The economic factor strongly reflected just a few years of organic management. Policy recommendations for reducing the number of dropouts are to focus on economics, environmental attitudes, and the regulatory issues surrounding certified organic production. PMID:20702020

  10. Urinary Biomarkers for Phthalates Associated with Asthma in Norwegian Children

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, Karin C. Lødrup; Calafat, Antonia M.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Håland, Geir; Mowinckel, Petter; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Løvik, Martinus

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-molecular-weight phthalates in indoor dust have been associated with asthma in children, but few studies have evaluated phthalate biomarkers in association with respiratory outcomes. Objectives: We explored the association between urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites and current asthma. Methods: In a cross-sectional analysis, 11 metabolites of 8 phthalates [including four metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate] were measured in one first morning void collected from 2001 through 2004 from 623 10-year-old Norwegian children. Logistic regression models controlling for urine specific gravity, sex, parental asthma, and income were used to estimate associations between current asthma and phthalate metabolite concentrations by quartiles or as log10-transformed variables. Results: Current asthma was associated with both mono(carboxyoctyl) phthalate (MCOP) and mono(carboxynonyl) phthalate (MCNP), although the association was limited to those in the highest quartile of these chemicals. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for current asthma was 1.9 (95% CI: 1.0, 3.3) for the highest MCOP quartile compared with the lowest quartile, and 1.3 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.7) for an interquartile-range increase. The aOR for current asthma was 2.2 (95% CI: 1.2, 4.0) for the highest MCNP quartile and 1.3 (95% CI: 1.0, 1.7) for an interquartile-range increase. The other phthalate metabolites were not associated with current asthma. Conclusions: Current asthma was associated with the highest quartiles of MCOP and MCNP, metabolites of two high molecular weight phthalates, diisononyl phthalate and diisodecyl phthalate, respectively. Given the short biological half-life of the phthalates and the cross-sectional design, our findings should be interpreted cautiously. PMID:23164678

  11. NORPERM, the Norwegian Permafrost Database - a TSP NORWAY IPY legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliussen, H.; Christiansen, H. H.; Strand, G. S.; Iversen, S.; Midttømme, K.; Rønning, J. S.

    2010-02-01

    NORPERM - The Norwegian Permafrost Database was developed at the Geological Survey of Norway during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2009 as the main data legacy of the IPY research project Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard (TSP NORWAY). This paper describes the structural and technical design of NORPERM. NORPERM follows the IPY data policy of open, free, full and timely release of IPY data, and the borehole metadata description follows the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) standard. The ground temperature data infrastructure in Norway and Svalbard is also presented, focussing on the TSP NORWAY permafrost observatory installations in the North Scandinavian Permafrost Observatory and Nordenskiöld Land Permafrost Observatory, as the data providers for NORPERM. Further developments of the database, possibly towards a regional database for the Nordic area, are also discussed. The purpose of NORPERM is to store ground temperature data safely and in a standard format for use in future research. NORPERM stores temperature time series from various depths in boreholes and from the air, snow cover, ground-surface or upper ground layer recorded by miniature temperature data-loggers, and temperature profiles with depth in boreholes obtained by occasional manual logging. It contains all the temperature data from the TSP NORWAY research project, totalling 32 boreholes and 98 sites with miniature temperature data-loggers for continuous monitoring of micrometeorological conditions, and 6 temperature depth profiles obtained by manual borehole logging. The amount of data in the database will gradually increase as data from older, previous projects are added. NORPERM also provides links to near real-time permafrost temperatures obtained by GSM data transfer.

  12. NORPERM, the Norwegian Permafrost Database - a TSP NORWAY IPY legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliussen, H.; Christiansen, H. H.; Strand, G. S.; Iversen, S.; Midttømme, K.; Rønning, J. S.

    2010-10-01

    NORPERM, the Norwegian Permafrost Database, was developed at the Geological Survey of Norway during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2009 as the main data legacy of the IPY research project Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard (TSP NORWAY). Its structural and technical design is described in this paper along with the ground temperature data infrastructure in Norway and Svalbard, focussing on the TSP NORWAY permafrost observatory installations in the North Scandinavian Permafrost Observatory and Nordenskiöld Land Permafrost Observatory, being the primary data providers of NORPERM. Further developments of the database, possibly towards a regional database for the Nordic area, are also discussed. The purpose of NORPERM is to store ground temperature data safely and in a standard format for use in future research. The IPY data policy of open, free, full and timely release of IPY data is followed, and the borehole metadata description follows the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) standard. NORPERM is purely a temperature database, and the data is stored in a relation database management system and made publically available online through a map-based graphical user interface. The datasets include temperature time series from various depths in boreholes and from the air, snow cover, ground-surface or upper ground layer recorded by miniature temperature data-loggers, and temperature profiles with depth in boreholes obtained by occasional manual logging. All the temperature data from the TSP NORWAY research project is included in the database, totalling 32 temperature time series from boreholes, 98 time series of micrometeorological temperature conditions, and 6 temperature depth profiles obtained by manual logging in boreholes. The database content will gradually increase as data from previous and future projects are added. Links to near real-time permafrost temperatures, obtained

  13. A note on the history of the Norwegian Psychoanalytic Society from 1933 to 1945.

    PubMed

    Anthi, Per; Haugsgjerd, Svein

    2013-08-01

    The Norwegian analysts, who were trained in Berlin before 1933, were drawn into a struggle against fascism, informed by politically leftist analysts who worked at the Berlin Institute. The Norwegian group, including the analysts Wilhelm Reich and Otto Fenichel, were committed to Marxist or social democratic ideologies in order to fight down fascism and Nazism. They were a source of inspiration but also of conflict. After the war the leadership of the IPA was sceptical about the Norwegian group because of its former connections with Die Linke, as well as its relations with Wilhelm Reich. This paper in part considers the courageous efforts of Nic Waal, whom Ernest Jones used as a delegate and courier to solve problems for the IPA and who was unjustly treated after the war.

  14. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    -branch junction formation and evolution by using high-resolution 3D numerical mechanical experiments that take into account realistic thermo-rheological structure and rheology of the lithosphere. We find that two major types of quadruple and triple junctions are formed under bi-directional or multidirectional far-field stress field: (i) plate rifting junctions are formed by the initial plate fragmentation and can be subsequently re-arranged into (ii) oceanic spreading junctions controlled by the new oceanic crust accretion. In particular, we document initial formation and destabilization of quadruple R-R-R-R junctions as initial plate rifting structures under bi-directional extension. In most cases, quadruple plate rifting junctions rapidly (typically within 1-2 Myr) evolve towards formation of two diverging triple oceanic spreading junctions connected by a linear spreading center lengthening with time. This configuration remains stable over long time scales. However, under certain conditions, quadruple junctions may also remain relatively stable. Asymmetric stretching results in various configurations, for example formation of "T-junctions" with trans-extensional components and combination of fast and slow spreading ridges. Combined with plume impingement, this scenario evolves in realistic patterns closely resembling observed plate dynamics. In particular, opening of the Red Sea and of the Afar rift system find a logical explanation within a single model. Numerical experiments also suggest that several existing oceanic spreading junctions form as the result of plate motions rearrangements after which only one of two plates spreading along the ridge become subjected to bi-directional spreading.

  15. Magmatic and tectonic extension at the Chile Ridge: Evidence for mantle controls on ridge segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Samuel M.; Ito, Garrett; Behn, Mark D.; Martinez, Fernando; Olive, Jean-Arthur; Escartín, Javier

    2016-06-01

    We use data from an extensive multibeam bathymetry survey of the Chile Ridge to study tectonomagmatic processes at the ridge axis. Specifically, we investigate how abyssal hills evolve from axial faults, how variations in magmatic extension influence morphology and faulting along the spreading axis, and how these variations correlate with ridge segmentation. The bathymetry data are used to estimate the fraction of plate separation accommodated by normal faulting, and the remaining fraction of extension, M, is attributed primarily to magmatic accretion. Results show that M ranges from 0.85 to 0.96, systematically increasing from first-order and second-order ridge segment offsets toward segment centers as the depth of ridge axis shoals relative to the flanking highs of the axial valley. Fault spacing, however, does not correlate with ridge geometry, morphology, or M along the Chile Ridge, which suggests the observed increase in tectonic strain toward segment ends is achieved through increased slip on approximately equally spaced faults. Variations in M along the segments follow variations in petrologic indicators of mantle melt fraction, both showing a preferred length scale of 50 ± 20 km that persists even along much longer ridge segments. In comparison, mean M and axial relief fail to show significant correlations with distance offsetting the segments. These two findings suggest a form of magmatic segmentation that is partially decoupled from the geometry of the plate boundary. We hypothesize this magmatic segmentation arises from cells of buoyantly upwelling mantle that influence tectonic segmentation from the mantle, up.

  16. Seasonal variation in the levels of organohalogen compounds in herring (Clupea harengus) from the Norwegian Sea.

    PubMed

    Frantzen, Sylvia; Måge, Amund; Iversen, Svein Arnholt; Julshamn, Kåre

    2011-09-01

    The Norwegian spring spawning (NSS) herring is an ecologically important fish stock in the Norwegian Sea, and with a catch volume exceeding one million tons a year it is also economically important and a valuable food source. In order to provide a baseline of the levels of contaminants in this fish stock, the levels of organohalogen compounds were determined in 800 individual herring sampled at 29 positions in the Norwegian Sea and off the coast of Norway. Due to seasonal migration, the herring were sampled where they were located during the different seasons. Concentrations of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs, non-dioxin-like PCBs (PCB(7)) and PBDEs were determined in fillet samples of individual herring, and found to be relatively low, with means (min-max) of 0.77 (0.24-3.5) ng TEQ kg(-1) wet weight (ww), 5.0 (1.4-24) μg kg(-1) ww and 0.47 (0.091-3.1) μg kg(-1) ww, respectively. The concentrations varied throughout the year due to the feeding- and spawning cycle: Starved, pre-spawning herring caught off the Norwegian coast in January-February had the highest levels and those caught in the Norwegian Sea in April-June, after further starvation and spawning, had the lowest levels. These results show that the concentrations of organohalogen compounds in NSS herring are relatively low and closely tied to their physiological condition, and that in the future regular monitoring of NSS herring should be made in the spawning areas off the Norwegian coast in late winter.

  17. Scalar winds from SSM/I in the Norwegian and Greenland seas during Norcsex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloersen, Per; Hubanks, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Data acquired with the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) special sensor microwave imager (SSM/I) during the Norwegian Coastal Sea Experiment (Norcsex) in March 1988 have been utilized to estimate scalar winds in the Norwegian and Greenland Seas. The algorithm for calculating these winds was first developed for the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) in order to investigate scalar winds during the Polar Lows Experiment in February 1984. The coefficients in this algorithm have been tuned to accommodate differences in the SSM/I and SMMR instruments.

  18. Examining Convergence in the Cultural Value Orientations of Norwegians in the Oil and Gas Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teague, Jennifer

    There is much debate in Norway as to whether Norwegian cultural values are being diluted by the increasing influx of international organizations. Little empirical work has been done to assess the effect of employment by international organizations on the cultural values of Norwegians. The aim of this study was to determine if individuals retain cultural values closest to their own nationality or the nationality of their employing organization. This objective was accomplished by comparing cultural value dimensions of Norwegians employed in organizations headquartered in one of five countries. Recruitment emails were sent to 612 possible participants and 160 individuals completed the survey completely, resulting in a sample size of N=160, a response rate of 26%. From the completed surveys, cultural dimension scores were calculated for each individual and group in the areas of power distance, individualism, masculinity, and uncertainty avoidance. Using those cultural dimension scores, three groups of one-way ANOVA tests were run in accordance with the parameters of each of three research questions. Comparing Norwegians employed in local government or a Norwegian oil and gas company, a significant difference existed only for uncertainty avoidance (p=.0074). Comparing cultural dimension scores of Norwegians employed in local government with those employed by one of four internationally-headquartered oil companies resulted in significant differences in scores for power distance (p=.0007), individualism (p=.0000), and uncertainty avoidance (p=.0000); however, there was not a statistically significant difference in masculinity scores between the two groups (p=.0792). Comparing cultural dimension scores of Norwegians employed in a Norwegian oil and gas company with those employed by one of four internationally-headquartered oil and gas companies also resulted in statistically significant differences in scores for power distance (p=.0015), individualism (p=.0000), and

  19. Vertical Alveolar Ridge Augmentation by Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, N. Nanda; Ravindran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Compromised alveolar ridge in vertical and horizontal dimension is a common finding in patients visiting practitioners for dental prosthesis. Various treatment modalities are available for correction of deficient ridges among which alveolar distraction osteogenesis is one. Aim To study the efficacy of alveolar distraction osteogenesis in augmentation of alveolar ridges deficient in vertical dimension. Materials and Methods Ten patients aged 16 to 46 years with deficient alveolar ridge underwent ridge augmentation in 11 alveolar segments using the distraction osteogenesis method. For each patient a custom made distraction device was fabricated. The device was indigenously manufactured with SS-316 (ISO 3506). Results The vertical bone gain reached more than 10mm without the use of bone transplantation. Certain complications like incorrect vector of distraction, paresthesia, pain and loss of transport segment were encountered during the course of the study. Conclusion Alveolar vertical distraction osteogenesis is a reliable and predictable technique for both hard and soft tissue genesis. Implant placement is feasible with primary stability in neogenerated bone at the level of the distracted areas. PMID:26816991

  20. Arctic Ocean: hydrothermal activity on Gakkel Ridge.

    PubMed

    Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Fourré, Elise

    2004-03-01

    In the hydrothermal circulation at mid-ocean ridges, sea water penetrates the fractured crust, becomes heated by its proximity to the hot magma, and returns to the sea floor as hot fluids enriched in various chemical elements. In contradiction to earlier results that predict diminishing hydrothermal activity with decreasing spreading rate, a survey of the ultra-slowly spreading Gakkel Ridge (Arctic Ocean) by Edmonds et al. and Michael et al. suggests that, instead of being rare, the hydrothermal activity is abundant--exceeding by at least a factor of two to three what would be expected by extrapolation from observation on faster spreading ridges. Here we use helium-3 (3He), a hydrothermal tracer, to show that this abundance of venting sites does not translate, as would be expected, into an anomalous hydrothermal 3He output from the ridge. Because of the wide implications of the submarine hydrothermal processes for mantle heat and mass fluxes to the ocean, these conflicting results call for clarification of the link between hydrothermal activity and crustal production at mid-ocean ridges.

  1. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the activities necessary to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The CRSP, also designated Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit (OU) 1, is one of four OUs along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The purpose of the RI is to collect data to (1) evaluate the nature and extent of known and suspected contaminants, (2) support an Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) and a Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA), (3) support the feasibility study in the development and analysis of remedial alternatives, and (4) ultimately, develop a Record of Decision (ROD) for the site. This chapter summarizes the regulatory background of environmental investigation on the ORR and the approach currently being followed and provides an overview of the RI to be conducted at the CRSP. Subsequent chapters provide details on site history, sampling activities, procedures and methods, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, and waste management related to the RI.

  2. Modern therapy for severe alveolar ridge atrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Feng; Pan, Chin-Yun; Wang, Wen-Chen; Lan, Ting-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report illustrates a modern method for oral rehabilitation of severe edentulous atrophic ridge. Shallow vestibule and small denture-bearing area of the maxilla provide insufficient retention, and only the symphyseal region of the mandible has obvious alveolar ridge. The surgery of deepening vestibule of the maxilla ridge was done by using tentative miniscrew combined with old denture and soft liner. The osseointegrated dental implants were installed over symphyseal region of the mandible to act as retentive devices for prostheses. In addition, functional reline with rebase material to build buccal-tongue contact over the retromolar area after denture delivery obtained high satisfaction from the patient. Many clinical conditions cannot be managed solely with implants or preprosthetic surgery alone, whereas a combination of the 2 can achieve successful outcome. PMID:24036818

  3. Diversity and antifungal susceptibility of Norwegian Candida glabrata clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kari-Mette; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Ingebretsen, André; Vikholt, Katharina Johnsen; Örtengren, Ulf Thore; Olsen, Ingar; Enersen, Morten; Gaustad, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients have resulted in greater incidence of invasive fungal infections with high mortality. Candida albicans infections dominate, but during the last decade, Candida glabrata has become the second highest cause of candidemia in the United States and Northern Europe. Reliable and early diagnosis, together with appropriate choice of antifungal treatment, is needed to combat these challenging infections. Objectives To confirm the identity of 183 Candida glabrata isolates from different human body sites using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and VITEK®2, and to analyze isolate protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven antifungal drugs was determined for the isolates to elucidate susceptibility. Design A total of 183 C. glabrata isolates obtained between 2002 and 2012 from Norwegian health-care units were analyzed. For species verification and differentiation, biochemical characterization (VITEK®2) and mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF) were used. MIC determination for seven antifungal drugs was undertaken using E-tests®. Results Using VITEK®2, 92.9% of isolates were identified as C. glabrata, while all isolates (100%) were identified as C. glabrata using MALDI-TOF. Variation in protein spectra occurred for all identified C. glabrata isolates. The majority of isolates had low MICs to amphotericin B (≤1 mg/L for 99.5%) and anidulafungin (≤0.06 mg/L for 98.9%). For fluconazole, 18% of isolates had MICs >32 mg/L and 82% had MICs in the range ≥0.016 mg/L to ≤32 mg/L. Conclusions Protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility characteristics of the C. glabrata isolates were diverse. Clustering of protein profiles indicated that many azole resistant isolates were closely related. In most cases, isolates had highest susceptibility to amphotericin B and anidulafungin. The results confirmed previous observations of high

  4. Fluid venting and seepage at accretionary ridges: the Four Way Closure Ridge offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Berndt, Christian; Crutchley, Gareth; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lin, Saulwood; Muff, Sina

    2016-06-01

    Within the accretionary prism offshore SW Taiwan, widespread gas hydrate accumulations are postulated to occur based on the presence of a bottom simulating reflection. Methane seepage, however, is also widespread at accretionary ridges offshore SW Taiwan and may indicate a significant loss of methane bypassing the gas hydrate system. Four Way Closure Ridge, located in 1,500 m water depth, is an anticlinal ridge that would constitute an ideal trap for methane and consequently represents a site with good potential for gas hydrate accumulations. The analysis of high-resolution bathymetry, deep-towed sidescan sonar imagery, high-resolution seismic profiling and towed video observations of the seafloor shows that Four Way Closure Ridge is and has been a site of intensive methane seepage. Continuous seepage is mainly evidenced by large accumulations of authigenic carbonate precipitates, which appear to be controlled by the creation of fluid pathways through faulting. Consequently, Four Way Closure Ridge is not a closed system in terms of fluid migration and seepage. A conceptual model of the evolution of gas hydrates and seepage at accretionary ridges suggests that seepage is common and may be a standard feature during the geological development of ridges in accretionary prisms. The observation of seafloor seepage alone is therefore not a reliable indicator of exploitable gas hydrate accumulations at depth.

  5. The influence of ridge migration on the magmatic segmentation of mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Carbotte, S M; Small, C; Donnelly, K

    2004-06-17

    The Earth's mid-ocean ridges display systematic changes in depth and shape, which subdivide the ridges into discrete spreading segments bounded by transform faults and smaller non-transform offsets of the axis. These morphological changes have been attributed to spatial variations in the supply of magma from the mantle, although the origin of the variations is poorly understood. Here we show that magmatic segmentation of ridges with fast and intermediate spreading rates is directly related to the migration velocity of the spreading axis over the mantle. For over 9,500 km of mid-ocean ridge examined, leading ridge segments in the 'hotspot' reference frame coincide with the shallow magmatically robust segments across 86 per cent of all transform faults and 73 per cent of all second-order discontinuities. We attribute this relationship to asymmetric mantle upwelling and melt production due to ridge migration, with focusing of melt towards ridge segments across discontinuities. The model is consistent with variations in crustal structure across discontinuities of the East Pacific Rise, and may explain variations in depth of melting and the distribution of enriched lavas.

  6. Normalization Ridge Regression in Practice I: Comparisons Between Ordinary Least Squares, Ridge Regression and Normalization Ridge Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulcock, J. W.

    The problem of model estimation when the data are collinear was examined. Though the ridge regression (RR) outperforms ordinary least squares (OLS) regression in the presence of acute multicollinearity, it is not a problem free technique for reducing the variance of the estimates. It is a stochastic procedure when it should be nonstochastic and it…

  7. The Role of Peer Review in Norwegian Quality Assurance: Potential Consequences for Excellence and Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langfeldt, Liv; Stensaker, Bjorn; Harvey, Lee; Huisman, Jeroen; Westerheijden, Don F.

    2010-01-01

    The article analyses the role of peer review within broader external quality assurance schemes. Based on an analytical framework emphasising that modern quality assurance schemes are designed as a balancing act between standardised guidelines and professional judgement, the article uses data from a recent evaluation of NOKUT, the Norwegian Quality…

  8. Changes and Challenges in Music Education: Reflections on a Norwegian Arts-in-Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christophersen, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    With a recent research study on a Norwegian arts-in-education programme "The Cultural Rucksack" as its starting point, this article addresses policy changes in the fields of culture and education and possible implications these could have on music education in schools. Familiar debates on the quality of education and the political…

  9. Mediating National Language Management: The Discourse of Citizenship Categorization in Norwegian Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Pia

    2009-01-01

    The dimension of language policing that is the focus in this article refers to the management of micro-level language use by a macro-level institution, in this context the Norwegian Language Council, co-constructed with media actors. An important aspect of language policing is the official definition of terms, carried out by bodies like the…

  10. Communication about Contraception and Knowledge of Oral Contraceptives amongst Norwegian High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Thomas; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil

    2003-01-01

    Examines communication about contraception and specific knowledge of oral contraceptives (OCs) in a sample of Norwegian high school students. More females than males discussed contraception at least monthly. Discussions were predominantly held with peers and not adults. Females were far more knowledgeable about OCs than males. The most significant…

  11. School Climate Reports from Norwegian Teachers: A Methodological and Substantive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallestad, Jan Helge; Olweus, Dan; Alsaker, Francoise

    1998-01-01

    Explores methodological and substantive issues relating to school climate, using a dataset derived from 42 Norwegian schools at two points of time and a standard definition of organizational climate. Identifies and analyzes four school-climate dimensions. Three dimensions (collegial communication, orientation to change, and teacher influence over…

  12. Modernising Education: New Public Management Reform in the Norwegian Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Møller, Jorunn; Skedsmo, Guri

    2013-01-01

    Since the end of the 1980s, the Norwegian education system has gone through major reform, influenced largely by new managerialist ideas. Strategies to renew the public sector were promoted as the new public management (NPM). This paper investigates the way ideas connected to NPM reforms have been introduced and interpreted in the Norwegian…

  13. Selective Critical Thinking: A Textbook Analysis of Education for Critical Thinking in Norwegian Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Børhaug, Kjetil

    2014-01-01

    Current Norwegian curricular guidelines oblige schools to educate citizens with a critical perspective on society. From a discourse theoretical perspective, this obligation implies that various school subjects, and in particular social studies, offer discourses on social issues that allow for different points of view and critical evaluation.…

  14. Love It or Leave It: Norwegian Students' Motivations and Expectations for Postcompulsory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Maria Vetleseter; Henriksen, Ellen Karoline

    2013-01-01

    In response to insufficient participation and female underrepresentation in physics education, this article uses questionnaire data from Norwegian physics students in upper secondary ("N" = 585) and first-year tertiary ("N" = 278) education to characterize the "physics choosers." An expectancy-value perspective is…

  15. Early Career Teachers' Emotional Experiences and Development--A Norwegian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakhelln, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Emotional experiences that are an integral part of the process of becoming teachers have been insufficiently explored in the research literature. The early experiences of three new teachers in a Norwegian upper secondary school are analysed using a collective case-study design and a socio-cultural theoretical framework. Emotions arising in the…

  16. National Assessment of Writing Proficiency among Norwegian Students in Compulsory Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasting, Rolf B.; Thygesen, Ragnar; Berge, Kjell Lars; Evensen, Lars Sigfred; Vagle, Wenche

    2009-01-01

    The paper reports and discusses a government-initiated nationwide assessment of writing proficiency among Norwegian compulsory school students. A sample-study of 7th and 10th grade students are discussed and reported with regard to challenges in measuring writing skills in a valid and reliable manner. For the 7th graders the results showed a…

  17. "I Am Not Angry in the Kindergarten!" Interruptive Anger as Democratic Participation in Norwegian Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindheim, Liv Torunn

    2014-01-01

    This article calls into question the idyllic picture of Norwegian kindergartens where harmonious and joyful interaction is the preferred and normal way to participate. If taking children's right to democratic participation and freedom of expression seriously, anger can also be seen as a legitimate way of participating. Conflicts of interest,…

  18. Validation of an Eulerian population model for the marine copepod Calanus finmarchicus in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alver, Morten Omholt; Broch, Ole Jacob; Melle, Webjørn; Bagøien, Espen; Slagstad, Dag

    2016-08-01

    Calanus finmarchicus is an important zooplankton species in the Norwegian Sea, as a dominant food organism for pelagic fish larvae, and a potentially large source of marine lipids and proteins. Its position in the marine food web also makes it an important model species in assessing the risk posed by oil spills in the Norwegian and Arctic Seas. In this study, an Eulerian population model for C.finmarchicus, coupled to the physical and ecological model SINMOD, is presented. The model includes the full life cycle of C. finmarchicus with a representation of all developmental stages. The model has been validated against field measurements made in different areas of the Norwegian Sea in 1997 and 1998. The model displays geographical and temporal distributions of development stages that is in line with observed patterns. When comparing time series for selected regions, we see a high degree of variability both in the field samples and model output. On average, the model deviations are near half of the summed variability of the field data and model estimates. The model has applications within assessment of ecological production, and the potential for harvesting in the Norwegian and Arctic Seas, but in combination with other models, also for the assessment of ecological effects of oil spills and other types of pollution.

  19. The Outdoor Environment in Norwegian Kindergartens as Pedagogical Space for Toddlers' Play, Learning and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Thomas; Martinsen, Marianne T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines some characteristics of the outdoor environment in Norwegian kindergartens. Understood as pedagogical space, outdoor conditions may enhance or restrict the youngest children's possibilities for play, learning and development. In 117 of 133 kindergartens (response rate: 87 %) participating in a longitudinal study, the heads of…

  20. The Norwegian Communicative Development Inventories: Reliability, Main Developmental Trends and Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonsen, Hanne Gram; Kristoffersen, Kristian E.; Bleses, Dorthe; Wehberg, Sonja; Jørgensen, Rune N.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents results from a large population-based study of early communicative development in Norwegian children using an adaptation of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories, comprising 6574 children between 8 and 36 months. Data were collected via the Internet. In accordance with similar studies from other languages,…

  1. Seismic Reflection Signatures of Internal Waves and Thermohaline Intrusions in the Norwegian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, P.; Holbrook, W. S.; Pearse, S.; Paramo, P.; Schmitt, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    Water-column reflections acquired on a seismic survey in the Norwegian Sea and corroborated by 35 XBTs at an average spacing of 5 km and 2 XCTDs at both ends of a 172 km line suggest that temperature fine structure from internal wave strains and thermohaline intrusions have distinct seismic signatures. The survey images reflections from temperature fine structure sensitive to changes as small as 0.03 °C at the water mass boundary between the Norwegian Atlantic Current (NwAC) and Norwegian Sea Deep Water (NSDW). Internal wave strains appear in XCTD data from the eastern part of the seismic line near the Norwegian coast showing congruent changes in temperature and density. Reflections in this region have relatively small amplitudes and slope across isotherms corresponding to changes of several degrees Celsius. In contrast, an XCTD taken from the western seaward side of the profile shows several depths where density does not vary with temperature. Salinity is compensating for changes in temperature; thus reflections in this region likely correspond to irreversible fine structure caused by thermohaline intrusions. These reflections have high amplitudes and closely follow isotherms. These results indicate that studying these signatures can provide information about the structure of the internal wave field and isopycnal stirring processes over the lateral and vertical extent of the water column.

  2. An Effective Introduction to Technology and Design in Norwegian Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkeby, Pal J.

    2010-01-01

    How can young pupils get "An effective introduction" to technology and design at the primary level in the Norwegian context? This question is highlighted with examples based on case studies at five classes in two schools doing their first technology and design project at grades 1 or 2 (age 6-8 years). The project was about air rockets. The…

  3. The Cognitive and Linguistic Foundations of Early Reading Development: A Norwegian Latent Variable Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lervag, Arne; Braten, Ivar; Hulme, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The authors present the results of a 2-year longitudinal study of 228 Norwegian children beginning some 12 months before formal reading instruction began. The relationships between a range of cognitive and linguistic skills (letter knowledge, phoneme manipulation, visual-verbal paired-associate learning, rapid automatized naming (RAN), short-term…

  4. Academic Achievement in Norwegian Secondary Schools: The Impact of Violence during Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Lihong; Mossige, Svein

    2012-01-01

    Using data from a national survey (N = 6,979) of young people in their last year in Norwegian secondary schools in 2007 (aged 18 and 19), this paper examines the effect of experience of violence including sexual abuse during childhood (before the age of 13) on the later academic achievement of young people. This investigation includes three types…

  5. New Management Systems in Norwegian Universities: The Interface Between Reform and Institutional Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Ingvild Marheim; Gornitzka, Ase

    1995-01-01

    Implementation and results of government-mandated "results-oriented planning" in Norwegian universities are analyzed using two approaches: the first looks at the effects of the initiative, and the second views the management reforms as cosmetic. It is found that while academic staff are involved in the new planning system, little effect has been…

  6. No Place: Small Children in Norwegian Asylum-Seeker Reception Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeberg, Marie Louise; Bagge, Cecilie; Enger, Truls Andre

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on empirical material from fieldwork among young children living with their families in two Norwegian reception centres for asylum-seekers, this article compares their realities to the norms and realities for other children in Norway. Children's spatial and social situations within the centres stand out in stark contrast to Norwegian…

  7. Included as Excluded and Excluded as Included: Minority Language Pupils in Norwegian Inclusion Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Line Torbjørnsen

    2015-01-01

    This article offers an analysis of four Norwegian policy documents on inclusion of minority language pupils. The main concepts of this policy will be reconstructed and re-described, applying Niklas Luhmann's systems theory at different levels of the analysis. Luhmann's theory about society as a conglomerate of self-referential social…

  8. Study Programmes for Engineers from Developing Countries at the Norwegian Institute of Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasson, Axel; Hermansen, John

    1989-01-01

    Describes the background of the study and fellowship programs for graduates from the developing countries at the Norwegian Institute of Technology. Discusses some experiences with the programs. Includes a brief description of five courses: (1) "Pulp and Paper Technology"; (2) "Marine Civil Engineering"; (3) "Hydropower Development"; (4) "Electric…

  9. Text Interpretation and Educational Design in Norwegian Textbooks of Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vestøl, Jon Magne

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on sociocultural perspectives on educational design, this article presents a qualitative study investigating how religious texts emerge as educational objects and mediating artefacts in Norwegian textbooks of religious and moral education. The article describes how the distribution of text references in textbooks influences the formation…

  10. Becoming a Learning Organization: The Espoused Values of Police Managers from Two Norwegian Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filstad, Cathrine; Gottschalk, Petter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate the extent to which espoused values among police managers in the Norwegian police force are compatible with those of a learning organization. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire was developed and administered to police managers in two police districts in Norway. A set of values was…

  11. Social Influence, Health Variables and Criminal Behaviours Associated with Substance Use among Rural Norwegian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordfjaern, Trond; Dahl, Hilde; Flemmen, Grete

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To investigate social influence, health, criminality and substance use in a sample of 1288 Norwegian rural adolescents. Relations between these factors and substance use were examined. Methods: Data were obtained from the "UngData" study. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted among adolescents (n = 740) in nine secondary…

  12. [Hormone replacement therapy among Norwegian women. Self-reported use and sales of estrogen preparations].

    PubMed

    Søgaard, A J; Fønnebø, V; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    In order to analyse the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the predicting factors for its use, two random samples of Norwegian women (30-79 years) were interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics in 1994 (n = 565) and in 1996 (n = 470). The extent of use of HRT was compared with statistics for sales of oestrogen in Norway and the Nordic countries. In the age group 45-69 years the use of hormone replacement therapy increased from 16.3% in 1994 to 19.1% in 1996. The proportion of users did not increase with a higher level of education. In addition to information received, and after adjusting for other variables, attitudes towards oestrogen and knowledge about it were the most important contributing factors for using HRT. Sales figures show that the use of systemic oestrogen in Norway has increased more than 280% since 1990. None of the Nordic countries have had a corresponding increase, but the Norwegian figures are still low compared to most other Nordic countries. In 1996 14.5% of Norwegian women (50-79 years) used oestrogen for urogenital disorders. Norwegian women need to be better informed and more knowledgeable to enable them to make conscious choice regarding use of hormone replacement therapy.

  13. The Newly Qualified Teacher: A Leader and a Professional? A Norwegian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimsath, Gerd; Nordvik, Grete; Bergsvik, Eli

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on a Norwegian study. The focus is two-fold, including the views of both new teachers and leaders on the issue of leadership and professionalism. First, the focus is on the way newly qualified teachers describe how they function in the school and kindergarten organizations. The discussion explores how new teachers' meetings…

  14. Intelligence Test Scores and Birth Order among Young Norwegian Men (Conscripts) Analyzed within and between Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerkedal, Tor; Kristensen, Petter; Skjeret, Geir A.; Brevik, John I.

    2007-01-01

    The present paper reports the results of a within and between family analysis of the relation between birth order and intelligence. The material comprises more than a quarter of a million test scores for intellectual performance of Norwegian male conscripts recorded during 1984-2004. Conscripts, mostly 18-19 years of age, were born to women for…

  15. Perceived Motivational Climates and Self-Reported Emotional and Behavioural Problems among Norwegian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stornes, Tor; Bru, Edvin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between perceived motivational climates and self-reported emotional and behavioural problems (EBP: symptoms of depression, lack of on-task-orientation and disruptive behaviour), among 1171 Norwegian 8th grade secondary school students from 65 school classes. Statistical analyses showed significant…

  16. Educational Attainment of 25 Year Old Norwegians According to Birth Order and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristensen, Petter; Bjerkedal, Tor

    2010-01-01

    This register-based longitudinal study of 392 969 Norwegians examined associations between birth order, gender and educational attainment at age 25 years within families (fixed effects regression) and between families (ordinary OLS regression). Data were retrieved from national registers for births of mothers with single births only and a first…

  17. Subsea template, pipeline anchor Troll-Oseberg gas-injection scheme in Norwegian North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Weibye, B.S.

    1988-01-18

    The author discusses the subsea, gas production template and the 30-mile pipeline that are key elements in supplying as from the Troll field for injection into Oseberg field in the Norwegian North Sea by 1991. The author discusses the design basis and philosophies as well as the production system, template installation and control pods.

  18. Do You /Ond 'taend? An Error Analysis of Norwegian Students' Pronunciation of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Thor Sigurd

    This preliminary report of an English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) pronunciation test carried out at Telemark College in Norway is first of all a description of the difficulties Norwegian students have with regard to the pronunciation of Received Pronunciation (RP) vowels and consonants. An attempt also is made to predict areas of possible…

  19. An Econometric Examination of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of Norwegian Retailing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Kahamseh, Saeed; Gunnarsson, Didrik; Larsen, Nils Magne; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral perspective model's (BPM; Foxall, 1990) retailing literature is built on extensive empirical research and techniques that were originally refined in choice experiments in behavioral economics and behavior analysis, and then tested mostly on British consumer panel data. We test the BPM in the context of Norwegian retailing. This…

  20. Preschool Teachers' Approaches to Science: A Comparison of a Chinese and a Norwegian Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Anne Synnøve Ekrene; He, Min

    2016-01-01

    This comparative study examines the way in which preschool teachers support children's science learning in a Chinese and a Norwegian kindergarten. The study takes an ethnographic approach. Preschool teachers from one kindergarten in Shanghai and one in Bergen were asked to videotape educational activities that focused on science in their…

  1. Competition and Leadership as Drivers in German and Norwegian University Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleiklie, Ivar; Lange, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The article analyses how steering and organisation of German and Norwegian universities have developed after both countries with Humboldtian university traditions introduced New Public Management-inspired governance reforms during the first decade of the 21st century. The article outlines different organisation ideals and values involved in…

  2. Learning-Conducive Work: A Survey of Learning Conditions in Norwegian Workplaces. CEDEFOP Panorama Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skule, Sveinung; Reichborn, Anders N.; Leren, Iver Jan, Ed.

    In this report, learning conditions in Norwegian workplaces were examined to identify ways of making workplaces more conducive to learning. Data were collected through interviews in 11 firms and a questionnaire survey of 1,300 private sector and 200 public sector employees. Opportunities to learn through work varied widely. Older women with little…

  3. Some Health Effects of Implementing School Nursing in a Norwegian High School: A Controlled Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svebak, Sven; Jensen, Eva Naper; Gotestam, K. Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a school nursing service on health complaints and mood were investigated in a Norwegian high school. The school nursing service was delivered to students in 1 high school, and students in a comparable high school served as the comparison group. There were 41 students in the treatment group and 63 in the comparison group. All…

  4. The Structural Disempowerment of Eastern European Migrant Farm Workers in Norwegian Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rye, Johan Fredrik; Andrzejewska, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Since the 2004 EU enlargement established one European common labour market, a large number of Eastern Europeans have taken up seasonal employment as hired farm workers in Norwegian agriculture. Much attention in the public has been given to the potential for "social dumping" of these migrating workers, as they are considered prone to exploitation…

  5. Comparability of the Social Skills Improvement System to the Social Skills Rating System: A Norwegian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamst-Klaussen, Thor; Rasmussen, Lene-Mari P.; Svartdal, Frode; Strømgren, Børge

    2016-01-01

    The Social Skills Improvement System-Rating Scales (SSIS-RS) is a multi-informant instrument assessing social skills and problem behavior in children and adolescents. It is a revised version of the Social Skills Rating System (SSRS). A Norwegian translation of the SSRS has been validated, but this has not yet been done for the Norwegian…

  6. How Pupils with Severe Visual Impairment Describe Coping with Reading Activities in the Norwegian Inclusive School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vik, Astrid Kristin; Lassen, Liv M.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores how 11 pupils with severe visual impairment cope with reading activities in inclusive Norwegian schools. All pupils received instruction in braille and print, and used an audio-text format. Having multiple reading options provided possibilities for pupils to achieve reading skills, but also generated stress. Theories of…

  7. What Characterizes the Algebraic Competence of Norwegian Upper Secondary School Students? Evidence from TIMSS Advanced

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Ida Friestad

    2015-01-01

    Algebra is the fundamental language of mathematics, and a profound understanding of school algebra is an important prerequisite for further studies in mathematical sciences. The aim of this study is to characterize the algebraic competence of the Norwegian upper secondary school students participating in Trends in International Mathematics and…

  8. Translating Knowledge into Action at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Trine; Francis, Charles; Pederson, Kristin; Lieblein, Geir; Rahman, Md. Hafizur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This article explores the impacts of action learning on graduates' abilities to use interdisciplinary knowledge to solve problems, practice teamwork on the job and become change agents through study in two MSc programmes at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB). Design/methodology/approach: Electronic questionnaires were…

  9. Revisiting Instructional and Transformational Leadership: The Contemporary Norwegian Context of School Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aas, Marit; Brandmo, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether the taxonomy of two conceptual models of leadership roles for principals--instructional and transformational leadership (IL and TL)--can be traced empirically in a sample of Norwegian school leaders. Design/methodology/approach: The participants consisted of 149 school leaders attending a…

  10. Imageability of Norwegian Nouns, Verbs and Adjectives in a Cross-Linguistic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonsen, Hanne Gram; Lind, Marianne; Hansen, Pernille; Holm, Elisabeth; Mevik, Bjorn-Helge

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a study of imageability ratings for a set of 1599 Norwegian words (896 nouns, 483 verbs and 220 adjectives) from a web-based survey. To a large extent, the results are in accordance with previous studies of other languages: high imageability scores in general, higher imageability scores for nouns than for verbs, and an…

  11. "Friendship in All Directions": Norwegian Children with Physical Disabilities Experiencing Friendship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asbjornslett, Mona; Engelsrud, Gunn H.; Helseth, Solvi

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how Norwegian children with physical disabilities experience friendship during the transition between primary and secondary school. The research was based on 38 life mode interviews with 15 children. Two themes were explored: (1) different kinds of friends: friends with disabilities, friends without disabilities and…

  12. Transferring and Transforming Technology Education: A Study of Norwegian Teachers' Perceptions of Ideas from Design & Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bungum, Berit

    2006-01-01

    What happens when educational ideas cross national and cultural borders? How do teachers respond to ideas originating in a different school system and a different national culture? This article reports on an empirical study investigating the transfer of ideas from Design & Technology as a subject in England and Wales into Norwegian schools. A…

  13. Norwegian Salmon Goes to Market: The Case of the Austevoll Seafood Cluster

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phyne, John; Hovgaard, Gestur; Hansen, Gard

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the globalisation of the farmed salmon commodity chain upon farmed salmon production in the western Norwegian municipality of Austevoll. On the basis of field research conducted in 2002 and 2003, we conclude that salmon farming in Austevoll has responded to the challenges of "buyer-driven" food chains by virtue of…

  14. Wisdom in the Open Air: The Norwegian Roots of Deep Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Peter, Ed.; Rothenberg, David, Ed.

    This book traces the Norwegian roots of "deep ecology": the search for solutions to environmental problems by examining fundamental tenets of culture. Deep ecology contributes to the philosophical foundations of environmental education and outdoor education, and much writing in this area has focused on promoting awareness of the human relationship…

  15. Principal Self-Efficacy and Work Engagement: Assessing a Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2011-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to develop and test the factor structure of a multidimensional and hierarchical Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale (NPSES). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between principal self-efficacy and work engagement. Principal self-efficacy was measured by the 22-item NPSES. Work…

  16. Personal Epistemology across Cultures: Exploring Norwegian and Spanish University Students' Epistemic Beliefs about Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braten, Ivar; Gil, Laura; Stromso, Helge I.; Vidal-Abarca, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The primary aim was to explore and compare the dimensionality of personal epistemology with respect to climate change across the contexts of Norwegian and Spanish students. A second aim was to examine relationships between topic-specific epistemic beliefs and the variables of gender, topic knowledge, and topic interest in the two contexts.…

  17. Exploring Antecedents of Organizational Citizenship Behaviour among Teachers at Norwegian Folk High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elstad, Eyvind; Christophersen, Knut Andreas; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    The folk high school (FHS) is a Nordic contribution to global education and is a unique approach to non-university adult education. Because expanded tuition is the true nature of Norwegian FHS, it is important for FHS that its teachers perform discretionary individual extra-role behaviour advantageous to the school organization, a phenomenon…

  18. Increasing Completion Rates in Norwegian Doctoral Training: Multiple Causes for Efficiency Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein; Olsen, Terje Bruen

    2014-01-01

    This article examines changes in completion rates and time-to-degree in Norwegian doctoral training over the last 30 years. A steadily increasing share of doctoral candidates holding a fellowship have been awarded their doctoral degree within five years; from 30% of those admitted in 1980 to 60% of those admitted 25 years later. Furthermore, the…

  19. Evaluation of the Norwegian Manifesto against Bullying, 2002-2004. A Summary of the Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tikkanen, Tarja I.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarises the main results of the research-based evaluation of the Norwegian Manifesto against bullying. Besides schools, the evaluation was to include bullying also in kindergartens and publicly organised leisure activities. Furthermore, the work in Manifesto was to be covered on national, regional and local levels. The goal setting…

  20. "Omdefinerer En Norsk Norge": The Influence of Changing Demographics on Norwegian Schooling for Social Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how Norwegian compulsory education, both philosophically and practically, reflects the institutionalized democratic values of the larger social and political community of Norway. It examines, through the application of collective and structural lenses of analysis, how shifting demographics in this social and political…

  1. Wrinkle Ridges and Young Fresh Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 May 2002) The Science Wrinkle ridges are a very common landform on Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. These ridges are linear to arcuate asymmetric topographic highs commonly found on smooth plains. The origin of wrinkle ridges is not certain and two leading hypotheses have been put forth by scientists over the past 40 years. The volcanic model calls for the extrusion of high viscosity lavas along linear conduits. This thick lava accumulated over these conduits and formed the ridges. The other model is tectonic and advocates that the ridges are formed by compressional faulting and folding. Today's THEMIS image is of the ridged plains of Lunae Planum located between Kasei Valles and Valles Marineris in the northern hemisphere of the planet. Wrinkle ridges are found mostly along the eastern side of the image. The broadest wrinkle ridges in this image are up to 2 km wide. A 3 km diameter young fresh crater is located near the bottom of the image. The crater's ejecta blanket is also clearly seen surrounding the sharp well-defined crater rim. These features are indicative of a very young crater that has not been subjected to erosional processes. The Story The great thing about the solar system is that planets are both alike and different. They're all foreign enough to be mysterious and intriguing, and yet familiar enough to be seen as planetary 'cousins.' By comparing them, we can learn a lot about how planets form and then evolve geologically over time. Crinkled over smooth plains, the long, wavy raised landforms seen here are called 'wrinkle ridges,' and they've been found on Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon - that is, on rocky bodies that are a part of our inner solar system. We know from this observation that planets (and large-enough moons) follow similar processes. What we don't know for sure is HOW these processes work. Scientists have been trying to understand how wrinkle ridges form for 40 years, and they still haven't reached a conclusion. That

  2. Are the High Hip Fracture Rates Among Norwegian Women Explained by Impaired Bone Material Properties?

    PubMed

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Vilaplana, Laila; Güerri, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Wang-Fagerland, Morten; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; F Eriksen, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture rates in Norway rank among the highest in the world, more than double that of Spanish women. Previous studies were unable to demonstrate significant differences between the two populations with respect to bone mass or calcium metabolism. In order to test whether the difference in fracture propensity between both populations could be explained by differences in bone material quality we assessed bone material strength using microindentation in 42 Norwegian and 46 Spanish women with normal BMD values, without clinical or morphometric vertebral fractures, no clinical or laboratory signs of secondary osteoporosis, and without use of drugs with known influence on bone metabolism. Bone material properties were assessed by microindentation of the thick cortex of the mid tibia following local anesthesia of the area using the Osteoprobe device (Active Life Scientific, Santa Barbara, CA, USA). Indentation distance was standardized against a calibration phantom of methylmethacrylate and results, as percentage of this reference value, expressed as bone material strength index units (BMSi). We found that the bone material properties reflected in the BMSi value of Norwegian women was significantly inferior when compared to Spanish women (77 ± 7.1 versus 80.7 ± 7.8, p < 0.001). Total hip BMD was significantly higher in Norwegian women (1.218 g/cm(2) versus 0.938 g/cm(2) , p < 0.001) but regression analysis revealed that indentation values did not vary with BMD r(2)  = 0.03 or age r(2)  = 0.04. In conclusion Norwegian women show impaired bone material properties, higher bone mass, and were taller than Spanish women. The increased height will increase the impact on bone after falls, and impaired bone material properties may further enhance the risk fracture after such falls. These ethnic differences in bone material properties may partly explain the higher propensity for fracture in Norwegian women.

  3. Cold seep carbonates along the Norwegian margin, insights into U-Th geochronology and S geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremiere, A.; Lepland, A.; Wing, B. A.; Sahy, D.; Condon, D. J.; Chand, S.; Noble, S. R.; Bui, T. H.; Thorsnes, T.; Brunstad, H.

    2015-12-01

    Cold seep carbonates along the Norwegian margin, insights into U-Th geochronology and S geochemistryAuthigenic carbonate crusts form in shallow subsurface of marine sediments due to the microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). As a result they are unique archives of the locus and intensity of past methane seepage that can be dated by using U-daughter decay affording the unique opportunity to constrain the absolute timing of methane release events. Because AOM is mainly driven by the microbial reduction of seawater sulfate, multiple sulfur isotope compositions of paired carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) and pyrite in seep carbonates taken as proxies for porewater sulfate and sulfide, respectively, have the potential to reconstruct the biogeochemical conditions under which seep carbonates precipitate. Methane-derived carbonate crusts were collected from several seepage sites on the Norwegian continental shelf, including sites in the North Sea, the Norwegian Sea and the Barents Sea. The U-Th dating results constrain the main episode of carbonate crust formation in the Barents and Norwegian seas during the time interval between 14 and 7 ka. Such ages suggest that the methane seepage along the northern Norwegian margin was most active after the collapse of the Scandinavian ice sheet and deglaciation of the area that took place at about 15 ka. The methane flux for the carbonate crust formation was likely provided by the dissociation of methane hydrates that extensively formed in underlying sediments during the last glacial period, but became unstable due to depressuring effects of retreating ice sheet. The precipitation of studied North Sea carbonate crusts occurred more recently, from 6 to 1 ka, suggesting that their formation is unrelated to the glacial history of the area. The paired sulfur stable isotope compositions of pyrite-CAS record a large range of fractionation factors (from 30 to 70 ‰) reflecting change of sulfate-reduction rates possibly controlled

  4. Ridge transform fault spreading pattern in freezing wax.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, D W; Brune, J N

    1972-10-20

    A laboratory experiment shows that ridge-ridge transform faults, inactive fracture zones, and other features characteristic of spreading oceanic ridges can be produced in a variety of paraffins. Although the resultant pattern depends upon the temperature of the wax and the ratio of spreading rate to surface cooling, the characteristic orthogonal ridge transform fault system is a preferred mode of separation. Symmetric spreading occurs under conditions of no tensile strength across the ridge, and the stability of transform faults is a consequence of their lack of shear strength. The experiment also shows that properties characteristic of oceanic ridges occur under conditions of passive convection where upwelling of material at the ridge crest is a result only of hydrostatic forces in the fluid; that is, the plate separation is caused not by large convective forces beneath the ridge but rather by tensile forces in the plate. PMID:17735477

  5. Wrinkle Ridges in Aeolis Dorsa, Mars: Preliminary Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borden, R. M.; Burr, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    Previous work has interpreted wrinkle ridges as compressional landforms caused by movement along blind thrust faults. Our preliminary mapping in the Aeolis Dorsa, Mars has identified widely distributed wrinkle ridges, suggesting episodic contraction.

  6. 1. Building 8 south elevation oblique along Ridge Avenue. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Building 8 south elevation oblique along Ridge Avenue. View looking east. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), Building No. 8, 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. 1. Building 7 south elevation oblique along Ridge Avenue. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Building 7 south elevation oblique along Ridge Avenue. View looking east. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), Building No. 7, 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. 1. General view, corner of Ridge Avenue and Crawford Street. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view, corner of Ridge Avenue and Crawford Street. Building 10 shown center. View looking east. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Detail view of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall showing drainpipes, camera facing northwest - Fort Barry, Bonita Ridge Access Road, Retaining Wall, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  10. View of northern end of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of northern end of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, camera facing northwest - Fort Barry, Bonita Ridge Access Road, Retaining Wall, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  11. Detail view of reinforced concrete of Bonita Ridge Access Road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of reinforced concrete of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, camera facing northwest - Fort Barry, Bonita Ridge Access Road, Retaining Wall, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  12. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  13. Oak Ridge Reservation Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    This report presents the waste management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation facilities. The primary purpose is to convey what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year.

  14. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1 (Chestnut Ridge Security Pits) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This Remedial Investigation (RI) Work Plan specifically addresses Chestnut Ridge Operable Unit 1, (OU1) which consists of the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP). The CRSP are located {approximately}800 ft southeast of the central portion of the Y-12 Plant atop Chestnut Ridge, which is bounded to the northwest by Bear Creek Valley and to the southeast by Bethel Valley. Operated from 1973 to 1988, the CRSP consisted of a series of trenches used for the disposal of classified hazardous and nonhazardous waste materials. Disposal of hazardous waste materials was discontinued in December 1984, while nonhazardous waste disposal ended on November 8, 1988. An RI is being conducted at this site in response to CERCLA regulations. The overall objectives of the RI are to collect data necessary to evaluate the nature and extent of contaminants of concern (COC), support an ecological risk assessment (ERA) and a human health risk assessment (HHRA), support the evaluation of remedial alternatives, and ultimately develop a Record of Decision for the site. The purpose of this Work Plan is to outline RI activities necessary to define the nature and extent of suspected contaminants at Chestnut Ridge OU1. Potential migration pathways also will be investigated. Data collected during the RI will be used to evaluate the overall risk posed to human health and the environment by OU1.

  15. Ridged Terrain on the Floor Melas Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Are these dunes? One of the most puzzling findings of the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera investigation has been the discovery of many surfaces of sharp, parallel ridges and grooves that--at first glance--look like dunes, but upon closer inspection turn out to be something else. They aren't dunes because they occur too close together, their crests are too sharp, and their slopes are too symmetrical. In most places that they occur on Mars, they appear to be occurring within a specific layer of (usually) dark material. Exactly what processes make these ridges is a mystery, but it clearly involves some sort of erosion. Dark mesas in this picture of the floor of Melas Chasma in the Valles Marineris system are developing sharp, parallel troughs and pits that appear to eventually erode to become the fields of ridges seen throughout the rest of the image. Dark, ridged surfaces like this are common in the central floors of Valles Marineris and elsewhere in the equatorial regions of Mars, and present a type of surface that may need to be avoided by future Mars landers. This image, illuminated by sunlight from the left, covers an area 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) wide and 14.5 kilometers (9 miles) long. The scene is located near 8.8oS, 76.8oW and was acquired on March 22, 1999.

  16. Blue Ridge Technical College Adult Reading Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Caren

    The development and implementation of a tutor training program designed to eliminate adult illiteracy in one area of North Carolina are described in this paper. Various sections of the paper provide information about (1) the history of the program, which was initiated by staff members at the learning center of the Blue Ridge Technical College in…

  17. Lomonosov Ridge off Greenland (LOMROG) 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcussen, C.; Jakobsson, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Lomonosov Ridge off Greenland was the primary focus for the LOMROG expedition. This part of the Arctic is virtually unexplored as difficult sea ice conditions have made it inaccessible for surface vessels. With Swedish icebreaker /Oden/ supported by new Russian nuclear icebreaker /50 Let Pobedy/, LOMROG managed to reach the southern most tip of the Lomonosov Ridge off Greenland to carry out multibeam mapping, subbottom and seismic reflection profiling, gravity measurements, geological coring and oceanographic station work. The LOMROG expedition is a Swedish/Danish collaboration project with participating scientists also from Canada, Finland, and USA. The data collection was made for the purpose of studying paleoceanography/oceanography, glacial history and the tectonic evolution of the of the Arctic Ocean as well as for Denmark's Continental Shelf Project under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea Article 76. One of the reasons for targeting the ice-infested area north of Greenland was that it likely holds answers to key questions regarding the glacial history of the Arctic Ocean, such as whether immense ice shelves existed in the Arctic Ocean during past glacial periods./ /Previous expeditions with /Oden/ in 1996 and the US nuclear submarine /Hawkbill/ in 1999, have demonstrated the occurrence of ice grounding down to 1000 m present water depth at about 87°N 145°E on the Lomonosov Ridge crest. If this ice grounding event resulted from a much debated, but supposedly coherent and large floating ice shelf, the Lomonosov Ridge north of Greenland must also be scoured. To test the hypothesis of a huge Arctic Ocean ice shelf LOMROG mapped the areas of the Lomonosov Ridge north of Greenland using the new EM120 multibeam bathymetry and SBP120 subbottom profiling system installed on the /Oden/ during the spring of 2007. Glacial erosion was indeed found at water depth shallower than approximately 800 m and two sediment cores retrieved from the glacially

  18. Louisiana slope salt-ridge continuity confirmed

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Hoffman, K.S.; Sullivan, N.

    1989-03-01

    The Louisiana offshore is a world-class hydrocarbon province. Abundant reservoirs develop as the result of interaction between salt tectonics and sedimentation. Thus, it is essential to know both regional and local characteristics of the extent and timing of salt tectonics as an aid in hydrocarbon exploration. Exploration mythology mandates that salt domes and ridges are virtually random across the slope area. In sharp contrast, the authors describe a definite pattern to the salt ridges of slightly concave (to the north) arcs, with the southernmost arc located along the Sigsbee Escarpment and the northernmost along the shelf break. Furthermore, salt domes may not be truly randomly located but rather part of ancestral or existent salt ridges. Confirming data are provided by dip bathymatric and seismic profiles. The bathymetric profiles are at 5-mi (8-km) spacings from 1987 published charts of the Gulf of Mexico. Dip seismic lines reveal that bathymetric highs are associated with underlying salt. Buried salt accumulations are surficially expressed by actual ridges and domes, a leveling of sea floor, or a local decrease in the rate of regional slope descent. Salt is the Neogene-age basement of the Louisiana slope. The existence of an overall salt-ridge pattern implies that there is a single dynamic geologic system controlling the evolution of this slope. As salt tectonic rates and timing are deciphered for specific sites along dip, intervening rates may be interpolated to unmapped zones. Confirming an overall salt tectonic pattern is mandatory prior to quantifying regional and specific rates for the whole slope.

  19. An interdisciplinary management of severely resorbed maxillary anterior ridge complicated by traumatic bite using a ridge splitting technique

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Narender Dev; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Chaudhari, Prabhat Kumar; Rathi, Shraddha

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the teeth and alveolar ridge of the maxillary anterior region due to trauma can cause severe alveolar ridge deficiency. Ridge augmentation is a valuable periodontal plastic surgical method for the correction of ridge defects for esthetic purpose. Although ridge augmentation can help to restore the ridge volume, the grafting procedures can significantly increase the patient morbidity, treatment time, and the cost. Among the ridge augmentation techniques, the ridge split procedure demonstrates many benefits such as no need for donor site, the rare risk of damage to underlying anatomical structures, less pain, and swelling. This case report presents a vertical split technique for increasing the bone volume. There was a remarkable healing and significant increase in bone volume. We have followed the case for 6 months. PMID:25810602

  20. Slow to Ultraslow Seafloor Spreading in the Norway Basin Under Influence of the Iceland Hotspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, A. J.; Mjelde, R.; Faleide, J. I.

    2005-12-01

    The Norway Basin was initiated by continental breakup between northern Europe and Greenland/Jan Mayen in the earliest Eocene (~54Ma). Being part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, continental breakup and early seafloor spreading produced voluminous magmatism. An ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) profile acquired in the year 2000 from the Norwegian Moere margin to the extinct spreading axis of the Aegir Ridge, was used to estimate variations in magma productivity as the oceanic basin evolved. Due to low magnetic data coverage, a satellite derived gravity map proved suitable to reinterpret the East Jan Mayen Fracture Zone (EJMFZ) system, but none of the other proposed fracture zones within the Norway Basin could be identified along its ~500 km length. The revised EJMFZ trace was used to re-evaluate spreading direction in the Norway Basin, which is quite asymmetric as it is condensed mostly on the southwestern side. The magnetic track recorded along the OBS profile was used to identify magnetic seafloor spreading anomalies by forward modeling, and projected onto synthetic flow lines half spreading rates were derived along-profile. Maximum rate was above 3 cm/a between A24A and A24b, falling off to ~0.7 cm/a (ultra-slow) towards the mid-Oligocene (25-28 Ma) termination of seafloor spreading. Breakup magmatism created oceanic crust up to 10-11 km thick, tapering down to thin crust by C23 time (51.4 Ma), the increased melt potential was thus spent ~2.5 Ma after continental breakup. There is a conspicuous correlation between half spreading rate and oceanic crustal thickness. As this is not observed in a normal seafloor spreading environment at most rates observed here, both plate spreading and magma production should be governed by a common cause, presumably hot asthenosphere restricted to the continental rift zone. While Oceanic crust created during ultra-slow spreading is thin (4 km), crust created during slow spreading is also thinner than the world average (5 vs. 7

  1. Mid-ocean ridge jumps associated with hotspot magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, Eric; Ito, Garrett; Behn, Mark D.

    2008-02-01

    Hotspot-ridge interaction produces a wide range of phenomena including excess crustal thickness, geochemical anomalies, off-axis volcanic ridges and ridge relocations or jumps. Ridges are recorded to have jumped toward many hotspots including, Iceland, Discovery, Galápagos, Kerguelen and Tristan de Cuhna. The causes of ridge jumps likely involve a number of interacting processes related to hotspots. One such process is reheating of the lithosphere as magma penetrates it to feed near-axis volcanism. We study this effect by using the hybrid, finite-element code, FLAC, to simulate two-dimensional (2-D, cross-section) viscous mantle flow, elasto-plastic deformation of the lithosphere and heat transport in a ridge setting near an off-axis hotspot. Heating due to magma transport through the lithosphere is implemented within a hotspot region of fixed width. To determine the conditions necessary to initiate a ridge jump, we vary four parameters: hotspot magmatic heating rate, spreading rate, seafloor age at the location of the hotspot and ridge migration rate. Our results indicate that the hotspot magmatic heating rate required to initiate a ridge jump increases non-linearly with increasing spreading rate and seafloor age. Models predict that magmatic heating, itself, is most likely to cause jumps at slow spreading rates such as at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge on Iceland. In contrast, despite the higher magma flux at the Galápagos hotspot, magmatic heating alone is probably insufficient to induce a ridge jump at the present-day due to the intermediate ridge spreading rate of the Galápagos Spreading Center. The time required to achieve a ridge jump, for fixed or migrating ridges, is found to be on the order of 10 5-10 6 years. Simulations that incorporate ridge migration predict that after a ridge jump occurs the hotspot and ridge migrate together for time periods that increase with magma flux. Model results also suggest a mechanism for ridge reorganizations not related to

  2. Loki's Castle: A sediment-influenced hydrothermal vent field at the ultra-slow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumberger, T.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Pedersen, R.; Thorseth, I. H.; Lilley, M. D.; Moeller, K.

    2010-12-01

    The chemical composition as well as the stable and radiogenic isotope signatures of hydrothermal fluids from the Loki’s Castle vent field, located at the Mohns-Knipovich bend in the Norwegian-Greenland Sea (73°N), are substantially different from sediment-starved mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. Geochemical studies of the hydrothermal vent fluids and the adjacent rift valley sediments provide insights into the influence of sediments on the hydrothermal fluid composition and provide constraints on acting redox conditions. Additionally, they reflect the degree of fluid-rock-sediment interaction at this arctic hydrothermal vent field. Here we present an overview of the geochemical characteristics of the hydrothermal and sedimentary components at Loki’s Castle, obtained during expeditions in 2008, 2009 and 2010, with emphasis on the stable and radiogenic isotope signatures. We compare these data with other sediment-influenced and sediment-starved mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. The hydrothermal vent fluids are characterized by a pH of ˜ 5.5 and by elevated concentrations of methane, hydrogen and ammonia, which reflect a sedimentary contribution. δ13CDIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) are depleted relative to mantle carbon values, consistent with an organic carbon input. The δ18OH2O values of the vents fluids are enriched compared to background bottom seawater, whereas the δD values are not. 87Sr/86Sr ratios are more radiogenic than those characteristic of un-sedimented mid-ocean ridge vent fluids. S-isotope data reflect mixing of a MORB source with sulphide derived from reduced seawater sulphate. To document the background sediment input of the ridge system, short gravity cores and up to 18 m long piston cores were recovered from various localities in the rift valley. The pore-fluid isotope chemistries of the sediments show vertical gradients that primarily reflect diagenesis and degradation of organic matter. The vertical gradient is locally enhanced

  3. Initiation of Ridges and Transform Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyst, M.; Thompson, G. A.; Parsons, T.

    2004-12-01

    No clear consensus has emerged to explain initiation of the strikingly regular pattern of ocean ridges and transform faults. The question is important on the continents also, because a less regular pattern of step-overs on faults such as the San Andreas influences the sources of earthquakes. We explore the question by finite element modeling and a study of observational data on ridges and transforms. We focus on the simplest case, where ridges and transforms seem to self-organize at new plate boundaries as soon as new oceanic (magmatic) crust forms. The South Atlantic supplies a clear example. Continental South America and Africa separated along an irregular break, whose general shape is still preserved in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In detail, however, the sea floor magnetic anomalies and satellite gravity show that traces of the ridges and transforms extend to the base of the continental slope, i.e. they formed quickly in the new oceanic crust. The Gulf of California provides another clear example and is notable because of its northward transition into the continental San Andreas fault system. In continental crust, dike segments connected by transform faults provide the clearest analogues of oceanic ridges and transforms. Remarkably, the ridge-transform pattern has been simulated by pulling the crust on molten wax [Oldenburg and Brune, JGR, 80, 1975] and also observed in the crust of a molten lava lake [Duffield, JGR, 77, 1972]. In neither of these models, however, do the spatial and temporal scales permit investigation of the dikes whose repeated emplacement and inflation builds layer 3 of the ocean crust. It is well established that, under a buoyant head of magma, dikes tend to fracture and intrude the crust in planes perpendicular to the least horizontal stress, and they relieve the stress difference as they inflate [e.g. Parsons and Thompson, Science, 253, 1991]. Dikes are commonly used as stress-direction indicators analogous to artificial hydraulic fractures

  4. 78 FR 2431 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office, Oak Ridge, TN...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    .... Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office has corrected an inventory of human remains and associated funerary... of Energy Oak Ridge Office. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary object to the... object in the possession of the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office. The human remains...

  5. Divergent Ridge Features on the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, M. E.; Sautter, L.; Steele, M.

    2014-12-01

    Multibeam data collected using a Kongsberg EM122 sonar system on the NOAA ship R/V Marcus G. Langseth led by chief scientist Douglas Toomey (University of Oregon) in 2009 and with a Simrad EM302 sonar system on two NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer cruises led by chief scientists James Gardner (University of New Hampshire) and Catalina Martinez (University of Rhode Island) in 2009 show the morphology of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Ridges, as well as the Blanco and Mendocino Fracture Zones. These ridges and fracture zones comprise the divergent plate boundary of the eastern edge of the Pacific Plate and the western edges of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda Plates. Both plates are being subducted beneath the western edge of the North American Plate. CARIS HIPS 8.1 software was used to process the multibeam data and create bathymetric images. The ridge axes, located off the coast of Washington and Oregon (USA) adjacent to the Cascadia Basin, indicate obvious signs of spreading, due to the series of faults and rocky ridges aligned parallel to the plate boundaries. Fault and ridge orientations are used to compare the direction of seafloor spreading, and indicate that both the Juan de Fuca Plate and Gorda Plate are spreading in a southeastern direction. Younger ridges from the Gorda Ridge system mapped in the study run parallel to the boundary, however older ridges do not show the same orientation, indicating a change in spreading direction. The presence of hydrothermal vents along the Juan de Fuca Ridge is also evidence of the active boundary, as the vent chimneys are composed of minerals and metals precipitated from the hot water heated by magma from beneath the spreading seafloor. In this study, the data are used to compare and contrast earthquake seismicity and ridge morphologies at a depth range of approximately 762 to 2134 meters. The diverging Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Gorda Plates along with the San Andreas Fault have potential to increase seismic and volcanic activity around

  6. Growth of a tectonic ridge during the Landers earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R.W.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-04-01

    The formation of tectonic ridges by localized vertical uplift along strike-slip faults has long been suspected, but the actual growth of a tectonic ridge during an earthquake has never been documented. During the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake sequence, an awl-shaped, dome-like topographic ridge along the Emerson fault zone increased its height at least 1 m concurrently with 3 m of right-lateral shift across the fault zone containing the ridge. Five deformation vectors within the ridge reveal dilatant behavior in addition to the uplift and shift on boundary faults. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Large-scale deformation associated with ridge subduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Fisher, M.A.; Scholl, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    Continuum models are used to investigate the large-scale deformation associated with the subduction of aseismic ridges. Formulated in the horizontal plane using thin viscous sheet theory, these models measure the horizontal transmission of stress through the arc lithosphere accompanying ridge subduction. Modelling was used to compare the Tonga arc and Louisville ridge collision with the New Hebrides arc and d'Entrecasteaux ridge collision, which have disparate arc-ridge intersection speeds but otherwise similar characteristics. Models of both systems indicate that diffuse deformation (low values of the effective stress-strain exponent n) are required to explain the observed deformation. -from Authors

  8. Growth of a tectonic ridge during the Landers earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, R.W.; Johnson, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The formation of tectonic ridges by localized vertical uplift along strike-slip faults has long been suspected, but the actual growth of a tectonic ridge during an earthquake has never been documented. During the 1992 Landers, California, earthquake sequence, an awl-shaped, dome-like topographic ridge along the Emerson fault zone increased its height at least 1 m concurrently with 3 m of right-lateral shift across the fault zone containing the ridge. Five deformation vectors within the ridge reveal dilatant behavior in addition to the uplift and shift on boundary faults.

  9. Mapping the regolith: Deep weathering and its impact for the Norwegian landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brönner, Marco; Olesen, Odleiv

    2013-04-01

    Different epochs of glaciations onshore Norway eroded and removed almost entirely the overlying sedimentary successions. The preglacial landscape is consequently masked by glacial erosion and the landscape as it is today might reflect the impact of deep weathering. The numerous sounds and islands along the Norwegian coast could to a large extend be conditioned by exhumation and erosion of weathered basement. Onshore Norway and in wells on the Norwegian continental shelf quite a few examples of deeply weathered and fractured basement are observed. A couple of hundred meters deep saprolites in narrow fracture zones were for example observed on the mainland of south-eastern Norway. Furthermore along the Norwegian coast several places like Lista, Karmøy, Vågsøy and at the Lofoten-Vesterålen archipelago, are well known for significant amounts of deeply weathered basement. A comprehensive mapping of these remains of weathering gives valuable indications if and to what extend the today's Norwegian landscape can be the product of glacial erosion of not only sedimentary rocks, but also thick packages of soft, deep weathered basement. New high quality aeromagnetic data were acquired along the Norwegian coast over the last years by the Geological survey of Norway as part of a crustal onshore-offshore project (COOP) and were applied for systematic mapping of deep weathering in conjunction with reprocessed data by using the AMAGER (AeroMAgnetic and GEomorphological Relations) method. Onshore Norway the AMAGER method was successfully applied in SE Norway (Olesen et al. 2007) and comprises a correlation of morphological depressions and magnetic lows. The method is based on the not necessarily but for Norway common observation that saprolite shows a noticeable reduced magnetization compared to the parent material and is moreover easily erodible. Relative magnetic lows correlating with topographic depressions in eroded and exposed basement landscapes are hitherto likely to

  10. Deregulation of the Building Code and the Norwegian Approach to Regulation of Accessibility in the Built Environment.

    PubMed

    Lyngstad, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation is on the political agenda in the European countries. The Norwegian building code related to universal design and accessibility is challenged. To meet this, the Norwegian Building Authority have chosen to examine established truths and are basing their revised code on scientific research and field tests. But will this knowledge-based deregulation comply within the framework of the anti-discrimination act and, and if not: who suffers and to what extent? PMID:27534290

  11. An ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Dick, Henry J B; Lin, Jian; Schouten, Hans

    2003-11-27

    New investigations of the Southwest Indian and Arctic ridges reveal an ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge that is characterized by intermittent volcanism and a lack of transform faults. We find that the mantle beneath such ridges is emplaced continuously to the seafloor over large regions. The differences between ultraslow- and slow-spreading ridges are as great as those between slow- and fast-spreading ridges. The ultraslow-spreading ridges usually form at full spreading rates less than about 12 mm yr(-1), though their characteristics are commonly found at rates up to approximately 20 mm yr(-1). The ultraslow-spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. The amagmatic segments are a previously unrecognized class of accretionary plate boundary structure and can assume any orientation, with angles relative to the spreading direction ranging from orthogonal to acute. These amagmatic segments sometimes coexist with magmatic ridge segments for millions of years to form stable plate boundaries, or may displace or be displaced by transforms and magmatic ridge segments as spreading rate, mantle thermal structure and ridge geometry change.

  12. An ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge.

    PubMed

    Dick, Henry J B; Lin, Jian; Schouten, Hans

    2003-11-27

    New investigations of the Southwest Indian and Arctic ridges reveal an ultraslow-spreading class of ocean ridge that is characterized by intermittent volcanism and a lack of transform faults. We find that the mantle beneath such ridges is emplaced continuously to the seafloor over large regions. The differences between ultraslow- and slow-spreading ridges are as great as those between slow- and fast-spreading ridges. The ultraslow-spreading ridges usually form at full spreading rates less than about 12 mm yr(-1), though their characteristics are commonly found at rates up to approximately 20 mm yr(-1). The ultraslow-spreading ridges consist of linked magmatic and amagmatic accretionary ridge segments. The amagmatic segments are a previously unrecognized class of accretionary plate boundary structure and can assume any orientation, with angles relative to the spreading direction ranging from orthogonal to acute. These amagmatic segments sometimes coexist with magmatic ridge segments for millions of years to form stable plate boundaries, or may displace or be displaced by transforms and magmatic ridge segments as spreading rate, mantle thermal structure and ridge geometry change. PMID:14647373

  13. Gender differentiation by finger ridge count among South Indian population.

    PubMed

    Nithin, M D; Manjunatha, B; Preethi, D S; Balaraj, B M

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the gender based on finger ridge count within a well-defined area. Rolled fingerprints were taken from 550 subjects (275 men and 275 women) belonging to South Indian population all within the age range of 18-65 years. Results show that women have a significantly higher ridge count than men. Application of Baye's theorem suggests that a fingerprint possessing ridge density <13 ridges/25 mm(2) is most likely to be of male origin. Likewise, a fingerprint having ridge count >14 ridges/25 mm(2) are most likely to be of female origin. These results are helpful as a tool for fingerprint experts as they can be used as a presumptive indicator of gender based on the degree of ridge density. PMID:21315302

  14. Faulting and folding in the formation of planetary wrinkle ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Plescia, J. B.; Franklin, B. J.

    Topographic profiles for planetary wrinkle ridges compiled from high-resolution Lunar Topographic Orthophoto maps for the moon and from monoscopic photoclinometry data for Mars reveal that many of these ridges are characterized by an elevation offset between one side of a ridge and the other. To investigate the relative importance of faulting and folding in the formation of planetary wrinkle ridges, this paper develops a model of subsurface structure, based on observations and measurements of surface physiography and topography by Golombek and Franklin (1987) and Plescia (1990), and assumptions of subsurface structure, which makes it possible to estimate shortening across wrinkle ridges on Moon and Mars. According to this model, total ridge shortening is on the order of 100 m; shortening due to faulting exceeds shortening due to folding for fault dips up to 60-80 deg, implying that faults beneath many wrinkle ridges break the surface to accomodate the greater displacement along the fault than is accomodated in the fold.

  15. Dielectric ridge waveguide gas laser apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    DeMaria, A.J.; Bridges, W.

    1989-03-14

    A dielectric ridged waveguide flowing gas laser apparatus is described, comprising in combination; a dielectric substrate having a predetermined number of the grooves formed theron, the grooves extending along the longitudinal axis of the dielectric substrate, an electrically conductive member in parallel alignment with the grooved side of the dielectric substrate such that an air gasp is formed therebetween the air gap containing an active laser gas medium, electrically conductive strips disposed on the outside of the dielectric substrate forming electrodes, the conductive strips being aligned with the grooves and having the same length and width as the grooves, and an excitation source connected between the conductive member and the conductive strips, to provide lasing in the ridged waveguide.

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The objective of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Management Plan is to compile and to consolidate information annually on how the ORNL Waste Management Program is conducted, which waste management facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, what activities are planned for the forthcoming fiscal year (FY), and how all of the activities are documented.

  17. Fingerprint image mosaicking by recursive ridge mapping.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoungtaek; Choi, Heeseung; Lee, Sangyoun; Kim, Jaihie

    2007-10-01

    To obtain a large fingerprint image from several small partial images, mosaicking of fingerprint images has been recently researched. However, existing approaches cannot provide accurate transformations for mosaics when it comes to aligning images because of the plastic distortion that may occur due to the nonuniform contact between a finger and a sensor or the deficiency of the correspondences in the images. In this paper, we propose a new scheme for mosaicking fingerprint images, which iteratively matches ridges to overcome the deficiency of the correspondences and compensates for the amount of plastic distortion between two partial images by using a thin-plate spline model. The proposed method also effectively eliminates erroneous correspondences and decides how well the transformation is estimated by calculating the registration error with a normalized distance map. The proposed method consists of three phases: feature extraction, transform estimation, and mosaicking. Transform is initially estimated with matched minutia and the ridges attached to them. Unpaired ridges in the overlapping area between two images are iteratively matched by minimizing the registration error, which consists of the ridge matching error and the inverse consistency error. During the estimation, erroneous correspondences are eliminated by considering the geometric relationship between the correspondences and checking if the registration error is minimized or not. In our experiments, the proposed method was compared with three existing methods in terms of registration accuracy, image quality, minutia extraction rate, processing time, reject to fuse rate, and verification performance. The average registration error of the proposed method was less than three pixels, and the maximum error was not more than seven pixels. In a verification test, the equal error rate was reduced from 10% to 2.7% when five images were combined by our proposed method. The proposed method was superior to other

  18. ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) 89

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.D.; Appleton, B.R.; Jefferson, J.W.; Merriman, J.R.; Mynatt, F.R.; Richmond, C.R.; Rosenthal, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    This is the inaugural issues of an annual publication about the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Here you will find a brief overview of ORNL, a sampling of our recent research achievements, and a glimpse of the directions we want to take over the next 15 years. A major purpose of ornl 89 is to provide the staff with a sketch of the character and dynamics of the Laboratory.

  19. The mean composition of ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, Allison; Dalton, Colleen A.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Su, Yongjun; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    2013-03-01

    mean composition of mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) is determined using a global data set of major elements, trace elements, and isotopes compiled from new and previously published data. A global catalog of 771 ridge segments, including their mean depth, length, and spreading rate enables calculation of average compositions for each segment. Segment averages allow weighting by segment length and spreading rate and reduce the bias introduced by uneven sampling. A bootstrapping statistical technique provides rigorous error estimates. Based on the characteristics of the data, we suggest a revised nomenclature for MORB. "ALL MORB" is the total composition of the crust apart from back-arc basins, N-MORB the most likely basalt composition encountered along the ridge >500 km from hot spots, and D-MORB the depleted end-member. ALL MORB and N-MORB are substantially more enriched than early estimates of normal ridge basalts. The mean composition of back-arc spreading centers requires higher extents of melting and greater concentrations of fluid-mobile elements, reflecting the influence of water on back-arc petrogenesis. The average data permit a re-evaluation of several problems of global geochemistry. The K/U ratio reported here (12,340 ± 840) is in accord with previous estimates, much lower than the estimate of Arevalo et al. (2009). The low Sm/Nd and 143Nd/144Nd ratio of ALL MORB and N-MORB provide constraints on the hypothesis that Earth has a non-chondritic primitive mantle. Either Earth is chondritic in Sm/Nd and the hypothesis is incorrect or MORB preferentially sample an enriched reservoir, requiring a large depleted reservoir in the deep mantle.

  20. Microbial life in ridge flank crustal fluids.

    PubMed

    Huber, Julie A; Johnson, H Paul; Butterfield, David A; Baross, John A

    2006-01-01

    To determine the microbial community diversity within old oceanic crust, a novel sampling strategy was used to collect crustal fluids at Baby Bare Seamount, a 3.5 Ma old outcrop located in the north-east Pacific Ocean on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Stainless steel probes were driven directly into the igneous ocean crust to obtain samples of ridge flank crustal fluids. Genetic signatures and enrichment cultures of microorganisms demonstrate that these crustal fluids host a microbial community composed of species indigenous to the subseafloor, including anaerobic thermophiles, and species from other deep-sea habitats, such as seawater and sediments. Evidence using molecular techniques indicates the presence of a relatively small but active microbial population, dominated by bacteria. The microbial community diversity found in the crustal fluids may indicate habitat variability in old oceanic crust, with inputs of nutrients from seawater, sediment pore-water fluids and possibly hydrothermal sources. This report further supports the presence of an indigenous microbial community in ridge flank crustal fluids and advances our understanding of the potential physiological and phylogenetic diversity of this community.

  1. Jurassic zircons from the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yang, Qunhui; Zhang, Lingmin; Ji, Fuwu; Dick, Henry

    2016-01-01

    The existence of ancient rocks in present mid-ocean ridges have long been observed but received less attention. Here we report the discovery of zircons with both reasonably young ages of about 5 Ma and abnormally old ages of approximate 180 Ma from two evolved gabbroic rocks that were dredged from the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) in the Gallieni fracture zone. U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope analyses of zircons were made using ion probe and conventional laser abrasion directly in petrographic thin sections. Young zircons and their host oxide gabbro have positive Hf isotope compositions (εHf = +15.7-+12.4), suggesting a highly depleted mantle beneath the SWIR. The spread εHf values (from-2.3 to-4.5) of abnormally old zircons, together with the unradiogenic Nd-Hf isotope of the host quartz diorite, appears to suggest an ancient juvenile magmatism along the rifting margin of the southern Gondwana prior to the opening of the Indian Ocean. A convincing explanation for the origin of the unusually old zircons is yet to surface, however, an update of the theory of plate tectonics would be expected with continuing discovery of ancient rocks in the mid-oceanic ridges and abyssal ocean basins. PMID:27185575

  2. Jurassic zircons from the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yang, Qunhui; Zhang, Lingmin; Ji, Fuwu; Dick, Henry

    2016-05-17

    The existence of ancient rocks in present mid-ocean ridges have long been observed but received less attention. Here we report the discovery of zircons with both reasonably young ages of about 5 Ma and abnormally old ages of approximate 180 Ma from two evolved gabbroic rocks that were dredged from the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) in the Gallieni fracture zone. U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotope analyses of zircons were made using ion probe and conventional laser abrasion directly in petrographic thin sections. Young zircons and their host oxide gabbro have positive Hf isotope compositions (εHf = +15.7-+12.4), suggesting a highly depleted mantle beneath the SWIR. The spread εHf values (from-2.3 to-4.5) of abnormally old zircons, together with the unradiogenic Nd-Hf isotope of the host quartz diorite, appears to suggest an ancient juvenile magmatism along the rifting margin of the southern Gondwana prior to the opening of the Indian Ocean. A convincing explanation for the origin of the unusually old zircons is yet to surface, however, an update of the theory of plate tectonics would be expected with continuing discovery of ancient rocks in the mid-oceanic ridges and abyssal ocean basins.

  3. Jurassic zircons from the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hao; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yang, Qunhui; Zhang, Lingmin; Ji, Fuwu; Dick, Henry

    2016-05-01

    The existence of ancient rocks in present mid-ocean ridges have long been observed but received less attention. Here we report the discovery of zircons with both reasonably young ages of about 5 Ma and abnormally old ages of approximate 180 Ma from two evolved gabbroic rocks that were dredged from the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) in the Gallieni fracture zone. U–Pb and Lu–Hf isotope analyses of zircons were made using ion probe and conventional laser abrasion directly in petrographic thin sections. Young zircons and their host oxide gabbro have positive Hf isotope compositions (εHf = +15.7–+12.4), suggesting a highly depleted mantle beneath the SWIR. The spread εHf values (from‑2.3 to‑4.5) of abnormally old zircons, together with the unradiogenic Nd-Hf isotope of the host quartz diorite, appears to suggest an ancient juvenile magmatism along the rifting margin of the southern Gondwana prior to the opening of the Indian Ocean. A convincing explanation for the origin of the unusually old zircons is yet to surface, however, an update of the theory of plate tectonics would be expected with continuing discovery of ancient rocks in the mid-oceanic ridges and abyssal ocean basins.

  4. Jurassic zircons from the Southwest Indian Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hao; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yang, Qunhui; Zhang, Lingmin; Ji, Fuwu; Dick, Henry

    2016-01-01

    The existence of ancient rocks in present mid-ocean ridges have long been observed but received less attention. Here we report the discovery of zircons with both reasonably young ages of about 5 Ma and abnormally old ages of approximate 180 Ma from two evolved gabbroic rocks that were dredged from the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) in the Gallieni fracture zone. U–Pb and Lu–Hf isotope analyses of zircons were made using ion probe and conventional laser abrasion directly in petrographic thin sections. Young zircons and their host oxide gabbro have positive Hf isotope compositions (εHf = +15.7–+12.4), suggesting a highly depleted mantle beneath the SWIR. The spread εHf values (from−2.3 to−4.5) of abnormally old zircons, together with the unradiogenic Nd-Hf isotope of the host quartz diorite, appears to suggest an ancient juvenile magmatism along the rifting margin of the southern Gondwana prior to the opening of the Indian Ocean. A convincing explanation for the origin of the unusually old zircons is yet to surface, however, an update of the theory of plate tectonics would be expected with continuing discovery of ancient rocks in the mid-oceanic ridges and abyssal ocean basins. PMID:27185575

  5. Infant directed speech in natural interaction--Norwegian vowel quantity and quality.

    PubMed

    Englund, Kjellrun T; Behne, Dawn M

    2005-05-01

    An interactive face-to-face setting is used to study natural infant directed speech (IDS) compared to adult directed speech (ADS). With distinctive vowel quantity and vowel quality, Norwegian IDS was used in a natural quasi-experimental design. Six Norwegian mothers were recorded over a period of 6 months alone with their infants and in an adult conversation. Vowel duration and spectral attributes of the vowels /a:/, /i:/ and /u:/, and their short counterparts /a/ /i/ and /u/ were analysed. Repeated measures analyses show that effects of vowel quantity did not differ between ADS and IDS, and for back vowel qualities, the vowel space was shifted upwards in IDS compared to ADS suggesting that fronted articulations in natural IDS may visually enhance speech to infants.

  6. Dr. Haakon Sæthre: a Norwegian neuroscientist and his resistance against Nazi Germany.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Haakon Sæthre was a leader of Norwegian neurology and psychiatry. He was resourceful, compassionate and had immense pride in his independent homeland. He described Sæthre-Chotzen syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type III). When Nazi Germany occupied Norway during World War II, Sæthre fearlessly and actively resisted, from revoking his medical association membership, to hiding persecuted Jews as patients in his psychiatric ward and aiding in their escape to Sweden, to managing the largest "illegal" food warehouse in Oslo with Danish humanitarian aid. As a prominent and noticeable citizen, he was arrested and executed by the Nazis in reprisal for the resistance's assassination of a hated Norwegian Nazi. His legacy lives on in Norway, where he was honored by a scholarship fund, a portrait and multiple plaques at Ullevål Hospital, and a street and memorial statue in his hometown. He was a hero and should be remembered by all who practice neurology.

  7. The Norwegian Danish Basin: A key to understanding the Cenozoic in the eastern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Thomas L.; Clausen, Ole R.; Andresen, Katrine J.; Goledowski, Bartosz

    2015-04-01

    The Danish part of Norwegian-Danish Basin, which constitutes the eastern part of the North Sea Basin, has been the key area for sequence stratigraphic subdivision and analysis of the Cenozoic succession since the mid 1990's. Widespread 3D seismic data, in the central parts of the North Sea Basin, as well as more scattered 3D seismic data in the Danish part of the Norwegian-Danish Basin, have given a more detailed understanding of the sequences and indicate that climate is tenable for the origin of Cenozoic sequence boundaries. The previous sequence stratigraphic interpretations have been an integrated part of an ongoing debate concerning vertical movements of the Fennoscandian shield versus the impact of climate and erosion. A newly accessed coherent regional 2D and reprocessed 3D seismic data set, in the Norwegian part of the Norwegian-Danish Basin, constitute the database for a new sequence stratigraphic analysis of the entire area. The objective of the new study is to test previous subdivisions and introduce a coherent 3D sequence stratigraphic analysis and depositional model for the entire Norwegian-Danish Basin. This analysis is necessary to get out of the stalemate with the uplift discussion. The study shows that the original subdivision by Michelsen et al. (1995, 1998) stands. However, revision of few a sequence boundaries may have to be adjusted due to new biostratigraphic information published. Furthermore, high-angle clinoforms and geomorphological transport complexes observed in the Danish North Sea Basin can be traced into the Norwegian sector. This together with the recognition of several other high-angle clinoform complexes, and their associated seismic facies distribution maps and thickness-maps, enhances the level of detail and constrains the previous published paleogeographic reconstructions of the Cenozoic. The geometry of the Cenozoic infill, in the Norwegian part of the Norwegian-Danish Basin, is here interpreted to be controlled by relative sea

  8. The prevalence of nasal mite (Pneumonyssoides caninum) infection in Norwegian dogs.

    PubMed

    Bredal, W P

    1998-04-15

    In a prospective study, the skulls of 250 dogs submitted for necropsy during 1993 at the Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine were examined for the presence of parasites. All skulls were cleaved sagitally, and the frontal sinuses and nasal cavities were visually inspected. Eighteen dogs (7%) had Pneumonyssoides caninum infection at necropsy. No other parasites were observed. Sixteen dogs had heavy or moderate infection scores and 60% of these had concurrent sinusitis. The infected dogs belonged to 14 different breeds, 10 were male and eight were female and they varied in age from four months to 10 years old. Breed distribution, sex and age of the infected dogs did not differ significantly from the total study population. This study indicates that nasal mite infection occurs commonly in Norwegian dogs.

  9. Mental readiness for maritime international operation: procedures developed by Norwegian navy.

    PubMed

    Sanden, Sverre; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Eid, Jarle; Sommerfelt-Pettersen, Jan; Koefoed, Vilhelm; Størksen, Roar; Røsseland, Atle; Neteland, Hans Olav; Wetteland, Per Inge; Wilhelmsen, Eirik Veum

    2014-01-01

    Seafarer's mental health is vital for a well-functioning organisation. Neglecting mental health status on board could be extremely costly for both the crew affected as well as the company. The present article outlines an extensive programme implemented in the Royal Norwegian Navy for personnel deployed in international operations. The challenges involved in international operations bare similarities to onboard personnel in civilian maritime operations. The program utilised by the Royal Norwegian Navy is extensive and not immediately applicable to civilian maritime companies. However, elements of this program could be used with limited resources. Questionnaire based screening, before, during and at the end of a contract period could result in early detections of mental health problems and increased retaining of personnel. This should be done by health professionals. Early targeting of at risk personnel could prevent serious costs for the individual as well as the company. PMID:25231333

  10. Mental readiness for maritime international operation: procedures developed by Norwegian navy.

    PubMed

    Sanden, Sverre; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Eid, Jarle; Sommerfelt-Pettersen, Jan; Koefoed, Vilhelm; Størksen, Roar; Røsseland, Atle; Neteland, Hans Olav; Wetteland, Per Inge; Wilhelmsen, Eirik Veum

    2014-01-01

    Seafarer's mental health is vital for a well-functioning organisation. Neglecting mental health status on board could be extremely costly for both the crew affected as well as the company. The present article outlines an extensive programme implemented in the Royal Norwegian Navy for personnel deployed in international operations. The challenges involved in international operations bare similarities to onboard personnel in civilian maritime operations. The program utilised by the Royal Norwegian Navy is extensive and not immediately applicable to civilian maritime companies. However, elements of this program could be used with limited resources. Questionnaire based screening, before, during and at the end of a contract period could result in early detections of mental health problems and increased retaining of personnel. This should be done by health professionals. Early targeting of at risk personnel could prevent serious costs for the individual as well as the company.

  11. The communication atmosphere between physician colleagues: competitive perfectionism or supportive dialogue? A Norwegian study.

    PubMed

    Akre, V; Falkum, E; Hoftvedt, B O; Aasland, O G

    1997-02-01

    Open and supportive communication is probably one of the most important promotors of learning, coping and satisfaction at the workplace. The aim of this paper is to describe and predict the communication atmosphere between Norwegian physicians. Twenty statements describing communication, as perceived by the physicians themselves, were presented to a random sample of the members of the Norwegian Medical Association of which more than 90% of the physicians in the country are members (N = 2628). In general, this investigation indicates that the communication atmosphere among Norwegian physicians is characterised by support and mutual respect. More than half of the respondents fully agreed that communication between colleagues in the workplace is marked by solidarity, and that experienced colleagues show respect for the less experienced in both personal and professional matters. Physicians working in hospitals described the communication atmosphere as substantially more selfish and competitive than non-hospital physicians, whilst general practitioners considered the atmosphere between colleagues to be more supportive than non-specialists. In addition, high perceived stress was associated with the perception of a less supportive atmosphere. However, the strongest predictor of the communication atmosphere was clearly the physician's perceived autonomy. The comprehensive retrenchment programmes implemented in Norwegian hospitals during recent years have increased stress and restricted professional autonomy among both physicians and other occupational groups. Our findings indicate that the communication atmosphere necessary to secure continuity of knowledge within the medical profession may have been jeopardised by this process. In the long term, this may prove hazardous to the quality of medical care. PMID:9015886

  12. Noise-induced hearing loss in a longitudinal study of Norwegian railway workers

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Arve; Skogstad, Marit; Johnsen, Torstein Seip; Engdahl, Bo; Tambs, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyse longitudinal data to assess the risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in Norwegian railway workers. Design Longitudinal. Setting A major Norwegian railway company. Methods We examined data from the first and last audiograms for the period 1991–2014, from 9640 railway workers with varying occupational noise exposure and with an average observation period of 10 years. The course of hearing acuity in seven groups of railway workers (train drivers, conductors, bus drivers, traffic controllers, train maintenance workers, track maintenance workers and others) were compared with each other and with ISO standards (ISO 1999). Results The change in hearing threshold during the observation period was 2–3 dB in the 0.5–4 kHz range and 6–7 dB in the 3–6 kHz range adjusted for age and sex, for all occupational groups, which is slightly less than expected (8 dB) according to ISO 1999. Conclusions The risk of NIHL in Norwegian railway workers during the period 1991–2014 has been negligible. PMID:27591022

  13. Relation between liquid hydrocarbon reserves and geothermal gradients - Norwegian North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, R.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Comparison of average geothermal gradients and initial liquid hydrocarbon reserves for 28 Norwegian North Sea fields indicates that gradients in the largest North Sea oil fields cluster around 2.1F/100 feet. No reserves are found where gradients are lower than 1.8F/100 feet or higher than 2.3F/100 feet. At 6.89 billion barrels, reserves for 14 fields falling between 2.05 and 2.15/100 feet total over four times the reserves for all other fields put together. Reserves for seven fields at gradients lower than 2.05F/100 feet and for seven higher than 2.15F/100 feet total 594 and 991 million barrels, respectively. The conclusion is that 2.1F/100 feet is the optimum gradient for generation of liquid hydrocarbons in the Norwegian North Sea, given the depth, kerogen type, and source rock potential of the Kimmeridge Clay, the primary source rock there. Gradients lower than this have not stimulated maximum generation from the source rock. At higher gradients, increasing gas production from source rocks and thermal cracking of previously generated liquid hydrocarbons to gas are effective in limiting liquid hydrocarbon reserves. The 2.1F/100 feet gradient should be a useful pathfinder in the search for new oil reserves in the Norwegian North Sea. Determination of the optimum gradient should be a useful pathfinder in other regions as well.

  14. Sleep Difficulties and Insomnia Symptoms in Norwegian Musicians Compared to the General Population and Workforce.

    PubMed

    Vaag, Jonas; Saksvik-Lehouillier, Ingvild; Bjørngaard, Johan Håkon; Bjerkeset, Ottar

    2016-01-01

    Sleep problems are reported as common among performing artists and musicians. However, epidemiological research comparing musicians to different groups of the general population is lacking. For this study, 4,168 members of the Norwegian Musician's Union were invited to an online survey regarding work and health. Of the 2,121 (51%) respondents, 1,607 were active performing musicians. We measured prevalence of insomnia symptoms using the Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS), and compared this sample to a representative sample of the general Norwegian population (n = 2,645). Overall, musicians had higher prevalence of insomnia symptoms compared to the general population (Prevalence Difference 6.9, 95% Confidence Interval 3.9-10.0). Item response analysis showed that this difference was mainly explained by nonrestorative sleep and dissatisfaction with sleep among musicians. An additional analysis, comparing musicians to the general Norwegian workforce (n = 8,518) on sleep difficulties, confirmed this tendency (Prevalence Difference 6.2, 95% Confidence Interval 4.3-8.1). Musicians performing classical, contemporary, rock, and country music reported the highest prevalence of insomnia, and these genres might be of special interest when developing preventative measures, treatment strategies, and further research on sleep difficulties among musicians.

  15. Symptoms of depression as reported by Norwegian adolescents on the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Lundervold, Astri J.; Breivik, Kyrre; Posserud, Maj-Britt; Stormark, Kjell Morten; Hysing, Mari

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated sex-differences in reports of depressive symptoms on a Norwegian translation of the short version of the Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ). The sample comprised 9702 Norwegian adolescents (born 1993–1995, 54.9% girls), mainly attending highschool. A set of statistical analyses were run to investigate the dimensionality of the SMFQ. Girls scored significantly higher than boys on the SMFQ and used the most severe response-category far more frequently. Overall, the statistical analyses supported the essential unidimensionality of SMFQ. However, the items with the highest loadings according to the bifactor analysis, reflecting problems related to tiredness, restlessness and concentration difficulties, indicated that some of the symptoms may both be independent of and part of the symptomatology of depression. Measurement invariance analysis showed that girls scored slightly higher on some items when taking the latent variable into account; girls had a lower threshold for reporting mood problems and problems related to tiredness than boys, who showed a marginally lower threshold for reporting that no-one loved them. However, the effect on the total SMFQ score was marginal, supporting the use of the Norwegian translation of SMFQ as a continuous variable in further studies of adolescents. PMID:24062708

  16. Reliability of triclosan measures in repeated urine samples from Norwegian pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, Randi J.; Engel, Stephanie M.; Jusko, Todd A.; Calafat, Antonia M.; Hoppin, Jane A.; London, Stephanie J.; Eggesbø, Merete; Aase, Heidi; Zeiner, Pål; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun P.; Guidry, Virginia T.; Longnecker, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a synthetic antibacterial chemical that is used in personal care products and is measurable in urine. Urinary TCS has been associated with allergy in children in Norway and the United States. A reasonable degree of temporal reliability of TCS urinary concentrations has been reported among U.S. children as well as for Puerto Rican pregnant women. We examined the reliability of TCS measures in urine among Norwegian pregnant women. Triclosan was measured in spot urine samples collected in gestational weeks 17, 23, and 29 from 45 women in The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) enrolled in 2007 and 2008. Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (rs) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) statistics were calculated. Fifty-six percent of the 45 women had a least one sample with a value above the method limit of detection (2.3 µg/L). The correlation coefficients were 0.61 for TCS concentrations at 17 and 23 weeks and 0.49 for concentrations at 17 and 29 weeks. For the three time points, the ICC was 0.49. The reliability of TCS concentrations in repeated urine samples from pregnant Norwegian women was reasonably good, suggesting a single urine sample can adequately represent TCS exposure during pregnancy. PMID:24472755

  17. Investigations of a novel fauna from hydrothermal vents along the Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR) (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, H.; Schander, C.; Halanych, K. M.; Levin, L. A.; Sweetman, A.; Tverberg, J.; Hoem, S.; Steen, I.; Thorseth, I. H.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic deep ocean hosts a variety of habitats ranging from fairly uniform sedimentary abyssal plains to highly variable hard bottoms on mid ocean ridges, including biodiversity hotspots like seamounts and hydrothermal vents. Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are usually associated with a highly specialized fauna, and since their discovery in 1977 more than 400 species of animals have been described. This fauna includes various animal groups of which the most conspicuous and well known are annelids, mollusks and crustaceans. The newly discovered deep sea hydrothermal vents on the Mohns-Knipovich ridge north of Iceland harbour unique biodiversity. The Jan Mayen field consists of two main areas with high-temperature white smoker venting and wide areas with low-temperature seepage, located at 5-700 m, while the deeper Loki Castle vent field at 2400 m depth consists of a large area with high temperature black smokers surrounded by a sedimentary area with more diffuse low-temperature venting and barite chimneys. The Jan Mayen sites show low abundance of specialized hydrothermal vent fauna. Single groups have a few specialized representatives but groups otherwise common in hydrothermal vent areas are absent. Slightly more than 200 macrofaunal species have been identified from this vent area, comprising mainly an assortment of bathyal species known from the surrounding area. Analysis of stable isotope data also indicates that the majority of the species present are feeding on phytodetritus and/or phytoplankton. However, the deeper Loki Castle vent field contains a much more diverse vent endemic fauna with high abundances of specialized polychaetes, gastropods and amphipods. These specializations also include symbioses with a range of chemosynthetic microorganisms. Our data show that the fauna composition is a result of high degree of local specialization with some similarities to the fauna of cold seeps along the Norwegian margin and wood-falls in the abyssal Norwegian Sea

  18. Hydrothermal Activity on ultraslow Spreading Ridge: new hydrothermal fields found on the Southwest Indian ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, C.; Li, H.; Deng, X.; Lei, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, K.; Zhou, J.; Liu, W.

    2014-12-01

    Ultraslow spreading ridge makes up about 25% of global mid-ocean ridge length. Previous studies believed that hydrothermal activity is not widespread on the ultraslow spreading ridge owing to lower magma supply. Southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) with the spreading rate between 1.2cm/a to 1.4cm/a, represents the ultraslow spreading ridge. In 2007, Chinese Cruise (CC) 19th discovered the Dragon Flag deposit (DFD) on the SWIR, which is the first active hydrothermal field found on the ultraslow spreading ridge. In recent years, over 10 hydrothermal fields have been found on the SWIR between Indomed and Gallieni transform faults by the Chinese team. Tao et al. (2012) implied that the segment sections with excess heat from enhanced magmatism and suitable crustal permeability along slow and ultraslow ridges might be the most promising areas for searching for hydrothermal activities. In 2014, CC 30thdiscovered five hydrothermal fields and several hydrothermal anomalies on the SWIR. Dragon Horn Area (DHA). The DHA is located on the southern of segment 27 SWIR, with an area of about 400 km2. The geophysical studies indicated that the DHA belongs to the oceanic core complex (OCC), which is widespread on the slow spreading ridges (Zhao et al., 2013). The rocks, such as gabbro, serpentinized peridotite, and consolidated carbonate were collected in the DHA, which provide the direct evidence with the existence of the OCC. However, all rock samples gathered by three TV-grab stations are basalts on the top of the OCC. A hydrothermal anomaly area, centered at 49.66°E,37.80° S with a range of several kms, is detected in the DHA. It is probably comprised of several hydrothermal fields and controlled by a NW fault. New discovery of hydrothermal fields. From January to April 2014, five hydrothermal fields were discovered on the SWIR between 48°E to 50°E during the leg 2&3 of the CC 30th, which are the Su Causeway field (48.6°E, 38.1°S), Bai Causeway field (48.8°E, 37.9 °S), Dragon

  19. Exposure to Fibres, Crystalline Silica, Silicon Carbide and Sulphur Dioxide in the Norwegian Silicon Carbide Industry

    PubMed Central

    Føreland, S.; Bye, E.; Bakke, B.; Eduard, W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess personal exposure to fibres, crystalline silica, silicon carbide (SiC) and sulphur dioxide in the Norwegian SiC industry. Methods: Approximately 720 fibre samples, 720 respirable dust samples and 1400 total dust samples were collected from randomly chosen workers from the furnace, processing and maintenance departments in all three Norwegian SiC plants. The respirable dust samples were analysed for quartz, cristobalite and non-fibrous SiC content. Approximately 240 sulphur dioxide samples were collected from workers in the furnace department. Results: The sorting operators from all plants, control room and cleaning operators in Plant A and charger, charger/mix and payloader operators in Plant C had a geometric mean (GM) of fibre exposure above the Norwegian occupational exposure limit (OEL) (0.1 fibre cm−3). The cleaner operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to respirable quartz (20 μg m−3). The charger/mix operators in Plant C had the highest GM exposure to respirable cristobalite (38 μg m−3) and the refinery crusher operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to non-fibrous SiC (0.65 mg m−3). Exposure to the crystalline silica and non-fibrous SiC was generally low and between 0.4 and 2.1% of the measurements exceeded the OELs. The cleaner operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to respirable dust (1.3 mg m−3) and total dust (21 mg m−3). GM exposures for respirable dust above the Norwegian SiC industry-specific OEL of 0.5 mg m−3 were also found for refinery crusher operators in all plants and mix, charger, charger/mix and sorting operators in Plant C. Only 4% of the total dust measurements exceeded the OEL for nuisance dust of (10 mg m−3). Exposure to sulphur dioxide was generally low. However, peaks in the range of 10–100 p.p.m. were observed for control room and crane operators in Plants A and B and for charger and charger/mix operators in Plant C. Conclusion: Workers in

  20. Magnetic Anomalies over the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Pitman, W C; Heirtzler, J R

    1966-12-01

    Four magnetic profiles across the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge reveal magnetic anomalies that show trends parallel with the ridge axis and symmetry about the ridge axis. The distribution of bodies that could cause these anomalies supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the generation of patterns of magnetic anomalies associated with the midocean ridge system. The geometry of the bodies accords with the known reversals of the geomagnetic field during the last 3.4 million years, indicating a spreading rate of the ocean floor of 4.5 centimeters per year. If one assume that the spreading rate within 500 kilometers of the ridge axis has been constant, reversals of the geomagnetic field during the last 10.0 million years can be determined. This new, detailed history of field reversals accords with observed anomalies over Reykjanes Ridge in the North Atlantic if a spreading rate of 1 centimeter per year is assumed there.

  1. Dynamical instability produces transform faults at mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Gerya, Taras

    2010-08-27

    Transform faults at mid-ocean ridges--one of the most striking, yet enigmatic features of terrestrial plate tectonics--are considered to be the inherited product of preexisting fault structures. Ridge offsets along these faults therefore should remain constant with time. Here, numerical models suggest that transform faults are actively developing and result from dynamical instability of constructive plate boundaries, irrespective of previous structure. Boundary instability from asymmetric plate growth can spontaneously start in alternate directions along successive ridge sections; the resultant curved ridges become transform faults within a few million years. Fracture-related rheological weakening stabilizes ridge-parallel detachment faults. Offsets along the transform faults change continuously with time by asymmetric plate growth and discontinuously by ridge jumps. PMID:20798313

  2. Dynamical instability produces transform faults at mid-ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Gerya, Taras

    2010-08-27

    Transform faults at mid-ocean ridges--one of the most striking, yet enigmatic features of terrestrial plate tectonics--are considered to be the inherited product of preexisting fault structures. Ridge offsets along these faults therefore should remain constant with time. Here, numerical models suggest that transform faults are actively developing and result from dynamical instability of constructive plate boundaries, irrespective of previous structure. Boundary instability from asymmetric plate growth can spontaneously start in alternate directions along successive ridge sections; the resultant curved ridges become transform faults within a few million years. Fracture-related rheological weakening stabilizes ridge-parallel detachment faults. Offsets along the transform faults change continuously with time by asymmetric plate growth and discontinuously by ridge jumps.

  3. En Echelon Ridge and Trough Structures on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalski, Joseph R.; Greeley, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Europa#s surface is tectonically and morphologically complex. Europan ridges, bands, ridged bands, double ridges, complex ridges, and troughs are collectively referred to as lineaments. Some lineaments are fault zones and exhibit sets of en echelon ridge and trough structures (EERTS). EERTS can be used to interpret the stress field in which the lineaments formed. These observations suggest that some lineaments at low latitudes initially formed as shear zones. rather than as purely tensional fractures as is commonly assumed. From stepping directions of EERTS and the offset directions of the lineaments in which they occur, we infer that some EERTS form as a result of compressional stress and others form as a result of tensional stress. EERTS that are inferred to form in compression are morphologically indistinguishable from EERTS that form in tension. The presence of tensional EERTS may support a diapiric origin for some ridges.

  4. Field Use of NMIS at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, L.G.; Conger, M.; Hughes, S.S.; Mattingly, J.K.; McEvers, J.A.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Perez, R.B.; Turner, C.R.; Uckan, T.; Valentine, T.E.

    1999-08-26

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS), developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12), has been successfully used at Y-12 for nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A). It is particularly useful in the high gamma-ray background of storage arrays and for shielded HEU. With three systems in use at Y-12, NMIS has enhanced the NMC&A capability for verification and for confirmation of materials in storage and for HEU receipts by providing capability not available or practical by other NDA methods for safeguards. It has recently cost-effectively quantified the HEU mass and enrichment of hundreds of HEU metal items to within a total spread of {+-} 5% (3 sigma) with and mean deviations for all HEU verified of + 0.2% for mass and {minus}0.2% for enrichment. Three cart portable systems are easily moved around with minimal impact on facility operations since no permanent dedicated floor space is required. The positive impact of NMIS at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is improved and more cost effective NMC&A as well as the resolution of NMC&A findings. Its operation at the Y-12 Plant is essential for compliance with the NMC&A requirements of the US Department of Energy. NMIS portability has allowed one system to be moved temporarily to the former K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant for characterization of a large deposit of hydrated uranyl fluoride. The impact of this NMIS application was enhanced and verified nuclear criticality safety that led to the safe removal of a large deposit originally estimated by gamma-ray spectrometry and neutron counting to contain 1300 kg of 3.3 wt% {sup 235}U material. NMIS has also been operational at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pantex.

  5. Mineralogy and Acid-Extractable Geochemistry from the Loki's Castle Hydrothermal Field, Norwegian Sea at 74 degrees N (South Knipovich Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, F. J.; Fonseca, R.; Dias, S.; Cruz, I.; Carvalho, C.; Relvas, J. M.; Pedersen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Loki’s Castle hydrothermal vent field was discovered in the summer of 2008 during a cruise led by the Centre of Geobiology of the University of Bergen, integrated in the H2Deep Project (Eurocores, ESF; see Pedersen et al., 2010, AGU Fall Meeting, Session OS26). Fresh volcanic glasses analyzed by EPMA are basalts. The vent site is composed of several active, over 10 m tall chimneys, producing up to 320 C fluid, at the top of a very large sulfide mound (estimated diameter 200 m). Mineralogy: The main sulfide assemblage in chimneys consists of sphalerite (Sp), pyrite (Py) and pyrrhotite, with lesser chalcopyrite (Ccp). Sulphide-poor selected samples collected at the base of chimneys are mostly composed of anhydrite (Anh), gypsum and talc (Tlc). Association of quartz, anhydrite, gypsum and barite were also found in some of the samples. The sulphide-poor samples from the base of the chimneys denote seawater interaction with the hydrothermal fluid and consequent decrease in temperature, precipitating sulfates. Sphalerite compositions are Zn(0.61-0.70)Fe(0.39-0.30)S. The variations in Fe content are consistent with those of hot, reduced hydrothermal fluids. The observed sulfide assemblage is consistent with the temperature of 320C measured in Loki’s Castle vents. Compositional zonation in sphalerites suggests different pulses of activity of the hydrothermal system, with higher contents of Zn in the center of the crystals. Geochemistry: Here we report preliminary data part of a major analytical task of sequential extraction of metals from sediments in the vicinity of Loki’s Castle, in an attempt to detect correlations with microbial populations and/or subseafloor mineralized intervals. The abundances of Cu, Pb, Ni, Cr, Zn, Fe, Mn and Co in sediments were determined by aqua regia extraction on subsamples from 7 gravity cores. Several anomalous intervals were sampled, in which Cu<707ppm, Ni shows many weak peaks (<50ppm), Cr shows 6 peaks (<121ppm), Zn shows 4 well-defined peaks (<234ppm). Fe varies up to ~9% and Mn, not surprisingly, is enriched in the upper few centimeters of each core. Co shows hardly any peaks. The various metals show variable degrees of intercorrelation. Cores GC6 and GC7, both located ~25 km to the SW of Loki’s Castle, contain the most anomalous intervals. Some intervals contain clusters of anomalous values of most analyzed metals, in others the anomalies are scattered vertically through both cores. The variations in metal contents along the GC6 and GC7 cores indicate oscillation in hydrothermal activity during sediment formation, suggesting different pulses of activity of the hydrothermal field. These two cores also reveal an enrichment in Mn in the upper layers, which could indicate either oxyhydroxide precipitation directly under the seafloor, due to the gradual mixing of the hydrothermal plumes with seawater (cooler and more oxidizing). Collectively, these data suggest both layered and cross-cutting metal-enriched intervals. The latter may correspond to hydrothermal upflow of mineralized solutions through the sediments.

  6. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Mucke, P.C.

    1992-10-01

    The first two volumes of this report present data and supporting narratives regarding the impact of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on its surrounding environs and the public during 1991. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a stand-alone'' report for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1991 data for the ORR. This volume, Volume 2, includes the detailed data formats that ensure all the environmental data are represented. Narratives are not included. The information in Vol. 2 is addressed and analyzed in Vol. 1.

  7. Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility Position Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Oral, H Sarp; Hill, Jason J; Thach, Kevin G; Podhorszki, Norbert; Klasky, Scott A; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the business, administration, reliability, and usability aspects of storage systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). The OLCF has developed key competencies in architecting and administration of large-scale Lustre deployments as well as HPSS archival systems. Additionally as these systems are architected, deployed, and expanded over time reliability and availability factors are a primary driver. This paper focuses on the implementation of the Spider parallel Lustre file system as well as the implementation of the HPSS archive at the OLCF.

  8. Environmental baseline survey report for West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge and parcel 21D in the vicinity of the East Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    King, David A.

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE?s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only no-further-investigation (NFI) reports. Groundwater sampling was also conducted to support a Parcel 21d decision. Based on available data West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, and West Pine Ridge are not impacted by site operations and are not subject to actions per the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA). This determination is supported by visual inspections, records searches and interviews, groundwater conceptual modeling, approved NFI reports, analytical data, and risk analysis results. Parcel 21d data, however, demonstrate impacts from site

  9. Comprehensive integrated planning: A process for the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Oak Ridge Comprehensive Integrated Plan is intended to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel in implementing a comprehensive integrated planning process consistent with DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management and Oak Ridge Operations Order 430. DOE contractors are charged with developing and producing the Comprehensive Integrated Plan, which serves as a summary document, providing information from other planning efforts regarding vision statements, missions, contextual conditions, resources and facilities, decision processes, and stakeholder involvement. The Comprehensive Integrated Plan is a planning reference that identifies primary issues regarding major changes in land and facility use and serves all programs and functions on-site as well as the Oak Ridge Operations Office and DOE Headquarters. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a valuable national resource and is managed on the basis of the principles of ecosystem management and sustainable development and how mission, economic, ecological, social, and cultural factors are used to guide land- and facility-use decisions. The long-term goals of the comprehensive integrated planning process, in priority order, are to support DOE critical missions and to stimulate the economy while maintaining a quality environment.

  10. An analysis of ridge axis gravity roughness and spreading rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Small, Christopher; Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    Fast and slow spreading ridges have radically different morphologic and gravimetric characteristics. In this study, altimeter measurements from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission are used to investigate spreading rate dependence of the ridge axis gravity field. Gravity roughness provides an estimate of the amplitude of the gravity anomaly and is robust to small errors in the location of the ridge axis. Gravity roughness as a weighted root mean square of the vertical deflection at 438 ridge crossings on the mid-ocean ridge system is computed. Ridge axis gravity anomalies show a decrease in amplitude with increasing spreading rate up to an intermediate rate of about 60-80 mm/yr and almost no change at higher rates; overall the roughness decreases by a factor of 10 between the lowest and highest rates. In addition to the amplitude decrease, the range of roughness values observed at a given spreading rate shows a similar order of magnitude decrease with transition between 60 and 80 mm/yr. The transition of ridge axis gravity is most apparent at three relatively unexplored locations on the Southeast Indian Ridge and the Pacific-Antarctic Rise; on these intermediate rate ridges the transition occurs abruptly across transform faults.

  11. Mantle plume capture, anchoring and outflow during ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, S. A.; Richards, M. A.; Geist, D.

    2015-12-01

    Geochemical and geophysical studies have shown that >40% of the world's mantle plumes are currently interacting with the global ridge system and such interactions may continue for up to 180 Myr[1]. At sites of plume-ridge interaction up to 1400 km of the spreading centre is influenced by dispersed plume material but there are few constraints on how and where the ridge-ward transfer of deep-sourced material occurs, and also how it is sustained over long time intervals. Galápagos is an archetypal example of an off-axis plume and sheds important light on these mechanisms. The Galápagos plume stem is located ~200 km south of the spreading axis and its head influences 1000 km of the ridge. Nevertheless, the site of enriched basalts, greatest crustal thickness and elevated topography on the ridge, together with active volcanism in the archipelago, correlate with a narrow zone (~150 km) of low-velocity, high-temperature mantle that connects the plume stem and ridge at depths of ~100 km[2]. The enriched ridge basalts contain a greater amount of partially-dehydrated, recycled oceanic crust than basalts elsewhere on the spreading axis, or indeed basalts erupted in the region between the plume stem and ridge. The presence of these relatively volatile-rich ridge basalts requires flow of plume material below the peridotite solidus (i.e.>80 km). We propose a 2-stage model for the development and sustainment of a confined zone of deep ridge-ward plume flow. This involves initial on-axis capture and establishment of a sub-ridge channel of plume flow. Subsequent anchoring of the plume stem to a contact point on the ridge during axis migration results in confined ridge-ward flow of plume material via a deep network of melt channels embedded in the normal spreading and advection of the plume head[2]. Importantly, sub-ridge flow is maintained. The physical parameters and styles of mantle flow we have defined for Galápagos are less-well known at other sites of plume-ridge

  12. Custom Titanium Ridge Augmentation Matrix (CTRAM): A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Connors, Christopher A; Liacouras, Peter C; Grant, Gerald T

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report of a custom titanium ridge augmentation matrix (CTRAM). Using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), a custom titanium space-maintaining device was developed. Alveolar ridges were virtually augmented, a matrix was virtually designed, and the CTRAM was additively manufactured with titanium (Ti6Al4V). Two cases are presented that resulted in sufficient increased horizontal bone volume with successful dental implant placement. The CTRAM design allows for preoperative planning for increasing alveolar ridge dimensions to support dental implants, reduces surgical time, and prevents the need for a second surgical site to gain sufficient alveolar ridge bone volume for dental implant therapy. PMID:27560675

  13. From tides to mixing along the Hawaiian ridge.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Daniel L; Boyd, Timothy J; Brainard, Russell E; Carter, Glenn S; Egbert, Gary D; Gregg, Michael C; Holloway, Peter E; Klymak, Jody M; Kunze, Eric; Lee, Craig M; Levine, Murray D; Luther, Douglas S; Martin, Joseph P; Merrifield, Mark A; Moum, James N; Nash, Jonathan D; Pinkel, Robert; Rainville, Luc; Sanford, Thomas B

    2003-07-18

    The cascade from tides to turbulence has been hypothesized to serve as a major energy pathway for ocean mixing. We investigated this cascade along the Hawaiian Ridge using observations and numerical models. A divergence of internal tidal energy flux observed at the ridge agrees with the predictions of internal tide models. Large internal tidal waves with peak-to-peak amplitudes of up to 300 meters occur on the ridge. Internal-wave energy is enhanced, and turbulent dissipation in the region near the ridge is 10 times larger than open-ocean values. Given these major elements in the tides-to-turbulence cascade, an energy budget approaches closure.

  14. Ridges and scarps in the equatorial belt of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Klockenbrink, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The morphology and distribution of ridges and scarps on Mars in the ?? 30?? latitude belt were investigated. Two distinct types of ridges were recognized. The first is long and linear, resembling mare ridges on the Moon; it occurs mostly in plains areas. The other is composed of short, anastomosing segments and occurs mostly in ancient cratered terrain and intervening plateaus. Where ridges are eroded, landscape configurations suggest that they are located along regional structures. The age of ridges is uncertain, but some are as young as the latest documented volcanic activity on Mars. The origins of ridges are probably diverse-they may result from wrinkling due to compression or from buckling due to settling over subsurface structures. The similar morphologic expressions of ridge types of various origins may be related to a similar deformation mechanism caused by two main factors: (1) most ridges are developed in thick layers of competent material and (2) ridges formed under stresses near a free surface. ?? 1981 D. Reidel Publishing Co.

  15. From tides to mixing along the Hawaiian ridge.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Daniel L; Boyd, Timothy J; Brainard, Russell E; Carter, Glenn S; Egbert, Gary D; Gregg, Michael C; Holloway, Peter E; Klymak, Jody M; Kunze, Eric; Lee, Craig M; Levine, Murray D; Luther, Douglas S; Martin, Joseph P; Merrifield, Mark A; Moum, James N; Nash, Jonathan D; Pinkel, Robert; Rainville, Luc; Sanford, Thomas B

    2003-07-18

    The cascade from tides to turbulence has been hypothesized to serve as a major energy pathway for ocean mixing. We investigated this cascade along the Hawaiian Ridge using observations and numerical models. A divergence of internal tidal energy flux observed at the ridge agrees with the predictions of internal tide models. Large internal tidal waves with peak-to-peak amplitudes of up to 300 meters occur on the ridge. Internal-wave energy is enhanced, and turbulent dissipation in the region near the ridge is 10 times larger than open-ocean values. Given these major elements in the tides-to-turbulence cascade, an energy budget approaches closure. PMID:12869758

  16. Fluid flow rate, temperature and heat flux at Mohns Ridge vent fields: evidence from isosampler measurements for phase separated hydrothermal circulation along the arctic ridge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, A.; Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.; Taylor, P.; Flynn, M.

    2005-12-01

    An expedition to the Mohns Ridge in the Norwegian-Greenland sea was carried out in July-August 2005 as part of BIODEEP, lead by University of Bergen (UoB). UoB had previously detected water column methane along this very slow spreading ridge. Previous ROV observations along the ridge (71 deg 18'N, 5 deg 47'W, 605 mbsl) near Jan Mayen had uncovered a broad area of ferric hydroxide-rich bacterial/mineral assemblages, comprising large populations of gallionella bacteria. This area was revisted in 2005. Characteristic of sections of this area ("Gallionella Garden") are chimney-like structures standing ~15 cm tall, often topped by a sea lily (heliometra glacialis). The interior of the structures comprised quasi-concentric bands with vertically-oriented channels. The Oregon State University/Cardiff University Isosampler sensor determined that some of these assemblages support fluid flow through their interior. The outflow from the chimney structures was typically +0.5 deg C, against background temperatures of -0.3 deg C. Flow anomalies were also identified atop extensive bacterial mats. Gallionella Gardens is several km in extent with active, albeit extremely low temperature hydrothermal flow. A field of active high temperature smoker chimney structures was located near Gallionella Garden at 540 mbsl. This field extends ~500 m along a scarp wall, with hydrothermal mounds extending along faults running perpendicular to the scarp, each of which has multiple smoker vents and areas of diffuse flow. There was evidence for phase separation, with a negatively buoyant fluid phase exiting some vent orifices and descending along the vent wall; and evidence for gas phase condensing after leaving some vent orifices. Gas bubble emissions were not uncommon. Isosampler sensors were available that were configured for lower temperature measurements at Gallionella Garden. While capable of detecting variations in effluent at the 4 millidegree level, the temperature ceiling for the sensor

  17. Ridge Orientations of the Ridge-Forming Unit, Sinus Meridiani, Mars-A Fluvial Explanation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. Justin; Herridge, A.

    2013-01-01

    Imagery and MOLA data were used in an analysis of the ridge-forming rock unit (RFU) exposed in Sinus Meridiani (SM). This unit shows parallels at different scales with fluvial sedimentary bodies. We propose the terrestrial megafan as the prime analog for the RFU, and likely for other members of the layered units. Megafans are partial cones of fluvial sediment, with radii up to hundreds of km. Although recent reviews of hypotheses for the RFU units exclude fluvial hypotheses [1], inverted ridges in the deserts of Oman have been suggested as putative analogs for some ridges [2], apparently without appreciating The wider context in which these ridges have formed is a series of megafans [3], a relatively unappreciated geomorphic feature. It has been argued that these units conform to the megafan model at the regional, subregional and local scales [4]. At the regional scale suites of terrestrial megafans are known to cover large areas at the foot of uplands on all continents - a close parallel with the setting of the Meridiani sediments at the foot of the southern uplands of Mars, with its incised fluvial systems leading down the regional NW slope [2, 3] towards the sedimentary units. At the subregional scale the layering and internal discontinuities of the Meridiani rocks are consistent, inter alia, with stacked fluvial units [4]. Although poorly recognized as such, the prime geomorphic environment in which stream channel networks cover large areas, without intervening hillslopes, is the megafan [see e.g. 4]. Single megafans can reach 200,000 km2 [5]. Megafans thus supply an analog for areas where channel-like ridges (as a palimpsest of a prior landscape) cover the intercrater plains of Meridiani [6]. At the local, or river-reach scale, the numerous sinuous features of the RFU are suggestive of fluvial channels. Cross-cutting relationships, a common feature of channels on terrestrial megafans, are ubiquitous. Desert megafans show cemented paleo-channels as inverted

  18. US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management Public Involvement Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This document was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements for writing community relations plans. It includes information on how the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office prepares and executes Environmental Management Community relations activities. It is divided into three sections: the public involvement plan, public involvement in Oak Ridge, and public involvement in 1995. Four appendices are also included: environmental management in Oak Ridge; community and regional overview; key laws, agreements, and policy; and principal contacts.

  19. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  20. [Comparative study of N, P output and eutrophication risk in runoff water in cross ridge and longitudinal ridge].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing-Xiu; Ma, Qian; Liu, Qian-Jin; Lü, Guo-An

    2011-02-01

    Field in-situ rainfall simulation tests with two rainfall intensities (40 mm x h(-1) and 70 mm x h(-1)), which were conducted at typical sloping cropland in Yimeng mountainous area, were designed to analyze the output characteristics of dissolved inorganic nitrogen, Inorganic-N (NO3(-)-N, NH4(+) -N) and dissolved phosphorus (DP) in runoff water, as well as to compare the eutrophication risk in this water by calculating three ratios of Inorganic-N/DP, NO3(-) -N/DP, and NH4(+)-N/DP, respectively, in cross ridge and longitudinal ridge tillage methods. Results showed that, under the same rainfall intensity, the DP level in runoff water was higher in cross ridge than longitudinal ridge, while the change of different Inorganic-N level between the two tillage methods were not consistent. Cross ridge could effectively reduce runoff and the output rate of Inorganic-N and DP when compared to the longitudinal ridge tillage, which would be more outstanding with the increases of rainfall intensities. The losses of Inorganic-N and DP in runoff water were 43% and 5% less, respectively, in cross ridge than longitudinal ridge at the 40 mm x h(-1) rainfall intensity, and were 68% and 55%, respectively, at 70 mm x h(-1). The higher Inorganic-N/DP and NO3(-) -N/DP ratios suggest that runoff water from either cross ridge or longitudinal ridge tillage have a certain eutrophication risk, which present an increasing trend during the precipitation-runoff process. Compared with longitudinal ridge, cross ridge can not only hinder the increasing trend of eutrophication risk, but also can significantly lower it, and thus effectively reduce the effect of sloping cropland runoff on the eutrophication processes of receiving waters.

  1. Topographic amplification across a taiwanese ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, Claire; Meunier, Patrick; Burtin, Arnaud; Marc, Odin; Weian Chao, Vvn; Wu, Yih-Min; Hovius, Niels

    2016-04-01

    A line of 6 broadband seismometers have been deployed across a ridge in the Hualien County (Eastern Taiwan) in order to study topographic amplification. Since March 2015, the network has been continuously recording waves incoming from the Taiwanese regional seismicity. The hill is well approximated by a triangular topography of 3600m in length by 900m in height. We present a preliminary analysis performed over a dozen of earthquakes selected from the Seismic Taiwanese catalog (CWBSN). We show that most of the Uphill records exhibit a systematic amplification of seismic waves (peak to peak of particle velocity) in the relevant frequency band [0.5-2Hz]. By contrast, energy within the larger frequency band [6-20Hz] reflects local site effects induced by the soil layer. We report amplification ratios ranging from ranging from 1.2 to 3 and from 1.8 to 4 for P and S waves respectively. We show that amplification processes at the top strongly depend on the parameter α defined as the angle between the azimuth of incoming wave and the azimuth of the ridge divide.

  2. VERITAS Observations of The Galactic Center Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew W

    2014-08-01

    The Galactic Center Ridge is perhaps the most local, busy environment for high-energy particle acceleration, harboring as it does many relativistic particle accelerators such as pulsar wind nebulae, supernova remnants, and the central supermassive black hole SgrA*. Observations with very high energy (VHE, >100 GeV) gamma-ray telescopes of the region have revealed multiple point sources associated with well-known objects, as well as regions of extended emission not directly associated with sources at other wavelengths. More importantly, the detection of a large, diffuse component of >300 GeV gamma-ray emission by the HESS collaboration is strongly believed to be the result of accelerated cosmic rays interacting with molecular-cloud regions, thus providing insight into high-energy cosmic ray acceleration. Here we present the VERITAS observations of the Galactic Center Ridge taken from 2008-2014 in the >2 TeV regime. We will focus on the VERITAS results on the known HESS sources in the region, as well as the diffuse component of TeV emission along the plane. Due to the much higher energy threshold of the VERITAS observations, our data provide a new window into some of the highest energy particle acceleration occurring in the center of our galaxy.

  3. VERITAS Observations of The Galactic Center Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew; Veritas

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Center Ridge is perhaps the most local, busy environment for high energy particle acceleration; home to many relativistic particle accelerators such as pulsar wind nebulae, supernova remnants, and the central supermassive black hole SgrA*. Observations with VHE (>100 GeV) gamma-ray telescopes of the region have revealed multiple point sources associated with well known objects, as well as regions of extended emission not directly associated with targets at other wavelengths. More importantly, the detection of a large, diffuse component of >300 GeV gamma-ray emission by the HESS collaboration is strongly believed to be the result of accelerated cosmic rays interacting with molecular cloud regions, thus providing a window into high energy cosmic ray acceleration. Here we present the VERITAS observations of the Galactic Center Ridge taken from 2008-2014 in the >2 TeV regime. We will focus on the VERITAS results on the known HESS sources in the region, as well as the diffuse component of TeV emission along the plane. Due to the much higher energy threshold of the VERITAS observations, our data provide a new window into some of the highest energy particle acceleration occurring in the center of our galaxy.

  4. The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron Refurbishment Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, II, Anthony J; Ball, James B; Dowling, Darryl T; Mosko, Sigmund W; Tatum, B Alan

    2011-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) has been in operation for nearly fifty years at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presently, it serves as the driver accelerator for the ORNL Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), where radioactive ion beams are produced using the Isotope Separation Online (ISOL) technique for post-acceleration by the 25URC tandem electrostatic accelerator. Operability and reliability of ORIC are critical issues for the success of HRIBF and have presented increasingly difficult operational challenges for the facility in recent years. In February 2010, a trim coil failure rendered ORIC inoperable for several months. This presented HRIBF with the opportunity to undertake various repairs and maintenance upgrades aimed at restoring the full functionality of ORIC and improving the reliability to a level better than what had been typical over the previous decade. In this paper, we present details of these efforts, including the replacement of the entire trim coil set and measurements of their radial field profile. Comparison of measurements and operating tune parameters with setup code predictions will also be presented.

  5. Quantifying relationships between abundances of cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa and terrain features: A case study on the Norwegian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiju; Purser, Autun; Guinan, Janine; Unnithan, Vikram; Yu, Jinsongdi; Zhang, Chengcheng

    2016-03-01

    An understanding of how terrain features influence abundance of a particular species greatly aids in the development of accurate predictive habitat suitability models. In this study, we investigated the observed seafloor coverage of cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa in relation to seabed topography at the Sotbakken and Røst Reefs on the Norwegian margin. The primary terrain features at the study sites are a SW-NE stretching mound at Sotbakken Reef and SW-NE running ridges at Røst Reef, located at depths of ~300-400 m and ~250-320 m respectively. Ship-borne multibeam bathymetry data, JAGO dive video data and JAGO positioning data were used in this study. Terrain variables were calculated at scales of 30 m, 90 m and 170 m based on the bathymetry data. Additionally, we investigated the relationships between the terrain variables at multiple scales using the Unweighted Pair Group Method. The observed L. pertusa coverage at both reefs was found to be significantly correlated with most investigated terrain variables, with correlations increasing in strength with increase in analysis scale, suggesting that large scale terrain features likely play an important role in influencing L. pertusa distribution. Small scale terrain variations appear less important in determining the suitability of a region of seafloor for L. pertusa colonization. We conclude that bathymetric position index and curvature, as well as seabed aspect, most strongly correlate with coral coverage, indicating that local topographic highs, with an orientation into inflowing bottom currents, are most suitable for L. pertusa habitation. These results indicate that developing habitat suitability models for L. pertusa will benefit from inclusion of particular key terrain variables (e.g. aspect, plan curvature, mean curvature and slope) and that these should ideally be computed at multiple spatial scales with a greater gap in scales than we used in this study, to maximize the inclusion of the key variables in

  6. Improved Digitization of Lunar Mare Ridges with LROC Derived Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, J. M.; Robinson, M. S.; Watters, T. R.; Bowman-Cisneros, E.; Enns, A. C.; Lawrence, S.

    2011-12-01

    Lunar wrinkle ridges (mare ridges) are positive-relief structures formed from compressional stress in basin-filling flood basalt deposits [1]. Previous workers have measured wrinkle ridge orientations and lengths to investigate their spatial distribution and infer basin-localized stress fields [2,3]. Although these plots include the most prominent mare ridges and their general trends, they may not have fully captured all of the ridges, particularly the smaller-scale ridges. Using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide Angle Camera (WAC) global mosaics and derived topography (100m pixel scale) [4], we systematically remapped wrinkle ridges in Mare Serenitatis. By comparing two WAC mosaics with different lighting geometry, and shaded relief maps made from a WAC digital elevation model (DEM) [5], we observed that some ridge segments and some smaller ridges are not visible in previous structure maps [2,3]. In the past, mapping efforts were limited by a fixed Sun direction [6,7]. For systematic mapping we created three shaded relief maps from the WAC DEM with solar azimuth angles of 0°, 45°, and 90°, and a fourth map was created by combining the three shaded reliefs into one, using a simple averaging scheme. Along with the original WAC mosaic and the WAC DEM, these four datasets were imported into ArcGIS, and the mare ridges of Imbrium, Serenitatis, and Tranquillitatis were digitized from each of the six maps. Since the mare ridges are often divided into many ridge segments [8], each major component was digitized separately, as opposed to the ridge as a whole. This strategy enhanced our ability to analyze the lengths, orientations, and abundances of these ridges. After the initial mapping was completed, the six products were viewed together to identify and resolve discrepancies in order to produce a final wrinkle ridge map. Comparing this new mare ridge map with past lunar tectonic maps, we found that many mare ridges were not recorded in the previous works. It was noted

  7. Two Vent Fields Discovered at the Ultraslow Spreading Arctic Ridge System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, R. B.; Thorseth, I. H.; Hellevang, B.; Schultz, A.; Taylor, P.; Knudsen, H. P.; Steinsbu, B. O.

    2005-12-01

    Two high-temperature vent fields were discovered at the Mohns Ridge during an expedition with the Norwegian research vessel "G.O. Sars" in July 2005. Both vent fields are located within the southernmost segment of the Mohns Ridge approximately 50 km north of the West Jan Mayen Fracture Zone. Water depths along this segment range from 3800 meters close to the fracture zone to ~500 meters at the segment centre where the vent fields are located. The largest field - named "Gallionella Garden" - is situated within a rift graben where high- and low-temperature venting occurs along ridge-parallel normal faults and fissures. Presently we have documented high- and low-temperature venting along more then 2 km of the fault and fissure system in the area. The high-temperature venting takes place at around 550 mbsl at the base of a 100 meter high fault wall and was traced ~500 meters along strike. The field consists of at least 10 major vent sites, each composed of multiple chimneys that are up to 5-10 meters tall. There are also large areas of diffuse flow. The temperature of the vent fluids was measured to be above 260°C at a chimney orifice. This is at the boiling point of seawater at these water depths, and gas bubbling was observed at several of the vent sites. A sample of the top of a chimney consists of anhydrite, barite, sphalerite and pyrite. Outside the high-temperature vent area mounds of ferric iron are abundant. Such deposits have presently been traced along ~2 km of the faults and fissure system in the area. The deposits are predominantly made up of branching and twisted stalks comparable to those formed by the iron oxidizing bacteria Gallionella ferruginea showing that the precipitation is mediated by microbial activity. The temperatures below the upper crust of a mound were measured to be one degree above the ambient water temperature. The Fe-oxyhydroxides show Nd-isotope compositions similar to the basaltic crust and Sr-isotope compositions close to that of

  8. The effect of sill intrusions on hydrothermal flow and thermal maturity in sedimentary basins: a case study from the Gjallar ridge, off Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bani Hassan, N.; Rupke, L.; Berndt, C.

    2012-12-01

    The causes and consequences of hydrothermal convection triggered by sill intrusions into sedimentary basins are explored using numerical modeling techniques. In particular, we study the impact of hydrothermal convection on the thermal history of the Vøring Basin, which is part of the Norwegian volcanic margin. In the Gjallar Ridge area, multichannel seismic data show numerous sill intrusions as high velocity reflectors, likely emplaced during North Atlantic continental break-up (~55 Ma). To study their impact on the thermal history of the Gjallar Ridge area, we have coupled a 1D basin reconstruction with 2D porous fluid flow simulations that are modeled based on 3D seismic data interpretation. The simulation results show that sill intrusions are likely to trigger a short-lived phase (<10 Ka) of hydrothermal convection and that circulation pathways are highly influenced by fault and fracture networks. These findings show that hydrothermal convection is a natural consequence of sill intrusions and has first order control on the maturation and thermal history of the surrounding and in particular overlying sediments, and should therefore be considered in reconstruction studies of volcanic margins as well as for the assessment of hydrocarbon maturity.

  9. Do Type of Childcare and Age of Entry Predict Behavior Problems during Early Childhood? Results from a Large Norwegian Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekhal, Ratib

    2012-01-01

    Associations between type and age of entry into Norwegian universally-accessible childcare and children's behavior problems at age 3 years were examined in this study. Data from 73,068 children in the large population-based, prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) were used, and included information about childcare arrangements,…

  10. Real-Time Ichthyoplankton Drift in Northeast Arctic Cod and Norwegian Spring-Spawning Herring

    PubMed Central

    Vikebø, Frode B.; Ådlandsvik, Bjørn; Albretsen, Jon; Sundby, Svein; Stenevik, Erling Kåre; Huse, Geir; Svendsen, Einar; Kristiansen, Trond; Eriksen, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background Individual-based biophysical larval models, initialized and parameterized by observations, enable numerical investigations of various factors regulating survival of young fish until they recruit into the adult population. Exponentially decreasing numbers in Northeast Arctic cod and Norwegian Spring Spawning herring early changes emphasizes the importance of early life history, when ichthyoplankton exhibit pelagic free drift. However, while most studies are concerned with past recruitment variability it is also important to establish real-time predictions of ichthyoplankton distributions due to the increasing human activity in fish habitats and the need for distribution predictions that could potentially improve field coverage of ichthyoplankton. Methodology/Principal Findings A system has been developed for operational simulation of ichthyoplankton distributions. We have coupled a two-day ocean forecasts from the Norwegian Meteorological Institute with an individual-based ichthyoplankton model for Northeast Arctic cod and Norwegian Spring Spawning herring producing daily updated maps of ichthyoplankton distributions. Recent years observed spawning distribution and intensity have been used as input to the model system. The system has been running in an operational mode since 2008. Surveys are expensive and distributions of early stages are therefore only covered once or twice a year. Comparison between model and observations are therefore limited in time. However, the observed and simulated distributions of juvenile fish tend to agree well during early fall. Area-overlap between modeled and observed juveniles September 1st range from 61 to 73%, and 61 to 71% when weighted by concentrations. Conclusions/Significance The model system may be used to evaluate the design of ongoing surveys, to quantify the overlap with harmful substances in the ocean after accidental spills, as well as management planning of particular risky operations at sea. The modeled

  11. 3D High-Resolution Seismic Imaging of Fluid Flow Anomalies on the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, S.; Eriksen, F. N.; Eriksen, O. K.; Myklebust, R.; Stokke, H. H.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow anomalies are common on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. Such features are imaged by multiple P-Cable high resolution seismic 2D lines and 3D cubes in the Norwegian Barents Sea. P-Cable is a high resolution 3D seismic system consisting of multiple streamers attached to a cross cable that is towed perpendicular to the vessels steaming direction. The short offset, high frequency source and closely spaced streamers facilitates for excellent vertical and horizontal resolution that provides key information for understanding the sub-surface. Recent data have been broadband processed, and the method has proven to enhance the imaging of the sub-surface significantly. Barents Sea P-Cable surveys have targeted shallow fluid anomalies in the uppermost ca. 500 meters of the sub-surface. New data have been acquired in 2012, 2014 and 2015. The most recent data focus on the southeast part of the Norwegian Barents Sea where P-Cable data give a new insight into the subsurface not provided by conventional seismic data in the region. Geologically, the Barents Sea region is characterized by Paleozoic and Mesozoic siliciclastic successions overlaid in most areas by a thin cover of Cenozoic glacial sediments. Hydrocarbon-rich Jurassic and Triassic sequences are locally situated in the shallow sub-surface as a result of extensive late Cenozoic uplift and erosion. The unloading has been reported to reactivate and create new faults in addition to initiate further migration of fluids in the sub-surface (Chand et al., 2012). The presence of shallow hydrocarbon systems creates an optimal setting for imaging fluid flow anomalies with high resolution 3D seismic data. The Barents Sea P-Cable data image a range of fluid related features such as cross-cutting reflections and bright spots, chimney structures, acoustic masking, pockmarks and mud volcanoes.

  12. Late Triassic uplift of southern Norway revealed by detrital zircons in the Norwegian-Danish Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivarius, Mette; Nielsen, Lars H.; Weibel, Rikke; Kristensen, Lars; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2016-04-01

    Zircon U/Pb geochronometry is used to identify the sediment source areas of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic shallow marine to paralic Gassum Formation in the Norwegian-Danish Basin. The analyses of zircon grains from geographically and stratigraphically widely distributed cores take advantage of the detailed sequence stratigraphic framework existing for the succession. The zircon ages indicate that the sediment in the lower part of the Gassum Formation in the northern and central parts of the basin was supplied solely from the Telemarkia Terrane in the southern part of southern Norway. However, age signatures from other basement terranes were added during periods of transgression presumably as a result of longshore reworking. The sediment in the eastern part of the basin has a different provenance signature that reflects supply from various sources of which some or all seemingly include older sediments. The basinwide fluvial incision that occurred during a relative sea-level fall in the Rhaetian is interpreted to be related to uplift of southern Norway since a pronounced content of zircon grains with U/Pb ages of 1.65 Ga were introduced in the Norwegian-Danish Basin at the time. This age is dominant in the upper part of the Gassum Formation and is present in all studied younger sediments in the Norwegian-Danish Basin, whereas it is missing in older sediments in the basin. Rocks with corresponding ages are presently exposed in the Jotun Nappe Complex and the Western Gneiss Complex in the central and northern parts of southern Norway. Thus, major faulting activity must have occurred in southern Norway during the Late Triassic that made such rocks available for erosion with permanent southeastwards drainage.

  13. Norwegian remote sensing spectrometry for mapping and monitoring of algal blooms and pollution - NORSMAP-89

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, L.H.; Johannessen, O.M.; Frette, O. )

    1990-01-09

    During the late spring of 1988 an extensive bloom of the toxic algae Chrysocromulina polylepis occurred in the Skagerrak region influencing most life in the upper 30 meter of the ocean. The algal front was advected northward with the Norwegian Coastal Current along the coast of southern Norway, where it became a severe threat to the Norwegian seafarming industry. An ad-hoc expert team was established to monitor and forecast the movement of the algae front. Remote sensing of sea surface temperature from the operational US NOAA satellites monitored the movement of the algal front, consistent with a warm ocean front. The lack of any optical remote sensing instrumentation was recognized as a major de-efficiency during this algal bloom. To prepare for similar events in the future Nansen Remote Sensing Center initiated a three week pilot study in the Oslofjord and Skagerrak region, during May 1989. The Canadian Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) was installed in the surveillance aircraft. Extensive in situ campaigns was also carried out by the Norwegian Institute for Water Research and Institute of Marine Research. A ship-borne non-imaging spectrometer was operated from the vessels participating in the field campaign. As a contribution from a joint campaign (EISAC '89) between the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Community and the European Space Agency (ESA) both the Canadian Fluorescence Line Imager (FLI) and the US 64-channel GER scanner was operated simultaneously at the NORSMAP 89 test site. Regions of different biological and physical conditions were covered during the pilot study and preliminary analysis are obtained from oil slicks, suspended matter from river, as well as minor algal bloom. The joint analysis of the data collected during the NORSMAP 89 campaign and conclussions will be presented, as well as suggestions for future utilization of airborne spectroscopy systems for operational monitoring of algal bloom and water pollution.

  14. Alkalic Basalt in Ridge Axis of 53˚E Amagmatic Segment Center, Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Wang, J.; Liu, Y.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is key tracer of composition and process in the mantle. It is interesting to notice that some alkalic basalts occur in amagmatic spreading center of ultraslow spreading ridges, for examples, 9-16˚E of the Southwest Indian ridge (Standish et al., 2008) and Lena Trough of Arctic Ocean (Snow et al., 2011). The latter is interpreted as the result of the pre-existence of continental transform fault or the especially cold thermal structure of ancient continental lithosphere. 53˚E segment, east of the Gallieni transform fault, was discovered as an amagmatic segment (Zhou and Dick, 2013). On both sides of the ridge axis, peridotites with a little gabbro are exposed in an area more than 3200 km2. Basalts exist in the southern portion of 53˚E segment, indicating the transformation from magmatic to amagmatic spreading about 9.4 million years ago. In April of 2014, Leg 4 of the RV Dayang Yihao cruise 30, basaltic glasses was dredged at one location (3500 m water depth) in the ridge axis of 53˚E segment center. It is shown by electric probe analysis that the samples have extremely high sodium content (4.0-4.49 wt% Na­2O ), relative higher potassium content (0.27-0.32 wt% K2O) and silica (50.67-51.87 wt% SiO2), and lower MgO content (5.9-6.4 wt% MgO). Mg-number is 0.55-0.59. It is distinctly different from the N-MORB (2.42-2.68 wt% Na2O, 0.03-0.06 wt% K2O, 48.6-49.6 wt% Si2O, 8.8-9.0 wt% MgO, Mg-numbers 0.63) distributed in the 560-km-long supersegment, west of the Gallieni transform fault, where the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field was discovered at 49.6˚E in 2007. The reasons for the alkalic basalt in the ridge axis of 53˚E amagmatic segment center, either by low melting degree of garnet stability field, by melting from an ancient subcontinental lithospheric mantle, or by sodium-metasomatism or even other mantle processes or their combination in the deep mantle, are under further studies.

  15. 60 Years of Great Science (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    2003-01-01

    This issue of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Review (vol. 36, issue 1) highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.

  16. Dielectrophoresis device and method having insulating ridges for manipulating particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.

    2008-03-25

    Embodiments of the present invention provide methods and devices for manipulating particles using dielectrophoresis. Insulating ridges and valleys are used to generate a spatially non-uniform electrical field. Particles may be concentrated, separated, or captured during bulk fluid flow in a channel having insulating ridges and valleys.

  17. Mantle anisotropy beneath the Earth's mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, Andy; Kendall, J.-Michael; Wookey, James

    2012-02-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy at oceanic spreading centres offer insights into mid-ocean ridge processes and the formation of new plates. Here, remote observations of seismic anisotropy beneath mid-ocean ridges are made using measurements of source-side shear wave splitting. Over 100 high-quality measurements are made using earthquakes that occur near mid-ocean ridges and transform faults, but are observed at teleseismic distances. In general, for off-axis ridge events, the polarisation of fast shear waves, ϕ″, is approximately parallel to the spreading direction. Nearer the ridge (<~50 km), ϕ″ becomes more scattered and is often ridge-parallel. Delay times, δt, tend to increase from < 1 s near the ridge axis to ˜ 3 s further away. Slow-spreading regions (Gakkel and Southwest Indian Ridges) show smaller amounts of splitting than faster spreading centres. At transform zones, the pattern is more complex. Coverage beneath the East Pacific Rise is especially good, and we observe a systematic increase in delay times in S wave splitting measurements compared to previous SKS splitting observations made at ocean-bottom seismometers. One compatible explanation is the presence of horizontally-aligned, connected layers of melt at depth; this is also compatible with other observations of the 'LAB' discontinuity and surface-wave derived measurements of radial anisotropy.

  18. 203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel have minimum height of 13, which accommodates most large recreational vehicles. This tunnel has the lowest clearance at 11-3. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  19. Site characterization of the West Chestnut Ridge site

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelle, R H; Huff, D D

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of investigations performed to date on the West Chestnut Ridge Site, on the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation. The investigations performed include geomorphic observations, areal geologic mapping, surficial soil mapping, subsurface investigations, soil geochemical and mineralogical analyses, geohydrologic testing, groundwater fluctuation monitoring, and surface water discharge and precipitation monitoring. 33 references, 32 figures, 24 tables.

  20. 2. Building 7 west elevation oblique from Ridge Avenue, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Building 7 west elevation oblique from Ridge Avenue, showing entrance to complex between Building 7 (right) and Building 8 (left). View looking NE. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), Building No. 7, 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. 2. General view from Richmond Branch Reading RR across Ridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. General view from Richmond Branch Reading RR across Ridge Avenue from Dobson Mills complex, showing entrance (between Buildings 8 on left and 7 on right), looking NE. Building 13/14 clearly visible in background to left. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Validity Shrinkage in Ridge Regression: A Simulation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faden, Vivian; Bobko, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Ridge regression offers advantages over ordinary least squares estimation when a validity shrinkage criterion is considered. Comparisons of cross-validated multiple correlations indicate that ridge estimation is superior when the predictors are multicollinear, the number of predictors is large relative to sample size, and the population multiple…

  3. View of middle portion of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of middle portion of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, showing Signal Corps Radar 296 Station 5 Tower concrete pier (top center), camera facing northwest - Fort Barry, Bonita Ridge Access Road, Retaining Wall, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  4. Oblique view of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, showing southernmost portion of intact wall and portion of concrete drainage ditch from Signal Corps Radar 296 Station 5 Transmitter Building foundation above, camera facing west-north - Fort Barry, Bonita Ridge Access Road, Retaining Wall, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  5. Contextual view of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Contextual view of Bonita Ridge Access Road Retaining Wall, showing concrete stairway and ramp with Army Fire Control Station (Buildings 621 and 622) at far left, camera facing southwest - Fort Barry, Bonita Ridge Access Road, Retaining Wall, Point Bonita, Marin Headlands, Sausalito, Marin County, CA

  6. 1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, ALONG THE RIDGE WITH RESIDENTIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, ALONG THE RIDGE WITH RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS EXTENDING EAST TO THE RADIO TOWERS AT U.S. 31 (TOP RIGHT), SHADES VALLEY (TO LEFT OF RIDGE), AND JONES VALLEY AND CITY OF BIRMINGHAM (TO RIGHT BUT NOT PICTURED) - Red Mountain Suburbs, Crest of Red Mountain, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Fingerprint Ridge Count: A Polygenic Trait Useful in Classroom Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendenhall, Gordon; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of the polygenic trait of total fingerprint ridge count in the classroom as a laboratory investigation. Presents information on background of topic, fingerprint patterns which are classified into three major groups, ridge count, the inheritance model, and activities. Includes an example data sheet format for fingerprints. (RT)

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site environmental report summary for 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This document presents a summary of the information collected for the Oak Ridge Reservation 1994 site environmental report. Topics discussed include: Oak Ridge Reservation mission; ecology; environmental laws; community participation; environmental restoration; waste management; radiation effects; chemical effects; risk to public; environmental monitoring; and radionuclide migration.

  9. 13. Whetstone Ridge. View of the restaurant and gift shop. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Whetstone Ridge. View of the restaurant and gift shop. It's board-and-batten construction with a long integral shed porch across the front, a jerkinhead roof and stone chimney are a reflection of the Appalachian Culture the parkway endeavors to interpret. The view is toward the southwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. 247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    247. Axial Parkway alignment along ridge top. Note the open vistas to either side of the roadway. These are maintained through vegetation management. The wood guide rail is a primary safety feature. View is to the northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  11. Simulations of the mesoscale circulation of the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heburn, George W.; Johnson, Clifford D.

    1995-01-01

    The Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian Seas provide the only link between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Oceans. This is a very dynamic region, rich in mesoscale variability. A two-layer, hydrodynamic version of the Navy layered ocean model is used to simulate the mesoscale frontal features and associated current systems. The model is wind-driven using monthly mean wind stresses and inflow/outflow mass flux from the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans. The current transports from the model results compare favorably with transport measurements from a number of observational experiments.

  12. The effects of building design on hazard of first service in Norwegian dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Martin, A D; Kielland, C; Nelson, S T; Østerås, O

    2015-12-01

    Reproductive inefficiency is one of the major production and economic constraints on modern dairy farms. The environment affects onset of ovarian activity in a cow postcalving and influences estrus behavior, which in turn affects a stockperson's ability to inseminate her at the correct time. This study used survival analysis to investigate effects of building design and animal factors on the postpartum hazard of first service (HFS) in freestall-housed Norwegian Red cows. The study was performed on 232 Norwegian dairy farms between 2004 and 2007. Data were obtained through on farm measurements and by accessing the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System. The final data set contained data on 38,436 calvings and 27,127 services. Univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses showed that herd size and milk yield were positively associated with HFS. Total free accessible area and free accessible area available per cow year were positively associated with the HFS, as was the number of freestalls available per cow. Cows housed on slatted floors had a lower HFS than those housed on solid floors. Conversely, cows housed on rubber floors had a higher HFS than cows on concrete floors. Dead-ending alleyways reduced the hazard of AI after calving. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model, accounting for herd management by including a frailty term for herd, showed relationships between hazard of postpartum service and explanatory variables. Animals in herds with more than 50 cows had a higher HFS [hazard ratio (HR)=3.0] compared with those in smaller herds. The HFS was also higher (HR=4.3) if more than 8.8 m(2) of space was available per cow year compared with herds in which animals had less space. The HFS after calving increased with parity (parity 2 HR=0.5, parity ≥3 HR=1.7), and was reduced if a lactation began with dystocia (HR=0.82) or was a breed other than Norwegian Red (HR=0.2). The frailty term, herd, was large and highly significant indicating a significant

  13. Making sense of global warming: Norwegians appropriating knowledge of anthropogenic climate change.

    PubMed

    Ryghaug, Marianne; Sørensen, Knut Holtan; Naess, Robert

    2011-11-01

    This paper studies how people reason about and make sense of human-made global warming, based on ten focus group interviews with Norwegian citizens. It shows that the domestication of climate science knowledge was shaped through five sense-making devices: news media coverage of changes in nature, particularly the weather, the coverage of presumed experts' disagreement about global warming, critical attitudes towards media, observations of political inaction, and considerations with respect to everyday life. These sense-making devices allowed for ambiguous outcomes, and the paper argues four main outcomes with respect to the domestication processes: the acceptors, the tempered acceptors, the uncertain and the sceptics.

  14. The Norwegian Plasma Fractionation Project--a 12 year clinical and economic success story.

    PubMed

    Flesland, O; Seghatchian, J; Solheim, B G

    2003-02-01

    The establishment of the Norwegian Fractionation Project (Project) was of major importance in preserving national self-sufficiency when plasma, cryoprecipitate and small batch factor IX-concentrates were replaced by virus inactivated products in the last part of the 1980s. Fractionation was performed abroad by contract with Octapharma after tenders on the European market. All Norwegian blood banks (>50) participated in the Project. Total yearly production was 50-60 tons of mainly recovered plasma. From 1993 solvent detergent (SD) treated plasma has replaced other plasma for transfusion. The blood banks paid for the fractionation and/or viral inactivation process, while the plasma remained the property of the blood banks and the final products were returned to the blood banks. The Project sold surplus products to other Norwegian blood banks and the majority of the coagulation factor concentrates to The Institute of Haemophilia and Rikshospitalet University Hospital. Both plasma and blood bank quality was improved by the Project. Clinical experience with the products has been satisfactory and self-sufficiency has been achieved for all major plasma proteins and SD plasma, but a surplus exceeding 3 years consumption of albumin has accumulated due to decreasing clinical use.The Project has secured high yields of the fractionated products and the net income from the produced products is NOK 1115 (140 Euros or US dollars) per litre plasma. An increasing surplus of albumin and the possibility of significant sales abroad of currently not fractionated IVIgG, could lead to a reorganisation of the Project from that of a co-ordinator to a national plasma handling unit. This unit could buy the plasma from the blood banks and have the plasma fractionated by contract after tender, before selling the products back for cost recovery. The small blood banks could produce plasma for products for the Norwegian market, while surplus products from the larger blood banks which are

  15. The effects of building design on hazard of first service in Norwegian dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Martin, A D; Kielland, C; Nelson, S T; Østerås, O

    2015-12-01

    Reproductive inefficiency is one of the major production and economic constraints on modern dairy farms. The environment affects onset of ovarian activity in a cow postcalving and influences estrus behavior, which in turn affects a stockperson's ability to inseminate her at the correct time. This study used survival analysis to investigate effects of building design and animal factors on the postpartum hazard of first service (HFS) in freestall-housed Norwegian Red cows. The study was performed on 232 Norwegian dairy farms between 2004 and 2007. Data were obtained through on farm measurements and by accessing the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System. The final data set contained data on 38,436 calvings and 27,127 services. Univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses showed that herd size and milk yield were positively associated with HFS. Total free accessible area and free accessible area available per cow year were positively associated with the HFS, as was the number of freestalls available per cow. Cows housed on slatted floors had a lower HFS than those housed on solid floors. Conversely, cows housed on rubber floors had a higher HFS than cows on concrete floors. Dead-ending alleyways reduced the hazard of AI after calving. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model, accounting for herd management by including a frailty term for herd, showed relationships between hazard of postpartum service and explanatory variables. Animals in herds with more than 50 cows had a higher HFS [hazard ratio (HR)=3.0] compared with those in smaller herds. The HFS was also higher (HR=4.3) if more than 8.8 m(2) of space was available per cow year compared with herds in which animals had less space. The HFS after calving increased with parity (parity 2 HR=0.5, parity ≥3 HR=1.7), and was reduced if a lactation began with dystocia (HR=0.82) or was a breed other than Norwegian Red (HR=0.2). The frailty term, herd, was large and highly significant indicating a significant

  16. A study of shame from sexual abuse within the context of a Norwegian incest center.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Kaare Torgny

    2013-01-01

    Working with those who have experienced sexual abuse is a complicated matter because such abuse not only involves the violation of the victim's body, but it often generates shame in those involved. This article is based on empirical data from 26 hours of videotaped focus group interviews with 19 adult men and women in a Norwegian incest center who spoke openly of the shame they experienced from sexual abuse as children, parents, and employees. Findings from this study show that shame from sexual abuse can be grouped into seven major categories: (a) family, (b) emotions, (c) body, (d) food, (e) self-image, (f) sex, and (g) therapy.

  17. First case of chronic wasting disease in Europe in a Norwegian free-ranging reindeer.

    PubMed

    Benestad, Sylvie L; Mitchell, Gordon; Simmons, Marion; Ytrehus, Bjørnar; Vikøren, Turid

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal contagious prion disease in cervids that is enzootic in some areas in North America. The disease has been found in deer, elk and moose in the USA and Canada, and in South Korea following the importation of infected animals. Here we report the first case of CWD in Europe, in a Norwegian free-ranging reindeer in Southern Norway. The origin of the disease is unknown. Until now a low number of cervids, and among them a few reindeer, have been tested for CWD in Norway. Therefore the prevalence of CWD is unknown.

  18. A Geomorphological Analysis of the Cenozoic Rejuvenation of the Southwestern Norwegian 'Passive' Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, Jeni; Redfield, Tim; Terje Osmundsen, Per; Arnhold, Chad; Conrad, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Although the Norwegian and Greenland rifted margins underwent Early Paleocene breakup, the southwestern Norwegian continental margin exhibits 2 to 3 km-high, sharply asymmetric seaward-facing escarpments and a 250+ km long topographic displacement gradient, a morphology not consistent with simple margin evolution models that predict subsidence and cooling as the dominate processes in tectonically-quiescent regions. Such atypical margins present a paradox: How is high, rugged topography along rifted margins maintained for tens to hundreds of millions of years after the cessation of extension? Recent work indicates the offshore crustal thinning gradient, a measure of the length from the continental escarpment to the location of the maximum crustal thickness, may play a controlling role: where the gradient is sharp the topography is most elevated; where gentle, the escarpments are lower. Although controversy remains, it is generally accepted, based on offshore geophysical data and onshore geomorphology, thermochronology, and structural geology, that the southwestern Norwegian escarpment has undergone topographic rejuvenation during the Cenozoic. Although several mechanistic models invoking various contributions of active tectonism have been proposed, from remnant topography recently carved by extensive glaciation to active uplift along large-scale onshore margin-parallel faults, the rejuvenating mechanism has not been resolved. Non-glacial components of rock column uplift may possibly be occurring today: tectonic control of major drainage patterns has been proposed and recent work in the Møre-Trøndelag Fault Complex provides compelling evidence for discrete fault-bound tectonic blocks with unique exhumation histories. We are seeking to constrain the primary mode of Cenozoic deformation along the western Norwegian continental rifted margin by utilizing a tiered approach with distinct but complementary techniques encompassing tectonic geomorphology, structural geology

  19. Treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients following psychiatric hospital treatment: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sørlie, Tore; Nergård, Jens-Ivar

    2005-06-01

    Treatment, treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients treated in a psychiatric hospital were compared. Although half of the Saami patients preferred to speak Saami with their therapists, only one patient did. The extensive use of traditional helpers was only partly recognized. Despite no differences in type and amount of treatment or symptom-change during the hospital stay, the Saami patients showed less satisfaction with all investigated treatment parameters including contact with staff, treatment alliance, information and global treatment satisfaction. There was less agreement between the ratings of the therapists and the Saami patients. Suggestions for improvements are made.

  20. Tool or Science? The History of Computing at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordal, Ola

    One may characterize the history of computing at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology by a tension between the computer as a tool in other disciplines and computer science as discipline in itself. This tension has been latent since the pioneering period of the 1950s until today. This paper shows how this have been expressed in the early attempts to take up computing at the University, and how it gave the Division of Computer Science a fairly rough start when it opened in 1972.

  1. First case of chronic wasting disease in Europe in a Norwegian free-ranging reindeer.

    PubMed

    Benestad, Sylvie L; Mitchell, Gordon; Simmons, Marion; Ytrehus, Bjørnar; Vikøren, Turid

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal contagious prion disease in cervids that is enzootic in some areas in North America. The disease has been found in deer, elk and moose in the USA and Canada, and in South Korea following the importation of infected animals. Here we report the first case of CWD in Europe, in a Norwegian free-ranging reindeer in Southern Norway. The origin of the disease is unknown. Until now a low number of cervids, and among them a few reindeer, have been tested for CWD in Norway. Therefore the prevalence of CWD is unknown. PMID:27641251

  2. Farm specific risk factors for Campylobacter colonisation in Danish and Norwegian broilers.

    PubMed

    Borck Høg, B; Sommer, H M; Larsen, L S; Sørensen, A I V; David, B; Hofshagen, M; Rosenquist, H

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacteriosis has become the leading bacterial zoonosis in humans in the European Union and other developed countries. There are many sources of human Campylobacter infections, but broilers and broiler meat have been shown to be the most important. In order to implement effective interventions that reduce the probability of Campylobacter colonisation of broiler flocks, it is essential to fully understand the risk factors involved. We present a bi-national risk factor survey comprising Campylobacter data from more than 5200 Danish and Norwegian indoor, conventional broiler flocks and the responses to a standardised questionnaire, with more than 40 explanatory variables from 277 Danish and Norwegian farms. We explored several models by using different combinations of the Danish and Norwegian data, including models with single-country datasets. All models were analysed using a generalized linear model using backwards elimination and forward selection. The results show that Norwegian broiler flocks had a lower risk of being colonised than Danish flocks. Farm specific variables that increased the risk of flocks becoming colonised with Campylobacter in both countries were: broiler houses older than five years; longer downtime (no. of days between flocks), probably a consequence of longer downtimes being associated with less focus on maintaining a high biosecurity level; broiler houses without a separate ante-room or barrier; and the use of the drinker nipples with cups or bells compared with nipples without cups. Additional country specific risk factors were also identified. For Norway, the risk of colonisation increased with increasing numbers of houses on a farm and when the water used for the broilers originated from surface water or bore holes instead of mains. For Denmark, having boot dips or low stocking density increased the risk of a flock becoming Campylobacter positive. The different model approaches allowed us to explore the effect of having a large

  3. Genetic variation in efficiency to deposit fat and lean meat in Norwegian Landrace and Duroc pigs.

    PubMed

    Martinsen, K H; Ødegård, J; Olsen, D; Meuwissen, T H E

    2015-08-01

    Feed costs amount to approximately 70% of the total costs in pork production, and feed efficiency is, therefore, an important trait for improving pork production efficiency. Production efficiency is generally improved by selection for high lean growth rate, reduced backfat, and low feed intake. These traits have given an effective slaughter pig but may cause problems in piglet production due to sows with limited body reserves. The aim of the present study was to develop a measure for feed efficiency that expressed the feed requirements per 1 kg deposited lean meat and fat, which is not improved by depositing less fat. Norwegian Landrace ( = 8,161) and Duroc ( = 7,202) boars from Topigs Norsvin's testing station were computed tomography scanned to determine their deposition of lean meat and fat. The trait was analyzed in a univariate animal model, where total feed intake in the test period was the dependent variable and fat and lean meat were included as random regression cofactors. These cofactors were measures for fat and lean meat efficiencies of individual boars. Estimation of fraction of total genetic variance due to lean meat or fat efficiency was calculated by the ratio between the genetic variance of the random regression cofactor and the total genetic variance in total feed intake during the test period. Genetic variance components suggested there was significant genetic variance among Norwegian Landrace and Duroc boars in efficiency for deposition of lean meat (0.23 ± 0.04 and 0.38 ± 0.06) and fat (0.26 ± 0.03 and 0.17 ± 0.03) during the test period. The fraction of the total genetic variance in feed intake explained by lean meat deposition was 12% for Norwegian Landrace and 15% for Duroc. Genetic fractions explained by fat deposition were 20% for Norwegian Landrace and 10% for Duroc. The results suggested a significant part of the total genetic variance in feed intake in the test period was explained by fat and lean meat efficiency. These new

  4. Mid-1980s distribution of tritium, 3He, 14C and 39Ar in the Greenland/Norwegian seas and the Nansen basin of the Arctic ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, P.; Bonisch, G.; Kromer, B.; Loosli, H.H.; Buehler, R.

    1995-12-31

    The distributions of tritium/3He, 14C and 39Ar observed in the period between 1985 and 1987 in the Greenland/Norwegian Seas and the Nansen Basin of the Arctic Ocean are presented. The data are used to outline aspects of the large-scale circulation and the exchange of deep water between the Greenland/Norwegian Seas and the Nansen Basin. Additionally, semi-quantitative estimates of mean ages of the main water masses found in these regions are obtained. Apparent tritium/3He ages of the upper waters (depth <500m) vary from close to zero in the Norwegian Current to about 15 years at the lower boundary of the Arctic halocline. The deep waters (>1,500m depth) of the Greenland/ Norwegian Seas show apparent tritium/3He ages between about 17 years in the Greenland Sea and 30 years in the Norwegian Sea.

  5. Evidence for melt channelization in Galapagos plume-ridge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, T.; Richards, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many present-day hot spots are located within ~ 1000 km of a mid-ocean ridge, either currently or in the geologic past, leading to frequent interaction between these two magmatic regimes. The consequent plume-ridge interactions provide a unique opportunity to test models for asthenosphere-lithosphere dynamics, with the plume acting as a tracer fluid in the problem, and excess magmatism reflecting otherwise unsampled sub-surface phenomena. Galapagos is an off-ridge hotspot with the mantle plume located ~150-250 km south of the plate boundary. Plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos is expressed by the formation of volcanic lineaments of islands and seamounts - e.g., the Wolf-Darwin lineament (WDL) - providing a direct probe of the plume-ridge interaction process, especially in regards to geochemical data. Although several models have been proposed to explain plume-ridge interaction in Galapagos, none adequately explain the observed characteristics, especially the WDL. In particular, predicted lithospheric fault orientations and melt density considerations appear at odds with observations, suggesting that lithospheric extension is not the primary process for formation of these islands. Other off-ridge hotspots interacting with nearby spreading ridges, such as Reunion and Louisville, also exhibit volcanic lineaments linking the plume and the ridge. Thus these lineament-type features are a common outcome of plume-ridge interaction that are indicative of the underlying physics. We propose that the lineaments are surface expressions of narrow sub-lithospheric melt channels focused towards the spreading ridge. These channels should form naturally due to the reactive infiltration instability in a two-phase flow of magma and solid mantle as demonstrated in two-phase flow simulations (e.g., Katz & Weatherley 2012). For Galapagos, we show that melt channels can persist thermodynamically over sufficient length-scales to link the plume and nearby ridge segments. We also show that

  6. Revisiting the Ridge-Push Force Using the Lithospheric Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; Coblentz, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    The geoid anomaly and driving force associated with the cooling oceanic lithosphere ("ridge push") are both proportional to dipole moment of the density-depth distribution, and allow a reevaluation of the ridge push force using the geoid. The challenge with this approach is to isolate the "lithospheric geoid" from the full geoid signal. Our approach is to use a band-pass spherical harmonic filter on the full geoid (e.g., EGM2008-WGS84, complete to spherical harmonic degree and order 2159) between orders 6 and 80. However, even this "lithospheric geoid" is noisy, and thus we average over 100 profiles evenly spaced along the global ridge system to obtain an average geoid step associated with the mid-ocean ridges. Because the positive ridge geoid signal is largest near the ridge (and to capture fast-spreading ridges), we evaluate symmetrical profiles extending ±45 m.y. about the ridge. We find an average ridge geoid anomaly of 4.5m, which is equivalent to a 10m anomaly for 100 m.y. old oceanic lithosphere. This geoid step corresponds to a ridge push force of ~2.4 x1012N/m for old oceanic lithosphere of 100 m.y., very similar to earlier estimates of ~2.5 x1012N/m based on simple half-space models. This simple half-space model also predicts constant geoid slopes of about 0.15 m/m.y. for cooling oceanic lithosphere. Our observed geoid slopes are consistent with this value for ages up to 40-50 m.y., but drop off to lower values at greater ages. We model this using a plate cooling model (with a thickness of the order of 125km) to fit the observation that the geoid anomaly and ridge driving force only increase slowly for ages greater than 40 m.y. (in contrast to the half-space model where the linear dependence on age holds for all ages). This reduction of the geoid slope results in a 20% decrease in the predicted ridge push force. This decrease is due to the combined effects of treating the oceanic lithosphere as a cooling plate (vs. a half-space), and the loss of geoidal

  7. Chemical signatures from hydrothermal venting on slow spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Henrietta N.

    At least 24 sites of active venting have been confirmed on slow and ultraslow spreading ridges, with dozens more indicated on the basis of hydrothermal plume distributions and/or dredge recovery of massive sulfides. Fluid chemistry data have been published for 13 sites: 8 on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 3 on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and 2 on the Central Indian Ridge. Three of these 13 sites (Rainbow, Logatchev, and Lost City) are known to be hosted in ultramafic terrain, and their fluid chemistries reflect the influence of serpentinization reactions, including elevated hydrogen and methane, and low silica concentrations. This brief review presents the published fluid chemistry for all 13 sites, including time series where available, and demonstrates the diversity of chemical compositions engendered by the myriad settings (near and off axis, young volcanic to ultramafic terrain, and depths up to 4100 m) of hydrothermal systems on slow and ultraslow spreading ridges.

  8. Black smokers on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    Evidence for a variety of active hydrothermal venting phenomena, including black smokers, was discovered at a site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by a research team of government and university scientists. The work was accomplished on a cruise of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Researcher during July 1985 as part of the NOAA Vents Program. The site of the venting phenomena is the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) Hydrothermal Field on the east wall of the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26°N. The TAG Hydrothermal Field was the first hydrothermal field to be found on an oceanic ridge; it was discovered 12 years ago in 1973. However, until the present cruise, only low-temperature hydrothermal activity had been documented, and the existence of higher-temperature hydrothermal activity along slow spreading oceanic ridges (half rate 2 cm/yr), such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, was in question.

  9. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, V.A.; Wilson, A.R.

    1990-10-01

    The first two volumes of this report are devoted to a presentation of environmental data and supporting narratives for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding environs during 1989. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a stand-alone'' report for the ORR for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1989 data. Volume 2 includes the detailed data summarized in a format to ensure that all environmental data are represented in the tables. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2. The tables in Vol. 2 are addressed in Vol. 1. For this reason, Vol. 2 cannot be considered a stand-alone report but is intended to be used in conjunction with Vol. 1. 16 figs., 194 tabs.

  10. Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental report for 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.R.

    1991-09-01

    The first two volumes of this report are devoted to a presentation of environmental data and supporting narratives for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding environs during 1990. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a stand-alone'' report for the ORR for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1990 data. Volume 2 includes the detailed data summarized in a format to ensure that all environmental data are represented in the tables. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2. The tables in Vol. 2 are addressed in Vol. 1. For this reason, Vol. 2 cannot be considered a stand-alone report but is intended to be used in conjunction with Vol. 1.

  11. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, N.L.

    1989-05-01

    The first two volumes of this report are devoted to a presentation of environmental data and supporting narratives for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding environs during 1988. Volume 1 includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a stand-alone'' report for the ORR for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1988 data. Volume 2 includes the detailed data summarized in a format to ensure that all environmental data are represented in the tables. Narratives are not included in Volume 2. The tables in Volume 2 are addressed in Volume 1. For this reason, Vol. 2 cannot be considered a stand-alone report but is intended to be used in conjunction with Volume 1.

  12. FOSSIL RIDGE WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Ed; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    The Fossil Ridge Wilderness Study Area, approximately 20 mi northeast of Gunnison in central Colorado, was studied and its mineral-resource potential assessed. Portions of the study area have substantiated resource potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, molybdenum, uranium, thorium, rare-earth elements, and high-calcium limestone. Much of the area has a probable resource potential for the preceeding commodities as well as for tin. Various other elements are found in anomalous concentrations within the study area, but there is likelihood for their occurrence in amounts sufficient to constitute resources. Exploration, especially for molybdenum, gold, and uranium, has been active in the past and is expected to continue in the future. No potential for fossil fuel resources was identified in this study.

  13. Reactive spreading: Adsorption, ridging and compound formation

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Cannon, R.M.; Tomsia, A.P.

    2000-09-11

    Reactive spreading, in which a chemically active element is added to promote wetting of noble metals on nonmetallic materials, is evaluated. Theories for the energetics and kinetics of the necessary steps involved in spreading are outlined and compared to the steps in compound formation that typically accompany reactive wetting. These include: fluid flow, active metal adsorption, including nonequilibrium effects, and triple line ridging. All of these can be faster than compound nucleation under certain conditions. Analysis and assessment of recently reported experiments on metal/ceramic systems lead to a focus on those conditions under which spreading proceeds ahead of the actual formation of a new phase at the interface. This scenario may be more typical than believed, and perhaps the most effective situation leading to enhanced spreading. A rationale for the pervasive variability and hysteresis observed during high temperature wetting also emerges.

  14. Ocean mixing studied near Hawaiian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkel, Robert; Munk, Walter; Worcester, Peter; Comuelle, Bruce D.; Rudnick, Daniel; Sherman, Jeffrey; Filloux, Jean H.; Dushaw, Brian D.; Howe, Bruce M.; Sanford, Thomas B.; Lee, Craig M.; Kunze, Eric; Gregg, Michael C.; Miller, Jack B.; Merrifield, Mark A.; Luther, Douglas S.; Firing, Eric; Brainard, Rusty; Flament, Pierre J.; Chave, Alan D.; Moum, James M.; Caldwell, Douglas R.; Levine, Murray D.; Boyd, Timothy; Egbert, Gary D.

    The Hawaii Ocean Mixing Experiment (HOME) is a grassroots program to study turbulent mixing processes near the Hawaiian Ridge. The HOME is motivated by the desire to understand diffusive aspects of the advective-diffusive balance that mediates the general circulation of the oceans. HOME is focused on tidally driven mixing, given the ubiquity of the tide as a deep-sea energy source.As the sea surface cools at high latitude, surface waters sink. Subsidence rate is sufficient to fill the worlds ocean with cold bottom water in approximately 3,000 years. Diffusive processes that transfer heat into the abyssal ocean are required to maintain a steady-state thermal structure. An effective eddy diffusivity of order Kp=10-4 m2 s-1, 700 times the molecular diffusivity of heat, is necessary [Munk, 1966]. Such a diffusivity might be supported by either mechanical mixing (turbulent transport) or thermodynamic (so-called doubly diffusive) processes.

  15. Source document for waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, P.L.; Kuhaida, A.J., Jr.

    1996-09-01

    This document serves as a source document for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and other types of documents developed for and pertaining to Environmental Restoration (ER) Program activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It contains descriptions of the (1) regulatory requirements for the ORR ER Program, (2) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) ER Program, (3) ORNL site history and characterization, and (4) history and characterization of Waste Area Groupings (WAGS) 1-20. This document was created to save time, effort, and money for persons and organizations drafting documents for the ER Program and to improve consistency in the documents prepared for the program. By eliminating the repetitious use of selected information about the program, this document will help reduce the time and costs associated with producing program documents. By serving as a benchmark for selected information about the ER Program, this reference will help ensure that information presented in future documents is accurate and complete.

  16. Oak Ridge Health Studies phase 1 report, Volume 1: Oak Ridge Phase 1 overview

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, M.I.; Van Cleave, M.L.; Turri, P.; Daniel, J.

    1993-09-01

    In July 1991, the State of Tennessee initiated the Health Studies Agreement with the United States Department of Energy to carry out independent studies of possible adverse health effects in people living in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge Reservation. The health studies focus on those effects that could have resulted or could result from exposures to chemicals and radioactivity released at the Reservation since 1942. The major focus of the first phase was to complete a Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. This study was designed to find out if enough data exist about chemical and radionuclide releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation to conduct a second phase. The second phase will lead to estimates of the actual amounts or the ``doses`` of various contaminants received by people as a result of off-site releases. Once the doses of various contaminants have been estimated, scientists and physicians will be better able to evaluate whether adverse health effects could have resulted from the releases.

  17. Melton Valley Storage Tanks Capacity Increase Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and maintain additional storage capacity at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLLW). New capacity would be provided by a facility partitioned into six individual tank vaults containing one 100,000 gallon LLLW storage tank each. The storage tanks would be located within the existing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) facility. This action would require the extension of a potable water line approximately one mile from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) area to the proposed site to provide the necessary potable water for the facility including fire protection. Alternatives considered include no-action, cease generation, storage at other ORR storage facilities, source treatment, pretreatment, and storage at other DOE facilities.

  18. Ridges swimming in a sea of dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The muted terrain of northern Acidalia Planitia testifies to the fact that the region is heavily mantled with dust. The most interesting features in this image are the small terraces located along the flanks of the ridges and the patterned ground seen at the base of the largest ridge (upper right). These features appear to be classic examples of periglacial landforms and may indicate the presence of shallow subsurface ice.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 54.9, Longitude 351 East (9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  19. Hydrothermal activity at the Arctic mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Rolf B.; Thorseth, Ingunn H.; Nygård, Tor Eivind; Lilley, Marvin D.; Kelley, Deborah S.

    Over the last 10 years, hydrothermal activity has been shown to be abundant at the ultraslow spreading Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridges (AMOR). Approximately 20 active and extinct vent sites have been located either at the seafloor, as seawater anomalies, or by dredge sampling hydrothermal deposits. Decreasing spreading rates and decreasing influence of the Icelandic hot spot toward the north along the AMOR result in a north-south change from a shallow and magmatically robust to a deep and magmatically starved ridge system. This contrast gives rise to large variability in the ridge geology and in the nature of the associated hydrothermal systems. The known vent sites at the southern part of the ridge system are either low-temperature or white smoker fields. At the deep, northern parts of the ridge system, a large black smoker field has been located, and seawater anomalies and sulfide deposits suggest that black smoker-type venting is common. Several of these fields may be peridotite-hosted. The hydrothermal activity at parts of the AMOR exceeds by a factor of 2 to 3 what would be expected by extrapolating from observations on faster spreading ridges. Higher fracture/fault area relative to the magma volume extracted seems a likely explanation for this. Many of the vent fields at the AMOR are associated with axial volcanic ridges. Strong focusing of magma toward these ridges, deep rifting of the ridges, and subsequent formation of long-lived detachment faults that are rooted below the ridges may be the major geodynamic mechanisms causing the unexpectedly high hydrothermal activity.

  20. Tiger team assessment of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1990-02-01

    This document contains findings identified during the Tiger Team Compliance Assessment of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The Y-12 Plant Tiger Team Compliance Assessment is comprehensive in scope. It covers the Environmental, Safety, and Health (including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) compliance), and Management areas and determines the plant's compliance with applicable federal (including DOE), state, and local regulations and requirements. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Removal action report on the Building 3001 canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a federal facility managed by Lockheed Martin C, Energy Research, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ORNL on the Oak Ridge Reservation in East Tennessee at the Anderson and Roane County lines, approximately 38 km (24 miles) west of Knoxville, Tennessee, and 18 km (11 miles) southwest of downtown Oak Ridge. The Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and its storage and transfer canal are located in Bldg. 3001 in the approximate center of Waste Area Grouping I in the ORNL main complex. 4:1 The Bldg. 3001 Storage Canal is an L-shaped, underground, reinforced-concrete structure running from the back and below the Graphite Reactor in Bldg. 3001 to a location beneath a hot cell in the adjacent Bldg. 3019. The Graphite Reactor was built in 1943 to produce small quantities of plutonium and was subsequently used to produce other isotopes for medical research before it was finally shut down in 1963. The associated canal was used to transport, under water, spent fuel slugs and other isotopes from the back of the reactor to the adjacent Bldg. 31319 hot cell for further processing. During its operation and years subsequent to operation, the canal`s concrete walls and floor became contaminated with radioisotopes from the water.This report documents the activities involved with replacing the canal water with a solid, controlled, low-strength material (CLSM) in response to a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action.

  2. Geological mapping of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Lemiszki, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Site (formerly known as the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) is located in the southern Appalachian Valley and Ridge province of east Tennessee and overlies an area of folded and faulted Cambrian through Ordovician sedimentary rocks in the footwall of the Whiteoak Mountain fault. Environmental restoration plans for the area require that the geology of the site be well understood because various aspects of the groundwater system are directly influenced by stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the bedrock. This study involved mapping the bedrock geology of an 18-square mile area in and around the plant site. Field mapping focused on: (1) checking the accuracy of previously mapped stratigraphic and fault contacts, (2) dividing the bedrock into distinct stratigraphic units based on field criteria, (3) determining the geometry of map-scale folds and faults, and (4) documenting various aspects of the local fracture system. Besides accomplishing all of the above tasks, results from this study have led to a number of new hypotheses regarding various aspects of the site geology. First, faulting and folding within carbonates of the Chickamauga Supergroup in the plant area has repeated certain rock units, which requires that there be a thrust fault in the subsurface below them. This thrust fault may project to the surface with the Carters Limestone. Second, thrust slices of the Rome Formation that overlie the Chickamauga carbonates may be extremely thin and have a limited aerial extent. Third, part of the Knox Group on McKinney Ridge is folded into an anticline. Evaluating the above hypotheses will require information about the subsurface that can only be acquired through drilling and surface geophysical surveys. The geologic map produced from this study can be used to evaluate the location of coreholes that will more effectively intersect a combination of stratigraphic, structural, and hydrologic targets.

  3. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Parker, A.F.

    1997-02-01

    This report provides summary information on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) sites as listed in the Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), dated January 1, 1992, Appendix C. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory was built in 1943 as part of the World War II Manhattan Project. The original mission of ORNL was to produce and chemically separate the first gram-quantities of plutonium as part of the national effort to produce the atomic bomb. The current mission of ORNL is to provide applied research and development in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in nuclear fusion and fission, energy conservation, fossil fuels, and other energy technologies and to perform basic scientific research in selected areas of the physical, life, and environmental sciences. ER is also tasked with clean up or mitigation of environmental impacts resulting from past waste management practices on portions of the approximately 37,000 acres within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Other installations located within the ORR are the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (K-25) and the Y-12 plant. The remedial action strategy currently integrates state and federal regulations for efficient compliance and approaches for both investigations and remediation efforts on a Waste Area Grouping (WAG) basis. As defined in the ORR FFA Quarterly Report July - September 1995, a WAG is a grouping of potentially contaminated sites based on drainage area and similar waste characteristics. These contaminated sites are further divided into four categories based on existing information concerning whether the data are generated for scoping or remedial investigation (RI) purposes. These areas are as follows: (1) Operable Units (OU); (2) Characterization Areas (CA); (3) Remedial Site Evaluation (RSE) Areas; and (4) Removal Site Evaluation (RmSE) Areas.

  4. The Davie Ridge: a Marginal Transform Ridge not Formed During Continental Breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phethean, J. J. J.; Van Hunen, J.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Davies, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The breakup of Gondwana translated Madagascar southwards relative to Africa along the Davie Fracture Zone (DFZ). This fracture zone now forms the Transform Passive Continental Margin (TPCM) from Kenya to Mozambique. The Davie Ridge (DR), a transform marginal ridge, has formed along the DFZ between 5 and 2°S and 22 and 11°S, but with little expression in-between. It has been proposed that this marginal ridge was formed by the thermal effects of a passing Mid Ocean Ridge (MOR) during the separation of Gondwana. Plate kinematic reconstructions, however, constrained by ocean magnetic anomalies, show that the MOR only passed between the north and south expressions of the DR. Therefore the positive linear gravity anomalies of the DR cannot be attributed to the effects of a passing MOR, and some other mechanism must be found to explain their formation. Interpretation of seismic reflection profiles along the DR shows that the gravity highs occur adjacent to large basin structures. In the north this correlates with a basin-bounding basement high of ~Albian age, and in the south with the rift flank uplifts of the currently active Quirimbas graben. This suggests that the northern and southern DR segments are instead shoulder uplifts resulting from two separate extensional episodes during different stress regimes. These are the Cretaceous NE-SW extension during the breakup of the south Atlantic, and the E-W extension of the Neogene-recent Afar-East Africa rift system, respectfully. The lack of deformation and DR formation along the region of the TPCM passed by the MOR suggests it has been coupled by thermal effects and/or the injection of magma.

  5. The Effect of Ridge Expansion on Implant Stability in Narrow Partially Edentulous Ridges - A Preliminary Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shaik, Latheef Saheb; Meka, Sridhar; Chakravarthi, Srinivas Pandi; Kolli, Naga Neelima Devi; Lingamaneni, Krishna Prasad; Avvaru, Susmita; Tiwari, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Currently, dental treatments with better aesthetic results and less treatment time is more acceptable by the patients. Inadequate amount of bone for implant placement at functionally and aesthetically most appropriate position is a common problem. Aim To assess the effect of ridge expansion on implant stability in narrow partially edentulous ridges and to evaluate clinically and radiographically the success of dental implants, placed immediately following ridge expansion procedure. Material and Methods Ten participants (nine males, one female, average age - 28 years) with partial edentulism associated with narrow atrophic alveolar ridges with adequate height and willing to participate in the study were included. The ridge expansion was performed using osteotomes and simultaneous implant placement was done. A total of 10 implants were placed. Stability, achieved ridge width and radiographic crestal bone loss were assessed three months post-operatively. Results Three months follow-up revealed stable implants both clinically and radiographically. All 10 implants were surrounded by adequate amount of bone required for successful functional rehabilitation. Conclusion The study reveals that the technique of ridge expansion using osteotomes is successful in horizontal expansion, in cases of atrophic alveolar ridges thus, eliminating the need for more complex treatment as well as reduces the rehabilitation time along with improving the quality of bone support. PMID:27790575

  6. Microgravity survey of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, R.D.

    1996-05-01

    Karst features are known to exist within the carbonate bedrock of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site and may play an important role in groundwater flow and contaminant migration. This report discusses the results of a microgravity survey of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The main objective of the survey is to identify areas containing bedrock cavities. Secondary objectives included correlating the observed gravity to the geology and to variations in overburden thickness. The analysis includes 11 profile lines that are oriented perpendicular to the geologic strike and major structures throughout the K-25 Site. The profile lines are modeled in an effort to relate gravity anomalies to karst features such as concentrations of mud-filled cavities. Regolith thickness and density data provided by boreholes constrain the models. Areally distributed points are added to the profile lines to produce a gravity contour map of the site. In addition, data from the K-901 area are combined with data from previous surveys to produce a high resolution map of that site. The K-25 Site is located in an area of folded and faulted sedimentary rocks within the Appalachian Valley and Ridge physiographic province. Paleozoic age rocks of the Rome Formation, Knox Group, and Chickamauga Supergroup underlie the K-25 Site and contain structures that include the Whiteoak Mountain Fault, the K-25 Fault, a syncline, and an anticline. The mapped locations of the rock units and complex structures are currently derived from outcrop and well log analysis.

  7. Site descriptions of environmental restoration units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, P.L.; Legeay, A.J.; Pesce, D.S.; Stanley, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    This report, Site Descriptions of Environmental Restoration Units at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is being prepared to assimilate information on sites included in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program of the K-25 Site, one of three major installations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) built during World War III as part of the Manhattan Project. The information included in this report will be used to establish program priorities so that resources allotted to the K-25 ER Program can be best used to decrease any risk to humans or the environment, and to determine the sequence in which any remedial activities should be conducted. This document will be updated periodically in both paper and Internet versions. Units within this report are described in individual data sheets arranged alphanumerically. Each data sheet includes entries on project status, unit location, dimensions and capacity, dates operated, present function, lifecycle operation, waste characteristics, site status, media of concern, comments, and references. Each data sheet is accompanied by a photograph of the unit, and each unit is located on one of 13 area maps. These areas, along with the sub-area, unit, and sub-unit breakdowns within them, are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B is a summary of information on remote aerial sensing and its applicability to the ER program.

  8. 78 FR 69447 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Existing Collection, Comments Requested: Friction Ridge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Requested: Friction Ridge Cards: Arrest and Institution; Applicant; Personal Identification; FBI Standard... form/collection: Friction Ridge Cards: Arrest and Institution; Applicant; Personal Identification;...

  9. Norwegian Security Policy and new environmental challenges. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Grout, T.J.

    1996-03-01

    The evolution of Norwegian security policy is a result of the evolving post-Cold War political order in Europe and the relationship that Norway has vis-a-vis its neighbors. A new set of priorities is emerging. With the end of the Cold War the factors which influenced the security policies of Norway since World War II have changed to include more non-traditional factors. In the past, Norway`s security concerns were primarily dictated by the military threat from the Soviet Union. Now, as the twenty-first century approaches, the former Soviet Union does not pose an immediate military threat. However, the Arctic still remains strategically important for Norway and NATO. These new priorities emphasize a foreign and security policy which stabilizes the region through political and economic aspects vice military means. This change however does not delete the traditional emphasis on the military aspects. Environmental degradation is one aspect of the non-traditional influences with which Norway is now concerned. The presence of a decaying Russian (former Soviet Union) nuclear submarine fleet coupled with the largest concentration of nuclear reactors in the world in the Kola Peninsula region pose a threat to Norway. Environmental issues have come to the forefront of Norwegian security and foreign policy concerns and in response, Norway has become a leader in emphasizing the importance of addressing environmental problems internationally.

  10. Cohort study of effect of vaccination on pancreas disease in Norwegian salmon aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Bang Jensen, Britt; Kristoffersen, Anja B; Myr, Camilla; Brun, Edgar

    2012-12-01

    Pancreas disease (PD) is an economically important viral disease in Norwegian aquaculture, with 75 to 89 annual outbreaks from 2009 to 2011. To hinder further spread of disease from an initial endemic area on the west coast of Norway, measures for surveillance and control are in place, and the disease is notifiable on a national level. Since 2008, the Norwegian coastline has been divided into 2 administrative zones separated by a production-free area of 10 nautical miles at approximately 63°N. At the same time, a vaccination program involving most marine salmonid farms was initiated by the industry, using a vaccine against PD that was made commercially available in 2007. The effects of the vaccine in the field have been questioned, since the annual number of PD outbreaks has not decreased as expected. However, other production parameters can be used for evaluation of vaccine effect, and in this study the effects of vaccination on cumulative mortality, growth rate, feed conversion factor and number of discarded fish were analyzed using data collected from fish cohorts with and without PD put to sea between spring 2007 and spring 2009. The results show that vaccination against PD has a positive effect in reducing the number of outbreaks, and decreasing cumulative mortality and the number of fish discarded at slaughter.

  11. Intestinal lactoflora in Estonian and Norwegian patients with antibiotic associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sepp, Epp; Stšepetova, Jelena; Smidt, Imbi; Rätsep, Merle; Kõljalg, Siiri; Lõivukene, Krista; Mändar, Reet; Jaanimäe, Liis; Löhr, Iren H; Natås, Olav B; Naaber, Paul

    2011-12-01

    The disruption of intestinal microbiota is an important risk factor for the development of Clostridium difficile caused antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD). The role of intestinal lactoflora in protection against C. difficile is unclear. Fecal samples (n = 74) from AAD patients were investigated for C. difficile and lactobacilli by culture and real-time PCR. Lactobacilli were identified by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR (ERIC-PCR) and sequencing of 16S rRNA. In C. difficile negative cases we found somewhat higher counts of intestinal Lactobacilli (5.02 vs. 2.15 CFU log(10)/g; p = 0.053) by culture and more frequently Lactobacillus plantarum (33.3% vs. 9.4%; p = 0.03) as compared with positive ones. Results of total counts of lactobacilli comparing Estonian and Norwegian samples were conflicting by culture and PCR. We found higher colonization of Norwegian AAD patients with L. plantarum (21% vs. 5%, p = 0.053) and Estonians with Lactobacillus gasseri (19% vs. 2%, p = 0.023). Particular lactobacilli (e.g. L. plantarum) may have a role in protection against C. difficile, whereas the meaning of total counts of lactobacilli remains questionable. In different persons and nations, different lactobacilli species may have a protective role against C. difficile. PMID:21549208

  12. Childbearing impeded education more than education impeded childbearing among Norwegian women.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel E; Kravdal, Øystein; Keilman, Nico

    2011-07-19

    In most societies, women at age 39 with higher levels of education have fewer children. To understand this association, we investigated the effects of childbearing on educational attainment and the effects of education on fertility in the 1964 birth cohort of Norwegian women. Using detailed annual data from ages 17 to 39, we estimated the probabilities of an additional birth, a change in educational level, and enrollment in the coming year, conditional on fertility history, educational level, and enrollment history at the beginning of each year. A simple model reproduced a declining gradient of children ever born with increasing educational level at age 39. When a counterfactual simulation assumed no effects of childbearing on educational progression or enrollment (without changing the estimated effects of education on childbearing), the simulated number of children ever born decreased very little with increasing completed educational level, contrary to data. However, when another counterfactual simulation assumed no effects of current educational level and enrollment on childbearing (without changing the estimated effects of childbearing on education), the simulated number of children ever born decreased with increasing completed educational level nearly as much as the decrease in the data. In summary, in these Norwegian data, childbearing impeded education much more than education impeded childbearing. These results suggest that women with advanced degrees have lower completed fertility on the average principally because women who have one or more children early are more likely to leave or not enter long educational tracks and never attain a high educational level.

  13. Associations Between Human Values and Alcohol Consumption Among Norwegians in the Second Half of Life.

    PubMed

    Nordfjaern, Trond; Brunborg, Geir Scott

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies investigating human values and alcohol consumption have focused on adolescents, so the current study examined associations between human values and alcohol consumption in a cohort of Norwegians in the second half of life (40 years and above). Human values were studied within Schwartz' theory.(1) A survey was conducted in 2002/2003 among Norwegians aged 40 to 79 years (n = 4 149). The respondents completed measures of human values, drinking frequency and typical drinking quantity. Females (9%) were more likely to report abstinence than males (3%). Males also reported a higher consumption level. Individuals with high education had lower levels of abstinence (4%) than those with basic education (7%), and high education was also related to more consumption. People aged 40-60 years were less likely to abstain from alcohol (3%) than individuals aged 61 years and above (10%). Unmarried individuals were more likely to report abstinence, but also reported somewhat higher consumption than married individuals. Multivariate analyses adjusting for demographics as well as somatic and mental health showed that hedonistic values were related to lower probability of abstaining, while Conformity and Universalism values were associated with a higher probability of abstaining. Achivement and Hedonism values were associated with more alcohol consumption, whereas Universialism, Tradition, and Conformity were related to lower alcohol consumption.

  14. Intake of multivitamin supplements and incident asthma in Norwegian adults: the HUNT study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lin; Brumpton, Ben; Langhammer, Arnulf; Chen, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Although intake of multivitamin supplements is becoming increasingly popular, the relationship between intake of multivitamin supplements and incident asthma remains unclear. Prospective studies in adults with long-term follow-up are especially scarce. Our objective was to investigate the association between intake of multivitamin supplements and asthma development in Norwegian adults. We followed 16 952 adult subjects from the second survey of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (1995–1997) up to 2006–2008, who, at baseline, were free of asthma and provided information on their intake of multivitamin supplements and cod liver oil. Regular intake of multivitamin supplements or cod liver oil was defined as daily intake for ≥3 months during the year prior to baseline. Incident asthma was defined as reported new-onset asthma after the 11-year follow-up. Intake of multivitamin supplements only was associated with an increased odds ratio for incident asthma (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.12–2.13) after adjustment for a number of common confounding factors (model I). Similar odds ratios were found for intake of cod liver oil only and for intake of both supplements (1.59 and 1.73, respectively). Regular intake of multivitamin supplements was associated with an increased odds ratio for incident asthma in Norwegian adults. PMID:27730154

  15. Noise exposure of commercial divers in the Norwegian Sector of the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Nedwell, J R; Mason, T I; Collett, A G; Gardiner, R W K

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that exposure to high noise levels can adversely affect human hearing. Legislation exists in Europe to control or restrict the level of noise to which employees may be exposed during the course of their work. While the noise levels to which a worker may be exposed is well defined in air, human sensitivity to noise is different in high-pressure and mixed-gas conditions. Relatively little research exists to define human hearing in these circumstances, and few measurements exist of the levels of noise to which divers working in these conditions are exposed. A study using specially designed equipment has been undertaken in Norwegian waters to sample the noise levels present during typical saturation dives undertaken by commercial divers working in the Norwegian oil and gas industry. The divers were working in heliox at depths of 30 msw and 120 msw. It found noise levels were generally dominated by self-noise: flow noise while breathing and communications. The noise levels, both when corrected for the difference in hearing sensitivity under pressure in mixed gas and uncorrected, would exceed legislated limits for noise exposure in a working day without the use of noisy tools.

  16. Fission track analysis, rift shoulder uplift, and tectonic modeling of the Norwegian Continental Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Andriessen, P.; Van Der Beek, P.; Cloetingh, S.; Rohrman, M. )

    1993-09-01

    Apatite fission track analysis from southern Norway and Sweden, across the Permian Carboniferous Oslo rift, are presented and discussed in relation to different rifting scenarios. Vertical and horizontal apatite fission tack profiles in middle and southern Norway unravel the post-Carboniferous history of the Fennoscandian shield. Fission track apatite ages range from 240 Ma in the south to 160 Ma in the north, and according to spontaneous fission track length measurements, they must be interpreted as mixed ages, indicating minor amounts of Paleozoic-Mesozoic sedimentary cover. Apatite fission track length and age modeling suggest rapid cooling and uplift in the Tertiary for the southernmost part of Norway, suggesting a differential uplift of the basement. the obtained data are important for the reconstruction of burial and thermal histories of Cenozoic sedimentary basins of the Norwegian continental margin in the northern North Sea, where diverse rifting events, intraplate stress regimes, and inversion tectonics are involved. Fission track analysis puts constraints on tectonic modeling of uplift of rift flanks and the Norwegian continental margin and yields information for these assessment of hydrocarbon potentials of the sedimentary basins.

  17. Mercury and selenium in harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) in Norwegian waters

    SciTech Connect

    Teigen, S.W.; Skaare, J.U.; Sand, G. . National Veterinary Inst.); Bjorge, A. ); Degre, E. . Dept. of Marine Zoology and Chemistry)

    1993-07-01

    Concentrations of mercury and selenium have been determined in liver and kidney of 92 harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) caught along the Norwegian coast. The hepatic and renal mercury concentrations ranged from 0.26 to 9.9 and 0.15 to 3.5 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1], respectively, whereas the corresponding selenium concentrations ranged from 0.74 to 14.2 and 0.60 to 8.6 [mu]g g[sup [minus]1], respectively. No significant differences in mean concentrations of mercury and selenium were found between females and males within the same age classes. However, the concentrations were positively correlated with age. The present results revealed a decreasing mercury concentration gradient from south to north along the Norwegian coast. In all age classes, a significant, positive correlation between the concentrations of mercury and selenium was found in both liver and kidney, the molar mercury-to-selenium ratio being 0.9660 and 0.2151, respectively. Implications of these findings for the biochemical and toxicological behavior of mercury and selenium in the harbor porpoise are considered.

  18. Farm-Related Concerns and Mental Health Status Among Norwegian Farmers.

    PubMed

    Logstein, Brit

    2016-01-01

    The agricultural sector in Norway has undergone structural changes over the past 50 years. The objective of this study was to analyze the distribution of concerns about farm economy, work time, and mental complaints among Norwegian farmers. In a sample of single principal owner-operators (n = 2,676), we calculated the unadjusted and adjusted odd ratios (ORs) for concerns about the farm economy, concerns for insufficient time to complete work, and high symptom load of mental complaints. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to explore the associations between farm characteristics, concerns, and mental health. Farmers had a high probability for an increased symptom load of mental complaints. The level of farm income was more strongly associated with economic concerns and mental health concerns when a major part of total household income resulted from farming. The high workload required in farming combined with off-farm supplemental employment was additionally associated with higher levels of time concerns and mental complaints. Norwegian farmers have a relatively high workload both in farming and in off-farm work but are able to make sustainable plans for their individual workload needs. The high individual workload in both these arenas poses a challenge, but was not associated with a greater probability for a high symptom load of mental complaints. PMID:27420178

  19. Chemostratigraphy of Upper Cretaceous chalk sequences in Norwegian-Danish basin and North Sea Central Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen, N.O.

    1987-05-01

    Geochemical studies of subsurface sections and outcrops in the Upper Cretaceous chalk sequences from the Norwegian-Danish basin and the North Sea Central Trough have resulted in a detailed chemostratigraphy for these strata. The most applicable chemostratigraphic markers are based on the distribution of strontium, magnesium, manganese, the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio, and the variations in the carbonate contents. It is demonstrated that the chemostratigraphic approach is valid at two levels: (1) a superior chemostratigraphy in which deep-sea cores from the Atlantic Ocean and sections from western Europe are correlated on the basis of significant geochemical anomalies and long-term variations most likely induced by oceanic geochemical cycles and sea level fluctuations; (2) a subordinate but detailed intrabasinal chemostratigraphic correlation which primarily reflects the physicochemical conditions in the depositional environment. The Upper Cretaceous chemostratigraphy established in the Danish area allows a detailed correlation between relatively continuous chalk sequences in the Norwegian-Danish basin and the rather condensed and hiati-influenced sections in the oil fields of the North Sea. The results emphasize the applicability of chemostratigraphy in the subsurface exploration for hydrocarbon reservoirs in chalk.

  20. Impaired nutritional status during intensive chemotherapy in Russian and Norwegian cohorts with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Per Ole; Ukrainchenko, Ekaterina; Afanasyev, Boris; Hulbekkmo, Kristin; Choukah, Amal; Gulbrandsen, Nina; Wisløff, Finn; Tangen, Jon-Magnus

    2008-10-01

    Intensive chemotherapy is mandatory in curative treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but whether the nutritional status deteriorates during treatment, is unknown. We therefore prospectively examined anthropometric and biochemical nutritional markers during intensive chemotherapy in 26 Russian and 19 Norwegian AML patients during 9 months from diagnosis. Although the body mass index remained unchanged in both cohorts, hand grip strength and triceps skinfold thickness declined (P<0.05) during treatment before normalisation at study end. We detected a similar significant, temporary decrease in albumin, transferrin, testosterone and gonadotrophins in both cohorts. Although the fat-soluble vitamins D and E also displayed such a pattern, vitamin A dropped and remained low throughout the study in both cohorts. The Russian patients reported lower global quality of life, more symptoms and more financial concern than the Norwegians. Our data suggest a catabolic metabolism during intensive chemotherapy for AML, leading to impaired nutritional status, hypofunction of the pituitary-gonadal axis and decreased health-related quality of life.

  1. Copernicus benefits the Norwegian Satellite Earth Observation Database for Marine and Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korosov, Anton; Johannessen, Johnny

    2014-05-01

    The Norwegian Satellite Earth Observation Database for Marine and Polar Research (NORMAP) is developed for creating and maintaining a repository of Earth Observation data over the high latitude and Arctic regions to facilitate, stimulate and strengthen high quality and original multidisciplinary Earth System research, application, exploitation and education in marine, polar and climate sciences. As such it is complementing and supporting the Norwegian strategy for advancing these science disciplines in the high latitude and Arctic regions. In the international arena, NORMAP benefits and complements the EU GMES MyOcean project, and other previous GMES downstream services such as AQUAMAR, MONARCH-A, SIDARUS, etc. With the launch of the first Sentinel-1 mission NORMAP will be reinforced by the new data flow from the Copernicus Space Component. NORMAP is also acquiring data from a multitude of other satellites through the unified Copernicus system and will become one of the national thematic information services designed to benefit the environmental monitoring and support effective policy-making.

  2. Noise exposure of commercial divers in the Norwegian Sector of the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Nedwell, J R; Mason, T I; Collett, A G; Gardiner, R W K

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that exposure to high noise levels can adversely affect human hearing. Legislation exists in Europe to control or restrict the level of noise to which employees may be exposed during the course of their work. While the noise levels to which a worker may be exposed is well defined in air, human sensitivity to noise is different in high-pressure and mixed-gas conditions. Relatively little research exists to define human hearing in these circumstances, and few measurements exist of the levels of noise to which divers working in these conditions are exposed. A study using specially designed equipment has been undertaken in Norwegian waters to sample the noise levels present during typical saturation dives undertaken by commercial divers working in the Norwegian oil and gas industry. The divers were working in heliox at depths of 30 msw and 120 msw. It found noise levels were generally dominated by self-noise: flow noise while breathing and communications. The noise levels, both when corrected for the difference in hearing sensitivity under pressure in mixed gas and uncorrected, would exceed legislated limits for noise exposure in a working day without the use of noisy tools. PMID:26094290

  3. Climate Change Impact on Hydrological Extremes: Preliminary Results from the Polish-Norwegian Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, Renata J.; Bogdanowicz, Ewa; Debele, Sisay E.; Doroszkiewicz, Joanna; Hisdal, Hege; Lawrence, Deborah; Meresa, Hadush K.; Napiórkowski, Jarosław J.; Osuch, Marzena; Strupczewski, Witold G.; Wilson, Donna; Wong, Wai Kwok

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the background, objectives, and preliminary outcomes from the first year of activities of the Polish-Norwegian project CHIHE (Climate Change Impact on Hydrological Extremes). The project aims to estimate the influence of climate changes on extreme river flows (low and high) and to evaluate the impact on the frequency of occurrence of hydrological extremes. Eight "twinned" catchments in Poland and Norway serve as case studies. We present the procedures of the catchment selection applied in Norway and Poland and a database consisting of near-natural ten Polish and eight Norwegian catchments constructed for the purpose of climate impact assessment. Climate projections for selected catchments are described and compared with observations of temperature and precipitation available for the reference period. Future changes based on those projections are analysed and assessed for two periods, the near future (2021-2050) and the far-future (2071-2100). The results indicate increases in precipitation and temperature in the periods and regions studied both in Poland and Norway.

  4. Miocene ridge impingement and the spawning of secondary ridges off Oregon, Washington and British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrar, Edward; Dixon, John M.

    1980-11-01

    The East Pacific Rise is the only extant portion of the South Pacific Spreading Center, which began to impinge on the North American plate margin ~30 Ma ago. The North Pacific Spreading Center, offset ~1500 km to the west on the Mendocino transform fault, remained active until ~9 Ma ago when it, too, impinged on the trench off the Oregon—Washington margin. The zones of mantle upwelling associated with the spreading centers have since migrated inland to their present sites beneath the Cascade and Garibaldi volcanic chains and the Rio Grande Rift, maintaining the ~1500 km offset that they have had since the Early Tertiary. Impingement of the North Pacific Spreading Center on the trench at anomaly 5 time juxtaposed the Pacific and American plates and the continuing relative motion between these plates across the north—south boundary has been accommodated by secondary spreading at the Gorda—Juan de Fuca—Explorer ridge system. These obliquely spreading ridges, fed by lateral mantle flow originating at the zone of mantle upwelling beneath the Cascade belt, are migrating away from the North American coast at half the Pacific—America velocity, and no subduction is occurring along the continental margin, the Juan de Fuca sea floor being an integral part of the American plate. This scenario is consistent with the fact that the sea floor along the continental margin has the same age as that which bears the last north—south anomaly on the Pacific plate (anomaly 5) preceding initiation of spreading at the Juan de Fuca and Explorer ridges (a fortuitous coincidence in models involving continued subduction of the Juan de Fuca sea floor). This model implies that the rate of motion between the Pacific and American plates is 8 cm/a. The Blanco fracture zone formed as a transform fault at the south end of the Juan de Fuca ridge and was initially collinear with the North American margin south of Cape Mendocino. The North Pacific Spreading Center impinged on this portion of

  5. Insights from new high-resolution data from the Traenadjupet Slide on the Norwegian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozzato, Alessandro; Tappin, David; Talling, Peter; Cartigny, Matthieu; Long, David; Hunt, James; Watts, Camilla; Pope, Ed; Allin, Joshua; Stanford, Jennifer; Dowdeswell, Julian

    2015-04-01

    Submarine landslides are among the largest mass flows on Earth and can be far larger than landslides on land. They can generate tsunami and therefore represent a significant geohazard. A series of large submarine landslides have been studied previously in unusual detail along the Norwegian continental margin, including the Storegga and Traenadjupet Slides. The most closely studied is the Storegga slide(1,2) which occurred 8.2k BP and moved >3,000 km3 of sediment(2). A tsunami with run up heights sometimes reaching 20m high has been identified from deposits mapped along the Norwegian, Shetland and mainland Scottish coasts (1). The Traenadjupet Slide is the second largest slide on the Norwegian margin with a volume of about 900km3. It has been dated to ~4k BP(3,4). The volume is comparable to that of the Storegga Slide. However, no major tsunami deposit at 4ka has yet been mapped that links to the Traenadjupet Slide (Stein Bondevik, pers. comm.). The purpose of this study is to obtain new insights into how the Traenadjupet Slide was emplaced. In particular, why did movement of 900km3 of sediment during the Traenadjupet Slide fail to produce a major tsunami at 4ka? We present a new field dataset for the Traendajupet Slide including MBES bathymetry, sub-bottom profiles, and piston cores acquired during the 64PE391 research expedition in July 2014, together with data acquired previously during the JCR51 cruise. These datasets cover a large part of Traenadjupet slide and give new insights into the mechanism of the slide failure. The Traenadjupet Slide morphology is very different to that of the Storegga Slide. The Storegga Slide disintegrated generating debris flows and turbidity currents that propagated for hundreds of kilometres. The Traenadjupet Slide, on the other hand, appears not to have disintegrated in a similar manner, but rather left thick mounded deposits at the foot of the slope(5). Several distinct lobes covered with 500m-scale sediment blocks are visible

  6. Salt distribution in the Norwegian-Danish Basin, Central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassier, Caroline; Jarsve, Erlend; Heeremans, Michel; Mansour Abdelmalak, Mohamed; Faleide, Jan Inge; Helge Gabrielsen, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Salt tectonics have extensively been studied in most parts of the Central North Sea. However, few studies have been done in the Norwegian side of the Norwegian-Danish Basin. In this contribution, we report a new regional analysis of the salt patterns across the offshore Norwegian-Danish Basin. We have mapped the regional distribution of salt structures in the Norwegian-Danish Basin using both old and recent 2D seismic reflection profiles tied to wells. The salt-thickness map shows three distinct salt structures patterns: (1) NW-SE trending salt walls in the northern part of the basin; the spacing between the walls vary between 7 to 12 km; (2) a dense and irregular distribution of salt diapirs in the southern part of the studied area; (3) an irregular pattern of sparse but big salt diapirs in the eastern part of the basin. This domain is characterized by numerous turtle structures associated with salt diapirs. Reflection seismic cross-sections show that most salt structures only pierce the Triassic sedimentary strata whereas only few salt structures reach the seabed. Rotated fault blocks indicate a gliding vergence towards the South in the eastern part of the basin and towards the SE in the western side of the Norwegian-Danish Basin. No mature or compressive salt structures, except some squeezed salt diapirs, are observed in the topographic lows of the basin. The initiation of salt tectonics started during the early Middle Triassic in the entire basin; salt tectonics reactivations were recorded during the Middle Jurassic, Paleogene, and prior to the Quaternary but are not homogeneous across the basin. Salt movements inferred from our study are in good agreement with previous studies. The trend of salt walls (domain 1) indicates a NE-SW extension which is not compatible with N-S trending pre-salt faults. Instead, the strong Triassic subsidence towards the SW has most likely controlled the formation of the salt walls. The salt was initially thicker in domain 2 that

  7. New insights into the structure of Norwegian continental margins from modern aeromagnetic compilations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbing, J.; Olesen, O.; Gernigon, L.; Skilbrei, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    We present the aeromagnetic compilation of the Norwegian mainland and its shelf area and its importance for geological models and tectonic studies. The combined data-set reveal that the bedrock structures are continuous from the Baltic Shield under the Caledonian orogen into the continental shelf and that the late-Caledonian collapse of the Caledonian orogene has influenced the style of extension on the Norwegian shelf. On the margin, modern high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys with small line-spacing, more accurate navigation and sensitive magnetometers have revealed the existence of significant magnetic anomalies arising from sedimentary layers. Sub-cropping Late Paleozoic to Tertiary sedimentary units along the Trøndelag-Nordland coast produce a very distinct anomaly pattern. The asymmetry of the anomalies, with a steep gradient and a negative anomaly to the east and a more gentle gradient to the west, relate the anomalies to a strata gently dipping westward. Susceptibility measurements on core samples, hand specimens and in situ on bedrock exposures are essential for the interpretation of these anomalies. Remapping of the oceanic crust has also improved our under-standing of the Tertiary opening of the North Atlantic as previously interpreted oceanic fracture zones zones do not exist; these were artefacts of poor navigation and wide line spacing of the vintage datasets. Tectonic reconstruction has shown that the opening of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea between the Jan Mayen and Senja fracture zones occurred along a stable axis without offsets of the oceanic spreading anomalies and without jumps in spreading axis. Transfer zones have previously been associated with oceanic fracture zones along the Mid-Norwegian and East-Greenland margins. Transfer zones are important entry points for sedimentary drainage systems, a relationship that has also been suggested for the transport of Cretaceous sands to the mid-Norwegian margin. Our new interpretation has consequently

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL BASELINE SURVEY REPORT FOR WEST BLACK OAK RIDGE, EAST BLACK OAK RIDGE, MCKINNEY RIDGE, WEST PINE RIDGE, AND PARCEL 21D IN THE VICINITY OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK, OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    David A. King

    2012-11-29

    This environmental baseline survey (EBS) report documents the baseline environmental conditions of five land parcels located near the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), including West Black Oak Ridge, East Black Oak Ridge, McKinney Ridge, West Pine Ridge, and Parcel 21d. The goal is to obtain all media no-further-investigation (NFI) determinations for the subject parcels considering existing soils. To augment the existing soils-only NFI determinations, samples of groundwater, surface water, soil, and sediment were collected to support all media NFI decisions. The only updates presented here are those that were made after the original issuance of the NFI documents. In the subject parcel where the soils NFI determination was not completed for approval (Parcel 21d), the full process has been performed to address the soils as well. Preparation of this report included the detailed search of federal government records, title documents, aerial photos that may reflect prior uses, and visual inspections of the property and adjacent properties. Interviews with current employees involved in, or familiar with, operations on the real property were also conducted to identify any areas on the property where hazardous substances and petroleum products, or their derivatives, and acutely hazardous wastes may have been released or disposed. In addition, a search was made of reasonably obtainable federal, state, and local government records of each adjacent facility where there has been a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or their derivatives, including aviation fuel and motor oil, and which is likely to cause or contribute to a release of any hazardous substance or any petroleum product or its derivatives, including aviation fuel or motor oil, on the real property. A radiological survey and soil/sediment sampling was conducted to assess baseline conditions of Parcel 21d that were not addressed by the soils-only NFI

  9. Hydrodynamic role of longitudinal ridges in a leatherback turtle swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Kyeongtae; Kim, Jooha; Lee, Sang-Im; Choi, Haecheon

    2015-11-01

    The leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), the fastest swimmer and the deepest diver among marine turtles, has five longitudinal ridges on its carapace. These ridges are the most remarkable morphological features distinguished from other marine turtles. To investigate the hydrodynamic role of these ridges in the leatherback turtle swimming, we model a carapace with and without ridges by using three dimensional surface data of a stuffed leatherback turtle in the National Science Museum, Korea. The experiment is conducted in a wind tunnel in the ranges of the real leatherback turtle's Reynolds number (Re) and angle of attack (α). The longitudinal ridges function differently according to the flow condition (i.e. Re and α). At low Re and negative α that represent the swimming condition of hatchlings and juveniles, the ridges significantly decrease the drag by generating streamwise vortices and delaying the main separation. On the other hand, at high Re and positive α that represent the swimming condition of adults, the ridges suppress the laminar separation bubble near the front part by generating streamwise vortices and enhance the lift and lift-to-drag ratio. Supported by the NRF program (2011-0028032).

  10. Characteristics of Hydrothermal Mineralization in Ultraslow Spreading Ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H.; Yang, Q.; Ji, F.; Dick, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal activity is a major component of the processes that shape the composition and structure of the ocean crust, providing a major pathway for the exchange of heat and elements between the Earth's crust and oceans, and a locus for intense biological activity on the seafloor and underlying crust. In other hand, the structure and composition of hydrothermal systems are the result of complex interactions between heat sources, fluids, wall rocks, tectonic controls and even biological processes. Ultraslow spreading ridges, including the Southwest Indian Ridge, the Gakkel Ridge, are most remarkable end member in plate-boundary structures (Dick et al., 2003), featured with extensive tectonic amagmatic spreading and frequent exposure of peridotite and gabbro. With intensive surveys in last decades, it is suggested that ultraslow ridges are several times more effective than faster-spreading ridges in sustaining hydrothermal activities. This increased efficiency could attributed to deep mining of heat and even exothermic serpentinisation (Baker et al., 2004). Distinct from in faster spreading ridges, one characteristics of hydrothermal mineralization on seafloor in ultraslow spreading ridges, including the active Dragon Flag hydrothermal field at 49.6 degree of the Southwest Indian Ridge, is abundant and pervasive distribution of lower temperature precipitated minerals ( such as Fe-silica or silica, Mn (Fe) oxides, sepiolite, pyrite, marcasite etc. ) in hydrothermal fields. Structures formed by lower temperature activities in active and dead hydrothermal fields are also obviously. High temperature precipitated minerals such as chalcopyrite etc. are rare or very limited in hydrothermal chimneys. Distribution of diverse low temperature hydrothermal activities is consistence with the deep heating mechanisms and hydrothermal circulations in the complex background of ultraslow spreading tectonics. Meanwhile, deeper and larger mineralization at certain locations along the

  11. Multiple linear regression with correlations among the predictor variables. Theory and computer algorithm ridge (FORTRAN 77)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gaans, P. F. M.; Vriend, S. P.

    Application of ridge regression in geoscience usually is a more appropriate technique than ordinary least-squares regression, especially in the situation of highly intercorrelated predictor variables. A FORTRAN 77 program RIDGE for ridged multiple linear regression is presented. The theory of linear regression and ridge regression is treated, to allow for a careful interpretation of the results and to understand the structure of the program. The program gives various parameters to evaluate the extent of multicollinearity within a given regression problem, such as the correlation matrix, multiple correlations among the predictors, variance inflation factors, eigenvalues, condition number, and the determinant of the predictors correlation matrix. The best method for the optimum choice of the ridge parameter with ridge regression has not been established yet. Estimates of the ridge bias, ridged variance inflation factors, estimates, and norms for the ridge parameter therefore are given as output by RIDGE and should complement inspection of the ridge traces. Application within the earth sciences is discussed.

  12. SRTM Stereo Pair: Wheeler Ridge, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Wheeler Ridge and vicinity, California, is a site of major tectonic activity, both historically and over recent geologic time. The epicenter of the 7.5 magnitude Kern County earthquake occurred here on July 21,1952, and numerous geologic and topographic features indicate rapid geologic processes. The ridge itself (upper-right center) is a geologic fold that is growing out of the southern San Joaquin Valley. A prominent 'wind gap,' now used for passage of the California aquaduct (with the aid of a pumping station), is evidence that the ridge grew faster than tranversing streams could erode down. Nearby abrupt and/or landslid mountain fronts similarly indicate a vigorous tectonic setting here, just north of the San Andreas fault. The Interstate 5 freeway can be seen crossing agricultural fields on the right and entering the very rugged and steep Grapevine Canyon toward the bottom.

    This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a preliminary Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing), or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive.

    The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle

  13. Hollow dentures: treatment option for atrophic ridges. a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Caculo, Shweta Pandurang; Aras, Meena Ajay; Chitre, Vidya

    2013-04-01

    Severely atrophic ridges provide decreased retention, support, and stability and pose a clinical challenge to the success of complete denture prostheses. Extreme ridge resorption also increases the interridge distance. Restoration of the vertical dimension and esthetics thus demands increased height of the prosthesis and in turn leads to an increase in prosthesis weight. Reducing the weight of the denture enhances stability and retention and reduces further resorption of the jaw, thereby favoring the prognosis of the denture. This report describes the rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with resorbed maxillary and mandibular ridges and an increased interridge distance using simplified techniques of fabricating hollow dentures.

  14. Migration of mid-ocean-ridge volcanic segments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schouten, Hans; Dick, H.J.B.; Klitgord, Kim D.

    1987-01-01

    The propagation of small-offset volcanic spreading-centre segments along mid-ocean ridge crests may reflect absolute motion of the plate boundary relative to the underlying mesospheric frame. Such a relationship could be caused by a purely vertical flow of the mantle under spreading centres and would have value in constraining past plate motions from non-transform trends generated during along-ridge propagation and in linking the major-element variability of oceanic crust and upper mantle to the bulk composition and temperatures of mantle ascending under mid-ocean ridges. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. The Oak Ridge Refrigerant Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kevil, Thomas H.

    1995-01-01

    For many years, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) have been used by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in air conditioning and process refrigeration systems. However, Title 6 of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and Executive Order 12843 (Procurement Requirements and Policies for Federal Agencies for Ozone Depleting Substances) signed by President Clinton require, as policy, that all federal agencies maximize their use of safe, alternate refrigerants and minimize, where economically practical, the use of Class 1 refrigerants. Unfortunately, many government facilities and industrial plants have no plan or strategy in place to make this changeover, even though their air conditioning and process refrigeration equipment may not be sustainable after CFC production ends December 31, 1995. The Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has taken an aggressive approach to complying with the CAAA and is working with private industry and other government agencies to solve tough manufacturing and application problems associated with CFC and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) alternatives. Y-12 was the first DOE Defense Program (DP) facility to develop a long-range Stratospheric Ozone Protection Plan for refrigerant management for compliance with the CAAA. It was also the first DOE DP facility to complete detailed engineering studies on retrofitting and replacing all air conditioning and process refrigeration equipment to enable operation with alternate refrigerants. The management plan and engineering studies are models for use by other government agencies, manufacturing plants, and private industry. This presentation identifies some of the hidden pitfalls to be encountered in the accelerated phaseout schedule of CFC's and explains how to overcome and prevent these problems. In addition, it outlines the general issues that must be considered when addressing the phase-out of ozone depleting substances and gives some 'lessons learned' by Y-12 from its Refrigerant Management

  16. Factor Structure of the Norwegian Version of the WAIS-III in a Clinical Sample: The Arithmetic Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egeland, Jens; Bosnes, Ole; Johansen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Confirmatory Factor Analyses (CFA) of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) lend partial support to the four-factor model proposed in the test manual. However, the Arithmetic subtest has been especially difficult to allocate to one factor. Using the new Norwegian WAIS-III version, we tested factor models differing in the number of…

  17. The Zero Programme against Bullying: Effects of the Programme in the Context of the Norwegian Manifesto against Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Erling; Bru, Edvin; Midthassel, Unni Vere; Vaaland, Grete S.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-bullying programme "Zero" was implemented at 146 Norwegian primary schools. The outcome among pupils was evaluated after 12 months of the total 16-month period using an age-equivalent design. The present study shows that bullying was reduced among pupils in the schools participating in the Zero programme. Moreover, National surveys in…

  18. Teaching About the United States in Norwegian Upper Secondary Schools: Suggested Course Outlines for English as a Foreign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartvedt, Alf

    1986-01-01

    English is the subject in which it is most appropriate in Norwegian secondary schools to provide a general introduction to life in the United States. The American studies content of courses taught to students taking one to four years of English is presented. (JDH)

  19. Factor Structure of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale for Norwegian School-Age Children Explored with Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drugli, May Britt; Hjemdal, Odin

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the Student-Teacher Relationship Scale (STRS) was examined in a national sample of 863 Norwegian schoolchildren in grades 1-7 (aged 6-13). The original factor structure of the STRS was tested by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The CFA results did not support the original three-factor structure of the STRS. Subsequent CFA of the…

  20. Survey of large circular and octagonal tanks operated at Norwegian commercial smolt and post-smolt sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey was conducted to determine the geometry, operating parameters, and other key features of large circular or octagonal culture tanks used to produce Atlantic salmon smolt and post-smolt at six major Norwegian Atlantic salmon production companies. A total of 55 large tanks were reported at sev...

  1. Subpolar gyre and radiative forcings moderate sea surface temperatures of the Norwegian Sea during the mid-Piacenzian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachem, Paul; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; McClymont, Erin

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Piacenzian age (ca. 3.3-3.0 Ma) of the Pliocene epoch has been proposed as a possible reference for future warm climate states. We have developed a new set of orbital-resolution alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) and ice rafted debris (IRD) records from the Norwegian Sea. SSTs in the Norwegian Sea were 2-3°C warmer in the mid-Piacenzian compared to the Holocene average. There is notable orbital-scale SST variability with a range of 4°C. The most likely cause of the average long-term warmth is a higher atmospheric CO2 concentration. A correlation of SST variability with the presence of Greenland-sourced IRD suggests a common climate forcing acting across the Nordic Seas region. The orbital-scale variability was in part caused by interplay of obliquity and precession, as low SSTs coincide with times of low northern summer insolation. Changes of the SST gradient between the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic sites suggest that the subpolar gyre was at least of comparable strength as during the Holocene. The North Atlantic Current (NAC) influence on the Norwegian Sea SSTs does not appear to have been stronger than during the Holocene.

  2. The Norwegian Offender Mental Health and Addiction Study – Design and Implementation of a National Survey and Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bukten, Anne; Lund, Ingunn Olea; Rognli, Eline Borger; Stavseth, Marianne Riksheim; Lobmaier, Philipp; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Clausen, Thomas; Kunøe, Nikolaj

    2015-01-01

    The Norwegian prison inmates are burdened by problems before they enter prison. Few studies have managed to assess this burden and relate it to what occurs for the inmates once they leave the prison. The Norwegian Offender Mental Health and Addiction (NorMA) study is a large-scale longitudinal cohort study that combines national survey and registry data in order to understand mental health, substance use, and criminal activity before, during, and after custody among prisoners in Norway. The main goal of the study is to describe the criminal and health-related trajectories based on both survey and registry linkage information. Data were collected from 1,499 inmates in Norwegian prison facilities during 2013–2014. Of these, 741 inmates provided a valid personal identification number and constitute a cohort that will be examined retrospectively and prospectively, along with data from nationwide Norwegian registries. This study describes the design, procedures, and implementation of the ongoing NorMA study and provides an outline of the initial data. PMID:26648732

  3. Young People's Talk about Religion and Diversity: A Qualitative Study of Norwegian Students Aged 13-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Lippe, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on how young people talk about religion and diversity in a multicultural society. More specifically, it focuses on how students speak about Islam and Muslims. In analysing interviews with students, a main interest has been to examine the relationship between the students' speech and dominant discourses in Norwegian society…

  4. A Norwegian Out-of-School Mathematics Project's Influence on Secondary Students' STEM Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Fredrik; Sjaastad, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Considerable resources are spent on initiatives aiming to increase achievement and participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Drawing on focus group interviews and a questionnaire study with participants in ENT3R, a Norwegian out-of-school mathematics program, we investigated why participants attended and stayed in…

  5. Mental Health Problems in Norwegian School Children Placed Out-of-Home: The Importance of Family Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havnen, Karen Skaale; Jakobsen, Reidar; Stormark, Kjell Morten

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to explore the association between mental health problems in children placed out-of-home and family risk factors reported as reasons for placement. The sample consisted of 109 Norwegian children aged 6-12 years. Mental health problems were assessed by the Revised Rutter scales reported by the parents and the…

  6. From a Narrative of Suffering towards a Narrative of Growth: Norwegian History Textbooks in the Inter-War Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovland, Brit Marie

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses changes and revisions of the Norwegian official Grand Narrative, as portrayed in primary school history textbooks. The selected corpus of textbooks of 1885-1940 shows narrative and historiographical changes supporting a hypothesis of a development from a "Narrative of Suffering" towards a "Narrative of…

  7. On the Question of Secular Trends in the Heritability of Intelligence Test Scores: A Study of Norwegian Twins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundet, Jon Martin; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Intelligence test data collected in 1931 through 1960 on 757 identical and 1,093 fraternal male twins, from the files of the Norwegian Armed Forces, were examined for secular trends in the heritability of intelligence test scores. Only ambiguous evidence of such trends was found. (SLD)

  8. Parenting after a Natural Disaster: A Qualitative Study of Norwegian Families Surviving the 2004 Tsunami in Southeast Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hafstad, Gertrud S.; Haavind, Hanne; Jensen, Tine K.

    2012-01-01

    How do parents support their children after a high-impact disaster? To answer this question, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 51 Norwegian parents. These parents and children were all severely exposed to the trauma of the tsunami disaster. The analyses show how parents interpret their children's signs of distress, as well as their own…

  9. Political Alienation among Migrant Youths: Exploring the Mechanisms of Political Alienation and Acculturation among Migrant Youths in Norwegian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhaug, Trond

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the following question: What characterizes the mechanisms of political alienation among non-Western immigrant students, and how might these mechanisms be related to student's acculturation attitudes? A theory of political alienation and acculturation is applied. Substantial quantitative data from Norwegian upper secondary…

  10. Allocating Information Costs in a Negotiated Information Order: Interorganizational Constraints on Decision Making in Norwegian Oil Insurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimer, Carol A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper analyzes two types of decisions for insuring mobile oil rigs and fixed installations in the Norwegian North Sea: (1) decisions about information for ratemaking and underwriting, and (2) decisions about the conditions of insurance. Appended are 46 references. (MLF)

  11. Saami and Norwegian clients' use of a treatment facility for drug and alcohol problems in northern Norway.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S

    1992-04-01

    Saami people ("Lapps") and Norwegians make different use of primary health care services, and Larsen and Nergård (1) reported an under-representation of Saami clients at a treatment facility for drug and alcohol problems in Northern Norway in the years 1986-1988. However, Saami and Norwegian groups did not differ in number of days in treatment, number of treatment incidents, mean age or self-reported years of problem drinking. Since it is believed that Saami clients are under-represented in Norwegian treatment facilities because of cultural differences, the location of treatment facilities within a Saami municipality was expected to increase the incidence of Saami clients. The present study investigated the incidence of Saami clients at Karasjok treatment facility during 1988 and 1989, 8 and 9 years after the opening of this treatment centre. All clients registered at Finnmark County's treatment facility for drug and alcohol problems during 1988-89 were categorized as either Saami or Norwegian by their language preference. Unfortunately, the Saami group was still under-represented among clients at this treatment facility. In addition, a significant difference in the sex-ratio between the two groups was found, indicating that Saami women do not use the institution at all. Results are discussed in terms of availability of health services for minority groups.

  12. The Use of the Dialogue Concepts from the Arsenal of the Norwegian Dialogue Pedagogy in the Time of Postmodernism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gradovski, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Inspired by the views by the American educationalist Henry Giroux on the role teachers and educationalists should be playing in the time of postmodernism and by Abraham Maslow's concept of biological idiosyncrasy, the author discusses how the concepts of the dialogues created by the representatives of Norwegian Dialogue Pedagogy, Hans Skjervheim,…

  13. The Outdoor Environment as a Site for Children's Participation, Meaning-Making and Democratic Learning: Examples from Norwegian Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aasen, Wenche; Grindheim, Liv Torunn; Waters, Jane

    2009-01-01

    In this article we explore socio-cultural theories of learning and some of the processes by which children learn democratic values. Norwegian policy and practice emphasises children's right to participation and involvement in decision-making. We discuss the importance of adults' attitudes, knowledge and ability to relate to and understand…

  14. A Shortened Norwegian Adaptation of the Lie Scale for Children (LSC) and the Defensiveness Scale for Children (DSC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugen, Richard

    1978-01-01

    Ten items consisting of five DSC items and five LSC items were translated into Norwegian in order (a) to control the verbal anxiety responses from defensive tendencies, (b) to handle the problem of response set (the tendency to answer a questionnaire in a stereotyped way), and (c) to permit research concerning the nature of defensiveness itself.…

  15. Degrees of Closure and Economic Success in the Norwegian Labour Market: Field of Study and Non-Western Immigrant Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drange, Ida

    2016-01-01

    This article compares outcomes in the Norwegian labour market for non-Western immigrants and majority colleagues with professional or master's degrees within three different fields of study: health science, social science and natural science. Professions have a higher degree of occupational closure, which may entail that non-Western immigrants…

  16. The Influence of Parents and Teachers on the Deep Learning Approach of Pupils in Norwegian Upper-Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elstad, Eyvind; Christophersen, Knut-Andreas; Turmo, Are

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this article was to explore the influence of parents and teachers on the deep learning approach of pupils by estimating the strength of the relationships between these factors and the motivation, volition and deep learning approach of Norwegian 16-year-olds. Method: Structural equation modeling for cross-sectional…

  17. Validation of a Norwegian Version of the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST): Application of Structural Equation Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diseth, Age

    2001-01-01

    Administered the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST) (N. Entwhistle and P. Ramsden, 1983) to 573 undergraduates to analyze a Norwegian version of this inventory. Structural equation modeling techniques reveal the usefulness of this instrument as a research took for the assessment of approaches to learning among Norwegian…

  18. Eating Problems and Their Risk Factors: A 7-Year Longitudinal Study of a Population Sample of Norwegian Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansi, Juliska; Wichstrom, Lars; Bergman, Lars R.

    2005-01-01

    The longitudinal stability of eating problems and their relationships to risk factors were investigated in a representative population sample of 623 Norwegian girls aged 13-14 followed over 7 years (3 time points). Three eating problem symptoms were measured: Restriction, Bulimia-food preoccupation, and Diet, all taken from the 12-item Eating…

  19. Does Universally Accessible Child Care Protect Children from Late Talking? Results from a Norwegian Population-Based Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekhal, Ratib; Zachrisson, Henrik Daae; Wang, Mari Vaage; Schjolberg, Synnve; von Soest, Tilmann

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the association between type of child care arrangement at age 1, 1.5 and 3 years and late talking (LT). The data were from 19,919 children in the population-based prospective Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and included information about child care arrangement, LT and a variety of covariates. Attendance at…

  20. Industriousness and Development of the School-System in the Eighteenth Century: The Experience of Norwegian Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Ida

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how the Norwegian urban school system was developed during the eighteenth century. In the cities, there were laws for Latin as well as Danish schools. During the eighteenth century, schools for poor children were established, while towards the end of the century the importance of the school system in relation to the economic…