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Sample records for aegle marmelos corr

  1. Evaluation of protective effect of Aegle marmelos Corr. in an animal model of chronic fatigue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lalremruta, Vanphawng; Prasanna, Gurunath S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate ethanolic extract of leaves of Aegle marmelos in an experimental animal model of chronic fatigue syndrome for potential therapeutic benefit. Materials and Methods: Age/weight-matched female Wistar albino rats were grouped into five groups. (Group I- V) (n = 8). Group I served as naïve control and II served as stress control. Except for group I animals, other group animals were subjected to forced swimming every day for 15 minutes to induce a state of chronic fatigue and simultaneously treated with ethanolic extract of Aegle marmelos (EEAM) 150 and 250 mg/kg b.w. and Imipramine (20 mg.kg b.w.), respectively. Duration of immobility, anxiety level and locomotor activity were assessed on day 1, 7, 14 and 21 followed by biochemical estimation of oxidative biomarkers at the end of the study. Results: Treatment with EEAM (150 and 250 mg/kg b.w.) resulted in a statistically significant and dose dependent reduction (P <0.001) in the duration of immobility, reduction in anxiety and increase in locomotor activity. Dose dependent and significant reduction in LPO level and increase in CAT and SOD was observed in extract treated animals. Conclusion: The results are suggestive of potential protective effect of A. marmelos against experimentally induced CFS. PMID:22701245

  2. Umbelliferone β-D-galactopyranoside from Aegle marmelos (L.) corr. an ethnomedicinal plant with antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic and antioxidative activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aegle marmelos (L.) Corr. (Rutaceae), commonly known as bael, is used to treat fevers, abdomen pain, palpitation of the heart, urinary troubles, melancholia, anorexia, dyspepsia, diabetes and diarrhea in Indian traditional systems of medicine. The object of the present study was to evaluate the antidiabetic, antihyperlipidemic and antioxidant oxidative stress of umbelliferone β-D-galactopyranoside (UFG) from stem bark of Aegle marmelos Correa. in STZ (streptozotocin) induced diabetic rat. Methods Diabetes was induced in rat by single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg). The rat was divided into the following groups; I – normal control, II – diabetic control, III – UFG (10 mg/kg), IV – UFG (20 mg/kg), V – UFG (40 mg/kg), VI – Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg, p.o., once a daily dose). Diabetes was measured by change the level blood glucose, plasma insulin and the oxidative stress were assessed in the liver by estimation of the level of antioxidant markers i.e. superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antihyperlipidemic effect was measured by estimation of total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL (low density lipoprotein) cholesterol, HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol, VLDL (very low density lipoprotein) cholesterol. However in a study, the increased body weight was observed and utilization of glucose was in the oral glucose tolerance test. Result Daily oral administration of different dose of UFG for 28 days showed significantly (P < 0.001) decreased in fasting blood glucose level and improve plasma insulin level as compared to the diabetic control group. Also it significantly (P < 0.001) decreased the level of glycated hemoglobin, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1-6-biphosphate and increased the level of hexokinase. UFG treatment decreased liver MDA and increased the level of SOD, GPx and CAT. UFG treatment of lipids it’s increased the level of cholesterol

  3. Aegle marmelos (L.) Corr. impedes onset of Insulin resistance syndrome in rats provided with drinking fructose from weaning to adulthood stages of development: A mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Rajani; Sehgal, Ratika; Rajora, Preeti; Sharma, Shveta; Kumar, Rajesh; Mathur, Sandeep

    2016-12-17

    To explore the effect of aqueous extract of leaves of Aegle marmelos (AM) on hepatic carbohydrate metabolism and insulin downstream signalling in rats provided with drinking fructose (15%) from weaning to adulthood. Wistar albino rats (4week) were randomly divided into Normal Control (NC), Fructose Control (FC) and treatment (AMT) groups and provided over 8 weeks, chow + water, chow + fructose (15%) and chow + fructose (15%) + AM (500 mg/kg/d, p.o.), respectively. Significantly (p<0.05) raised levels of Fasting Blood Glucose, lipid, visceral weight, plasma insulin and leptin, glycogen, gluconeogenesis enzyme levels but decreased glycolytic enzyme activity was recorded in FC as compared to NC. Raised levels of glucose transporter (GLUT 2) protein but decreased activity of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K/AkT) and Janus Kinase -Signal Transducer And Activator of Transcription-3 (JAK-STAT3) in hepatic tissue, indicate a state of insulin and leptin resistance in FC. AMT recorded significant (p<0.05) lowering of physical, and glycemic parameters, reinforcement of hepatic glycolytic over gluconeogenic pathway and upregulated PI3K/AkT and JAK-STAT3 pathways, as compared to FC. For the first time, the mechanism underlying development of Insulin Resistance Syndrome (IRS) is delineated here, along with the potential of Aegle marmelos in impeding the same.

  4. Hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic activity of Aegle marmelos seed extract in normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Achyut Narayan; Gupta, Rajesh Kumar; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Diwakar, Sandhya; Watal, Geeta

    2006-10-11

    Aegle marmelos Corr. (Rutaceae) is widely used in Indian Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The aqueous extract of Aegle marmelos seeds was administered orally at different doses (100, 250 and 500 mg/kg) to normal as well as sub (fasting blood glucose (FBG) normal; glucose tolerance abnormal) and mild (FBG 120-250 mg/dl) diabetic rats. The dose of 250 mg/kg was found to be most effective dose and it decreases blood glucose level (BGL) by 35.1% in normal healthy rats after 6h of administration. The same dose also showed a marked reduction in BGL of 41.2% in sub and 33.2% in mild diabetic rats in glucose tolerance test (GTT) after 2 h. Treatment of severely (FBG >250 mg/dl) diabetic rats for 14 days with a dose of 250 mg/kg reduces the fasting blood glucose by 60.84% and urine sugar by 75% than their pretreatment levels. It brought about fall in level of total cholesterol (TC) by 25.49% with increase of 33.43% in high density lipoprotein (HDL) and decrease of 53.97 and 45.77% in low density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglyceride (TG), respectively. These results clearly indicate that aqueous seed extract of Aegle marmelos possess antidiabetic and hypolipidemic effects in diabetic rats.

  5. Therapeutic potential of Aegle marmelos (L.)-An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shahedur; Parvin, Rashida

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal plants are used in herbalism. They form the easily available source for healthcare purposes in rural and tribal areas. In the present review, an attempt has been made to congregate the phytochemical and pharmacological studies done on an important medicinal plant Aegle marmelos. Extensive experimental and clinical studies prove that Aegle marmelos possesses antidiarrhoeal, antimicrobial, antiviral, radioprotective, anticancer, chemopreventive, antipyretic, ulcer healing, antigenotoxic, diuretic, antifertility and anti-inflammatory properties, which help it to play role in prevention and treatment of many disease. Therefore, it is worthwhile to review its therapeutic properties to give an overview of its status to scientist both modern and ancient. This review also encompasses on the potential application of the above plant in the pharmaceutical field due to its wide pharmacological activities.

  6. Antifungal activity of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa (Rutaceae) leaf extract on dermatophytes

    PubMed Central

    Balakumar, S; Rajan, S; Thirunalasundari, T; Jeeva, S

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the in vitro antifungal activity of Aegle marmelos leaf extracts and fractions on the clinical isolates of dermatophytic fungi like Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum, Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum and Epidermophyton floccosum. Methods The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of various extracts and fractions of the leaves of Aegle marmelos were measured using method of National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Results Aegle marmelos leaf extracts and fractions were found to have fungicidal activity against various clinical isolates of dermatophytic fungi. The MIC and MFC was found to be high in water and ethyl alcohol extracts and methanol fractions (200µg/mL) against dermatophytic fungi studied. Conclusions Aegle marmelos leaf extracts significantly inhibites the growth of all dermatophytic fungi studied. If this activity is confirmed by in vivo studies and if the compound is isolated and identified, it could be a remedy for dermatophytosis. PMID:23569781

  7. Simultaneous determination of aegeline and six coumarins from different parts of the plant Aegle marmelos using UHPLC-PDA-MS and chiral separation of aegeline using HPLC-ToF-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fast UHPLC-PDA method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of one alkaloid, aegeline, and six coumarins namely: umbelliferone; scopoletin; marmesinin; 8-hydroxypsoralen angelicin and marmelosin from leaf, fruit, root and bark of Aegle marmelos (L.) Corrêa (Rutaceae). The method was validate...

  8. Inhibition of CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 b Aegle marmelos and its constituents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aegle marmelos (bael) is a popular tree in India and other Southeast Asian countries. The fruit is usually consumed as dried, fresh or juice and is reported to have a high nutritional value and many perceived health benefits. Despite of the edible nature and therapeutic properties of A. marmelos, no...

  9. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from aqueous Aegle marmelos leaf extract

    SciTech Connect

    Jagajjanani Rao, K.; Paria, Santanu

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Silver nanoparticles capped with polyphenols present in Aegle marmelos leaf extract. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Silver nanoparticles are synthesized using Aegle marmelos leaf extract in aqueous media. ► Reduction reaction is fast and occurs at room temperature. ► The presence of polyphenols acts as in situ capping agent. -- Abstract: Synthesis of nanoparticles by green route is an emerging technique drawing more attention recently because of several advantages over the convention chemical routes. The present study reports one-pot synthesis and in situ stabilization of silver nanoparticles using Aegle marmelos leaf extract. Nanoparticles of almost uniform spherical size (∼60 nm) were synthesized within ∼25 min reaction time at room temperature. The size of particles depends on the ratio of AgNO{sub 3} and leaf extract. The crystallinity, size, and shape of the nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and scanning electron microscopy respectively. The size stability was attained by the capping effect of polyphenolic tannin compound, procatacheuate in the extract. The capped polyphenols can be removed from the particle surface by simple NaOH/methanol wash. The involvement of phenolic compounds in metal ion reduction and capping were supported by UV–visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, high performance liquid chromatography, and zeta potential measurements.

  10. Microwave assisted synthesis and optimization of Aegle marmelos-g-poly(acrylamide): release kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Setia, A; Kumar, R

    2014-04-01

    Microwave assisted grafting of poly(acrylamide) on to Aegle marmelos gum was carried out employing 3-factor 3-level full factorial design. Microwave power, microwave exposure time and concentration of gum were selected as independent variable and grafting efficiency was taken as dependent variable. A. marmelos-g-poly(acrylamide) was characterized by FTIR, DSC, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Microwave power, microwave exposure time had synergistic effect on grafting efficiency where as concentration of the gum did not contributed much to grafting efficiency. Batch having microwave power - 80%, microwave exposure time -120 s and concentration of A. marmelos gum - 2% was selected as the optimized formulation. Comparative release behaviour of diclofenac sodium from the matrix tablets of A. marmelos gum and A. marmelos-g-polyacrylamide was evaluated. The results of kinetic studies revealed that the graft copolymer matrix, marketed tablets and polymer matrix tablets of A. marmelos gum released the drug by zero order kinetics and with n value greater than 1, indicating that the mechanism for release as super case II transport i.e. dominated by the erosion and swelling of the polymer.

  11. Phytochemical Evaluation, Antimicrobial Activity, and Determination of Bioactive Components from Leaves of Aegle marmelos

    PubMed Central

    Mujeeb, Farina; Bajpai, Preeti; Pathak, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic value of Aegle marmelos Correa (Rutaceae), commonly known as ‘‘Bael,” has been recognized as a component of traditional medication for the treatment of various human ailments. The plant, though, being highly explored, still lacks sufficient evidences for the best variety possessing the highest degree of medicinal values. The present study is focused on phytochemical screening of aqueous and methanolic leaf extracts of 18 varieties/accessions of A. marmelos. The crude extracts of A. marmelos revealed the presence of several biologically active phytochemicals with the highest quantity of alkaloids, flavonoids, and phenols in Pant Aparna variety. The antibacterial efficacy was investigated against pathogenic bacterial strains and the highest inhibitory activity of aqueous extract was obtained against S. epidermidis, whereas methanolic extract was found to be most potent against S. aureus at 40 mg/mL concentration. However, in aqueous : ethanol, the best results were observed against E. aerogenes followed by K. pneumonia and S. epidermidis. The MIC of aqueous and methanol extract of Aegle marmelos ranged from 10 mg/mL to 40 mg/mL whereas in aqueous : ethanol it ranged between 40 mg/mL and 160 mg/mL. The GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of many bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic compounds, fatty acid methyl esters, terpenoids, phenolics, and steroids that can be postulated for antibacterial activity. PMID:24900969

  12. Quantification and comparison of extraction methods for alkaloids in Aegle marmelos leaves by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Karmase, Aniket; Prasanna, K; Rasabattula, Sruti; Bhutani, Kamlesh K

    2014-07-01

    The leaves of Aegle marmelos are reported to contain multi-bioactive classes of compounds including coumarins, furanocoumarins and alkaloids. HPLC analysis of the crude extract was challenging due to low concentrations of the compounds in the leaves. Five compounds visible in the HPLC chromatogram were separated and identified by HPLC and further elaborated for quantification as marker compounds of A. marmelos leaves using a C18 column with detection at 275 nm. A gradient mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water was used. The developed HPLC method showed good linearity (r2 > 0.994), high precision (RSD<5%), and good recovery (99.27-99.98%) of the compounds. The lowest detection limit was 5 ng and the method was found to be robust. All the validation parameters were within the permissible limits. Therefore, the developed method is accurate and reliable for the quality control of A. marmelos. This is the first report of extensive quantitative HPLC analysis of marker compounds in A. marmelos leaves and method validation.

  13. Studies on the antidiarrhoeal activity of Aegle marmelos unripe fruit: Validating its traditional usage

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa has been widely used in indigenous systems of Indian medicine due to its various medicinal properties. However, despite its traditional usage as an anti-diarrhoeal there is limited information regarding its mode of action in infectious forms of diarrhoea. Hence, we evaluated the hot aqueous extract (decoction) of dried unripe fruit pulp of A. marmelos for its antimicrobial activity and effect on various aspects of pathogenicity of infectious diarrhoea. Methods The decoction was assessed for its antibacterial, antigiardial and antirotaviral activities. The effect of the decoction on adherence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and invasion of enteroinvasive E. coli and Shigella flexneri to HEp-2 cells were assessed as a measure of its effect on colonization. The effect of the decoction on production of E. coli heat labile toxin (LT) and cholera toxin (CT) and their binding to ganglioside monosialic acid receptor (GM1) were assessed by GM1-enzyme linked immuno sorbent assay whereas its effect on production and action of E. coli heat stable toxin (ST) was assessed by suckling mouse assay. Results The decoction showed cidal activity against Giardia and rotavirus whereas viability of none of the six bacterial strains tested was affected. It significantly reduced bacterial adherence to and invasion of HEp-2 cells. The extract also affected production of CT and binding of both LT and CT to GM1. However, it had no effect on ST. Conclusion The decoction of the unripe fruit pulp of A. marmelos, despite having limited antimicrobial activity, affected the bacterial colonization to gut epithelium and production and action of certain enterotoxins. These observations suggest the varied possible modes of action of A. marmelos in infectious forms of diarrhoea thereby validating its mention in the ancient Indian texts and continued use by local communities for the treatment of diarrhoeal diseases. PMID:19930633

  14. Sulfation of Aegle marmelos gum: synthesis, physico-chemical and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Manish; Rana, Vikas; Kumar, Vineet; Singh, Ram S; Kennedy, John F; Tiwary, Ashok K

    2013-02-15

    The present investigation was aimed at optimizing the conditions for preparing sulfated derivative of gum obtained from partially ripe fruits of Aegle marmelos. Elemental analysis, FTIR-ATR and NMR studies confirmed successful sulfation. The ratio of chlorosulfonic acid to pyridine exerted maximum influence on the degree of substitution followed by reaction temperature and reaction time. The sulfated derivative showed higher swelling in both acidic and alkaline pH as compared to unmodified gum. It also possessed higher negative zeta potential, higher viscosity, work of shear, firmness, consistency, cohesiveness and index of viscosity as compared to both unmodified gum as well as sodium alginate. Sulfated derivative was superior to unmodified gum and sodium alginate in terms of antimicrobial and anticoagulant activity. The sulfated sample appears to be a potential substitute over the unmodified gum sample and sodium alginate for modulating physicochemical properties of food and drug release dosage forms.

  15. In Vivo Healing Potential of Aegle marmelos in Excision, Incision, and Dead Space Wound Models

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, M. K.; Purohit, V.; Agarwal, M.; Singh, A.; Goel, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    The study incorporates the wound healing potential of Aegle marmelos fruit pulp extract (AME) on excision, incision, and dead space wound models in rats. AME (200 mg/kg) was administered orally once daily for variable days depending on the type of wound ulcer study. AME was studied for its wound breaking strength (incision wound), rate of contraction, period of epithelization and histology of skin (excision model), and granulation tissue free radicals, antioxidants, acute inflammatory marker, and connective tissue markers and deep connective tissue histology (dead space wound). Complete wound contraction and epithelization were observed at the 20th day after treatment with AME as compared to the 24th day in control rats. Mean epithelization period and scar area were decreased while wound breaking strength was increased with AME compared with control. Granulation tissue showed increased levels of collagen determinants (33.7 to 64.4%, P < 0.001) and antioxidants (13.0 to 38.8%, P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), whereas markers of oxidative stress (55.0 to 55.6%, P < 0.001) and myeloperoxidase (21.3%, P < 0.001) were decreased in AME treated group. A. marmelos seems to promote wound healing by enhancing connective tissue formation and antioxidants status with decrease in free radicals and myeloperoxidase having tissue damaging effects. PMID:24737990

  16. Effect of Aegle marmelos and Murraya koenigii in treatment of delayed pubertal buffaloes heifers

    PubMed Central

    Baitule, Mohan M.; Gawande, A. P.; Kumar, Umesh; Sahatpure, S. K.; Patil, Manoj S.; Baitule, Mansi M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to study the estrus induction, ovulation, and conception rate of delayed puberty in buffaloes heifers by feeding a herbal plants Aegle marmelos (bael/bili/bhel leaf) and Murraya koenigii (Curry leaf). Materials and Methods: Totally, 24 buffalo heifers with delayed puberty were selected for the present study and divided randomly in four equal groups (n=6). Before experiment, all animals were dewormed with albendazole at 10 mg/kg body weight to prevent them from the stress of parasitism. In the present experiment, four group taken and Group I (n=6) treated with A. marmelos, Group II (n=6) treated with M. koenigii, Group III (n=6) treated with mixture of A. marmelos and M. koenigii and fed for 9 days. Group IV (n=6) considered as control and fed with concentrate only. The blood samples were collected from all the animals on day 0 (before treatment), 4, 9 (during treatment), on the day of estrus and day 8 after the onset of estrus. The 10 ml blood was collected from the jugular vein of all the experimental animals for estimation of serum calcium, inorganic phosphorus, and progesterone (P4). The estrus response, ovulation, conception rate along with serum calcium, inorganic phosphorus, and progesterone level were determined by the standard protocol. Results: From Group III 4 heifers, from Group II 3 heifers, and from Group I and IV (Control) 2 heifers each, exhibited the estrus. The estrus response was recorded as 33.33%, 50.00%, 75.00%, and 33.33% in Group I, Group II, Group III, and Group IV, respectively. In treatment Group III, serum calcium found significantly more (p<0.05) on day 8 post-estrus as compared to other groups at a similar interval. Inorganic phosphorus and progesterone show no significant difference between groups. The ovulation and conception rates are comparatively better in Group III (75%) buffalo heifers than other groups. Conclusion: Herbal supplementation of A. marmelos and M. koenigii in combination, as well as M. koenigii

  17. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by adsorption using bael leaves (Aegle marmelos).

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, S; Mohanty, Ashok; Sudha, T Nag; Upadhyay, A K; Konar, J; Sircar, J K; Madhukar, A; Gupta, K K

    2010-01-15

    Biosorption of Pb(II) on bael leaves (Aegle marmelos) was investigated for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution using different doses of adsorbent, initial pH, and contact time. The maximum Pb loading capacity of the bael leaves was 104 mg g(-1) at 50 mg L(-1) initial Pb(II) concentration at pH 5.1. SEM and FT-IR studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) occurs inside the wall of the hollow tubes present in the bael leaves and carboxylic acid, thioester and sulphonamide groups are involved in the process. The sorption process was best described by pseudo second order kinetics. Among Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms, the latter had a better fit with the experimental data. The activation energy E(a) confirmed that the nature of adsorption was physisorption. Bael leaves can selectively remove Pb(II) in the presence of other metal ions. This was demonstrated by removing Pb from the effluent of exhausted batteries.

  18. Bioprospecting Endophytic Fungi and Their Metabolites from Medicinal Tree Aegle marmelos in Western Ghats, India.

    PubMed

    Mani, Vellingiri Manon; Soundari, Arockiamjeyasundar Parimala Gnana; Karthiyaini, Damodharan; Preeth, Kathirvel

    2015-09-01

    The increasing emergence of lead drugs for the resistance produced by the pathogenic strains and arrival of new diseases have initiated the need for searching novel metabolites with best anticancer and antimicrobial properties than the existing one. With this view, the investigation was conducted for the isolation, identification, and biological evaluation of potential endophytic fungi of Aegle marmelos, a medicinal tree used for more than three decades, for curing various disorders. A total of 169 endophytic fungal strains obtained from sampling and among those 67 were pigmented strains. Upon antagonistic screening, five endophytic fungal strains exhibited antagonistic potentiality by inhibiting the pathogens. These five potent strains were characterized at molecular level by sequencing the amplified internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS 4 regions of rDNA and they were grouped under order Pleosporales, Eurotiales, and Capnodiales. The metabolites from the respective strains were produced in fungal culturing media and extracted using polar solvents. Further, the extracts of five endophytes manifested antimicrobial activity against tested clinical pathogens and Alternaria alternata (FC39BY), Al. citrimacularis (FC8ABr), and Curvularia australiensis (FC2AP) exhibited significant antimicrobial profile against 9 of 12 tested pathogens, showing broad spectrum activity. The antioxidant levels of all the five endophytes revealed the highest activity at least concentrations, and major activity was unveiled by the members of order Pleosporales FC2AP and FC8ABr. This research explains the value of endophytic fungal extracts and its significance of antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

  19. Bioprospecting Endophytic Fungi and Their Metabolites from Medicinal Tree Aegle marmelos in Western Ghats, India

    PubMed Central

    Soundari, Arockiamjeyasundar Parimala Gnana; Karthiyaini, Damodharan; Preeth, Kathirvel

    2015-01-01

    The increasing emergence of lead drugs for the resistance produced by the pathogenic strains and arrival of new diseases have initiated the need for searching novel metabolites with best anticancer and antimicrobial properties than the existing one. With this view, the investigation was conducted for the isolation, identification, and biological evaluation of potential endophytic fungi of Aegle marmelos, a medicinal tree used for more than three decades, for curing various disorders. A total of 169 endophytic fungal strains obtained from sampling and among those 67 were pigmented strains. Upon antagonistic screening, five endophytic fungal strains exhibited antagonistic potentiality by inhibiting the pathogens. These five potent strains were characterized at molecular level by sequencing the amplified internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS 4 regions of rDNA and they were grouped under order Pleosporales, Eurotiales, and Capnodiales. The metabolites from the respective strains were produced in fungal culturing media and extracted using polar solvents. Further, the extracts of five endophytes manifested antimicrobial activity against tested clinical pathogens and Alternaria alternata (FC39BY), Al. citrimacularis (FC8ABr), and Curvularia australiensis (FC2AP) exhibited significant antimicrobial profile against 9 of 12 tested pathogens, showing broad spectrum activity. The antioxidant levels of all the five endophytes revealed the highest activity at least concentrations, and major activity was unveiled by the members of order Pleosporales FC2AP and FC8ABr. This research explains the value of endophytic fungal extracts and its significance of antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. PMID:26539047

  20. Semisynthetic Studies Identify Mitochondria Poisons from Botanical Dietary Supplements – Geranyloxycoumarins from Aegle marmelos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Mahdi, Fakhri; Du, Lin; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2013-01-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation and subsequent structure elucidation of a Bael tree Aegle marmelos lipid extract yielded two unstable acylated geranyloxycoumarin mixtures (1–2), six geranyloxycoumarins (3–8), (+)-9′-isovaleroxylariciresinol (9), and dehydromarmeline (10). In a T47D cell-based reporter assay, 1 and 2 potently inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1 activation (IC50 values 0.18 and 1.10 μg mL−1, respectively). Insufficient material and chemical instability prevented full delineation of the fatty acyl side chain olefin substitution patterns in 1 and 2. Therefore, five fatty acyl geranyloxycoumarin ester derivatives (11–15) were prepared from marmin (3) and commercial fatty acyl chlorides by semisynthesis. The unsaturated C-6′ linoleic acid ester derivative 14 that was structurally most similar to 1 and 2, inhibited HIF-1 activation with comparable potency (IC50 0.92 μM). The octanoyl (11) and undecanoyl (12) ester derivatives also suppressed HIF-1 activation (IC50 values 3.1 and 0.87 μM, respectively). Mechanistic studies revealed that these geranyloxycoumarin derivatives disrupt mitochondrial respiration, primarily at complex I. Thus, these compounds may inhibit HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondria-mediated hypoxic signaling. One surprising observation was that, while less potent, the purported cancer chemopreventive agent auraptene (8) was found to act as a mitochondrial poison that disrupts HIF-1 signaling in tumors. PMID:23434131

  1. Pharmacognostic standardisation and antiproliferative activity of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa leaves in various human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Bhatti, Rajbir; Singh, J.; Saxena, A. K.; Suri, Nitasha; Ishar, M. P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic management of cancer is a great clinical challenge and alternative medicines are being extensively explored to have integrated approach to cure cancer. Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa (Rutaceae) is known for its hypoglycaemic, radioprotective, antidiarrhoeal and many other pharmacological activities. The present study is designed to carryout pharmacognostic standardisation and evaluation of antiproliferative activity of the leaf extracts Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa (Rutaceae) and the chromatographic fractions of the most active extract. Hexane, petroleum ether, chloroform and ethanol extracts of the shade dried leaves were prepared by soxhelation and antiproliferative activity was assessed using human cancer cell lines of lung (A-549), colon (CoLo-05), ovary (IGR-OV-1), prostrate (PC3), leukaemia (THP-1) and breast (MCF-7) cancer. Bioactivity-derived fractionation was carried out for most active extract by column chromatography. The phytochemical studies indicated alkaloids, anthraquinones, terpenoids in the alcohol, chloroform extracts and tannins, terpenoids, reducing sugars in the petroleum ether and hexane extracts. Ethanol extract showed maximum inhibition in colon and breast carcinoma cell lines at a dose of 100 μg/ml. Column chromatography of the ethanol extract yielded five fractions. Out of this, fractions 2, 4 and 5 showed significant inhibition in leukaemia cell line with IC50 of 12.5, 86.2 and >100 μg/ml for fractions 2, 4 and 5, respectively. High-performance thin layer chromatography of the fraction 2 revealed imperatorin as one of the major phytoconstituents. Among the different extracts investigated, ethanol extract exhibited significant antiproliferative activity and its fraction 2 containing furanocoumarin imperatorin showed antiproliferative activity against leukaemia cell line with IC50 of 12.5 μg/ml. PMID:24591736

  2. Identification and Characterization of a Type III Polyketide Synthase Involved in Quinolone Alkaloid Biosynthesis from Aegle marmelos Correa*

    PubMed Central

    Resmi, Mohankumar Saraladevi; Verma, Priyanka; Gokhale, Rajesh S.; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Quinolone alkaloids, found abundantly in the roots of bael (Aegle marmelos), possess various biological activities and have recently gained attention as potential lead molecules for novel drug designing. Here, we report the characterization of a novel Type III polyketide synthase, quinolone synthase (QNS), from A. marmelos that is involved in the biosynthesis of quinolone alkaloid. Using homology-based structural modeling, we identify two crucial amino acid residues (Ser-132 and Ala-133) at the putative QNS active site. Substitution of Ser-132 to Thr and Ala-133 to Ser apparently constricted the active site cavity resulting in production of naringenin chalcone from p-coumaroyl-CoA. Measurement of steady-state kinetic parameters demonstrates that the catalytic efficiency of QNS was severalfold higher for larger acyl-coenzymeA substrates as compared with smaller precursors. Our mutagenic studies suggest that this protein might have evolved from an evolutionarily related member of chalcone synthase superfamily by mere substitution of two active site residues. The identification and characterization of QNS offers a promising target for gene manipulation studies toward the production of novel alkaloid scaffolds. PMID:23329842

  3. In-vitro anti-inflammatory and mosquito larvicidal efficacy of nickel nanoparticles phytofabricated from aqueous leaf extracts of Aegle marmelos Correa.

    PubMed

    Angajala, Gangadhara; Ramya, R; Subashini, R

    2014-07-01

    In recent years there is a tremendous growth in the interdisciplinary world of nanotechnology across the globe and emergence of its potential applications remains as a big revolution to the industry. Fusion of green nanotechnology and medicine represents one of the major breakthroughs of modern science with the aim of developing nanomaterials for diagnosis, treatment, prevention of various diseases and overall improving health for the beneficial of mankind. In the present study phytofabrication of nickel nanoparticles (nickel NPs) was carried out by using indigenous Aegle marmelos Correa aqueous leaf extracts as a reducing, stabilizing and capping agents. Nickel NPs were characterized by UV-spectroscopy, FTIR, XRD, SEM, AFM and TGA studies. Phytosynthesis of nickel NPs was monitored both at room temperature (25°C) and at 60°C for 5h. The green synthesis of triangular shape nickel NPs phytofabricated from A. marmelos Correa aqueous leaf extracts having face centered cubic structure showing an average particle size of 80-100nm which is in consistent with the particle size calculated by XRD Scherer equation. We further explored and compared nickel NPs of A. marmelos Correa with crude leaf extracts of A. marmelos Correa for its in-vitro anti-inflammatory and mosquito larvicidal efficacy against three blood feeding parasites. The results obtained clearly gives an idea that nickel NPs of A. marmelos Correa (NiNPs of AmC) possess an enhanced anti-inflammatory and larvicidal activity when compared to crude leaf extracts of A. marmelos Correa.

  4. Antibacterial activity of Aegle marmelos against leaf, bark and fruit extracts

    PubMed Central

    Poonkothai, M.; Saravanan, M.

    2008-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of the methanol, chloroform and aqueous extracts from the leaves, bark and fruit of A. marmelos was studied using disc diffusion method against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus (Gram Positive), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Salmonella paratyphi A and Salmonella paratyphi B (Gram Negative). Results suggest that the methanolic extract has significant antibacterial activity against tested bacteria. The present study justifies the claimed uses of A. marmelos in the traditional system of medicine to treat various infectious diseases. PMID:22557272

  5. In vitro glucose uptake activity of Aegles marmelos and Syzygium cumini by activation of Glut-4, PI3 kinase and PPARgamma in L6 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Anandharajan, R; Jaiganesh, S; Shankernarayanan, N P; Viswakarma, R A; Balakrishnan, A

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of methanolic extracts of Aegles marmelos and Syzygium cumini on a battery of targets glucose transporter (Glut-4), peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase (PI3 kinase) involved in glucose transport. A. marmelos and S. cumini are anti-diabetic medicinal plants being used in Indian traditional medicine. Different solvent extracts extracted sequentially were analysed for glucose uptake activity at each step and methanol extracts were found to be significantly active at 100ng/ml dose comparable with insulin and rosiglitazone. Elevation of Glut-4, PPARgamma and PI3 kinase by A. marmelos and S. cumini in association with glucose transport supported the up-regulation of glucose uptake. The inhibitory effect of cycloheximide on A. marmelos- and S. cumini-mediated glucose uptake suggested that new protein synthesis is required for the elevated glucose transport. Current observation concludes that methanolic extracts of A. marmelos and S. cumini activate glucose transport in a PI3 kinase-dependent fashion.

  6. Essential oil of Aegle marmelos as a safe plant-based antimicrobial against postharvest microbial infestations and aflatoxin contamination of food commodities.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Kumar, Ashok; Dubey, Nawal K; Gupta, Rajesh

    2009-08-01

    The essential oil of Aegle marmelos L. Correa (Rutaceae) showed strong fungitoxicity against some storage fungi-causing contamination of foodstuffs. The oil also showed efficacy as aflatoxin suppressor at 500 microL/L as it completely arrested the aflatoxin B(1) production by the toxigenic strains (Navjot 4NSt and Saktiman 3NSt) of Aspergillus flavus Link. Keeping in view the side effects of synthetic fungicides, A. marmelos oil may be recommended as an antimicrobial of plant origin to enhance the shelf life of stored food commodities by controlling the fungal growth as well as aflatoxin secretion. This is the 1st report on aflatoxin B(1) inhibitory nature of this oil. A. marmelos oil may be recommended as a novel plant-based antimicrobial in food protection over synthetic preservatives, most of which are reported to incite environmental problems because of their nonbiodegradable nature and side effects on mammals. The LD(50) of Aegle oil was found to be 23659.93 mg/kg body weight in mice (Mus musculus L.) when administered for acute oral toxicity showing nonmammalian toxicity of the oil. GC-MS analysis of the oil found DL-Limonene to be major component.

  7. Aegle marmelos Mediated Green Synthesis of Different Nanostructured Metal Hexacyanoferrates: Activity against Photodegradation of Harmful Organic Dyes

    PubMed Central

    Jassal, Vidhisha; Kaith, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Prussian blue analogue potassium metal hexacyanoferrate (KMHCF) nanoparticles Fe4[Fe(CN)6]3 (FeHCF), K2Cu3[Fe(CN)6]2 (KCuHCF), K2Ni[Fe(CN)6]·3H2O (KNiHCF), and K2Co[Fe(CN)6] (KCoHCF) have been synthesized using plant based biosurfactant Aegle marmelos (Bael) and water as a green solvent. It must be emphasized here that no harmful reagent or solvent was used throughout the study. Plant extracts are easily biodegradable and therefore do not cause any harm to the environment. Hence, the proposed method of synthesis of various KMHCF nanoparticles followed a green path. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Field-Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR). MHCF nanoparticles were used for the photocatalytic degradation of toxic dyes like Malachite Green (MG), Eriochrome Black T (EBT), Methyl Orange (MO), and Methylene Blue (MB). Under optimized reaction conditions, maximum photocatalytic degradation was achieved in case of KCuHCF nanoparticles mediated degradation process (MG: 96.06%, EBT: 83.03%, MB: 94.72%, and MO: 63.71%) followed by KNiHCF (MG: 95%, EBT: 80.32%, MB: 91.35%, and MO: 59.42%), KCoHCF (MG: 91.45%, EBT: 78.84%, MB: 89.28%, and MO: 58.20%). PMID:27034896

  8. Protective effects of Aegle marmelos fruit pulp on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ghatule, Rohit R.; Gautam, Manish K.; Goel, Shalini; Singh, Amit; Joshi, Vinod K.; Goel, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aegle marmelos (AM) fruit has been advocated in indigenous system of medicine for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders, fever, asthma, inflammations, febrile delirium, acute bronchitis, snakebite, epilepsy, leprosy, myalgia, smallpox, leucoderma, mental illnesses, sores, swelling, thirst, thyroid disorders, tumours and upper respiratory tract infections. Objective: The objective of this study was to study the curative effect of 50% ethanol extract of dried fruit pulp of AM (AME) against 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced experimental colitis. Materials and Methods: AME (200 mg/kg) was administered orally, once daily for 14 days after TNBS-induced colitis. Rats were given intracolonic normal saline or TNBS alone or TNBS plus oral AME. AME was studied for its in vitro antibacterial activity against Gram-negative intestinal bacteria and on TNBS-induced changes in colonic damage, weight and adhesions (macroscopic and microscopic), diarrhea, body weight and colonic levels of free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation), antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione) and pro-inflammatory marker (myeloperoxidase [MPO]) in rats. Results: AME showed antibacterial activity against intestinal pathogens and decreased colonic mucosal damage and inflammation, diarrhea, colonic free radicals and MPO and enhanced body weight and colonic antioxidants level affected by TNBS. The effects of AME on the above parameters were comparable with sulfasalazine, a known colitis protective drug (100 mg/kg, oral). Conclusion: AME shows curative effects against TNBS-induced colitis by its antibacterial activity and promoting colonic antioxidants and reducing free radicals and MPO-induced colonic damage. PMID:24914296

  9. Biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Aegle marmelos (Bael) Fruit Extract and Its Application to Prevent Adhesion of Bacteria: A Strategy to Control Microfouling

    PubMed Central

    Nithya Deva Krupa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Marine biofilms formed due to adhesion of bacteria and other microorganisms on submerged surfaces are generally considered to be a major form of microfouling. Subsequent attachment of larvae of higher organisms like barnacles, mussels, and so forth, on marine biofilms, causes macrofouling. Several approaches have been used to prevent micro- and macrofouling. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are known to exhibit strong inhibitory and antimicrobial activity. Biological synthesis of AgNPs is rapidly gaining importance due to its growing success. Hence, the present study is focused on the biosynthesis of AgNPs using fruit extract of Aegle marmelos and its characterization through UV-Vis spectrophotometer, X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further isolation and identification of marine biofilm forming bacteria were carried out through 16S rDNA analysis. The antimicrofouling effect of the biosynthesized AgNPs was tested against marine biofilm forming bacteria and the results suggested that it could effectively inhibit biofilm formation. This preliminary study has proved that AgNPs may be used as antimicrofouling agent for the prevention of biofouling in the early stages. PMID:25258620

  10. Development and Application of Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for Chemical Warfare Nerve and Sulfur Mustard Agents.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Opresko, Dennis M; Young, Robert A; Hauschild, Veronique

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) have been developed for the chemical warfare agents GB, GA, GD, GF, VX, and sulfur mustard. These AEGLs were approved by the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances after Federal Register publication and comment, and judged as scientifically valid by the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology Subcommittee on AEGLs. AEGLs represent general public exposure limits for durations ranging from 10 min to 8 h, and for three levels of severity (AEGL-1, AEGL-2, AEGL-3). Mild effects are possible at concentrations greater than AEGL-1, while life-threatening effects are expected at concentrations greater than AEGL-3. AEGLs can be applied to various civilian and national defense purposes, including evacuation and shelter-in-place protocols, reentry levels, protective clothing specifications, and analytical monitoring requirements. This report documents development and derivation of AEGL values for six key chemical warfare agents, and makes recommendations for their application to various potential exposure scenarios.

  11. Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for Time Varying Toxic Plumes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-12

    package, which we are calling EAGLE, in the sections below. The package contains the tabulated AEGL data for chlorine (CL2) and ammonia (NH3) at...200C. The molecular weight for chlorine (CL2) is MW = 70.9 and for ammonia (NH3), MW = 17.03. Figure 1 just below reproduces the chlorine table...below shows the same information as Table 1, but for ammonia . The toxicity levels are 50 or 60 times lower than for chlorine, but the behavior with

  12. Guidelines and Criteria for the Search Strategy, Evaluation, Selection, and Documentation of Key Data and Supporting Data Used for the Derivation of AEGL Values

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is Section 2.3 of the Standing Operating Procedures for Developing Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for Hazardous Chemicals. It discusses methodologies used to search for and select data for development of AEGL values.

  13. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  14. 7 CFR 301.76-2 - Regulated articles for Asian citrus psyllid and citrus greening.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and plant parts (including leaves), except fruit, of: Aegle marmelos, Aeglopsis chevalieri, Afraegle... asiatica, Triphasia trifolia, Vepris (=Toddalia) lanceolata, and Zanthoxylum fagara. (b) Propagative seed..., the movement of propagative seed of these species from an area quarantined for citrus greening...

  15. Down regulation of cerebellar serotonergic receptors in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats: Effect of pyridoxine and Aegle marmelose.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Pretty Mary; Paul, Jes; Paulose, C S

    2010-04-29

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in cerebellar damage caused by diabetes, leading to deterioration in glucose homeostasis causing metabolic disorders. The present study was carried out to find the effects of Aegle marmelose leaf extract and insulin alone and in combination with pyridoxine on the cerebellar 5-HT through 5-HT(2A) receptor subtype, gene expression studies on the status of antioxidants-superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) and immunohistochemical studies in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. 5-HT and 5-HT(2A) receptor binding parameters, B(max) and K(d), showed a significant decrease (p<0.001) in the cerebellum of diabetic rats compared to control. Gene expression studies of SOD, GPx, 5-HT(2A) and 5-HTT in cerebellum showed a significant down regulation (p<0.001) in diabetic rats compared to control. Pyridoxine treated alone and in combination with insulin, A. marmelose to diabetic rats reversed the B(max), K(d) of 5-HT, 5-HT(2A) and the gene expression of SOD, GPx, 5-HT(2A) and 5-HTT in cerebellum to near control. The gene expression of 5-HT(2A) and 5-HTT were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. Also, the Rotarod test confirms the motor dysfunction and recovery by treatment. These data suggest the antioxidant and neuroprotective role of pyridoxine and A. marmelose through the up regulation of 5-HT through 5-HT(2A) receptor in diabetic rats. Our results suggest that pyridoxine treated alone and in combination with insulin and A. marmelose has a role in the regulation of insulin synthesis and release, normalizing diabetic related oxidative stress and neurodegeneration affecting the motor ability of an individual by serotonergic receptors through 5-HT(2A) function. This has clinical significance in the management of diabetes.

  16. Alterations in hippocampal serotonergic and INSR function in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats exposed to stress: neuroprotective role of pyridoxine and Aegle marmelose.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Pretty Mary; Kuruvilla, Korah P; Mathew, Jobin; Malat, Anitha; Joy, Shilpa; Paulose, C S

    2010-09-25

    Diabetes and stress stimulate hippocampal 5-HT synthesis, metabolism and release. The present study was carried out to find the effects of insulin, Aegle marmelose alone and in combination with pyridoxine on the hippocampal 5-HT, 5-HT(2A) receptor subtype, gene expression studies on 5-HT(2A), 5-HTT, INSR, immunohistochemical studies and elevated plus maze in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. 5-HT content showed a significant decrease (p < 0.001) and a significant increase (p < 0.001) in 5-HIAA in hippocampus of diabetic rats compared to control. 5-HT receptor binding parameters B(max) and Kd showed a significant decrease (p < 0.001) whereas 5-HT(2A) receptor binding parameters Bmax showed a significant decrease (p < 0.001) with a significant increase (p < 0.05) in Kd in hippocampus of diabetic rats compared to control. Gene expression studies of 5-HT(2A), 5-HTT and INSR in hippocampus showed a significant down regulation (p < 0.001) in diabetic rats compared to control. Pyridoxine treated in combination with insulin and A. marmelose to diabetic rats reversed the 5-HT content, B(max), Kd of 5-HT, 5-HT(2A) and gene expression of 5-HT(2A), 5-HTT and INSR in hippocampus to near control. The gene expression of 5-HT(2A) and 5-HTT were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. Behavioural studies using elevated plus maze showed that serotonin through its transporter significantly increased (p < 0.001) anxiety-related traits in diabetic rats which were corrected by combination therapy. Our results suggest that pyridoxine treated in combination with insulin and A. marmelose has a role in the regulation of insulin synthesis and release, normalising diabetic related stress and anxiety through hippocampal serotonergic function. This has clinical significance in the management of diabetes.

  17. Alterations in hippocampal serotonergic and INSR function in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats exposed to stress: neuroprotective role of pyridoxine and Aegle marmelose

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes and stress stimulate hippocampal 5-HT synthesis, metabolism and release. The present study was carried out to find the effects of insulin, Aegle marmelose alone and in combination with pyridoxine on the hippocampal 5-HT, 5-HT2A receptor subtype, gene expression studies on 5-HT2A, 5-HTT, INSR, immunohistochemical studies and elevated plus maze in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. 5-HT content showed a significant decrease (p < 0.001) and a significant increase (p < 0.001) in 5-HIAA in hippocampus of diabetic rats compared to control. 5-HT receptor binding parameters Bmax and Kd showed a significant decrease (p < 0.001) whereas 5-HT2A receptor binding parameters Bmax showed a significant decrease (p < 0.001) with a significant increase (p < 0.05) in Kd in hippocampus of diabetic rats compared to control. Gene expression studies of 5-HT2A, 5-HTT and INSR in hippocampus showed a significant down regulation (p < 0.001) in diabetic rats compared to control. Pyridoxine treated in combination with insulin and A. marmelose to diabetic rats reversed the 5-HT content, Bmax , Kd of 5-HT, 5-HT2A and gene expression of 5-HT2A, 5-HTT and INSR in hippocampus to near control. The gene expression of 5-HT2A and 5-HTT were confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. Behavioural studies using elevated plus maze showed that serotonin through its transporter significantly increased (p < 0.001) anxiety-related traits in diabetic rats which were corrected by combination therapy. Our results suggest that pyridoxine treated in combination with insulin and A. marmelose has a role in the regulation of insulin synthesis and release, normalising diabetic related stress and anxiety through hippocampal serotonergic function. This has clinical significance in the management of diabetes. PMID:20868513

  18. Using COSI-CORR to Quantify Earthflow Movement Rates Over Decadal Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerovski-Darriau, C.; Roering, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Large, complex earthflow systems can evolve over diverse (seasonal to millennial) timescales and thus require a range of tools to document their kinematics. In many areas, extensive archives of historical aerial photographs offer potential for quantifying decadal fluctuations, but tracking individual features has been impractical over significant temporal and spatial scales. Here, we explore recent software that automates landslide mapping and improves feasibility of tracking deformation at these scales. The Co-registration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) software allows for correlation between air photographs and LiDAR imagery, and tracks surface deformation over a sequence of aerial surveys. To analyze the efficacy for landslides, we focused on a 1km2 area riddled with active earthflows, shallow landslides, and gullying in the Waipaoa River catchment on the North Island of New Zealand. This area is dominated by Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary clay-rich mudstones and calcite-rich sandstones with highly sheared and more massive units that fail in diverse fashion. Starting in the 1900s, the area was burned and converted to pastureland, and is now heavily grazed by sheep and cattle. Slope deformation in the study area has accelerated due to this history of land use changes. We used aerial photographs from 1956, 1960, 1979, and 1982 to track slide movement. The photos were scanned at 1200 dpi (21 micron), giving a ground resolution between approximately 0.2-1m/pixel (scale of 1:16000 to 1:47000). We rectified the photos with 2010 orthophotos and a corresponding 1m LiDAR DEM and hillshade map using the COSI-Corr interface in ENVI 4.5. They were then sequentially correlated, which automatically identifies surface changes with sub-pixel resolution. Next we generated a vector field displacement map for each time step with 8m grid nodes. The resulting vector maps show velocities ranging from about 1-5m/yr. This corresponds well with previously

  19. Oviposition-deterrent, ovicidal, and repellent activities of indigenous plant extracts against Anopheles subpictus Grassi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Elango, G; Bagavan, A; Kamaraj, C; Abduz Zahir, A; Abdul Rahuman, A

    2009-11-01

    Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. The leaf acetone, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of Aegle marmelos (Linn.) Correa ex Roxb, Andrographis lineata Wallich ex Nees, and Cocculus hirsutus (L.) Diels were tested for oviposition-deterrent, ovicidal, and repellent activities against Anopheles subpictus Grassi (Diptera: Culicidae). The percentage of effective oviposition repellency of 92.60 , 93.04, 95.20, 88.26, 92.80, 94.01, 95.77, 96.93, and 92.54 at 500 ppm and the lowest repellency of 47.14, 58.00, 56.52, 64.93, 71.09, 66.42, 50.62, 57.62, and 65.73 at 31.25 ppm in acetone, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of Aegle marmelos, Andrographis lineata, and Cocculus hirsutus, respectively. The oviposition activity index (OAI) value of acetone, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of Aegle marmelos, Andrographis lineata, and Cocculus hirsutus at 500 ppm were -0.86, -0.87, -0.90, -0.78, -0.87, -0.86, -0.91, -0.94, and -0.86 respectively. The OAI values revealed that the solvent plant extracts have deterrent effect, and they caused a remarkable negative response resulting in oviposition of very few eggs. Mean percent hatchability of the ovicidal activity was observed 24 h after treatment. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. Mortality of 100% with ethyl acetate extract of Aegle marmelos, methanol extracts Aegle marmelos, Andrographis lineata, and Cocculus hirsutus were exerted at 1,000 ppm. The maximum repellent activity was observed at 500 ppm in methanol extracts of Aegle marmelos, Andrographis lineata, and ethyl acetate extract of Cocculus hirsutus, and the mean complete protection time ranged from 90 to 120 min with the different extracts tested. These results suggest that the leaf extracts of Aegle marmelos, Andrographis lineata, and Cocculus hirsutus have the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly

  20. Opération multimode transverse des OPOs: des structures classiques aux corrélations quantiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinelli, M.; Ducci, S.; Gigan, S.; Treps, N.; Maître, A.; Fabre, C.

    2002-06-01

    Nous démontrons la formation de structures transverses sur les faisceaux émis par un oscillateur paramétrique optique (OPO) de type II en configuration confocale. D'un point de vue classique nous mettons en évidence le caractère multimode transverse de telles structures. A travers l'étude des corrélations spatiales des faisceaux générés nous montrons que ces structures sont également multimodes d'un point de vue quantique.

  1. Behavioral evidence of an ectoparasitic interaction between Triatoma pseudomaculata Corrêa e Espínola (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) and Periplaneta americana (L.) (Blattodea: Blattidae).

    PubMed

    Pontes, G B; Noireau, F; Lorenzo, M G

    2011-01-01

    The present work tested whether Triatoma pseudomaculata Corrêa & Espínola shows behavioral traits indicating that it is capable of feeding on arthropods. We consistently observed nymphs extending their proboscis in the direction of cockroaches and attempting to bite. Insects presented a preference for biting specific cockroach body parts. Our results suggest that arthropod hemolymph represents an alternative source of food that increases the survival of T. pseudomaculata individuals undergoing long starvation.

  2. Image cross-correlation using COSI-Corr: A versatile technique to monitor and quantity surface deformation in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprince, S.; Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a suite of algorithms for precise Co-registration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) which were implemented in a software package first released to the academic community in 2007. Its capability for accurate surface deformation measurement has proved useful for a wide variety of applications. We present the fundamental principles of COSI-Corr, which are the key ingredients to achieve sub-pixel registration and sub-pixel measurement accuracy, and we show how they can be applied to various types of images to extract 2D, 3D, or even 4D deformation fields of a given surface. Examples are drawn from recent collaborative studies and include: (1) The study of the Icelandic Krafla rifting crisis that occurred from 1975 to 1984 where we used a combination of archived airborne photographs, declassified spy satellite imagery, and modern satellite acquisitions to propose a detailed 2D displacement field of the ground; (2) The estimation of glacial velocities from fast New Zealand glaciers using successive ASTER acquisitions; (3) The derivation of sand dunes migration rates; (4) The estimation of ocean swell velocity taking advantage of the short time delay between the acquisition of different spectral bands on the SPOT 5 satellite; (5) The derivation of the full 3D ground displacement field induced by the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake, as recorded from pre- and post-event lidar acquisitions; (6) And, the estimation of 2D in plane deformation of mechanical samples under stress in the lab. Finally, we conclude by highlighting the potential future and implication of applying such correlation techniques on a large scale to provide global monitoring of our environment.

  3. Development of a Standardized Methodology for the Use of COSI-Corr Sub-Pixel Image Correlation to Determine Surface Deformation Patterns in Large Magnitude Earthquakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliner, C. W. D.; Dolan, J. F.; Hollingsworth, J.; Leprince, S.; Ayoub, F.

    2014-12-01

    Coseismic surface deformation is typically measured in the field by geologists and with a range of geophysical methods such as InSAR, LiDAR and GPS. Current methods, however, either fail to capture the near-field coseismic surface deformation pattern where vital information is needed, or lack pre-event data. We develop a standardized and reproducible methodology to fully constrain the surface, near-field, coseismic deformation pattern in high resolution using aerial photography. We apply our methodology using the program COSI-corr to successfully cross-correlate pairs of aerial, optical imagery before and after the 1992, Mw 7.3 Landers and 1999, Mw 7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes. This technique allows measurement of the coseismic slip distribution and magnitude and width of off-fault deformation with sub-pixel precision. This technique can be applied in a cost effective manner for recent and historic earthquakes using archive aerial imagery. We also use synthetic tests to constrain and correct for the bias imposed on the result due to use of a sliding window during correlation. Correcting for artificial smearing of the tectonic signal allows us to robustly measure the fault zone width along a surface rupture. Furthermore, the synthetic tests have constrained for the first time the measurement precision and accuracy of estimated fault displacements and fault-zone width. Our methodology provides the unique ability to robustly understand the kinematics of surface faulting while at the same time accounting for both off-fault deformation and measurement biases that typically complicates such data. For both earthquakes we find that our displacement measurements derived from cross-correlation are systematically larger than the field displacement measurements, indicating the presence of off-fault deformation. We show that the Landers and Hector Mine earthquake accommodated 46% and 38% of displacement away from the main primary rupture as off-fault deformation, over a mean

  4. Théorie visco-élastique non-extensive V. équations de diffusion, fonctions de distribution, viscosités et coefficients de diffusion, fonctions de corrélation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volino, F.

    . Des paramètres d'ordre tensoriels sont définis dans le cas de la rotation. Pour la rotation, les fonctions de corrélation des polynômes de Legendre sont calculées. Ces quantités permettent d'établir les expressions, dans les cas les plus simples, des fonctions de corrélations rotationnelles pertinentes pour l'analyse des données de relaxation diélectrique, diffusion de la lumière, et diffusion incohérente de neutrons. On trouve que toutes les fonctions de corrélation, aussi bien translationnelles que rotationnelles, sont fondamentalement non-exponentielles.

  5. Les tumeurs des glandes salivaires, étude épidémio-clinique et corrélation anatomoradiologique: étude rétrospective à propos de 148 cas

    PubMed Central

    Fassih, Malika; Abada, Redallah; Rouadi, Sami; Mahtar, Mohamed; Roubal, Mohamed; Essaadi, Mustapha; El Kadiri, Mohamed Fatmi

    2014-01-01

    Les tumeurs des glandes salivaires sont rares, elles représentent moins de 3% de l'ensemble des tumeurs. Les tumeurs bénignes sont les plus fréquentes dominées par l'adénome pléomorphe, la glande parotide reste la localisation la plus commune. L'objectif de ce travail est d’évaluer la contribution des 3 méthodes d'imagerie: échographie, TDM et IRM dans la différentiation entre tumeur maligne et lésion bénigne. C'est une étude rétrospective à propos de 148 cas de tumeurs des glandes salivaires collectés sur 5 ans. Les paramètres étudiés étaient l’âge, le sexe du patient, le motif de consultation, les données de l'examen clinique, les données de l'imagerie. Chacun des critères radiologiques utilisés pour déterminer la nature de la tumeur a été analysée et corrélé avec les données de l'histologie. L'analyse s'est basée sur le test du X2 et le calcul du p. Nous avons calculé la sensibilité, la spécificité et l'efficacité diagnostique pour chaque modalité. La localisation parotidienne était prédominante (80%), les tumeurs bénignes ont représenté 76%, dominés par l'adénome pléomorphe. L’échographie a révélé que seulement la présence de quelques critères prédisent le caractère malin de la masse: les limites floues, irrégulières, et la présence d'adénopathies (p < 0,05). A la TDM, seules les limites floues de la masse et l'extension aux tissus adjacents étaient des indicateurs de malignité. A l'IRM, l'irrégularité des contours, l'hyposignal et le signal intermédiaire en séquences T1 et T2, et l'extension aux tissus avoisinants étaient en faveur de la malignité. La corrélation entre résultats de l'imagerie et diagnostic histologique a révélé la supériorité de l'IRM par rapport au scanner et à l’échographie, en termes de sensibilité, spécificité et efficacité diagnostique. L’évaluation préopératoire des tumeurs des glandes salivaires est devenue un challenge pour les ORL et les

  6. Formulation development and in vitro antioxidant studies of Churnas containing natural sweetener and nutraceutical

    PubMed Central

    Salunkhe, V. R.; Bhise, S B

    2009-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre, Curcuma longa, Azadiracta indica, Aegle marmelos, Salacia chinensis, Emblica officinalis were used as active components and Stevia rebaudiana as natural sweetener with nutraceuticalfor development of Churnas. The free radical scavengingpotential of Churnas was studied by using different antioxidant models of screening. The hydroalcoholic extract of sweet and bitter Churnas at 500μg/ ml showed maximum scavenging of the riboflavin NET system, DPPH and total antioxidant capacity. However, the extract showed only moderate scavenging activity of nitric oxide radicals and iron chelation. This could be due to higher phenolic content in the extract. Sweetness potency of Churna was found to be appropriate sweet, acceptable and palatable. These observations can be useful for the justifications of various ingredients and therapeutic applications of the Churnas. PMID:22557329

  7. Formulation development and in vitro antioxidant studies of Churnas containing natural sweetener and nutraceutical.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, V R; Bhise, S B

    2009-04-01

    Gymnema sylvestre, Curcuma longa, Azadiracta indica, Aegle marmelos, Salacia chinensis, Emblica officinalis were used as active components and Stevia rebaudiana as natural sweetener with nutraceuticalfor development of Churnas. The free radical scavengingpotential of Churnas was studied by using different antioxidant models of screening. The hydroalcoholic extract of sweet and bitter Churnas at 500μg/ ml showed maximum scavenging of the riboflavin NET system, DPPH and total antioxidant capacity. However, the extract showed only moderate scavenging activity of nitric oxide radicals and iron chelation. This could be due to higher phenolic content in the extract. Sweetness potency of Churna was found to be appropriate sweet, acceptable and palatable. These observations can be useful for the justifications of various ingredients and therapeutic applications of the Churnas.

  8. Bactericidal Effect of Selected Antidiarrhoeal Medicinal Plants on Intracellular Heat-Stable Enterotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Birdi, Tannaz J.; Brijesh, S.; Daswani, Poonam G.

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhoeal diseases due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli continue to be a cause of global concern. Medicinal plants have been gaining popularity as promising antidiarrhoeal agents. In the present study, four antidiarrhoeal plants, viz. Aegle marmelos, Cyperus rotundus, Psidium guajava and Zingiber officinale were screened against a heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli strain. Decoctions of these plants were studied for their effect on intracellular killing of the bacterial strain using murine monocytic cell line, J774. [3H] thymidine release assay was used to evaluate the apoptotic/necrotic effect. All plants at concentrations <1% enhanced intracellular killing of the bacteria by J774 cells. However, at higher concentrations, the decoctions induced apoptosis in J774 cells. The study demonstrates that these plants could control diarrhoea caused by heat-stable toxin-producing enterotoxigenic E. coli through their immunomodulatory effect. PMID:25035535

  9. Application of the Kombucha 'tea fungus' for the enhancement of antioxidant and starch hydrolase inhibitory properties of ten herbal teas.

    PubMed

    Watawana, Mindani I; Jayawardena, Nilakshi; Choo, Candy; Waisundara, Viduranga Y

    2016-03-01

    Ten herbal teas (Acacia arabica, Aegle marmelos flower, A. marmelos root bark, Aerva lanata, Asteracantha longifolia, Cassia auriculata, Hemidesmus indicus, Hordeum vulgare, Phyllanthus emblica, Tinospora cordifolia) were fermented with the Kombucha 'tea fungus'. The pH values of the fermented beverages ranged from 4.0 to 6.0 by day 7, while the titratable acidity ranged from 2.5 to 5.0g/mL (P<0.05). Gallic acid had statistically significantly increased (P<0.05) in almost all the samples by day 7. The Oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay indicated 5 of the Kombucha beverages to have statistically significant increases (P<0.05) by day 7. The α-amylase inhibitory activities ranged from 52.5 to 67.2μg/mL in terms of IC50 values following fermentation, while the α-glucosidase inhibitory activities ranged from 95.2 to 196.1μg/mL. In conclusion, an enhancement of the antioxidant and starch hydrolase inhibitory potential of the herbal teas was observed by adding the tea fungus.

  10. Lipolytic and antiadipogenic effects of (3,3-dimethylallyl) halfordinol on 3T3-L1 adipocytes and high fat and fructose diet induced obese C57/BL6J mice.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Munisankar; Pandikumar, Perumal; Saravanan, Subramaniam; Toppo, Erenius; Pazhanivel, Natesan; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2014-10-05

    Aegle marmelos Correa., (Rutaceae) is a medium sized tree distributed in South East Asia and used traditionally for the management of obestiy and diabetes. In this study the lipolytic and antiadipogenic effects of (3,3-dimethylallyl) halfordinol (Hfn) isolated from leaves of A. marmelos have been investigated. Intracellular lipid accumulation was measured by oil red O staining and glycerol secretion. The expression of genes related to adipocyte differentiation was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Hfn decreased intracellular triglyceride accumulation and increased glycerol release in a dose dependent manner (5-20 μg/ml) in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In high fat diet fed C57/BL 6J mice, treatment with Hfn for four weeks reduced plasma glucose, insulin and triglyceride levels and showed a significant reduction in total adipose tissue mass by 37.85% and visceral adipose tissue mass by 62.99% at 50mg/kg b.w. concentration. RT-PCR analyses indicated that Hfn decreased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT enhancer binding protein α (CEBPα) and increased the expression of sterol regulatory enzyme binding protein (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), Adiponectin and Glucose transporter protein 4 (GLUT4) compared to the high fat diet group. These results suggested that Hfn decreased adipocyte differentiation and stimulated lipolysis of adipocytes. This study justifies the folklore medicinal uses and claims about the therapeutic values of this plant for the management of insulin resistance and obesity.

  11. Cloning and Structure-Function Analyses of Quinolone- and Acridone-producing Novel Type III Polyketide Synthases from Citrus microcarpa*

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Takahiro; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Takashi; Kinjo, Keishi; Kato, Ryohei; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Morita, Hiroyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2013-01-01

    Two novel type III polyketide synthases, quinolone synthase (QNS) and acridone synthase (ACS), were cloned from Citrus microcarpa (Rutaceae). The deduced amino acid sequence of C. microcarpa QNS is unique, and it shared only 56–60% identities with C. microcarpa ACS, Medicago sativa chalcone synthase (CHS), and the previously reported Aegle marmelos QNS. In contrast to the quinolone- and acridone-producing A. marmelos QNS, C. microcarpa QNS produces 4-hydroxy-N-methylquinolone as the “single product” by the one-step condensation of N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. However, C. microcarpa ACS shows broad substrate specificities and produces not only acridone and quinolone but also chalcone, benzophenone, and phloroglucinol from 4-coumaroyl-CoA, benzoyl-CoA, and hexanoyl-CoA, respectively. Furthermore, the x-ray crystal structures of C. microcarpa QNS and ACS, solved at 2.47- and 2.35-Å resolutions, respectively, revealed wide active site entrances in both enzymes. The wide active site entrances thus provide sufficient space to facilitate the binding of the bulky N-methylanthraniloyl-CoA within the catalytic centers. However, the active site cavity volume of C. microcarpa ACS (760 Å3) is almost as large as that of M. sativa CHS (750 Å3), and ACS produces acridone by employing an active site cavity and catalytic machinery similar to those of CHS. In contrast, the cavity of C. microcarpa QNS (290 Å3) is significantly smaller, which makes this enzyme produce the diketide quinolone. These results as well as mutagenesis analyses provided the first structural bases for the anthranilate-derived production of the quinolone and acridone alkaloid by type III polyketide synthases. PMID:23963450

  12. Evaluation of Aromatic Plants and Compounds Used to Fight Multidrug Resistant Infections

    PubMed Central

    Perumal Samy, Ramar; Manikandan, Jayapal; Al Qahtani, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine plays a vital role for primary health care in India, where it is widely practiced to treat various ailments. Among those obtained from the healers, 78 medicinal plants were scientifically evaluated for antibacterial activity. Methanol extract of plants (100 μg of residue) was tested against the multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Forty-seven plants showed strong activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei (strain TES and KHW) and Staphylococcus aureus, of which Tragia involucrata L., Citrus acida Roxb. Hook.f., and Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa ex Roxb. showed powerful inhibition of bacteria. Eighteen plants displayed only a moderate effect, while six plants failed to provide any evidence of inhibition against the tested bacteria. Purified compounds showed higher antimicrobial activity than crude extracts. The compounds showed less toxic effect to the human skin fibroblasts (HEPK) cells than their corresponding aromatic fractions. Phytochemical screening indicates that the presence of various secondary metabolites may be responsible for this activity. Most of the plant extracts contained high levels of phenolic or polyphenolic compounds and exhibited activity against MDR pathogens. In conclusion, plants are promising agents that deserve further exploration. Lead molecules available from such extracts may serve as potential antimicrobial agents for future drug development to combat diseases caused by the MDR bacterial strains as reported in this study. PMID:24223059

  13. Food and feeding behaviour of Asiatic elephant (Elephas maximus Linn.) in Kuldiha Wild Life Sanctuary, Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Kalpana K; Patra, A K; Paramanik, D S

    2013-01-01

    The feeding behaviour of Asiatic elephant (Elephas maximus) with food reference was studied in Kuldiha Wildlife Sanctuary in Odisha during 2007 to 2009. Though the study area houses a good number of plant species only 71 species were identified as elephant fodder plants. The food trail of elephant was observed as twig breaking, bark peeling, branch breaking, stem twisting uprooting and flower plucking in different regions of study area during different seasons. Alteration of predominantly browsing strategy with that of grazing around the year was related to seasonal variation of food plants. Consumption of tree species (56%) was highest as compared to shrubs (20%), herbs (14%) and climbers (10%). A high degree of variation in dicot- monocot ratio (61:10)) was marked during identification of elephant fodder plant by direct observation. Microscopic analysis of dung showing a high degree of variation in average dicot- monocot ratio suggested that the food plant selection of elephant was highly opportunistic and seasonal. The elephants extensively fed on the plant species like Careya arborea, Kydia calycina, Helicteres isora, Mallotus philippinensis, Aegle marmelos, Zizyphus mauritiona, Bauhinia racemosa, Bauhinia vahlii, Mimosa pudica, Asparagus racemosus, Smilax zeylanica and Diosporea species. They were fond of Madhuca indica (Mahula) flowers in winter and fruits of Mangifera indica (Mango) in summer. They were never found feeding on Tectona grandis and Eucalyptus maculate inside the study area.

  14. Studies on effects of indigenous plant extracts on filarial vector Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles.

    PubMed

    Elango, G; Rahuman, A Abdul; Kamaraj, C; Zahir, A Abduz; Bagavan, A

    2010-06-01

    Mosquito control is facing a threat because of the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of leaf ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extracts of Aegle marmelos (L.) Correa ex Roxb (Rutaceae), Andrographis lineata Wallich ex Nees. (Acanthaceae), Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees. (Acanthaceae), Cocculus hirsutus (L.) Diels (Menispermaceae), Eclipta prostrata L. (Asteraceae) and Tagetes erecta L. (Compositae) on ovicidal and oviposition-deterrent activities against Culex tritaeniorhynchus Giles (Diptera: Culicidae). The percentage of egg hatching in methanol extracts of Andrographis lineata, Cocculus hirsutus and T. erecta were 16, 12 and 16 exerted at 500 ppm, respectively. The percentage of effective oviposition repellency was 97.77 at 500 ppm and the lowest repellency was 42.06 at 31.25 ppm in methanol and acetone extracts of Andrographis lineata and Andrographis paniculata, respectively. The oviposition activity index values revealed that the solvent plant extracts have deterrent effect, and they caused a remarkable negative response resulting in oviposition of very few eggs. These results suggest that the leaf solvent plant extracts have the potential to be used as an ideal ecofriendly approach for the control of the Culex tritaeniorhynchus.

  15. Ovicidal and Oviposition Deterrent Activities of Medicinal Plant Extracts Against Aedes aegypti L. and Culex quinquefasciatus Say Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Reegan, Appadurai Daniel; Gandhi, Munusamy Rajiv; Paulraj, Micheal Gabriel; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the ovicidal and oviposition deterrent activities of five medicinal plant extracts namely Aegle marmelos (Linn.), Limonia acidissima (Linn.), Sphaeranthus indicus (Linn.), Sphaeranthus amaranthoides (burm.f), and Chromolaena odorata (Linn.) against Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Three solvents, namely hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol, were used for the preparation of extracts from each plant. Methods Four different concentrations—62.5 parts per million (ppm), 125 ppm, 250 ppm, and 500 ppm—were prepared using acetone and tested for ovicidal and oviposition deterrent activities. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the significance of the treatments and means were separated by Tukey's test of comparison. Results Among the different extracts of the five plants screened, the hexane extract of L. acidissima recorded the highest ovicidal activity of 79.2% and 60% at 500 ppm concentration against the eggs of Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti, respectively. Similarly, the same hexane extract of L. acidissima showed 100% oviposition deterrent activity at all the tested concentrations against Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. aegypti adult females. Conclusion It is concluded that the hexane extract of L. acidissima could be used in an integrated mosquito management program. PMID:25737834

  16. Botanicals to control soft rot bacteria of potato.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Khan, A A; Ali, M E; Mian, I H; Akanda, A M; Abd Hamid, S B

    2012-01-01

    Extracts from eleven different plant species such as jute (Corchorus capsularis L.), cheerota (Swertia chiraita Ham.), chatim (Alstonia scholaris L.), mander (Erythrina variegata), bael (Aegle marmelos L.), marigold (Tagetes erecta), onion (Allium cepa), garlic (Allium sativum L.), neem (Azadiracta indica), lime (Citrus aurantifolia), and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) were tested for antibacterial activity against potato soft rot bacteria, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) P-138, under in vitro and storage conditions. Previously, Ecc P-138 was identified as the most aggressive soft rot bacterium in Bangladeshi potatoes. Of the 11 different plant extracts, only extracts from dried jute leaves and cheerota significantly inhibited growth of Ecc P-138 in vitro. Finally, both plant extracts were tested to control the soft rot disease of potato tuber under storage conditions. In a 22-week storage condition, the treated potatoes were significantly more protected against the soft rot infection than those of untreated samples in terms of infection rate and weight loss. The jute leaf extracts showed more pronounced inhibitory effects on Ecc-138 growth both in in vitro and storage experiments.

  17. Botanicals to Control Soft Rot Bacteria of Potato

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. M.; Khan, A. A.; Ali, M. E.; Mian, I. H.; Akanda, A. M.; Abd Hamid, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Extracts from eleven different plant species such as jute (Corchorus capsularis L.), cheerota (Swertia chiraita Ham.), chatim (Alstonia scholaris L.), mander (Erythrina variegata), bael (Aegle marmelos L.), marigold (Tagetes erecta), onion (Allium cepa), garlic (Allium sativum L.), neem (Azadiracta indica), lime (Citrus aurantifolia), and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) were tested for antibacterial activity against potato soft rot bacteria, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) P-138, under in vitro and storage conditions. Previously, Ecc P-138 was identified as the most aggressive soft rot bacterium in Bangladeshi potatoes. Of the 11 different plant extracts, only extracts from dried jute leaves and cheerota significantly inhibited growth of Ecc P-138 in vitro. Finally, both plant extracts were tested to control the soft rot disease of potato tuber under storage conditions. In a 22-week storage condition, the treated potatoes were significantly more protected against the soft rot infection than those of untreated samples in terms of infection rate and weight loss. The jute leaf extracts showed more pronounced inhibitory effects on Ecc-138 growth both in in vitro and storage experiments. PMID:22701096

  18. Rapid densitometric method for simultaneous analysis of umbelliferone, psoralen, and eugenol in herbal raw materials using HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Dhalwal, Kamlesh; Shinde, Vaibhav M; Mahadik, Kakasaheb R; Namdeo, Ajay G

    2007-08-01

    The term 'phenolics' refers to a vast array of biologically active compounds ubiquitous in plants, many of which have been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years. Umbelliferone, psoralen, and eugenol are widely occurring phenolic compounds of plant origin, for which many biological activities against chronic diseases have been reported. A simple HPTLC method has been developed for the simultaneous quantification of umbelliferone, psoralen, and eugenol. These three compounds were quantified in the dried fruit pulp of Aegle marmelos and in the fruit of Trachyspermum ammi and Foeniculam vulgare. The technique enables rapid and sensitive simultaneous analysis in different samples. The method was validated for precision, repeatability, and accuracy in accordance with ICH guidelines. The accuracy of the method was checked by a recovery study conducted at three different levels and the average percentage recovery was found to be 98.88% for umbelliferone, 100.104% for psoralen, and 99.33% for eugenol. The proposed HPTLC method for the simultaneous quantification of umbelliferone, psoralen, and eugenol was found to be simple, precise, specific, sensitive, and accurate. It can be used for routine quality control of herbal raw materials as well as formulations containing any or all of these compounds.

  19. Effect of umbelliferone on tail tendon collagen and haemostatic function in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Pugalendi, Kodukkur Viswanathan

    2007-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to affect collagen in various tissues. Umbelliferone (7-hydroxycoumarin), a natural antioxidant and benzopyrone, is found in golden apple (Aegle marmelos Correa) and bitter orange (Citrus aurantium). Plant-derived phenolic coumarins have been shown to act as dietary antioxidants. In this study, we have investigated the influence of umbelliferone on collagen content and its effects on the tail tendon in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Male albino Wistar rats (180-200 g) were made diabetic by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg). Normal and diabetic rats were treated with umbelliferone for 45 days. Diabetic rats had increased glucose and decreased insulin levels. Tail tendons of diabetic rats had increased total collagen, glycation and fluorescence, and decreased levels of neutral, acid and pepsin-soluble collagens. We have studied the effect of umbelliferone on haemostatic function because umbelliferone is also a coumarin derivative like the anticoagulant, warfarin. Diabetic rats had a significant decrease in prothrombin, clotting and bleeding time, and treatment with umbelliferone made these parameters almost normal. Our results show that umbelliferone controls glycaemia and has a beneficial effect on collagen content and its properties, i.e. collagen related parameters, in the tail tendon, which indicates recovery from the risk (recovery of animals from the risk of complications) of collagen-mediated diabetic polyneuropathy and diabetic nephropathy.

  20. Isolation and biological evaluation of novel Tetracosahexaene hexamethyl, an acyclic triterpenoids derivatives and antioxidant from Justicia adhatoda.

    PubMed

    Dhankhar, Sandeep; Dhankhar, Seema; Ruhil, Sonam; Balhara, Meenakshi; Malik, Vinay; Chhillar, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Forty five extracts fraction of nine selected Indian medicinal plants, based on their use in traditional systems of medicine were analyzed for their antioxidant potential. All the extracts were investigated for phenol content value calculated in Gallic acid equivalents (% of GAE) and antioxidant potential. Moreover, total phenolic content (% dw equivalents to gallic acid) of all plant extracts were found in the range of 3.04 to 24.03, which correlated with antioxidant activity. The findings indicated a promising antioxidant activity of crude extracts fractions of three plants (Justicia adhatoda, Capparis aphylla and Aegle marmelos) and required the further exploration for their effective utilization. Results indicated that petroleum ether fraction of J. adhatoda out of three plants also possesses the admirable antioxidant abilities with high total phenolic content. Following, in vitro antioxidant activity-guided phytochemical separation procedures, twelve fractions of petroleum ether extract of J. adhatoda were isolated by silica gel column chromatography. One fraction (Rf value: 0.725) showed the noticeable antioxidant activity with ascorbic acid standard in hydroxyl radical scavenging assays. The molecular structures elucidations of purified antioxidant compound were carried out using spectroscopic studies ((1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and MS). This compound was reported from this species for the first time. The results imply that the J. adhatoda might be a potential source of natural antioxidants and 2,6,10,14,18,22-Tetracosahexaene, 2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyl is an antioxidant ingredient in J. adhatoda.

  1. Fetal Hemoglobin Inducers from the Natural World: A Novel Approach for Identification of Drugs for the Treatment of β-Thalassemia and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Nicoletta; Zuccato, Cristina; Lampronti, Ilaria; Borgatti, Monica; Gambari, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this review is to present examples of lead compounds identified from biological material (fungi, plant extracts and agro-industry material) and of possible interest in the field of a pharmacological approach to the therapy of β-thalassemia using molecules able to stimulate production of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) in adults. Concerning the employment of HbF inducers as potential drugs for pharmacological treatment of β-thalassemia, the following conclusions can be reached: (i) this therapeutic approach is reasonable, on the basis of the clinical parameters exhibited by hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin patients, (ii) clinical trials (even if still limited) employing HbF inducers were effective in ameliorating the symptoms of β-thalassemia patients, (iii) good correlation of in vivo and in vitro results of HbF synthesis and γ-globin mRNA accumulation indicates that in vitro testing might be predictive of in vivo responses and (iv) combined use of different inducers might be useful to maximize HbF, both in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we present three examples of HbF inducers from the natural world: (i) angelicin and linear psoralens, contained in plant extracts from Angelica arcangelica and Aegle marmelos, (ii) resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and several plant extracts and (iii) rapamycin, isolated from Streptomyces hygroscopicus. PMID:18955291

  2. Muscodor kashayum sp. nov. – a new volatile anti-microbial producing endophytic fungus

    PubMed Central

    Meshram, Vineet; Kapoor, Neha; Saxena, Sanjai

    2014-01-01

    Muscodor kashayum (MycoBank no.: MB 803800; GenBank no.: KC481680) is a newly described endophytic fungus of a medicinal plant Aegle marmelos (Bael tree), growing in the tropical conserved rainforest in the Western Ghats of India. Muscodor kashayum possesses distinct morphological, molecular and physiological features from the earlier reported Muscodor species. The fungus forms characteristic rings of the ropy mycelium on potato dextrose agar medium. This sterile fungus is characterised by the presence of a pungent smell which is attributable to a blend of more than 23 volatile organic constituents, predominantly 3-cyclohexen-1-ol,1-(1,5-dimethyl-4-hexenyl)-4-methyl; 1,6-dioxacyclododecane-7,12-dione; 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-(1-oxopropyl) phenol; 2,4-di-tert-butylthiophenol and 4-octadecylmorpholine. In the in vitro anti-microbial assay using M. kashayum, growth of 75% of test fungi/yeasts and 72% of the test bacteria were completely inhibited. Therefore, M. Kashayum holds potential for future application to be used as a myco-fumigation agent. PMID:24587960

  3. corr3p_tr: A particle approach for the general three-body problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edvardsson, S.; Karlsson, K.; Olin, H.

    2016-03-01

    This work presents a convenient way to solve the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation numerically for a general three-particle system including full correlation and mass polarization. Both Coulombic and non-Coulombic interactions can be studied. The eigensolver is based on a second order dynamical system treatment (particle method). The Hamiltonian matrix never needs to be realized. The wavefunction evolves towards the steady state solution for which the Schrödinger equation is fulfilled. Subsequent Richardson extrapolations for several meshes are then made symbolically in matlab to obtain the continuum solution. The computer C code is tested under Linux 64 bit and both double and extended precision versions are provided. Test runs are exemplified and, when possible, compared with corresponding values in the literature. The computer code is small and self contained making it unusually simple to compile and run on any system. Both serial and parallel computer runs are straight forward.

  4. Green leafy porridges: how good are they in controlling glycaemic response?

    PubMed

    Anuruddhika Subhashinie Senadheera, Senadheera Pathirannehelage; Ekanayake, Sagarika

    2013-03-01

    Green leafy porridges made with leaf water extracts, rice and coconut milk are common Sri Lankan dietary remedies for diabetes. Though water and ethanolic extracts of most leaves elicit hypoglycaemic effects, data are not available on the efficacy when leaf extracts are incorporated into porridges. Thus, an effort was made to evaluate the proximate compositions and glycaemic index (GI) of some commonly consumed green leafy porridges. The GI of rice porridge and coconut milk porridge were measured to evaluate the effect of other ingredients other than the leaf extracts. Rice was the main contributor to carbohydrate (56-68% on dry weight) and water was the main component in porridges (89-93%). Fat and total dietary fibre contents ranged between 2.5-27% and 5-10%, respectively. The GI of all porridges was low (GI ≤ 55), except Cassia auriculata which had a high GI of 77 ± 12. The GIs of coconut milk, Aerva lanata, Hemidesmus indicus, Scoparia dulcis, Asparagus racemosus, Cephalandra indica, Cardiospermum halicacabum, Murraya koenigii and Aegle marmelos were 31 ± 5, 32 ± 5, 40 ± 8, 39 ± 8, 37 ± 4, 49 ± 8, 46 ± 8, 44 ± 8 and 50 ± 8, respectively. All porridges had a low or medium glycaemic loads ( ≤ 19). However, peak blood glucose reductions of ≥ 25% were observed in all leafy and coconut milk porridges, except in C. auriculata and Atlantia zeylanica, when compared with the glucose control. Therefore, green leafy porridges, except Cassia, can be recommended as breakfast meals for diabetics due to their low GI, peak blood glucose reduction and presence of other nutrients in green leaves.

  5. THE EFFECT OF UNCERTAINTY FACTOR PLACEMENT IN A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) FOR ACUTE EXPOSURE GUIDELINE LEVELS (AEGL).

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK models may be used in risk assessment to reduce uncertainties associated with dosimetry; however, other considerations may still lead to incorporation of uncertainty factors (UF). We investigated the consequences of incorporating UFs at three different steps in the modeling...

  6. Holocene vegetation and climatic variations in Central India: A study based on multiproxy evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, M. S.; Sharma, Anupam; Phartiyal, Binita; Kumar, Kamlesh

    2013-11-01

    Palynology, texture, mineralogy, geochemistry, and magnetic susceptibility analysis of a 2 m deep sediment core from Padauna Swamp, southeastern Madhya Pradesh infers that between 8600 and 7500 cal yr BP a warm and relatively less-humid climate prevailed with open tree-savannahs dominated by grasses followed by sedges, Artemisia and members of Chenopodiaceae/Amaranthaceae with scanty trees viz., Schrebera, Aegle marmelos and Sterculia urens. This is well supported by lower organic to carbonate carbon ratio, coarser texture having relatively low CIA and magnetic susceptibility values and presence of some primary minerals. Between 7500 and 6250 cal yr BP the tree-savannahs were succeeded by open mixed deciduous forests with the invasion of a few more trees viz., Madhuca indica, Holoptelea, Emblica officinalis, Mitragyna parvifolia and members of Anacardiaceae in response to onset of a warm and humid climate. A considerable rise in organic carbon generated from the degradation of plentiful biomass along with increase in clay content with signs of kaolinite and increase in immobile over mobile elements with slightly higher CIA and magnetic susceptibility values also suggest climatic amelioration. The presence of ruderal plants such as Artemisia, Cannabis sativa and Cheno/Am further infers initiation of human activities in the region. Between 6250 and 2800 cal yr BP, the mixed deciduous forests became more diverse and dense, subduing grasses and other herbaceous elements. Sporadic incursion of Shorea robusta (Sal) in forest floristic was recorded around 5000 cal yr BP. The overall change in the vegetation mosaic reflects that a warm and more-humid climate prevailed in the region, probably on account of invigoration of southwest monsoon. This observation is further corroborated by other proxy data showing a spurt in organic/inorganic carbon ratio, increase in clay content with matured mineralogy, significantly higher CIA and magnetic susceptibility values. Since 2800 cal

  7. Modélisation du comportement diélectrique des matériaux binaires, corrélation avec les lois des mélanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottreau, A.-M.

    1998-03-01

    In a farmer paper, we proposed a new modelisation law of the heterogeneous media. We now intend to show that it actually is a probability law of mixed bodies (in reference to K. Lichtenecker's terms), which allows to account for the various laws usually used. Dans un précédent article, nous avons proposé une nouvelle loi de modélisation des matériaux hétérogènes. Nous nous proposons ici de montrer que c'est une loi de probabilité des corps mixtes, (pour reprendre les termes utilisés par K. Lichtenecker), qui permet de rendre compte des différentes lois généralement utilisées.

  8. A novel ether-linked phytol-containing digalactosylglycerolipid in the marine green alga, Ulva pertusa

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Yohei; Nagamatsu, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Matsunaga, Naoyuki; Okino, Nozomu; Yamaguchi, Kuniko; Ito, Makoto

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Alkaline-resistant galactolipid, AEGL, was found in marine algae. • The sugar moiety of AEGL is identical to that of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. • AEGL is the first identified glycolipid that possesses an ether-linked phytol. • AEGL is ubiquitously distributed in green, red and brown marine algae. - Abstract: Galactosylglycerolipids (GGLs) and chlorophyll are characteristic components of chloroplast in photosynthetic organisms. Although chlorophyll is anchored to the thylakoid membrane by phytol (tetramethylhexadecenol), this isoprenoid alcohol has never been found as a constituent of GGLs. We here described a novel GGL, in which phytol was linked to the glycerol backbone via an ether linkage. This unique GGL was identified as an Alkaline-resistant and Endogalactosylceramidase (EGALC)-sensitive GlycoLipid (AEGL) in the marine green alga, Ulva pertusa. EGALC is an enzyme that is specific to the R-Galα/β1-6Galβ1-structure of galactolipids. The structure of U. pertusa AEGL was determined following its purification to 1-O-phytyl-3-O-Galα1-6Galβ1-sn-glycerol by mass spectrometric and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. AEGLs were ubiquitously distributed in not only green, but also red and brown marine algae; however, they were rarely detected in terrestrial plants, eukaryotic phytoplankton, or cyanobacteria.

  9. Antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of some fruits.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Dhan; Upadhyay, Garima; Pushpangadan, P; Gupta, Charu

    2011-01-01

    Phenols, a major group of antioxidant phytochemicals, have profound importance due to their biological and free radical scavenging activities. To identify their potential sources extracts of some fruits and their different parts were studied for total phenolic contents (TPC), antioxidant (AOA) and free radical scavenging activities (FRSA). The amount of TPC varied from 10.5 (Carissa carandus, fruit peel) to 343.2 mg/g (Caesalpinia Mexicana, fruits) and AOA from 20.3% (Musa paradisiacal, fruits) to 96.7% (Caesalpinia Mexicana, fruits). Fruits of Caesalpinia Mexicana, Acacia auriculiformis, fruit pericarp green fibres of Cocus nucifera, and fruits of Emblica officinalis were found to have high TPC (73.1-343.2 mg/g) and high AOA (68.5-96.7%). Promising fruits were studied for their FRSA and reducing power (RP) measured by DPPH assay where the fruits of Caesalpinia mexicana, fruit pericarp fibres of Cocus nucifera, fruits of Emblica officinalis showed very low IC50 ranging from 0.009 to 0.016 mg/ml, EC50 from 0.39 to 0.70 mg/mg DPPH and reasonably high values (142.1-256.3) of anti radical power (ARP), indicating their strong FRSA and reducing power (RP) as evident by their low ASE/ml values (0.42-1.08). They also showed better inhibition of lipid peroxidation measured by using ferric thiocyanate assay and by using egg yolk compared to the reference standard quercetin. The ferrous and ferric ion chelating capacity of the promising fruits and their underutilized parts in terms of IC50 varied from 0.12 (Emblica officinalis, fruits) to 2.44 mg/ml (Mangifera indica, Seed kernel) and 0.22 (Caesalpinia Mexicana, fruits) to 2.59 mg/ml (Litchi chinensis, fruit peel) respectively. Fruit pulp, peel and seeds of Litchi chinensis with reasonable amount of phenols (48.3, 43.9, 50.1 mg/ml) showed low ARP (23.5, 38.3, 33.8) and ASE/ml (3.13, 2.18, 2.62) respectively in contrast to Aegle marmelos with comparatively lower phenols (35.1 mg/g) exhibited good ARP (57.4) and RP (1.67 ASE

  10. 75 FR 14153 - National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... chloride; monoethanolamine; nerve agent VX; nitric oxide; oleum; propargyl alcohol; propionaldehyde; red... chloride. DATES: A meeting of the NAC/AEGL Committee will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 13,...

  11. Development of acute exposure guideline levels for airborne exposures to hazardous substances.

    PubMed

    Krewski, Daniel; Bakshi, Kulbir; Garrett, Roger; Falke, Ernest; Rusch, George; Gaylor, David

    2004-04-01

    Hazardous substances can be released into the atmosphere due to industrial and transportation accidents, fires, tornadoes, earthquakes, and terrorists, thereby exposing workers and the nearby public to potential adverse health effects. Various enforceable guidelines have been set by regulatory agencies for worker and ambient air quality. However, these exposure levels generally are not applicable to rare lifetime acute exposures, which possibly could occur at high concentrations. Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) provide estimates of concentrations for airborne exposures for an array of short durations that possibly could cause mild (AEGL-1), severe, irreversible, potentially disabling adverse health effects (AEGL-2), or life threatening effects (AEGL-3). These levels can be useful for emergency responders and planners in reducing or eliminating potential risks to the public. Procedures and methodologies for deriving AEGLs are reviewed in this paper that have been developed in the United States, with direct input from international representatives of OECD member-countries, by the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guidelines for Hazardous Substances and reviewed by the National Research Council. Techniques are discussed for the extrapolation of effects across different exposure durations. AEGLs provide a viable approach for assisting in the prevention, planning, and response to acute airborne exposures to toxic agents.

  12. Pollution Atmosphérique et Santé: Corrélation ou Causalité? Le Cas de la Relation entre l'Exposition aux Particules et la Mortalité Cardio-pulmonaire.

    PubMed

    Dab, William; Ségala, Claire; Dor, Frédéric; Festy, Bernard; Lameloise, Philippe; Moullec, Yvon Le; Tertre, Alain Le; Médina, Sylvia; Quénel, Philippe; Wallaert, Benoît; Zmirou, Et Denis

    2001-02-01

    De nombreuses études épidémiologiques ont observé dans des contextes différents une faible relation à court terme entre les particules et la mortalité cardio-pulmonaire, même quand les normes de qualité de l'air n'étaient pas dépassées. La causalité de cette relation est un enjeu de santé publique en raison de l'importance de la population exposée. Notre objectif est de faire l'inventaire critique des arguments utilisés dans 15 revues de la littérature publiées. Nous expliquons l'importance de distinguer la validité de la causalité et analysons de façon systématique les différents critères de jugement dans le contexte des études écologiques temporelles. Notre conclusion est que la relation observée est valide et que la plupart des critères de causalité sont respectés. Diminuer le niveau d'exposition des populations aux particules est souhaitable. En Europe, en agissant à la source, notamment sur les émissions Diesel, on diminuera aussi d'autres polluants qui peuvent jouer un rôle sanitaire. Aux États-Unis, la situation est plus complexe car les particules sont surtout secondaires. Il est également indispensable de poursuivre les recherches pour mieux connaître les déterminants des expositions globales des individus et mieux comprendre le rôle toxique des différents facteurs physico-chimiques des particules.

  13. Corrélation stratigraphique entre les unités oligo-miocènes de Tunisie centrale et le NumidienStratigraphic correlation between the Numidian formation (North Tunisia) and Oligo Miocene deposits of central Tunisia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaich, Chokri; Hooyberghs, Herman-Jean-François; Durlet, Christophe; Renard, Maurice

    2000-10-01

    Sedimentologic and biostratigraphic studies from the Oligocene to Middle Miocene deposits, exposed in central and north Tunisia, lead to a sequence stratigraphy subdivision of these deposits into several third order depositional sequences. The north-south correlations show that the detrital quartz pebbles appeared much later in central Tunisia (within a 'fluvial-deltaic' complex), than in the Numidian in northern Tunisia (characterised by deep submarine channels filled with high density turbidites). Thus, in central Tunisia, the Fortuna Formation (from Rupelian to Lower Burdigalian) could not have supplied Numidian sands from the Saharan region as has been proposed by several authors.

  14. Evaluation of risk assessment guideline levels for the chemical warfare agents mustard, GB, and VX.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Heidi M

    2002-06-01

    The U.S. Army has estimated acute lethality guideline levels for inhalation of the chemical warfare agents mustard, GB, and VX. These levels are expressed as dosages measured in milligram-minutes per cubic meter (mg-min/m(3)). The National Advisory Council has also proposed acute emergency guideline levels (AEGLs) for the agents. The AEGLs are threshold exposure limits for the general public for mild effects, serious adverse effects, and lethality. They are expressed as air concentrations (in units of mg/m(3)) and are applicable to emergency exposure periods ranging from 10 min to 8 h. The report discusses strengths and deficiencies in the levels, important parameters (i.e., exposure time, breathing rate) that need to be explicitly addressed in deriving the guideline levels, and possible impacts that could result from using AEGLs instead of guideline dosages in future assessments.

  15. 47 CFR 1.1105 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the wireline competition services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Service FCC Form No. Feeamount Paymenttype code 1. Domestic 214 Applications Corres & 159 1,050.00 CDT 2... Allocation of Costs Rules Part 65 Rate of Return & Rate Base Rules Corres & 159 7,990.00 BEA (ii) Part...

  16. 47 CFR 1.1105 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the wireline competition services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Service FCC Form No. Feeamount Paymenttype code 1. Domestic 214 Applications Corres & 159 1,050.00 CDT 2... Allocation of Costs Rules Part 65 Rate of Return & Rate Base Rules Corres & 159 7,990.00 BEA (ii) Part...

  17. 47 CFR 1.1107 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... $18,800.00 BJT c. All other International 214 Applications Corres & 159 $1,130.00 CUT d. Special Temporary Authority (all services) Corres & 159 $1,130.00 CUT e. Assignments or transfers (all services) Corres & 159 $1,130.00 CUT 3. Fixed Satellite Transmit/Receive Earth Stations: a. Initial...

  18. 32 CFR 108.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/100013p.pdf. (2) Non... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/605501p.pdf. (3) Any health care services...://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302041p.pdf. (h) Emergency Health Care. The Secretaries of...

  19. 48 CFR 237.173-3 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Determining Workforce Mix (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/110022p.pdf); DoD Directive 2310.01E, The Department of Defense Detainee Program (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231001p.pdf... Questioning (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/311509p.pdf)); pertaining to detainee...

  20. 48 CFR 237.173-3 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Determining Workforce Mix (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/110022p.pdf); DoD Directive 2310.01E, The Department of Defense Detainee Program (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231001p.pdf... Questioning (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/311509p.pdf)); pertaining to detainee...

  1. 32 CFR 108.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/300005p.pdf. 2 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/220502p.pdf. 3 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231008p.pdf....

  2. 75 FR 67632 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Prohibition on Interrogation of Detainees by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Determining Workforce Mix ( http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/110022p.pdf ); DoD Directive 2310.01E, The Department of Defense Detainee Program ( http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf... Tactical Questioning ( http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/311509p.pdf ). Furthermore,...

  3. 32 CFR 108.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/100013p.pdf. (2) Non... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/605501p.pdf. (3) Any health care services...://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302041p.pdf. (h) Emergency Health Care. The Secretaries of...

  4. 32 CFR 108.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/300005p.pdf. 2 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/220502p.pdf. 3 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231008p.pdf....

  5. 32 CFR 108.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/100013p.pdf. (2) Non... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/605501p.pdf. (3) Any health care services...://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302041p.pdf. (h) Emergency Health Care. The Secretaries of...

  6. 76 FR 49650 - Private Security Contractors (PSCs) Operating in Contingency Operations, Combat Operations or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... self defense. \\3\\ Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302041p.pdf . PSC. During...\\ Available from http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302040p.pdf . (e) The geographic Combatant...\\ Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/html/302041.htm . (2) Through the Contracting...

  7. 48 CFR 237.173-3 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Determining Workforce Mix (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/110022p.pdf); DoD Directive 2310.01E, The Department of Defense Detainee Program (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231001p.pdf... Questioning (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/311509p.pdf)); pertaining to detainee...

  8. 32 CFR 108.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/300005p.pdf. 2 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/220502p.pdf. 3 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231008p.pdf....

  9. 32 CFR 108.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/100013p.pdf. (2) Non... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/605501p.pdf. (3) Any health care services...://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302041p.pdf. (h) Emergency Health Care. The Secretaries of...

  10. 32 CFR 185.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... disturbances because: 16 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302512p.pdf. 17 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/552505p.pdf. (1) Such... . 18 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/200018p.pdf. (3)...

  11. 32 CFR 185.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... disturbances because: 16 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302512p.pdf. 17 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/552505p.pdf. (1) Such... . 18 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/200018p.pdf. (3)...

  12. 32 CFR 117.55 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...))” (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/514301p.pdf) and DoD Instruction 5220.22, “National Industrial Security Program” (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/522022p.pdf): (1...://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/522022p.pdf). (1) Make FOCI determinations on a...

  13. 48 CFR 237.173-3 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Determining Workforce Mix (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/110022p.pdf); DoD Directive 2310.01E, The Department of Defense Detainee Program (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231001p.pdf... Questioning (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/311509p.pdf)); pertaining to detainee...

  14. 78 FR 24124 - National Guard Bureau Privacy Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ...'' (Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/510577p.pdf ). (b) It does not apply to the... Impact Assessment (PIA)'' (Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/540016p.pdf...://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/520001_vol4.pdf ). (e) NGB offices shall permit individuals...

  15. 32 CFR 108.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/300005p.pdf. 2 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/220502p.pdf. 3 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231008p.pdf....

  16. 32 CFR 185.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... disturbances because: 16 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302512p.pdf. 17 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/552505p.pdf. (1) Such... . 18 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/200018p.pdf. (3)...

  17. 32 CFR 185.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... disturbances because: 16 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302512p.pdf. 17 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/552505p.pdf. (1) Such... . 18 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/200018p.pdf. (3)...

  18. Quantification of Hydrogen Cyanide Generated at Low Temperature O-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile (CS) Dispersal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-10

    Guidelines ( MEGs ). This study quantified airborne HCN levels generated in both the field, at live CS training events at Ft. Jackson, SC, and in the...quantifiable even at 100 ºC, much lower than previously hypothesized, but well below the OEL and MEGs . Findings may assist in standardizing DoD... MEGs )(39), the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs)(40), the National Institute for Occupational Safety

  19. Risk Analysis for Environmental Health Triage

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T

    2005-11-18

    The Homeland Security Act mandates development of a national, risk-based system to support planning for, response to and recovery from emergency situations involving large-scale toxic exposures. To prepare for and manage consequences effectively, planners and responders need not only to identify zones of potentially elevated individual risk, but also to predict expected casualties. Emergency response support systems now define ''consequences'' by mapping areas in which toxic chemical concentrations do or may exceed Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) or similar guidelines. However, because AEGLs do not estimate expected risks, current unqualified claims that such maps support consequence management are misleading. Intentionally protective, AEGLs incorporate various safety/uncertainty factors depending on scope and quality of chemical-specific toxicity data. Some of these factors are irrelevant, and others need to be modified, whenever resource constraints or exposure-scenario complexities require responders to make critical trade-off (triage) decisions in order to minimize expected casualties. AEGL-exceedance zones cannot consistently be aggregated, compared, or used to calculate expected casualties, and so may seriously misguide emergency response triage decisions. Methods and tools well established and readily available to support environmental health protection are not yet developed for chemically related environmental health triage. Effective triage decisions involving chemical risks require a new assessment approach that focuses on best estimates of likely casualties, rather than on upper plausible bounds of individual risk. If risk-based consequence management is to become a reality, federal agencies tasked with supporting emergency response must actively coordinate to foster new methods that can support effective environmental health triage.

  20. Identification of an endocytosis motif in an intracellular loop of Wntless protein, essential for its recycling and the control of Wnt protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Gasnereau, Isabelle; Herr, Patrick; Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Basler, Konrad; Gleeson, Paul A

    2011-12-16

    The secretion of Wnt signaling proteins is dependent upon the transmembrane sorting receptor, Wntless (Wls), which recycles between the trans-Golgi network and the cell surface. Loss of Wls results in impairment of Wnt secretion and defects in development and homeostasis in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and the mouse. The sorting signals for the internalization and trafficking of Wls have not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Wls internalization requires clathrin and dynamin I, components of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Moreover, we have identified a conserved YXXϕ endocytosis motif in the third intracellular loop of the multipass membrane protein Wls. Mutation of the tyrosine-based motif YEGL to AEGL (Y425A) resulted in the accumulation of human mutant Wls on the cell surface of transfected HeLa cells. The cell surface accumulation of Wls(AEGL) was rescued by the insertion of a classical YXXϕ motif in the cytoplasmic tail. Significantly, a Drosophila Wls(AEGL) mutant displayed a wing notch phenotype, with reduced Wnt secretion and signaling. These findings demonstrate that YXXϕ endocytosis motifs can occur in the intracellular loops of multipass membrane proteins and, moreover, provide direct evidence that the trafficking of Wls is required for efficient secretion of Wnt signaling proteins.

  1. Identification of an Endocytosis Motif in an Intracellular Loop of Wntless Protein, Essential for Its Recycling and the Control of Wnt Protein Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Gasnereau, Isabelle; Herr, Patrick; Chia, Pei Zhi Cheryl; Basler, Konrad; Gleeson, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    The secretion of Wnt signaling proteins is dependent upon the transmembrane sorting receptor, Wntless (Wls), which recycles between the trans-Golgi network and the cell surface. Loss of Wls results in impairment of Wnt secretion and defects in development and homeostasis in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and the mouse. The sorting signals for the internalization and trafficking of Wls have not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Wls internalization requires clathrin and dynamin I, components of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathway. Moreover, we have identified a conserved YXXφ endocytosis motif in the third intracellular loop of the multipass membrane protein Wls. Mutation of the tyrosine-based motif YEGL to AEGL (Y425A) resulted in the accumulation of human mutant Wls on the cell surface of transfected HeLa cells. The cell surface accumulation of WlsAEGL was rescued by the insertion of a classical YXXφ motif in the cytoplasmic tail. Significantly, a Drosophila WlsAEGL mutant displayed a wing notch phenotype, with reduced Wnt secretion and signaling. These findings demonstrate that YXXφ endocytosis motifs can occur in the intracellular loops of multipass membrane proteins and, moreover, provide direct evidence that the trafficking of Wls is required for efficient secretion of Wnt signaling proteins. PMID:22027831

  2. Developmental Associations between Short-Term Variability and Long-Term Changes: Intraindividual Correlation of Positive and Negative Affect in Daily Life and Cognitive Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hülür, Gizem; Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual notions and empirical evidence suggest that the intraindividual correlation (iCorr) of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) is a meaningful characteristic of affective functioning. PA and NA are typically negatively correlated within-person. Previous research has found that the iCorr of PA and NA is relatively stable over time…

  3. 32 CFR 108.6 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extent allowed by law. 10 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... to sign RHCAs. 11 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf... rates applicable to students in International Military Education and Training programs. (d) The...

  4. 32 CFR 108.6 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extent allowed by law. 10 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... to sign RHCAs. 11 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf... rates applicable to students in International Military Education and Training programs. (d) The...

  5. 32 CFR 108.6 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extent allowed by law. 10 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... to sign RHCAs. 11 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf... rates applicable to students in International Military Education and Training programs. (d) The...

  6. 32 CFR 108.6 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... extent allowed by law. 10 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... to sign RHCAs. 11 Copies available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf... rates applicable to students in International Military Education and Training programs. (d) The...

  7. 32 CFR 159.6 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... procedures shall: 9 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/html/231101.htm. 10 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/520008r.pdf. 11 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs... response to hostile acts or demonstrated hostile intent. 12 Available at...

  8. 32 CFR 185.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DoD Instruction 6055.06) 2 . 2 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... DoD Directive 2000.15) 3 . 3 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... Directive 5525.5). 4 Available by downloading at...

  9. 32 CFR 185.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/511113p.pdf. (i) Coordinate requests... Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/832002p.pdf. (5) Exercise staff... accordance with DoD Directive 1322.18 21 . 21 Available by downloading at...

  10. 32 CFR 158.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... guidance in DoD Directive 3020.49 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302049p.pdf) and the authority in DOD Directive 5134.01 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/513401p.pdf)....

  11. 48 CFR 252.211-7007 - Reporting of Government-Furnished Property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... materiel (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/400025m.pdf). “Unique item identifier (UII... Procedures manual (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/400025m.pdf). (e) When Government-furnished...) and (f)(1)(iii), in accordance with the data submission procedures at...

  12. 32 CFR 185.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/511113p.pdf. (i) Coordinate requests... Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/832002p.pdf. (5) Exercise staff... accordance with DoD Directive 1322.18 21 . 21 Available by downloading at...

  13. 32 CFR 158.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... guidance in DoD Directive 3020.49 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302049p.pdf) and the authority in DOD Directive 5134.01 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/513401p.pdf)....

  14. 32 CFR Appendix A to 32 Cfr Part 65 - Additional Reporting Requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Data System (RCCPDS)” (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/773054m_vol1.pdf). (11) Direct... of Active Duty Military Personnel Records” (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/133605p... the TEB Web application at https://www.dmdc.osd.mil/milconnect/. The TEB Users Manual, maintained...

  15. 32 CFR 159.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...,” and this part. 6 Available from http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302040p.pdf. (e) The.... 7 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/html/302041.htm. (2) Through the... Router Network at http://js.smil.mil. If the requester is not an authorized user of the...

  16. 32 CFR 185.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/511113p.pdf. (i) Coordinate requests... Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/832002p.pdf. (5) Exercise staff... accordance with DoD Directive 1322.18 21 . 21 Available by downloading at...

  17. 32 CFR 159.6 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... procedures shall: 9 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/html/231101.htm. 10 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/520008r.pdf. 11 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs... response to hostile acts or demonstrated hostile intent. 12 Available at...

  18. 32 CFR 185.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/511113p.pdf. (i) Coordinate requests... Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/832002p.pdf. (5) Exercise staff... accordance with DoD Directive 1322.18 21 . 21 Available by downloading at...

  19. 77 FR 52254 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Reporting of Government-Furnished Property...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... status of ] materiel (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/400025m.pdf ). ``Unique item... Accounting Procedures manual ( http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/400025m.pdf ). (e) When..., paragraphs (e) and (f)(1)(iii), in accordance with the data submission procedures at...

  20. 77 FR 57486 - Federal Voting Assistance Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... Joint Publication 1-02 (available at http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/dod_dictionary/ ) and this section... DoD Directive 5124.02 (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/512402p.pdf ). (2....dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/452506m.pdf ), to implement measures to ensure a postmark or...

  1. 32 CFR 185.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DoD Instruction 6055.06) 2 . 2 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... DoD Directive 2000.15) 3 . 3 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... Directive 5525.5). 4 Available by downloading at...

  2. 32 CFR 185.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DoD Instruction 6055.06) 2 . 2 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... DoD Directive 2000.15) 3 . 3 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... Directive 5525.5). 4 Available by downloading at...

  3. 32 CFR 159.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...,” and this part. 6 Available from http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302040p.pdf. (e) The.... 7 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/html/302041.htm. (2) Through the... Router Network at http://js.smil.mil. If the requester is not an authorized user of the...

  4. 32 CFR 105.1 - Purpose

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...DD 5124.02 1 and 32 CFR part 103: 1 Available: http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/512402p... guidance and procedures for the SAPR Program (see 32 CFR 103.3), can be found at www.dtic.mil/whs...; and 2 Available: http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/512402p.pdf. (e) Incorporates DTM...

  5. 32 CFR 185.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DoD Instruction 6055.06) 2 . 2 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... DoD Directive 2000.15) 3 . 3 Available by downloading at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... Directive 5525.5). 4 Available by downloading at...

  6. 32 CFR 105.1 - Purpose

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...DD 5124.02 1 and 32 CFR part 103: 1 Available: http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/512402p... guidance and procedures for the SAPR Program (see 32 CFR 103.3), can be found at www.dtic.mil/whs...; and 2 Available: http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/512402p.pdf. (e) Incorporates DTM...

  7. 32 CFR 68.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and DoD Directive 1322.08E (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/132208p.pdf). (2... DoD Directive 1322.08E, DoD Instruction (DoDI) 1322.25 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... procedures published in the DANTES Examination Program Handbook, available at...

  8. 32 CFR 158.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... guidance in DoD Directive 3020.49 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302049p.pdf) and the authority in DOD Directive 5134.01 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/513401p.pdf)....

  9. 32 CFR 68.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and DoD Directive 1322.08E (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/132208p.pdf). (2... DoD Directive 1322.08E, DoD Instruction (DoDI) 1322.25 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... procedures published in the DANTES Examination Program Handbook, available at...

  10. 76 FR 52133 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Contractors Performing Private Security...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Other Significant Operations'' at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf was written to cover... Contingency Operations, Combat Operations, or Other Significant Military Operations, at http://www.dtic.mil... Operations, or Other Significant Operations, at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf ;...

  11. 75 FR 73997 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Definition of Sexual Assault (DFARS Case 2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ...) Program ( http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/649501p.pdf .) This proposed change will add a new... Assault Prevention and Response Program, at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/649501p.pdf....regulations.gov . Follow the instructions for submitting comments. E-mail: dfars@osd.mil . Include DFARS...

  12. Preventing a Hollow Army: 20th Century Lessons for the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    1971-1976. Source: Karl E. Cocke, William G. Bell, John B. Corr, Romana M. Danysh, Walter G. Hermes, James E. Hewes Jr., and Thomas E. Kelly III...KS: USACGS. Cocke, Karl E., William G. Bell, John B. Corr, Romana M. Danysh, Walter G. Hermes, James e. Hewes Jr., and Thomas E. Kelly III. 1977

  13. 47 CFR 1.1104 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for media services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Permit (Electronic Filing) 349 & 159 730.00 MOF b. New License (Electronic Filing) 350 & 159 150.00 MEF c... MOF b. New License (Electronic Filing) 350 & 159 150.00 MEF c. Special Temporary Authority Corres... b. New License (Electronic Filing) 347 & 159 150.00 MEF c. Special Temporary Authority Corres &...

  14. 47 CFR 1.1104 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for media services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... & 159 $790.00 MOF b. New License (Electronic Filing) 350 & 159 $160.00 MEF c. License Renewal.... New License (Electronic Filing) 350 & 159 $160.00 MEF c. Special Temporary Authority Corres & 159 $190.... New License (Electronic Filing) 347 & 159 $160.00 MEF c. Special Temporary Authority Corres & 159...

  15. 47 CFR 1.1104 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for media services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Permit (Electronic Filing) 349 & 159 730.00 MOF b. New License (Electronic Filing) 350 & 159 150.00 MEF c... MOF b. New License (Electronic Filing) 350 & 159 150.00 MEF c. Special Temporary Authority Corres... b. New License (Electronic Filing) 347 & 159 150.00 MEF c. Special Temporary Authority Corres &...

  16. 47 CFR 1.1104 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for media services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (Electronic Filing) 349 & 159 730.00 MOF b. New License (Electronic Filing) 350 & 159 150.00 MEF c. License.... New License (Electronic Filing) 350 & 159 150.00 MEF c. Special Temporary Authority Corres & 159 175... License (Electronic Filing) 347 & 159 150.00 MEF c. Special Temporary Authority Corres & 159 175.00 MGF...

  17. Functional Description for the Department of the Army Movement Management System. Redesign Phase 1 (DAMMS-R1). Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    Accordance With IBM International Business Machines IBS International Business Services ICP Interim Change Package ID Identification IL Installation...111-163 38 4 Prepare-Reconsignment-Request 111-355 34 4 Prepare-Cnsgn-Rept-Evnts-(TTB> 111-329 18 4 Prep-Cnsgn-Rept-Evnts-Corr- ZTB 111-173 25 4 Prep...Corr-<ZTW> .. 111-162 12 Prep-Cnsgn-Rept-Evnts-Corr- ZTB 111-172 13 Prep-Cntnr-0/H-Over-5-Day-Rept 111-186 14 Prep-Convey-Change-Notif-(TTU> 111-190 15

  18. A Study on Improving Defense Acquisition through the Application of Defense Acquisition Workforce Improvement Act (DAWIA) Concept to Defense Industry Workforce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf/500052mwch1_1195/p500052m.p df Department of Defense (DoD) (2006 January). Defense Acquisition...Education, Training, and Career Development Program. Retrieved on 21 May 2009, from http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf2/d500052p.pdf...Development Progam. Retrieved on 21 May 2009, from http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf/i500058wch3_011492/i500058p.p df Department of Defense

  19. Discrepancy among acute guideline levels for emergency response.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Mattias; Palmen, Nicole; Johanson, Gunnar

    2010-12-15

    Acute guidance values are tools for public health risk assessment and management during planning, preparedness and response related to sudden airborne release of hazardous chemicals. The two most frequently used values, i.e. Acute Exposure Guidance Levels (AEGL) and Emergency Response Planning Guideline (ERPG), were compared in qualitative and quantitative terms. There was no significant difference between the general level of AEGL and ERPG values, suggesting the two systems are equally precautious. However, the guidance values diverged by a factor of 3 or more for almost 40% of the substances, including many of high production volume. These deviations could be explained by differences in selection of critical effect or critical study and in a few cases differences in interpretation of the same critical study. Diverging guidance values may hamper proper risk communication and risk management. Key factors for broad international acceptance of harmonized values include transparency of the decision process, agreement on definition of toxicological tiers, and a target population including sensitive groups of the general population. In addition, development of purely health based values is encouraged. Risk management issues, such as land use and emergency response planning should be treated separately, as these rely on national legislation and considerations.

  20. 32 CFR 806b.29 - Sending personal information over electronic mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 4 3 , provides additional guidance regarding For Official Use Only information. 3 http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/54007r_0998/p54007r.pdf. (c) Do not disclose personal information...

  1. 32 CFR 806b.29 - Sending personal information over electronic mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 4 3 , provides additional guidance regarding For Official Use Only information. 3 http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/54007r_0998/p54007r.pdf. (c) Do not disclose personal information...

  2. 76 FR 38051 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Definition of Sexual Assault (DFARS Case 2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ..., Title 10, Chapter 47 (http: www.constitution.org/mil/ucmj19970615.htm). DoDD 6495.01, ``Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program,'' is available at http: www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/...

  3. 32 CFR 806b.29 - Sending personal information over electronic mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 4 3 , provides additional guidance regarding For Official Use Only information. 3 http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/54007r_0998/p54007r.pdf. (c) Do not disclose personal information...

  4. 78 FR 52117 - DoD Privacy Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... 6025.18-R, ``DoD Health Information Privacy Regulation'' (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs... for Management of Information Requirements'' (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres... Appropriations Reporting Requirements'' (available at...

  5. 32 CFR 806b.29 - Sending personal information over electronic mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 4 3 , provides additional guidance regarding For Official Use Only information. 3 http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/54007r_0998/p54007r.pdf. (c) Do not disclose personal information...

  6. 32 CFR 806b.29 - Sending personal information over electronic mail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 4 3 , provides additional guidance regarding For Official Use Only information. 3 http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/54007r_0998/p54007r.pdf. (c) Do not disclose personal information...

  7. 78 FR 69267 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Requirements Relating to Supply Chain Risk...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... Networks (TSN), at ( http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/520044p.pdf ). (b) The authority... name (if any), and ``DFARS Case 2012-D050'' on your attached document. Email: dfars@osd.mil ....

  8. 32 CFR 223.6 - Procedures-identifying and controlling DoD UCNI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... additional guidance on marking classified documents. 4 Available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs... files. 5 Available on the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/520001_vol3.pdf....

  9. SYSTEMS CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF PETROLEUM POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of an established mathematical treatment useful for the characterization and identification of petroleum pollutants is described. Using discriminant analysis of relevant infrared spectrophotometric data, 99% of numerous known and unknown oil samples have been corr...

  10. 32 CFR 182.6 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .../corres/pdf/451513r.pdf. (vii) Intelligence information held by the DoD Components and relevant to drug... concerning illegal drugs that is provided to civilian law enforcement officials under provisions of DoD...

  11. 32 CFR 182.6 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .../corres/pdf/451513r.pdf. (vii) Intelligence information held by the DoD Components and relevant to drug... concerning illegal drugs that is provided to civilian law enforcement officials under provisions of DoD...

  12. 32 CFR 182.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (IG DoD).” 4 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/510601p.pdf. (e) The Under... in accordance with DoD Directive 1322.18,5 “Military Training.” 5 Available at http://www.dtic.mil... agencies. 6 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/510577p.pdf. (3) Assist the...

  13. 32 CFR 182.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (IG DoD).” 4 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/510601p.pdf. (e) The Under... in accordance with DoD Directive 1322.18,5 “Military Training.” 5 Available at http://www.dtic.mil... agencies. 6 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/510577p.pdf. (3) Assist the...

  14. 32 CFR 183.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...D support of special events. (3) In accordance with DoDD 5111.13 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs... part, in accordance with DoDD 5410.18 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/541018p.pdf), DoDI 5410.19 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/541019p.pdf) and DoDD 5122.05...

  15. 32 CFR 103.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Program Procedures,” November 13, 2008 found at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/649502p.pdf; (5) DoDD 6400.1, “Family Advocacy Program (FAP),” August 23, 2004 found at http://www.dtic.mil/whs... found at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/502512p.pdf; (7) DoD Instruction...

  16. 32 CFR 103.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Program Procedures,” November 13, 2008 found at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/649502p.pdf; (5) DoDD 6400.1, “Family Advocacy Program (FAP),” August 23, 2004 found at http://www.dtic.mil/whs... found at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/502512p.pdf; (7) DoD Instruction...

  17. 32 CFR 183.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...D support of special events. (3) In accordance with DoDD 5111.13 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs... part, in accordance with DoDD 5410.18 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/541018p.pdf), DoDI 5410.19 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/541019p.pdf) and DoDD 5122.05...

  18. 32 CFR 183.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...D support of special events. (3) In accordance with DoDD 5111.13 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs... part, in accordance with DoDD 5410.18 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/541018p.pdf), DoDI 5410.19 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/541019p.pdf) and DoDD 5122.05...

  19. 78 FR 13543 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Technical Amendments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... link ``http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/ 400025m.pdf'' and adding the link ``http://www2.dla.mil/j-6/dlmso/ elibrary/manuals/dlm/dlm--pubs.asp'' in its place; 0 b. In paragraph (d)(6) by removing the link ``http://www.dtic.mil/whs/ directives/corres/pdf/400025m.pdf'' and adding the link...

  20. High Temperature Oxidation and Electrochemical Studies Related to Hot Corrosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Dis. Faraday. Soc., 1., 11 (1947) 9. G.W. Walter , Corr. Sci., 2&, 681 (1986) 10. F. Mansfeld, Corr.-NACE, 36, 301 (1981). 11. J. B. Wagner, Jr. and C...Soc., p2v 84-2, Pennington, NJ (1984), p. 519. 20. D.F. Shriver, S. Clancy, P.M. Blonsky, and L.C. Hardy, "Sixth Riso International Symposium on Met

  1. Modeling Incremental Initial Active Duty Continuation Probabilities in the Selected Marine Corps Reserve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Military Manpower, last modified November 21, 2003, 2, http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf2/d11451p.pdf. 26 Figure 5. AFQT Score...http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf2/d11451p.pdf. Erhardt, Bruce J. Jr. “Development of a Markov Model for Forecasting Continuation...Technical Information Center Ft. Belvoir, Virginia 2. Dudley Knox Library Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California

  2. In vitro antibacterial, antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of some essential oils.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Upma; Ojha, Swati; Tripathi, N N; Singh, Pooja

    2015-11-01

    In vitro antibacterial activity of 16 essential oils was investigated by disc diffusion method against two Gram positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus and two Gram negative bacteria, Shigella flexneri and Escherichia coli. Oils of Cymbopogon citratus and Ocimum basilicum showed highest antibacterial activity. Gram positive bacteria were found to be more sensitive than Gram negative. Antioxidant activities were tested by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay and ABTS radical cation decolourization assay while Folin-Ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content. In DPPH assay, highest antioxidant activity was observed in 0. basilicum oil followed by Azeratum conyzoides, A. marmelos and C. citratus, with percent inhibition and IC50 value ranging from 66.11-71.93% and 14.10-17.92 µl ml(-1) respectively. In ABTS assay, similar results were obtained but with higher percent inhibition which ranged from 67.48-76.23% and lower IC50 value (12.12-17.21 µ ml(-1)). Moreover, radical scavenging activity of essential oils was lower than that observed for the synthetic antioxidant BHA and BHT. The total phenolic content of the essential oils as GAE in mg 100 µl(-1) of EO was found to be highest in O. basilicum (0.406) oil followed byA. conyzoides (0.322), A. marmelos (0.238) and C. citratus (0.231). The results provide evidence that the oils of C. citratus and O. basilicum can be further commended for treatment of infections caused by these bacterial pathogens and are potential source of natural antioxidants having appreciable amount of total phenolic content.

  3. Effect of medicinal plants on the crystallization of cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswathi, N. T.; Gnanam, F. D.

    1997-08-01

    One of the least desirable calcifications in the human body is the mineral deposition in atherosclerosis plaques. These plaques principally consist of lipids such as cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, phospholipids and triglycerides. Chemical analysis of advanced plaques have shown the presence of considerable amounts of free cholesterol identified as cholesterol monohydrate crystals. Cholesterol has been crystallized in vitro. The extracts of some of the Indian medicinal plants detailed below were used as additives to study their effect on the crystallization behaviour of cholesterol. It has been found that many of the herbs have inhibitory effect on the crystallization such as nucleation, crystal size and habit modification. The inhibitory effect of the plants are graded as Commiphora mughul > Aegle marmeleos > Cynoden dactylon > Musa paradisiaca > Polygala javana > Alphinia officinarum > Solanum trilobatum > Enicostemma lyssopifolium.

  4. Investigation of the Corrosion Inhibition of CTAB and SDS on Carbon Steel Using an Experimental Design Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand, Farzin; Wang, Jiamei; Zhang, Lefu

    2016-03-01

    The corrosion inhibition performance of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) on carbon steel was investigated in sodium chloride solutions. Using an experimental design strategy pH, chloride concentration, SDS/CTAB concentrations, and temperature were optimized by conducting only 30 experiments. The optimum value of each factor was obtained from the designed matrix of the experiments based on the lowest log I corr value calculated for each experimental condition. The 3D surface plots of the electrochemical response (log I corr) against each factor were constructed. The optimum conditions in which the lowest log I corr can be achieved were found as follows: pH 12, [Cl-] ≈ 1 M, [SDS] ≈ 200 ppm, [CTAB] ≈ 20 ppm, and T ≈ 10 °C.

  5. Cascade de photons dans les boîtes quantiques uniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, I.; Moreau, E.; Gérard, J. M.; Abram, I.

    2002-06-01

    Nous présentons l'observation expérimentale de l'émission squentielle de photons par une boîte quantique unique sous pompage optique continu ou pulsé. Cette cascade radiative produit des paires de photons corrélés qui sont émis suivant un ordre bien défini. En effet, la fonction de corrélation croisée entre les deux photons formant la paire présente une allure asymétrique, de type groupement ou dégroupement de photons, suivant l'ordre temporel de détection des deux photons. Prédit théoriquement en physique atomique, ce comportement asymétrique de la fonction de corrélation de second ordre est la signature de l'émission successive de photons.

  6. Assessing clinicians' consultation with people with profound learning disability: producing a rating scale.

    PubMed

    Kerr, M P; Evans, S; Nolan, M; Fraser, W I

    1995-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a scale for assessing clinicians' communication with people with profound learning disability. Four psychiatrists and four nurses were assessed completing three simple non-invasive clinical procedures--blood pressure, pulse and axillary temperature--with people with profound learning disability. Videotaped assessment of consultations was performed by three experienced speech and language therapists using a previously designed scale for analysing encounters with people with mild learning disability. This led to the production of a new scale specifically for people with profound learning disability. A significant inter-rater reliability was found between the three speech therapists for total scores (rater a-b, corr = 0.654, P = 0.006; rater a-c, corr = 0.795, P = 0.0001: rater b-c, corr = 0.673, P = 0.004). Significant reliability between raters was also found for the subsections of verbal behaviour and non-verbal behaviour.

  7. The Electrochemical Behavior of Alloy 22 in Extreme Chloride and Nitrate Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Etien, R A; Gordon, S R; Ilevbare, G O

    2004-12-01

    Alloy 22 specimens were tested in high temperature, high concentration chloride and nitrate environments. Results of this study indicate that increasing nitrate to chloride ratio in these electrolytes increases resistance to localized breakdown and mitigates repassivation. Open circuit (E{sub corr}), breakdown and repassivation potentials all increase, and localized corrosion morphology changes as nitrate to chloride ratio increases. Results also indicate that increasing the temperature increases E{sub corr} values, while breakdown potentials and repassivation potentials peak at 130 C for the highest nitrate to chloride ratio electrolytes.

  8. Bivariate Normal Wind Statistics model: User’s Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    BIKI/ SLqTX. SOSTY, PROSTD COMMON /BLK2/ XBAR, YBAR COIIMON /BLK3/ CORR., DENOM DATA ITERM, IYES/-I.’ Y "/ I FORMAT (’ *** USAFETAC/DND WIND STATISTICS...THE FIVE BASIC PARAMETERS *** CCC 70 WRITE (ITERM,77) 77 FORMAT (’ INPUT MEAN X,STDEVX,MEAM YSTDE Y ,*CORR. COEFF.-’ READ (ITERP.8) XBAR, STDEVX. YBAR ...the X- Y axes through a given angle. Subroutine RSPGDR Gives the (conditional) probability of a specified range of wind speeds when the wind direction

  9. A parameter selection for Raman spectroscopy-based detection of chemical contaminants in food powders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raman spectroscopy technique has proven to be a reliable method for detection of chemical contaminants in food ingredients and products. To detect each contaminant particle in a food sample, it is important to determine the effective depth of penetration of laser through the food sample and the corr...

  10. Polyfunctional cytokine production by central memory T cells from cattle in response to Mycobacterium bovis infection and BCG vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyfunctional T cells simultaneously produce IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including TB. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle elicits ex vivo polyfunctional T cell responses. Vaccine-elicited IFN-gamma Tcm (CD4+ CD45RO+ CCR7+) responses corr...

  11. 32 CFR 321.1 - Purpose and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... policies and procedures to effect compliance with the Privacy Act of 1974 and DoD Directive 5400.11 1 . 1 Copies may be obtained via internet at http://web7.whs.osd.mil/corres.htm. (b) The procedures set...

  12. Quality Controlling Surfzone Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter Observations to Estimate the Turbulent Dissipation Rate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-15

    al. 1994) and bubbles (e.g., Garret et al. 2000) decay with depth. The elevated δCORR closer to the surface and with stronger wave-breaking is...nearshore. J. Phys. Ocean., 37, 1764–1777. MARCH 2010 FEDDERSEN 27 Garret , C., M. Li, and D. Farmer, 2000: The connection between bubble size spectra

  13. FECAL CALPROTECTIN AND GASTROINTESTINAL (GI) PERMEABILITY CORRELATE WITH DISEASE ACTIVITY INDEX, AND HISTOLOGIC, ENDOSCOPIC, AND RADIOLOGIC FINDINGS IN CHILDREN WITH CROHN DISEASE (CD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal calprotectin and permeability are noninvasive measures of GI inflammation and damage, respectively. However, there are scant data as to the possible association between the tests and CD disease activity in children. We hypothesized that levels of fecal calprotectin and permeability would corre...

  14. 47 CFR 1.1107 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Space Stations (Geostationary): a. Application for Authority to Launch & Operate (per satellite) (i... satellite) 312 Main & Corres & 159 860.00 CRY 9. Space Stations (NGSO): a. Application for Authority to... Paymenttype code 1. International Fixed Public Radio (Public & Control Stations): a. Initial...

  15. 47 CFR 1.1107 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Space Stations (Geostationary): a. Application for Authority to Launch & Operate (per satellite) (i... satellite) 312 Main & Corres & 159 860.00 CRY 9. Space Stations (NGSO): a. Application for Authority to.... International Fixed Public Radio (Public & Control Stations): a. Initial Construction Permit (per station)...

  16. 47 CFR 1.1107 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Space Stations (Geostationary): a. Application for Authority to Launch & Operate (per satellite) 312... satellite) 312 Main & Corres & 159 830.00 CRY 9. Space Stations (NGSO): a. Application for Authority to.... International Fixed Public Radio (Public & Control Stations) a. Initial Construction Permit (per station)...

  17. 47 CFR 1.1107 - Schedule of charges for applications and other filings for the international services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Space Stations (Geostationary): a. Application for Authority to Launch & Operate (per satellite) (i... satellite) 312 Main & Corres & 159 860.00 CRY 9. Space Stations (NGSO): a. Application for Authority to... Paymenttype code 1. International Fixed Public Radio (Public & Control Stations): a. Initial...

  18. Activity patterns and parasitism rates of fire ant decapitating flies (Diptera:Phoridae:Pseudacteon spp.) in their native Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: This work describes the annual and daily activity patterns of two parasitoid fly communities of the fire ant S. invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in their native Argentina. Pseudacteon (Diptera: Phoridae) flies were censused monthly for one year at two sites in northwestern Corr...

  19. 32 CFR 161.6 - Procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adhesive materials are to be placed on either side of an ID card. Holes shall not be punched into ID cards....dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/523020p.pdf). (iii) In accordance with FIPS Publication 201-1...-76-1/SP800-76-1_012407.pdf). (vi) In coordination with the Executive Manager for DoD Biometrics...

  20. Formal Modeling of Diffie-Hellman Derivability for Exploratory Automated Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    model to a weaker one which does not capture exponent addition or group multiplication. This would seem to be a problematic model: it seems to deny the...protocol analysis for Diffie-Hellman. CoRR, abs/1202.2168, 2012. [5] Catherine Meadows and Paliath Narendran. A unification algorithm for the group

  1. A Preliminary Study of Some Methods for Following the Accelerated Aging and Life Prediction of Rubbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    cAIA EA. On a examin6 43 6chantillons de caoutchouc vieillis A des temp~ratures comprises entre 70 et 150 0 C pendant des p~riodes pouvant atteiridre...echantillons de polyisopr~ne. Les trois techniques permettaient de mesurer dans les caoutchoucs des changernents qui 6taient en corr~lation avec la dur6e et

  2. Traditional Knowledge of Rainwater Harvesting Compared to Five Modern Case Studies (proceedings)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water-energy-food nexus is receiving increased attention worldwide due to climate change and rising population. According to a projection of the United Nations, the global population is expected to increase by a factor of 1.3 by 2050—from 7.2 billion to 9.6 billion—with corre...

  3. 32 CFR 183.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... includes support to civilian law enforcement officials must comply with DoDD 5525.5 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/552505p.pdf). (g) DoD support of special events that includes support to civilian intelligence officials must comply with DoD 5240.1-R (see...

  4. 75 FR 10191 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS); DFARS Case 2009-D017, Continuation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... contractor services (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302037p.pdf ). This DoDI requires DoD.... E-mail: dfars@osd.mil . Include DFARS Case 2009-D017 in the subject line of the message. Fax:...

  5. 78 FR 21826 - Defense Support of Civilian Law Enforcement Agencies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Procedure 12 of DoD 5240.1-R.\\1\\ \\1\\ Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/524001r.pdf... users may obtain a copy at www.dtic.smil.mil/whs/directives . Others may send a written request by email... support activities, the ASD(HD&ASA) shall: \\3\\ Available at...

  6. 32 CFR 117.53 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...,” (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/520507p.pdf). Classified contract. As defined in... Military and Associated Terms” (available at http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp1_02.pdf). Company. As..., “Joint Communication System” (available at http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp6_0.pdf)....

  7. 75 FR 59613 - Personnel Review Boards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... the Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/infomgt/forms/eforms/dd0149.pdf (DD Form 149) and... Internet at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/705006p.pdf . (i) Page limitations on briefs..., Inspector General Complaints Resolution. \\2\\ Copies may be obtained via the Internet at...

  8. 76 FR 44282 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Prohibition on Interrogation of Detainees by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... Detainee Program ( http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/231001p.pdf ); and DoD Directive 3115.09, DoD Intelligence Interrogations, Detainee Debriefings, and Tactical Questioning http://www.dtic.mil... provided by DoD Instruction 1100.22, Policy and Procedures for Determining Workforce Mix (...

  9. 48 CFR 225.370-4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Operations, or Other Significant Military Operations, at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf... accordance with the clauses at 252.211-7003 and 252.245.7001 and physically marked in accordance with MIL-STD...-7003 and 252.245.7001 and physically marked in accordance with MIL-STD 130 (current version) and...

  10. 32 CFR 183.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... includes support to civilian law enforcement officials must comply with DoDD 5525.5 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/552505p.pdf). (g) DoD support of special events that includes support to civilian intelligence officials must comply with DoD 5240.1-R (see...

  11. 32 CFR 161.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Instruction 1000.1, “Identity Cards Required by the Geneva Convention” (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs...” (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/100025p.pdf). (d) The CAC, a form of DoD ID...

  12. 32 CFR 183.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... includes support to civilian law enforcement officials must comply with DoDD 5525.5 (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/552505p.pdf). (g) DoD support of special events that includes support to civilian intelligence officials must comply with DoD 5240.1-R (see...

  13. 32 CFR 161.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Defense” (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/832003p.pdf). (b) The Assistant... purposes in accordance with DoD 5200.08-R, “Physical Security Program” (available at http://www.dtic.mil...: Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI)” (available at...

  14. 77 FR 43039 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Contractors Performing Private Security Functions Outside the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Defense Instruction (DoDI) 3020.50 at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302050p.pdf ). ] The...) These designations can be found at http://www.acq.osd.mil/dpap/pacc/cc/designated_areas_of_other_significant_military_operations.html and...

  15. 32 CFR 161.10 - Benefits for active duty members of the uniformed services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and DoD Instruction 1330.17, “Armed Services Commissary Operations” (available at http://www.dtic.mil...” (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/133021p.pdf); and DoD Instruction...

  16. GAMA/H-ATLAS: common star formation rate indicators and their dependence on galaxy physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Norberg, P.; Gunawardhana, M. L. P.; Heinis, S.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Bourne, N.; Brough, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Cluver, M. E.; Cooray, A.; da Cunha, E.; Driver, S. P.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Grootes, M. W.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R.; Lacey, C.; Lara-Lopez, M. A.; Loveday, J.; Maddox, S. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oteo, I.; Owers, M. S.; Popescu, C. C.; Smith, D. J. B.; Taylor, E. N.; Tuffs, R. J.; van der Werf, P.

    2016-09-01

    We compare common star formation rate (SFR) indicators in the local Universe in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) equatorial fields (˜160 deg2), using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from GALEX, far-infrared and sub-millimetre (sub-mm) photometry from Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey, and Hα spectroscopy from the GAMA survey. With a high-quality sample of 745 galaxies (median redshift = 0.08), we consider three SFR tracers: UV luminosity corrected for dust attenuation using the UV spectral slope β (SFRUV, corr), Hα line luminosity corrected for dust using the Balmer decrement (BD) (SFRH α, corr), and the combination of UV and infrared (IR) emission (SFRUV + IR). We demonstrate that SFRUV, corr can be reconciled with the other two tracers after applying attenuation corrections by calibrating Infrared excess (IRX; i.e. the IR to UV luminosity ratio) and attenuation in the Hα (derived from BD) against β. However, β, on its own, is very unlikely to be a reliable attenuation indicator. We find that attenuation correction factors depend on parameters such as stellar mass (M*), z and dust temperature (Tdust), but not on Hα equivalent width or Sérsic index. Due to the large scatter in the IRX versus β correlation, when compared to SFRUV + IR, the β-corrected SFRUV, corr exhibits systematic deviations as a function of IRX, BD and Tdust.

  17. Methoprene and temperature effects on caste differentiation and protein composition in the Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utilization of multiple caste is a shared feature of many social insects. In termites, multiple extrinsic factors have been shown to impact caste differentiation; for example, temperature has been shown to increase soldier production. The objective of this investigation was to examine and corr...

  18. United States Army Contingency Contracting Operations: Emerging Roles, Procedures, and Challenges Facing Contracting Professionals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    2008 from http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/302041p.pdf. 24 David Barstow, Richard A. Oppel Jr., James Risen, & Eric Schmitt. (April 9... Oppel Jr., Richard A., Risen, James, and Schmitt, Eric. (April 9, 2004). The Struggle For Iraq: The Contractors: Security Firm Says Its Workers

  19. Two macros for producing graphs to assess agreement between two variables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is intended for those familiar with PROC GPLOT from SAS/GRAPH®1 and PROC UNIVARIATE and PROC CORR from base SAS®. Via macro procedures, two graphs are developed to aid in the assessment of agreement between two variables. The first is a variant on a mean-difference plot, the second is a...

  20. [Home automation for elderly people in the process of losing their autonomy].

    PubMed

    Muller, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The safety of elderly people, particularly dependent at night, is a major factor in preventingthem from remaining in their own home. An experiment in Corrèze using domotics and advanced remote assistance services and involving around one hundred elderly people living at home, took place from summer 2009 to autumn 2010.

  1. An Attitude Control System for a Large Geosynchronous Earth-Pointing Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-05

    oriented to corres- pond to the array of normals to the faces of a dodecahedron . This is shown in Fig. 7. (?) Fig. 7. Gyro axes with respect to a...regular dodecahedron , 23 This arrangement yields a unique symmetry in which all instrument lA’s are at a spherical angle of 2<J> from each other

  2. 32 CFR 44.4 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... required in the various ranks, ratings, and specialties. (3) Are available immediately for active duty (AD... all members remaining in the Ready Reserve shall be considered immediately available for AD service... obtained at http://web7.whs.osd.mil/corres.htm. (f) Ready Reservists whose immediate recall to AD during...

  3. Study on improvement of durability for reinforced concrete by surface-painting migrating corrosion inhibitor and engineering application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ning; WANG, Zixiao; LIU, Zhiyong; Zhou, Jiyuan; Zheng, Duo

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion currents of steel bar in concrete with three W/B and four chloride contents after surface-painting two migrating corrosion inhibitors (PCI-2015 and MCI-A) 14d to 150d in atmospheric condition were measured. The results showed that the corrosion current density (I corr) of steel bar reduced to 0.1 μA.cm-2 from the initial highest 3.833 μA.cm-2 (W/B=0.65, NaCl-1%) after surface-painting PCI-2015 14 d, and the I corr was still lower than 0.1 μA.cm-2 until 150d. The compressive strength and chloride migration coefficient of concrete specimens were tested. The possible reasons of the mechanisms of durability improvement for reinforced concrete by applying PCI-2015 inhibitor were PCI-2015 may be reacted with calcium hydroxide in cement concrete and lots of inhibitor particles may be adsorbed on the active sites first and then a stable protective layer may be formed. The I corr of steel bars in a hydraulic aqueduct concrete structure after painting PCI-2015, MCI-A (the United States) and MCI-B (Europe) during 6 months was monitored by Gecor 8 tester. The results showed that the average values of I corr of steel bars after painting the PCI-2015 150d fulfilled the specification requirements in “Design code for concrete structure strengthening (E.3) ”(GB 50367-2013).

  4. 32 CFR 233.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Director, FVAP carries out the responsibilities identified in Procedures. (c) The IG DoD, in addition to... accordance with DoD Directive 5124.02 (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/512402p.pdf... Federal responsibilities assigned in DoD Directive 5124.02, Executive Order 12642, 10 U.S.C. 1566, 42...

  5. 32 CFR 233.5 - Responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Director, FVAP carries out the responsibilities identified in Procedures. (c) The IG DoD, in addition to... accordance with DoD Directive 5124.02 (available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/512402p.pdf... Federal responsibilities assigned in DoD Directive 5124.02, Executive Order 12642, 10 U.S.C. 1566, 42...

  6. Operationally Responsive Spacelift: Supporting a Seven-Day Launch Schedule

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    June 2012. http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/ corres/pdf/320011d_0683/p320011d.pdf. Everett, Terry. Space Acquisitions: DoD Needs a Departmentwide...March 2009. 63 INITIAL DISTRIBUTION LIST 1. Defense Technical Information Center Ft. Belvoir, Virginia 2. Dudley Knox Library Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California

  7. THE WATER BALANCE OF THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN AND ITS RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE. (R824995)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Historical precipitation, temperature and streamflow data for the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) are analyzed with the objective of developing simple statistical and water balance models of streamflow at the watershed's outlet. Annual streamflow is highly corre...

  8. Long-Term Corrosion Potential Behavior of Alloy 22 in Hot 5 m CaCl2 + 5 m Ca(NO3)2 Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M A; Carranza, R M; Stuart, M L; Rebak, R B

    2007-02-20

    Alloy 22 is a nickel base alloy highly resistant to all forms of corrosion. In very aggressive conditions (e.g. hot concentrated chloride containing brines) Alloy 22 could suffer localized attack, namely pitting and crevice corrosion. The occurrence of localized corrosion in a given environment is governed by the values of the critical potential (E{sub crit}) for crevice corrosion and the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) that the alloy may establish in the studied environment. If E{sub corr} is equal or higher than E{sub crit}, localized corrosion may be expected. This paper discusses the evolution of E{sub corr} of Alloy 22 specimens in 5 m CaCl{sub 2} + 5 m Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} brines at 100 C and 120 C. Two types of specimens were used, polished as-welded (ASW) creviced and noncreviced specimens and as-welded plus solution heat-treated (ASW+SHT) creviced specimens. The latter contained the black annealing oxide film on the surface. Results show that, for all types of Alloy 22 specimens the E{sub corr} was higher at 120 C than at 100 C, probably because a more protective film formed at the higher temperature. Specimens with the black oxide film on the surface showed more oscillations in the potential. None of the tested specimens suffered crevice corrosion probably because of the relatively high concentration of nitrate in the electrolyte, R = [NO3]/[Cl] = 1.

  9. Overview of Options, Issues, etc.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-30

    corr Dip-spin Al/Zn filled polymers  All commercial vehicles, some mil Electroless Ni- PTFE  In-house coating Keith Legg 847-680-9420 klegg...vehicles, what about aircraft, vessels? Electroless Ni-PTFE – connectors only  Excellent corrosion, conductivity; galvanic mismatch, not sacrificial

  10. RAPID 2D NMR METHOD FOR DETERMINING P-COUMARATE AND FERULATE LEVELS IN CORN (AND OTHER GRASS) CELL WALLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grass cell wall components are acylated by the hydroxycinnamates p-coumarate and ferulate. p-Coumarates largely acylate lignin sidechains, exclusively at the gamma-position, whereas ferulates primarily acylate the arabinosyl C5-position of arabinoxylans. Such components can be quantified as the corr...

  11. An Analysis of Combat Aircraft Avionics Production Costs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Naviqetion ITI Corr. (Federal Labs.) Republic Electrcuics ARN-92 LORIA C/D Haviqation ITT Corp. (Federal Labs.) - - - 1 1 -81- Table A-6 (Page 2 of 2) TECHNO...the Air Force, USAF Cost and Planning Factors, Volume 1, AFR 173-10, May 2, 1977. Daniels , J. M., Estimating Avionics Equipment Costs for Military

  12. Corrosion study of single crystal Ni-Mn-Ga alloy and Tb0.27Dy0.73Fe1.95 alloy for the design of new medical microdevices.

    PubMed

    Pouponneau, Pierre; Savadogo, Oumarou; Napporn, Teko; Yahia, L'Hocine; Martel, Sylvain

    2011-02-01

    Once placed in a magnetic field, smart magnetic materials (SMM) change their shape, which could be use for the development of smaller minimally invasive surgery devices activated by magnetic field. However, the potential degradation and release of cytotoxic ions by SMM corrosion has to be determined. This paper evaluates the corrosion resistance of two SMM: a single crystal Ni-Mn-Ga alloy and Tb(0.27)Dy(0.73)Fe(1.95) alloy. Ni-Mn-Ga alloy displayed a corrosion potential (E (corr)) of -0.58 V/SCE and a corrosion current density (i (corr)) of 0.43 μA/cm(2). During the corrosion assay, Ni-Mn-Ga sample surface was partially protected; local pits were formed on 20% of the surface and nickel ions were mainly found in the electrolyte. Tb(0.27)Dy(0.73)Fe(1.95) alloy exhibited poor corrosion properties such as E (corr) of -0.87 V/SCE and i (corr) of 5.90 μA/cm(2). During the corrosion test, this alloy was continuously degraded, its surface was impaired by pits and cracks extensively and a high amount of iron ions was measured in the electrolyte. These alloys exhibited low corrosion parameters and a selective degradation in the electrolyte. They could only be used for medical applications if they are coated with high strain biocompatible materials or embedded in composites to prevent direct contact with physiological fluids.

  13. Nowcasting of deep convective clouds and heavy precipitation: Comparison study between NWP model simulation and extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bližňák, Vojtěch; Sokol, Zbyněk; Zacharov, Petr

    2017-02-01

    An evaluation of convective cloud forecasts performed with the numerical weather prediction (NWP) model COSMO and extrapolation of cloud fields is presented using observed data derived from the geostationary satellite Meteosat Second Generation (MSG). The present study focuses on the nowcasting range (1-5 h) for five severe convective storms in their developing stage that occurred during the warm season in the years 2012-2013. Radar reflectivity and extrapolated radar reflectivity data were assimilated for at least 6 h depending on the time of occurrence of convection. Synthetic satellite imageries were calculated using radiative transfer model RTTOV v10.2, which was implemented into the COSMO model. NWP model simulations of IR10.8 μm and WV06.2 μm brightness temperatures (BTs) with a horizontal resolution of 2.8 km were interpolated into the satellite projection and objectively verified against observations using Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), correlation coefficient (CORR) and Fractions Skill Score (FSS) values. Naturally, the extrapolation of cloud fields yielded an approximately 25% lower RMSE, 20% higher CORR and 15% higher FSS at the beginning of the second forecasted hour compared to the NWP model forecasts. On the other hand, comparable scores were observed for the third hour, whereas the NWP forecasts outperformed the extrapolation by 10% for RMSE, 15% for CORR and up to 15% for FSS during the fourth forecasted hour and 15% for RMSE, 27% for CORR and up to 15% for FSS during the fifth forecasted hour. The analysis was completed by a verification of the precipitation forecasts yielding approximately 8% higher RMSE, 15% higher CORR and up to 45% higher FSS when the NWP model simulation is used compared to the extrapolation for the first hour. Both the methods yielded unsatisfactory level of precipitation forecast accuracy from the fourth forecasted hour onward.

  14. Several Well-observed Asteroidal Occultations in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timerson, Brad; Durech, J.; Abramson, H.; Brooks, J.; Caton, D.; Clark, D.; Conard, S.; Cooke, B.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J.; Edberg, S.; Ellington, C.; Faircloth, J.; Herchak, S.; Iverson, E.; Jones, R.; Lucas, G.; Lyzenga, G.; Maley, P.; Martinez, L.; Menke, J.; Mroz, G.; Nolan, P.; Peterson, R.; Preston, S.; Rattley, G.; Ray, J.; Scheck, A.; Stamm, J.; Stanton, R.; Suggs, R.; Tatum, R.; Thomas, W.

    2011-10-01

    During 2010 IOTA observers in North America reported about 190 positive observations for 106 asteroid occultation events. For several asteroids, this included observations with multiple chords. For two events, an inversion model was available. An occultation by 16 Psyche on 2010 August 21 yielded a best-fit ellipse of 235.4 x 230.4 km. On 2010 December 24, an occultation by 93 Minerva produced a best-fit ellipse of 179.4 x 133.4 km. An occultation by 96 Aegle on 2010 October 29 yielded a best-fit ellipse of 124.9 x 88.0 km. An occultation by 105 Artemis on 2010 June 24 showed a best-fit ellipse of 125.0 x 92.0 km. An occultation by 375 Ursula on 2010 December 4 produced a best-fit ellipse of 125.0 km x 135.0 km. Of note are two events not summarized in this article. On 2010 August 31, an occultation by 695 Bella yielded a new double star. That event will be summarized in the JDSO. Finally, on 2010 April 6, an occultation of zeta Ophiuchi by 824 Anastasia was observed by 65 observers at 69 locations. Unfortunately a large shift in the path yielded only 4 chords. Results of that event, and all the events mentioned here, can be found on the North American Asteroidal Occultation Results web page.

  15. Fourier Transform Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy for Quantitative Analysis of Gas Mixtures at Low Temperatures for Homeland Security Applications.

    PubMed

    Meier, D C; Benkstein, K D; Hurst, W S; Chu, P M

    2017-05-01

    Performance standard specifications for point chemical vapor detectors are established in ASTM E 2885-13 and ASTM E 2933-13. The performance evaluation of the detectors requires the accurate delivery of known concentrations of the chemical target to the system under test. Referee methods enable the analyte test concentration and associated uncertainties in the analyte test concentration to be validated by independent analysis, which is especially important for reactive analytes. This work extends the capability of a previously demonstrated method for using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy for quantitatively evaluating the composition of vapor streams containing hazardous materials at Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGL) to include test conditions colder than laboratory ambient temperatures. The described method covers the use of primary reference spectra to establish analyte concentrations, the generation of secondary reference spectra suitable for measuring analyte concentrations under specified testing environments, and the use of additional reference spectra and spectral profile strategies to mitigate the uncertainties due to impurities and water condensation within the low-temperature (7 °C, -5 °C) test cell. Important benefits of this approach include verification of the test analyte concentration with characterized uncertainties by in situ measurements co-located with the detector under test, near-real-time feedback, and broad applicability to toxic industrial chemicals.

  16. The Electrochemical Behavior of Alloy in Extreme Chloride and Bitrate Environments

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Etien; S.R. Gordon; G.O. Ilevbare

    2006-07-27

    Alloy 22 specimens were tested in high temperature (100 to 160 C), high concentration chloride and nitrate environments. Results of this study indicate that increasing nitrate to chloride ratio to 0.5 in these electrolytes increases resistance to localized breakdown and enhances repassivation. In these extreme environments, localized corrosion occurred by pitting even though specimens were tested using artificial crevice formers. Open circuit (E{sub corr}), breakdown and repassivation potentials all increase, and pitting morphology changes as nitrate to chloride ratio increases from 0.05 and 0.15 to 0.5. Results also indicate that increasing the temperature from 100 to 160 C increases E{sub corr} values, while breakdown potentials and repassivation potentials peak at 130 C for the 0.5 nitrate to chloride ratio electrolytes.

  17. FRACTAL DIMENSION OF GALAXY ISOPHOTES

    SciTech Connect

    Thanki, Sandip; Rhee, George; Lepp, Stephen E-mail: grhee@physics.unlv.edu

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we investigate the use of the fractal dimension of galaxy isophotes in galaxy classification. We have applied two different methods for determining fractal dimensions to the isophotes of elliptical and spiral galaxies derived from CCD images. We conclude that fractal dimension alone is not a reliable tool but that combined with other parameters in a neural net algorithm the fractal dimension could be of use. In particular, we have used three parameters to segregate the ellipticals and lenticulars from the spiral galaxies in our sample. These three parameters are the correlation fractal dimension D {sub corr}, the difference between the correlation fractal dimension and the capacity fractal dimension D {sub corr} - D {sub cap}, and, thirdly, the B - V color of the galaxy.

  18. Dense transcript profiling in single cells by image correlation decoding

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Cai, Long

    2016-01-01

    Recent work in sequential fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) has demonstrated the ability to uniquely encode a large number of molecular species in single cells. However, the multiplexing capacity is practically limited by the density of the barcoded objects in the cell. Here, we present a general method using image correlation to resolve the temporal barcodes in sequential hybridization experiments, allowing high density objects to be decoded. Using this correlation FISH (corrFISH) approach, we profiled the gene expression of ribosomal proteins in single cells in cell cultures and in mouse thymus tissue sections. In tissues, corrFISH revealed cell type specific gene expression of ribosomal proteins. The combination of sequential barcoding FISH and correlation analyses provides a general strategy for multiplexing a large number of RNA molecules and potentially other high copy number molecules in single cells. PMID:27271198

  19. Cryptographie quantique à variables continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencheikh, K.; Jankovic, A.; Symul, T.; Levenson, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    Nous avons élaboré un protocole de cryptographie quantique qui permet de générer et de distribuer une clé secrète aléatoire. Le protocole repose sur l'utilisation de paires de champs électromagnétiques dont les quadratures présentent des corrélations quantiques de type Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen. Les fluctuations quantiques instantanése constituent les bits aléatoires de la clé secrète, et la dégradation irréversible des corrélations quantiques des quadratures causée par une tierce personne permet de la détecter et de garantir la sécurité d'échange.

  20. Cross-section fluctuations in open microwave billiards and quantum graphs: The counting-of-maxima method revisited.

    PubMed

    Dietz, B; Richter, A; Samajdar, R

    2015-08-01

    The fluctuations exhibited by the cross sections generated in a compound-nucleus reaction or, more generally, in a quantum-chaotic scattering process, when varying the excitation energy or another external parameter, are characterized by the width Γcorr of the cross-section correlation function. Brink and Stephen [Phys. Lett. 5, 77 (1963)] proposed a method for its determination by simply counting the number of maxima featured by the cross sections as a function of the parameter under consideration. They stated that the product of the average number of maxima per unit energy range and Γcorr is constant in the Ercison region of strongly overlapping resonances. We use the analogy between the scattering formalism for compound-nucleus reactions and for microwave resonators to test this method experimentally with unprecedented accuracy using large data sets and propose an analytical description for the regions of isolated and overlapping resonances.

  1. Geoacoustic and Tomographic Inversion of Haro Strait Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Geoacoustic and Tomographic Inversion of Haro Strait Data A. Tolstoy 1538 Hampton Hill Circle, McLean VA 22101 phone: (703) 760-0881 email... inversion codes. • the geometric inversion of an individual Haro Strait nw014 (data) slice (and the nw024, sw029 paths) to determine likely...found plus possible array shapes). Different Haro Strait slice inversion efforts have also been made by Jaschke and Chapman (󈨧), Corré and N.R

  2. Sea-Based Aviation National Naval Responsibility (SBA NNR) - Structures and Materials - Overview and Roll-out

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-13

    Resistant Shape Memory / High Elasticity Materials Anisotropic Material Fatigue Behavior 6.1 6.2 6.1 6.2 SCC/CORR Fatigue Resistant AL Alloy ...strength steel alloys • Material Properties Improvements – Higher strength, lighter weight, lower cost, easier fabrication aerospace alloys ...Conformable Core – Metal foams , composite sandwich, failure mapping Advanced Structural Concepts – Materials tailored structural responses Implementation

  3. The classic: Radiography of the trapeziometacarpal joint. Degenerative changes of this joint. 1936.

    PubMed

    Robert, M

    2014-04-01

    This classic article is a translation and reprint (Appendix 1. Supplemental material is available with the online version of CORR.) from the French of the original article by M. Robert, entitled La radiographie de l'articulation trapézo-métacarpienne. Les arthroses de cette jointure. The original article was published in Société de Radiologie Méd de France, Bulletins.1936;24:687-689. (Reproduced with kind permission of the SFR.).

  4. Analytical and Experimental Studies of Beam Waveguide Absorbers for Structural Damping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    la\\cr %~ilwVadc aoorbcr rthle 1 )U NUC-IzN irqtenva2e. Allt constant Variabls of’ tile Redu,-e rog-ram1 were defined inl eachi FORTRAN-k, program. We...thle infinite beaml as i’rcq uenc(: inl - creaIse. Thle results of’ thle Bernoul-1E1-uler beam theory do riot quite corres;pond to ex- perrirntl suls...2... ............ ... .... ... . .. .. . . .. ... lmr

  5. Ocean Thermal Analysis and Related Naval Operational Considerations in the Ionian Sea - June 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    core eddy which was comparable in size (ca. 30 km) and location with one found in MILOC-68. Spatial correlation functions of tempera- ture were...warm core eddy which was comparable in size (ca. 30 km) and location with one found in MILOC-68. Spatial correlation functions of temperature were...varides, et en particulier, un tourbillon chaud comparable en taille et position A celui trouv6 aui cours de MILOC-68. Les fonctions de corr~1ation

  6. Cartographic Issues in the Development of a Digital GRASS Database

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Sites in Cell Format Ii 6 Map Informaion 16 7 Category Information ror Geograpic Features 16 8 Map Inrormation on Overlay 17 9 Coding Linear and Areal...outside the corridor, GRASS interprets this as defining a new direction for the line. The program saves the first point of the 22 cum nt line segment ...and the lst point that fills inside the same corrWor. The incrvcning points are corsdered unnecsary to deflne the tine segment and ae discarded. A new

  7. Spatial Orientation from High-Velocity Blur Patterns: Perception of Divergence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    sensitivity to blur pattern information suggest that continuous blur patterns, now lacking in discrete-frame video or motion picture displays, might be...investigations using motion pictures with dots movin g wi th velocity functions calculated to corres pond to movement i n var i ous conditi ons , e.g...AD—A 035 ‘408 NEVADA UNIV RENO FAST MOTION PERCEPTION LAB - FIG 6/16 SPATIAL ORIENTATION FROM HIGH—VELOCITY BLUR PATTERNS: PERCEPTIO——ETCCU

  8. Regenerative Burner System for Thermoelectric Power Sources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    of the air—to—air heat exchanger, the smoke level. An exceptionally cisan , smokeless Heat b ases, present in the configuration of this pro— fire is...zero (0) on this scale. A Bacharach number totype heat exchanger, are estimated to be approxi— of 10 is the highest smoke level measured and corre...regenera— and fouling. High reliability burners are normally tive burner system design . The lower fuel requirement adjusted to No. 2 or 3 smoke . Scale

  9. The Impact of Experience, Exposure and Support on Emergency Worker Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-02-26

    to dysphoria , defined as a "negative change in emotional status following the Guyana experience." Significantly higher rates of dysphoria were...and enlisted personnel were more dysphoric than officers. Greater dysphoria was also reported in those with more exposure to remains. However...partialled the effects of age, gender and marital status from social support yielded significance for SBP, DBP and MMPI scores. Pearson corre lations

  10. Evaluation of Zn-rich Primers and Rust Converters for Corrosion Protection of Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    phosphoric acid at ~15-33% wt., phosphoric and tannic acids , optimum conversion takes place from 3 to 12 months, thickness of oxide layer and its...barrier characteristics. 1.Gempler’s (water-based, tannic acid ) 2.Loctite rust treatment (polymeric-based, barium sulfate) 3.Total Solutions (water...based, tannic acid ) 4.Phoscote (phosphoric acid – current USMC product) 5.VpCI CorrVerter (combined rust converter and primer) 6.Corroseal (water-based

  11. Higher-Order Adaptive Finite-Element Methods for Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-03

    employ the finite-temperature Fermi- Dirac smearing [3] to suppress the charge sloshing associated with degenerate or close to degenerate eigenstates...elements up to degree eight (HEX27, HEX125SPECT, HEX343SPECT, HEX729SPECT). The numbers following the words ‘TET’ and ‘HEX’ denote the number of nodes in...work are constructed as Lagrange polynomials interpolated through an optimal distribution of nodes corre- sponding to the roots of derivatives of

  12. 32 CFR 182.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Procedure 12 of DoD 5240.1-R.1 1 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/524001r.pdf. (4... obtain a copy at www.dtic.smil.mil/whs/directives. Others may send a written request by email to USDI.Pubs@osd.mil. (5) NG personnel in State active duty or title 32, U.S.C., status. (6) Maritime...

  13. 32 CFR 182.2 - Applicability and scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Procedure 12 of DoD 5240.1-R.1 1 Available at http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/524001r.pdf. (4... obtain a copy at www.dtic.smil.mil/whs/directives. Others may send a written request byemail to USDI.Pubs@osd.mil. (5) NG personnel in State active duty or title 32, U.S.C., status. (6) Maritime...

  14. 32 CFR 158.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Publication 1-02 (see http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp1_02.pdf). Contingency program management. The... deploying with the force in DoD Instruction 3020.41 and DoD Directive 3002.01E (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs... (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/DTM-08-009.pdf), and the Manual for...

  15. 32 CFR 158.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Publication 1-02 (see http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/new_pubs/jp1_02.pdf). Contingency program management. The... deploying with the force in DoD Instruction 3020.41 and DoD Directive 3002.01E (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs... (see http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/DTM-08-009.pdf), and the Manual for...

  16. Are Standard Diagnostic Test Characteristics Sufficient for the Assessment of Continual Patient Monitoring?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c . THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 In this...thoracic or abdominal hematomas, c ) explicit vascular injury and operative repair, or d) limb amputation. Patients who received blood but did not meet...see panel C ). For instance, at 2 min, fewer than 25% of the patients had a decision rendered by the SPRT, and consequently, the corre- sponding

  17. Tank Crewman (M60A1) Readiness Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    stop the tank. 2. PERFORM EVASIVE MANEUVERS UPON ENEMY CONTACT a. Follow TC Commands. * Took up corr-ct firing position in respon.:e to TC’s directions...Followed route given by TC. b. Begin Evasive Maneuvers on Own Initiative a, Necessary. * Selected a hull defilade positinn where available...abilities in conducting before-operations checks, disassembling and assembling weapons, and driving, loading, and shooting in a tactical setting. When used

  18. Reactions at the Metal Vertex of a Monometal Metallocarborane Cluster. The Chemistry of (closo-3,3-(PPh3)2-3-(HSO4)-3,1,2-RhC2B9H11) and (closo-3-(PPh3)-3,3-(NO3)-3,1,2RhC2B9H11).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-09

    through the oxidative addition of hydrogen to generate unprecedented formal Rh(V) seven-coordinate dihydrides which reductively eliminate H2So4 or...to give the corres- ponding aldehydes. As examples one finds that (2) reacts with ethanol or n -propanol at slightly elevated temperatures to produce...reactant (2) and product (1) are insoluble in ethanol and n -propanol. Two possible mech- anisms for this facile reaction are shown in Scheme III. Scqeme

  19. Mechanistic Approaches to Improve Correction of the Most Common Disease-Causing Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Vedrana; Lazrak, Ahmed; Guroji, Purushotham; Matalon, Sadis; Bebok, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    The most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene leads to deletion of the phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) in the CFTR protein and causes multiple folding and functional defects. Contrary to large-scale efforts by industry and academia, no significant therapeutic benefit has been achieved with a single “corrector”. Therefore, investigations concentrate on drug combinations. Orkambi (Vertex Pharmaceuticals), the first FDA-approved drug for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) caused by this mutation, is a combination of a corrector (VX-809) that facilitates ΔF508 CFTR biogenesis and a potentiator (VX-770), which improves its function. Yet, clinical trials utilizing this combination showed only modest therapeutic benefit. The low efficacy Orkambi has been attributed to VX-770-mediated destabilization of VX-809-rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Here we report that the negative effects of VX-770 can be reversed by increasing the half-life of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) form (band B) of ΔF508 CFTR with another corrector (Corr-4a.) Although Corr-4a alone has only minimal effects on ΔF508 CFTR rescue, it increases the half-life of ΔF508 CFTR band B when it is present during half-life measurements. Our data shows that stabilization of band B ΔF508 CFTR with Corr-4a and simultaneous rescue with VX-809, leads to a >2-fold increase in cAMP-activated, CFTRinh-172-inhibited currents compared to VX-809 alone, or VX-809+VX-770. The negative effects of VX-770 and the Corr-4a protection are specific to the native I507-ATT ΔF508 CFTR without affecting the inherently more stable, synonymous variant I507-ATC ΔF508 CFTR. Our studies emphasize that stabilization of ΔF508 CFTR band B in the ER might improve its functional rescue by Orkambi. PMID:27214033

  20. Chrono: A Parallel Physics Library for Rigid-Body, Flexible-Body, and Fluid Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    and memory hierarchy associated with GPUs. Today, an Nvidia GPU has close to seven billion transistors. Priced at about $6000, an Nvidia Kepler K20x...This section describes a validation effort in which experi- mental results were compared to simulation results obtained from Chrono::Engine. To this...used to set up a corre- sponding simulation to match the experimental results . For more detail, see [17]. UNCLASSIFIED 6 Copyright c© 2013 by ASME

  1. Bibliography on Tidal Hydraulics. Supplementary Material Compiled from June 1983 to June 1986. Tidal Flows in Rivers and Harbors. Supplement Number 10.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    the German Bight which look rather sim- entering the sheltered waters on the South ila r. The reference values of the corre- East Queensland coast...points in the investigated sea region, ment of Geology , University of South so as to examine the circulation mechanism Florida, Tampa. of the bay water...compilation of " Geology and Geotechnical Characteristics beach profiles (showing both the maximum of Sediments in East Bay Area, Mississippi and minimum

  2. Low-Speed Pressure Distribution Measurements Over the Aft-Fuselage, Fins and Stabilators of a 1/9th Scale F/A-18 Wind-Tunnel Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    structural fatigue life, based on measured operational loading con- ditions, is designated the International Follow - On Structural Test Project ( IFOSTP ...Canadian Aeronautical Industry to conduct a fatigue test on the F/A-18 aircraft. This collaboration, which is aimed at re-evaluating the aircraft’s...total loads which will be applied to the structure during the fatigue test are those corre- sponding to the parameters recorded by the onboard

  3. JPRS Report, Soviet Union, Foreign Military Review, No. 7, July 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    under conditions corre- sponding to altitudes of up to 73 km. On another range some 18.3 m long, they assess the capabilities of the wind shields in...been the questions of monitoring the observance of the pro- visions of the future convention by its participants. The Soviet Union has proposed...corporations, would be supported by strict monitoring , including international on-the-spot inspec- tions. At the same time, attention has been drawn

  4. Forward-backward multiplicity correlations in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D’Erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J. -Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Lu, X. -G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal’Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskon, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J. -P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I. -K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-20

    The strength of forward-backward (FB) multiplicity correlations is measured by the ALICE detector in proton-proton (pp) collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV. The measurement is performed in the central pseudorapidity region (|η| < 0.8) for the transverse momentum pT > 0.3 GeV/c. Two separate pseudorapidity windows of width ($\\delta$η) ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 are chosen symmetrically around η = 0. The multiplicity correlation strength (bcorr) is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity gap (ηgap) between the two windows as well as the width of these windows. The correlation strength is found to decrease with increasing ηgap and shows a non-linear increase with $\\delta$η. A sizable increase of the correlation strength with the collision energy, which cannot be explained exclusively by the increase of the mean multiplicity inside the windows, is observed. The correlation coefficient is also measured for multiplicities in different configurations of two azimuthal sectors selected within the symmetric FB η-windows. Two different contributions, the short-range (SR) and the long-range (LR), are observed. The energy dependence of bcorr is found to be weak for the SR component while it is strong for the LR component. Moreover, the correlation coefficient is studied for particles belonging to various transverse momentum intervals chosen to have the same mean multiplicity. Both SR and LR contributions to bcorr are found to increase with pT in this case. Results are compared to PYTHIA and PHOJET event generators and to a string-based phenomenological model. In conclusion, the observed dependencies of bcorr add new constraints on phenomenological models.

  5. Prevention of Infections Associated with Combat-Related Extremity Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    civilian trauma care, a Cochrane review indi- cated that antimicrobials were protective against early infec- tion compared with no antimicrobials (relative...typically penicillin and streptomycin) active against the bacteria initially found in the wound.53 Notably, wound cultures did not always corre- late with...This effect was attributed to the activity of -lactams antimicrobials against streptococci and staphylococci. The Eastern Association for the Surgery

  6. JPRS Report, Near East & South Asia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the corre- sponding period of 1987-88. Industrial output growth: The prospects of industrial growth for the current year are encouraging in view of...against its abnormal fluctuations. The two main things lacking in this econ- omy are bread for the poor and milk for the children. Just as no two...and many others have shifted from the agricultural track to the industrial track and, as a result, are now employing workers from outside the kibbutz

  7. JPRS Report, Latin America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    88 pp 4, 5 [Interview with President Jose Sarney by Special Corre- spondent Marilda Mascarenhas at Sao Luis , Maranhao, on or about 1 January 1988...Coindreau on Narcotics Threat to Political System- Former President of the Employers Confederation of the Mexican Republic (COPARMEX) Jose Luis Coindreau...34Everything will be different in 1988." That is the promise made by President Jose Sarney in an exclusive interview granted to CORREIO BRAZILIENSE. He

  8. Active Control of Radiated Sound with Integrated Piezoelectric Composite Structures. Volume 3: Appendices (Concl.)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    uncontrolled) adopting a similar control design using a MIMO feedforward natural frequency. In general, the controlled system corre- controller and a recursive...The effectiveness of this 16 R. A. Burdisso, C. R. Fuller, and Z. Li, "Eigenproperties of MIMO feed-formulation is demonstrated through numerical...would represent a impractical error sensing scheme and when the radiating structure is relatively massive . V. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors gratefully

  9. Sustainability Report 2009: Sustain the Mission, Secure the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    comptroller/ cfs/fy2008.html). Fort Monmouth, NJ, closure report (http://www.hqda.Army.mil/acsim/brac/Report- Closure -FortMonmouth.pdf). Reporting...conducts assessments of its impacts on the community infrastructure due to closure and growth as described under indicator EC9. Table 4. FY08 Army...activities, realignment, or closure (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/ corres/pdf/541012p.pdf). The Army conducts a variety of studies to

  10. Using Simulation Analysis to Evaluate Enlistment Programs for Non Prior Service Army Reserve Enlistments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    UNITED STATES ARMY RECRUITING COMMAND 1307 3d Avenue Fort Knox , KY 40121 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER A 11...B.D. Department of Defense Instruction 1215.19 Change 1, 8 Mar. 2001. 10 Jun. 2010 <http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf2/i121519p.pdf...Virginia 2. Dudley Knox Library Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 3. Rachel T. Johnson Naval Postgraduate School Monterey

  11. Mechanistic Approaches to Improve Correction of the Most Common Disease-Causing Mutation in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Bali, Vedrana; Lazrak, Ahmed; Guroji, Purushotham; Matalon, Sadis; Bebok, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    The most common mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene leads to deletion of the phenylalanine at position 508 (ΔF508) in the CFTR protein and causes multiple folding and functional defects. Contrary to large-scale efforts by industry and academia, no significant therapeutic benefit has been achieved with a single "corrector". Therefore, investigations concentrate on drug combinations. Orkambi (Vertex Pharmaceuticals), the first FDA-approved drug for treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) caused by this mutation, is a combination of a corrector (VX-809) that facilitates ΔF508 CFTR biogenesis and a potentiator (VX-770), which improves its function. Yet, clinical trials utilizing this combination showed only modest therapeutic benefit. The low efficacy Orkambi has been attributed to VX-770-mediated destabilization of VX-809-rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Here we report that the negative effects of VX-770 can be reversed by increasing the half-life of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) form (band B) of ΔF508 CFTR with another corrector (Corr-4a.) Although Corr-4a alone has only minimal effects on ΔF508 CFTR rescue, it increases the half-life of ΔF508 CFTR band B when it is present during half-life measurements. Our data shows that stabilization of band B ΔF508 CFTR with Corr-4a and simultaneous rescue with VX-809, leads to a >2-fold increase in cAMP-activated, CFTRinh-172-inhibited currents compared to VX-809 alone, or VX-809+VX-770. The negative effects of VX-770 and the Corr-4a protection are specific to the native I507-ATT ΔF508 CFTR without affecting the inherently more stable, synonymous variant I507-ATC ΔF508 CFTR. Our studies emphasize that stabilization of ΔF508 CFTR band B in the ER might improve its functional rescue by Orkambi.

  12. Optimal Sampling Efficiency in Monte Carlo Simulation With an Approximate Potential

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Boltzmann sampling of an approximate potential (the “reference” system) is used to build a Markov chain in the isothermal - isobaric ensemble. At the end...in the isothermal - isobaric ensemble. At the end points of the chain, the energy is evaluated at a more accurate level the “full” system and a...1pn. 7 In the isothermal - isobaric ensemble,30 for which the corre- sponding potential is the Gibbs free energy,31 Wi = − Ui + PVi + N ln Vi

  13. In Situ Repair of Deteriorated Concrete in Hydraulic Structures: Laboratory Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    emulsifiable polyester resin, furfuryl alcohol, a furan resin, a high molecular weight (HMW) methacrylate, and a polyure- thane. These materials are...78-50ER3 emulsifiable polyester (Alpha Corp.) Furfuryl alcohol (QO Chemicals, Inc.) QuaCorr 1001 furan resin (QO Chemicals, Inc.) PCM-1100 high...promoter system. 8 16. Furfuryl alcohol is a low viscosity, water soluble monomer produced from agricultural wastes such as corn cobs and oil hulls

  14. Common Mechanisms of Neuronal Cell Death after Exposure to Diverse Environmental Insults: Implications for Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    corres\\DODcommonmechfinalreportJuly2006.doc 27 Ronald L. Hayes. Comparison of biomarkers alpha-II spectrin breakdown products, S100B , and tau after...death, we and others have made rapid advances in the development of biomarkers allowing non-invasive study of proteolytic pathology in in vivo models...In addition, proteomics-based platforms can provide powerful technologies to detect biomarkers ultimately providing capabilities for non-invasive

  15. Forward-backward multiplicity correlations in pp collisions at = 0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskon, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Segato, G.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The strength of forward-backward (FB) multiplicity correlations is measured by the ALICE detector in proton-proton (pp) collisions at = 0 .9, 2 .76 and 7 TeV. The measurement is performed in the central pseudorapidity region (| η| < 0 .8) for the transverse momentum p T > 0 .3 GeV /c. Two separate pseudorapidity windows of width ( δη) ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 are chosen symmetrically around η = 0. The multiplicity correlation strength ( b corr) is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity gap ( η gap) between the two windows as well as the width of these windows. The correlation strength is found to decrease with increasing η gap and shows a non-linear increase with δη. A sizable increase of the correlation strength with the collision energy, which cannot be explained exclusively by the increase of the mean multiplicity inside the windows, is observed. The correlation coefficient is also measured for multiplicities in different configurations of two azimuthal sectors selected within the symmetric FB η-windows. Two different contributions, the short-range (SR) and the long-range (LR), are observed. The energy dependence of b corr is found to be weak for the SR component while it is strong for the LR component. Moreover, the correlation coefficient is studied for particles belonging to various transverse momentum intervals chosen to have the same mean multiplicity. Both SR and LR contributions to b corr are found to increase with p T in this case. Results are compared to PYTHIA and PHOJET event generators and to a string-based phenomenological model. The observed dependencies of b corr add new constraints on phenomenological models. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. A One-Step Delamination Procedure to Form Single Sheet Iron(III)-(oxy)Hydroxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dispersion of a layered iron(III)-(oxy)hydroxide intercalated with dodecanoate (oxGRC12, Fe3IIIO2.18(OH)3.13(C12H23O2)0.56(SO4)0.47; derived from the corr...

  17. Individual Differences and Age-Related Performance Assessment in Naval Aviators. Part 1. Battery Development and Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    press. Dichotic listening. This task, described in detail by Gopher (1982) presents subjects with a series of word and digit pairs, simultaneously... Digit Recall + 2nd-order tracking: # correct .70 RT .67 RMS .86 Dichotic Listening Task: 1. Omissions: ff correct .93 2. Intrusions: # corre(:t .89 3...speed, a running memory task, .racking tasks performed alone and with the memory tasks, a dichotic listening task, and a computerized version of three

  18. Integrating Coordinated Path Following Algorithms to Mitigate the Loss of Communication Among Multiple UAVs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    fastest-growing segment of the military- oriented aeronautical industry. The Weibel & Hansman (2005) report observes that the recent technological...http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/605507p.pdf Weibel , R. E., & Hansman, R. J. (2005). Safety considerations for operation of unmanned...bitstream/handle/1721.1/34912/ Weibel %20- %20ICAT%20Report%20-%20UAV%20Safety.pdf 55 Xargay, E., Kaminer, I., Pascoal, A., Hovakimyan, N

  19. Thermal Analysis and Design of Air Cooled Electronic Circuit Boards Using a Desktop Computer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    tabular and graphical. By using internal selection of heat transfer corre- lations, the THERMELEX system depends only on input of physical parameters...only on input of physical parameters for thermal predictions. 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION---------------------------------------- 13 A...depending only on natural circulation for cooling. The major emphasis over the last 15 years has been a continuing effort toward a reduction in physical

  20. Visual Evoked Responses and EEGS for Divers Breathing Hyperbaric Air: An Assessment of Individual Differences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-03

    PAGE THE PROBLEM To find and assess quantitatively electrophysiologieal corre- lates of nitrogen narcosis in divers. FINDINGS Marked decrements in...visual evoked responses were found in most divers under conditions conducive to nitrogen narcosis . Results of this study show the average sizes of...the decrements and their probability of occurrence in a large group of subjects. APPLICATION Since nitrogen narcosis is a major problem deterring air

  1. Peripheral Nerve Diffusion Tensor Imaging: Assessment of Axon and Myelin Sheath Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Heckel, A.; Weiler, M.; Xia, A.; Ruetters, M.; Pham, M.; Bendszus, M.; Heiland, S.; Baeumer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) parameters as in-vivo biomarkers of axon and myelin sheath integrity of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. Methods MRI examinations at 3T including DTI were conducted on wrists in 30 healthy subjects. After manual segmentation of the median nerve quantitative analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) as well as axial, radial and mean diffusivity (AD, RD, and MD) was carried out. Pairwise Pearson correlations with electrophysiological parameters comprising sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and compound muscle action potential (CMAP) as markers of axon integrity, and distal motor latency (dml) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (sNCV) as markers of myelin sheath integrity were computed. The significance criterion was set at P=0.05, Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Results DTI parameters showed a distinct proximal-to-distal profile with FA, MD, and RD extrema coinciding in the center of the carpal tunnel. AD correlated with CMAP (r=0.50, p=0.04, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of myelin sheath integrity. RD correlated with sNCV (r=-0.53, p=0.02, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. FA correlated with dml (r=-0.63, p=0.002, Bonf. corr.) and sNCV (r=0.68, p=0.001, Bonf. corr.) but not with markers of axon integrity. Conclusion AD reflects axon integrity, while RD (and FA) reflect myelin sheath integrity as validated by correlation with electrophysiology. DTI parameters consistently indicate a slight decrease of structural integrity in the carpal tunnel as a physiological site of median nerve entrapment. DTI is particularly sensitive, since these findings are observed in healthy participants. Our results encourage future studies to evaluate the potential of DTI in differentiating axon from myelin sheath injury in patients with manifest peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26114630

  2. Environmental Effects on the Incubation Time Characteristics in Stress-Corrosion Cracking

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    115. Gaillard, Chouvy, and Blechet: Rev. Alum., 1982, vol. 513, pp. 30-35. 116. D. Rhodes and J.C. Radon : Corr. Sci., 1981, vol. 21 (5), pp. 381-389...T. Saito and T. Tanaka: J. Jpn. Inst. Light Met, 1975, vol. 25 (6), pp. 214- 222 . 120. R.C. Dorward and K.R. Hasse: Corros. Sci., 1982, vol. 22 (3

  3. Setting Performance Standards: A Review of Related Literatures and Identification of Future Research Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    TRIBUTION: Primary distribution of this report h0enm deb-A-Fease address corre dence concerning distribution of repo .. .S. Army Research Institute e...Department of the Army position , unless so designated by other authorized documents. UNCLASSIFIED .URITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE REPORT DOCUMENTATION...procedures should incorporate both absolute levels and positive changes in performance, that con- tinuous utility functions can help identify multiple

  4. Enlightening discriminative network functional modules behind Principal Component Analysis separation in differential-omic science studies.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Sara; Ge, Yan; Durán, Claudio; Palladini, Alessandra; Jiménez-Jiménez, Víctor; Martínez-Sánchez, Luisa María; Wang, Yuting; Sales, Susanne; Shevchenko, Andrej; Poser, Steven W; Herbig, Maik; Otto, Oliver; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas; Guck, Jochen; Gerl, Mathias J; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio

    2017-03-13

    Omic science is rapidly growing and one of the most employed techniques to explore differential patterns in omic datasets is principal component analysis (PCA). However, a method to enlighten the network of omic features that mostly contribute to the sample separation obtained by PCA is missing. An alternative is to build correlation networks between univariately-selected significant omic features, but this neglects the multivariate unsupervised feature compression responsible for the PCA sample segregation. Biologists and medical researchers often prefer effective methods that offer an immediate interpretation to complicated algorithms that in principle promise an improvement but in practice are difficult to be applied and interpreted. Here we present PC-corr: a simple algorithm that associates to any PCA segregation a discriminative network of features. Such network can be inspected in search of functional modules useful in the definition of combinatorial and multiscale biomarkers from multifaceted omic data in systems and precision biomedicine. We offer proofs of PC-corr efficacy on lipidomic, metagenomic, developmental genomic, population genetic, cancer promoteromic and cancer stem-cell mechanomic data. Finally, PC-corr is a general functional network inference approach that can be easily adopted for big data exploration in computer science and analysis of complex systems in physics.

  5. Corrosion behavior of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloyed with Cu.

    PubMed

    Koike, Marie; Cai, Zhuo; Oda, Yutaka; Hattori, Masayuki; Fujii, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Toru

    2005-05-01

    It has recently been found that alloying with copper improved the inherently poor grindability and wear resistance of titanium. This study characterized the corrosion behavior of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloyed with copper. Alloys (0.9 or 3.5 mass % Cu) were cast with the use of a magnesia-based investment in a centrifugal casting machine. Three specimen surfaces were tested: ground, sandblasted, and as cast. Commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V served as controls. Open-circuit potential measurement, linear polarization, and potentiodynamic cathodic polarization were performed in aerated (air + 10% CO(2)) modified Tani-Zucchi synthetic saliva at 37 degrees C. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization was conducted in the same medium deaerated by N(2) + 10% CO(2). Polarization resistance (R(p)), Tafel slopes, and corrosion current density (I(corr)) were determined. A passive region occurred for the alloy specimens with ground and sandblasted surfaces, as for CP Ti. However, no passivation was observed on the as-cast alloys or on CP Ti. There were significant differences among all metals tested for R(p) and I(corr) and significantly higher R(p) and lower I(corr) values for CP Ti compared to Ti-6Al-4V or the alloys with Cu. Alloying up to 3.5 mass % Cu to Ti-6Al-4V did not change the corrosion behavior. Specimens with ground or sandblasted surfaces were superior to specimens with as-cast surfaces.

  6. Effect of fluoride and albumin concentration on the corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Her-Hsiung

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of fluoride and albumin concentration on the corrosion behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in acid artificial saliva (pH 5/37 degrees C) using potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization test. Chemical analyses of the surface passive film were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that either the NaF (0-0.5%) or the presence of albumin (0-0.2%) in 0.1% NaF-containing media had a significant influence on the corrosion potential (E(corr)), corrosion rate (I(corr)), passive current density (I(pass)), and polarization resistance (R(p)) (p<0.01). The I(corr) and I(pass) values increased on increasing the NaF concentration, but decreased with the presence of albumin in NaF-containing media. The R(p) value decreased on increasing the NaF concentration, but increased with the presence of albumin in NaF-containing media. When the NaF concentration was higher than 0.1%, the protectiveness of TiO(2) passive film formed on Ti-6Al-4V alloy was destroyed by fluoride ions, leading to the formation of Na(2)TiF(6). The presence of albumin, regardless of the concentration, in 0.1% NaF-containing acid media improved the corrosion resistance of Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  7. A method for the flow diagnosis and interpretation of a well test through the use of the pressure derivative function

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando Ascencio Cendejas; Fernando Samaniego Verduzco; Jesus Rivera Rodriquez

    1994-01-20

    This paper presents an alternative technique for transient pressure analysis. The new method is based on the pressure derivative function and the impulse theory. This method uses a mathematical and graphical evaluation of an equation of the type [t{sub corr,f}] t{sup nf}{Delta}p'{sub 1} = m{sup 1}{sub f}, where n{sub f} is related to the specific flow pattern toward the well and the constant m{sup 1}{sub f} with the formation conductivity. This procedure simultaneously allows the diagnosis of the flow pattern through the presence of a horizontal line of a graph of [t{sub corr,f}]t{sup nf}{Delta}p'{sub 1} versus t, and an estimation of the formation conductivity through the value of the constant m{sup 1}{sub f}, given by the intersection of this line with the ordinate axis. In the ordinate graphing group, t{sub corr,f} is a correction factor for variable rate producing conditions, approximately equal to unity for long producing times. For constant rate drawdown tests this factor is equal to one. f in this graphing group stands for the type of flow prevailing during a specific period of the test, i.e., spherical, linear, or radial. Variable well flow rates are also considered in the theory of analysis presented in this study. This new method is successfully applied to three field cases published in the literature.

  8. Enlightening discriminative network functional modules behind Principal Component Analysis separation in differential-omic science studies

    PubMed Central

    Ciucci, Sara; Ge, Yan; Durán, Claudio; Palladini, Alessandra; Jiménez-Jiménez, Víctor; Martínez-Sánchez, Luisa María; Wang, Yuting; Sales, Susanne; Shevchenko, Andrej; Poser, Steven W.; Herbig, Maik; Otto, Oliver; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas; Guck, Jochen; Gerl, Mathias J.; Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    Omic science is rapidly growing and one of the most employed techniques to explore differential patterns in omic datasets is principal component analysis (PCA). However, a method to enlighten the network of omic features that mostly contribute to the sample separation obtained by PCA is missing. An alternative is to build correlation networks between univariately-selected significant omic features, but this neglects the multivariate unsupervised feature compression responsible for the PCA sample segregation. Biologists and medical researchers often prefer effective methods that offer an immediate interpretation to complicated algorithms that in principle promise an improvement but in practice are difficult to be applied and interpreted. Here we present PC-corr: a simple algorithm that associates to any PCA segregation a discriminative network of features. Such network can be inspected in search of functional modules useful in the definition of combinatorial and multiscale biomarkers from multifaceted omic data in systems and precision biomedicine. We offer proofs of PC-corr efficacy on lipidomic, metagenomic, developmental genomic, population genetic, cancer promoteromic and cancer stem-cell mechanomic data. Finally, PC-corr is a general functional network inference approach that can be easily adopted for big data exploration in computer science and analysis of complex systems in physics. PMID:28287094

  9. Corrosion Rate of Alloy 22 as a Function of Immersion Time

    SciTech Connect

    Estill, J C; Hust, G A; King, K J; Rebak, R B

    2005-03-21

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is a nickel (Ni) based alloy containing nominally 22% Chromium (Cr), 13% Molybdenum (Mo) and 3% tungsten (W). Alloy 22 is highly resistant to general and localized corrosion such as pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Due to the formation of a stable passive film, when Alloy 22 is immersed in certain electrolytes, its corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) increases and its corrosion rate (CR) decreases as a function of the immersion time. This paper discusses the evolution of E{sub corr} and corrosion rate (CR) of creviced Alloy 22 specimens in six different mixtures of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium nitrate (KNO{sub 3}) at 100 C. Two types of specimens were used, polished as-welded (ASW) and as-welded solution plus heat-treated (ASW+SHT). The latter contained the black annealing oxide film on the surface. Results show that, for the two type of materials, as the immersion time increases, E{sub corr} increased and the CR decreased. Even for concentrated brine solutions at 100 C the CR was < 50 nm/year after more than 100 days immersion.

  10. Reconnaissance optique des formes en parallele utilisant des reseaux de neurones et une mire de reduction de dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Philippe

    Cette recherche vise à la mise en OEuvre optique de la reconnaissance des images en utilisant une mire d'anneaux afin de générer des vecteurs caractéristiques qui seront ensuite classifiés par un réseau de neurones. On proposera deux architectures originales: une qui permettra la reconnaissance invariante sous rotation en utilisant un corrélateur conjoint; l'autre montage permettra une classification en parallèle de plusieurs images grâce à la capacité des mires d'anneaux de compresser l'information. Ce dernier montage est basé sur un corrélateur 4F. On présentera des résultats optiques expérimentaux pour ces deux montages. Pour arriver à des résultats concluants on analysera le comportement des vecteurs obtenus à partir d'une mire d'anneaux, on introduira une règle d'apprentissage optimisant le pic de corrélation en réduisant les pics parasites et on corrigera à l'aide d'un algorithme génétique les modulations de phases générées par le modulateur spatial à cristaux liquides.

  11. Soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam CT: Evaluation by 2AFC tests in relation to physical performance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Tward, D. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Daly, M. J.; Richard, S.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Paul, N. S.

    2007-11-15

    Soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was evaluated via two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) tests. Investigations included the dependence of detectability on radiation dose, the influence of the asymmetric three-dimensional (3D) noise-power spectrum (NPS) in axial and sagittal or coronal planes, and the effect of prior knowledge on detectability. Custom-built phantoms ({approx}15 cm diameter cylinders) containing soft-tissue-simulating spheres of variable contrast and diameter were imaged on an experimental CBCT bench. The proportion of correct responses (P{sub corr}) in 2AFC tests was analyzed as a figure of merit, ideally equal to the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. P{sub corr} was evaluated as a function of the sphere diameter (1.6-12.7 mm), contrast (20-165 HU), dose (1-7 mGy), plane of visualization (axial/sagittal), apodization filter (Hanning and Ram-Lak), and prior knowledge provided to the observer [ranging from stimulus known exactly (SKE) to stimulus unknown (SUK)]. Detectability limits were characterized in terms of the dose required to achieve a given level of P{sub corr} (e.g., 70%). For example, a 20 HU stimulus of diameter down to {approx}6 mm was detected with P{sub corr} 70% at dose {>=}2 mGy. Detectability tended to be greater in axial than in sagittal planes, an effect amplified by sharper apodization filters in a manner consistent with 3D NPS asymmetry. Prior knowledge had a marked influence on detectability - e.g., P{sub corr} for a {approx}6 mm(20 HU) sphere was {approx}55%-65% under SUK conditions, compared to {approx}70%-85% for SKE conditions. Human observer tests suggest practical implications for implementation of CBCT: (i) Detectability limits help to define minimum-dose imaging techniques for specific imaging tasks; (ii) detectability of a given structure can vary between axial and sagittal/coronal planes, owing to the spatial-frequency content of the 3D NPS in relation to the

  12. Association entre les hormones sexuelles, les marqueurs de remodelage osseux et la densité minérale osseuse chez des femmes ménopausées d'origine marocaine (étude transversale)

    PubMed Central

    El Maataoui, Aissam; Biaz, Asmae; El Boukhrissi, Fatima; El Machtani, Si; Dami, Abdellah; Bouhsain, Sanae; Bamou, Youssef; El Maghraoui, Abdellah; Ouzzif, Zhor

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Le présent travail se propose d’étudier la relation entre les hormones sexuelles, notamment l’œstradiol et l'indice de l’œstradiol libre, le sulfate de déhydroépiandrosterone et la sex hormone binding globulin, les marqueurs de remodelage osseux et la densité minérale osseuse chez une population de femmes marocaine ménopausées. Méthodes Il s'agit d'une étude transversale, menée sur une période de 6 mois d'octobre 2012 à fin avril 2013 et ayant fait participer deux cent deux (202). Résultats L’œstradiol et l'indice d’œstradiol libre (IEL) ont montré une corrélation négative respectivement à l'ostéocalcine (OC), à la crosslaps (β-CTX) et l'OC (p<0.001). La sulfate de déhydroepiandrosterone S-DHEA a été corrélée positivement à l'OC (p<0.001), alors que e taux sérique de la sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) l'a été corrélé à la β-CTX et l'OC (p<0.001). Par ailleurs, une corrélation positive a été établie entre la densité minérale osseuse (DMO) au col de fémur et le poids, l'indice de masse corporelle (IMC), l'IEL et la S-DHEA. Une corrélation négative a été retrouvée entre la DMO au col de fémur d'une part et l’âge, la DDR, la SHBG, la β-CTX et l'OC d'une autre part. Conclusion Le présent travail montre que l'augmentation de l’âge et la diminution de l’œstradiol libre expliquent la diminution de la DMO au niveau du col du fémur, alors que l'augmentation du taux sérique de la SHBG et la diminution du poids expliquent la diminution de la DMO au rachis lombaire. PMID:26848353

  13. A procedure for the joint evaluation of substrate partitioning and kinetic parameters for reactions catalyzed by enzymes in reverse micellar solutions. I. Hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate catalyzed by lipase in sodium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulphosuccinate (AOT)/buffer/heptane.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, L F; Abuin, E; Lissi, E

    2001-04-15

    A simple method useful for the joint evaluation of substrate partitioning and kinetic parameters for reactions catalyzed by enzymes entrapped in reverse micelles is proposed. The method is applied to the hydrolysis of 2-naphthyl acetate (2-NA) catalyzed by lipase in sodium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/buffer/heptane reverse micellar solutions. In the presence of micelles, the relationship between the initial reaction rate and the analytical concentration of 2-NA was dependent on AOT concentration at a constant W ([water]/[AOT]) value. The dependence of the initial reaction rate profiles with [AOT] was analyzed according with the method proposed to obtain the partition constant of 2-NA between the micelles and the external solvent, Kp. A value of Kp = 2.7 L mol(-1) was obtained irrespective of the water content of the micelles (W from 5 to 20). The catalytic rate constant kcat in the micellar solutions was independent of [AOT] but slightly decreased with an increase in W from 2 x 10(-6) mol g(-1) s(-1) at W = 5 to 1.2 x 10(-6) mol g(-1) s(-1) at W = 20. The apparent Michaelis constant determined in terms of the analytical concentration of 2-NA increased with [AOT] at a given W and moderately decreased with W at a fixed [AOT]. The increase with [AOT] is accounted for by considering the partitioning of the substrate. After correction for the partitioning of 2-NA values of (Km)corr were obtained as 3.9 x 10(-3) mol L(-1) (W = 5), 4.6 x 10(-3) mol L(-1) (W = 10), 2.3 x 10(-3) mol L(-1) (W = 15), and 1.7 x 10(-3) mol L(-1) (W = 20). The rate parameters in the aqueous phase in the absence of micelles, were obtained as (kcat)aq = 7.9 x 10(-6) mol g(-1) s(-1) and (Km)aq = 2.5 x 10(-3) mol L(-1). In order to compare the efficiency of the enzyme in the micellar solution with that in aqueous phase, the values of (Km)corr were in turn corrected to take into account differences in the substrate activity, obtaining so a set of (Km)*corr values. The efficiency of the

  14. Long Term Electrochemical Behavior of Creviced and Non-Creviced Alloy 22 in CaCl2 + Ca(NO3)2 Brines at 155?C

    SciTech Connect

    Rodr?guez, M A; Stuart, M L; Rebak, R B

    2006-11-08

    Alloy 22 is a nickel base alloy highly resistant to all forms of corrosion. In very aggressive conditions (e.g. hot concentrated chloride containing brines) Alloy 22 could suffer localized attack, namely pitting and crevice corrosion. Chloride ion is known to be the most detrimental aggressive agent for Alloy 22 and is able to promote crevice corrosion when tight crevices exist in hot chloride containing solutions of different concentrations. Nitrate ion is an effective inhibitor of chloride induced crevice corrosion when present in a high enough [NO{sub 3}{sup -}]/[Cl{sup -}] ratio. The occurrence of localized corrosion in a given environment is governed by the values of the critical potential (E{sub crit}) for crevice corrosion and the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) that the alloy may establish in the studied environment. If E{sub corr} is equal or higher than E{sub crit}, localized corrosion may be expected. This paper discusses the evolution of E{sub corr} and corrosion rate (CR) of Alloy 22 specimens in 18 m CaCl{sub 2} + 9 m Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and 18 m CaCl{sub 2} + 0.9 m Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} brines at 155 C. Two types of specimens were used, polished as-welded (ASW) creviced and non-creviced specimens and as-welded plus solution heat-treated (ASW+SHT) creviced specimens. The latter contained the black annealing oxide film on the surface. Results show that, in a few immersion days E{sub corr} reached a stable value higher than the open circuit potential of a platinum electrode in 18 m CaCl{sub 2} + 9 m Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} for all specimens tested. Specimens tested in this solution did not suffer any type of localized attack. On the other hand, E{sub corr} showed oscillations of up to 600 mV in 18 m CaCl{sub 2} + 0.9 m Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} during the entire immersion period. These oscillations were due to pitting corrosion development. Crevice corrosion was not observed in any testing case. Corrosion rates for specimens in the latter solution ([NO{sub 3

  15. Local source identification of trace metals in urban/industrial mixed land-use areas with daily PM10 limit value exceedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Olmo, Ignacio; Andecochea, Carlos; Ruiz, Sara; Fernández-Ferreras, José Antonio; Irabien, Angel

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the analysis of the concentration levels, inter-site variation and source identification of trace metals at three urban/industrial mixed land-use sites of the Cantabria region (northern Spain), where local air quality plans were recently approved because the number of exceedances of the daily PM10 limit value according to the Directive 2008/50/EC had been relatively high in the last decade (more than 35 instances per year). PM10 samples were collected for over three years at the Torrelavega (TORR) and Los Corrales (CORR) sites and for over two years at the Camargo (GUAR) site and analysed for the presence of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), titanium (Ti), vanadium (V), molybdenum (Mo), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), antimony (Sb) and zinc (Zn). Analysis of enrichment factors revealed an anthropogenic origin of most of the studied elements; Zn, Cd, Mo, Pb and Cu were the most enriched elements at the three sites, with Fe and V as the least enriched elements. Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) and pollutant roses (Cu at TORR, Zn at CORR and Mn at GUAR) were used to identify the local sources of the studied metals. Analysis of PMF results revealed the main sources of trace metals at each site as road traffic at the TORR site, iron foundry and casting industry at the CORR site and a ferro-manganese alloy industry at the GUAR site. Other sources were also identified at these sites, but with much lower contributions, such as minor industrial sources, combustion and traffic mixed with the previous sources.

  16. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable.

  17. Iron corrolates: unambiguous chloroiron(III) (corrolate)(2-.) pi-cation radicals.

    PubMed

    Walker, F Ann; Licoccia, Silvia; Paolesse, Roberto

    2006-04-01

    The structures, electron configurations, magnetic susceptibilities, spectroscopic properties, molecular orbital energies and spin density distributions, redox properties and reactivities of iron corrolates having chloride, phenyl, pyridine, NO and other ligands are reviewed. It is shown that with one very strong donor ligand such as phenyl anion the electron configuration of the metal is d(4)S=1 Fe(IV) coordinated to a (corrolate)(3-) anion, while with one weaker donor ligand such as chloride or other halide, the electron configuration is d(5)S=3/2 Fe(III) coordinated to a (corrolate)(2-.) pi-cation radical, with antiferromagnetic coupling between the metal and corrolate radical electron. Many of these complexes have been studied by electrochemical techniques and have rich redox reactivity, in most cases involving two 1-electron oxidations and two 1-electron reductions, and it is not possible to tell, from the shapes of cyclic voltammetric waves, whether the electron is added or removed from the metal or the macrocycle; often infrared, UV-Vis, or EPR spectroscopy can provide this information. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic methods are most useful in delineating the spin state and pattern of spin density distribution of the complexes listed above, as would also be expected to be the case for the recently-reported formal Fe(V)O corrolate, if this complex were stable enough for characterization by NMR spectroscopy. Iron, manganese and chromium corrolates can be oxidized by iodosylbenzene and other common oxidants used previously with metalloporphyrinates to effect efficient oxidation of substrates. Whether the "resting state" form of these complexes, most generally in the case of iron [FeCl(Corr)], actually has the electron configuration Fe(IV)(Corr)(3-) or Fe(III)(Corr)(2-.) is not relevant to the high-valent reactivity of the complex.

  18. The use of chloride-sodium ratio in the evaluation of metabolic acidosis in critically ill neonates.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Abdullah; Ecevit, Ayşe; Ozkiraz, Servet; Ince, Deniz Anuk; Akcan, Abdullah Baris; Tarcan, Aylin

    2012-06-01

    Acid-base disturbances have been usually evaluated with the traditional Henderson-Hasselbach method and Stewart's physiochemical approach by quantifying anions of tissue acids (TA). It is hypothesized that an increase in tissue acids during metabolic acidosis would cause a compensatory decrease in the plasma chloride (Cl) relative to sodium (Cl-Na ratio) in order to preserve electroneutral balance. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the use of Cl-Na ratio as a bedside tool to evaluate the identifying raised TA in neonates as an alternative to complex calculations of Stewart's physiochemical approach. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2008 and December 2009. Infants were included in the study when blood gas analysis reveals a metabolic acidosis; pH <7.25 and sHCO(3) concentration was <22 mEq/L. The Cl-Na ratio, sodium-chloride difference (Diff(NaCl)), anion gap (AG), albumin-corrected AG (AG(corr)), strong ion difference (SID), unmeasured anions (UMA), and TA were calculated at each episode of metabolic acidosis. A total of 105 metabolic acidosis episodes occurred in 59 infants during follow-up. Hypochloremic metabolic acidosis occurred in 17 (16%) of samples, and all had increased TA. The dominant component of TA was UMA rather than lactate. There was a negative correlation between the Cl-Na ratio and SID, AG(corr), UMA, and TA. Also, there was a positive correlation between Diff(NaCl) and SID, AG(corr), UMA, and TA. Base deficit and actual bicarbonate performed poorly in identifying the TA. In conclusion, our study suggested that Diff(NaCl) and Cl-Na ratio are simple and fast, and may be an alternative method to complex Stewart's physiochemical approach in identifying raised UMA and TA in critically ill neonates.

  19. Decomposing cerebral blood flow MRI into functional and structural components: A non-local approach based on prediction

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Benjamin M.; Wang, Danny JJ; Detre, John A.; Gee, James C.; Avants, Brian B.

    2014-01-01

    We present RIPMMARC (Rotation Invariant Patch-based Multi-Modality Analysis aRChitecture), a flexible and widely applicable method for extracting information unique to a given modality from a multi-modal data set. We use RIPMMARC to improve interpretation of arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion images by removing the component of perfusion that is predicted by the underlying anatomy. Using patch-based, rotation invariant descriptors derived from the anatomical image, we learn a predictive relationship between local neuroanatomical structure and the corresponding perfusion image. This relation allows us to produce an image of perfusion that would be predicted given only the underlying anatomy and a residual image that represents perfusion information that cannot be predicted by anatomical features. Our learned structural features are significantly better at predicting brain perfusion than tissue probability maps, which are the input to standard partial volume correction techniques. Studies in test-retest data show that both the anatomically predicted and residual perfusion signal are highly replicable for a given subject. In a pediatric population, both the raw perfusion and structurally predicted images are tightly linked to age throughout adolescence throughout the brain. Interestingly, the residual perfusion also shows a strong correlation with age in select regions including the hippocampi (corr= 0.38, p-value < 10−6), precuneus (corr= −0.44, p < 10−5), and combined default mode network regions (corr= −0.45, p < 10−8) that is independent of global anatomy-perfusion trends. This finding suggests that there is a regionally heterogeneous pattern of functional specialization that is distinct from that of cortical structural development. PMID:25449745

  20. Decomposing cerebral blood flow MRI into functional and structural components: a non-local approach based on prediction.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Benjamin M; Wang, Danny J J; Detre, John A; Gee, James C; Avants, Brian B

    2015-01-15

    We present RIPMMARC (Rotation Invariant Patch-based Multi-Modality Analysis aRChitecture), a flexible and widely applicable method for extracting information unique to a given modality from a multi-modal data set. We use RIPMMARC to improve the interpretation of arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion images by removing the component of perfusion that is predicted by the underlying anatomy. Using patch-based, rotation invariant descriptors derived from the anatomical image, we learn a predictive relationship between local neuroanatomical structure and the corresponding perfusion image. This relation allows us to produce an image of perfusion that would be predicted given only the underlying anatomy and a residual image that represents perfusion information that cannot be predicted by anatomical features. Our learned structural features are significantly better at predicting brain perfusion than tissue probability maps, which are the input to standard partial volume correction techniques. Studies in test-retest data show that both the anatomically predicted and residual perfusion signals are highly replicable for a given subject. In a pediatric population, both the raw perfusion and structurally predicted images are tightly linked to age throughout adolescence throughout the brain. Interestingly, the residual perfusion also shows a strong correlation with age in selected regions including the hippocampi (corr = 0.38, p-value <10(-6)), precuneus (corr = -0.44, p < 10(-5)), and combined default mode network regions (corr = -0.45, p < 10(-8)) that is independent of global anatomy-perfusion trends. This finding suggests that there is a regionally heterogeneous pattern of functional specialization that is distinct from that of cortical structural development.

  1. Correlation of free-response and receiver-operating-characteristic area-under-the-curve estimates: Results from independently conducted FROC/ROC studies in mammography

    PubMed Central

    Zanca, Federica; Hillis, Stephen L.; Claus, Filip; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Celis, Valerie; Provoost, Veerle; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: From independently conducted free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiments, to study fixed-reader associations between three estimators: the area under the alternative FROC (AFROC) curve computed from FROC data, the area under the ROC curve computed from FROC highest rating data, and the area under the ROC curve computed from confidence-of-disease ratings. Methods: Two hundred mammograms, 100 of which were abnormal, were processed by two image-processing algorithms and interpreted by four radiologists under the FROC paradigm. From the FROC data, inferred-ROC data were derived, using the highest rating assumption. Eighteen months afterwards, the images were interpreted by the same radiologists under the conventional ROC paradigm; conventional-ROC data (in contrast to inferred-ROC data) were obtained. FROC and ROC (inferred, conventional) data were analyzed using the nonparametric area-under-the-curve (AUC), (AFROC and ROC curve, respectively). Pearson correlation was used to quantify the degree of association between the modality-specific AUC indices and standard errors were computed using the bootstrap-after-bootstrap method. The magnitude of the correlations was assessed by comparison with computed Obuchowski-Rockette fixed reader correlations. Results: Average Pearson correlations (with 95% confidence intervals in square brackets) were: Corr(FROC, inferred ROC) = 0.76[0.64, 0.84] > Corr(inferred ROC, conventional ROC) = 0.40[0.18, 0.58] > Corr (FROC, conventional ROC) = 0.32[0.16, 0.46]. Conclusions: Correlation between FROC and inferred-ROC data AUC estimates was high. Correlation between inferred- and conventional-ROC AUC was similar to the correlation between two modalities for a single reader using one estimation method, suggesting that the highest rating assumption might be questionable. PMID:23039631

  2. Excrétion rénale des ions divalents après homotransplantation rénale

    PubMed Central

    Cartier, F.; Popovtzer, M. M.; Robinette, J.; Pinggera, W. F.; Halgrimson, C. G.; Starzl, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ L’élimination rénale des ions divalents, celle du Na et du K, ont été étudiées de façon comparative dans les suites immédiates de l’homotransplantation rénale chez 6 patients. Durant la période initiale polyurique (> 3ml/mn), le taux d’excrétion du Ca filtré (Cca/Ccr), du Mg, du P, du Na et du K, est élevé et il existe une corrélation étroite et quasi constante entre l’élimination du Ca, du Mg et du Na ; la corrélation n’est pas constante entre l’élimination du Na et du K, du Mg et du K. Pendant les deux jours suivants, le taux d’excrétion diminue, sauf pour le P ; il existe encore une corrélation entre l’excrétion du Ca, du Mg et du Na, non entre celle du Na et du K, du Mg et du K. L’excrétion du Ca l’emporte sur celle du Na au cours de la première période, non au cours de la seconde. A la lumière de ces données, on envisage l’intervention possible de divers facteurs, tels l’inflation hydrosique et l’hyperazotémie préalables, l’ischémie rénale contemporaine de la transplantation, les effets de la dénervation rénale, du traitement cortisonique, de l’hyperparathyroïdie et ceux des modifications circulatoires rénales. PMID:4574592

  3. Spectral Approaches to Learning Predictive Representations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Dean P. Foster, and Lyle H. Ungar . Spectral learning of latent-variable pcfgs. In ACL (1), pages 223–231, 2012. 1.1 [26] Paramveer S. Dhillon, Jordan...Rodu, Michael Collins, Dean P. Foster, and Lyle H. Ungar . Spectral dependency parsing with latent variables. In EMNLP-CoNLL, pages 205–213, 2012. 1.1...H. Ungar . Spectral dimensionality reduction for hmms. CoRR, abs/1203.6130, 2012. 1.1 [34] Kenji Fukumizu, Le Song, and Arthur Gretton. Kernel bayes

  4. Pseudopolymorphism in hydroxybenzophenones: the dihydrate of 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxybenzophenone.

    PubMed

    Landre, I M R; Martins, F T; Ellena, J A; Dos Santos, M H; Doriguetto, A C

    2012-04-01

    A dihydrate pseudopolymorph of bis(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methanone, C(13)H(10)O(5)·2H(2)O, (I), was obtained during polymorphism screening of hydroxybenzophenone derivatives. This structure, in which the molecule sits on a twofold axis, was compared with the known anhydrous form of (I) [Schlemper (1982). Acta Cryst. B38, 554-559]. The role of water in the crystal assembly was established on the basis of the known monohydrate pseudopolymorph of 3,4-dihydroxybenzophenone [Landre, Souza, Corrêa, Martins & Doriguetto (2010). Acta Cryst. C66, o463-o465].

  5. F-16 Task Analysis Criterion-Referenced Objective and Objectives Hierarchy Report. Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    mareuver and tar get’s actions and position, describe subsequent specfic actions to t,.ke Ai the phase manual, FWIC Instructional texts, and TRICOM...steps in the roceeli-e ;or :4-.sie attack in AAM mode dith AMi-9j r correct oroer with ro o-,issics. _ [Acadesic) I nee r iiri~g, ;ridirh- the AI & .J...presentatior of the AI -?J zissile on, the missile over-ridedgih oe corr-ectly idertifV the VCrIOUS components and state the values represerted LAW t.he

  6. Unaspis lansivora sp. n. (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), a new pest of Lansium domesticum (Meliaceae), and a key to Unaspis species.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gillian W

    2015-01-13

    Since 2004, an undescribed species of Unaspis (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) has become a damaging pest on Lansium domesticum Corrêa in the Philippines. Its attack on the leaves causes premature senescence and defoliation, resulting in the production of few, underdeveloped, sour fruit and sometimes killing the trees. The scale was misidentified initially as Lepidosaphes ulmi (Linnaeus) and then as Unaspis citri (Comstock), but further study indicated that it was an undescribed species of potential plant quarantine significance. The pest is described as U. lansivora sp. n. and an identification key to all 19 species of Unaspis is provided. Its distribution, host range and prospects for its biological control are discussed.

  7. Optoelectronic Workshops. 11. Superlattice Disordering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-07

    34tbL LA OVE- C EL6U-Q 1" &&F EC~Corr Loi - %. 4 W7 IJJ E- L-’T SL..ytQb L6C 004i c6 > P1.16 ~ ~ w LEC - E US: 0kLkok-TP ~ Or V44A LA 0.2- 0.1- L&J. - 0.1...13 M.Wihl, P.J. Stiles and J1. Tauc , Proc. 1 Ith Intern. Conf. on the Physics of Semiconductors, Warsaw 1972, p.4 84. 14 M.A. Nizarnetdinova, Phys

  8. A Better Least-Squares Method when Both Variables Have Uncertainties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    results ob- mize tained by Jefferys’ are remarkably similar to those of Britt S f,ilt + k4) and Luecke ." Howkever, Jefferys appeared to be unaware of...the existence of the Britt - Luecke paper, or indeed of any of where x + i has been abbreviated by i. The minimization the other works referred to by the...R. Macdonald. Comput J 15, 148 1Q72, the different methods were even greater than the corre- ’It I. Britt and R. If. uecke. Technomctrics 15. 233 1973

  9. The Streambank Erosion Control Evaluation and Demonstration Act of 1974, Section 32, Public Law 93-251. Appendix D. Ohio River Demonstration Projects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    SERICCA 20 MOUNDSVILLE, W. VA. PHALARIS ARUNOINACEA REED CANARY GRASS 2 IT 01AGROSTIS AL&A "to TOP 5S T LOTUS CORNICULATUS ISIROSFOOT TRFIL 10 OHIO... CORNICULATUS BIROSFOOT TREFOIL to F ,*21 LAETPESTUCA ARUNOHNAC A TALL fESCUE 0S I TE LOTUS CORNICULATUS SIROSFOOT TREFOIL .00H1 RIVE PLATE 19 D-2-37...AGROS-ris .4LBA KED 7TOP s LorLJS CORNICULATUS AJ*DSFooT rXEF’OL 10 C FKSruc9 fiRuNDINACER, TALL FffSC IAf CPCV.31,VLTA) 30 CORrD/VILq4 Vh9#9PffYC.is

  10. Symposium: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Held in Beaune, France on 28-30 May 1990.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    or12 siply i tie n erofbursts tea thed srin rtion ae sa as wouldn the dura* slp htcaatrzsteitegration funection Ishw InFgr13A. oejc at Auljle urslt...awe i’ ge, corr~tic dn leBruit avcl ~ito i ptmcedcclr diie bzlspcrsonnhes ig.~es. Linteraction catnie" poor tea frivqicecs comprises dan5 Is, grue...grande perte de cettuites ciu~cs esternes docoettidaire (EPi) et ecponse de fibres ut[. (OiiCs) (uut Irs sujets Aigus calune" stir tea em-taires sil ni

  11. Extracting dune mobility time series from sequences of optical satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.; Leprince, S.

    2012-12-01

    COSI-Corr (Co-registration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation) is an exciting new tool for the automatic detection and quantification of Earth surface movement from pairs of satellite imagery. The program was originally developed by geophysicists interested in earthquakes, but has quickly found applications in geomorphology, including the study of glaciers, landslides, and sand dunes both on Earth and, recently, on Mars. Given two optical images of the same dune area taken at different times, COSI-Corr calculates the displacement field that maximizes the correlation between the two exposures. Temporal changes of dune celerity can serve as a sensitive proxy for the windiness of desert areas. It can be shown that any change in shear velocity (u*) causes a three times larger change in dune celerity (v): ∂ {v}/{v} = 3 ∂ {u*}/{u_*} We have developed an algorithm to use COSI-Corr to compare a sequence multiple satellite images in order to extract time series of dune celerity and monitor the windiness of remote field locations devoid of weather stations and anemometers. The algorithm involves the following steps: Georeference, orthorectify and resample the images to a common resolution. Measure the displacement field for each time step with COSI-Corr. Destripe the raw correlation results to remove uncorrected attitude effects. `Warp' the destriped displacement fields back to a common reference, e.g. the first image in the sequence. `Clean' the correlation results using a combination of two filters, requiring the displacements to (a) have a high signal-to-noise ratio and (b) move in a consistent direction with time. Connect the `surviving' pixels of the displacement map and track them across the image with time, yielding a map-view of dune migration paths. Project the stepwise displacements of each dune track on the resultant migration direction to obtain the cumulative displacements. Select those pixels with a total displacement near the mode of this

  12. Characterization of Pairwise Correlations from Multiple Quantum Correlated Beams Generated from Cascaded Four-Wave Mixing Processes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hailong; Cao, Leiming; Jing, Jietai

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically characterize the performance of the pairwise correlations (PCs) from multiple quantum correlated beams based on the cascaded four-wave mixing (FWM) processes. The presence of the PCs with quantum corre- lation in these systems can be verified by calculating the degree of intensity difference squeezing for any pair of all the output fields. The quantum correlation characteristics of all the PCs under different cascaded schemes are also discussed in detail and the repulsion effect between PCs in these cascaded FWM processes is theoretically predicted. Our results open the way for the classification and application of quantum states generated from the cascaded FWM processes. PMID:28071759

  13. Out-of-Sequence Measurements Filtering Using Forward Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    decorrélée de la plus récente estimation dans la piste par une méthode de décorrélation similaire à celle par le filtre d’information... Kalman Filter method presented in [9], which also uses equivalent measurements. DRDC Valcartier TR 2005-485 5 4 Impact of missing measurements on...The influence of age can be explained by the Kalman filter recursiveness. Therefore, the age of a measurement is determined by the number of subsequent

  14. Pooled Analysis of CNS Response to Alectinib in Two Studies of Pretreated Patients With ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gadgeel, Shirish M; Shaw, Alice T; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Gandhi, Leena; Socinski, Mark A; Camidge, D Ross; De Petris, Luigi; Kim, Dong-Wan; Chiappori, Alberto; Moro-Sibilot, Denis L; Duruisseaux, Michael; Crino, Lucio; De Pas, Tommaso; Dansin, Eric; Tessmer, Antje; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Han, Ji-Youn; Bordogna, Walter; Golding, Sophie; Zeaiter, Ali; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-12-01

    Purpose Alectinib has shown activity in the CNS in phase I and II studies. To further evaluate this activity, we pooled efficacy and safety data from two single-arm phase II studies (NP28761 and NP28673; ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01871805 and NCT01801111, respectively) in patients with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Both studies included patients with ALK-positive NSCLC who had previously received crizotinib; all patients received alectinib 600 mg twice per day. The primary end point in both studies was independent review committee (IRC)-assessed objective response rate (ORR; by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST] version 1.1). Additional end points (all by IRC) included CNS ORR (CORR), CNS disease control rate (CDCR), and CNS duration of response (CDOR). Results One hundred thirty-six patients had baseline CNS metastases (60% of the overall study populations); 50 patients (37%) had measurable CNS disease at baseline. Ninety-five patients (70%) had prior CNS radiotherapy; 55 patients completed the CNS radiotherapy more than 6 months before starting alectinib. Median follow-up time was 12.4 months (range, 0.9 to 19.7 months). For patients with baseline measurable CNS disease, IRC CORR was 64.0% (95% CI, 49.2% to 77.1%), CDCR was 90.0% (95% CI, 78.2% to 96.7%), and median CDOR was 10.8 months (95% CI, 7.6 to 14.1 months). For patients with measurable and/or nonmeasurable baseline CNS disease, IRC CORR was 42.6% (95% CI, 34.2% to 51.4%), CDCR was 85.3% (95% CI, 78.2% to 90.8%), and median CDOR was 11.1 months (95% CI, 10.3 months to not evaluable). CORR was 35.8% (95% CI, 26.2% to 46.3%) for patients with prior radiotherapy (n = 95) and 58.5% (95% CI, 42.1% to 73.7%) for patients without prior radiotherapy (n = 41). As previously reported, alectinib was well tolerated, regardless of baseline CNS disease. Conclusion Alectinib showed good efficacy against CNS metastases, in addition to systemic activity

  15. Correlation Study of Laboratory Physical and Chemical Data with Dynamometer Engine Sequence Performance Testing of Engine Lubricating Oils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    and chemical data and dynamomet er and field perfo rmance. The initial stud y produced internal and group correlations among the data and suggests a...sm all (a corre lation of I .0 i~ ~~r kct cor rela t ion ’, Prin cip al comp onent .iii,il ~ 515 Was enmp lo~ ed to stud ~ lhe iner al l re hi t i...Additive ) K = Potassium (Addit ive) V N = Nitr ogen (Additive ) . V Mg = Magnesium (Additive ) B = Boron (Additive ) Other = To include wear and

  16. Pulmonary Function After Treatment for Embryonal Brain Tumors on SJMB03 That Included Craniospinal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Daniel M.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Billups, Catherine A.; Stokes, Dennis C.; Broniscer, Alberto; Bartels, Ute; Chintagumpala, Murali; Hassall, Timothy E.; Gururangan, Sridharan; McCowage, Geoffrey B.; Heath, John A.; Cohn, Richard J.; Fisher, Michael J.; Srinivasan, Ashok; Robinson, Giles W.; Gajjar, Amar

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The treatment of children with embryonal brain tumors (EBT) includes craniospinal irradiation (CSI). There are limited data regarding the effect of CSI on pulmonary function. Methods: Protocol SJMB03 enrolled patients 3 to 21 years of age with EBT. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV{sub 1}] and forced vital capacity [FVC] by spirometry, total lung capacity [TLC] by nitrogen washout or plethysmography, and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide corrected for hemoglobin [DLCO{sub corr}]) were obtained. Differences between PFTs obtained immediately after the completion of CSI and 24 or 60 months after the completion of treatment (ACT) were compared using exact Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and repeated-measures models. Results: Between June 24, 2003, and March 1, 2010, 303 eligible patients (spine dose: ≤2345 cGy, 201; >2345 cGy, 102; proton beam, 20) were enrolled, 260 of whom had at least 1 PFT. The median age at diagnosis was 8.9 years (range, 3.1-20.4 years). The median thoracic spinal radiation dose was 23.4 Gy (interquartile range [IQR], 23.4-36.0 Gy). The median cyclophosphamide dose was 16.0 g/m{sup 2} (IQR, 15.7-16.0 g/m{sup 2}). At 24 and 60 months ACT, DLCO{sub corr} was <75% predicted in 23% (27/118) and 25% (21/84) of patients, FEV{sub 1} was <80% predicted in 20% (34/170) and 29% (32/109) of patients, FVC was <80% predicted in 27% (46/172) and 28% (30/108) of patients, and TLC was <75% predicted in 9% (13/138) and 11% (10/92) of patients. DLCO{sub corr} was significantly decreased 24 months ACT (median difference [MD] in % predicted, 3.00%; P=.028) and 60 months ACT (MD in % predicted, 6.00%; P=.033) compared with the end of radiation therapy. These significant decreases in DLCO{sub corr} were also observed in repeated-measures models (P=.011 and P=.032 at 24 and 60 months ACT, respectively). Conclusions: A significant minority of EBT survivors experience PFT deficits after CSI

  17. Improved Ceramic Anodes for Corrosion Protection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    Traditionally. impressed current systems have used tion (CEGS) 2310. antides that are either inexpensive and very large (high silicon, chromium ...2’ and Fe3s or Mn2 by severe spalling or flaking of material fromt the and Mn3 are both present on the B site of the spinel sample face. The time to...normal spinel , with 80 percent of the Mn 2 on the time. the required potential increased rapidly. corres- normal or A site and 20 percent on the

  18. Reliability Model Demonstration Study. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    startup ap5301 ae ecz 189 189 190 co in dOO ml spetr 01154 mioper tab display ap5301 ad daz 189 189 190 co In dOO ma amorr 01148 redefine fd2 ap5301 apc...SysVer Gr CU Det Res Ver PC PD Cis Ef Co-ord 04066 dc disk interface seO9O1 cc ccs 082 I11 11l co pa fOO .1 drhod 04511 corr jam & term proc in gene

  19. The Coast Artillery Journal. Volume 67, Number 5, November 1927

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1927-11-01

    Address: The COAST AuTII..LEllY JOl:liI::-iAL, Fort ~Ionroe" Ya .. Printed by H01:STOX PKI~TI:SG A~D PL"lSLISHI:\\C Hm:sE" Hampton" Ya .. Report...physical effect. Fur- thermore, no set of physical explanations which I have yet seen printed is susceptible of reduction to the universally accepted...explosion of the powder. The ( virtual ) translation of the earth on its orbit, and the corre, sponding translatory motion of the projectile, can be

  20. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 21, Number 10, October 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    harm vary by major geographic region of assignment William P. Corr, III, MD, MPH P A G E 6 Risk of type II diabetes and hypertension associated with...incidence of chronic insom- nia. In addition, this report examines the association between both hyperten- sion and type II diabetes and chronic insomnia...were at higher risk for type II diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.17 [95% CI, 1.75–2.69]) and hypertension (adjusted HR, 2.00 [95% CI, 1.85

  1. Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference (39th) Held in Madison, Wisconsin on 7-10 October 1986. Program and Abstracts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    PHYSICS 1611 LAUREL AVE., #608 ROLLA MO 65401 KNOXVILLE TN 37916 314-341-4781 615-637-6740 CORR, JAY DAVANLOO. FARZIN UNIV. OF WINDSOR UNIV.OF TEXAS...NEYNABER, ROY H. PAI, ROBERT UNIV.OF CALIFORNIA- GTE SAN DIEGO/DEPT. PHYSICS 60 BOSTON ST. 8-019 SALEM MA 01970 LA JOLLA CA 92093 617-777-1900 619-534...SCHEUER. JAY T. SHIRAI. TOSHIZO UNIV.OF WISCONSIN ARGONNE NAT’L LAB. 1500 JOHNSON ST. 9700 S. CASS AVE. MADISON WI 53706 ARGONNE IL 60439 608-271

  2. Fast Two-Qubit Gates in Semiconductor Quantum Dots using a Photonic Microcavity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-22

    we focus on the former mechanism. The unintended tran- sitions can cause Ug to deviate from the ideal UCZ and effectively cause loss of coherence in...starts decreasing more rapidly for σ/ωe >∼ 0.2 due to involvement of a larger number of unintended transitions. Next, we consider the effects of...0〉, (A1) where |0〉 is the vacuum state of the cavity. The corre- sponding energies are controlled by the magnetic field via Zeeman splitting. For

  3. Evaluation of Existing Image Matching Methods for Deriving Glacier Surface Displacements Globally from Optical Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, T.; Kääb, A.

    2011-12-01

    Automatic matching of images from two different times is a method that is often used to derive glacier surface velocity. Nearly global repeat coverage of the Earth's surface by optical satellite sensors now opens the possibility for global-scale mapping and monitoring of glacier flow with a number of applications in, for example, glacier physics, glacier-related climate change and impact assessment, and glacier hazard management. The purpose of this study is to compare and evaluate different existing image matching methods for glacier flow determination over large scales. The study compares six different matching methods: normalized cross-correlation (NCC), the phase correlation algorithm used in the COSI-Corr software, and four other Fourier methods with different normalizations. We compare the methods over five regions of the world with different representative glacier characteristics: Karakoram, the European Alps, Alaska, Pine Island (Antarctica) and southwest Greenland. Landsat images are chosen for matching because they expand back to 1972, they cover large areas, and at the same time their spatial resolution is as good as 15 m for images after 1999 (ETM+ pan). Cross-correlation on orientation images (CCF-O) outperforms the three similar Fourier methods, both in areas with high and low visual contrast. NCC experiences problems in areas with low visual contrast, areas with thin clouds or changing snow conditions between the images. CCF-O has problems on narrow outlet glaciers where small window sizes (about 16 pixels by 16 pixels or smaller) are needed, and it also obtains fewer correct matches than COSI-Corr in areas with low visual contrast. COSI-Corr has problems on narrow outlet glaciers and it obtains fewer correct matches compared to CCF-O when thin clouds cover the surface, or if one of the images contains snow dunes. In total, we consider CCF-O and COSI-Corr to be the two most robust matching methods for global-scale mapping and monitoring of glacier

  4. Electrochemical Behavior of Three 90Cu-10Ni Tubes from Different Manufacturers After Immersion in 3.5% NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekerenam, Okpo O.; Ma, Aili; Zheng, Yugui; Emori, Wilfred

    2017-02-01

    Investigation on the electrochemical behavior and corrosion product films formed on three 90Cu-10Ni tubes designated as Tubes A, B and C from three different manufacturers with different service lives were carried out using electrochemical techniques, SEM, XRD and XPS after immersion in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results of polarization curve measurements showed noticeable decrease in the corrosion current densities (I corr) of the three tubes with immersion time, and the I corr of Tube C was comparatively lower than those of Tubes A and B at early immersion period. EIS measurements revealed duplex film layers on the surface of the samples with the inner film formation occurring at different times for different tubes as the film resistance R f2 revealed the formation of the inner compact layer in Tube C after 15-day immersion and in Tubes A and B after 30 days. Tube C showed better corrosion resistance which is due to early formation of the inner compact oxide film. The XPS analysis revealed Ni enrichment on the surface film of the three samples but Ni depletion as the immersion time is increased.

  5. Fretting corrosion behaviour of ball-and-socket joint on dental implants with different prosthodontic alloys.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Canedo, R; Padrós, A; Bañeres, M V; Arano, J M

    2003-01-01

    The fretting corrosion of five materials for implant suprastructures (cast-titanium, machined-titanium, gold alloy, silver-palladium alloy and chromium-nickel alloy), was investigated in vitro, the materials being galvanically coupled to a titanium ball-and-socket-joint with tetrafluoroethylene under mechanical load. Various electrochemical parameters (E(corr), i(corr), Evans diagrams, polarization resistance and Tafel slopes) were analyzed. The microstructure of the different dental materials was observed before and after corrosion processes by optical and electron microscopy. It can be observed that the mechanical load produces an important decrease of the corrosion resistance. The cast and machined titanium had the most passive current density at a given potential and chromium-nickel alloy had the most active critical current density values. The high gold content alloys have excellent resistance corrosion, although this decreases when the gold content is lower in the alloy. The palladium alloy had a low critical current density due to the presence of gallium in this composition but a selective dissolution of copper-rich phases was observed through energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

  6. Study of corrosion between a titanium implant and dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Meyer, J M

    1994-06-01

    The infiltration of saliva into the multi-metallic structures on titanium implants brings different types of alloys into temporary or permanent contact. In this way a galvanic cell is established as a result of their potential difference. The galvanic cell phenomenon is compounded by another type of corrosion resulting from the geometry of the assembly: localized crevice corrosion. Fifteen galvanic couples (Ti/gold-based alloys, Ti/palladium-based alloy and Ti/non-precious alloys) were studied. Various electrochemical parameters (Ecorr, Ecommon, Ecouple corr, Ecrevice, icorr, icouple corr and Tafel slopes) were analysed. The galvanic currents measured are of the same order of magnitude (except Ti/stainless steel). They remain low. Application of the mixed-potential theory shows that titanium in coupling with the alloys studied will be under either cathodic or anodic control. According to the results obtained, an alloy that is potentially usable for superstructures in a galvanic coupling with titanium must fulfil a certain number of parameters: in a coupling, titanium must have a weak anodic polarization; the current generated by the galvanic cell must also be weak; the crevice potential must be markedly higher than the common potential.

  7. Galvanic corrosion behavior of titanium implants coupled to dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Cortada, M; Giner, L; Costa, S; Gil, F J; Rodríguez, D; Planell, J A

    2000-05-01

    The corrosion of five materials for implant suprastructures (cast-titanium, machined-titanium, gold alloy, silver-palladium alloy and chromium-nickel alloy), was investigated in vitro, the materials being galvanically coupled to a titanium implant. Various electrochemical parameters E(CORR), i(CORR) Evans diagrams, polarization resistance and Tafel slopes) were analyzed. The microstructure of the different dental materials was observed before and after corrosion processes by optical and electron microscopy. Besides, the metallic ions released in the saliva environment were quantified during the corrosion process by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry technique (ICP-MS). The cast and machined titanium had the most passive current density at a given potential and chromium-nickel alloy had the most active critical current density values. The high gold content alloys have excellent resistance corrosion, although this decreases when the gold content is lower in the alloy. The palladium alloy had a low critical current density due to the presence of gallium in this composition but a selective dissolution of copper-rich phases was observed through energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

  8. EARLIER: an observational study to evaluate the use of cinacalcet in incident hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism in daily clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Hemetsberger, Margit; Oberbauer, Rainer; Erb, Helmut; Pronai, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    The EARLIER (Evaluation of MimpARa in incident hemodiaLysis patIEnts with secondaRy hyperparathyroidism; SHPT) observational postmarketing surveillance study evaluated incident hemodialysis patients (< 1 year dialysis vintage; n = 146) receiving cinacalcet in Austrian clinical practice. Despite intervention with vitamin D sterols and phosphate binders, 24 % had already developed severe SHPT (intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) > 800 pg/mL) at baseline. After cinacalcet was started, median iPTH decreased substantially, from 611 pg/mL to 251 pg/mL (median decrease 58 % [IQR - 36 to - 78 %] at 12 months. Overall, 36 % of patients achieved the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) target range (150-300 pg/mL) for iPTH; this included 35 % of those with severe SHPT at baseline. Serum phosphorus (P), calcium (Ca) (corr), and Ca (corr) × P also decreased, with 43, 34, and 62 % of patients, respectively, reaching K/DOQI targets at 12 months. Thus, in this observational study, mineral metabolism in incident dialysis patients with SHPT improved after starting cinacalcet.

  9. MCM7 polymorphisms associated with the AML relapse and overall survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Sol; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Koh, Youngil; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (MCM7) encodes a member of MCM complex, which plays a critical role in the initiation of gene replication. Due to the importance of MCM complex, MCM7 gene has been regarded as a candidate gene for cancer development. In the present study, seven MCM7 polymorphisms were genotyped in 344 subjects composed of 103 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and 241 normal controls to examine the possible associations between MCM7 polymorphisms and the risk of AML. MCM7 polymorphisms were not associated with the risk of AML (P > 0.05). However, MCM7 polymorphisms were significantly related to the relapse of AML and overall survival. The rs2070215 (N144S) showed a protective effect to the risk of AML relapse (OR = 0.37; P (corr) = 0.02). In haplotype analyses, the ht1 and ht2 showed significant associations with the risk of AML relapse (P (corr) = 0.02-0.03). In addition, rs1534309 showed an association with the overall survival of AML patients. Patients with major homozygote genotype (CC) of rs1534309 showed a higher survival rate than the patients with other genotypes (CG and GG). The results of the present study indicate that MCM7 polymorphisms may be able to predict the prognosis of AML patients.

  10. Formation of a nano-pattering NiTi surface with Ni-depleted superficial layer to promote corrosion resistance and endothelial cell-material interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Li, Yan; Xia, Yun; Venkatraman, Subbu S; Xiang, Yan; Zhao, Xinqing

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium ion implantation was performed on NiTi alloy to suppress Ni ion release as well as to improve corrosion resistance and cell-material interaction. A thicker Ni-depleted nano-scale composite layer formed after Zr implantation and the corrosion resistance was evidently increased in aspects of increased E(br) - E(corr) (difference between corrosion potential and breakdown potential) and decreased corrosion current density. 2.5/2 NiTi sample possessed the highest E(br) - E(corr), more than 500 mV higher than that of untreated NiTi, suggesting a significant improvement on pitting corrosion resistance. Ni ion release rate of Zr-NiTi was decreased due to the depletion of Ni in the superficial surface layer and the diffusion resistance effect of the ZrO(2)/TiO(2) nano-film. Increased surface wettability induced by increased surface roughness was obtained after Zr implantation. Zr-NiTi samples were found to be favorable to endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation, especially after 5 and 7 days culture.

  11. Short wave infrared chemical imaging as future tool for analysing gunshot residues patterns in targets.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Ojeda, F E; Torre-Roldán, M; García-Ruiz, C

    2017-05-15

    This work used chemical imaging in the short-wave infrared region for analysing gunshot residues (GSR) patterns in cotton fabric targets shot with conventional and non-toxic ammunition. It presents a non-destructive, non-toxic, highly visual and hiperspectral-based approach. The method was based on classical least squares regression, and was tested with the ammunition propellants and their standard components' spectra. The propellants' spectra were satisfactorily used (R(2) >0.966, and CorrCoef >0.982) for identifying the GSR irrespective of the type of ammunition used for the shooting. In a more versatile approach, nitrocellulose, the main component in the ammunition propellants, resulted an excellent standard for identifying GSR patterns (R(2)>0.842, and CorrCoef >0.908). In this case, the propellants' stabilizers (diphenilamine and centralite), and its nitrated derivatives as well as dinitrotoluene, showed also high spectral activity. Therefore, they could be recommended as complementary standards for confirming the GSR identification. These findings establish the proof of concept for a science-based evidence useful to support expert reports and final court rulings. This approach for obtaining GSR patterns can be an excellent alternative to the current and traditional chemical methods, which are based in presumptive and invasive colour tests.

  12. Optimization of the HOVF Spray Parameters by Taguchi Method for High Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yujiao; Wu, Yuping; Zhang, Jianfeng; Hong, Sheng; Guo, Wenmin; Chen, Liyan; Liu, Hao

    2015-07-01

    Taguchi method was used to optimize the parameters of the high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process and obtain the high corrosion-resistant Fe-based coatings. Based on the signal-to-noise ( S/ N) ratio and the analysis of variance, the significance of spray parameters in determining the porosity of the coatings was found to be in the order of spray distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow. Thus, the optimal parameters for the porosity of the HVOF sprayed Fe-based coating were determined as 280 mm for the spray distance, 963 scfh for the oxygen flow, and 28 gph for the kerosene flow. The potentiodynamic polarization and EIS tests indicated that the Fe-based coating prepared with the optimal parameters exhibited a higher corrosion potential ( E corr) of -196.14 mV, a lower corrosion current density ( i corr) of 0.14 μA/cm2, and a higher coating resistance ( R c) of 2.26 × 106 Ω cm2 than those of the hard chromium coating in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. This superior corrosion resistance could be attributed to the dense structure with low porosity and partially amorphous phases of the Fe-based coatings.

  13. An open science resource for establishing reliability and reproducibility in functional connectomics

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xi-Nian; Anderson, Jeffrey S; Bellec, Pierre; Birn, Rasmus M; Biswal, Bharat B; Blautzik, Janusch; Breitner, John C.S; Buckner, Randy L; Calhoun, Vince D; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Chen, Antao; Chen, Bing; Chen, Jiangtao; Chen, Xu; Colcombe, Stanley J; Courtney, William; Craddock, R Cameron; Di Martino, Adriana; Dong, Hao-Ming; Fu, Xiaolan; Gong, Qiyong; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Han, Ying; He, Ye; He, Yong; Ho, Erica; Holmes, Avram; Hou, Xiao-Hui; Huckins, Jeremy; Jiang, Tianzi; Jiang, Yi; Kelley, William; Kelly, Clare; King, Margaret; LaConte, Stephen M; Lainhart, Janet E; Lei, Xu; Li, Hui-Jie; Li, Kaiming; Li, Kuncheng; Lin, Qixiang; Liu, Dongqiang; Liu, Jia; Liu, Xun; Liu, Yijun; Lu, Guangming; Lu, Jie; Luna, Beatriz; Luo, Jing; Lurie, Daniel; Mao, Ying; Margulies, Daniel S; Mayer, Andrew R; Meindl, Thomas; Meyerand, Mary E; Nan, Weizhi; Nielsen, Jared A; O’Connor, David; Paulsen, David; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Qi, Zhigang; Qiu, Jiang; Shao, Chunhong; Shehzad, Zarrar; Tang, Weijun; Villringer, Arno; Wang, Huiling; Wang, Kai; Wei, Dongtao; Wei, Gao-Xia; Weng, Xu-Chu; Wu, Xuehai; Xu, Ting; Yang, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qinglin; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ke; Zhen, Zonglei; Zhou, Yuan; Zhu, Xing-Ting; Milham, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to identify meaningful functional imaging-based biomarkers are limited by the ability to reliably characterize inter-individual differences in human brain function. Although a growing number of connectomics-based measures are reported to have moderate to high test-retest reliability, the variability in data acquisition, experimental designs, and analytic methods precludes the ability to generalize results. The Consortium for Reliability and Reproducibility (CoRR) is working to address this challenge and establish test-retest reliability as a minimum standard for methods development in functional connectomics. Specifically, CoRR has aggregated 1,629 typical individuals’ resting state fMRI (rfMRI) data (5,093 rfMRI scans) from 18 international sites, and is openly sharing them via the International Data-sharing Neuroimaging Initiative (INDI). To allow researchers to generate various estimates of reliability and reproducibility, a variety of data acquisition procedures and experimental designs are included. Similarly, to enable users to assess the impact of commonly encountered artifacts (for example, motion) on characterizations of inter-individual variation, datasets of varying quality are included. PMID:25977800

  14. Avoiding errors attributable to topography in GPS-IR snow depth retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuangcheng; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) interferometric reflectometry represents a potential source of new snow data for climate scientists and water managers with spatial and temporal sensitivity. Generally, the snow layer fluctuation is considered to be correlated with the ground surface fluctuation. The reflector heights in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are quite close to the vertical distance between the antenna and the ground or snow level at the corresponding Fresnel zone. The reflector heights at different zones were represented by a grid model in this work, which can reflect and overcome some of the problems caused by the topography. The proposed method for snow depth retrievals looks for good quality reflector height values of the horizontal reflecting zone in the grid model, and with this method improvements in snow depth retrieval accuracy were achieved (RMSE: 7.40 cm, Corr.: 0.99) compared to the PBO H2O group calculation results (RMSE: 16.58 cm, Corr.: 0.99).

  15. Detection of herb-symptom associations from traditional chinese medicine clinical data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Bing; Zhou, Xue-Zhong; Zhang, Run-Shun; Wang, Ying-Hui; Peng, Yonghong; Hu, Jing-Qing; Xie, Qi; Xue, Yan-Xing; Xu, Li-Li; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Bao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is an individualized medicine by observing the symptoms and signs (symptoms in brief) of patients. We aim to extract the meaningful herb-symptom relationships from large scale TCM clinical data. Methods. To investigate the correlations between symptoms and herbs held for patients, we use four clinical data sets collected from TCM outpatient clinical settings and calculate the similarities between patient pairs in terms of the herb constituents of their prescriptions and their manifesting symptoms by cosine measure. To address the large-scale multiple testing problems for the detection of herb-symptom associations and the dependence between herbs involving similar efficacies, we propose a network-based correlation analysis (NetCorrA) method to detect the herb-symptom associations. Results. The results show that there are strong positive correlations between symptom similarity and herb similarity, which indicates that herb-symptom correspondence is a clinical principle adhered to by most TCM physicians. Furthermore, the NetCorrA method obtains meaningful herb-symptom associations and performs better than the chi-square correlation method by filtering the false positive associations. Conclusions. Symptoms play significant roles for the prescriptions of herb treatment. The herb-symptom correspondence principle indicates that clinical phenotypic targets (i.e., symptoms) of herbs exist and would be valuable for further investigations.

  16. Détermination assistée par ordinateur de la structure des molécules organiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzillard, J.-M.

    1998-02-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy offers the unique possibility of accessing proximity relationships between atoms by means of chemical shift correlation experiments. Structure determination of small molecules has become thus much simpler. Computer programs can use directly correlation information for structure analysis. The use and operation mechanism of such a program, LSD (Logic for Structure Determination) are presented. The example compound is gibberellic acid, a natural product. La spectroscopie de Résonance Magnétique Nucléaire offre un moyen unique de déterminer des relations de proximité entre atomes par le biais des expériences de corrélation. L'analyse structurale de petites molécules organiques s'en trouve extrêmement facilitée. Des programmes informatiques peuvent utiliser directement les informations de corrélation pour déduire des structures. Le fonctionnement et l'usage d'un tel programme, LSD (Logic for Structure Determination), sont détaillés sur un exemple, l'acide gibberellique.

  17. Génération de faisceaux EPR à l'aide d'un oscillateur paramétrique optique à auto-verrouillage de phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurat, J.; Longchambon, L.; Coudreau, T.; Fabre, C.

    2004-11-01

    Les faisceaux continus orthogonalement polarisés émis par les Oscillateurs Paramétriques Optiques (OPO) de type II pompés au-dessus du seuil présentent au niveau quantique de fortes corrélations d'intensité et anti-corrélations de phase. Ils sont donc de très bons candidats pour générer des faisceaux intriqués en quadrature. Cependant, un phénomène de diffusion de phase rend difficile la mesure des propriétés sur la phase. Nous avons étudié théoriquement le régime stationnaire et les propriétés quantiques d'un OPO contenant une lame biréfringente. Le couplage linéaire qui en résulte entraîne un verrouillage en phase ainsi qu'un fonctionnement à dégénérescence en fréquence à l'intérieur d'une zone d'accrochage. L'expérience en cours au laboratoire a permis d'observer ce phénomène de verrouillage.

  18. Regularity of Cardiac Rhythm as a Marker of Sleepiness in Sleep Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Vallverdú, Montserrat; Caminal, Pere; Vilaseca, Isabel; Montserrat, Josep M.; Gaig, Carles; Salamero, Manel; Santamaria, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Aim The present study aimed to analyse the autonomic nervous system activity using heart rate variability (HRV) to detect sleep disordered breathing (SDB) patients with and without excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) before sleep onset. Methods Two groups of 20 patients with different levels of daytime sleepiness -sleepy group, SG; alert group, AG- were selected consecutively from a Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) research protocol. The first waking 3-min window of RR signal at the beginning of each nap test was considered for the analysis. HRV was measured with traditional linear measures and with time-frequency representations. Non-linear measures -correntropy, CORR; auto-mutual-information function, AMIF- were used to describe the regularity of the RR rhythm. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests. Results Non-linear dynamic of the RR rhythm was more regular in the SG than in the AG during the first wakefulness period of MSLT, but not during MWT. AMIF (in high-frequency and in Total band) and CORR (in Total band) yielded sensitivity > 70%, specificity >75% and an area under ROC curve > 0.80 in classifying SG and AG patients. Conclusion The regularity of the RR rhythm measured at the beginning of the MSLT could be used to detect SDB patients with and without EDS before the appearance of sleep onset. PMID:25860587

  19. Influence of CrN-coating thickness on the corrosion resistance behaviour of aluminium-based bipolar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, José; Barreras, Félix; Lozano, Antonio; Maza, Mario

    The electrical and corrosion properties of CrN-coated aluminium alloy Magnal-45 (Al-5083) probes have been evaluated, in order to assess their viability to be used as bipolar plates in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. To this end, ceramic micro-layers of chromium nitride (CrN) with different thicknesses (3, 4, and 5 μm) have been deposited on the surface of the Al alloy (Al-5083) using the physical vapour deposition (PVD) technique. A decrease in 2 orders of magnitude of I corr values for the coated Al has been observed compared to the as-received Al-alloy when the probes have been exposed to simulated anodic conditions in a micro-reactor. On the other hand, when subjected to a cathodic-simulated environment, the Al-CrN probes with 3 μm and 4 μm coatings have shown a decrease in I corr of one order of magnitude, while a variation of two orders of magnitude has also been obtained for the 5 μm coating.

  20. Interaction between a high purity magnesium surface and PCL and PLA coatings during dynamic degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Song, Yang; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Li, Jianan; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Xiaonong

    2011-04-01

    In this study, polycaprolactone (PCL) and polylactic acid (PLA) coatings were prepared on the surface of high purity magnesium (HPMs), respectively, and electrochemical and dynamic degradation tests were used to investigate the degradation behaviors of these polymer-coated HPMs. The experimental results indicated that two uniform and smooth polymer films with thicknesses between 15 and 20 µm were successfully prepared on the HPMs. Electrochemical tests showed that both PCL-coated and PLA-coated HPMs had higher free corrosion potentials (E(corr)) and smaller corrosion currents (I(corr)) in the modified simulated body fluid (m-SBF) at 37 °C, compared to those of the uncoated HPMs. Dynamic degradation tests simulating the flow conditions in coronary arteries were carried out on a specific test platform. The weight of the specimens and the pH over the tests were recorded to characterize the corrosion performance of those samples. The surfaces of the specimens after the dynamic degradation tests were also examined. The data implied that there was a special interaction between HPM and its polymer coatings during the dynamic degradation tests, which undermined the corrosion resistance of the coated HPMs. A model was proposed to illustrate the interaction between the polymer coatings and HPM. This study also suggested that this reciprocity may also exist on the implanted magnesium stents coated with biodegradable polymers, which is a potential obstacle for the further development of drug-eluting magnesium stents.

  1. Mercaptans emissions in diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, Sérgio Machado; Arbilla, Graciela

    Biodiesel and ethanol are fuels in clear growth and evidence, basically due to its relation with the greenhouse effect reduction. There are several works regarding regulated pollutants emissions, but there is a lack of reports in non-regulated emissions. In a previous paper (Corrêa and Arbilla, 2006) the emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons were reported and in 2007 another paper was published in 2008 focusing carbonyls emissions (Corrêa and Arbilla, 2008). In this work four mercaptans (methyl, ethyl, n-propyl and n-butyl mercaptans) were evaluated for a heavy-duty diesel engine, fueled with pure diesel (D) and biodiesel blends (v/v) of 2% (B2), 5% (B5), 10% (B10), and 20% (B20). The tests were carried using a six cylinder heavy-duty engine, typical of the Brazilian fleet of urban buses, during a real use across the city. The exhaust gases were diluted near 20 times and the mercaptans were sampled with glass fiber filters impregnated with mercuric acetate. The chemical analyses were performed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection. The results indicated that the mercaptans emissions exhibit a reduction with the increase of biodiesel content, but this reduction is lower as the mercaptan molar mass increases. For B20 results the emission reduction was 18.4% for methyl mercaptan, 18.1% for ethyl mercaptan, 16.3% for n-propyl mercaptan, and 9.6% for n-butyl mercaptan.

  2. Low solar activity variability and IRI 2007 predictability of equatorial Africa GPS TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewale, A. O.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Cilliers, P. J.; McKinnell, L. A.; Adeloye, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Diurnal, seasonal and latitudinal variations of Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) over the equatorial region of the African continent and a comparison with IRI-2007 derived TEC (IRI-TEC), using all three options (namely; NeQuick, IRI01-corr and IRI-2001), are presented in this paper. The variability and comparison are presented for 2009, a year of low solar activity, using data from thirteen Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. VTEC values were grouped into four seasons namely March Equinox (February, March, April), June Solstice (May, June, July), September Equinox (August, September, October), and December Solstice (November, December, January). VTEC generally increases from 06h00 LT and reaches its maximum value at approximately 15h00-17h00 LT during all seasons and at all locations. The NeQuick and IRI01-corr options of the IRI model predict reasonably well the observed diurnal and seasonal variation patterns of VTEC values. However, the IRI-2001 option gave a relatively poor prediction when compared with the other options. The post-midnight and post-sunset deviations between modeled and observed VTEC could arise because NmF2 or the shape of the electron density profile, or both, are not well predicted by the model; hence some improvements are still required in order to obtain improved predictions of TEC over the equatorial region of the Africa sector.

  3. Estimating accuracy of land-cover composition from two-stage cluster sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehman, S.V.; Wickham, J.D.; Fattorini, L.; Wade, T.D.; Baffetta, F.; Smith, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Land-cover maps are often used to compute land-cover composition (i.e., the proportion or percent of area covered by each class), for each unit in a spatial partition of the region mapped. We derive design-based estimators of mean deviation (MD), mean absolute deviation (MAD), root mean square error (RMSE), and correlation (CORR) to quantify accuracy of land-cover composition for a general two-stage cluster sampling design, and for the special case of simple random sampling without replacement (SRSWOR) at each stage. The bias of the estimators for the two-stage SRSWOR design is evaluated via a simulation study. The estimators of RMSE and CORR have small bias except when sample size is small and the land-cover class is rare. The estimator of MAD is biased for both rare and common land-cover classes except when sample size is large. A general recommendation is that rare land-cover classes require large sample sizes to ensure that the accuracy estimators have small bias. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Open quantum system stochastic dynamics with and without the RWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Y. B.

    2015-02-01

    We study the dynamics of a two-level quantum system interacting with a single frequency electromagnetic field and a stochastic magnetic field, with and without making the rotating wave approximation (RWA). The transformation to the rotating frame does not commute with the stochastic Hamiltonian if the stochastic field has nonvanishing components in the transverse direction, hence, applying the RWA requires transformation of the stochastic terms in the Hamiltonian. For Gaussian white noise, the master equation is derived from the stochastic Schrödinger-Langevin equations, with and without the RWA. With the RWA, the master equation for the density matrix has Lindblad terms with coefficients that are time-dependent (i.e., the master equation is time-local). An approximate analytic expression for the density matrix is obtained with the RWA. For Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise, as well as other types of colored noise, in contradistinction to the Gaussian white noise case, the non-commutation of the RWA transformation and the noise Hamiltonian can significantly affect the RWA dynamics when ω {{τ }corr} 1, where ω is the electromagnetic field frequency and {{τ }corr} is the stochastic magnetic field correlation time.

  5. Dune and ripple migration along Curiosity's traverse in Gale Crater on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D.; Ewing, R. C.; Fenton, L. K.; Michaels, T. I.; Ayoub, F.; Bridges, N. T.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, Curiosity, has safely landed near a 35-km-long dark dune field in Gale Crater on Mars. This dune field lies along Curiosity's traverse to Aeolis Mons (Mt. Sharp). Here we present new evidence of aeolian activity and further estimate wind directions within the dune field through analysis of ripple migration with the COSI-Corr technique, which provides precise measurements of ripple displacement at the sub-pixel scale.The area analyzed is located ~10 km southwest of rover Curiosity's current position and ~4 km SW of its selected path through Aeolis Mons (Mt. Sharp) (Fig. 1a). Here barchan dunes with elongated horns and seif dunes coexist with more typical barchan and dome dunes (Fig. 1a, b), with slopes sculpted by two intersecting ripple crestline orientations trending at 45° and 330°. The range of dune types and ripple orientations indicate the dune field morphology is influenced by at least two winds from the NW and the NE. The direction of migration is toward the SW, suggesting the most recent sand transporting winds were from the NE (Fig. 1c). These results match previous predictions and can be used to forecast the wind conditions close to the entry point to Mt. Sharp. Fig. 1: a-b) Study area c) Ripple migration direction computed using the COSI-Corr technique

  6. The function of genomes in bioenergetic organelles.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, John F

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are energy-transducing organelles of the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. They originated as bacterial symbionts whose host cells acquired respiration from the precursor of the mitochondrion, and oxygenic photosynthesis from the precursor of the chloroplast. The host cells also acquired genetic information from their symbionts, eventually incorporating much of it into their own genomes. Genes of the eukaryotic cell nucleus now encode most mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins. Genes are copied and moved between cellular compartments with relative ease, and there is no obvious obstacle to successful import of any protein precursor from the cytosol. So why are any genes at all retained in cytoplasmic organelles? One proposal is that these small but functional genomes provide a location for genes that is close to, and in the same compartment as, their gene products. This co-location facilitates rapid and direct regulatory coupling. Redox control of synthesis de novo is put forward as the common property of those proteins that must be encoded and synthesized within mitochondria and chloroplasts. This testable hypothesis is termed CORR, for co-location for redox regulation. Principles, predictions and consequences of CORR are examined in the context of competing hypotheses and current evidence. PMID:12594916

  7. New generation super alloy candidates for medical applications: corrosion behavior, cation release and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Reclaru, L; Ziegenhagen, R; Unger, R E; Eschler, P Y; Constantin, F

    2014-12-01

    Three super alloy candidates (X1 CrNiMoMnW 24-22-6-3-2 N, NiCr21 MoNbFe 8-3-5 AlTi, CoNiCr 35-20 Mo 10 BTi) for a prolonged contact with skin are evaluated in comparison with two reference austenitic stainless steels 316L and 904L. Several electrochemical parameters were measured and determined (E(oc), E(corr), i(corr), b(a), b(c), E(b), R(p), E(crev) and coulometric analysis) in order to compare the corrosion behavior. The cation release evaluation and in vitro biological characterization also were performed. In terms of corrosion, the results reveal that the 904L steels presented the best behavior followed by the super austenitic steel X1 CrNiMoMnW 24-22-6-3-2 N. For the other two super alloys (NiCr and CoNiCr types alloys) tested in different conditions (annealed, work hardened and work hardened+age hardened) it was found that their behavior to corrosion was weak and close to the other reference stainless steel, 316L. Regarding the extraction a mixture of cations in relatively high concentrations was noted and therefore a cocktail effect was not excluded. The results obtained in the biological assays WST-1 and TNF-alpha were in correlation with the corrosion and extraction evaluation.

  8. Stable operation during pilot-scale anaerobic digestion of nutrient-supplemented maize/sugar beet silage.

    PubMed

    Nges, Ivo Achu; Björn, Annika; Björnsson, Lovisa

    2012-08-01

    Biogas production from maize/sugar beet silage was studied under mesophilic conditions in a continuous stirred tank reactor pilot-scale process. While energy crop mono-digestion is often performed with very long hydraulic retention times (HRTs), the present study demonstrated an efficient process operating with a 50-day HRT and a corrected total solids (TS(corr)) based organic loading rate of 3.4 kg/m(3)d. The good performance was attributed to supplementation with both macro- and micronutrients and was evidenced by good methane yields (318 m(3)/ton TS(corr)), which were comparable to laboratory maximum expected yields, plus low total volatile fatty acid concentrations (<0.8 g/L). A viscoplastic and thixotropic digester fluid behaviour was observed, and the viscosity problems common in crop mono-digestion were not seen in this study. The effluent also complied with Swedish certification standards for bio-fertilizer for farmland application. Nutrient addition thus rendered a stable biogas process, while the effluent was a good quality bio-fertilizer.

  9. Comprehensive spatiotemporal glacier and ice sheet velocity measurements from Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Twila; Fahnestock, Mark; Scambos, Ted; Klinger, Marin; Haran, Terry

    2015-04-01

    Combining newly developed software with Landsat 8 image returns, we are now producing broad-coverage ice velocity measurements on weekly to monthly scales across ice sheets and glaciers. Using new image-to-image cross correlation software, named PyCorr, we take advantage of the improved radiometric resolution of the Landsat 8 panchromatic band to create velocity maps with sub-pixel accuracy. Landsat 8's 12-bit radiometric resolution supports measurement of ice flow in uncrevassed regions based on persistent sastrugi patterns lasting weeks to a few months. We also leverage these improvements to allow for ice sheet surface roughness measurements. Landsat 8's 16-day repeat orbit and increased image acquisition across the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets supports development of seasonal to annual ice sheet velocity mosaics with full coverage of coastal regions. We also create time series for examining sub-seasonal change with near real time processing in areas such as the Amundsen Sea Embayment and fast flowing Greenland outlet glaciers. In addition, excellent geolocation accuracy enables velocity mapping of smaller ice caps and glaciers, which we have already applied in Alaska and Patagonia. Finally, PyCorr can be used for velocity mapping with other remote sensing imagery, including high resolution WorldView satellite data.

  10. Why chloroplasts and mitochondria retain their own genomes and genetic systems: Colocation for redox regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Allen, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria are subcellular bioenergetic organelles with their own genomes and genetic systems. DNA replication and transmission to daughter organelles produces cytoplasmic inheritance of characters associated with primary events in photosynthesis and respiration. The prokaryotic ancestors of chloroplasts and mitochondria were endosymbionts whose genes became copied to the genomes of their cellular hosts. These copies gave rise to nuclear chromosomal genes that encode cytosolic proteins and precursor proteins that are synthesized in the cytosol for import into the organelle into which the endosymbiont evolved. What accounts for the retention of genes for the complete synthesis within chloroplasts and mitochondria of a tiny minority of their protein subunits? One hypothesis is that expression of genes for protein subunits of energy-transducing enzymes must respond to physical environmental change by means of a direct and unconditional regulatory control—control exerted by change in the redox state of the corresponding gene product. This hypothesis proposes that, to preserve function, an entire redox regulatory system has to be retained within its original membrane-bound compartment. Colocation of gene and gene product for redox regulation of gene expression (CoRR) is a hypothesis in agreement with the results of a variety of experiments designed to test it and which seem to have no other satisfactory explanation. Here, I review evidence relating to CoRR and discuss its development, conclusions, and implications. This overview also identifies predictions concerning the results of experiments that may yet prove the hypothesis to be incorrect. PMID:26286985

  11. Preparation of the Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes/Nickel Composite Coating with Superior Wear and Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuewu; Gu, Yang; Shi, Tian; Peng, Dai; Tang, Mingkai; Zhang, Qiaoxin; Huang, Xingjiu

    2015-12-01

    The multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nickel (MWCNTs/Ni) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Cu substrate by electro-deposition method in the electrolyte with well-dispersed MWCNTs. Surface morphologies of the composite coatings with protrusion structures were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer were used to characterize the phase structures, functional groups, and elements distribution of the coatings as well as the incorporated MWCNTs. In addition, the effect of MWCNTs percentage on thickness, hardness, wear, and corrosion resistance of the coatings was also investigated. Results indicated that the incorporation of MWCNTs positively affected the hardness of coatings for their strengthening skeletons effect. Meanwhile, the coating with the MWCNTs concentration of 0.2 g/L could achieve the lowest friction coefficient, wear rate as well as the mass loss in the tribological test by a ball-on-disk tribometer. And also, the optimal corrosion resistance with the highest corrosion potential ( E corr) and the lowest corrosion current density ( I corr) of the composite coating was finally proved after the potentiodynamic polarization evaluation, which could promote the potential applications in preparing the functional nanocomposite materials.

  12. Estimation of dune migration rates north Riyadh City, KSA, using SPOT 4 panchromatic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mutiry, M.; Hermas, E. A.; Al-Ghamdi, K. A.; Al-Awaji, H.

    2016-12-01

    Irq Al-Rethmah is located north of Riyadh City, KSA, as elongated NW-SE sand accumulations. Its formation and development are highly controlled by the ridge-and-valley landscape dominant in the east of Saudi Arabia. The active dunes of Irq Al-Rethmah are basically represented by barchan and transverse dunes. These active dunes either superimpose the old stable dunes and sand sheets or directly occur over the alluvial plain adjacent to the western reaches of old stable dunes. The Co-registration of optically sensed images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) technology was conducted on two SPOT 4 panchromatic images acquired in 2006 and 2009 respectively to determine the migration rates and direction of the active dunes. The average annual migration rates of active dunes ranged from 1.6 to 2.25 m/yr. The migration rates decrease where the active dunes superimpose the old stable dunes and sand sheets. On the other hand, these rates increase when the active dunes are located over the alluvial plain along the western margins of Irq Al-Rethmah. The calculated vector displacement field by COSI-Corr technology suggest a southward direction of dune migration indicating that the predominant wind direction is northerly. Although the calculated rates are generally low in comparison to other measured migration rates of sand dunes in the east of Saudi Arabia, the spatial analysis implies potential hazards of active dunes against many landuse components such as roads, powerlines, and recreational facilities in the study area.

  13. Exhaled nitric oxide concentration upon acute exposure to moderate altitude.

    PubMed

    Caspersen, C; Stang, J; Thorsen, E; Stensrud, T

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess immediate changes in the partial pressure of nitric oxide (NO) in exhaled gas (PE NO ) in healthy trained subjects who were acutely exposed to moderate altitude. One group of nine and another group of 20 healthy subjects were exposed to an ambient pressure of 728 hPa (546 mmHg) corresponding to an altitude of 2800 m for 5 and 90 min, respectively, in an altitude chamber. PE NO was measured offline by sampling exhaled gas in tight metal foil bags at 5, 30, 60, and 90 min. A correction for increased expiratory flow rate due to gas density effects at altitude was performed (PE NO corr). PE NO was significantly decreased by 13-16%, while the fraction of NO in exhaled gas (FE NO) was increased by 16-19% compared to sea level. There was no significant change in PE NO corr after exposure to altitude for 5, 30, 60, and 90 min. We conclude that there was no change in PENO upon arrival at altitude after correcting for gas density effects on expiratory flow rate. Corrections for altitude effects must be done before comparing measurements performed at different altitudes when using measurements of FENO to monitor athletes who have asthma during training at altitude.

  14. Why chloroplasts and mitochondria retain their own genomes and genetic systems: Colocation for redox regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Allen, John F

    2015-08-18

    Chloroplasts and mitochondria are subcellular bioenergetic organelles with their own genomes and genetic systems. DNA replication and transmission to daughter organelles produces cytoplasmic inheritance of characters associated with primary events in photosynthesis and respiration. The prokaryotic ancestors of chloroplasts and mitochondria were endosymbionts whose genes became copied to the genomes of their cellular hosts. These copies gave rise to nuclear chromosomal genes that encode cytosolic proteins and precursor proteins that are synthesized in the cytosol for import into the organelle into which the endosymbiont evolved. What accounts for the retention of genes for the complete synthesis within chloroplasts and mitochondria of a tiny minority of their protein subunits? One hypothesis is that expression of genes for protein subunits of energy-transducing enzymes must respond to physical environmental change by means of a direct and unconditional regulatory control--control exerted by change in the redox state of the corresponding gene product. This hypothesis proposes that, to preserve function, an entire redox regulatory system has to be retained within its original membrane-bound compartment. Colocation of gene and gene product for redox regulation of gene expression (CoRR) is a hypothesis in agreement with the results of a variety of experiments designed to test it and which seem to have no other satisfactory explanation. Here, I review evidence relating to CoRR and discuss its development, conclusions, and implications. This overview also identifies predictions concerning the results of experiments that may yet prove the hypothesis to be incorrect.

  15. Corrosion study of iron-cobalt alloys for MRI-based propulsion embedded in untethered microdevices operating in the vascular network.

    PubMed

    Pouponneau, Pierre; Savadogo, Oumarou; Napporn, Teko; Yahia, L'hocine; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-04-01

    Our group have shown in an experiment performed in the carotid artery of a living swine that magnetic gradients generated by a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could propel and navigate untethered medical microdevices and micro-nanorobots in the human vasculature. The main problem with these devices is that the metal necessary for magnetic propulsion may corrode and induce cytotoxic effects. The challenge, then, is to find an alloy with low corrosion yet providing an adequate magnetization level for propulsion in often stringent physiological conditions. Because of their high magnetization, we studied the corrosion behavior of two iron-cobalt alloys, Permendur (49% Fe, 49% Co, 2% V) and Vacoflux 17 (81% Fe, 17% Co, 2% Cr), in physiological solution by potentiodynamic polarization assay, surface analysis, and corrosion electrolyte analysis. Both alloys exhibited low corrosion parameters such as a corrosion potential (E(corr)) of -0.57 V/SCE and E(corr) of -0.42 V/SCE for Vacoflux 17. The surface of Permendur samples was homogenously degraded. Vacoflux 17 surface was impaired by cracks and crevices. Both alloys had a stoichiometric dissolution in the electrolyte, and they released enough cobalt to induce cytotoxic effects. This study concluded that Fe-Co alloys could be used preferably in medical microdevices if they were coated so as not to come in contact with physiological solutions.

  16. Polymorphism of the DQA1 promoter region (QAP) and DRB1, QAP, DQA1, DQB1 haplotypes in systemic lupus erythematosus. SLE Study Group members.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z; Kimura, A; Hartung, K; Haas, P J; Volgger, A; Brünnler, G; Bönisch, J; Albert, E D

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the DNA polymorphism for the DQA1 promoter region (QAP) and HLA-class II DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1 genes in 178 central European patients with Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) using polymerase chain reaction and Dig-ddUTP labeled oligonucleotides. Increased frequencies of DRB1*02 and *03 are confirmed by DNA typing. In addition, the frequencies of DQA1*0501, *0102 and DQB1*0201, *0602 alleles are increased in the patients as compared to controls. The strongest association to SLE is found with DRB1*03 and DOB1*0201 alleles (p < 10(-7), p corr. < 10(-5) and p < 10(-6), p corr. < 10(-4), respectively). By investigating the DQA1 promoter region in the SLE patients we have detected nine different QAP variants. Increased frequencies of QAP1.2 and QAP4.1 are observed in patients as compared to controls (p < 0.05, p corr. = n.s.). Analysis of linkage disequilibria demonstrates a very strong association between QAP variants and DQA1, DRB1 alleles. Certain QAP variants are completely associated with DQA1 and DRB1 alleles, whereas others can combine with different DQA1 and DRB1 alleles. All DRB1*02-positive patients and controls carry QAP1.2, and all DRB1*03-positive patients and controls carry QAP4.1. Conversely, the QAP1.2 variant appears only in DRB1*02 haplotypes, while the QAP4.1 variant can be observed in DRB1*03, *11, and *1303 haplotypes. Based on the strong linkage disequilibria between DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 genes and between DRB1-QAP-DQA1, we have deduced the four-point haplotypes for DRB1-QAP-DQA1-DQB1 in patients and controls. Two haplotypes DRB1*02-QAP1.2-DQA1*0102-DQB1*0602 and DRB1*03-QAP4.1-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 are significantly increased in patients as compared to controls (p < 0.01, p corr. = n.s., RR = 1.8 and p < 10(-7), p corr. < 10(-5), RR = 3.1, respectively). The analysis of relative risks attributed to the various alleles of QAP, DQA1, and DQB1 as well as the investigation of the deduced DRB1-QAP-DQA1-DQB1 haplotypes leads to the conclusion

  17. Implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive emission model for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieser, Johannes; Aulinger, Armin; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2010-05-01

    base years 2000 and 2001. The 54x54km² emissions data for 2000 were used as input for the CMAQ4.6 CTM and the calculated air concentrations were compared to EMEP measurements in Europe. Statistical comparison of Ozone and three particulate species (NH4,NO3,SO4) showed that SMOKE/E performs very good under the tested circumstances. O3 : (NMB 0.71) (SD 0.68) (F2 0.83) (CORR 0.55) using 48 Stations (hourly) NH4: (NMB 0.25) (SD 1.01) (F2 0.55) (CORR 0.53) using 8 Stations (daily) NO3: (NMB 0.42) (SD 0.60) (F2 0.40) (CORR 0.45) using 7 Stations (daily) SO4: (NMB 0.34) (SD 0.84) (F2 0.65) (CORR 0.55) using 21 Stations (daily) Abbreviations: Normalized Mean Bias (NMB), Standard Deviation (SD), Factor of 2 (F2), Correlation (CORR). The calculated air concentrations were compared with CMAQ runs using two purchased emissions datasets. It could be shown that the modified SMOKE model produces results comparable to those of commonly used European emissions data sets. For the future it is planed to implement emissions of heavy metals and polyfluorinated compounds into the SMOKE Europe model.

  18. The Direct Detection of Lyman Continuum Emission from Star-forming Galaxies at z~3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapley, Alice E.; Steidel, Charles C.; Pettini, Max; Adelberger, Kurt L.; Erb, Dawn K.

    2006-11-01

    We present the results of rest-frame UV spectroscopic observations of a sample of 14 z~3 star-forming galaxies in the SSA 22a field. These spectra are characterized by unprecedented depth in the Lyman continuum region. For the first time, we have detected escaping ionizing radiation from individual galaxies at high redshift, with 2 of the 14 objects showing significant emission below the Lyman limit. We also measured the ratio of emergent flux density at 1500 Å to that in the Lyman continuum region, for the individual detections (C49 and D3) and the sample average. If a correction for the average IGM opacity is applied to the spectra of the objects C49 and D3, we find f1500/f900,corr,C49=4.5 and f1500/f900,corr,D3=2.9. The average emergent flux density ratio in our sample is corr>=22, implying an escape fraction ~4.5 times lower than inferred from the composite spectrum from Steidel and coworkers. If this new estimate is representative of LBGs, their contribution to the metagalactic ionizing radiation field is Jν(900)~2.6×10-22 ergs s-1 cm-2 Hz-1 sr-1, comparable to the contribution of optically selected quasars at the same redshift. The sum of the contributions from galaxies and quasars is consistent with recent estimates of the level of the ionizing background at z~3, inferred from the H I Lyα forest optical depth. There is significant variance among the emergent far-UV spectra in our sample, yet the factors controlling the detection or nondetection of Lyman continuum emission from galaxies are not well determined. Because we do not yet understand the source of this variance, significantly larger samples will be required to obtain robust constraints on the galaxy contribution to the ionizing background at z~3 and beyond. Based, in part, on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA and was made possible by the

  19. Activités physiques libres ou encadrées et condition physique liée à la santé chez des adultes burundais: étude transversale

    PubMed Central

    Bizimana, Jean Berchmans; Lawani, Mansourou Mohamed; Akplogan, Barnabé; Gaturagi, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Introduction l’activité physique régulière a un impact positif sur la santé. Cette étude a pour objet de comparer la condition physique liée à la santé des adultes qui s’exercent librement avec celle des adultes bénéficiant d’un encadrement professionnel. Elle tente aussi d’établir une relation entre le niveau d’activité physique et les paramètres de la condition liée à la santé. Méthodes nous avons évalué le niveau d’activité physique et les paramètres de la condition physique liée à la santé. Par le test t pour échantillons indépendants, nous avons comparé les moyennes et avons par le calcul du coefficient de corrélation r de Pearson analysé la relation entre le niveau d’activité physique et les paramètres de la condition physique. Résultats des écarts significatifs (p < 0,05) de niveau d’activité physique, de souplesse, de V˙O2max et de la FC de repos ont été enregistrés en faveur du groupe encadré. Le niveau d’activité physique est positivement corrélé (p < 0,05) au V˙O2max et à la force de préhension mais négativement corrélé à la FC de repos et au cholestérol LDL. La prévalence des facteurs de risque cardiovasculaire n’est pas élevée excepté pour le cholestérol HDL. Conclusion les résultats de cette étude montrent que l’activité physique libre est aussi efficace que l’activité physique encadrée dans le maintien des profils lipidique et physiologique favorables à la santé chez l’adulte burundais. Cependant, l’activité physique encadrée apporte des bénéfices supplémentaires pour le V˙O2max, la fréquence cardiaque de repos, la souplesse antérieure et la détente verticale PMID:28203315

  20. Alloy 22 Localized Corrosion Susceptibility In Aqueous Solutions Of Chloride And Nitrate Salts Of Sodium And Potassium At 110 - 150?C

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, S; Hailey, P D; Lian, T; Staggs, K J; Gdowski, G E

    2006-01-17

    , again limited to the crevice region. However, the 24 hr E{sub corr} value was higher for the Ca based solution; this is probably due to the higher acidity of this solution (Ca{sup 2+} is slightly hydrolyzing). Intermediate-term corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) measurements indicate that moderately acidic conditions are required to achieve elevated E{sub corr} values.

  1. History of the Development of Liquid-Applied Coatings for Protection of Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Joseph J.; Hansen, marlin H.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion of reinforcing steel in concrete is an insidious problem for structures at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). KSC is located on the coast of Florida in a highly corrosive atmosphere. Launch pads, highway bridge infrastructure, and buildings are strongly affected. To mitigate these problems, NASA initiated a development program for a Galvanic Liquid-Applied Coating System (GLACS). A breakthrough in this area would have great commercial value in transportation, marine and construction industry infrastructures. The patented NASA GLACS system has undergone considerable testing to meet the needs of commercialization. A moisture-cure coating gives excellent adhesion with ease of application compared to existing galvanic products on the market. The latest development, GalvaCori; can be sprayed or hand applied to almost any structure shape. A self-adhesive conductive tape system has been devised to simplify current collection within the coating areas. In testing programs, millivolt potential and milliamp output per square foot of anode have been closely studied at actual test sites. These two parameters are probably the most challenging items of a resin-based, room-temperature-applied, galvanic coating. Extensive re-formulation has resulted in a system that provides the needed polarization for catholic protection of reinforcing steel in concrete in a variety of structure environments. The rate of corrosion of rebar in concrete is greatly affected by the environment of the structure. In addition to this, for any given concrete structure; moisture level, carbonization, and chloride contamination influences the rate of rebar corrosion. Similarly, the cathodic protection level of galvanic systems is also dependent on the moisture level of the concrete. GalvaCorr is formulated to maintain galvanic activity as the moisture level of the structure declines. GalvaCorr is available as a three-part kit. The mixing step requires about ten minutes. The viscosity can be easily

  2. A hierarchical family of three-dimensional potential energy surfaces for He-CO

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K A; McBane, George C

    2005-08-22

    A hierarchical family of five three-dimensional potential energy surfaces has been developed for the benchmark He-CO system. Four surfaces were obtained at the coupled cluster singles and doubles level of theory with a perturbational estimate of triple excitations, CCSD*T*, and range in quality from the doubly augmented double-zeta basis set to the complete basis set *CBS* limit. The fifth corresponds to an approximate CCSDT/CBS surface *CCSD with iterative triples/CBS, denoted CBS+corr*. The CBS limit results were obtained by pointwise basis set extrapolations of the individual counterpoise-corrected interaction energies. For each surface, over 1000 interaction energies were accurately interpolated using a reproducing kernel Hilbert space approach with an R-6+R-7 asymptotic form. In each case, both three-dimensional and effective two-dimensional surfaces were developed. In standard Jacobi coordinates, the final CBS+corr surface has a global minimum at rCO=2.1322a0 ,R=6.418a0, and * =70.84° with a well depth of -22.34 cm-1. The other four surfaces have well depths ranging from -14.83 cm-1 *CCSD*T*/d-aug-cc-pVDZ* to -22.02 cm-1 *CCSD*T*/CBS*. For each of these surfaces the infrared spectrum has been accurately calculated and compared to experiment, as well as to previous theoretical and empirical surfaces. The final CBS+corr surface exhibits root-mean-square and maximum errors compared to experiment *4He* of just 0.03 and 0.04 cm-1, respectively, for all 42 transitions and is the most accurate ab initio surface to date for this system. Other quantities investigated include the interaction second virial coefficient, the integral cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients for rotational relaxation of CO by He, and rate coefficients for CO vibrational relaxation by He. All the observable quantities showed a smooth convergence with respect to the quality of the underlying interaction surface. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. *DOI: 10.1063/1.1947194*

  3. Memory effects in the dynamic response of a random two-spin Ising system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nifle, M.; Hilhorst, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by magnetic memory effects observable in spin glasses we study an extremely simplified model system. It consists of two Ising spins with Glauber dynamics, whose equilibrium correlation is a rapidly and randomly changing function of the external field. As in spin glasses, a nonliear dynamic response appears even in the regime of linear static properties. We calculate (i) the linear and nonlinear ac susceptibility in zero field and (ii) the linear ac susceptibility as a function of the rate change of a slowly varying background field. Mathematically the problem is to deal with a stochastic differential equation with long-ranged correlations in time. For an oscillating field of sufficiently large amplitude H0 (but still in the statically linear regime) these correlations lead to nonanalytic correction terms sim H0^{-1} log H0 in the dynamic susceptibility. Motivé par des effets de mémoire observables dans les verres de spin l'on étudie un système modèle extrêmement simplifié. Ils se compose de deux spins d'Ising à dynamique de Glauber, dont la fonction de corrélation à l'équilibre varie rapidement et aléatoirement en fonction du champ extérieur. Comme dans les verres de spin, une réponse dynamique non linéaire apparaît déjà dans le régime linéaire des propriétés statiques. On calcule (i) les susceptibilités alternatives linéaire et non linéaire en champ zéro et (ii) la susceptibilité alternative linéaire en fonction du taux de variation d'un champ primaire à variation lente. Le problème mathématique consiste en une équation différentielle stochastique avec des corrélations temporelles de longue portée. Pour un champ oscillant d'amplitude H0 suffisamment grande (mais toujours dans le régime statiquement linéaire) ces corrélations conduisent à des termes correctifs non analytiques sim H0^{-1} log H0 dans la susceptibilité dynamique.

  4. Maternal mortality and its correlates: practical implications of data analysis across multiple countries.

    PubMed

    Sagynbekov, Ken Imanak

    2013-07-01

    Objectif : Les études portant sur la mortalité maternelle qui utilisent des données issues de multiples pays en viennent souvent à repérer des corrélats significatifs sur le plan statistique et à les interpréter comme étant des facteurs pertinents en matière de politique. Cette étude a été conçue pour traiter de la fragilité d’une association statistique entre le taux de mortalité maternelle et ses principaux corrélats, ainsi que pour évaluer la pertinence de l’analyse de données issues de multiples pays à des fins d’élaboration de politiques. Méthodes : Les tendances de la variation du taux de mortalité maternelle associées au taux de fertilité, au revenu par habitant, à l’inscription aux écoles primaires et secondaires, à la qualité institutionnelle, à la participation des femmes à la politique et aux indicateurs des systèmes de santé dans 111 pays en 2000 et dans 128 pays en 2005 ont été explorées au moyen d’une approche de modélisation linéaire à niveaux multiples. Résultats : Le taux de fertilité et le revenu par habitant ont été les seuls facteurs prédictifs robustes du taux de mortalité maternelle. À la suite de la neutralisation des effets du taux de fertilité, du revenu par habitant et des facteurs contextuels propres à chacune des régions, nous avons constaté que les indicateurs des systèmes de santé et l’inscription scolaire étaient des facteurs prédictifs directs instables du taux de mortalité maternelle. Conclusion : Bien que les études comparatives multipays puissent identifier des corrélats clés en ce qui concerne le taux de mortalité maternelle, les recommandations en matière de politique visant la réduction de ce taux devraient être fondées sur des modèles causaux qui tiennent compte des facteurs contextuels.

  5. HepML, an XML-based format for describing simulated data in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S.; Dudko, L.; Kekelidze, D.; Sherstnev, A.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we describe a HepML format and a corresponding C++ library developed for keeping complete description of parton level events in a unified and flexible form. HepML tags contain enough information to understand what kind of physics the simulated events describe and how the events have been prepared. A HepML block can be included into event files in the LHEF format. The structure of the HepML block is described by means of several XML Schemas. The Schemas define necessary information for the HepML block and how this information should be located within the block. The library libhepml is a C++ library intended for parsing and serialization of HepML tags, and representing the HepML block in computer memory. The library is an API for external software. For example, Matrix Element Monte Carlo event generators can use the library for preparing and writing a header of an LHEF file in the form of HepML tags. In turn, Showering and Hadronization event generators can parse the HepML header and get the information in the form of C++ classes. libhepml can be used in C++, C, and Fortran programs. All necessary parts of HepML have been prepared and we present the project to the HEP community. Program summaryProgram title: libhepml Catalogue identifier: AEGL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPLv3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 138 866 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 613 122 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, C Computer: PCs and workstations Operating system: Scientific Linux CERN 4/5, Ubuntu 9.10 RAM: 1 073 741 824 bytes (1 Gb) Classification: 6.2, 11.1, 11.2 External routines: Xerces XML library ( http://xerces.apache.org/xerces-c/), Expat XML Parser ( http://expat.sourceforge.net/) Nature of problem: Monte Carlo simulation in high

  6. Effect of corrosion rate and surface energy of silver coatings on bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Zhao, Q

    2010-03-01

    Many studies suggest a strong antimicrobial activity of silver coatings. The biocidal activity of silver is related to the biologically active silver ion released from silver coatings. However, no studies have been reported on the effect of surface energy of silver coatings on antibacterial performance. In this paper, three silver coatings with various corrosion rates and surface energies were prepared on stainless steel plates using AgNO(3) based electroless plating solutions. The corrosion rate and surface energy of the silver coatings were characterized with CorrTest Electrochemistry Workstation and Dataphysics OCA-20 contact angle analyzer, respectively. The antibacterial performance of the silver coatings was evaluated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, which frequently causes medical device-associated infections. The experimental results showed that surface energy had significant influence on initial bacterial adhesion at low corrosion rate. The extended DLVO theory was used to explain the bacterial adhesion behavior.

  7. A three-dimensional He-CO potential energy surface with improved long-range behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBane, George C.

    2016-12-01

    A weakness of the "CBS + corr" He-CO potential energy surface (Peterson and McBane, 2005) has been rectified by constraining the potential to adopt accurate long-range behavior for He-CO distances well beyond 15a0 . The resulting surface is very similar to the original in the main part of the interaction. Comparison with accurately known bound-state energies indicates that the surface is slightly improved in the region sampled by the highest lying bound states. The positions of shape and Feshbach resonances within a few cm-1 of the j = 1 excitation threshold are essentially unchanged. The low-energy scattering lengths changed noticeably. The revised surface generates a small negative limiting scattering length for collisions with 4He, while the original surface gave a small positive one. Both surfaces yield scattering lengths quite different from the widely used surface of Heijmen et al. (1997) for both He isotopes.

  8. The kinematic footprints of five stellar streams in Andromeda's halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, S. C.; Ibata, R.; Irwin, M.; Koch, A.; Letarte, B.; Martin, N.; Collins, M.; Lewis, G. F.; McConnachie, A.; Peñarrubia, J.; Rich, R. M.; Trethewey, D.; Ferguson, A.; Huxor, A.; Tanvir, N.

    2008-11-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of five stellar streams (`A', `B', `Cr', `Cp' and `D') as well as the extended star cluster, EC4, which lies within Stream`C', all discovered in the halo of M31 from our Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam survey. These spectroscopic results were initially serendipitous, making use of our existing observations from the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph mounted on the Keck II telescope, and thereby emphasizing the ubiquity of tidal streams that account for ~70 per cent of the M31 halo stars in the targeted fields. Subsequent spectroscopy was then procured in Stream`C' and Stream`D' to trace the velocity gradient along the streams. Nine metal-rich ([Fe/H] ~ -0.7) stars at vhel = -349.5kms-1,σv,corr ~ 5.1 +/- 2.5km s-1 are proposed as a serendipitous detection of Stream`Cr', with follow-up kinematic identification at a further point along the stream. Seven metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~-1.3) stars confined to a narrow, 15 km s-1 velocity bin centred at vhel = -285.6, σv,corr = 4.3+1.7-1.4 km s-1 represent a kinematic detection of Stream`Cp', again with follow-up kinematic identification further along the stream. For the cluster EC4, candidate member stars with average [Fe/H] ~-1.4, are found at vhel = -282 suggesting it could be related to Stream`Cp'. No similarly obvious cold kinematic candidate is found for Stream`D', although candidates are proposed in both of two spectroscopic pointings along the stream (both at ~ -400km s-1). Spectroscopy near the edge of Stream`B' suggests a likely kinematic detection at vhel ~ -330, σv,corr ~ 6.9km s-1, while a candidate kinematic detection of Stream`A' is found (plausibly associated to M33 rather than M31) with vhel ~ -170, σv,corr = 12.5km s-1. The low dispersion of the streams in kinematics, physical thickness and metallicity makes it hard to reconcile with a scenario whereby these stream structures as an ensemble are related to the giant southern stream. We conclude that the M31 stellar

  9. Limitations of Non-linear Dynamics in Predicting Sea Clutter Returns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    l’efficacité prédictive des détecteurs linéaires et non linéaires est mise à l’essai en fonction des données réelles, mais aucune amélioration n’est...pour le fouillis de mer mesuré et les processus stochastiques simulés. D’autres essais portant sur le comportement de la fonction de corrélation par...l’efficacité prédictive des détecteurs linéaires et non linéaires est mise à l’essai en fonction des données réelles, mais aucune amélioration n’est

  10. Détection et exaltation de la luminescence de molécules biologiques individuelles en solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, E.; Lenne, P. F.; Rigneault, H.

    2002-06-01

    La Spectroscopie de Corrélation de Fluorescence (FCS) est une technique d'analyse statistique des fluctuations de luminescence produites par des molécules fluorescentes diffusant librement dans un volume de collection de quelque μm^3. Une limitation fondamentale de la technique provient de l'ouverture numérique limitée des systèmes optiques conventionnels qui ne collectent qu'une faible partie des photons émis. Nous présentons des résultats relatifs à l'augmentation du nombre de photons collectés en utilisant le concept du contrôle de l'émission spontanée par des structures photoniques de type miroir diélectrique.

  11. Search for third generation squarks in pp collisions at 13 TeV with CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Strobbe, Nadja C.

    2016-11-14

    Three searches for third generation squarks using proton-proton collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC are presented. The data corre- spond to an integrated luminosity of 12.9 fb-1. The analyses define exclusive search regions and estimate contributions from standard model processes to these regions by using control samples in the data. No significant deviation from the standard model expectation is observed in the data. The results are interpreted in simplified SUSY models of direct and gluino-mediated top squark production. Depending on the model, top squark masses up to 910 GeV and gluino masses up to 1780 GeV are excluded.

  12. Calling for an ecological approach to studying climate change and infectious diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2009-01-01

    My Concepts and Synthesis paper (Lafferty 2009),which inspired this Forum, echoed the premise that earlyreviews about climate change exaggerated claims thatinfectious diseases will increase in the future (Randolph2009). The paper sparked five well-reasoned commen-taries from ecologists with considerable expertise ininfectious diseases (Dobson 2009, Harvell et al. 2009,Ostfeld 2009, Pascual and Bouma 2009, Randolph2009). These reviews illustrate several examples andcase studies which corr elate i ncreases in infectiousdisease with existing climate variation, though alterna-tive explanations exist for many of these patterns(Dobson 2009, Harvell et al. 2009, Ostfeld 2009, Pascualand Bouma 2009, Randolph 2009). A common messageis that an ecological approach is increasingly relevant tothe challenging topic of infectious disease.

  13. HLA antigens and Berger's disease.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Houssin, A; Soulillou, J P; Denis, J; Guimbretiere, J; Guenel, J

    1980-07-01

    We have studied the frequencies of HLA-A, -B antigens in 73 Berger's disease patients, plus HLA-DR antigens in 35 of them, and compared the percentages of antigens frequencies with those of a local and national panel. This study does not confirm the positive associations with HLA-Bw35 or HLA-B12 which have been previously reported. The HLA-DR typing only showed increased frequency of blanks in the patients (P smaller than 0.01, but no significant corr.P). Patients with Berger's disease and renal failure have a higher (but still not significant) HLA-Bw35 frequency than those without renal failure. The reasons for the discrepancy between our group and others are analysed.

  14. Efficient Simulation Budget Allocation for Selecting an Optimal Subset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; He, Donghai; Fu, Michael; Lee, Loo Hay

    2008-01-01

    We consider a class of the subset selection problem in ranking and selection. The objective is to identify the top m out of k designs based on simulated output. Traditional procedures are conservative and inefficient. Using the optimal computing budget allocation framework, we formulate the problem as that of maximizing the probability of correc tly selecting all of the top-m designs subject to a constraint on the total number of samples available. For an approximation of this corre ct selection probability, we derive an asymptotically optimal allocat ion and propose an easy-to-implement heuristic sequential allocation procedure. Numerical experiments indicate that the resulting allocatio ns are superior to other methods in the literature that we tested, and the relative efficiency increases for larger problems. In addition, preliminary numerical results indicate that the proposed new procedur e has the potential to enhance computational efficiency for simulation optimization.

  15. An uncertainty relation in terms of generalized metric adjusted skew information and correlation measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Ya-Jing; Cao, Huai-Xin; Meng, Hui-Xian; Chen, Liang

    2016-12-01

    The uncertainty principle in quantum mechanics is a fundamental relation with different forms, including Heisenberg's uncertainty relation and Schrödinger's uncertainty relation. In this paper, we prove a Schrödinger-type uncertainty relation in terms of generalized metric adjusted skew information and correlation measure by using operator monotone functions, which reads, U_ρ ^{(g,f)}(A)U_ρ ^{(g,f)}(B)≥ f(0)^2l/k| Corr_ρ ^{s(g,f)}(A,B)| ^2 for some operator monotone functions f and g, all n-dimensional observables A, B and a non-singular density matrix ρ . As applications, we derive some new uncertainty relations for Wigner-Yanase skew information and Wigner-Yanase-Dyson skew information.

  16. Flood Forecasting in River System Using ANFIS

    SciTech Connect

    Ullah, Nazrin; Choudhury, P.

    2010-10-26

    The aim of the present study is to investigate applicability of artificial intelligence techniques such as ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System) in forecasting flood flow in a river system. The proposed technique combines the learning ability of neural network with the transparent linguistic representation of fuzzy system. The technique is applied to forecast discharge at a downstream station using flow information at various upstream stations. A total of three years data has been selected for the implementation of this model. ANFIS models with various input structures and membership functions are constructed, trained and tested to evaluate efficiency of the models. Statistical indices such as Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Correlation Coefficient (CORR) and Coefficient of Efficiency (CE) are used to evaluate performance of the ANFIS models in forecasting river flood. The values of the indices show that ANFIS model can accurately and reliably be used to forecast flood in a river system.

  17. Stochastic acceleration of solar flare protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The acceleration of solar flare protons is considered by cyclotron damping of intense Alfven wave turbulence in a magnetic trap. The energy diffusion coefficient is computed for a near-isotropic distribution of super-Alfvenic protons and a steady-state solution for the particle spectrum is found for both transit-time and diffusive losses out of the ends of the trap. The acceleration time to a characteristic energy approximately 20 Mev/nucl can be as short as 10 sec. On the basis of phenomenological arguments an omega/2 frequency dependence for the Alfven wave spectrum is inferred. The correlation time of the turbulence lies in the range .0005 less than tau/corr less than .05s.

  18. The chemokine receptor CCR5 deletion mutation is associated with MS in HLA-DR4-positive Russians.

    PubMed

    Favorova, O O; Andreewski, T V; Boiko, A N; Sudomoina, M A; Alekseenkov, A D; Kulakova, O G; Slanova, A V; Gusev, E I

    2002-11-26

    The authors studied the possible association between the presence of a 32-base pair deletion allele in CC chemokine receptor 5 gene [3p21] (CCR5 Delta 32 allele) and the occurrence of MS. The presence of CCR5 Delta 32 homozygotes among patients with MS indicates that the absence of CCR5 did not protect against MS. Moreover, the CCR5 Delta 32 mutation was associated with MS in HLA-DR4-positive Russians (p(corr) < 0.001, odds ratio [OR] = 25.0). The (CCR5 Delta 32,DR4)-positive phenotype was negatively associated with early MS onset (at ages < or = 18 years) (p = 0.0115, OR = 0.1).

  19. Bringing Breast Cancer Technologies to Market | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    CCR research is recognized in novel competition to encourage the commercialization of breast cancer inventions. Editor’s note: This article was originally published in CCR Connections (Volume 8, No. 1). The Breast Cancer Startup Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition, and was one of three finalists recognized by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Deputy Secretary Bill Corr. For more information on the Challenge, see previous article on the Poster website. Start-up companies are instrumental in bringing the fruits of scientific research to market. Recognizing an opportunity to bring entrepreneurial minds to bear on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, the Avon Foundation for Women partnered with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation to launch the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge.

  20. The behavior of pre-rusted steel in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, J.A.; Bautista, A.; Feliu, S.; Ramirez, E.

    1996-03-01

    This paper explores the possibility of an effective protection for precorroded steel by effect of the high alkalinity of the encasing mortar (by itself or in combination with the action of sodium nitrite). Application of a waterproof coating on the mortar surface was evaluated for this purpose. The behavior of clean steel electrodes and in three different pre-corrosion grades was characterized from periodic measurements of the corrosion potential (E{sub corr}) and polarization resistance (R{sub p}). Neither mortar alkalinity alone nor in combination with the effect of nitride ions was found to passivate the reinforcements in the two higher corrosion grades over 2 years of exposure in an atmosphere of a high relative humidity. Also, immersion of the specimens in a 5% NaNO{sub 2} solution was found not to passivate steel undergoing active corrosion. The effectiveness of the waterproofing treatment for diminishing reinforcement corrosion was found to rely heavily on timely application.

  1. Improving Capture-gamma Libraries for Nonproliferation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sleaford, Brad W.; Hurst, Aaron M.

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the measurement, evaluation and incorporation of new -ray spectroscopic data into the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) for nonproliferation applications. Analysis and processing techniques are described along with key deliverables that have been met over the course of this project. A total of nine new ENDF libraries have been submitted to the National Nuclear Data Center at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and are now available in the ENDF/B-VIII.beta2 release. Furthermore, this project has led to more than ten peer-reviewed publications and provided theses for ve graduate students. This project is a component of the NA-22 venture collaboration on \\Correlated Nuclear Data in Fission Events" (LA14-V-CorrData-PD2Jb).

  2. Electrochemical and analytical characterization of three corrosion inhibitors of steel in simulated concrete pore solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jin-Jie; Sun, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion inhibitors for steel, such as sodium phosphate (Na3PO4), sodium nitrite (NaNO2), and benzotriazole (BTA), in simulated concrete pore solutions (saturated Ca(OH)2) were investigated. Corrosion behaviors of steel in different solutions were studied by means of corrosion potential ( E corr), linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization (PDP). A field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) was used for observing the microstructures and morphology of corrosion products of steel. The results indicate that, compared with the commonly used nitrite-based inhibitors, Na3PO4 is not a good inhibitor, while BTA may be a potentially effective inhibitor to prevent steel from corrosion in simulated concrete pore solutions.

  3. Bruit thermique et effets quantiques dans une cavité optique de grande finesse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniard, T.; Briant, T.; Heidmann, A.; Pinard, M.

    2006-10-01

    Nous nous intéressons aux bruits dans les mesures optiques de très grande sensibilité et aux limites associées. Une des limitations fondamentales des mesures interférométriques, telles que les détections d'ondes gravitationnelles, est liée aux fluctuations de la pression de radiation exercée par la lumière sur les miroirs. Celle-ci induit des corrélations quantiques entre la position des miroirs et les fluctuations de la lumière. L'observation de ces effets quantiques ouvrirait de nombreuses perspectives: étude de la limite quantique standard, production d'états comprimés, réalisation d'une mesure quantique non destructive ldots

  4. Manipulation quantique de la lumière par un amplificateur non linéaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symul, T.; Bencheikh, K.; Levenson, J. A.

    2002-06-01

    Nous proposons un dispositif original, appelé Amplificateur Non Linéaire (ANL), permettant la génération et la manipulation d'états quantiques de la lumière. Ce dispositif permet une compression du bruit quantique de la lumière en dessous de la limite quantique standard plus efficace que celle obtenue par interactions non linéaires du second ordre ou du troisième ordre. Il permet également d'inverser les fluctuations quantiques en intensité de la lumière, et de produire des photons jumeaux ayant des corrélations quantiques plus élevées et plus robustes que ceux produits par un amplificateur paramétrique seul.

  5. Effects of Cryogenic Forging and Anodization on the Mechanical Properties of AA 7075-T73 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Teng-Shih; Liao, Tien-Wei; Hsu, Wen-Nong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, high-strength AA7075 alloy samples were cryogenically forged after annealing and then subjected to solution and aging treatments. The cryogenically forged 7075-T73 alloy samples displayed equiaxed fine grains associated with abundant fine precipitates in their matrix. Compared with conventional 7075-T73 alloy samples, the cryogenically forged samples exhibited an 8-12% reduction in tensile strength and an increased fatigue strength and higher corrosion resistance. The fatigue strength measured at 107 cycles was 225 MPa in the bare samples; the strength was increased to 250 MPa in the cryogenically forged samples. The effect of anodization on the corrosion resistance of the bare samples was improved from (E corr) -0.80 to -0.61 V.

  6. Constrained Bithiazoles: Small Molecule Correctors of Defective ΔF508–CFTR Protein Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conformationally constrained bithiazoles were previously found to have improved efficacy over nonconstrained bithiazoles for correction of defective cellular processing of the ΔF508 mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. In this study, two sets of constrained bithiazoles were designed, synthesized, and tested in vitro using ΔF508–CFTR expressing epithelial cells. The SAR data demonstrated that modulating the constraining ring size between 7- versus 8-membered in these constrained bithiazole correctors did not significantly enhance their potency (IC50), but strongly affected maximum efficacy (Vmax), with constrained bithiazoles 9e and 10c increasing Vmax by 1.5-fold compared to benchmark bithiazole corr4a. The data suggest that the 7- and 8-membered constrained ring bithiazoles are similar in their ability to accommodate the requisite geometric constraints during protein binding. PMID:25061695

  7. Significance of coplanar macrocells to corrosion in concrete-embedded steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, P.; Ramirez, E.; Feliu, S.; Gonzalez, J.A.; Lopez, W.

    1999-03-01

    The influence of microcells and galvanic macrocells on the corrosion kinetics of concrete-embedded steel was investigated experimentally. Nine stainless steel/carbon steel coplanar macrocouples in cathodic-to-anodic ratios of 0.02 to 50 were cast in concrete slabs made from cement, sand, and water in a 1:3:0:5 proportion plus 2% calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) per cement weight. Corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), galvanic current (i{sub g}), polarization resistance (R{sub p}), and impedance measurements from 100 kHz to 0.01 Hz were made for the two metals, coupled and uncoupled. i{sub g} data provided by a zero resistance ammeter led to potentially underestimated corrosion rates for anodic areas, whereas R{sub p} measurements provided fairly reliable corrosion rates. Macrocells polarized anodic areas very slightly at points where an anodic and a cathodic process took place simultaneously.

  8. A positive relationship between groundwater velocity and submersed macrophyte biomass in Sparkling Lake, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lodge, David M.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Striegl, Robert G.

    1989-01-01

    We measured groundwater velocity and submersed macrophyte biomass at 52 shal- low (0.4-6.6 m) sites in mesotrophic Sparkling Lake, Vilas County, Wisconsin, during May-Au- gust 1985. Seventeen percent of variation in macrophyte biomass was explained by a signifi- cant (P < 0.005) relation with depth [log(biomass + 1) = 0.49 depth - 0.08 (depth)2 + 0.121. Some of the remaining variation in macrophyte bio- mass was explained by a significant rank corre- lation of biomass-on-depth residuals with groundwater velocity (rs = 0.46, P < 0.0 1). These results suggest that water movement through the sediment-water interface may be a determinant of macrophyte abundance and distribution. 

  9. Contents, accumulation and release of energy in green, dead and decomposing plant materials in an upland grassland near Kamenicky, Czechoslovakia.

    PubMed

    Ulehlová, B

    1980-01-01

    The energy content was studied in above-ground live plant material and in litter in a natural grassland ecosystem with dominant Nardus stricta L., defined phytosociologically as Polygalo-Nardetum strictae. PREISING 1950 corr. OBERDORFER 1957, and in two of its fertilized variants in the course of 1975 to 1977. Based on the determined production characteristics and data on decomposition processes, the amounts of energy accumulated by the green parts of the stands and the amount of energy released during decomposition from the litter were calculated. Changes in the energy content of litter in different stages of decomposition were determined. With progressing decomposition the energy content per gram ash-free decomposing plant litter increases.

  10. A DESIGN METHOD FOR TRACKS AND ROADBEDS OF RAILROAD-CROSSING UNDER FREIGHT TRAIN LOADS AND FORKLIFT LOADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itou, Kazuki; Momoya, Yoshitsugu; Sekine, Etsuo

    In the current design method of asphalt pavement in freight container yard, a theoretical design method based on multilayered elastic analysis is applied. However, in a design of railroad-crossing existing in the yard, heavy wheel loads of forklift and viscosity of asphalt pavement is not considered. In this study, the method of identifying the stiffness coefficient of asphalt pavement with consideration on its viscoelasticity under the heavy loading, and the design of the railroad crossing corresponding to the heavy loading of the forklift are shown. The method of the new design of railroad-crossing by FEM using the stiffness coefficient set in consideration of viscoelasticity of the asphalt pavement and track structure corres ponding to traffic volume are shown.

  11. Improved Correction of IR Loss in Diffuse Shortwave Measurements: An ARM Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Younkin, K; Long, CN

    2003-11-01

    Simple single black detector pyranometers, such as the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP) used by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, are known to lose energy via infrared (IR) emission to the sky. This is especially a problem when making clear-sky diffuse shortwave (SW) measurements, which are inherently of low magnitude and suffer the greatest IR loss. Dutton et al. (2001) proposed a technique using information from collocated pyrgeometers to help compensate for this IR loss. The technique uses an empirically derived relationship between the pyrgeometer detector data (and alternatively the detector data plus the difference between the pyrgeometer case and dome temperatures) and the nighttime pyranometer IR loss data. This relationship is then used to apply a correction to the diffuse SW data during daylight hours. We developed an ARM value-added product (VAP) called the SW DIFF CORR 1DUTT VAP to apply the Dutton et al. correction technique to ARM PSP diffuse SW measurements.

  12. The rs2071559 AA VEGFR-2 genotype frequency is significantly lower in neovascular age-related macular degeneration patients.

    PubMed

    Lazzeri, Stefano; Orlandi, Paola; Figus, Michele; Fioravanti, Anna; Cascio, Elisa; Di Desidero, Teresa; Agosta, Elisa; Canu, Bastianina; Sartini, Maria Sole; Danesi, Romano; Nardi, Marco; Bocci, Guido

    2012-01-01

    In this prospective, case-control genetic study, 120 consecutive neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) cases and 78 controls were enrolled. Two SNPs (rs2071559 and rs1870377) of VEGF-A receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) gene were analyzed with the technique of Real-Time PCR to investigate a genetic link between AMD and VEGFR-2 gene polymorphisms in Italian patients. The frequency of the VEGFR-2 genotype rs2071559 AA was significantly lower (18.33%) in patients with AMD than in the control subjects (34.62%; P = 0.0095, chi-square test; P(corr) = 0.038; OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.82). In conclusion, although with the limitations of a small sample size and the few SNPs studied, this study demonstrates a lower frequency of VEGFR-2 rs2071559 AA genotype in an AMD patient population, suggesting future studies on the role VEGFR-2 SNPs.

  13. Flood Forecasting in River System Using ANFIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Nazrin; Choudhury, P.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate applicability of artificial intelligence techniques such as ANFIS (Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System) in forecasting flood flow in a river system. The proposed technique combines the learning ability of neural network with the transparent linguistic representation of fuzzy system. The technique is applied to forecast discharge at a downstream station using flow information at various upstream stations. A total of three years data has been selected for the implementation of this model. ANFIS models with various input structures and membership functions are constructed, trained and tested to evaluate efficiency of the models. Statistical indices such as Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Correlation Coefficient (CORR) and Coefficient of Efficiency (CE) are used to evaluate performance of the ANFIS models in forecasting river flood. The values of the indices show that ANFIS model can accurately and reliably be used to forecast flood in a river system.

  14. Dépression et niveau de fardeau chez les aidants familiaux des sujets déments en Tunisie

    PubMed Central

    Ben Thabet, Jihène; Jaoua, Feriel; Charfi, Nada; Zouari, Lobna; Zouari, Nasreddine; Maalej, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Introduction La démence peut retentir lourdement sur les aidants familiaux du patient. Les objectifs de notre étude étaient de déterminer le niveau de fardeau et de la dépression chez les aidants familiaux de sujets déments, et d'identifier les facteurs associés à un niveau de fardeau élevé. Méthodes Il s'agissait d'une enquête auprès de 65 aidants tunisiens. Les niveaux de fardeau et de la dépression ont été évalués par, respectivement, l'inventaire de Zarit et l’échelle de Beck. Résultats Le taux des aidants qui avaient un niveau de fardeau élevé était de 52,3 %. Une dépression modérée ou sévère a été relevée chez 46,2 %. Un niveau de fardeau élevé était corrélé, du côté de l'aidant, avec le niveau socio-économique moyen à élevé, la cohabitation avec le patient, le fait d’être son conjoint, la réduction des activités quotidiennes et la sévérité de la dépression, et, du côté du dément, avec l'agressivité. Conclusion Les facteurs corrélés à un niveau de fardeau élevé orientent vers les cibles d'intervention et sont susceptibles d’être améliorés par la prise en charge, ce qui contribuerait à alléger la détresse des aidants. PMID:22384291

  15. Preparation and Performance of Plasma/Polymer Composite Coatings on Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H. R.; Hamzah, E.; Bagheriyan, S.; Daroonparvar, M.; Kasiri-Asgarani, M.; Shah, A. M.; Medraj, M.

    2016-09-01

    A triplex plasma (NiCoCrAlHfYSi/Al2O3·13%TiO2)/polycaprolactone composite coating was successfully deposited on a Mg-1.2Ca alloy by a combination of atmospheric plasma spraying and dip-coating techniques. The NiCoCrAlHfYSi (MCrAlHYS) coating, as the first layer, contained a large number of voids, globular porosities, and micro-cracks with a thickness of 40-50 μm, while the Al2O3·13%TiO2 coating, as the second layer, presented a unique bimodal microstructure with a thickness of 70-80 μm. The top layer was a hydrophobic polymer, which effectively sealed the porosities of plasma layers. The results of micro-hardness and bonding strength tests showed that the plasma coating presented excellent hardness (870 HV) and good bonding strength (14.8 MPa). However, the plasma/polymer coatings interface exhibited low bonding strength (8.6 MPa). The polymer coating formed thick layer (100-110 μm) that homogeneously covered the surface of the plasma layers. Contact angle measurement showed that polymer coating over plasma layers significantly decreased surface wettability. The corrosion current density ( i corr) of an uncoated sample (262.7 µA/cm2) decreased to 76.9 µA/cm2 after plasma coatings were applied. However, it was found that the i corr decreased significantly to 0.002 µA/cm2 after polymer sealing of the porous plasma layers.

  16. Étude des modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouzri, A.; Dorbez-Sridi, R.; Oumezzine, M.

    2004-11-01

    Les modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice en poudre en fonction du taux d'hydratation sont étudiées par calorimétrie différentielle à balayage et par diffusion des rayons X. L'analyse thermique par DSC a permis de montrer que pour les faibles taux d'hydratation (≤ 50%) l'eau est complètement confinée dans les pores alors que pour les forts taux d'hydratation (>50%) l'eau se trouve aussi bien dans les pores qu'autour des grains de la silice. L'apparition de la glace cubique lors du refroidissement de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice prouve que l'interaction eau-silice ne peut être négligée lors de la détermination du signal de l'eau. L'extraction du signal, diffusé uniquement par l'eau confinée, à partir des intensités diffusées par le gel de silice à deux taux d'hydratation distincts, révèle dans les fonctions de corrélation de paire un pic à 3.7Å qui ne peut être attribué qu'à une corrélation oxygène-oxygène inexistante dans l'eau massique et résultant de la déformation du réseau tétraédrique des molécules d'eau sous l'effet du confinement et de la proximité d'une surface.

  17. Exhaust emissions from ships at berth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, D. A.

    Emission measurements have been carried out on board six ships at berth during normal real-world operation (hotelling, unloading and loading activities). The study included three passenger ferries, one transoceanic container/ro-ro, one transoceanic car/truck carrier, and one chemical tanker. Emissions were measured from 22 auxiliary engines (AEs, medium and high-speed marine diesels) covering seven engine models and ranging in size from 720 to 2675 kW maximum output. The fuels varied from low sulphur gasoils ( 2.91 cst viscosity) through to residual oils ( 411 cst viscosity). Both specific emission factors ( g kWh -1) at a given engine load and total emissions (kg) of nitrogen oxides (NO x), sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide, particulate matter (PM) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons during actual harbour stops were determined. In addition, some preliminary measurements to investigate PM size distributions were undertaken. The specific emissions showed significant variations between the different engine models and also within the same engine model on board the same ship. For example NO x emissions varied between 9.6 and 20.2 g kWh corr-1 between all engines and 14.2- 18.6 g kWh corr-1 between engines of the same model and fuel. Other emissions from boiler use and possible main engine warm-up prior to departure were in general expected to be considerably less than those from the AEs. The results obtained for the three passenger ferries demonstrate that empirically derived, emission formulae using dead weight tonnage can prove to be a cost-effective and accurate tool for harbour emission inventories.

  18. An optimal index for measuring the effect of East Asian winter monsoon on China winter temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundi; Yang, Song; Wu, Qigang

    2015-11-01

    Extreme cold events occur frequently in China. The authors define a representative yet simple index to reveal the monthly changes in China winter temperature associated with the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM), which is represented by both the leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode and the country-mean temperature index of Chinese 160 gauge stations. A combined technique of correlation and multivariate EOF (Corr-MVEOF) analyses is applied to capture the dominant coupled patterns of EAWM circulation system. Based on the atmospheric circulation features captured by the leading Corr-MVEOF mode, a new EAWM index referred to as CNWMI is derived by using a stepwise regression analysis. The CNWMI highlights the importance of (1) the Mongolia-Siberian High (MSH) and its southward expansion and (2) the Asia-wide meridional dipole anomaly of 500 hPa geopotential height. Compared with the 27 existing EAWM indices, the CNWMI not only best represents the leading modes of both EAWM circulation system and China winter temperature, but also reasonably tracks the intraseasonal-to-interdecadal variations of EAWM so that the monthly intensity of EAWM can be monitored conveniently. In particular, the Aleutian low (AL) is not strongly related to the MSH and may not be responsible for the variability of EAWM/MSH. Moreover, the indices that are highly correlated with the temperature over southern East Asia do not show significant relationships with the AL, which is different from the conventional concept that a strong EAWM/MSH is linked to a deepened AL. In contrast, the anomalous Australia-Maritime Continent low is in good agreement with the variation of EAWM/MSH.

  19. Oxytocin receptor gene methylation: converging multilevel evidence for a role in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Christiane; Dannlowski, Udo; Bräuer, David; Stevens, Stephan; Laeger, Inga; Wittmann, Hannah; Kugel, Harald; Dobel, Christian; Hurlemann, René; Reif, Andreas; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Heindel, Walter; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Arolt, Volker; Gerlach, Alexander L; Hoyer, Jürgen; Deckert, Jürgen; Zwanzger, Peter; Domschke, Katharina

    2015-05-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a commonly occurring and highly disabling disorder. The neuropeptide oxytocin and its receptor (OXTR) have been implicated in social cognition and behavior. This study-for the first time applying a multilevel epigenetic approach-investigates the role of OXTR gene methylation in categorical, dimensional, and intermediate neuroendocrinological/neural network phenotypes of social anxiety. A total of 110 unmedicated patients with SAD and matched 110 controls were analyzed for OXTR methylation by direct sequencing of sodium bisulfite-converted DNA extracted from whole blood. Furthermore, OXTR methylation was investigated regarding SAD-related traits (Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS)), salivary cortisol response during the Trier social stress test (TSST), and amygdala responsiveness to social phobia related verbal stimuli using fMRI. Significantly decreased OXTR methylation particularly at CpG Chr3: 8 809 437 was associated with (1) the categorical phenotype of SAD (p<0.001, Cohen's d=0.535), (2) increased SPS and SIAS scores (p<0.001), (3) increased cortisol response to the TSST (p=0.02), and (4) increased amygdala responsiveness during social phobia-related word processing (right: p(corr)<0.001; left: p(corr)=0.005). Assuming that decreased OXTR methylation confers increased OXTR expression, the present finding may reflect a compensatory upregulation for pathologically reduced oxytocin levels or a causally relevant increased OXTR activation in SAD and related traits. OXTR methylation patterns might thus serve as peripheral surrogates of oxytocin tone and aid in establishing accessible biomarkers of SAD risk allowing for indicated preventive interventions and personalized treatment approaches targeting the oxytocin system.

  20. WISE TF: A MID-INFRARED, 3.4 {mu}m EXTENSION OF THE TULLY-FISHER RELATION USING WISE PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lagattuta, David J.; Mould, Jeremy R.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Hong Tao; Springob, Christopher M.; Masters, Karen L.; Koribalski, Baerbel S.; Jones, D. Heath

    2013-07-10

    We present a mid-infrared Tully-Fisher (TF) relation using photometry from the 3.4 {mu}m W1 band of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite. The WISE TF relation is formed from 568 galaxies taken from the all-sky 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) galaxy catalog, spanning a range of environments including field, group, and cluster galaxies. This constitutes the largest mid-infrared TF relation constructed to date. After applying a number of corrections to galaxy magnitudes and line widths, we measure a master TF relation given by M{sub corr} = -22.24 - 10.05[log (W{sub corr}) - 2.5], with an average dispersion of {sigma}{sub WISE} = 0.686 mag. There is some tension between WISE TF and a preliminary 3.6 {mu}m relation, which has a shallower slope and almost no intrinsic dispersion. However, our results agree well with a more recent relation constructed from a large sample of cluster galaxies. We additionally compare WISE TF to the near-infrared 2MTF template relations, finding a good agreement between the TF parameters and total dispersions of WISE TF and the 2MTF K-band template. This fact, coupled with typical galaxy colors of (K - W1) {approx} 0, suggests that these two bands are tracing similar stellar populations, including the older, centrally-located stars in the galactic bulge which can (for galaxies with a prominent bulge) dominate the light profile.

  1. Corrosion behaviour of Ti-15Mo alloy for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satendra; Narayanan, T S N Sankara

    2008-07-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Ti-15Mo alloy in 0.15M NaCl solution containing varying concentrations of fluoride ions (190, 570, 1140 and 9500 ppm) is evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometric/current-time transient (CTT) studies to ascertain its suitability for dental implant applications. The study reveals that there is a strong dependence of the corrosion resistance of Ti-15Mo alloy on the concentration of fluoride ions in the electrolyte medium. Increase in fluoride ion concentration from 0 to 9500 ppm shifts the corrosion potential (E(corr)) from -275 to -457 mV vs. SCE, increases the corrosion current density (i(corr)) from 0.31 to 2.30 microA/cm(2), the passive current density (i(pass)) from 0.07 to 7.32 mA/cm(2) and the double-layer capacitance (C(dl)) from 9.63 x 10(-5) to 1.79 x 10(-4)F and reduces the charge transfer resistance (R(ct)) from 6.58 x 10(4) to 6.64 x 10(3)Omega cm(2). In spite of the active dissolution, the Ti-15Mo alloy exhibit passivity at anodic potentials at all concentrations of the fluoride ions studied. In dental implants since the exposure of the alloy will be limited only to its 'neck', the amount of Mo ions released from Ti-15Mo alloy is not likely to have an adverse and hence, in terms of biocompatibility this alloy seems to be acceptable for dental implant applications. The results of the study suggest that Ti-15Mo alloy can be a suitable alternative for dental implant applications.

  2. Electrochemical deposition and evaluation of electrically conductive polymer coating on biodegradable magnesium implants for neural applications.

    PubMed

    Sebaa, Meriam A; Dhillon, Shan; Liu, Huinan

    2013-02-01

    In an attempt to develop biodegradable, mechanically strong, biocompatible, and conductive nerve guidance conduits, pure magnesium (Mg) was used as the biodegradable substrate material to provide strength while the conductive polymer, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was used as a conductive coating material to control Mg degradation and improve cytocompatibility of Mg substrates. This study explored a series of electrochemical deposition conditions to produce a uniform, consistent PEDOT coating on large three-dimensional Mg samples. A concentration of 1 M 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene in ionic liquid was sufficient for coating Mg samples with a size of 5 × 5 × 0.25 mm. Both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry coating methods produced adequate coverage and uniform PEDOT coating. Low-cost stainless steel and copper electrodes can be used to deposit PEDOT coatings as effectively as platinum and silver/silver chloride electrodes. Five cycles of CV with the potential ranging from -0.5 to 2.0 V for 200 s per cycle were used to produce consistent coatings for further evaluation. Scanning electron micrographs showed the micro-porous structure of PEDOT coatings. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed the peaks of sulfur, carbon, and oxygen, indicating sufficient PEDOT coating. Adhesion strength of the coating was measured using the tape test following the ASTM-D 3359 standard. The adhesion strength of PEDOT coating was within the classifications of 3B to 4B. Tafel tests of the PEDOT coated Mg showed a corrosion current (I(CORR)) of 6.14 × 10(-5) A as compared with I(CORR) of 9.08 × 10(-4) A for non-coated Mg. The calculated corrosion rate for the PEDOT coated Mg was 2.64 mm/year, much slower than 38.98 mm/year for the non-coated Mg.

  3. Comparison of Ionospheric TEC Derived from GPS and IRI 2012 Model during Geomagnetic Storms at Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlia, Dessi; Wu, Falin

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the variations of vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) at Manado, Indonesia (geographic coordinates : lat 1.34 ° S and long 124.82 ° E) for period 2013. The GPS measured TEC is compared with the TEC derived from the IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) 2012 model. Vertical TEC measurements obtained from dual frequency GPS receiver that is GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillations and TEC monitor). Variation of TEC validate to IRI 2012 model at Manado station has been compared with the model for three different topside of electron density namely NeQuick, IRI-01-Corr and IRI2001.There is a need to investigation on diurnal, seasonal variations, solar activity dependence of TEC and including effects of space weather related events to TEC and modeling of TEC. In this paper, diurnal and seasonal variations of VTEC and the effect of VTEC due to space weather events like Geomagnetic storms are analyzed. The result show that the TEC prediction using IRI-2001 model overestimated the GPS TEC measurements, while IRI-NeQuick and IRI-01-corr show a tendency to underestimates the observed TEC during the day time particularly in low latitude region in the maximum solar activity period (2013). The variations of VTEC during 17th March, 2013, 29th June, 2013 storms are analyzed. During 17th March,2013 storm enhancement in VTEC with Kp value 6 and Disturbance storm index (DST) -132 nT. During 29th June, 2013 storm VTEC depletion with value 7 and DST -98 nT. Significant deviations in VTEC during the main phase of the storms are observed. It is found that the response of ionospheric TEC consist of effects of both enhancement and depletions in ionospheric structures (positive and negative storm). Keywords: TEC ionosphere, GPS, GISTM, IRI 2012 model, solar activity, geomagnetic storm

  4. NIR spectroscopy for the in-line monitoring of a multicomponent formulation during the entire freeze-drying process.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Juan G; de Waard, Hans; De Beer, Thomas; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Blanco, Marcel

    2014-08-01

    Freeze drying is a complex, time consuming and thus expensive process, hence creating a need for understanding the material behaviour in the process environment and for process optimization. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy offers the opportunity to monitor physicochemical changes of the formulation during freeze-drying. The aim of this work was to examine whether NIR spectroscopy allows in-line monitoring of all components during the entire freeze-drying process of a multi-component pharmaceutical formulation (a solution of fenofibrate and mannitol in a mixture of tertiary-butyl alcohol, and water). To extract useful information of all components in the formulation from the large multivariate data-sets obtained during in-line spectroscopic monitoring, several spectral pre-processing techniques and spectral data analysis techniques such as the mean of selected wavenumbers (Mws), the correlation coefficient (CorrCoef) and principal component analysis (PCA) have been evaluated and compared. To find out whether these chemometric techniques are also able to differentiate between changes in the process settings influencing the freeze-drying process of the formulation, freeze-drying processes were performed at four different conditions. Results demonstrated that in-line measurements using NIR spectroscopy were possible in an icy environment and that a further process understanding could be obtained. Data-analysis revealed the crystallization behaviour of each of the four components. In addition, using the three pre-processing techniques allowed observe the sublimation of the solvents. Mws and CorrCoef have proven to be adequate methods for monitoring the main physicochemical changes of product during the processes; this affirmation was confirmed by observing the outputs of PCA for entire processes.

  5. Discordance gradient-surface dans le rétrécissement mitral: le gradient moyen transmitral est-il un critère de sévérité ou un indice de tolérance du rétrécissement mitral serré?

    PubMed Central

    Najih, Hayat; Arous, Salim; Laarje, Aziza; Baghdadi, Dalila; Benouna, Mohamed Ghali; Azzouzi, Leila; Habbal, Rachida

    2016-01-01

    Le rétrécissement mitral (RM) rhumatismal demeure une valvulopathie fréquente dans les pays en voie de développement. Cependant, les pays industrialisés ont vu l'émergence ces dernières années de nouvelles étiologies de RM; notamment l'origine médicamenteuse et/ou toxique responsable de valvulopathies restrictives aussi bien sténosantes que régurgitantes. Pour cette raison, l'évaluation échocardiographique du RM et surtout, la définition de critères objectifs pour conclure au caractère serré du RM reste toujours d'actualité. Les objectifs du travail sont: évaluer l'existence ou non d'une corrélation directe entre le gradient moyen transmitral (GMT) et la sévérité du RM chez les patients porteurs d'un RM serré ou très serré (critère primaire) et analyser les différents paramètres qui conditionnent le gradient moyen transmitral (GMT) (Critère secondaire). Il s'agit d'une étude transversale monocentrique incluant tous les patients admis au service de Cardiologie du CHU Ibn Rochd de Casablanca pour un RM serré ou très serré, sur une période d'une année (Janvier 2014 à Décembre 2014). Nous avons analysés séparément deux groupes de patients : ceux avec un gradient moyen transmitral<10 mmHg (groupe 1) et ceux avec un gradient>10mmHg (groupe2). 50 patients porteurs d'un RM serré ou très serré ont été inclus. L'âge moyen de nos patients est de 41,7 ans avec prédominance féminine (sex ratio: 0,25). 64% de nos patients avaient un RM serré et 36% avaient un RM très serré. 52% (26 patients) avaient un GMT <10mmHg et 48% (24 patients) avaient un gradient moyen >10mmHg, ce qui suggère l'absence de corrélation directe entre la sévérité du RM et le GMT (coefficient de Pearson R: -0,137). Pour la dyspnée, 80% des patients du groupe 1 étaient dyspnéiques stade II de la NYHA et 70% des patients du groupe 2 étaient dyspnéiques stade III (41%) ou IV (29%) de la NYHA, ce qui signifie l'existence d'une corr

  6. Correlation of cord blood pH, base excess, and lactate concentration measured with a portable device for identifying fetal acidosis.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, Lyne; Provençal, Mathieu; Caqueret, Aurore; Wo, Bi Lan; Bujold, Emmanuel; Larivière, François; Bédard, Marie-Josée

    2014-07-01

    Objectif : Déterminer l’efficacité des analyseurs de lactate portatifs, pour ce qui est de l’identification de l’acidose fœtale, en mettant en corrélation les valeurs artérielle et veineuse du lactate constatées dans le sang de cordon ombilical et les mesures du lactate, du pH et de l’excès de bases révélées par les analyseurs du laboratoire central. Méthodes : Nous avons mené une étude prospective en utilisant le sang de cordon artériel et veineux prélevé chez 52 femmes qui ont connu une grossesse monofœtale s’étant soldée en un accouchement à terme. Nous avons évalué la corrélation entre la concentration en lactate du sang de cordon mesurée au moyen de deux exemplaires du même appareil portatif (Lactate Plus, Nova Biomedical) et le résultat obtenu au moyen d’un analyseur du laboratoire central. Nous avons par la suite procédé à des analyses de la corrélation entre la concentration artérielle en lactate mesurée au moyen de l’appareil portatif et les valeurs artérielles du pH et de l’excès de bases. Résultats : Nous avons constaté un pH artériel médian de 7,24 (plage : 7,05 - 7,35) et une concentration artérielle en lactate médiane de 3,7 mmol/l (plage : 1,7 - 8,8 mmol/l). Une excellente corrélation a été constatée entre les concentrations en lactate mesurées par les deux appareils portatifs (R2 artériel = 0,98 et R2 veineux = 0,98) et entre les concentrations mesurées par l’appareil portatif et par l’analyseur du laboratoire central (R2 artériel = 0,94 et R2 veineux = 0,95). Au sein de notre population, les seuils optimaux permettant de prédire un pH < 7,20 ou un excès de bases > −8,0 mmol/l ont été des concentrations en lactate de 4,9 mmol/l et de 5,3 mmol/l, respectivement, selon l’analyse de la fonction d’efficacité du récepteur. En présence d’une concentration en lactate > 4,9 mmol/l, l’appareil portatif comptait une sensibilité de 82 % et une spécificité de 90

  7. Protective factors for mental disorders and psychological distress in female, compared with male, service members in a representative sample.

    PubMed

    Mota, Natalie P; Medved, Maria; Whitney, Debbie; Hiebert-Murphy, Diane; Sareen, Jitender

    2013-10-01

    Objectif : Quoique l’intérêt militaire pour la promotion de la résilience psychologique va en grandissant, les ressources protectrices contre la psychopathologie ont été sous-étudiées chez les membres féminins des forces armées. À l’aide d’un échantillon représentatif du personnel des Forces canadiennes, nous avons recherché si la pratique religieuse, la spiritualité, l’adaptation, et le soutien social étaient liés aux troubles mentaux et à la détresse psychologique chez le personnel féminin des Forces, et si des différences selon le sexe survenaient dans ces associations. Méthode : La pratique religieuse et la spiritualité étaient auto-déclarées. Les items d’adaptation étaient tirés de 3 échelles et produisaient 3 facteurs (actif, évitement, et automédication). Le soutien social était évalué par le Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey. Les troubles mentaux de l’année précédente ont été diagnostiqués au moyen du World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview. L’Échelle de détresse psychologique de Kessler a évalué la détresse. Des modèles de régression multivariée ont servi à rechercher les liens entre les corrélats et les résultats psychologiques de chaque sexe. Pour les associations qui n’étaient statistiquement significatives que pour un sexe, les interactions des sexes par corrélat ont été calculées. Résultats : Chez les membres féminins des forces, des relations inverses ont été constatées entre le soutien social et le trouble dépressif majeur (TDM), tout TDM ou trouble anxieux, l’idéation suicidaire, et la détresse. Aucune association n’a été détectée entre la pratique religieuse et les résultats, et la spiritualité était associée à la probabilité accrue de certains résultats. L’adaptation active était liée à moins de détresse psychologique, tandis que l’adaptation par évitement et l’automédication étaient liées à la

  8. Telescópio de patrulhamento solar em 12 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, F.; Costa, J. E. R.

    2003-08-01

    O telescópio de patrulhamento solar é um instrumento dedicado à observação de explosões solares com início de suas operações em janeiro de 2002, trabalhando próximo ao pico de emissão do espectro girossincrotrônico (12 GHz). Trata-se de um arranjo de três antenas concebido para a detecção de explosões e determinação em tempo real da localização da região emissora. Porém, desde sua implementação em uma montagem equatorial movimentada por um sistema de rotação constante (15 graus/hora) o rastreio apresentou pequenas variações de velocidade e folgas nas caixas de engrenagens. Assim, tornou-se necessária a construção de um sistema de correção automática do apontamento que era de fundamental importância para os objetivos do projeto. No segundo semestre de 2002 empreendemos uma série de tarefas com o objetivo de automatizar completamente o rastreio, a calibração, a aquisição de dados, controle de ganhos, offsets e transferência dos dados pela internet através de um projeto custeado pela FAPESP. O rastreio automático é realizado através de um inversor que controla a freqüência da rede de alimentação do motor de rastreio podendo fazer micro-correções na direção leste-oeste conforme os radiômetros desta direção detectem uma variação relativa do sinal. Foi adicionado também um motor na direção da declinação para correção automática da variação da direção norte-sul. Após a implementação deste sistema a precisão do rastreio melhorou para um desvio máximo de 30 segundos de arco, o que está muito bom para este projeto. O Telescópio se encontra em funcionamento automático desde março de 2003 e já conta com várias explosões observadas após a conclusão desta fase de automação. Estamos apresentando as explosões mais intensas do período e com as suas respectivas posições no disco solar.

  9. A 45-year time series of Saharan dune mobility from remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2012-04-01

    Decadal trends in the aeolian dust record of the Sahara affect the global climate system and the nutrient budget of the Atlantic Ocean. One proposed cause of these trends are changes in the frequency and intensity of dust storms, which have hitherto been hard to quantify. Because sand flux scales with the cube of wind speed, dune migration rates can be used as a proxy for storminess. Relative changes in the storminess of the Sahara can thus be monitored by tracking the migration rates of individual sand dunes over time. The Bodélé Depression of northern Chad was selected as a target area for this method, because it is the most important point-source of aeolian dust on the planet and features the largest and fastest dunes on Earth. A collection of co-registered Landsat, SPOT, and ASTER scenes, combined with declassified American spy satellite images was used to construct a 45 year record of dune migration in the Bodélé Depression. One unexpected outcome of the study was the observation of binary dune interactions in the imagery sequence, which reveals that when two barchan dunes collide, a transfer of mass occurs so that one dune appears to travel through the other unscathed, like a solitary wave. This confirms a controversial numerical model prediction and settles a decade-old debate in aeolian geomorphology. The COSI-Corr change detection method was used to measure the dune migration rates from 1984 until 1987, 1990, 1996, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010. An algorithm was developed to automatically warp the resulting displacement fields back to a common point in time. Thus, individual image pixels of a dune field were tracked over time, allowing the extraction of a time series from the co-registered satellite images without further human intervention. The automated analysis was extended further back into the past by comparison of the 1984 image with declassified American spy satellite (Corona) images from 1965 and 1970. Due to the presence of

  10. Measurement and Calculation of Electrochemical Potentials in Hydrogenated High Temperature Water, including an Evaluation of the Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia/Iron-Iron Oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) Probe as Reference Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Steven A. Attanasio; David S. Morton; Mark A. Ando

    2001-10-22

    The importance of knowing the electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP, also referred to as E{sub con}) of nickel-base alloys in hydrogenated water is related to the need to understand the effects of dissolved (i.e., aqueous) hydrogen concentration ([H{sub 2}]) on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Also, the use of a reference electrode (RE) can improve test quality by heightening the ability to detect instances of out-of-specification or unexpected chemistry. Three methods are used to measure and calculate the ECP of nickel-based alloys in hydrogenated water containing {approx} 1 to 150 scc/kg H{sub 2} (0.1 to 13.6 ppm H{sub 2}) at 260 to 360 C. The three methods are referred to as the specimen/component method, the platinum (Pt) method, and the yttria-stabilized zirconia/iron-iron oxide (YSZ/Fe-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) RE method. The specimen/component method relies upon the assumption that the specimen or component behaves as a hydrogen electrode, and its E{sub corr} is calculated using the Nernst equation. The present work shows that this method is valid for aqueous H{sub 2} levels {ge} {approx} 5 to 10 scc/kg H{sub 2}. The Pt method uses a voltage measurement between the specimen or component and a Pt electrode, with the Pt assumed to behave as a hydrogen electrode; this method is valid as long as the aqueous H{sub 2}level is known. The YSZ/Fe-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, which represents a relatively new approach for measuring E{sub corr} in this environment, can be used even if the aqueous H{sub 2} level is unknown. The electrochemical performance of the YSZ/Fe-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} probe supports its viability as a RE for use in high temperature hydrogenated water. Recent design modifications incorporating a teflon sealant have improved the durability of this RE (however, some of the REs do still fail prematurely due to water in-leakage). The Pt method is judged to represent the best overall approach, though there are cases where the other methods are superior

  11. Intrication de deux atomes en utilisant le blocage de Rydberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaëtan, A.

    2010-12-01

    Considérons un système quantique constitué de deux sous-systèmes : on dit qu'il est dans un état intriqué s'il existe des corrélations quantiques entre les états de ces derniers. La compréhension et la mise en œuvre d'états intriqués ont de nombreuses applications (métrologie quantique, étude des systèmes fortement corrélés, traitement quantique de l'information, etc.) et constituent le contexte général de ce travail de thèse. Plus en détail, nous démontrons la réalisation d'un état intriqué de deux atomes neutres piégés indépendamment. Pour cela, nous exploitons le phénomène de blocage de Rydberg : lorsqu'on essaie d'exciter simultanément deux atomes séparés de quelques micromètres vers un état de Rydberg donné, la forte interaction entre atomes de Rydberg peut empêcher cette excitation simultanée. Dans ce cas, seul un des deux atomes est excité et l'on génère ainsi des corrélations quantiques entre les états des deux atomes, c'est-à-dire de l'intrication. Dans notre expérience, deux atomes de 87Rb dans l'état fondamental 5S1/2 sont piégés chacun dans une pince optique microscopique, à une distance relative de 4 micromètres. En réalisant des transitions entre l'état 5S1/2 et l'état de Rydberg 58D3/2 par des transitions à deux photons, nous obtenons un état intriqué des deux atomes dans les sous-niveaux |5S1/2, f = 1, mf = 1> et |5S1/2, f = 2, mf = 2>. Afin de quantifier l'intrication, nous mesurons la fidélité par rapport à l'état-cible en réalisant des transitions Raman entre ces deux sous-niveaux. La fidélité des paires d'atomes présentes à la fin de l'expérience est supérieure à la valeur seuil de 0,5, ce qui prouve la création d'un état intriqué.

  12. The Danger from the Outer Space. (Breton Title: O Perigo que Vem do Espaço.) El Peligro que Viene del Espacio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedaque, Paulo

    2005-12-01

    Among the several risks to which the terrestrial life is subject, there is a remote possibility of collision with minor astronomical bodies such as comets and asteroids, which can potentially cause consequences ranging from minor damages to large cataclysms with reflections for the whole Earth. The frequency of the collisions is smaller whenever the external bodies are bigger and more massive. It is possible to conduct simulations taking into account these factors and the velocities and angles of the collisions to estimate their probabilities, the consequences for our planet and the frequency of such events. The results of the simulations are presented graphically to facilitate the final analysis. Finally, we point out that there are several research centers in the world working in the surveillance of the sky to identify possible "aggressive" bodies and evaluate the actual risks for the planet.

    Entre os muitos riscos que corre o ambiente terrestre, existe a possibilidade, ainda que remota, de choques com pequenos corpos celestes como cometas, asteróides e meteoróides que podem provocar desde pequenas colisões sem grandes conseqüências até cataclismos de enormes dimensões, com reflexos para toda a vida existente na Terra. A taxa das colisões, como era de se esperar, é tanto maior quanto menores forem as dimensões e a massa do corpo externo. É possível fazer simulações levando-se em conta o diâmetro médio do objeto celeste, sua densidade, a velocidade e o ângulo de colisão para estimar as conseqüências que trariam tais colisões. É possível também estimar ampère probabilidades dos choques e avaliar os reais riscos que nosso planeta corre e com que periodicidade podemos esperá-los. Os resultados dessas simulações aparecem em gráficos de modo a facilitar a analise final. Por fim, lembramos que existem centros de pesquisa em várias partes do mundo trabalhando no patrulhamento do céu na busca de

  13. Reliability, validity, and clinical use of the Dominic Interactive: a DSM-based, self-report screen for school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Lise; Berthiaume, Claude; St-Georges, Marie; Piché, Geneviève; Smolla, Nicole

    2013-08-01

    Objectifs : Comme aucun indicateur unique ne peut être considéré comme étant l’étalon de référence de la psychopathologie pédiatrique, il est nécessaire d’interviewer les enfants à l’égard de leurs propres symptômes. Notre étude portait sur la fiabilité, la validité et l’utilisation clinique du Dominique interactif (DI), un instrument multimédia auto-déclaré servant à évaluer chez les enfants d’âge scolaire, les symptômes des troubles mentaux les plus fréquents du Manuel diagnostique et statistique des troubles mentaux, 4e édition, texte révisé. Méthodes : Un échantillon de 585 enfants de 6 à 11 ans de cliniques communautaires et psychiatriques a été utilisé pour analyser la cohérence interne, l’estimation test–retest de la fiabilité, et la validité liée à un critère du DI contre l’état des sujets référés. En outre, les coefficients de corrélation inter-indicateurs entre cet instrument (rapport des enfants) et l’inventaire des symptômes des enfants (rapport des parents) ont été explorés dans un sous-échantillon de 292 participants. Résultats : Pour le total de l’échantillon, les coefficients alpha de Cronbach se situaient entre 0,63 et 0,91. Les kappas test–retest variaient de 0,42 à 0,62 pour les catégories basées sur les seuils d’inclusion, excepté pour les phobies spécifiques. Les coefficients de corrélation intraclasse allaient de 0,70 à 0,81 pour les échelles de symptômes. Le DI discriminait entre les enfants référés et non référés à des cliniques psychiatriques pour toutes les échelles de symptômes. Les coefficients de corrélation inter-indicateurs significatifs étaient plus élevés pour les symptômes externalisants (0,35 à 0,48) que pour les symptômes internalisants (0,14 à 0,27). Conclusions : Les résultats de notre étude soutiennent raisonnablement les propriétés psychométriques adéquates du DI. Cet instrument offre une méthode de dépistage sensible

  14. [Surgical treatment of spinal tuberculosis: an orthopedic service experience].

    PubMed

    Soares do Brito, Joaquim; Batista, Nuno; Tirado, António; Fernandes, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A espondilodiscite de etiologia tuberculosa é responsável por mais de 40% do universo destas infeções. Enquanto a quimioterapia tuberculostática se mantém como gold-standard da terapêutica desta patologia, o tratamento cirúrgico tem lugar em situações muito específicas. Neste trabalho apresentam-se os resultados de 33 doentes com espondilodiscite tuberculosa operados no nosso serviço durante os últimos 15 anos.Objetivo: Avaliar retrospetivamente doentes com diagnóstico de espondilodiscite tuberculosa operados num período de 15 anos(1996 a 2011); avaliar opções cirúrgicas tomadas e respetivos resultados relativamente à resolução da infeção, controlo da deformidade e evolução da lesão neurológica.Material e Métodos: Análise retrospetiva dos processos clínicos e avaliações imagiológicas de doentes com diagnóstico de espondilodiscite tuberculosa operados entre 1996 e 2011. Foram identificados 33 doentes com idade média de 46,7 anos; 17 doentes apresentavam infeção torácica, 11 lombar e cinco toraco-lombar. O abcesso paravertebral foi identificado em 26 dos casos estudados, existindo extensão intracanalar em 16 doentes. Nove dos doentes avaliados apresentavam lesão neurológica. A abordagem cirúrgica por via anterior foi utilizada em sete casos, a via posterior em 11 e a abordagem combinada foi a preferida em 15 ocasiões. A quimioterapia antibacilar foi mantida em média por 14 meses, com seguimento médio de 24 meses.Resultados: Verificámos cura da infeção em todos os doentes, sendo documentados critérios de fusão óssea, em média, 10,6 meses pós-cirurgia. A abordagem anterior isolada não permitiu obter correção da deformidade inicial, enquanto a via posterior permitiu uma correção média de 12,7º e a via combinada uma correção média de 8,7º. Cinco dos doentes com lesão neurológica melhoraram 2 a 3 níveis na escala ASIA durante o seguimento pós-operatório. Como complicações referem-se 2

  15. Validity and Reliability of the Swedish Version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale in People with Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Anette; Nilsagård, Ylva

    2013-01-01

    Objectif : Évaluer la validité et la fiabilité de la version suédoise de l'échelle ABC (Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale) de confiance de la personne en son équilibre associé à des gestes de la vie quotidienne chez les personnes >1 an après un AVC. Concept : Collecte initiale de données transversales multicentres avec suivi à l'aide de l'échelle ABC en Suède. Méthode : Un test de locomotion TUG (timed up-and-go), 10 mètres de marche chronométrée (10MWT) et un test de marche de 6 minutes (6MWT) ont été effectués; une évaluation à l'échelle ABC et le questionnaire Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) ont été réalisés; des données sur l'historique des chutes ont aussi été recueillies au cours d'une séance. Une semaine plus tard, l'échelle ABC a été envoyée aux participants pour une deuxième évaluation. Les coefficients de corrélation de Spearman ont été calculés, et la fiabilité a été évaluée à l'aide du coefficient de corrélation intraclasse (CCI) et du coefficient alpha de Cronbach. Résultats : Un échantillon de commodité de 67 personnes a été inclus (âge moyen: 68 ans). Le pointage moyen à l'échelle ABC est passé de 57 à la première évaluation à 43 lors de la seconde; 19 participants (28%) ont signalé des chutes au cours des trois mois précédents. Les pointages à l'échelle ABC affichaient une corrélation modérée avec le test TUG (r=0,48), le 10 MWT (r=0,52), avec le 6MWT (r=0,45) et avec le pointage sommaire de la composante physique du questionnaire SF-36 (r=0,43). La cohérence interne était élevée pour l'échelle ABC au test-retest (α=0,95–0,97). Le CCI était de 0,82 (I.C. de 95%, 0,72–0,88). Conclusions. La version suédoise de l'échelle ABC constitue un outil de mesure valable et fiable pour sonder la confiance en son équilibre chez les personnes >1 an après un AVC.

  16. Laboratory Earthquake Measurements with the High-speed Digital Image Correlation Method and Applications to Super-shear Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, V.; Lapusta, N.; Rosakis, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mapping full-field displacements and strains on the Earth's surface during an earthquake is of paramount importance to enhance our understanding of earthquake mechanics. In this study, the feasibility of such measurements using image correlation methods is investigated in a laboratory earthquake setup. Earthquakes are mimicked in the laboratory by dynamic rupture propagating along an inclined frictional interface formed by two Homalite plates under compression, using the configuration developed by Rosakis and coworkers (e.g., Rosakis et al., 2007). In our study, the interface is partially glued, in order to confine the rupture before it reaches the ends of the specimen. The specimens are painted with a speckle pattern to provide the surface with characteristic features for image matching. Images of the specimens are taken before and after dynamic rupture with a 4 Megapixels resolution CCD camera. The digital images are analyzed with two software packages: VIC-2D (Correlated Solutions Inc.) and COSI-Corr (Leprince et. al, 2007). Both VIC-2D and COSI-Corr are able to characterize the full-field static displacement of a dynamic crack. For example, in a case with secondary mode I cracks, the correlation analysis performed with either software clearly shows (i) the relative displacement (slip) along the frictional interface, (ii) the rupture arrest on the glued boundaries, and (iii) the presence of two wing cracks. The obtained displacement measurements are converted to strains, using de-noising techniques. The digital image correlation method is then used in combination with high-speed photography. We will report our progress on the study of a spontaneously expanding sub-Rayleigh shear crack advancing along an interface containing a patch of favorable heterogeneity, such as a preexisting subcritical crack or a patch with higher prestress. According to the predictions of Liu and Lapusta (2008), intersonic transition and propagation can be achieved in the presence of a

  17. Dépistage des maladies cardiovasculaires chez des étudiants de l'Université de Douala et influence des activités physiques et sportives

    PubMed Central

    Ewane, Marielle Epacka; Mandengue, Samuel Honoré; Priso, Eugene Belle; Tamba, Stéphane Moumbe; Ahmadou; Fouda, André Bita

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Les maladies cardiovasculaires (MCV) constituent l'une des principales causes de mortalité dans les pays en développement. Le dépistage de ces dernières chez des jeunes est un défi dans la lutte contre leur expansion. Le but de cette étude était de dépister ces maladies au sein d'une population jeunes d’étudiants camerounais. Methodes Deux mille six cent cinquante-huit étudiants de l'Université de Douala (23,6 ± 2,9 ans, sex-ratio H/F = 0,9) ont en Avril - Mai 2011 participé à une campagne de dépistage gratuit du diabète, de l'hypertension artérielle (HTA) et de l'obésité. Ils ont également été soumis à une d'enquête évaluant leur niveau en activités physiques et sportives (APS). Resultats 12,7% des participants avaient une pression artérielle (PA) ≥ 140/90 mmHg, 3,6% étaient obèses et 0,9% avaient une glycémie ≥1,26 g/L. Des corrélations ont été trouvées entre certains facteurs de risque (diabète, hypertension et obésité) et le niveau académique d'une part (r =0,366; p < 0,0001) et le temps passé devant la télévision d'autres part (r = 0,411; p < 0,0001). L‘APS était inversement corrélée à l‘âge (r =-0,015; p < 0,0001) et au temps passé devant la télévision (r = -0,059; p = 0,002). Conclusion La présence des MCV et leurs facteurs de risque mis en évidence dans cette étude réalisée en milieu estudiantin camerounais interpelle à une prévention et une éducation dans la lutte contre ces dernières. PMID:22655111

  18. Anomalous dielectric relaxation in lithium-potassium tantalate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussineau, P.; Farssi, Y.; Frénois, C.; Levelut, A.; Toulouse, J.; Ziolkiewicz, S.

    1994-08-01

    In order to describe the unusual dielectric properties observed in Ki{1-χ}Li{χ}TaO3. crystals a new approchh is proposed. The dynamical Glauber theory, previously applied to spinglasses, is modifiéd by the introduction of the spectral distribution of the random interactions between the dipoles associated with the Li+ ions. Moreover, the dipole corrélations are taken into account by the Onsager réaction field. As a result, the calculated dielectric constant reproduces well the unusual features of the Argand diagrams and, in particular, their finite slope at low frequencies and infinite slope at high frequencies (strophoidal shape). The temperature dépendance of some parameters shows, however, the limits of a spin-glass type model in describing the collective behaviour of randomly distributed dipoles in a highly polarizable medium. Une nouvelle approche est présentée qui permet de décrire les propriétés diélectriques particulières de cristaux mixtes de Ki{1-χ}Li{χ}TaO3. Elle s'appuie sur la théorie dynamique de Glauber, déjà utilisée pour les verres de spins, et modifiée par l'introduction d'une distribution spectrale spécifique aux interactions aléatoires des dipôles électriques associés aux ions Li+. En outre, les corrélations entre dipôles sont prises en compte par le champ de réaction d'Onsager. II s'ensuit que la constante diélectrique complexe ainsi calculée reproduit fidèlement les particularités des diagrammes d'Argand, telles que la pente finie aux basses fréquences et la pente infinie aux hautes fréquences (forme strophoïdale). La dépendance en température de certains paramètres déterminés par le calcul montre les limites de l'analogie avec les verres de spins et met en évidence le rôle d'un réseau très polarisable dans le comportement collectif d'une assemblée de dipôles électriques.

  19. Comparison of GPS based TEC measurements with the IRI-2012 model for the period of low to moderate solar activity (2009-2012) at the crest of equatorial anomaly in Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karia, S. P.; Patel, N. C.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-04-01

    The measurements of total electron content (TEC) are conducted at Surat (21° 9‧ N, 72° 47‧ E) in India, which lies under the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly region, for a period of four years from low to moderate solar activity (2009-2012) using a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. These results are compared with the TEC derived from IRI-2012 using three different options of topside electron density: NeQuick, IRI01-corr and IRI-2001. As there is difference between the upper limit of integration in the GPS TEC (20,200 km) and the IRI model (2000 km), to have a fair comparison of measured TEC with that of modeled TEC, the plasmaspheric contribution to the GPS TEC is removed. The measured TEC are compared with the model derived TEC for different times of the day for all months of four years (2009-2012). The IRI-2012 estimates the TEC well for the dusk hours 1800LT and noon hour 1200LT from 2010 to 2012. However, the estimation shows discrepancies with the observed TEC in the year 2009. For 0600LT it is observed that, from 2009 to 2011 the predictions made by IRI-2012 (options NeQuick and IRI01-corr) shifts from over estimation (0-50%) to under estimation (50-75%) and estimate the TEC well in the year 2012. In general, from 2009 to 2012, it is observed that with ascending phase of solar cycle the discrepancies in IRI prediction decreases for 0600LT, 1200LT and 1800LT hours of the day. Further, the comparison is also done for TEC at peak hour 1430LT for four months i.e. April, June, October and December (representing four seasons). It is observed that the peak hour TEC obtained by model overestimates the TEC for a low solar activity year 2009 but estimates well in 2010 and 2012 (except June). Further, model underestimates the peak hour TEC for moderate solar activity year 2011.

  20. Suivi prospectif sur 5 ans des tentatives de suicide en population clinique dans la région de Fès, Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Aarab, Chadya; Elghazouani, Fatima; Aalouane, Rachid; Rammouz, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Au Maroc, les tentatives de suicide (TS) demeurent un sujet mal évalué à cause de considérations socioculturelles et l'absence d'approche longitudinale. L'objectif principal était d’évaluer le devenir des suicidants après 5ans au centre universitaire psychiatrique de Fès, les objectifs secondaires étaient l'estimation de la prévalence des TS, préciser les étiologies les plus fréquentes, et établir une corrélation entre les paramètres sociodémographiques, cliniques et évolutifs. Etude prospective à visée transversale et longitudinale, incluant les suicidants vus à l'hôpital psychiatrique de Fès, avec un suivi longitudinal sur 5ans. L’évaluation a été faite par un hétéro-questionnaire et le Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) cherchant le trouble psychiatrique sous jacent. On a recruté 105 patients suicidants, 62% des femmes, l’âge moyen est de 29,23ans. La prévalence des tentatives de suicide est de 3% sur l'ensemble des consultants à l’établissement. Les troubles de l'humeur, psychotiques et de personnalité ont occupé respectivement 37,6%, 27,7%, et 25,7% des cas. La récidive suicidaire a été notée chez 54% des patients, était significativement corrélée à la vie solitaire (P: 0,039) et à la présence d'antécédents familiaux de TS (P: 0,046). L'utilisation de moyens violents était significativement fréquente chez les patients psychotiques. Après 5ans, 32 patients ont répondu à notre appel. Le taux de récidive était de 15%. On a noté trois cas de décès dont deux suicides confirmés. Les résultats confirment les données de la littérature scientifique avec certaines particularités cliniques et évolutives. PMID:25478042

  1. Isotropic-Cholesteric Co-Existence and Magnetic Field-Induced Isotropic-Nematic Transition of Filamentous Bacteriophage FD in Aqueous Suspension.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jianxin

    1995-01-01

    Isotropic to liquid crystalline phase transition for a lyotropic suspension of geometrically asymmetric macromolecules occurs to a wild class of synthetic polymers and biopolymers. Although in decades statistical mechanical theories have been developed to predict the thermodynamic conditions and the properties of such transition, quantitative comparison with theory has been compounded with complications such as charge, shape, polydispersity in size, and additional interactions with the solvent and among the macromolecules themselves. We chose the aqueous suspension of the filamentous bacteriophage fd as a model system to study the isotropic to liquid crystalline transition. The co-existence concentrations, as a function of ionic strength, were measured directly by spectrophotometry. Our data confirm quantitatively the predictions of a statistical mechanic treatment first described by Onsager, modified to include the effects of charge and flexibility of rodlike particles. We have also extended a previous study of the pretransitional angular correlations in the isotropic solutions of fd through the measurement of the magnetic-field-induced birefringence, i.e. the measurement of the Cotton-Mouton constant. At several ionic strengths the magnetic-field-induced birefringence, which is proportional to the number of particles in a correlation volume N_{rm corr}, was measured for fd concentrations spanning the entire isotropic region. From this data the limiting concentration of stability (spinodal) of the isotropic phase is obtained. A theoretical expression for the magnetic birefringence of persistent polymers was derived and agreed well with the data with the exception that N_{rm corr} at the isotropic to liquid crystal transition was smaller than predicted. In the proximity of the highest possible isotropic concentration, that is the isotropic in co-existence with anisotropic, we studied the effect of a high magnetic field. A first order field-induced isotropic

  2. Effects of methylphenidate on acute math performance in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Grizenko, Natalie; Cai, Emmy; Jolicoeur, Claude; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Joober, Ridha

    2013-11-01

    Objectif : Examiner les effets à court terme (aigus) du méthylphénidate (MPH) sur la performance en mathématique chez des enfants souffrant du trouble de déficit de l’attention avec hyperactivité (TDAH), et quels facteurs prédisent une amélioration de la performance en math. Méthode : Cent quatre-vingt-dix-huit enfants souffrant du TDAH ont participé à un essai de MPH croisé, randomisé, à double insu et contrôlé avec placebo. La réponse du MPH en math a été déterminée par l’administration de problèmes de math ajustés à leur niveau scolaire durant la Restricted Academic Situation Scale (RASS). Les tests t de Student ont été menés afin d’évaluer le changement de la performance en math avec les psychostimulants. La corrélation entre le changement à la RASS et le changement de la performance en math a aussi été examinée. Une régression linéaire a été exécutée pour déterminer les variables prédictives. Résultats : Les enfants souffrant du TDAH se sont améliorés significativement en math avec le MPH (P < 0,001). Le degré d’amélioration à la RASS (qui évalue l’activité motrice et l’orientation dans les tâches) et dans la performance en math avec MPH était hautement corrélé. L’âge de l’enfant au départ et les scores normaux au départ au Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT) – des opérations numériques représentaient 15 % des variances d’amélioration aiguë en math. Conclusions : Le MPH améliore la performance aiguë en mathématique chez les enfants souffrant du TDAH. Les enfants plus jeunes qui ont de moins bons scores en math (évalué par le WIAT) ont surtout amélioré leurs scores en math lorsqu’ils ont reçu des psychostimulants. Numéro d’enregistrement d’essai clinique : NCT00483106.

  3. Automated optical image correlation to constrain dynamics of slow-moving landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, B. H.; Roering, J. J.; Lamb, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    Large, slow-moving landslides can dominate sediment flux from mountainous terrain, yet their long-term spatio-temporal behavior at the landscape scale is not well understood. Movement can be inconspicuous, episodic, persist for decades, and is challenging and time consuming to quantify using traditional methods such as stereo photogrammetry or field surveying. In the absence of large datasets documenting the movement of slow-moving landslides, we are challenged to isolate the key variables that control their movement and evolution. This knowledge gap hampers our understanding of landslide processes, landslide hazard, sediment budgets, and landscape evolution. Here we document the movement of numerous slow-moving landslides along the Eel River, northern California. These glacier-like landslides (earthflows) move seasonally (typically 1-2 m/yr), with minimal surface deformation, such that scattered shrubs can grow on the landslide surface for decades. Previous work focused on manually tracking the position of individual features (trees, rocks) on photos and LiDAR-derived digital topography to identify the extent of landslide activity. Here, we employ sub-pixel change detection software (COSI-Corr) to generate automated maps of landslide displacement by correlating successive orthorectified photos. Through creation of a detailed multi-temporal deformation field across the entire landslide surface, COSI-Corr is able to delineate zones of movement, quantify displacement, and identify domains of flow convergence and divergence. The vegetation and fine-scale landslide morphology provide excellent texture for automated comparison between successive orthorectified images, although decorrelation can occur in areas where translation between images is greater than the specified search window, or where intense ground deformation or vegetation change occurs. We automatically detected movement on dozens of active landslides (with landslide extent and displacement confirmed by

  4. Revisiting Past Earthquakes and Seismo-Volcanic Crises Using Declassified Optical Satellite Imagery (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Leprince, S.; Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.

    2009-12-01

    In this study we demonstrate that the recently declassified Corona KH-9 images can be used to measure ground deformation due to seismotectonic and volcanic events from optical sub-pixel correlation. We use high resolution (6-9 m) satellite images, available from the USGS for a relatively small cost ($30 per image, swath measuring 250 x 125 km). The images are processed with the user-friendly software package COSI-Corr, which allows for automatic and precise ortho-rectification, co-registration, and sub-pixel correlation of pushbroom satellite and aerial images. Knowledge of the camera calibration information is required to determine the interior and exterior orientation parameters of the camera, which are in turn needed to successfully orthorectify and co-register the images using COSI-Corr. Because the camera information still remains classified, we follow the approach of Surazakov, et al., (2009), who conclude the Hexagon KH9 camera system is similar to the NASA Large Format Camera (LFC) system. We successfully tested the approach on the 1999 Hector Mine, USA (Ms 7.4) and 1992 Landers, USA (Ms 7.5) earthquakes and then moved on to analyze a number of other large events. We have in particular been able to measure the surface deformation induced by the 1975-1984 Krafla rifting crisis in NE Iceland, by correlating a Hexagon image from 15th September 1977 with a SPOT5 image from 2002. During the period 1977-2002 we find an average E-W extension of 3±0.5 m across the rift, which extends NNE from Lake Myvatn in the south to Ásbyrgi canyon near the coast to the north (a distance of over 40 km) and were able to determine which faults were activated. We have also co-registered a number of Hexagon images to both SPOT and ASTER images (orthorectified using either SRTMv2 or ASTER GDEM topographic data) to determine the co-seismic rupture location and amount of displacement in various significant intraplate earthquakes for which InSAR or GPS data is unavailable: 1976

  5. Measuring Mars Sand Flux Seasonality from a Time Series of Hirise Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.; Bridges, N. T.; Leprince, S.; Lucas, A.

    2012-12-01

    The volumetric transport rate of sand, or flux, is a fundamental quantity that relates to the rate of landscape evolution through surface deposition and erosion. Measuring this quantity on Mars is particularly relevant as wind is the dominant geomorphic agent active at present on the planet. Measuring sand flux on Mars has been made possible thanks to the availability of times series of high resolution images acquired by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) and precise image registration and correlation methods which permits the quantification of movement to sub-pixel precision. In this study, focused on the Nili Patera dune field, we first measured the migration rate of sand ripples and dune lee fronts over 105 days, using a pair of HiRISE images acquired in 2007, correlated and co-registered with COSI-Corr. From these measurements and the estimation of the ripple and dune heights, we derived the reptation and saltation sand fluxes. We next applied the same methodology to a time-series of eight images acquired in 2010-2011 covering one Mars year. Pairs of sequential images, were processed with COSI-Corr yielding a times series of 8 displacement maps. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the time-series to quantify more robustly the time evolution of the signal and filter out noise, in particular due to misalignment of CCDs. Using the first two components, which account for 84% of the variance, the seasonal variation of the ripple migration rate was estimated. We clearly observe continuously active migration throughout the year with a strong seasonal quasi-sinusoidal variation which peaks at perihelion. Ripple displacement orientation is stable in time, toward ~N115°E. The wind direction is thus relatively constant in this area, a finding consistent with the barchan morphology and orientation of the dunes. The dataset require that sand moving winds must occur daily to weekly throughout the year. The amplitude of the seasonal

  6. Characterisation of GPS-TEC in the African equatorial and low latitude region and the regional evaluation of the IRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adebiyi, S. J.; Adimula, I. A.; Oladipo, O. A.

    2016-06-01

    With the increasing application of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) products and services, knowledge of the Total Electron Content (TEC) variation is vital, particularly in historically under-sampled regions. The ionospheric induced-error, which is the largest and most variable error source of GNSS applications, is proportional to TEC along the satellite-receiver path. Simultaneous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements from six African equatorial and low latitude stations in the southern hemisphere are used to investigate the latitudinal variation of TEC over the region during the year 2013, a year of moderate solar activity. The analysis reveals some detailed features of seasonal, month-to-month and solar activity dependence of TEC. The seasonal variation of TEC revealed that the daytime and the pre-midnight values of TEC for stations located close to the geographic equator is considerably higher in equinoxes and June solstice compared to stations farther from the equator, however, the difference is insignificant during the December solstice. The month-to-month variation of TEC shows semi-annual symmetry/asymmetry in TEC values for stations closer/farther from the equator. TEC sensitivity to solar activity shows significant seasonal and latitudinal characteristics. Generally, a relatively good correlation exists between TEC and F10.7 for stations around the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) region compared to those found at stations close to the equator. Beyond the EIA region, the correlation coefficients drop in all seasons. TEC predicted by the three topside options of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model [i.e. the NeQuick (NeQ), IRI-2001 Corrected (IRI-01 Corr) and the IRI-2001 (IRI-01) options] exhibits latitudinal and seasonal characteristics. The NeQ option performed better than the other two options at stations located within the equatorial region in most of the months and seasons. Outside the EIA region, the IRI-01 Corr

  7. Ribosomal Proteins RPS11 and RPS20, Two Stress-Response Markers of Glioblastoma Stem Cells, Are Novel Predictors of Poor Prognosis in Glioblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuai; Tso, Jonathan L.; Menjivar, Jimmy C.; Wei, Bowen; Lucey, Gregory M.; Mareninov, Sergey; Chen, Zugen; Liau, Linda M.; Lai, Albert; Nelson, Stanley F.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Tso, Cho-Lea

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma stem cells (GSC) co-exhibiting a tumor-initiating capacity and a radio-chemoresistant phenotype, are a compelling cell model for explaining tumor recurrence. We have previously characterized patient-derived, treatment-resistant GSC clones (TRGC) that survived radiochemotherapy. Compared to glucose-dependent, treatment-sensitive GSC clones (TSGC), TRGC exhibited reduced glucose dependence that favor the fatty acid oxidation pathway as their energy source. Using comparative genome-wide transcriptome analysis, a series of defense signatures associated with TRGC survival were identified and verified by siRNA-based gene knockdown experiments that led to loss of cell integrity. In this study, we investigate the prognostic value of defense signatures in glioblastoma (GBM) patients using gene expression analysis with Probeset Analyzer (131 GBM) and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data, and protein expression with a tissue microarray (50 GBM), yielding the first TRGC-derived prognostic biomarkers for GBM patients. Ribosomal protein S11 (RPS11), RPS20, individually and together, consistently predicted poor survival of newly diagnosed primary GBM tumors when overexpressed at the RNA or protein level [RPS11: Hazard Ratio (HR) = 11.5, p<0.001; RPS20: HR = 4.5, p = 0.03; RPS11+RPS20: HR = 17.99, p = 0.001]. The prognostic significance of RPS11 and RPS20 was further supported by whole tissue section RPS11 immunostaining (27 GBM; HR = 4.05, p = 0.01) and TCGA gene expression data (578 primary GBM; RPS11: HR = 1.19, p = 0.06; RPS20: HR = 1.25, p = 0.02; RPS11+RPS20: HR = 1.43, p = 0.01). Moreover, tumors that exhibited unmethylated O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) or wild-type isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were associated with higher RPS11 expression levels [corr (IDH1, RPS11) = 0.64, p = 0.03); [corr (MGMT, RPS11) = 0.52, p = 0.04]. These data indicate that increased expression of RPS11 and RPS20 predicts shorter patient survival. The study also

  8. Characteristic corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline TiN films prepared by high density plasma reactive magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Kang, C G; Kim, Y T; Cheong, W S; Song, P K

    2013-07-01

    Nanocytalline TiN films were deposited on non-alkali glass and Al substrates by reactive DC magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with an electromagnetic field system (EMF). The microstructure and corrosion resistance of the TiN-coated Al substrates were estimated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods. All the TiN films shows that they have a (111) preferred orientation at room temperature. TiN films deposited on Al substrate using only DCMS 400 W showed a sheet resistance of 3.22 x 10-1 omega/symbol see texts (resistivity, 3.22 x 10-5 omegacm). On the other hand, a relatively low sheet resistance of 1.91 x 10-1 omega/symbol see text (1.91 x 10-5 omegacm) was obtained for the dense nanocrystalline TiN film deposited on Al substrate using DCMS 375 W+ EMF 25 W, indicating that the introduction of an EMF system enhanced the electrical properties of the TiN film. TiN films deposited on Al substrate at 400 degreesC had a (200) preferred orientation with the lowest sheet resistance of 1.28x10-1 omega/symbol see texts (1.28 x 10-5 omegacm) which was attributed to reduced nano size defects and an improvement of the crystallinity. Potentiostatic and Potentiodynamic tests with a TiN-coated Al showed good corrosion resistance (l/corr, = 2.03 microA/cm2, Ecorr = -348 mV) compared to the uncoated Al substrate (/corr = 4.45 microA/cm2, Ecorr = -650 mV). Furthermore, EMF system showed that corrosion resistance of the TiN film also was enhanced compared to DCMS only. For the TiN film deposited on Al substrate at 400 degreesC, corrosion current and potential was 0.63 micro/cm2 and -1.5 mV, respectively. This improved corrosion resistance of the TiN film could be attributed to the densification of the film caused by enhancement of nitrification with increasing high reactive nitrogen radicals.

  9. Validation of Malaysian Versions of Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS), Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (MUSE) and 8-Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) Using Partial Credit Rasch Model

    PubMed Central

    Al Abboud, Safaa Ahmed; Ahmad, Sohail; Bidin, Mohamed Badrulnizam Long

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a common silent epidemic disease with frequent morbidity and mortality. The psychological and psychosocial health factors are negatively influencing the glycaemic control in diabetic patients. Therefore, various questionnaires were developed to address the psychological and psychosocial well-being of the diabetic patients. Most of these questionnaires were first developed in English and then translated into different languages to make them useful for the local communities. Aim The main aim of this study was to translate and validate the Malaysian versions of Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS), Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (MUSE), and to revalidate 8-Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) by Partial Credit Rasch Model (Modern Test Theory). Materials and Methods Permission was obtained from respective authors to translate the English versions of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 into Malay language according to established standard international translation guidelines. In this cross-sectional study, 62 adult DM patients were recruited from Hospital Kuala Lumpur by purposive sampling method. The data were extracted from the self-administered questionnaires and entered manually in the Ministeps (Winsteps) software for Partial Credit Rasch Model. The item and person reliability, infit/outfit Z-Standard (ZSTD), infit/outfit Mean Square (MNSQ) and point measure correlation (PTMEA Corr) values were analysed for the reliability analyses and construct validation. Results The Malay version of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 found to be valid and reliable instrument for the Malaysian diabetic adults. The instrument showed good overall reliability value of 0.76 and 0.93 for item and person reliability, respectively. The values of infit/outfit ZSTD, infit/outfit MNSQ, and PTMEA Corr were also within the stipulated range of the Rasch Model proving the valid item constructs of the questionnaire. Conclusion The

  10. Une validation de la forme abrégée de l’Échelle de provisions sociales : l’ÉPS-10 items

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Jean

    2016-01-01

    L’Échelle de provisions sociales-10 items (ÉPS-10) est une version abrégée de l’Échelle de provisions sociales (Social Provisions Scale) (Cutrona et Russell, 1987) validée en langue française sur une population québécoise (Caron, 1996) et qui permet de mesurer la disponibilité du soutien social. L’ÉPS-10 conserve cinq des six sous-échelles de l’ÉPS (l’attachement ; l’intégration sociale ; la confirmation de sa valeur ; l’aide matérielle et l’orientation), le besoin de se sentir utile et nécessaire ayant été exclu, et ne garde que les items formulés positivement, soit deux items par dimension du soutien. L’article présente la validation de l’EPS-10 sur un échantillon représentatif de 2433 personnes provenant de la population générale du sud-ouest de Montréal. Elle a une forte validité concomitante avec l’Échelle originelle de 24 items (ÉPS). Tous ces items sont fortement corrélés au score total et sa consistance interne est excellente. Des analyses de corrélation entre les sous-échelles et le score global et une analyse factorielle indiquent que l’ÉPS-10 conserve sa validité de construit. L’ÉPS-10 explique 14,1 % de la variance de la détresse psychologique et 25,4 % de la variance de la qualité de vie et conserve un pouvoir prédictif équivalent à l’ÉPS à 24 items. L’ensemble des analyses suggère que l’ÉPS-10 est un instrument fiable et valide pour mesurer la disponibilité du soutien social avec un temps d’administration réduit de moitié. Il s’avère un excellent choix pour les enquêtes épidémiologiques. PMID:24337002

  11. Temperature-dependent structural studies of mullite-type Bi2Fe4O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murshed, M. Mangir; Nénert, Gwilherm; Burianek, Manfred; Robben, Lars; Mühlberg, Manfred; Schneider, Hartmut; Fischer, Reinhard X.; Gesing, Thorsten M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the temperature-dependent structural studies on the mullite-type Bi2Fe4O9 compound. The crystal structures were determined using both powder X-ray diffraction and single crystal neutron diffraction. The thermal expansion of the cell parameters from smallest to largest occurred in the order acorr was determined by autocorrelation analysis between 740 cm-1 and 900 cm-1 for each temperature-dependent spectrum. The break of the slope of Δcorr at about 773 K was interpreted as the change of some vibrational modes of the FeO4 tetrahedra. The intrinsic effects observed around 773 K are responsible for extrinsic parameter changes found around 900 K.

  12. Transport et bruit quantique dans les fils mésoscopiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrès, J.

    2002-01-01

    Un conducteur quantique est bien caractérisé par sa conductance donnée par la formule de Landauer. Mais le bruit contient davantage d'informations que la conductance : il mesure les fluctuations temporelles du courant autour de sa valeur moyenne. De plus, le signe des corrélations de bruit est lié à la statistique des porteurs de charge. Dans une jonction entre un métal normal et un supraconducteur, le bruit présente une singularité à la fréquence Josephson, signature de la charge 2e des paires de Cooper impliquées dans le transport. Lorsque la tension appliquée est supérieure au gap du supraconducteur, la courbe du bruit exhibe des singularités à plusieurs fréquences auxquelles on peut associer un processus de réflexion ou de transmission. L'analogue fermionique de l'expérience d'Hanbury-Brown et Twiss avec un supraconducteur permet d'observer à la fois des corrélations positives et négatives dans un même système. Maintenir une différence de potentiel entre les deux extrémités d'un fil crée une situation relevant de la thermodynamique hors de l'équilibre. Formellement, on peut se ramener à un calcul à l'équilibre et écrire une théorie des perturbations grâce à la méthode de Keldysh. La théorie des liquides de Luttinger décrit les systèmes unidimensionnels d'électrons en interaction. Le hamiltonien peut se mettre sous forme quadratique grâce à la bosonisation. D'autre part, un liquide de Luttinger chiral constitue un bon modèle des états de bord de l'effet Hall quantique fractionnaire. Grâce au formalisme de Keldysh, on peut retrouver une formule de type Schottky et identifier la charge des quasiparticules de Laughlin.

  13. Note on: 'EMDPLER: A F77 program for modeling the EM response of dipolar sources over the non-magnetic layer earth models' by N.P. Singh and T. Mogi, Computers & Geosciences 36 (2010) 430-440

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamie, Majid; Mirzaei, Saeid; Mirzaei, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper some mistakes arising in Singh and Mogi (2010) that are: (1) wrong formulation of the intrinsic impedance of the layers of an N-layered earth (Zi) and reflection coefficient of the EM wave in TM-mode (rTM), (2) using wrong and the very same algorithms for computing reflection coefficients of the EM wave in both the TE- and the TM-mode (rTE and rTM) and (3) using flawed algorithms for computing phase and normalized phase values, relating to electric and magnetic components of the EM wave, are noted and corrected form of these mistakes are presented. Moreover, in order to illustrate how these mistakes can affect forward modeling results different two- and three-layered earth models, the same as the models used in Singh and Mogi (2010), are chosen; afterwards EMDPLER and corrected version of this program, presented in this paper titled "EMDPLER_Corr", are conducted on these models and real and imaginary parts of Hz and Hy components of the magnetic field intensity, their normalized amplitudes (|Hz /Hz0 |and|Hy /Hy0 |) and the corresponding normalized phases are computed, plotted versus frequency and compared with each other.

  14. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  15. Linking anisotropy with Fe3C distribution in AISI 1045 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ke-chang; Li, Gui-hua; Sun, Yi-min; Wang, Yong-gang; Li, Ying-jie; Cao, Guang-hui; Wang, Wei-min

    2015-12-01

    The anisotropy of the microstructure, thermal expansion behavior, corrosion resistance and magnetic properties of AISI 1045 steel was investigated. The distribution of Fe3C lamellae in the investigation plane parallel to the radial directions of molds was observed to differ from that in the investigation plane perpendicular to the radial directions by transmission electron microscopy. The lattice constants a 0 of α-Fe deduced from the XRD patterns of samples prepared using a sand (S)-mold and cut parallel to the radial direction of the mold (S//) and using a metal (M)-mold and cut parallel to the radial direction (M//), the corrosion resistance measured using an electrochemical workstation, and the magnetic permeability obtained by vibrating sample magnetometry also indicated the existence of anisotropy in the tested samples. The anisotropic change of corrosion potential ( E corr), pitting potential ( E pit) and magnetic permeability ( µ) of the samples was observed to depend on the orientation factor F 200 of α-Fe in the measured samples, which is controlled by the distribution of Fe3C lamellae in the eutectoid structure.

  16. Multi-Model Comparison of Lateral Boundary Contributions to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone become more stringent, there has been growing attention on characterizing the contributions and the uncertainties in ozone from outside the US to the ozone concentrations within the US. The third phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII3) provides an opportunity to investigate this issue through the combined efforts of multiple research groups in the US and Europe. The model results cover a range of representations of chemical and physical processes, vertical and horizontal resolutions, and meteorological fields to drive the regional chemical transport models (CTMs), all of which are important components of model uncertainty (Solazzo and Galmarini, 2016). In AQMEII3, all groups were asked to track the contribution of ozone from lateral boundary through the use of chemically inert tracers. Though the inert tracer method tends to overestimate the impact of ozone boundary conditions compared with other methods such as chemically reactive tracers and source apportionment (Baker et al., 2015), the method takes the least effort to implement in different models, and is thus useful in highlighting and understanding the process-level differences amongst the models. In this study, results from four models were included (CMAQ driven by WRF, CAMx driven by WRF, CMAQ driven by CCLM, DEHM driven by WRF). At each site, the distribution of daily maximum 8-hour ozone, and the corre

  17. Exploring the role of quantum chemical descriptors in modeling acute toxicity of diverse chemicals to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Reenu; Vikas

    2015-09-01

    Various quantum-mechanically computed molecular and thermodynamic descriptors along with physico-chemical, electrostatic and topological descriptors are compared while developing quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for the acute toxicity of 252 diverse organic chemicals towards Daphnia magna. QSAR models based on the quantum-chemical descriptors, computed with routinely employed advanced semi-empirical and ab-initio methods, along with the electron-correlation contribution (CORR) of the descriptors, are analyzed for the external predictivity of the acute toxicity. The models with reliable internal stability and external predictivity are found to be based on the HOMO energy along with the physico-chemical, electrostatic and topological descriptors. Besides this, the total energy and electron-correlation energy are also observed as highly reliable descriptors, suggesting that the intra-molecular interactions between the electrons play an important role in the origin of the acute toxicity, which is in fact an unexplored phenomenon. The models based on quantum-chemical descriptors such as chemical hardness, absolute electronegativity, standard Gibbs free energy and enthalpy are also observed to be reliable. A comparison of the robust models based on the quantum-chemical descriptors computed with various quantum-mechanical methods suggests that the advanced semi-empirical methods such as PM7 can be more reliable than the ab-initio methods which are computationally more expensive.

  18. Hydroxyapatite coating on biodegradable AZ31 and Mg-Ca alloys prepared by RF-magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhametkaliyev, T. Surmeneva, M. Surmenev, R.; Mathan, B. K.

    2015-11-17

    A thin film of hydroxyapatite (HA) was deposited on AZ31 and Mg-Ca alloys by using radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The thickness of the HA coating was determined to be 750 nm. The phase composition, microstructure, and surface morphology of the HA coatings were investigated using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. In vitro degradation behaviour of the HA coated alloys was evaluated in simulated body fluid (SBF) and 3.5wt.% NaCl solution using electrochemical method. The coatings homogeneously covered the entire surface of the substrates. The coating structure corresponded to a nanostructured HA. The ultrathin coating significantly improved the degradation resistance of the alloy. Nanocrystalline HA coating significantly improved the corrosion resistance of the Mg-Ca and AZ31 magnesium alloys. The polarization resistance (Rp) of the coated Mg-Ca alloy was more than two-order of magnitude higher and the corrosion current density I{sub corr} reduced by ∼ 98% as compared to the base alloy.

  19. Acides gras oméga-3 et dyslexie

    PubMed Central

    Zelcer, Michal; Goldman, Ran D.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Question À la lumière de la hausse du nombre d’enfants d’âge scolaire ayant reçu un diagnostic de dyslexie, quel est le rôle des suppléments d’acides gras oméga-3 dans la prise en charge de cette affection? Réponse La dyslexie est le trouble d’apprentissage le plus répandu et elle est connue pour ses causes multifactorielles. De récentes données probantes pointent vers une corrélation entre le métabolisme défectueux des acides gras polyinsaturés et les troubles de neurodéveloppement, tels que la dyslexie. Bien que l’administration de suppléments d’acides gras oméga-3 aux enfants dyslexiques ait fait l’objet d’études, les données probantes sont limitées. Les critères diagnostiques homogènes de dyslexie, les mesures objectives de carence en acides gras et la surveillance étroite de l’apport alimentaire ne sont que quelques-uns des facteurs pouvant améliorer la qualité de la recherche dans ce domaine.

  20. Ni ion release, osteoblast-material interactions, and hemocompatibility of hafnium-implanted NiTi alloy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Li, Yan; Zhao, Xinqing; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Tao

    2012-04-01

    Hafnium ion implantation was applied to NiTi alloy to suppress Ni ion release and enhance osteoblast-material interactions and hemocompatibility. The auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscope results showed that a composite TiO(2)/HfO(2) nanofilm with increased surface roughness was formed on the surface of NiTi, and Ni concentration was reduced in the superficial surface layer. Potentiodynamic polarization tests displayed that 4 mA NiTi sample possessed the highest E(br) - E(corr), 470 mV higher than that of untreated NiTi, suggesting a significant improvement on pitting corrosion resistance. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry tests during 60 days immersion demonstrated that Ni ion release rate was remarkably decreased, for example, a reduction of 67% in the first day. The water contact angle increased and surface energy decreased after Hf implantation. Cell culture and methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium indicated that Hf-implanted NiTi expressed enhanced osteoblasts adhesion and proliferation, especially after 7 days culture. Hf implantation decreased fibrinogen adsorption, but had almost no effect on albumin adsorption. Platelets adhesion and activation were suppressed significantly (97% for 4 mA NiTi) and hemolysis rate was decreased by at least 57% after Hf implantation. Modified surface composition and morphology and decreased surface energy should be responsible for the improvement of cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility.

  1. Chilean Astronomers and the Birth of Cerro Tololo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, H.

    1990-11-01

    P# JMEN. Hace treinta afios que se tnict6 en Chile la de n luga adecuado pata establecer observatoro astron6ini- Co, que a en wi ieflector de 1 in de diam'etrr . importante destacar el papel que le corres-pondi6 al Obseiwatorio Nacional de Ia Universidad de `Chile -- re'.-. tarde Departamento de de la inisma Univer- sidad .- en 1 de este proycoto. Los resultados han ido mucho mct5 impoftaftes lo esperado . de tal nodo q. el prc -ama destinado a instalar ui telescopio de tama- f ha I levado al establ ecimiento de iri centro de acti- cientfica de relieve inten-acional. ALb(TRA . Thifty years ago the search for a site adequate for the est 1ishment of an astronomical was fn (Thile. Initially it was planned that the main telescope would be a 1 in i-cf lector. It is importaft to the role played by th O Astm-'n6mioo Nacional de la Unfversidad de Cbf Ic - later 0: Depaftamento de of the same University - in the development of this project. The results have been much more important than was e:-:pected initially: in thiS way the prr gram for a telescope of moderate size was transfo -med in a major project wh i ch 1 cad to the estab 1 ). shinent of an i nt i ona 1 center of scieftific research. AQ/ W : OBSERVATORIES

  2. Modeling the Effect of Temperature and Potential on the In Vitro Corrosion Performance of Biomedical Hydroxyapatite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, M. İbrahim; Karahan, İsmail H.; Yücel, Yasin; Golden, Teresa D.

    2016-10-01

    CoCrMo biomedical alloys were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer to improve biocompatibility and in vitro corrosion performance. A fast electrodeposition process was completed in 5 minutes for the hydroxyapatite coating. Effect of the solution temperature and applied potential on the in vitro corrosion performance of the hydroxyapatite coatings was modeled by response surface methodology (RSM) coupled with central composite design (CCD). A 5-level-2-factor experimental plan designed by CCD was used; the experimental plan contained 13 coating experiments with a temperature range from 283 K to 347 K (10 °C to 74 °C) and potential range from -1.2 to -1.9 V. Corrosion potential ( E corr) of the coatings in a simulated body fluid solution was chosen as response for the model. Predicted and experimental values fitted well with an R 2 value of 0.9481. Response surface plots of the impedance and polarization resistance ( R P) were investigated. Optimized parameters for electrodeposition of hydroxyapatite were determined by RSM as solution temperature of 305.48 K (32.33 °C) and potential of -1.55 V. Hydroxyapatite coatings fabricated at optimized parameters showed excellent crystal formation and high in vitro corrosion resistance.

  3. Use of DNA barcoding to distinguish the malaria vector Anopheles neivai in Colombia.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, Andrés; Suaza-Vasco, Juan; Marcet, Paula L; Ruíz-Molina, Natalia; Cáceres, Lorenzo; Porter, Charles; Uribe, Sandra

    2016-10-17

    A reference 535 bp barcode sequence from a fragment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (COI), acquired from specimens of An. neivai Howard, Dyar & Knab, 1913 from its type locality in Panama, was used as a tool for distinguishing this species from others in the subgenus Kerteszia. Comparisons with corresponding regions of COI between An. neivai and other species in the subgenus (An. bellator Dyar & Knab 1906, An. homunculus Komp 1937, An cruzii Dyar & Knab, 1908 and An. laneanus Corrêa & Cerqueira, 1944) produced K2P genetic distances of 8.3-12.6%, values well above those associated with intraspecific variation. In contrast, genetic distances among 55 specimens from five municipalities in the Colombian Pacific coastal state of Chocó were all within the range of 0-2.5%, with an optimized barcode threshold of 1.3%, the limit for unambiguous differentiation of An. neivai. Among specimens from the Chocó region, 18 haplotypes were detected, two of which were widely distributed over the municipalities sampled. The barcode sequence permits discrimination of An. neivai from sympatric species and indicates genetic variability within the species; aspects key to malaria surveillance and control as well as defining geographic distribution and dispersion patterns.

  4. Ionisation en couche K et effet biologique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'Hoir, A.; Herve Du Penhoat, M. A.; Champion, C.; Fayard, B.; Touati, A.; Abel, F.; Politis, M. F.; Despiney-Bailly, I.; Sabatier, L.; Chetioui, A.

    1998-04-01

    Initial steps of radiation action mechanism on biological targets are still undnown. The strong correlation observed between inactivation cross sections by heavy ions and K-vacancy production cross sections has drawn the attention on this process. Although quite minor in the energy deposition of these particles, the K-ionization process gives rise to quite efficient ionization clusters. Values of K-ionization biological effectivenesses extracted from measured relative biological efficiencies of ultra soft X-rays support the idea of a major -may be a dominant- contribution of the K-vacancy process to the biological effect of heavy ions. Les étapes initiales des mécanismes d'effet biologique des radiations sont encore mal connues. La forte corrélation observée entre sections efficaces d'inactivation par ions lourds et sections efficaces d'ionisation K a attiré l'attention sur ce processus. Bien que de faible probabilité, l'ionisation K engendre des grappes d'ionisation très efficaces. Les valeurs de rendement létal extraites des efficacités biologiques relatives mesurées pour les rayonnements X ultra-mous suggèrent une contribution majeure -peut-être dominante- de l'ionisation K à l'effet biologique des ions.

  5. A new technique for the detection of large scale landslides in glacio-lacustrine deposits using image correlation based upon aerial imagery: A case study from the French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Paz; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-10-01

    Landslide monitoring has benefited from recent advances in the use of image correlation of high resolution optical imagery. However, this approach has typically involved satellite imagery that may not be available for all landslides depending on their time of movement and location. This study has investigated the application of image correlation techniques applied to a sequence of aerial imagery to an active landslide in the French Alps. We apply an indirect landslide monitoring technique (COSI-Corr) based upon the cross-correlation between aerial photographs, to obtain horizontal displacement rates. Results for the 2001-2003 time interval are presented, providing a spatial model of landslide activity and motion across the landslide, which is consistent with previous studies. The study has identified areas of new landslide activity in addition to known areas and through image decorrelation has identified and mapped two new lateral landslides within the main landslide complex. This new approach for landslide monitoring is likely to be of wide applicability to other areas characterised by complex ground displacements.

  6. Fracture of concrete caused by the reinforcement corrosion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. T.; Millard, A.; Caré, S.; L'Hostis, V.; Berthaud, Y.

    2006-11-01

    One of the most current degradations in reinforced concrete structures is related to the corrosion of the reinforcements. The corrosion products during active corrosion induce a mechanical pressure on the surrounding concrete that leads to cover cracking along the rebar. The objective of this work is to study the cracking of concrete due to the corrosion of the reinforcements. The phenomenon of corrosion/cracking is studied in experiments through tests of accelerated corrosion on plate and cylindrical specimens. A CCD camera is used to take images every hour and the pictures are analyzed by using the intercorrelation image technique (Correli^LMT) to derive the displacement and strain field. Thus the date of appearance of the first through crack is detected and the cinematic crack initiations are observed during the test. A finite element model that allows prediction of the mechanical consequences of the corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete structures is proposed. From the comparison between the test results and numerical simulations, it may be concluded that the model is validated in term of strains up to the moment when the crack becomes visible, and in terms of crack pattern.

  7. Analysis of the hydration water around bovine serum albumin using terahertz coherent synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Bye, Jordan W; Meliga, Stefano; Ferachou, Denis; Cinque, Gianfelice; Zeitler, J Axel; Falconer, Robert J

    2014-01-09

    Terahertz spectroscopy was used to study the absorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in water. The Diamond Light Source operating in a low alpha mode generated coherent synchrotron radiation that covered a useable spectral bandwidth of 0.3-3.3 THz (10-110 cm(-1)). As the BSA concentration was raised, there was a nonlinear change in absorption inconsistent with Beer's law. At low BSA concentrations (0-1 mM), the absorption remained constant or rose slightly. Above a concentration of 1 mM BSA, a steady decrease in absorption was observed, which was followed by a plateau that started at 2.5 mM. Using a overlapping hydration layer model, the hydration layer was estimated to extend 15 Å from the protein. Calculation of the corrected absorption coefficient (αcorr) for the water around BSA by subtracting the excluded volume of the protein provides an alternative approach to studying the hydration layer that provides evidence for complexity in the population of water around BSA.

  8. Relaxation magnétique nucléaire du carbone-13 et dynamique des molécules de chlorpromazine associées en solution aqueuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, S.; Thévand, A.

    1998-02-01

    13C relaxation times and heteronuclear NOE enhancements have been measured for chlorpromazine hydrochloride salt in chloroform and water. The dipolar contribution to 13C ^1H spin systems relaxation rates were extracted and allowed us to characterize the molecular reorientation in the two solvents. The correlation times are on either side of “T1 minimum". The values agree with the size of the molecule and show an association by stacking of 11 monomeric entities. Les temps de relaxation des 13C et les accroissements par effet Overhauser 1Hto13C ont été mesurés parallèlement sur la molécule de chlorhydrate de chlorpromazine non associée dans le chloroforme et auto-associée dans l'eau. L'extraction de la contribution dipolaire aux constantes de vitesse de relaxation des systèmes 13C 1H de la molécule a permis de caractériser la réorientation de la molécule dans les deux cas. Les temps de corrélation obtenus qui se situent de part et d'autre du “T1 minimum" sont en accord avec la taille de la molécule isolée et montrent que l'agrégat est formé par empilement de 11 molécules.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON EFFECTS OF CATHODIC PROTECTION TO PREVENT MACRO-CELL CORROSION OF STEEL IN CONCRETE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Ueno, Moe; Ishii, Kouji; Seki, Hiroshi

    Reinforcing bars embedded in concrete tend to corrode due to salt attack under marine environments. Corrosion of bars might be often caused with phenomenon of macro-cell. Cathodic protection has been, so far, applied to control the corrosion of reinforcing bars in RC members. In order to make clear the mechanisms of macro-cell corr osion and the effect of cathodic protecti on, laboratory tests were carried out. Testing concrete specimens contained two reinforcing bars which were buried at upper area of specimens and at lower area of ones, respectively. Lower zone of the concrete specimens were immersed in water. Testing results indicated as follows: (1) reinforci ng bars under wetting condition were anode and reinforcing bars under drying one cathode, (2) current density of macro-cell between two bars increased according as the potential difference increased and electric resistance of the concrete between two bars decreased, and (3) cathodic protection was effective to prevented macro-cell corrosion of reinforcing bars in concrete. Furthermore, it was presumed that corroded iron might be reduced to metal iron due to the protection current.

  10. Determinants of fatigue and stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fatigue can be triggered by previous perceived stress which may lead to impairment of performance and function. The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between fatigue and perceived stress. Method Health determinants including sociodemographic factors for associations between fatigue and perceived stress in the general population (N = 2,483) are outlined. Fatigue and stress were assessed with the Chalder Fatigue Scale (CFS) and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ). Results Within the general population, 25.9% of male and 34.5% of female respondents reported moderate fatigue during the last six months; 9.7% of subjects reported substantial fatigue lasting six months or longer. An adjusted regression analysis (R2corr = .28, p < .001) showed that fatigue is highest associated with perceived stress and self-perceived health status. The following factors were correlated with increased rates of fatigue and perceived stress: female gender, divorce/separation, low social class and poor health status. Conclusion We conclude that the two conditions overlap most in terms of socio-economic status and self-perceived health status. PMID:21774803

  11. Visible and Infrared Optical Design for the ITER Upper Ports

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; Seppala, L; Morris, K; Groth, M; Fenstermacher, M; Allen, S; Synakowski, E; Ortiz, J

    2007-03-01

    This document contains the results of an optical design scoping study of visible-light and infrared optics for the ITER upper ports, performed by LLNL under contract for the US ITER Project Office. ITER is an international collaboration to build a large fusion energy tokamak with a goal of demonstrating net fusion power for pulses much longer than the energy confinement time. At the time of this report, six of the ITER upper ports are planned to each to contain a camera system for recording visible and infrared light, as well as other diagnostics. the performance specifications for the temporal and spatial resolution of this system are shown in the Section II, Functional Specifications. They acknowledge a debt to Y. Corre and co-authors of the CEA Cadarache report ''ITER wide-angle viewing and thermographic and visible system''. Several of the concepts used in this design are derived from that CEA report. The infrared spatial resolution for optics of this design is diffraction-limited by the size of the entrance aperture, at lower resolution than listed in the ITER diagnostic specifications. The size of the entrance aperture is a trade-off between spatial resolution, optics size in the port, and the location of relay optics. The signal-to-noise ratio allows operation at the specified time resolutions.

  12. Calculating Internal Avalanche Velocities From Correlation With Error Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, J. N.; Tiefenbacher, F.

    Velocities inside avalanches have been calculated for many years by calculating the cross-correlation between light sensitive sensors using a method pioneered by Dent. His approach has been widely adopted but suffers from four shortcomings. (i) Corre- lations are studied between pairs of sensors rather than between all sensors simulta- neously. This can result in inconsistent velocities and does not extract the maximum information from the data. (ii) The longer the time that the correlations are taken over the better the noise rejection, but errors due to non-constant velocity increase. (iii) The errors are hard to quantify. (iv) The calculated velocities are usually widely scattered and discontinuous. A new approach is described that produces a continuous veloc- ity field from any number of sensors at arbitrary locations. The method is based on a variational principle that reconstructs the underlying signal as it is advected past the sensors and enforces differentiability on the velocity. The errors in the method are quantified and applied to the problem of optimal sensor positioning and design. Results on SLF data from chute experiments are discussed.

  13. Corrosion protection of aluminum metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, H.J.; Mansfeld, F.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion protection of aluminum metal-matrix composites (MMC) by anodizing treatments was investigated. Electrochemical behavior of MMC without protection also was investigated. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements were used to characterize the properties of protective surface layers. Materials studied were Al 6061/SiC, alloy A356/SiC, Al 2009/SiC, Al 2014/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with various reinforcement concentrations. The MMC had similar corrosion (E{sub corr}) and pitting (E{sub pit}) potentials as the matrix alloy. The cathodic current density for oxygen reduction in 0.5% N sodium chloride increased for Al 6061/SiC MMC with reinforcement concentration, which was attributed to electrochemically active interfaces between the matrix and the reinforcement particles. Anodizing and hot-water sealing were less effective for MMC than for the matrix aluminum alloys. The reinforcement particles produced a more porous structure of the anodized layer for MMC. Improved results were noted for dichromate sealing, where chromium (Cr{sup 6+}) in the pores of the outer oxide acted as an inhibitor. The effectiveness of corrosion protection methods decreased with increasing reinforcement concentration and was a function of the matrix alloy but not of the reinforcement material. The observed reduction in corrosion protection was believed to result from corrosion-susceptible interfaces formed between the reinforcement particles and the matrix.

  14. Corrosion of machined titanium dental implants under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Messer, Regina L W; Tackas, Gyula; Mickalonis, John; Brown, Yolanda; Lewis, Jill B; Wataha, John C

    2009-02-01

    The effects of hyperglycemia, altered cell function, or inflammatory mediators on implant corrosion are not well studied; yet, these effects are critical to implant biocompatibility and osseointegration. Because implant placement is burgeoning, patients with medically compromising systemic conditions such as diabetes are increasingly receiving implants, and the role of other inflammatory diseases on implant corrosion also needs investigation. In the current study, the corrosion properties of commercially available, machined titanium implants were studied in blood, cultures of monocytic cells, and solutions containing elevated dextrose concentrations. Implant corrosion was estimated by open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistance, and electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for 26 h. In selected samples, THP1 monocytic cells were activated for 2 h with Lipopolysaccharide prior to implant exposure, and IL-1beta secretion was measured to assess the affect of the implants on monocyte activation. Implants under conditions of inflammatory stress exhibited more negative E(corr) values, suggesting an increased potential for corrosion. Linear polarization measurements detected increased corrosion rates in the presence of elevated dextrose conditions over PBS conditions. EIS measurements suggested that implants underwent surface passivation reactions that may have limited corrosion over the short term of this test. This result was supported by cyclic polarization tests. IL-1beta secretion was not altered under conditions of corrosion or implant exposure. The results suggest that inflammatory stress and hyperglycemia may increase the corrosion of dental endosseous titanium-based implants, but that longer, more aggressive electrochemical conditions may be necessary to fully assess these effects.

  15. A galvanic sensor for monitoring the corrosion condition of the concrete reinforcing steel: relationship between the galvanic and the corrosion currents.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Elsa Vaz; Figueira, Rita Bacelar; Salta, Maria Manuela Lemos; da Fonseca, Inês Teodora Elias

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a study carried out on the design and performance of galvanic and polarization resistance sensors to be embedded in concrete systems for permanent monitoring of the corrosion condition of reinforcing steel, aiming to establish a correlation between the galvanic currents, I(gal), and the corrosion currents, I(corr), estimated from the polarization resistance, R(p). Sensors have been tested in saturated Ca(OH)(2) aqueous solutions, under a variety of conditions, simulating the most important parameters that can accelerate the corrosion of concrete reinforcing steel, such as carbonation, ingress of chloride ions, presence or absence of O(2). For all the conditions, the influence of temperature (20 to 55 °C) has also been considered. From this study, it could be concluded that the galvanic currents are sensitive to the various parameters following a trend similar to that of the R(p) values. A relationship between the galvanic and the corrosion current densities was obtained and the limiting values of the I(gal), indicative of the state condition of the reinforcing steel for the designed sensor, were established.

  16. The relationships between empathy, stress and social support among medical students

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-hee; Kim, Seok Kyoung; Yi, Young Hoon; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Chae, Jiun; Hwang, Jiyeon; Roh, HyeRin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between stress, social support, and empathy among medical students. Methods We evaluated the relationships between stress and empathy, and social support and empathy among medical students. The respondents completed a question-naire including demographic information, the Jefferson Scale of Empathy, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Corre-lation and linear regression analyses were conducted, along with sub-analyses according to gender, admission system, and study year. Results In total, 2,692 questionnaires were analysed. Empathy and social support positively correlated, and empathy and stress negatively correlated. Similar correla-tion patterns were detected in the sub-analyses; the correla-tion between empathy and stress among female students was negligible. In the regression model, stress and social support predicted empathy among all the samples. In the sub-analysis, stress was not a significant predictor among female and first-year students. Conclusions Stress and social support were significant predictors of empathy among all the students. Medical educators should provide means to foster resilience against stress or stress alleviation, and to ameliorate social support, so as to increase or maintain empathy in the long term. Furthermore, stress management should be emphasised, particularly among female and first-year students. PMID:26342190

  17. The new reinforcement sensitivity theory: implications for personality measurement.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Luke D; Pickering, Alan D; Jackson, Chris J

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we review recent modifications to Jeffrey Gray's (1973, 1991) reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST), and attempt to draw implications for psychometric measurement of personality traits. First, we consider Gray and McNaughton's (2000) functional revisions to the biobehavioral systems of RST. Second, we evaluate recent clarifications relating to interdependent effects that these systems may have on behavior, in addition to or in place of separable effects (e.g., Corr, 2001; Pickering, 1997). Finally, we consider ambiguities regarding the exact trait dimension to which Gray's "reward system" corresponds. From this review, we suggest that future work is needed to distinguish psychometric measures of (a) fear from anxiety and (b) reward-reactivity from trait impulsivity. We also suggest, on the basis of interdependent system views of RST and associated exploration using formal models, that traits that are based upon RST are likely to have substantial intercorrelations. Finally, we advise that more substantive work is required to define relevant constructs and behaviors in RST before we can be confident in our psychometric measures of them.

  18. Fractionating negative and positive affectivity in handedness: Insights from the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality.

    PubMed

    Beaton, Alan A; Mutinelli, Sofia; Corr, Philip J

    2016-07-28

    The Annett Hand Preference Questionnaire (AHPQ), as modified by Briggs and Nebes [(1975). Patterns of hand preference in a student population. Cortex, 11(3), 230-238. doi: 10.1016/s0010-9452(75)80005-0 ], was administered to a sample of 177 participants alongside the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of Personality Questionnaire [RST-PQ; Corr, P. J., & Cooper, A. (2016). The Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of Personality Questionnaire (RST-PQ): Development and validation. Psychological Assessment. doi: 10.1037/pas000 ], which measures two factors of defensive negative emotion, motivation and affectivity-the Behavioural Inhibition System (BIS) and the Fight-Flight-Freeze System (FFFS)-and one positive-approach dimension related to reward sensitivity, persistence and reactivity-the Behavioural Approach System. We sought to clarify the nature of negative, and positive, affectivity in relation to handedness. ANOVAs and multiple regression analyses converged on the following conclusions: left-handers were higher on the BIS, not the FFFS, than right-handers; in right-handers only, strength of hand preference was positively correlated with the FFFS, not the BIS. The original assessment method proposed by Annett was also used to assess handedness, but associations with RST-PQ factors were not found. These findings help us to clarify existing issues in the literature and raise new ones for future research.

  19. [Effect of the near infrared spectrum resolution on the nitrogen content model in green tea].

    PubMed

    Yang, Dan; Liu, Xin; Liu, Hong-Gang; Zhang, Ying-Bin; Yin, Peng

    2013-07-01

    The effect of different resolutions(2, 4, 6, 8, 16 cm(-1)) on the near infrared spectrogram and nitrogen content model for green tea was studied. Test results showed that instrument resolution could influence the spectra quality. The higher the resolution was, the richer the information would be, but the noise would increase. With lower resolution, spectrogram would be much more smooth, but get seriously distorted, and prediction accuracy would decrease at the same time. The partial least squares model was built after spectral pretreatment. When resolution was 4 cm(-1), the RMSEP value of external validation set was 0.054 6, which was obviously lower than others. The Corr. Coeff. was 0.998 2. Its prediction performance was the best and the prediction accuracy better. STDEV and RSD were 0.020 and 0.334 respectively. Resolution 4 cm(-1) for near infrared spectrometer collecting green tea samples was the optimal resolution. This research can provide a reference for parameters selection when collecting green tea spectra with near infrared spectrometer, improve the stability and prediction performance of the model and promote the application and promotion of the near infrared spectroscopy for tea.

  20. Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, Thomas F.; Mitra, Atindra K.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the results on analytical models and measurement and simulation of statistical properties from a study of microwave reverberation (mode-stirred) chambers performed at Texas Tech University. Two analytical models of power transfer vs. frequency in a chamber, one for antenna-to-antenna transfer and the other for antenna to D-dot sensor, were experimentally validated in our chamber. Two examples are presented of the measurement and calculation of chamber Q, one for each of the models. Measurements of EM power density validate a theoretical probability distribution on and away from the chamber walls and also yield a distribution with larger standard deviation at frequencies below the range of validity of the theory. Measurements of EM power density at pairs of points which validate a theoretical spatial correlation function on the chamber walls and also yield a correlation function with larger correlation length, R(sub corr), at frequencies below the range of validity of the theory. A numerical simulation, employing a rectangular cavity with a moving wall shows agreement with the measurements. The determination that the lowest frequency at which the theoretical spatial correlation function is valid in our chamber is considerably higher than the lowest frequency recommended by current guidelines for utilizing reverberation chambers in EMC testing. Two suggestions have been made for future studies related to EMC testing.

  1. CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS IN OLDER HAN WOMEN.

    PubMed

    Jun, Tao; Yuan, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Malnutrition is one of the most prevalent problems in older people, but there is little information about the nutritional status of the older women in China. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate the nutritional status and clinically correlated factors for malnutrition in older Han women in China. In total, 2,556 hospital- and community-based Han women aged 60 years or older were recruited between May 2007 and December 2014. All women completed comprehensive geriatric assessment, and the Mini Nutritional Assessment Short Form (MNA-SF) was used to assess the nutritional status. The clinically corre- lated factors for malnutrition were also analyzed, including social factors, health status, and dietary behavior. The average age of these women was 75.9 ± 9.4 years, and 63.8% women lived in urban areas. Of the total respondents, 344 and 716 women were classified as malnutrition and at risk of malnutrition, respectively. Five factors were independently and positively correlated with poor nutrition, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), gastrointestinal disease, depression, cognitive impairment, and comorbidity (≥ 2). Three factors were independently and negatively correlated with poor nutrition, including economic status, meat intake, and fish intake. The older Han women with these five health problems should be given more attention with regards to their nutritional status. Improving economic status, eating more meat and fish were recommended for preventing poor nutrition in older women.

  2. Electrostatic correlations and the polyelectrolyte self energy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kevin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2017-02-28

    We address the effects of chain connectivity on electrostaticfluctuations in polyelectrolyte solutions using a field-theoretic, renormalizedGaussian fluctuation (RGF) theory. As in simple electrolyte solutions [Z.-G. Wang,Phys. Rev. E 81, 021501 (2010)], the RGF provides a unified theory forelectrostatic fluctuations, accounting for both dielectric and charge correlationeffects in terms of the self-energy. Unlike simple ions, the polyelectrolyte self energydepends intimately on the chain conformation, and our theory naturally provides aself-consistent determination of the response of intramolecular chain structure topolyelectrolyte and salt concentrations. The effects of the chain-conformation on theself-energy and thermodynamics are especially pronounced for flexiblepolyelectrolytes at low polymer and salt concentrations, where application of thewrong chain structure can lead to a drastic misestimation of the electrostaticcorrelations. By capturing the expected scaling behavior of chain size from dilute tosemi-dilute regimes, our theory provides improved estimates of the self energy at lowpolymer concentrations and correctly predicts the eventual N-independenceof the critical temperature and concentration of salt-free solutions of flexiblepolyelectrolytes. We show that the self energy can be interpreted in terms of aninfinite-dilution energy μm,0(el) and a finite concentrationcorrelation correction μ(corr) which tends to cancel out the formerwith increasing concentration.

  3. Low modulus Ti-Nb-Hf alloy for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    González, M; Peña, J; Gil, F J; Manero, J M

    2014-09-01

    β-Type titanium alloys with a low elastic modulus are a potential strategy to reduce stress shielding effect and to enhance bone remodeling in implants used to substitute failed hard tissue. For biomaterial application, investigation on the mechanical behavior, the corrosion resistance and the cell response is required. The new Ti25Nb16Hf alloy was studied before and after 95% cold rolling (95% C.R.). The mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and its corrosion behavior was analyzed by potentiostatic equipment in Hank's solution at 37°C. The cell response was studied by means of cytotoxicity evaluation, cell adhesion and proliferation measurements. The stress-strain curves showed the lowest elastic modulus (42GPa) in the cold worked alloy and high tensile strength, similar to that of Ti6Al4V. The new alloy exhibited better corrosion resistance in terms of open circuit potential (EOCP), but was similar in terms of corrosion current density (iCORR) compared to Ti grade II. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the chemical composition of the alloy does not induce cytotoxic activity. Cell studies in the new alloy showed a lower adhesion and a higher proliferation compared to Ti grade II presenting, therefore, mechanical features similar to those of human cortical bone and, simultaneously, a good cell response.

  4. Gravitational stress-induced changes in the phosphoproteom of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, Ruediger; Hausmann, Niklas; Neef, Maren; Schuetz, Wolfgang; Madlung, Johannes; Fladerer, Claudia; Nordheim, Alfred; Costa, Alex; Barjaktarovic, Zarko

    Callus cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana respond to changes in gravitational field strengths by changes in protein expression. Using ESI-MS/MS for proteins with differential abundance after separation by 2D-PAGE, 28 spots which changed reproducibly and significantly (P¡0.05) in amount after 2h of hypergravity (18 up-, 10 down-regulated) could be identified. The corre-sponding proteins were largely involved in stress responses, including detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS; Barjaktaroviá et al., J. Exptl. Bot. 58:4357 (2007)). In the present study, c we extended these investigations to phosphorylated proteins. For this purpose, callus cell cul-tures of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to hypergravity (8 g) and simulated weightlessness (random positioning; RP) for up to 30 min, a period of time which yielded most reliable data. First changes, however, were visible as early as 10 min after start of treatment. Out of the protein spots altered in phosphorylation, we were able to identify 24 from those responding to random positioning and 12 which responded to 8 g. The respective proteins are involved in scavenging and detoxification of ROS (32Most recent data obtained from parabolic flights indicate that exposure times to g of as little as 20 s are sufficient to alter the phosphorylation of proteins pattern. This is accompanied by changes in the cellular Ca2+ and H2O2 contents.

  5. Production de faisceaux EPR à l'aide d'un oscillateur paramétrique optique à auto-verrouillage de phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longchambon, L.; Laurat, J.; Treps, N.; Ducci, S.; Maître, A.; Coudreau, T.; Fabre, C.

    2002-06-01

    Nous étudions théoriquement les propriétés quantiques des faisceaux lumineux continus orthogonalement polarisés émis par un Oscillateur Paramétrique Optique (OPO) de type II contenant une lame biréfringente. Quand les axes optiques de la lame sont tournés par rapport à ceux du cristal paramétrique, un couplage apparaît entre les faisceaux signal et complémentaire qui entraîne un verrouillage de phase entre les deux modes et un fonctionnement à dégénérescence de fréquence à l'intérieur d'une zone d'accrochage. Les corrélations quantiques entre les deux faisceaux permettent de définir les zones dans l'espace des paramètres expérimentaux où les différents critères associés à l'intrication EPR utilisés en information quantique sont vérifiés.

  6. Préparation conditionnelle d'un état en régime de variables continues : génération expérimentale d'un état non-classique à partir de faisceaux jumeaux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurat, J.; Coudreau, T.; Treps, N.; Maître, A.; Fabre, C.

    2004-11-01

    Ce travail constitue la première démonstration expérimentale de préparation conditionnelle d'un état non-classique dans le domaine des variables continues. A partir d'un OPO de type II qui génère au dessus du seuil des faisceaux signal et complémentaire fortement corrélés en intensité, les valeurs de l'intensité du signal sont conservées uniquement lorsque le complémentaire prend une valeur comprise dans une bande plus petite que son écart-type. Par cette technique très simple, nous avons généré un état sub-Poissonien 4.4 dB (64%) sous le bruit quantique standard à partir de faisceaux jumeaux présentant une réduction du bruit sur leur différence d'intensité de 7.5 dB (82%).

  7. Aqueous Alteration of Enstatite Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Ziegler, K.; Weisberg, M. K.; Gounelle, M.; Berger, E. L.; Le, L.; Ivanov, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Kaidun meteorite is different from all other meteorites [1], consisting largely of a mixture of “incompatible” types of meteoritic material – carbonaceous and enstatite chondrites, i.e. corre-sponding to the most oxidized and the most reduced samples of meteorite materials, including CI1, CM1-2, CV3, EH3-5, and EL3. In addition to these, minor amounts of ordinary and R chondrites are present. In addition, approximately half of the Kaidun lithologies are new materials not known as separate meteorites. Among these are aqueously altered enstatite chondrites [1], which are of considerable interest because they testify that not all reduced asteroids escaped late-stage oxidation, and hydrolysis, and also because hydrated poorly crystalline Si-Fe phase, which in turn is re-placed by serpentine (Figs 3-5). In the end the only indication of the original presence of metal is the re-sidual carbides. In other enstatite chondrite lithogies (of uncertain type) original silicates and metal have been thoroughly replaced by an assemblage of authi-genic plagioclase laths, calcite boxwork, and occasion-al residual grains of silica, Cr-rich troilite, ilmenite, and rare sulfides including heideite (Fig. 6). Fe and S have been largely leached from the rock (Fig. 4). Again the accessory phases are the first clue to the original character of the rock, which can be verified by O isotopes. It is fortunate that Kaidun displays every step of the alteration process.

  8. Quantitative analysis of collagen change between normal and cancerous thyroid tissues based on SHG method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiwen; Huang, Zufang; Xi, Gangqin; Chen, Yongjian; Lin, Duo; Wang, Jing; Li, Zuanfang; Sun, Liqing; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Rong

    2012-03-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is proved to be a high spatial resolution, large penetration depth and non-photobleaching method. In our study, SHG method was used to investigate the normal and cancerous thyroid tissue. For SHG imaging performance, system parameters were adjusted for high-contrast images acquisition. Each x-y image was recorded in pseudo-color, which matches the wavelength range in the visible spectrum. The acquisition time for a 512×512-pixels image was 1.57 sec; each acquired image was averaged four frames to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Our results indicated that collagen presence as determined by counting the ratio of the SHG pixels over the whole pixels for normal and cancerous thyroid tissues were 0.48+/-0.05, 0.33+/-0.06 respectively. In addition, to quantitatively assess collagen-related changes, we employed GLCM texture analysis to the SHG images. Corresponding results showed that the correlation both fell off with distance in normal and cancerous group. Calculated value of Corr50 (the distance where the correlation crossed 50% of the initial correlation) indicated significant difference. This study demonstrates that SHG method can be used as a complementary tool in thyroid histopathology.

  9. Quantitative analysis of collagen change between normal and cancerous thyroid tissues based on SHG method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiwen; Huang, Zufang; Xi, Gangqin; Chen, Yongjian; Lin, Duo; Wang, Jing; Li, Zuanfang; Sun, Liqing; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Rong

    2011-11-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is proved to be a high spatial resolution, large penetration depth and non-photobleaching method. In our study, SHG method was used to investigate the normal and cancerous thyroid tissue. For SHG imaging performance, system parameters were adjusted for high-contrast images acquisition. Each x-y image was recorded in pseudo-color, which matches the wavelength range in the visible spectrum. The acquisition time for a 512×512-pixels image was 1.57 sec; each acquired image was averaged four frames to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Our results indicated that collagen presence as determined by counting the ratio of the SHG pixels over the whole pixels for normal and cancerous thyroid tissues were 0.48+/-0.05, 0.33+/-0.06 respectively. In addition, to quantitatively assess collagen-related changes, we employed GLCM texture analysis to the SHG images. Corresponding results showed that the correlation both fell off with distance in normal and cancerous group. Calculated value of Corr50 (the distance where the correlation crossed 50% of the initial correlation) indicated significant difference. This study demonstrates that SHG method can be used as a complementary tool in thyroid histopathology.

  10. Methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete structures on the basis of half-cell potential and concrete resistivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, Lukasz

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the corrosion of steel reinforcement has become a major problem in the construction industry. Therefore, much attention has been given to developing methods of predicting the service life of reinforced concrete structures. The progress of corrosion cannot be visually assessed until a crack or a delamination appears. The corrosion process can be tracked using several electrochemical techniques. Most commonly the half-cell potential measurement technique is used for this purpose. However, it is generally accepted that it should be supplemented with other techniques. Hence, a methodology for assessing the probability of corrosion in concrete slabs by means of a combination of two methods, that is, the half-cell potential method and the concrete resistivity method, is proposed. An assessment of the probability of corrosion in reinforced concrete structures carried out using the proposed methodology is presented. 200 mm thick 750 mm  ×  750 mm reinforced concrete slab specimens were investigated. Potential E corr and concrete resistivity ρ in each point of the applied grid were measured. The experimental results indicate that the proposed methodology can be successfully used to assess the probability of corrosion in concrete structures.

  11. ProbMetab: an R package for Bayesian probabilistic annotation of LC–MS-based metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ricardo R.; Jourdan, Fabien; Salvanha, Diego M.; Letisse, Fabien; Jamin, Emilien L.; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos A.; Vêncio, Ricardo Z. N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: We present ProbMetab, an R package that promotes substantial improvement in automatic probabilistic liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry-based metabolome annotation. The inference engine core is based on a Bayesian model implemented to (i) allow diverse source of experimental data and metadata to be systematically incorporated into the model with alternative ways to calculate the likelihood function and (ii) allow sensitive selection of biologically meaningful biochemical reaction databases as Dirichlet-categorical prior distribution. Additionally, to ensure result interpretation by system biologists, we display the annotation in a network where observed mass peaks are connected if their candidate metabolites are substrate/product of known biochemical reactions. This graph can be overlaid with other graph-based analysis, such as partial correlation networks, in a visualization scheme exported to Cytoscape, with web and stand-alone versions. Availability and implementation: ProbMetab was implemented in a modular manner to fit together with established upstream (xcms, CAMERA, AStream, mzMatch.R, etc) and downstream R package tools (GeneNet, RCytoscape, DiffCorr, etc). ProbMetab, along with extensive documentation and case studies, is freely available under GNU license at: http://labpib.fmrp.usp.br/methods/probmetab/. Contact: rvencio@usp.br Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24443383

  12. Mindcontrol: A Web Application for Brain Segmentation Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Keshavan, Anisha; Datta, Esha; McDonough, Ian; Madan, Christopher R; Jordan, Kesshi; Henry, Roland G

    2017-03-29

    Tissue classification plays a crucial role in the investigation of normal neural development, brain-behavior relationships, and the disease mechanisms of many psychiatric and neurological illnesses. Ensuring the accuracy of tissue classification is important for quality research and, in particular, the translation of imaging biomarkers to clinical practice. Assessment with the human eye is vital to correct various errors inherent to all currently available segmentation algorithms. Manual quality assurance becomes methodologically difficult at a large scale - a problem of increasing importance as the number of data sets is on the rise. To make this process more efficient, we have developed Mindcontrol, an open-source web application for the collaborative quality control of neuroimaging processing outputs. The Mindcontrol platform consists of a dashboard to organize data, descriptive visualizations to explore the data, an imaging viewer, and an in-browser annotation and editing toolbox for data curation and quality control. Mindcontrol is flexible and can be configured for the outputs of any software package in any data organization structure. Example configurations for three large, open-source datasets are presented: the 1000 Functional Connectomes Project (FCP), the Consortium for Reliability and Reproducibility (CoRR), and the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE) Collection. These demo applications link descriptive quality control metrics, regional brain volumes, and thickness scalars to a 3D imaging viewer and editing module, resulting in an easy-to-implement quality control protocol that can be scaled for any size and complexity of study.

  13. Caractérisation par ellipsométrie spectroscopique de films minces de tellurure de bismuth obtenus par voie électrochimique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, A.; Stein, N.; Boulanger, C.; Johann, L.

    2004-12-01

    Des films de tellurure de bismuth (Bi2Te3) d’épaisseur proche de 1 mm ont été développés par voie électrochimique. Leurs indices optiques ont été déterminés par ellipsométrie spectroscopique (SE). Le domaine spectral des indices optiques s’étend de 400 nm à 1300 nm. L’ellipsométrie spectroscopique à angle d’incidence variable (VASE) a été utilisée pour corréler les données SE. Cette partie a été complétée par des analyses par microscopie à force atomique (AFM) qui ont permis de déterminer la rugosité des films. A partir de ces résultats et en associant l’absorption fondamentale des films de Bi2Te3 à une transition indirecte, l’énergie de bande interdite a été évaluée à 0,3 eV. Par ailleurs des mesures associant ellipsométrie spectroscopique à temps réel et électrochimie ont pu être réalisées. Ainsi les premiers instants de croissance ont été observés.

  14. [The National Medical Arbitration Commission: 20 years].

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Juan Ramón

    Cuando la Secretaría de Salud todavía tenía el logotipo azul que decía SSA, corrían tiempos difíciles porque no había dinero y la idea de crear nuevas instituciones era recibida con reservas, no sólo por el Presidente Zedillo, siempre generoso y atento a las necesidades de salud de la población, sino también, como ya es costumbre, por el secretario de Hacienda, responsable de cuidar el erario público. Y es que la idea de hacer crecer el gasto corriente del gobierno se percibía, no sin razón, como un acto que podía infligir el riesgo de fomentar estructuras administrativas ineficaces y obesas. No ha sido el caso de la Comisión Nacional de Arbitraje Médico (CONAMED), pues sus aproximadamente 200 trabajadores siguen realizando una labor inmensa con una estructura ligera.

  15. A correlação índice espectral vs. luminosidade em QSOs e suas implicações

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rissmann, A.

    2003-08-01

    Estudos de variabilidade de núcleos ativos já demonstraram ser comum o fato de seu contínuo óptico/UV tornar-se mais "duro" à medida que a luminosidade aumenta. Essa tendência ocorre tanto de forma individual quanto global, e pode ter implicações importantes (1) para estudos fotométricos de variabilidade conduzidos numa banda fixa no referencial do observador, comparando objetos a diferentes redshifts, e (2) no cálculo da correção K, com consequente impacto na determinação de massas de buracos negros e bojos de galáxias hospedeiras (através da relação de Magorrian). Confirmo aqui as correlações positivas entre o índice espectral e a luminosidade óptica, utilizando dados espectroscópicos de 11 QSOs monitorados no Brasil e no Chile, durante ~2 anos. O estudo é complementado com parâmetros extraídos de espectros e de dados fotométricos públicos de quasares. Destaco ainda as diferenças observadas em tais correlações para objetos do tipo radio-loud e radio-quiet. Este projeto é financiado pelo I. Milênio/CNPq.

  16. Remotely-Sensed Glacial Velocities: Mt. Shasta Advance vs. Sierra Nevada Retreat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. A.; Bookhagen, B.; Burbank, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Monitoring changes in alpine glaciers is crucial to understanding the impacts of global climate change because alpine glacier systems respond quickly to changes in the earth´s climate. The glaciers of the Sierra Nevada and southern Cascades are of particular interest because they provide a major water reservoir to the state of California. Oddly, while most glaciers worldwide (including in the Sierra Nevada) are retreating, glaciers in northern California are advancing, and examining differences between these two locations will help resolve this paradox. Whereas previous studies have mapped the spatial extents of glaciers from aerial and satellite imagery, this study utilizes glacial velocities as a monitoring tool to examine the differences of the glaciers in the Sierra Nevada and on Mount Shasta. Using the program COSI-Corr in ENVI, horizontal surface ice flow velocities are calculated at the subpixel level from a time-series of co-registered, orthorectified, and correlated, late-summer satellite imagery. Through a combination of 15-meter Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Radiometer (ASTER) and 5-meter SPOT imagery, orthorectified using a 15-meter resampled Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM), glacial velocities are derived on major glaciers on Mount Shasta and in the Palisades of the Sierra Nevada for 2000-2008. This study demonstrates the utility of combining various types of remote sensing imagery to create a complete time record, and from this record derive glacial velocities for use in monitoring climate change effectively.

  17. Differences in the treatment of male and female patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Florakas, C; Wilson, R; Toffelmire, E; Godwin, M; Morton, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a difference in the allocation of types of dialysis to male and female patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). DESIGN: Descriptive study. SETTING: Canada. PATIENTS: All patients registered with the Canadian Organ Replacement Register (CORR) whose treatment began between 1981 and 1991. Data were obtained for 19,732 patients, of whom 18,010 had sufficiently complete data and were being treated with either peritoneal dialysis or hemodialysis 3 months after the diagnosis of ESRD. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis according to sex. RESULTS: Significantly more male (58.1%) than female (50.8%) patients were receiving hemodialysis 3 months after diagnosis (p < 0.00001). Multivariate analysis to control for the possible confounding effects of age, province of treatment, diagnosis, concurrent illness and year of diagnosis did not explain the difference. CONCLUSIONS: In Canada from 1981 to 1991 male patients were more likely than female patients to receive hemodialysis for the treatment of ESRD. Additional research is needed to explain this finding. PMID:7954176

  18. Probabilistic error correction for RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hai-Son; Schulz, Marcel H.; McCauley, Brenna M.; Hinman, Veronica F.; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing of RNAs (RNA-Seq) has revolutionized the field of transcriptomics, but the reads obtained often contain errors. Read error correction can have a large impact on our ability to accurately assemble transcripts. This is especially true for de novo transcriptome analysis, where a reference genome is not available. Current read error correction methods, developed for DNA sequence data, cannot handle the overlapping effects of non-uniform abundance, polymorphisms and alternative splicing. Here we present SEquencing Error CorrEction in Rna-seq data (SEECER), a hidden Markov Model (HMM)–based method, which is the first to successfully address these problems. SEECER efficiently learns hundreds of thousands of HMMs and uses these to correct sequencing errors. Using human RNA-Seq data, we show that SEECER greatly improves on previous methods in terms of quality of read alignment to the genome and assembly accuracy. To illustrate the usefulness of SEECER for de novo transcriptome studies, we generated new RNA-Seq data to study the development of the sea cucumber Parastichopus parvimensis. Our corrected assembled transcripts shed new light on two important stages in sea cucumber development. Comparison of the assembled transcripts to known transcripts in other species has also revealed novel transcripts that are unique to sea cucumber, some of which we have experimentally validated. Supporting website: http://sb.cs.cmu.edu/seecer/. PMID:23558750

  19. Le carcinome neuro-endocrine cutané primitif: à propos d'un nouveau cas et revue de la littérature

    PubMed Central

    Boukind, Samira; Elatiqi, Oumkeltoum; Dlimi, Meriem; Elamrani, Driss; Benchamkha, Yassine; Ettalbi, Saloua

    2015-01-01

    Le carcinome neuro- endocrine cutané primitif (CNEC) est une tumeur cutanée rare et agressive du sujet âgé, favorisée par le soleil et l'immunodépression. Elle est caractérisée par une évolution agressive avec un fort taux de récidive, une évolution ganglionnaire régionale et un risque de métastases à distance. Nous rapportons un cas de cette tumeur chez un patient âgé de 67 ans sous forme d'un placard nodulaire hémorragique mesurant 16 /14 cm. Le patient a bénéficié d'une exérèse chirurgicale large avec couverture de la perte de substance par un lambeau musculo-cutané du muscle grand dorsal, un curage ganglionnaire axillaire et une radiothérapie adjuvante. Après un recul de 2 ans et 2 mois, le patient est toujours vivant sans métastase ni récidive. La littérature étant pauvre, la prise en charge diagnostique et thérapeutique est controversée et donc hétérogène. Globalement le pronostic est mauvais, et certains paramètres corrélés au pronostic sont précisés. PMID:26185585

  20. Use of DNA barcoding to distinguish the malaria vector Anopheles neivai in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    LÓPEZ-RUBIO, ANDRÉS; SUAZA-VASCO, JUAN; MARCET, PAULA L; RUÍZ-MOLINA, NATALIA; CÁCERES, LORENZO; PORTER, CHARLES; URIBE, SANDRA

    2016-01-01

    A reference 535 bp barcode sequence from a fragment of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (COI), acquired from specimens of An. neivai Howard, Dyar & Knab, 1913 from its type locality in Panama, was used as a tool for distinguishing this species from others in the subgenus Kerteszia. Comparisons with corresponding regions of COI between An. neivai and other species in the subgenus (An. bellator Dyar & Knab 1906, An. homunculus Komp 1937, An cruzii Dyar & Knab, 1908 and An. laneanus Corrêa & Cerqueira, 1944) produced K2P genetic distances of 8.3–12.6%, values well above those associated with intraspecific variation. In contrast, genetic distances among 55 specimens from five municipalities in the Colombian Pacific coastal state of Chocó were all within the range of 0–2.5%, with an optimized barcode threshold of 1.3%, the limit for unambiguous differentiation of An. neivai. Among specimens from the Chocó region, 18 haplotypes were detected, two of which were widely distributed over the municipalities sampled. The barcode sequence permits discrimination of An. neivai from sympatric species and indicates genetic variability within the species; aspects key to malaria surveillance and control as well as defining geographic distribution and dispersion patterns. PMID:27811749

  1. Measurement of ground displacement from optical satellite image correlation using the free open-source software MicMac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, Ana-Maria; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc; Delorme, Arthur; Binet, Renaud; Klinger, Yann

    2015-02-01

    Image correlation is one of the most efficient techniques to determine horizontal ground displacements due to earthquakes, landslides, ice flows or sand dune migrations. Analyzing these deformations allows a better understanding of the causes and mechanisms of the events. By using sub-pixel correlation on before- and after-event ortho-images obtained from high resolution satellite images it is possible to compute the displacement field with high planimetric resolution. In this paper, we focus on measuring the ground displacements due to seismotectonic events. The three sub-pixel correlators used are: COSI-Corr - developed by Caltech, a free, closed-source correlator, dependent on commercial software (ENVI) and widely used by the geoscience community for measuring ground displacement; Medicis - developed by CNES, also a closed-source correlator capable of measuring this type of deformation; and MicMac - developed by IGN, the free open-source correlator we study and tune for measuring fine ground displacements. We measured horizontal ground deformation using these three correlators on SPOT images in three study cases: the 2001 Kokoxili earthquake, the 2005 dyke intrusion in the Afar depression and the 2008 Yutian earthquake.

  2. A study of correlations between the release of drugs from petrolatum-based gels containing nonionic surfactants and some physical and physico-chemical characteristics of the gel systems.

    PubMed

    Colo, G D; Nannipieri, E; Serafini, M F; Vitale, D

    1986-06-01

    Synopsis The in vitro release of benzocaine and 2-ethyIhexyl p-di-methylaminobenzoate (EH-PABA) from petrolatum-based gels either containing two nonionic surfactants, or not, was compared with some physical and/or physico-chemical characteristics of the drugs, the gels and the drug-gel systems. The surfactants had no effect on the release of EH-PABA, the less polar drug, whereas they decreased the release of benzocaine. Moreover, the release data show a complex dependence of diffusive properties of ben-zocaine on drug and surfactant concentration. Benzocaine appears to form mixed micelles with each of the two surfactants and/or undergoes self-aggregation phenomena within surfactant micelles. The results indicate that drug diffusion is influenced by gel porosity, drug molecular size and polarity and molecular interactions. Etude des corrélations entre la disponibilité des medicaments dans les gels a base de vaseline contenant des surfactifs non ioniques et quelques propriétés physiques et physicochimiques des gels.

  3. Investigation of Synthesized Sulfonated Melamine Formaldehyde as a Novel Corrosion Inhibitor for Mild Steel in Saline Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Zahra; Pakshir, Mahmoud; Mohamadi, Somayeh

    2015-02-01

    A water soluble compound named sulfonated melamine formaldehyde (SMF) was synthesized and its corrosion inhibition behavior was studied for carbon steel in 3.5% NaCl solution by polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). SMF was characterized with hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and then its physical properties and corrosion prevention efficiencies were investigated. The corrosion behavior of SMF was found to be dependent strongly on the electric nature of functional groups which are present in its structure. The decrease in ( i corr) and the increase in inhibition efficiency (% IE) with increasing the SMF concentrations proves that it protects C-steel in 3.5% NaCl solution from being corroded and Nyquist diagrams indicate that increasing charge transfer resistance is associated with a decrease in the capacitance and increase in the percentage inhibition efficiency. The decrease in capacitance values could be attributed to the adsorption of the inhibitor molecules at the metal surface by increasing the concentration of inhibitor in the solution the inhibition efficiency increased and the best inhibition was obtained at 1000 ppm inhibitor concentration. The scanning electron microscope was used to investigate the surface morphology of specimens in the absence and presence of inhibitor compound.

  4. Electrostatic correlations and the polyelectrolyte self energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Kevin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2017-02-01

    We address the effects of chain connectivity on electrostaticfluctuations in polyelectrolyte solutions using a field-theoretic, renormalizedGaussian fluctuation (RGF) theory. As in simple electrolyte solutions [Z.-G. Wang,Phys. Rev. E 81, 021501 (2010)], the RGF provides a unified theory forelectrostatic fluctuations, accounting for both dielectric and charge correlationeffects in terms of the self-energy. Unlike simple ions, the polyelectrolyte self energydepends intimately on the chain conformation, and our theory naturally provides aself-consistent determination of the response of intramolecular chain structure topolyelectrolyte and salt concentrations. The effects of the chain-conformation on theself-energy and thermodynamics are especially pronounced for flexiblepolyelectrolytes at low polymer and salt concentrations, where application of thewrong chain structure can lead to a drastic misestimation of the electrostaticcorrelations. By capturing the expected scaling behavior of chain size from dilute tosemi-dilute regimes, our theory provides improved estimates of the self energy at lowpolymer concentrations and correctly predicts the eventual N-independenceof the critical temperature and concentration of salt-free solutions of flexiblepolyelectrolytes. We show that the self energy can be interpreted in terms of aninfinite-dilution energy μm,0 el and a finite concentrationcorrelation correction μcorr which tends to cancel out the formerwith increasing concentration.

  5. A 45-year time series of dune mobility indicating constant windiness over the central Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.; Leprince, S.

    2012-07-01

    Although evidence is mounting that links global warming to changes in atmospheric dynamics over the Atlantic realm, similar studies over the African continent are lacking. And even if such models would exist, it would be difficult to verify their validity due to the paucity of meteorological observations and anemometers in the central Sahara. A pragmatic way around this problem is to monitor barchan dune velocity as a proxy for the windiness of desert areas. Dune migration rates are a measure of the amount of work done by the wind which does not require field measurements but can be observed from space instead. This paper presents a novel application of the remote sensing tool COSI-Corr for the construction of time series of dune mobility from sequences of optical satellite imagery. The technique has been applied to the Bodélé Depression in northern Chad, to demonstrate that dune migration rates in the central Sahara have been remarkably constant for nearly half a century, leading us to conclude that wind velocities have not changed more than 0.2% per year over that period. It is therefore unlikely that the frequency and intensity of dust storms originating from this ‘hot spot’ has significantly changed over the past decades either.

  6. Le chondrosarcome naso-sinusien: à propos de deux cas et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Touati, Mohamed Mliha; Chihani, Mehdi; Darouassi, Youssef; Lakouichmi, Mohammed; Tourabi, Khalid; Bouaity, Brahim; Ammar, Haddou

    2014-01-01

    Le chondrosarcome est une tumeur maligne très destructrice d'origine cartilagineuse, osseuse et mesnchymateuse. La localisation au niveau de la tête et cou est rare et le siège naso sinusien est encore plus rare. Nous rapportons deux observations de chondrosarcome du sinus maxillaire droit et sphéno ethmoïdale. Le but de notre travail est de montrer à travers ces deux cas cliniques, l'intérêt de la tomodensitométrie et de la résonance magnétique dans la présemption diagnostique en corrélation avec la clinique et l'endoscopie,de discuter le choix de la voix et la technique d'abord chirurgical et la surveillance post opératoire. A travers ces deux observations nous soulignerons les difficultés que pose cette tumeur à l'anatomopathologiste pour différencier entre chondrome et chondrosarcome. PMID:25810801

  7. Crystallization and Preliminary Diffraction Analysis of the CAL PDZ Domain in Complex with a Selective Peptide Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    J Amacher; P Cushing; J Weiner; D Madden

    2011-12-31

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which regulates epithelial fluid and ion homeostasis. The CFTR cytoplasmic C-terminus interacts with a number of PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) proteins that modulate its intracellular trafficking and chloride-channel activity. Among these, the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL) has a negative effect on apical-membrane expression levels of the most common disease-associated mutant {Delta}F508-CFTR, making CAL a candidate target for the treatment of CF. A selective peptide inhibitor of the CAL PDZ domain (iCAL36) has recently been developed and shown to stabilize apical expression of {Delta}F508-CFTR, enhancing net chloride-channel activity, both alone and in combination with the folding corrector corr-4a. As a basis for structural studies of the CAL-iCAL36 interaction, a purification protocol has been developed that increases the oligomeric homogeneity of the protein. Here, the cocrystallization of the complex in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 35.9, b = 47.7, c = 97.3 {angstrom}, is reported. The crystals diffracted to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (1.96 {angstrom}{sup 3} Da{sup -1}), it appears that the asymmetric unit contains two complexes.

  8. Automatic, computer-based speech assessment on edentulous patients with and without complete dentures - preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Stelzle, F; Ugrinovic, B; Knipfer, C; Bocklet, T; Nöth, E; Schuster, M; Eitner, S; Seiss, M; Nkenke, E

    2010-03-01

    Dental rehabilitation of edentulous patients with complete dentures includes not only aesthetics and mastication of food, but also speech quality. It was the aim of this study to introduce and validate a computer-based speech recognition system (ASR) for automatic speech assessment in edentulous patients after dental rehabilitation with complete dentures. To examine the impact of dentures on speech production, the speech outcome of edentulous patients with and without complete dentures was compared. Twenty-eight patients reading a standardized text were recorded twice - with and without their complete dentures in situ. A control group of 40 healthy subjects with natural dentition was recorded under the same conditions. Speech quality was evaluated by means of a polyphone-based ASR according to the percentage of the word accuracy (WA). Speech acceptability assessment by expert listeners and the automatic rating of the WA by the ASR showed a high correlation (corr = 0.71). Word accuracy was significantly reduced in edentulous speakers (55.42 +/- 13.1) compared to the control group's WA (69.79 +/- 10.6). On the other hand, wearing complete dentures significantly increased the WA of the edentulous patients (60.00 +/- 15.6). Speech production quality is significantly reduced after complete loss of teeth. Reconstitution of speech production quality is an important part of dental rehabilitation and can be improved for edentulous patients by means of complete dentures. The ASR has proven to be a useful and easily applicable tool for automatic speech assessment in a standardized way.

  9. Wenchuan Event Detection And Localization Using Waveform Correlation Coupled With Double Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinkard, M.; Heck, S.; Schaff, D. P.; Young, C. J.; Richards, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The well-studied Wenchuan aftershock sequence triggered by the May 12, 2008, Ms 8.0, mainshock offers an ideal test case for evaluating the effectiveness of using waveform correlation coupled with double difference relocation to detect and locate events in a large aftershock sequence. We use Sandia's SeisCorr detector to process 3 months of data recorded by permanent IRIS and temporary ASCENT stations using templates from events listed in a global catalog to find similar events in the raw data stream. Then we take the detections and relocate them using the double difference method. We explore both the performance that can be expected with using just a small number of stations, and, the benefits of reprocessing a well-studied sequence such as this one using waveform correlation to find even more events. We benchmark our results against previously published results describing relocations of regional catalog data. Before starting this project, we had examples where with just a few stations at far-regional distances, waveform correlation combined with double difference did and impressive job of detection and location events with precision at the few hundred and even tens of meters level.

  10. Longitudinal test-retest neuroimaging data from healthy young adults in southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wei, Dongtao; Chen, Qunlin; Yang, Wenjing; Meng, Jie; Wu, Guorong; Bi, Taiyong; Zhang, Qinglin; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Qiu, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI) has been widely used to map the structure and function of the human brain, as well as its behavioral associations. However, to date, a large sample with a long-term longitudinal design and a narrow age-span has been lacking for the assessment of test-retest reliability and reproducibility of brain-behavior correlations, as well as the development of novel causal insights into these correlational findings. Here we describe the SLIM dataset, which includes brain and behavioral data across a long-term retest-duration within three and a half years, mMRI scans provided a set of structural, diffusion and resting-state functional MRI images, along with rich samples of behavioral assessments addressed—demographic, cognitive and emotional information. Together with the Consortium for Reliability and Reproducibility (CoRR), the SLIM is expected to accelerate the reproducible sciences of the human brain by providing an open resource for brain-behavior discovery sciences with big-data approaches. PMID:28195583

  11. Genetic variability analysis of Byrsonima crassifolia germplasm collected in Pará State using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S M; Moura, E F; Ramos, G K S; Oliveira, M S P

    2016-10-17

    Native of the Amazon, the nanche (Byrsonima crassifolia) is a fruit cultivated by family farmers and used in cooking; as such, it represents an opportunity for regional agribusiness. The Embrapa Eastern Amazon set up an active germplasm bank (BAG) consisting of 22 accessions sampled in 11 municipalities of Pará State. Due to its economic potential, there is an interest to advance the genetic breeding program of this species. The aim of this study was to characterize the BAG nanche collection using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Accessions were genotyped using 23 pre-selected ISSR primers resulting in 109 amplified polymorphic and 51 monomorphic bands. With eight polymorphic bands each, the most polymorphic primers were UBC 809 and UBC 848. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average cluster analysis based on Jaccard's coefficient indicated that the individuals clustered into two distinct groups. Accessions Igarapé Açu-2 and Augusto Corrêa-Pl 1 were most similar. The genetic dissimilarity values ranged from 0.10 to 0.59. We conclude that the ISSR markers were efficient in detecting polymorphisms in the nanche accessions, and that it is possible to infer the genetic variability among accessions of the collection. This demonstrate the importance of using molecular markers in poorly studied species and the advantages that this information can bring to the genetic improvement of such species.

  12. Electrochemical and biological characterization of coatings formed on Ti-15Mo alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kazek-Kęsik, Alicja; Krok-Borkowicz, Małgorzata; Pamuła, Elżbieta; Simka, Wojciech

    2014-10-01

    β-Type titanium alloys are considered the future materials for bone implants. To improve the bioactivity of Ti-15Mo, the surface was modified using the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process. Tricalcium phosphate (TCP, Ca3PO4), wollastonite (CaSiO3) and silica (SiO2) were selected as additives in the anodizing bath to enhance the bioactivity of the coatings formed during the PEO process. Electrochemical analysis of the samples was performed in Ringer's solution at 37°C. The open-circuit potential (EOCP) as a function of time, corrosion potential (ECORR), corrosion current density (jCORR) and polarization resistance (Rp) of the samples were determined. Surface modification improved the corrosion resistance of Ti-15Mo in Ringer's solution. In vitro studies with MG-63 osteoblast-like cells were performed for 1, 3 and 7 days. After 24h, the cells were well adhered on the entire surfaces, and their number increased with increasing culture time. The coatings formed in basic solution with wollastonite exhibited better biological performance compared with the as-ground sample.

  13. Measuring Mars sand flux seasonality from a time series of HiRISE images and calibrating the threshold for sand mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.; Newman, C. E.; Richardson, M. I.; Lucas, A.; Leprince, S.; Bridges, N. T.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, focused on the Nili Patera dune field on Mars, we measured the temporal variation of the migration rate of sand ripples from the correlation of a time-series of HiRISE images using COSI-Corr. The time-series covers approximately 1.5 Mars year which allows us to observe seasonal migration rate variability as well as taking an early glimpse on yearly variation. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to the time-series to quantify more robustly the time evolution of the signal and filter out noise, in particular due to unrecorded satellite jitter. Using the first two components, which account for 82% of the variance, the seasonal variation of the ripple migration rate was estimated. We clearly observe continuously active migration throughout the year with a strong seasonal quasi-sinusoidal variation which peaks at perihelion. Coupling between surface winds and sand transport is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is likely crucial for both erosion of the surface and for the emission of finer (dust) particles into the atmosphere. Analysis of the distinctive seasonal variation of sand flux with an atmospheric model is used to infer an effective threshold for sand motion. This is the first direct estimate of the stress threshold at Mars on spatial scales relevant for dynamical atmospheric modeling of sand transport, surface erosion, and dust lifting.

  14. Measurement Of Neutron Radius In Lead By Parity Violating Scattering Flash ADC DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Zafar

    2012-06-01

    This dissertation reports the experiment PREx, a parity violation experiment which is designed to measure the neutron radius in 208Pb. PREx is performed in hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility from March 19th to June 21st. Longitudionally polarized electrons at energy 1 GeV scattered at and angle of θlab = 5.8 ° from the Lead target. Beam corrected pairty violaing counting rate asymmetry is (Acorr= 594 ± 50(stat) ± 9(syst))ppb at Q2 = 0.009068GeV 2. This dissertation also presents the details of Flash ADC Data Acquisition(FADC DAQ) system for Moller polarimetry in Hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The Moller polarimeter measures the beam polarization to high precision to meet the specification of the PREx(Lead radius experiment). The FADC DAQ is part of the upgrade of Moller polarimetery to reduce the systematic error for PREx. The hardware setup and the results of the FADC DAQ analysis are presented

  15. The development of a learning management system for dental radiology education: A technical report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hee-Jin; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to suggest the development of a learning management system for dental radiology education using the Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment (Moodle). Materials and Methods Moodle is a well-known and verified open-source software-learning management system (OSS-LMS). The Moodle software was installed on a server computer and customized for dental radiology education. The system was implemented for teaching undergraduate students to diagnose dental caries in panoramic images. Questions were chosen that could assess students' diagnosis ability. Students were given several questions corre-sponding to each of 100 panoramic images. Results The installation and customization of Moodle was feasible, cost-effective, and time-saving. By having students answer questions repeatedly, it was possible to train them to examine panoramic images sequentially and thoroughly. Conclusion Based on its educational efficiency and efficacy, the adaptation of an OSS-LMS in dental school may be highly recommended. The system could be extended to continuing education for dentists. Further studies on the objective evaluation of knowledge acquisition and retention are needed. PMID:28361030

  16. Probabilistic error correction for RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Le, Hai-Son; Schulz, Marcel H; McCauley, Brenna M; Hinman, Veronica F; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2013-05-01

    Sequencing of RNAs (RNA-Seq) has revolutionized the field of transcriptomics, but the reads obtained often contain errors. Read error correction can have a large impact on our ability to accurately assemble transcripts. This is especially true for de novo transcriptome analysis, where a reference genome is not available. Current read error correction methods, developed for DNA sequence data, cannot handle the overlapping effects of non-uniform abundance, polymorphisms and alternative splicing. Here we present SEquencing Error CorrEction in Rna-seq data (SEECER), a hidden Markov Model (HMM)-based method, which is the first to successfully address these problems. SEECER efficiently learns hundreds of thousands of HMMs and uses these to correct sequencing errors. Using human RNA-Seq data, we show that SEECER greatly improves on previous methods in terms of quality of read alignment to the genome and assembly accuracy. To illustrate the usefulness of SEECER for de novo transcriptome studies, we generated new RNA-Seq data to study the development of the sea cucumber Parastichopus parvimensis. Our corrected assembled transcripts shed new light on two important stages in sea cucumber development. Comparison of the assembled transcripts to known transcripts in other species has also revealed novel transcripts that are unique to sea cucumber, some of which we have experimentally validated. Supporting website: http://sb.cs.cmu.edu/seecer/.

  17. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  18. Wear and Corrosion Behaviors of FeCrBSiNbW Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Coating Prepared by Arc Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. B.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, B. S.

    2012-09-01

    FeCrBSiNbW coatings were synthesized using robotically manipulating twin wires arc spraying system. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the coating were characterized. The coating has a laminated structure, and its porosity is 2.8%. The microstructure of the coating consists of amorphous and α-(Fe,Cr) nanocrystalline. The nanocrystalline grains with a scale of 20-75 nm are homogenously dispersed in amorphous matrix. The results show that FeCrBSiNbW coating has excellent wear and corrosion resistance. The wear resistance of the coating is about 4.6 times higher than that of 3Cr13 coating under the same testing condition. In 3.5% NaCl aqueous solution, the amorphous/nanocrystalline coating presents lower I corr values in polarization curves and higher fitted R t values in EIS plots than that of the 0Cr18Ni9 coating (chemical composition by EDAX analysis: C1.07-O12.38-Si0.49-Cr15.18-Mn0.89-Ni7.09-Fe62.24 at.%).

  19. Towards a more accurate extraction of the SPICE netlist from MAGIC based layouts

    SciTech Connect

    Geronimo, G.D.

    1998-08-01

    The extraction of the SPICE netlist form MAGIC based layouts is investigated. It is assumed that the layout is fully coherent with the corresponding mask representation. The process of the extraction can be made in three steps: (1) extraction of .EXT file from layout, through MAGIC command extract; (2) extraction of the netlist from .EXT file through ext2spice extractor; and (3) correction of the netlist through ext2spice.corr program. Each of these steps introduces some approximations, most of which can be optimized, and some errors, most of which can be corrected. Aim of this work is the description of each step, of the approximations and errors on each step, and of the corresponding optimizations and corrections to be made in order to improve the accuracy of the extraction. The HP AMOS14TB 0.5 {micro}m process with linear capacitor and silicide block options and the corresponding SCN3MLC{_}SUBM.30.tech27 technology file will be used in the following examples.

  20. Association of Polymorphisms of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts Gene with Schizophrenia in a Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jiawu; Zuo, Xiang; Yin, Jingwen; Luo, Xudong; Li, Zheng; Lin, Juda

    2017-01-01

    Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that binds diverse ligands involved in the development of inflammatory damage and diverse chronic diseases including schizophrenia. Here, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (G82S, -374T/A, and -429T/C) in the RAGE gene were genotyped in 923 patients with schizophrenia and 874 healthy-matched controls in a Han Chinese population using the SNaPshot technique. Additionally, we investigated the association among aforementioned SNPs with the clinical psychotic symptoms of the patients and neurocognitive function. Our study demonstrated that the frequencies of the TC + CC genotypes and the C allele in the -429T/C polymorphism were significantly lower in the patients compared with the controls (p = 0.031 and p = 0.034, resp.). However, the significant effect disappeared when using Bonferroni correction (p = 0.093 and p = 0.102, resp.). And there were no significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies between the patients and the controls for G82S and -374T/A polymorphisms. Additionally, the -429T/C C allele carriers had marginally higher Symbol coding scores than the subjects with the TT genotypes [p = 0.031 and p (corr) = 0.093]. Our data indicate that the RAGE -429T/C polymorphism may be associated with the susceptibility of schizophrenia. PMID:28373983

  1. SU-E-I-85: Exploring the 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET Characteristics in Staging of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics derived from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET image and assess its capacity in staging of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods: 26 patients with newly diagnosed ESCC who underwent 18F-FDG PET scan were included in this study. Different image-derived indices including the standardized uptake value (SUV), gross tumor length, texture features and shape feature were considered. Taken the histopathologic examination as the gold standard, the extracted capacities of indices in staging of ESCC were assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. Specificity and sensitivity for each of the studied parameters were derived using receiver-operating characteristic curves. Results: 18F-FDG SUVmax and SUVmean showed statistically significant capability in AJCC and TNM stages. Texture features such as ENT and CORR were significant factors for N stages(p=0.040, p=0.029). Both FDG PET Longitudinal length and shape feature Eccentricity (EC) (p≤0.010) provided powerful stratification in the primary ESCC AJCC and TNM stages than SUV and texture features. Receiver-operating-characteristic curve analysis showed that tumor textural analysis can capability M stages with higher sensitivity than SUV measurement but lower in T and N stages. Conclusion: The 18F-FDG image-derived characteristics of SUV, textural features and shape feature allow for good stratification AJCC and TNM stage in ESCC patients.

  2. Identification de lois constitutives et de lois de frottement adaptées aux grandes vitesses de sollicitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalverny, O.; Capéraa, S.; Pantalé, O.; Sattouf, C.

    2002-12-01

    Cet article présente une méthodologie d'identification de lois constitutives et de lois de contact adaptées aux matériaux métalliques sous chargement dynamique à grande vitesse de déformation. Les essais sont effectués à partir de montages expérimentaux adaptés à un lanceur à gaz permettant d'obtenir une vitesse de projectile de l'ordre de 350m/s pour une masse totale de 30gr. Le premier essai consiste en un impact de Taylor correspondant à un chargement mécanique de type compression. Le second essai de type “extrusion conique" permet la détermination des lois de frottement à grande vitesse. La procédure générale d'identification des lois de comportement à partir d'essais dynamiques se fait au moyen d'une analyse post-mortem des échantillons et de la corrélation entre ces résultats expérimentaux et un modèle numérique des essais. Pour les deux cas précédemment cités, nous présentons la configuration optimale d'essai ainsi que les résultats obtenus à partir d'un algorithme d'optimisation de type Levenberg-Marquard.

  3. Diffraction des neutrons : principe, dispositifs expérimentaux et applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, C.

    2003-02-01

    La diffraction de neutrons, sur monocristal ou sur échantillon polycristallin (ou poudre), est une technique très largement utilisée, en science des matériaux comme en biologie, lorsque l'on souhaite déterminer la structure cristalline d'un composé ou d'une molécule. Toutefois, le degré de précision de la détermination structurale est très corrélé au choix de l'instrument utilisé. Il s'en suit que la question “comment choisir l'instrument le mieux adapté au composé et à la problématique ?" apparaît comme fondamentale. L'objectif de ce cours est de tenter de répondre à cette question en décrivant brièvement les caractéristiques instrumentales de différents diffractomètres, en exposant les avantages spécifiques des expériences de diffraction de neutrons et en donnant quelques exemples d'application.

  4. Semiclassical methods in solid state physics : two examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissard, Jean; Barelli, Armelle

    1993-02-01

    We present here a review of two problems motivated by 2D models for high T, superconductivity. The first part concerns the energy spectrum of 2D Bloch electrons in a uniform magnetic field. A semiclassical analysis provides a qualitative as well as a quantitative understanding of this spectrum. In the second part we make the case for the application of “Quantum Chaos" to strongly correlated fermion systems. It is illustrated by the level spacing distribution for the t - J model in two dimensions. Ce travail est une revue de deux problèmes motivés par l'étude des modèles bidimensionnels pour la supraconductivité à haute température critique. La première partie concerne l'étude du spectre d'énergie pour des électrons de Bloch bidimensionnels soumis à un champ magnétique uniforme. Une analyse semi-classique permet d'en comprendre les propriétés qualitatives et quantitatives. La deuxième partie est un plaidoyer pour l'utilisation des méthodes du “Chaos Quantique" dans l'étude des systèmes de fermions fortement corrélés. La distribution des écarts de niveaux d'un modèle t - J en deux dimensions, en fournit une illustration.

  5. Chronotype predicts activity patterns in the neural underpinnings of the motor system during the day.

    PubMed

    Peres, Isabella; Vetter, Céline; Blautzik, Janusch; Reiser, Maximilian; Pöppel, Ernst; Meindl, Thomas; Roenneberg, Till; Gutyrchik, Evgeny

    2011-12-01

    Neuroimaging is increasingly used to study the motor system in vivo. Despite many reports of time-of-day influences on motor function at the behavioral level, little is known about these influences on neural motor networks and their activations recorded in neuroimaging. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the authors studied 15 healthy subjects (9 females; mean ± SD age: 23 ± 3 yrs) performing a self-paced finger-tapping task at different times of day (morning, midday, afternoon, and evening). Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent signal showed systematic differences across the day in task-related motor areas of the brain, specifically in the supplementary motor area, parietal cortex, and rolandic operculum (p(corr)< .0125). The authors found that these time-of-day-dependent hemodynamic modulations are associated with chronotype and not with homeostatic sleep pressure. These results show that consideration of time-of-day for the analysis of fMRI studies is imperative.

  6. Acute toxicity testing in cultures of mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Walum, E; Peterson, A

    1983-01-01

    Cultured mouse neuroblastoma cells (C1300) may be used as models for nerve cells since they have a number of properties in common with their normal counterparts in vivo. In order to test the possibility of using C1300 cells as alternative to experimental animals when testing for acute toxicity, cells (clone 41A3) were exposed to a number of common chemicals (CH3HgCl, CdCl2,HgCl2 ppDDT, n-butanol, benzene, dioxan, n-propanol, aceton and t-butanol). The toxic effect was quantified by measuring the degree of cell detachment in the cultures. The concentrations of chemicals that caused 25% of the total cell number to detach (TD25) were used for comparison with LD50 values. In spite of the very simplified situation in culture, where the toxicity of a substance is little or not at all influenced by factors like penetration, storage, metabolism and excretion a good correlation (corr. coeff. 0,98) was obtained between TD25 values and LD50 values. Good correlations between in vitro and in vivo tests have also been reported by others. One possible explanation to these findings could be simplified in vivo toxicokinetics of these substances when tested in high doses for general effects like animal death. If so, simple in vitro tests may be used for predicting acute toxicity of certain groups of substances.

  7. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde associated with the use of natural gas as a fuel for light vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, Sérgio M.; Arbilla, Graciela

    Data collected from 1998 to 2001 clearly show that formaldehyde levels in ambient air of the city of Rio de Janeiro increased in 2001 (Corrêa et al., 2003, Atmospheric Environment 37, 23-29). In order to continue this study, samples were collected at the same site in the period from 2001 to 2002. In this work, we present the observed trends for formaldehyde and acetaldehyde levels from 1998 to 2002. Mean formaldehyde levels increased from 20 ppb in 1998 to 80 ppb in 2002, while acetaldehyde concentrations remained nearly unchanged. The formaldehyde/acetaldehyde ratio increased from 1.0 to 4.5 in the same period of time. These results may be explained by the increasing use of compressed natural gas by the vehicular fleet, in substitution of ethanol and gasohol (a mixture of gasoline and ethanol, 24% v/v). In order to confirm this hypothesis, some experiments were carried out to estimate the formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions from 20 automobiles powered by natural gas. The results showed a mean formaldehyde/acetaldehyde emission ratio of 3.42 for natural gas-fueled vehicles and of 0.24 when the same vehicles are fueled with gasohol. These high levels of formaldehyde may be attributed to the incomplete combustion of methane (80-90% of the natural gas) that is catalytically converted to formaldehyde in the exhaust pipe.

  8. Microsynchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Shah, R.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Burgy, F.; Rousseau, J.-P.

    2006-12-01

    Grâce aux progrès réalisés sur les chaînes laser ultra intenses, il est maintenant possible de produire des faisceaux de rayons X par interaction laser-plasma en utilisant un laser ultra bref. De plus, cette source est polychromatique et de durée femtoseconde, ce qui ouvre la voie vers de nombreuses applications. Lorsqu'un laser intense (50TW, 30fs) est focalisé sur le front avant d'un jet d'hélium, des électrons sont piégés dans le sillage de l'impulsion laser et ensuite accélérés pour enfin osciller dans le plasma lui même. Comme dans un synchrotron, un faisceau X de faible divergence est produit par ces oscillations électroniques. Après avoir présenté le principe de cette source, nous montrons les derniers résultats obtenus pour sa caractérisation spatiale et spectrale, ainsi que la corrélation entre le faisceau d'électrons et de rayons X produits par ce procédé.

  9. [Secondary Alveolar Bone Grafting in Orofacial Cleft: A Survey of a Portuguese Tertiary Hospital].

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Isabel; Morgado, Hélder; Mariz, Carlos; Estevão-Costa, José Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Introdução: A fenda lábio-palatina é a malformação congénita craniofacial mais frequente. Na presença de defeito ósseo, a técnica de enxerto ósseo alveolar secundário é o método de correção mais consensual entre os autores. Neste estudo avalia-se o resultado da aplicação desta técnica num hospital terciário. Material e Métodos: Análise dos enxertos ósseos alveolares secundários realizados entre 2007 e 2014, sendo incluídos os casos em que a crista ilíaca foi a região dadora e em que a informação clínica e imagiológica estava completa. A eficácia da intervenção foi avaliada radiologicamente com recurso à escala de Bergland (tipo I-IV), e correlacionada com variáveis associadas à patologia e/ou correção cirúrgica. Resultados: Dos 32 enxertos ósseos alveolares secundários realizados, 29 cumpriam os critérios de inclusão: 13 casos (44,8%) correspondiam a fendas pré-forâmen unilaterais completas; quatro (13,8%) a fendas pré-forâmen bilaterais completas; oito (27,6%) a fendas transforâmen unilaterais e quatro (13,8%) a fendas transforâmen bilaterais. Pela escala de Bergland (aplicada com um seguimento médio de 8 ± 5 meses), seis eram do tipo I, 15 do tipo II, cinco de tipo III e três do tipo IV. Não foi encontrada associação entre a eficácia da intervenção cirúrgica e o tipo de fenda lábio-palatina, presença do incisivo e fase de erupção do canino. Cinco doentes foram submetidos a novo enxerto ósseo alveolar (três tipo II e dois tipo III na avaliação inicial). Discussão: Na presente série, o enxerto ósseo alveolar foi eficaz na maioria dos doentes (72%, tipo I e II), independentemente do tipo de fenda lábio-palatina. A proporção de falências (10,3%) e a necessidade ulterior de reintervenção (17%) foram relativamente altas justificando o seguimento a longo-prazo e a continuação deste estudo. Conclusão: Importa realçar o envolvimento multidisciplinar para identificação atempada do momento

  10. Statistical mechanics and visual signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, Marc; Bialek, William

    1994-11-01

    We show how to use the language of statistical field theory to address and solve problems in which one must estimate some aspect of the environnent from the data in an array of sensors. In the field theory formulation the optimal estimator can be written as an expectation value in an ensemble where the input data act as external field. Problems at low signal-to-noise ratio can be solved in perturbation theory, while high signal-to-noise ratios are treated with a saddle-point approximation. These ideas are illustrated in detail by an example of visual motion estimation which is chosen to model a problem solved by the fly's brain. The optimal estimator bas a rich structure, adapting to various parameters of the environnent such as the mean-square contrast and the corrélation time of contrast fluctuations. This structure is in qualitative accord with existing measurements on motion sensitive neurons in the fly's brain, and the adaptive properties of the optimal estimator may help resolve conficts among different interpretations of these data. Finally we propose some crucial direct tests of the adaptive behavior. Nous montrons comment employer le langage de la théorie statistique des champs pour poser et résoudre des problèmes où l'on doit estimer une caractéristique de l'environnement à l'aide de données provenant d'un ensemble de détecteurs. Dans ce formalisme, l'estimateur optimal peut être écrit comme la valeur moyenne d'un opérateur, l'ensemble des données d'entrée agissant comme un champ externe. Les problèmes à faible rapport signal-bruit sont résolus par la théorie des perturbations. La méthode du col est employée pour ceux à haut rapport signal-bruit. Ces idées sont illustrées en détails sur un modèle d'estimation visuelle du mouvement basé sur un problème résolu par la mouche. L'estimateur optimal a une structure très riche, s'adaptant à divers paramètres de l'environnement tels la variance du contraste et le temps de corr

  11. Fréquence, implication clinique et valeur pronostique de la lymphopénie au cours du lupus érythémateux systémique: étude cas témoin

    PubMed Central

    Ha-ou-nou, Fatima Zahra; Essaadouni, Lamiaa

    2015-01-01

    Le lupus érythémateux systémique (LES) est une maladie auto-immune dotée d'un grand polymorphisme clinique et caractérisée par la production d'une grande variété d'autoanticorps. Sa définition repose sur les critères de l'ACR dont fait partie la lymphopénie. Afin de déterminer s'il existe une corrélation entre la présence de la lymphopénie d'une part et les manifestations cliniques, immunologiques et l'activité du lupus érythémateux systémique d'autre part, nous avons réalisé une étude rétrospective, comparative portant sur 148 cas de LES colligés dans un service de médecine interne entre 2006 et 2012. Ces patients ont été subdivisés en 2 groupes: Groupe 1 avec lymphopénie (taux de lymphocytes < 1500/mm3) et groupe 2 sans lymphopénie (taux de lymphocytes ≥ 1500/mm3). Les 2 groupes ont été comparés en fonction de la présentation clinique et immunologique et l'activité de la maladie mesurée par le SLEDAI (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index). L’âge moyen des patients (134 femmes et 14 hommes) était de 35,64 ans. L'atteinte hématologique était présente dans 81,1% des cas avec une lymphopénie dans 69,2% des cas. Une association statistiquement significative était notée entre la lymphopénie et l'atteinte rénale (p = 0,025), l'atteinte cardiaque (p = 0,004), l'anémie hémolytique (p = 0,020), la présence d'anticorps anti DNA (p = 0,046), le traitement par cyclophosphamide (p = 0.035) et l'activité de la maladie (p < 0,01). En revanche il n'y avait pas de corrélation entre la présence de lymphopénie et les atteintes cutanées, articulaires et neuropsychiatriques. La lymphopénie est une manifestation fréquente du lupus systémique. Notre étude a démontré que sa présence est associée à plusieurs manifestations cliniques graves dont les atteintes cardiaque et rénale. Ceci pourrait faire d'elle un outil utile dans l’évaluation du pronostic de la maladie. PMID:26401197

  12. Exogenic olivine on Vesta from Dawn Framing Camera color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schäfer, Michael; Thangjam, Guneshwar; Le Corre, Lucille; Reddy, Vishnu; Christensen, Ulrich; Mengel, Kurt; Sierks, Holger; Vincent, Jean-Baptist; Cloutis, Edward A.; Russell, Christopher T.; Schäfer, Tanja; Gutierrez-Marques, Pablo; Hall, Ian; Ripken, Joachim; Büttner, Irene

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present the results of a global survey of olivine-rich lithologies on (4) Vesta. We investigated Dawn Framing Camera (FC) High Altitude Mapping Orbit (HAMO) color cubes (∼60 m/pixel resolution) by using a method described in Thangjam et al. (Thangjam, G., Nathues, A., Mengel, K., Hoffmann, M., Schäfer, M., Reddy, V., Cloutis, E.A., Christensen, U., Sierks, H., Le Corre, L., Vincent, J.-B, Russell, C.T. [2014b]. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. arXiv:1408.4687 [astro-ph.EP]). In total we identified 15 impact craters exhibiting olivine-rich (>40 wt.% ol) outcrops on their inner walls, some showing olivine-rich material also in their ejecta and floors. Olivine-rich sites are concentrated in the Bellicia, Arruntia and Pomponia region on Vesta's northern hemisphere. From our multi-color and stratigraphic analysis, we conclude that most, if not all, of the olivine-rich material identified is of exogenic origin, i.e. remnants of A- or/and S-type projectiles. The olivine-rich lithologies in the north are possibly ejecta of the ∼90 km diameter Albana crater. We cannot draw a final conclusion on their relative stratigraphic succession, but it seems that the dark material (Nathues, A., Hoffmann, M., Cloutis, E.A., Schäfer, M., Reddy, V., Christensen, U., Sierks, H., Thangjam, G.S., Le Corre, L., Mengel, K., Vincent, J.-B., Russell, C.T., Prettyman, T., Schmedemann, N., Kneissl, T., Raymond, C., Gutierrez-Marques, P., Hall, I. Büttner, I. [2014b]. Icarus (239, 222-237)) and the olivine-rich lithologies are of a similar age. The origin of some potential olivine-rich sites in the Rheasilvia basin and at crater Portia are ambiguous, i.e. these are either of endogenic or exogenic origin. However, the small number and size of these sites led us to conclude that olivine-rich mantle material, containing more than 40 wt.% of olivine, is basically absent on the present surface of Vesta. In combination with recent impact models of Veneneia and Rheasilvia (Clenet, H., Jutzi

  13. Temperature-dependent structural studies of mullite-type Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}O{sub 9}

    SciTech Connect

    Murshed, M. Mangir; Nenert, Gwilherm; Burianek, Manfred; Robben, Lars; Muehlberg, Manfred; Schneider, Hartmut; Fischer, Reinhard X.; Gesing, Thorsten M.

    2013-01-15

    We report on the temperature-dependent structural studies on the mullite-type Bi{sub 2}Fe{sub 4}O{sub 9} compound. The crystal structures were determined using both powder X-ray diffraction and single crystal neutron diffraction. The thermal expansion of the cell parameters from smallest to largest occurred in the order acorr was determined by autocorrelation analysis between 740 cm{sup -1} and 900 cm{sup -1} for each temperature-dependent spectrum. The break of the slope of {Delta}corr at about 773 K was interpreted as the change of some vibrational modes of the FeO{sub 4} tetrahedra. The intrinsic effects observed around 773 K are responsible for

  14. Standardizing foot-type classification using arch index values.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher Kevin; Weil, Rich; de Boer, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Objectif : L'absence d'un système fiable pour le classement des types de pieds fait en sorte qu'il est très difficile de parvenir à des conclusions à partir des recherches existantes et de prendre des décisions cliniques, puisque des pieds formés différemment peuvent bouger différemment et réagir de manière différente aux traitements. L'objectif de cette étude était d'en arriver à un consensus entre évaluateurs pour le classement des types de pieds en fonction de valeurs d'indice établies à partir de photos de la cambrure du pied réalisées à l'aide d'une boîte à miroir. Méthode : Pour cette étude corrélationnelle à deux évaluateurs, un échantillon de 11 bénévoles en bonne santé avec indice de poids corporel variant de normal à obèse a été recruté au sein d'un groupe participant à un programme de perte de poids et parmi des personnes recevant des traitements en physiothérapie. L'indice de la cambrure de leur pied a été calculé à l'aide du logiciel AutoCAD et à partir d'empreintes obtenues à l'aide d'une boîte à miroir pour la prise de photos. Un classement des cambrures selon divers types – cambrure élevée, normale ou faible – a été effectué à partir des valeurs d'indices pour la cambrure du pied. La fiabilité de ces indices a été déterminée à l'aide de corrélations intraclasses; le consensus quant au classement des types de pieds a été obtenu à l'aide d'un indice quadratique kappa pondéré. Résultats : L'indice moyen des cambrures était de 0,215 pour un évaluateur et de 0,219 pour le deuxième évaluateur, avec une étendue globale de 0,017 à 0,370. Les deux évaluateurs ont classé 6 des pieds de l'étude comme étant peu cambrés; 9 des cambrures ont été jugées normales et 7 pieds présentaient des cambrures prononcées. La fiabilité entre les évaluateurs pour l'indice des cambrures des pieds était CCI=0,90; le consensus entre évaluateurs pour le classement des types de pieds

  15. Indoor and Outdoor Mobility following Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Storey, Ava S T; Myrah, Ainslie M; Bauck, Robyn A; Brinkman, Danielle M; Friess, Shawn N; Webber, Sandra C

    2013-01-01

    Objectifs : En premier lieu, établir la relation entre la capacité de mobilité à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur chez les aînés qui ont subi une arthroplastie unilatérale totale du genou (TKA); en second lieu, évaluer l'intensité de la marche chez les mêmes individus et comparer tous les résultats à l'aide d'un groupe de contrôle composé d'aînés n'ayant aucune pathologie du genou. Méthodologie : Dans le cadre d'une étude transversale, les participants (TKA=16, moyenne de 22,9 [écart-type 9,7] mois après TKA; groupe de contrôle=22) ont effectué des tests de marche à l'intérieur et ont marché sur un parcours extérieur de 580 m sur divers types de surfaces (p. ex. bordure de chaussée, gazon, trottoir), avec changements de direction fréquents. La capacité de marche a été évaluée à l'aide de montres chronomètres, de GPS et d'accéléromètres. Résultats : Le temps de marche à l'extérieur était modérément corrélé (p<0,05) avec un test TUG (timed up-and-go); (r=0,65), un test de l'escalier (stair-climb test, SCT) (r=0,67 en montée, r=0,79 en descente), un test de marche de 10 mètres (10 mWT); (r=0,73), et un test de marche de 6 minutes (6 MWT); (r=−0,75). En fonction du décompte des activités, les niveaux d'intensité pendant la marche pour les participants des deux groupes étaient modérés (marche à l'extérieur et 6 MWT). Il n'y a pas eu de différence significative dans la capacité de marche entre les deux groupes (pour le TUG, le SCT, le 10 mWT, le 6 MWT, et la marche à l'extérieur). Conclusions : Les tests de marche cliniques habituellement utilisés sont corrélés de façon modérée avec la mobilité à l'extérieur. La capacité de mobilité chez les personnes post-TKA était similaire aux participants du groupe de contrôle à l'intérieur comme à l'extérieur, et les participants des deux groupes sont parvenus à un niveau d'activité physique modérée grâce à la marche.

  16. Carbon dioxide-based supercritical fluids as IC manufacturing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.B.; Davenhall, L.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Pierce, T.; Tiefert, K.

    1999-05-11

    The production of integrated circuits (IC's) involves a number of discrete steps which utilize hazardous or regulated solvents and generate large waste streams. ES&H considerations associated with these chemicals have prompted a search for alternative, more environmentally benign solvent systems. An emerging technology for conventional solvent replacement is the use of supercritical fluids based on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Research work, conducted at Los Alamos in conjunction with the Hewlett-Packard Company, has lead to the development of a CO{sub 2}-based supercritical fluid treatment system for the stripping of hard-baked photoresists. This treatment system, known as Supercritical CO{sub 2} Resist Remover, or CORR, uses a two-component solvent composed of a nonhazardous, non-regulated compound, dissolved in supercritical CO{sub 2}. The solvent/treatment system has been successfully tested on metallized Si wafers coated with negative and positive photoresist, the latter both before and after ion-implantation. A description of the experimental data will be presented. Based on the initial laboratory results, the project has progressed to the design and construction of prototype, single-wafer photoresist-stripping equipment. The integrated system involves a closed-loop, recirculating cycle which continuously cleans and regenerates the CO{sub 2}, recycles the dissolved solvent, and separates and concentrates the spent resist. The status of the current design and implementation strategy of a treatment system to existing IC fabrication facilities will be discussed. Additional remarks will be made on the use of a SCORR-type system for the cleaning of wafers prior to processing.

  17. Facteurs associes au port de charge céphalique chez des enfants au Bénin: étude transversale

    PubMed Central

    Akplogan, Barnabé; Hounmenou, Alain Mahoutin; Aze, Oscar; Alegbeh, Sakibou Essofa; Azondekon, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Le port de charge céphalique par les enfants est une méthode de manutention courante au Bénin. Peu d’étude sont investigué sur le port de charge céphalique chez les enfants. Méthodes Cette étude transversale vise à faire l’état des lieux et à identifier les facteurs associés au port de charge céphalique chez des enfants au Bénin. Au total,300 enfants âgés de 13,7 ± 2,6 ans ont participé à l’étude dans les 12 départements du Bénin. La méthode non probabiliste et la technique accidentelle ont été utilisées pour déterminer la taille de l’échantillon. La masse portée par les enfants constitue la variable dépendante. L’âge, la taille, les sites corporels des douleurs, l'ancienneté dans le port de charge etla fréquence hebdomadaire du port céphalique de charge constituent les variables indépendantes. Résultats Le rapport de la masse portée sur le poids corporel est évalué en moyenne à 66%. Pendant et après le port de charge, les douleurs ressenties sont localisées essentiellement au cou, au dos et au bas du dos. Le test de corrélation entre charge portée et la taille indique r = 0,58 (p < 0,001). Conclusion Cette étude indique que les enfants surchargent leur rachis lors du port de charge céphalique. PMID:27279962

  18. The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline metal ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, E. M.; Rashad, M. M.; Khalil, H. F. Y.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Hussein, M. R.; El-Sabbah, M. M. B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline metal ferrite MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films have been synthesized via electrodeposition-anodization process. Electrodeposited (M)Fe2 alloys were obtained from aqueous sulfate bath. The formed alloys were electrochemically oxidized (anodized) in aqueous (1 M KOH) solution, at room temperature, to the corresponding hydroxides. The parameters controlling the current efficiency of the electrodeposition of (M)Fe2 alloys such as the bath composition and the current density were studied and optimized. The anodized (M)Fe2 alloy films were annealed in air at 400 °C for 2 h. The results revealed the formation of three ferrite thin films were formed. The crystallite sizes of the produced films were in the range between 45 and 60 nm. The microstructure of the formed film was ferrite type dependent. The corrosion behavior of ferrite thin films in different pH solutions was investigated using open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The open circuit potential indicates that the initial potential E im of ZnFe2O4 thin films remained constant for a short time, then sharply increased in the less negative direction in acidic and alkaline medium compared with Ni and Cu ferrite films. The values of the corrosion current density I corr were higher for the ZnFe2O4 films at pH values of 1 and 12 compared with that of NiFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 which were higher only at pH value 1. The corrosion rate was very low for the three ferrite films when immersion in the neutral medium. The surface morphology recommended that Ni and Cu ferrite films were safely used in neutral and alkaline medium, whereas Zn ferrite film was only used in neutral atmospheres.

  19. Estimates of monthly streamflow characteristics and dominant-discharge hydrographs for selected sites in the lower Missouri and Little Missouri River basins in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Johnson, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Various streamflow characteristics were estimated for water-reservation purposes for 17 sites in the lower Missouri River Basin and four sites in the Little Missouri River Basin in Montana. The characteristics were mean monthly and annual streamflow and monthly mean streamflow that is exceeded 90, 80, 50, and 20 percent of the time. In addition, dominant-discharge hydrographs were estimated for 10 of the 17 sites in the lower Missouri River Basin and for four sites in the Little Missouri River Basin. Dominant discharge was considered to be equal to the peak discharge having a recurrence interval of two years. Monthly streamflow characteristics generally were based on a common 1937-86 base period. A mixed-station record-extension program was used to estimate missing flow data for streamflow-gaging stations. Two methods were used to estimate characteristics at ungaged sites. One method was based on corre- lating discharge measurements at the estimating site with concurrent discharges at a nearby gaged site. The second method was based on using a drainage-area ratio to transfer characteristics at a gaged site to the estimating site. Dominant discharges for gaged sites were obtained from a previous flood-frequency report or by fitting a log-Pearson Type 3 probability distribution to recorded peak-flow data. A drainage-area-ratio adjustment was used to transfer dominant dis- charges from gaged sites to ungaged sites. Dominant-discharge hydrographs were determined from visual examination of recorded hydrographs having maximum daily discharges that were relatively close to the estimated dominant discharges.

  20. Networks of genetic loci and the scientific literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeiks, J. R.; Grate, L. R.; Mian, I. S.

    This work considers biological information graphs, networks in which nodes corre-spond to genetic loci (or "genes") and an (undirected) edge signifies that two genes are discussed in the same article(s) in the scientific literature ("documents"). Operations that utilize the topology of these graphs can assist researchers in the scientific discovery process. For example, a shortest path between two nodes defines an ordered series of genes and documents that can be used to explore the relationship(s) between genes of interest. This work (i) describes how topologies in which edges are likely to reflect genuine relationship(s) can be constructed from human-curated corpora of genes an-notated with documents (or vice versa), and (ii) illustrates the potential of biological information graphs in synthesizing knowledge in order to formulate new hypotheses and generate novel predictions for subsequent experimental study. In particular, the well-known LocusLink corpus is used to construct a biological information graph consisting of 10,297 nodes and 21,910 edges. The large-scale statistical properties of this gene-document network suggest that it is a new example of a power-law network. The segregation of genes on the basis of species and encoded protein molecular function indicate the presence of assortativity, the preference for nodes with similar attributes to be neighbors in a network. The practical utility of a gene-document network is illustrated by using measures such as shortest paths and centrality to analyze a subset of nodes corresponding to genes implicated in aging. Each release of a curated biomedical corpus defines a particular static graph. The topology of a gene-document network changes over time as curators add and/or remove nodes and/or edges. Such a dynamic, evolving corpus provides both the foundation for analyzing the growth and behavior of large complex networks and a substrate for examining trends in biological research.