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Sample records for aeolian dust component

  1. Aeolian dust as a transport hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddock, M. C.; Strong, C. L.; Murray, P. S.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2013-06-01

    The effects of blowing dust on transport operations are often mentioned as one of the significant impacts of aeolian processes on human welfare. However, few studies have been presented to demonstrate this impact. This research examined official air traffic incident reports in Australia for inclusively 1969-2010 to characterise the hazard of blowing dust to aviation in the country, the first such study of its kind. For the 42 year record, 61 incidents were identified (mean 1.4 per annum), with the large majority occurring in the first half of the 1970s. Only 20% of incidents occurred from 1984 onwards. Australian dust activity has not decreased over time, and the reduction in incidents is partly explained by improvements in aviation technology. The centralisation of Air Traffic Control operations to major coastal cities may however have reduced pilot reporting of dust-induced aviation incidents. By type of dust activity, dust storms were associated with nearly half of the reported incidents and dust hazes produced around a quarter. Only 5% of incidents resulted in any physical damage to aircraft and only one case involving personal injury was reported. The majority of the adverse effects on aviation due to dust (nearly 60% of reported incidents) were related to difficulties for navigation and completion of scheduled journey. Since aircraft damage and bodily harm were rare, the impact of dust in Australia is mostly that of inconvenience and associated raised economic costs. From 1990, the temporal pattern of incidents does not show any significant increase despite several intensely dusty years associated with recent droughts. This suggests that Australian aviation safety may be relatively resistant to the adverse effects of atmospheric dust as a hazard.

  2. Identifying sources of aeolian mineral dust: Present and past

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R; Prospero, Joseph M; Baddock, Matthew C; Gill, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian mineral dust is an important component of the Earth’s environmental systems, playing roles in the planetary radiation balance, as a source of fertilizer for biota in both terrestrial and marine realms and as an archive for understanding atmospheric circulation and paleoclimate in the geologic past. Crucial to understanding all of these roles of dust is the identification of dust sources. Here we review the methods used to identify dust sources active at present and in the past. Contemporary dust sources, produced by both glaciogenic and non-glaciogenic processes, can be readily identified by the use of Earth-orbiting satellites. These data show that present dust sources are concentrated in a global dust belt that encompasses large topographic basins in low-latitude arid and semiarid regions. Geomorphic studies indicate that specific point sources for dust in this zone include dry or ephemeral lakes, intermittent stream courses, dune fields, and some bedrock surfaces. Back-trajectory analyses are also used to identify dust sources, through modeling of wind fields and the movement of air parcels over periods of several days. Identification of dust sources from the past requires novel approaches that are part of the geologic toolbox of provenance studies. Identification of most dust sources of the past requires the use of physical, mineralogical, geochemical, and isotopic analyses of dust deposits. Physical properties include systematic spatial changes in dust deposit thickness and particle size away from a source. Mineralogy and geochemistry can pinpoint dust sources by clay mineral ratios and Sc-Th-La abundances, respectively. The most commonly used isotopic methods utilize isotopes of Nd, Sr, and Pb and have been applied extensively in dust archives of deep-sea cores, ice cores, and loess. All these methods have shown that dust sources have changed over time, with far more abundant dust supplies existing during glacial periods. Greater dust supplies in

  3. Aeolian dust in Colorado Plateau soils: Nutrient inputs and recent change in source

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Richard; Belnap, Jayne; Reheis, Marith; Lamothe, Paul; Luiszer, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Aeolian dust (windblown silt and clay) is an important component in arid-land ecosystems because it may contribute to soil formation and furnish essential nutrients. Few geologic surfaces, however, have been characterized with respect to dust-accumulation history and resultant nutrient enrichment. We have developed a combination of methods to identify the presence of aeolian dust in arid regions and to evaluate the roles of this dust in ecosystem processes. Unconsolidated sandy sediment on isolated surfaces in the Canyonlands region of the Colorado Plateau differs greatly in mineralogical and chemical composition from associated bedrock, mainly aeolian sandstone. Detrital magnetite in the surficial deposits produces moderately high values of magnetic susceptibility, but magnetite is absent in nearby bedrock. A component of the surficial deposits must be aeolian to account for the abundance of magnetite, which formed originally in far-distant igneous rocks. Particle-size analysis suggests that the aeolian dust component is typically as much as 20–30%. Dust inputs have enriched the sediments in many elements, including P, Mg, Na, K, and Mo, as well as Ca, at sites where bedrock lacks calcite cement. Soil-surface biologic crusts are effective dust traps that apparently record a change in dust sources over the past several decades. Some of the recently fallen dust may result from human disturbance of land surfaces that are far from the Canyonlands, such as the Mojave Desert. Some land-use practices in the study area have the potential to deplete soil fertility by means of wind-erosion removal of aeolian silt. PMID:11390965

  4. Aeolian dust in Colorado Plateau soils: Nutrient inputs and recent change in source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.; Belnap, Jayne; Lamothe, Paul; Luiszer, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Aeolian dust (windblown silt and clay) is an important component in arid-land ecosystems because it may contribute to soil formation and furnish essential nutrients. Few geologic surfaces, however, have been characterized with respect to dust-accumulation history and resultant nutrient enrichment. We have developed a combination of methods to identify the presence of aeolian dust in arid regions and to evaluate the roles of this dust in ecosystem processes. Unconsolidated sandy sediment on isolated surfaces in the Canyonlands region of the Colorado Plateau differs greatly in mineralogical and chemical composition from associated bedrock, mainly aeolian sandstone. Detrital magnetite in the surficial deposits produces moderately high values of magnetic susceptibility, but magnetite is absent in nearby bedrock. A component of the surficial deposits must be aeolian to account for the abundance of magnetite, which formed originally in far-distant igneous rocks. Particle-size analysis suggests that the aeolian dust component is typically as much as 20a??30%. Dust inputs have enriched the sediments in many elements, including P, Mg, Na, K, and Mo, as well as Ca, at sites where bedrock lacks calcite cement. Soil-surface biologic crusts are effective dust traps that apparently record a change in dust sources over the past several decades. Some of the recently fallen dust may result from human disturbance of land surfaces that are far from the Canyonlands, such as the Mojave Desert. Some land-use practices in the study area have the potential to deplete soil fertility by means of wind-erosion removal of aeolian silt.

  5. Optical Properties of Aeolian Dusts Common to West Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both recent models and historical events such as the Dust Bowl and volcanic eruptions have illustrated aerosols can play a significant role in climate change through direct and indirect optical effects. Soil dust aerosols generated by Aeolian processes represent a significant fraction of the total ...

  6. Mechanics of aeolian processes: Soil erosion and dust production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrabadi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aeolian (wind) processes occur as a result of atmosphere/land-surface system interactions. A thorough understanding of these processes and their physical/mechanical characterization on a global scale is essential to monitoring global change and, hence, is imperative to the fundamental goal of the Earth observing system (Eos) program. Soil erosion and dust production by wind are of consequence mainly in arid and semi arid regions which cover 36 percent of the Earth's land surface. Some recent models of dust production due to wind erosion of agricultural soils and the mechanics of wind erosion in deserts are reviewed and the difficulties of modeling the aeolian transport are discussed.

  7. Aeolian transport of biota with dust: A wind tunnel experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas, J. A., Jr.; Gill, T. E.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Walsh, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ephemeral wetlands are ideal sources for dust emission, as well as repositories for dormant stages of aquatic invertebrates. An important component of invertebrate dispersal and colonization to new areas is the ability to be entrained into the atmosphere. Aquatic invertebrate eggs fall within the size of dust and sand grains (30-600μm), are less dense and aerodynamically shaped. We have shown previously that aquatic invertebrates can be dispersed long distances in dust storms but the extent of transport of taxa based on diapausing egg size/morphology has not been investigated. Here, we control the wind erosion process in a wind tunnel to test entrainment of diapausing stages of brine shrimp, clam shrimp, tadpole shrimp, fairy shrimp, Daphnia, and the rotifers Brachionus plicatilis and B. calyciflorus into the air by saltation. Diapausing eggs were mixed with sterilized wind-erodible soil. The soil/egg mixture was moistened with distilled water and air dried to form a crust. Dust was generated in a wind tunnel by releasing sand grains that act as saltator material similar to wind-entrained natural sands. Maximum wind velocity was 10m/s and entrained particles were sampled through an isokinetic horizontal intake opening. Aeolian sediment was collected from three points in the system; transfer section for coarse sediment, the pan subtending a settling chamber for finer saltation-sized sediment, and two paper filters for suspension-sized sediment. Samples were then passed through 250 and 350 μm sieves to remove abrader sand and rehydrated with various sterile media depending on the type of organism. We retrieved viable brine, fairy, and tadpole shrimp, ostracods, Daphnia, and diapausing eggs of the rotifers after hydration. This experiment demonstrates that resting stages of many invertebrates can be wind-eroded due to size and egg morphology and remain viable under controlled conditions mimicking dust emission.

  8. Lidar measurements of Aeolian dust: Mars and Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, C. S.; Davy, R.; Komguem, L.; Junkermann, W.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Phoenix Lidar system was operated in 2008, beginning in Martian northern spring (L_s = 78) through mid summer (L_s = 147). During this period, nighttime observations of dust indicate both persistent background dust up to heights of approximately 15 km, and enhanced dust loading in the Boundary Layer up to heights of approximately 4 km. The magnitude of the optical extinction was observed to decrease within the Boundary Layer with time following summer solstice. This situation is similar to that observed in the Australian desert: a persistent dust layer up to heights of 6 km, with a daytime Convective Boundary Layer increasing up to heights of 4 km during local dust storm activity, and then decreasing during night. A comparative study was undertaken, with the results being augmented by both in situ measurements of the Australian desert dust, as made by over-flying aircraft, and modeled results of Aeolian dust in both environments.

  9. Optical properties of Aeolian dusts common to West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lulu; Zobeck, Ted M.; Hsieh, Daniel H.; Holder, Dean; Morgan, Cristine L. S.; Thompson, Jonathan E.

    2011-11-01

    Both recent models and historical events such as the Dust Bowl and volcanic eruptions have illustrated aerosols can play a significant role in climate change through direct and indirect optical effects. Soil dust aerosols generated by Aeolian processes represent a significant fraction of the total mass burden of atmospheric particles. Central to a better understanding of the climate effects of dust aerosols is knowledge of their optical properties. This research study utilized a dust generator and several instruments to determine certain optical properties of Aeolian dust mimics created by the Amarillo and Pullman soil types native to the panhandle of Texas, USA. Values for the mass-extinction coefficient ranged between 1.74 and 2.97 m 2 g -1 at 522 nm depending on how mass concentration was determined. Single-scatter albedo (SSA) for both soil types ranged from 0.947 to 0.980 at visible wavelengths with SSA increasing at longer wavelengths. Angstrom absorption exponents were measured as 1.73 for Pullman and 2.17 for Amarillo soil. Observed Angstrom extinction exponents were 0.110 and 0.168 for the Pullman and Amarillo soil types. The optical properties reported may be of use for optical based estimates of soil erosion and aid in understanding how regional soil dusts may alter radiative transport presently and during historical events such as the Dust Bowl era.

  10. The nature and formation of aeolian mineral dust material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Ian; O'hara-Dhand, Ken; McLaren, Sue

    2013-04-01

    Aeolian dust affects climate and records past climates. It has become a much studied material but there has been a certain lack of emphasis on the actual nature of the dust, and an even greater neglect of actual production mechanisms for dust particles. Huge amounts of dust may be raised from the Bodele depression and other parts of North Africa, and much of it may be carried across the North Atlantic to aid in soil formation in Brazil. But what does it consist of? We know that much of the Bodele dust is diatoms from old Lake Chad, but what of the lithological inorganic mineral content? A very crude division of aeolian dust into large dust(say around 20-50um) and small dust (2-5um)has been proposed. Much of the study of loess has been confused by the failure to make this distinction, and similar problems may arise in the study of the finer fractions of aeolian dust. Much aeolian material is clay-mineral based- formed from clay mineral aggregates(CMA), from lake bottom sediments. This can form large dust particles, as in parna in Australia, but also contributes largely to small long travel aerosolic dust. Another major contributor is the quartz fragment. The large dust for classic loess deposits is mostly quartz silt- and there is considerable discussion about the controls that affect quartz silt. There are some interesting modalities in the world of quartz particle sedimentology which need to be examined. Quartz sand (say 200-500um) is the key initiating material and the formation processes for quartz sand have a down-the-line effect on the formation of smaller particles. The central observation is the action of two processes- a eutectic-like reaction in the proto-rock granite which defines the essential nature of sand particles, and the high-low displacive crystallographic transformation which introduces tensile stresses into the quartz particle systems. The limited range of eutectic particle size means a limited range of tensile stresses. A neat combination of

  11. A Japan-Sino joint project, ADEC - Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, M.

    2004-05-01

    In recent years, aeolian dust has been thought to be an important factor of the climate system on the earth by the radiative forcing effect in the atmosphere and by the influence on the carbon dioxide cycle because deposited dust supplies nutrient salts for the phytoplankton on the ocean surface. Among them, radiative forcing direct and/or indirect effects are important factors of the global warming. Nevertheless, the reliability of the evaluation regarding the radiative forcing impact of aeolian dust is very low. [IPCC, 2001]. This is because the understanding and the model representations of dust entrainment, spatial and temporal distribution of dust, and optical properties of dust particles are not so accurate. Based on this background, Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact (ADEC) was started in April 2000 as a Japan-Sino Joint Project. The goal of this project is to evaluate the global dust supply to the atmosphere and its radiative forcing direct effect. For this purpose, we have made: 1) in situ observations at desert areas in China for wind erosion processes, 2) network observations from China to Japan, ranging from 80 to 140 East, for understanding spatial-size distribution, chemical, and optical properties of dust particles, and 3) numerical simulation by GCM dust model for evaluation of dust impact on the global climate over the past 50 years. This was planned as a five-year project and two intensive observations, IOP-1, April 12-25 2002, and IOP-2, March 15-26 2003, were put into practice. Intensive observations were made at 6 sites in China (Qira, Aksu, Dunhuang, Shapotou, Beijing, and Qingdao) and 4 sites in Japan (Naha, Fukuoka, Nagoya, and Tsukuba). Preliminary results show that 1) saltation flux at a gobi desert monitored by a newly developed sand particle counter was around 10 times larger than that of a sand dune, which will be caused by the difference of the parent soil size distribution of each ground condition, 2) the background of KOSA

  12. Aeolian removal of dust from photovoltaic surfaces on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Marabito, Mark

    1990-01-01

    It is well documented that Mars is totally engulfed in huge dust storms nearly each Martian year. Dust elevated in these global dust storms, or in any of the numerous local dust storms could settle on photovoltaic surfaces and seriously hamper photovoltaic power system performance. Using a recently developed technique to uniformly dust simulated photovoltaic surfaces, samples were subjected to Martian-like winds in an attempt to determine whether natural aeolian processes on Mars would sweep off the settled dust. The effects of wind velocity, angle of attack, height off the Martian surface, and surface coating material were investigated. Principles which can help to guide the design of photovoltaic arrays bound for the Martian surface were uncovered. Most importantly, arrays mounted with an angle of attack approaching 45 deg show the most efficient clearing. Although the angular dependence is not sharp, horizontally mounted arrays required significantly higher wind velocities to clear off the dust. From the perspective of dust-clearing it appears that the arrays may be erected quite near the ground, but previous studies have suggested that saltation effects can be expected to cause such arrays to be covered by sand if they are set up less than about a meter from the ground. Providing that the surface chemistry of Martian dusts is comparable to our test dust, the materials used for protective coating may be optimized for other considerations such as transparency, and chemical or abrasion resistance. The static threshold velocity is low enough that there are regions on Mars which experience winds strong enough to clear off a photovoltaic array if it is properly oriented. Turbulence fences proved to be an ineffective strategy to keep dust cleared from the photovoltaic surfaces.

  13. Geochemical provenance of soils in Kerman urban areas, Iran: Implications for the influx of aeolian dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbandi, Reza; Aftabi, Alijan

    2016-06-01

    The investigation of the interaction of aeolian dust with residual soils has not been fully explored in the Kerman urban areas, Iran. To assess the geochemical influence of aeolian dust on the residual soils of the Kerman urban areas of Iran, 27 samples were studied petrogeochemically. The arid-semi-arid climate of the area together with the southwest-northeast prevailing wind, have deposited aeolian sands over the residual soils. Residual soils reflect similar mineral compositions to that of the underlying bedrock and include mostly calcite and quartz. However, the minor occurrences of pyroxene, amphibole, olivine, plagioclase and volcanic clasts in urban soils and aeolian dust are attributed to volcanogenic inputs transported by aeolian dust. Urban soils and aeolian dust show different geochemical signatures from the local carbonate rocks. All samples contain trace element concentrations that are higher than the carbonate bedrock. Discrimination diagrams indicate that immobile trace elements have geochemical affinity to the detrital ferromagnesian dust inputs and are different from the local carbonate bedrock. Based on the elemental bivariate and ternary diagrams, the soils and aeolian dust are derived from the interaction of carbonate and volcanic rocks. This highlights that the urban soils in the Kerman urban areas have been formed by interactions of the aeolian dust with the primitive residual soils.

  14. Aeolian Removal of Dust Types from Photovoltaic Surfaces on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.

    1990-01-01

    Dust elevated in local or global dust storms on the Martian surface could settle on photovoltaic (PV) surfaces and seriously hamper their performance. Using a recently developed technique to apply a uniform dust layer, PV surface materials were subjected to simulated Martian winds in an attempt to determine whether natural aeolian processes on Mars would sweep off the settled dust. Three different types of dust were used. The effects of wind velocity, angle of attack, height above the Martian surface, and surface coating material were investigated. It was found that arrays mounted on an angle of attack approaching 45 deg show the most efficient clearing. Although the angular dependence is not sharp, horizontally mounted arrays required much higher wind velocities to clear off the dust. From this test it appears that the arrays may be erected quite near the ground, but previous studies have suggested that saltation effects can be expected to cause such arrays to be covered by soil if they are set up less than about a meter from the ground. Particle size effect appear to dominate over surface chemistry in these experiments, but additional tests are required to confirm this.

  15. Aeolian Removal of Dust Types from Photovoltaic Surfaces on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Marabito, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Dust elevated in local or global dust storms on the Martian surface could settle on photovoltaic (PV) surfaces and seriously hamper their performance. Using a recently developed technique to apply a uniform dust layer, PV surface materials were subjected to simulated Martian winds in an attempt to determine whether natural Aeolian processes on Mars would sweep off the settled dust. Three different types of dust were used; an optical polishing powder, basaltic "trap rock", and iron (III) oxide crystals. The effects of wind velocity, angle of attack, height above the Martian surface, and surface coating material were investigated. It was found that arrays mounted with an angle of attack approaching 45 degrees show the most efficient clearing. Although the angular dependence is not sharp, horizontally mounted arrays required significantly higher wind velocities to clear off the dust. From this test it appears that the arrays may be erected quite near the ground, but previous studies have suggested that saltation effects can be expected to cause such arrays to be covered by soil if they are set up less than about a meter from the ground. Particle size effects appear to dominate over surface chemistry in these experiments, but additional tests are required to confirm this. Providing that the surface chemistry of Martian dusts is not drastically different from simulated dust and that gravity differences have only minor effects, the materials used for protective coatings for photovoltaic arrays may be optimized for other considerations such as transparency, and chemical or abrasion resistance. The static threshold velocity is low enough that there are regions on Mars which experience winds strong enough to clear off a photovoltaic array if it is properly oriented. Turbulence fences proved to be an ineffective strategy to keep dust cleared from the photovoltaic surfaces.

  16. Dust on Mars: An Aeolian Threat to Human Exploration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA HEDS Program is duly concerned for human explorers regarding the potential hazard posed by the ubiquitous dust mantle on Mars. To evaluate properties of dust that could be hazardous to humans, the NMS 2001 Lander payload will include the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment. This includes optical and atomic-force microscopy to evaluate soil grains for shape and size, wet chemistry to evaluate toxic substances, electrometry to evaluate triboelectric charging, and test-material palets to evaluate electrostatic and magnetic adhesion, and the hardness/abrasiveness of soil grains; these experimental subcomponents are delivered samples by the camera-equipped robotic arm of the lander which will acquire material from depths of 0.5 to 1.0 m in the soil. Data returned by MECA will be of value to both the hEDS and planetary/astrobiology communities. Dust poses a threat to human exploration because the martian system does not hydrologically or chemically remove fine particles that are being continuously generated by thermal, aeolian, and colluvial weathering, and by volcanism and impact over billions of years. The dust is extremely fine-grained, in copious quantities, ubiquitous in distribution, continually mobile, and a source of poorly-grounded static charges -- a suite of characteristics posing a particulate and electrical threat to explorers and their equipment. Dust is mobilized on global and regional scales, but probably also unpredictably and violently at local scales by dust devils. The latter might be expected in great abundance owing to near surface atmospheric instability (dust devils were detected by Pathfinder during its brief lifetime). Preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that space-suit materials subjected to windblown dust may acquire a uniform, highly adhesive dust layer that is also highly cohesive laterally owing to electrostatic forces. This layer will obscure visibility through the helmet visor, penetrate joints

  17. Dust on Mars: An Aeolian Threat to Human Exploration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA HEDS Program is duly concerned for human explorers regarding the potential hazard posed by the ubiquitous dust mantle on Mars. To evaluate properties of dust that could be hazardous to humans, the MPS 2001 Lander payload will include the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment. This includes optical and atomic-force microscopy to evaluate soil grains for shape and size, wet chemistry to evaluate toxic substances, electrometry to evaluate triboelectric charging, and test-material palets to evaluate electrostatic and magnetic adhesion, and the hardness/abrasiveness of soil grains; these experimental subcomponents are delivered samples by the camera-equipped robotic arm of the lander which will acquire material from depths of 0.5 to 1.0 m in the soil. Data returned by MECA will be of value to both the BEDS and planetary/astrobiology communities. Dust poses a threat to human exploration because the martian system does not hydrologically or chemically remove fine particles that are being continuously generated by thermal, aeolian, and colluvial weathering, and by volcanism and impact over billions of years. The dust is extremely fine-grained, in copious quantities, ubiquitous in distribution, continually mobile, and a source of poorly-grounded static charges -- a suite of characteristics posing a particulate and electrical threat to explorers and their equipment. Dust is mobilized on global and regional scales, but probably also unpredictably and violently at local scales by dust devils. The latter might be expected in great abundance owing to near surface atmospheric instability (dust devils were detected by Pathfinder during its brief lifetime). Preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that space-suit materials subjected to windblown dust may acquire a uniform, highly adhesive dust layer that is also highly cohesive laterally owing to electrostatic forces. This layer will obscure visibility through the helmet visor, penetrate joints

  18. Aeolian dust experiment on climate impact: An overview of Japan China joint project ADEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikami, M.; Shi, G. Y.; Uno, I.; Yabuki, S.; Iwasaka, Y.; Yasui, M.; Aoki, T.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Kurosaki, Y.; Masuda, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Matsuki, A.; Sakai, T.; Takemi, T.; Nakawo, M.; Seino, N.; Ishizuka, M.; Satake, S.; Fujita, K.; Hara, Y.; Kai, K.; Kanayama, S.; Hayashi, M.; Du, M.; Kanai, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Zhang, X. Y.; Shen, Z.; Zhou, H.; Abe, O.; Nagai, T.; Tsutsumi, Y.; Chiba, M.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-07-01

    The Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact (ADEC) was initiated in April 2000 as a joint five-year Japan-China project. The goal was to understand the impact of aeolian dust on climate via radiative forcing (RF). Field experiments and numerical simulations were conducted from the source regions in northwestern China to the downwind region in Japan in order to understand wind erosion processes temporal and spatial distribution of dust during their long-range transportation chemical, physical, and optical properties of dust and the direct effect of radiative forcing due to dust. For this, three intensive observation periods (IOP) were conducted from April 2002 to April 2004. The in situ and network observation results are summarized as follows: (1) In situ observations of the wind erosion process revealed that the vertical profile of moving sand has a clear size dependency with height and saltation flux and that threshold wind velocity is dependent on soil moisture. Results also demonstrated that saltation flux is strongly dependent on the parent soil size distribution of the desert surface. (2) Both lidar observations and model simulations revealed a multiple dust layer in East Asia. A numerical simulation of a chemical transport model, CFORS, illustrated the elevated dust layer from the Taklimakan Desert and the lower dust layer from the Gobi Desert. The global-scale dust model, MASINGAR, also simulated the dust layer in the middle to upper free troposphere in East Asia, which originated from North Africa and the Middle East during a dust storm in March 2003. Raman lidar observations at Tsukuba, Japan, found the ice cloud associated with the dust layer at an altitude of 6 to 9 km. Analysis from lidar and the radio-sonde observation suggested that the Asian dust acted as ice nuclei at the ice-saturated region. These results suggest the importance of dust's climate impact via the indirect effect of radiative forcing due to the activation of dust into ice nuclei

  19. Changes in soil aggregation and dust emission potential in response to aeolian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    swet, Nitzan; Katra, Itzhak

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian (wind) dust emission has high environmental and socioeconomic significances due to loss of natural soil and air pollution. Dust emission involves complex interactions between the airflow and the soil surface. The soil aggregates were dust particles are held determine the topsoil erodibility in aeolian erosion. Although the key role of soil aggregation in dust emission mechanisms, information on changes in soil aggregate size distribution (ASD) due to aeolian erosion is lucking. This study is focused on quantitative ASD analyses before and after aeolian processes (saltation). Aeolian experiments and soil analyses were conducted on semiarid loess topsoils with different initial conditions of aggregation. The results show that saltation rates and PM emissions depend on the initial ASD and shear velocity. In all initial soil conditions, the content of aggregates at saltator-sized 63-250 μm was increased by 10-34 % following erosion of macro-aggregates > 500 μm. It revealed that the aggregate-saltator production increases with the shear velocity (up to 0.61 m s-1) for soils with available macro-aggregates. The findings highlight the dynamics in soil aggregation in response to aeolian transport and therefore its significance for determining the mechanisms of dust emission from soil aggregates.

  20. Granulometric profiling of aeolian dust deposits by automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Jakab, Gergely; Kiss, Klaudia; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Determination of granulometric parameters is of growing interest in the Earth sciences. Particle size data of sedimentary deposits provide insights into the physicochemical environment of transport, accumulation and post-depositional alterations of sedimentary particles, and are important proxies applied in paleoclimatic reconstructions. It is especially true for aeolian dust deposits with a fairly narrow grain size range as a consequence of the extremely selective nature of wind sediment transport. Therefore, various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed only from precise grain size data. As terrestrial wind-blown deposits are among the most important archives of past environmental changes, proper explanation of the proxy data is a mandatory issue. Automated imaging provides a unique technique to gather direct information on granulometric characteristics of sedimentary particles. Granulometric data obtained from automatic image analysis of Malvern Morphologi G3-ID is a rarely applied new technique for particle size and shape analyses in sedimentary geology. Size and shape data of several hundred thousand (or even million) individual particles were automatically recorded in this study from 15 loess and paleosoil samples from the captured high-resolution images. Several size (e.g. circle-equivalent diameter, major axis, length, width, area) and shape parameters (e.g. elongation, circularity, convexity) were calculated by the instrument software. At the same time, the mean light intensity after transmission through each particle is automatically collected by the system as a proxy of optical properties of the material. Intensity values are dependent on chemical composition and/or thickness of the particles. The results of the automated imaging were compared to particle size data determined by three different laser diffraction instruments

  1. Aeolian dust emissions in Southern Africa: field measurements of dynamics and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David; Washington, Richard; King, James; Eckardt, Frank; Bryant, Robert; Nield, Joanna; Dansie, Andrew; Baddock, Matthew; Haustein, Karsten; Engelstaedter, Sebastian; von Holdt, Johannah; Hipondoka, Martin; Seely, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Airborne dust derived from the world's deserts is a critical component of Earth System behaviour, affecting atmospheric, oceanic, biological, and terrestrial processes as well as human health and activities. However, very few data have been collected on the factors that control dust emission from major source areas, or on the characteristics of the dust that is emitted. Such a paucity of data limits the ability of climate models to properly account for the radiative and dynamical impacts triggered by atmospheric dust. This paper presents field data from the DO4 Models (Dust Observations for Models) project that aims to understand the drivers of variability in dust emission processes from major source areas in southern Africa. Data are presented from three field campaigns undertaken between 2011 and 2015. We analysed remote sensing data to identify the key geomorphological units in southern Africa which are responsible for emission of atmospheric dust. These are the Makgadikgadi pans complex in northern Botswana, the ephemeral river valleys of western Namibia, and Etosha Pan in northern Namibia. Etosha Pan is widely recognised as perhaps the most significant source of atmospheric dust in the southern hemisphere. We deployed an array of field equipment within each source region to measure the variability in and dynamics of aeolian erosivity, as well as dust concentration and flux characteristics. This equipment included up to 11 meteorological stations measuring wind shear stress and other standard climatic parameters, Cimel sun photometers, a LiDAR, sediment transport detectors, high-frequency dust concentration monitors, and dust flux samplers. Further data were gathered at each site on the dynamics of surface characteristics and erodibility parameters that impact upon erosion thresholds. These data were augmented by use of a Pi-Swerl portable wind tunnel. Our data represent the first collected at source for these key dust emission areas and highlight the

  2. Compositional trends in aeolian dust along a transect across the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, H.L.; Reynolds, R.L.; Reheis, M.C.; Yount, J.C.; Neff, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian dust strongly influences ecology and landscape geochemistry over large areas that span several desert ecosystems of the southwestern United States. This study evaluates spatial and temporal variations and trends of the physical and chemical properties of dust in the southwestern United States by examining dust deposited in natural depressions on high isolated surfaces along a transect from the Mojave Desert to the central Colorado Plateau. Aeolian dust is recognized in these depressions on the basis of textural, chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical characteristics and comparisons of those characteristics to the underlying bedrock units. Spatial and temporal trends suggest that although local dust sources are important to the accumulated material in these depressions, Mojave Desert dust sources may also contribute. Depth trends in the depressions suggest that Mojave sources may have contributed more dust to the Colorado Plateau recently than in the past. These interpretations point to the important roles of far-traveled aeolian dust for landscape geochemistry and imply future changes to soil geochemistry under changing conditions in far-distant dust source areas. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Sensitivity simulations with direct shortwave radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-07-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate and dust deposition records suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key elements controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these elements are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters can be reasonably constrained, the simulated dust DRF spans a~wide uncertainty range related to the strong nonlinearity of the Earth system. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several watts per square metre in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In the case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In the case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods, which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters, dust DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  4. Sensitivity simulations with direct radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-01-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate variables and dust deposits suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key factors controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these factors are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters are reasonably constrained by use of these studies, the simulated dust DRF spans a wide uncertainty range related to nonlinear dependencies. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several W m-2 in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters the DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  5. Aeolian dust deposition rates in Northern French forests and inputs to their biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lequy, Émeline; Legout, Arnaud; Conil, Sébastien; Turpault, Marie-Pierre

    2013-12-01

    This study describes the Aeolian dust deposition (ADD) in 4 sites of Northern France. Between December 2009 and March 2012, we sampled (i) Aeolian dust every four weeks, and (ii) 6 episodes of forecasted high atmospheric dust load mainly from the Saharan desert, the largest source of Aeolian dust in the world. These samples were treated with oxygen peroxide to remove organic matter so as to only compare the mineral fraction of the samples in the 4 sampling sites and to analyze their mineralogy. The solid samples contained the hardly soluble part of Aeolian dust (H-ADD). Its deposition was of 1.9 ± 0.3 g m-2 year-1 with a seasonal pattern of high deposition from spring to early autumn and a low deposition in winter. H-ADD deposition during the forecasted episodes of high atmospheric load did not systematically exceed the deposition rate during the rest of the sampling period. This indicates that such episodes little contributed to the annual H-ADD rate. The mineralogy revealed a heterogeneous set of minerals dominated by silicates with a common basis of major types (quartz, feldspars, mica, chlorite, kaolinite and interlayered clay minerals in every sample) with randomly trace minerals (Fe-oxides, sulfates, amphibole, talc, gibbsite and carbonates). The chemistry of H-ADD led to a dominant input of Si (up to 4.4 kg ha-1 year-1), while the nutrients inputs of Ca, K, Mg and P from ADD and the atmospheric organics (APD) in openfield were together of 1.5 ± 0.5 kg ha-1 year-1 with a high contribution of soluble minerals and organic matter of ca. 40% for Mg and K, and of ca. 80% for Ca and P. Nutrient inputs from APD are especially an interesting source of P for forests developed on acidic soils.

  6. Lower tropospheric aerosol loadings over South Africa: The relative contribution of aeolian dust, industrial emissions, and biomass burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piketh, S. J.; Annegarn, H. J.; Tyson, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    The southern African haze layer is a ubiquitous subcontinental-scale feature of the lower atmosphere that extends to a depth of ˜5 km(˜500 hPa level) on non rain days, particularly in winter. Aerosols derived from biomass burning are commonly thought to contribute substantially to the total background aerosol loading within the layer. It is shown that in both summer and winter this supposition is without foundation over South Africa. Summer and winter aerosol loadings are derived from gravimetric analysis of stacked filter units and from proton-induced X ray emission (PIXE) analysis of one to four hourly resolved streaker samples. From concentrations of eleven inorganic elements, apportionment into four primary sources, biomass burning particulates, aeolian dust, industrial sulphur aerosols, and marine aerosols, has been effected. It is shown that the background biomass burning component of the total aerosol loading over South Africa in general, and within the plume of material being recirculated over South Africa and from there exported from the subcontinent south of 22°S to the Indian Ocean in particular, is minimal in both summer and winter. Except over coastal and adjacent inland areas, marine aerosols likewise make up a small fraction of the total loading. This is particularly so over the inland plateau areas. Crustally-derived aeolian dust and industrially-produced sulphur aerosols are demonstrated to be the major summer and winter constituents of the haze layer over South Africa and the particulate material being transported to the Indian Ocean region. Sulphur is transported within the aerosol plume exiting southern Africa to the Indian Ocean as agglomerates on aeolian dust nuclei.

  7. Aeolian removal of dust from radiator surfaces on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hotes, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Simulated radiator surfaces made of arc-textured Cu and Nb-1 percent-Zr and ion beam textured graphite and C-C composite were fabricated and their integrated spectral emittance characterized from 300 to 3000 K. A thin layer of aluminum oxide, basalt, or iron (III) oxide dust was then deposited on them, and they were subjected to low pressure winds in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel. It was found that dust deposited on simulated radiator surfaces may or may not seriously lower their integrated spectral emittance, depending upon the characteristics of the dust. With Al2O3 there is no appreciable degradation of emittance on a dusted sample, with basaltic dust there is a 10 to 20 percent degradation, and with Fe2O3 a 20 to 40 percent degradation. It was also found that very high winds on dusted highly textured surfaces can result in their abrasion. Degradation in emittance due to abrasion was found to vary with radiator material. Arc-textured Cu and Nb-1 percent Zr was found to be more susceptible to emittance degradation than graphite or C-C composite. The most abrasion occurred at low angles, peaking at the 22.5 deg test samples.

  8. Aeolian removal of dust from radiator surfaces on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Gaier, J.R.; Perez-Davis, M.E.; Rutledge, S.K.; Hotes, D.

    1994-09-01

    Simulated radiator surfaces made of arc-textured copper and niobium-one percent-zirconium, and ion beam textured graphite and carbon-carbon composite were fabricated and their integrated spectral emittance characterized from 300 to 3000 K. A thin layer of aluminum oxide, basalt, or iron (III) oxide dust was then deposited on them, and they were subjected to low pressure winds in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel. It has been found that dust deposited on simulated radiator surfaces may or may not seriously lower their integrated spectral emittance, depending upon the characteristics of the dust. With Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} there is no appreciable degradation of emittance on a dusted sample, with basaltic dust there is a 10-20 percent degradation, and with Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} a 20-40 percent degradation. It was also found that very high winds on dusted highly textured surfaces can result in their abrasion. Degradation in emittance due to abrasion was found to vary with radiator material. Arc-textured copper and Nb-1%Zr was found to be more susceptible to emittance degradation than graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The most abrasion occurred at low angles, peaking at the 22.5{degrees} test samples.

  9. A study of the management strategies for river aeolian dust inhibition at the estuary of Zhuo-shui River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, S. F.; Lin, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    With the characteristics of humidity in summer and drought in winter, there existing lots of bare lands due to the decline of water level cause large amounts of aeolian dust and environmental deterioration during the monsoon seasons in central Taiwan. How to adopt effective measures to inhibit the damage of dust is an essential issue. This study selected the serious dust-affected section of Zhuo-shui river (bridge Zi-qiang to Xi-bin) to delineate the areas of potential aeolian dust occurrence, explore the relationship between elevation and water level determined from return period analysis, submit the countermeasures for dust inhibition at the bare lands and/or cultivated areas, and address the responsibilities of related authority offices for dust prevention by means of literature review. The return period of inundation for the areas of potential aeolian dust occurrence is 1.1 years. Engineering of dust prevention with highly unit price are not recommended due to could be destroyed annually. The deposition sites of a river are usually located at the convex bank, which with silt texture and high salinity are not suitable for cultivation, are delineated as the areas of potential aeolian dust occurrence. Besides technology consideration in dust prevention, this study also examined the related articles of river management to integrate a comprehensive vision for better riverside environment and air quality.

  10. The accretion of aeolian dust in soils of the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Neff, Jason C.; Farmer, G. Lang

    2011-06-01

    Recent observations suggest a contemporary aeolian dust flux of at least 5-10 g m-2 yr-1 to high-elevation ecosystems of the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. To better quantify the influence of dust on San Juan soil geochemistry, we used Sr and Nd isotopic mixing models to estimate the total mass of accreted dust in soils of two alpine basins underlain by bedrocks of different geochemical composition. In order to minimize the potentially confounding effects caused by transient soil pools of Sr and Nd, we implemented a sequential leaching procedure that isolates the residual mineral fraction of soils and their putative parent materials, including local saprolite and exogenous dust inputs. Using this approach, we calculated masses of accreted dust in soils, which were similar across the two isotopic tracers and differing local geologies. Long-term rates of dust accretion were estimated to be slightly higher than contemporary rates of dust deposition. We conclude that dust inputs comprise from 10% to 40% of the total soil mass in these ecosystems. Our observations suggest that dust inputs have exerted a primary control on soil development in the San Juan Mountains and have likely influenced the physical and chemical characteristics of soils in this region.

  11. Asian Winter Monsoons in the Eocene: Evidence from the Aeolian Dust Series of the Xining Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licht, A.; Adriens, R.; Pullen, A. T.; Kapp, P. A.; Abels, H.; van Cappelle, M.; Vandenberghe, J.; Dupont Nivet, G.

    2014-12-01

    The aeolian dust deposits of the Chinese Loess Plateau are attributed to spring and winter monsoonal storms sweeping clastic material from the deserts of the Asian interior into central China and are reported to begin 25-22 million years (Myr) ago. The beginning of aeolian dust sedimentation has been attributed to the onset of central Asia desertification and winter monsoonal circulation, and are commonly linked to development of high topographic relief associated with the Tibetan-Himalayan orogenic system. However, recent papers suggest that the core of the Tibetan Plateau may have reached significant elevation since the earliest phases of the India-Asia collision 55 Myr ago. Here, we extend the sedimentary record of the Chinese Loess Plateau at its western margin to include the late Eocene - late Oligocene deposits of the Xining Basin, which were deposited between 41 and 25 Myr ago based on detailed magnetostratigraphy. The particle size, shape, and surface microtexture of quartz grains in these deposits display textures indicative of prolonged aeolian transport; grain-size distributions show a bimodal distribution similar to Miocene through Quaternary deposits of the Chinese Loess Plateau. The clay mineralogy of the finer fraction and U/Pb zircon ages of the coarser fraction from Xining Loess sediments sampled along three sections spanning the whole studied interval are also similar to those observed in Quaternary and Neogene aeolian deposits of the Chinese Loess Plateau and thus suggest similar sources located in central China. However, slight differences in Eocene U/Pb zircon ages, such as the lack of Cenozoic ages or the scarcity of zircons older than 2000 Myr, suggest that the Tibetan Plateau may have contributed little to the aeolian dust deposition, in favor of sources located further north and west (Kunlun and Tian Shan Ranges). The Xining deposits are thus the first direct evidence that winter monsoonal winds were active 15 Myr earlier than previously

  12. Aeolian dust deposition during the Eocene-Oligocene in central to eastern Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, Jef; Abels, Hemmo; van Cappelle, Marijn

    2015-04-01

    Aeolian dust deposition during the Eocene-Oligocene in central to eastern Asia Jef Vandenberghe1, Hemmo Abels2 and Marijn van Cappelle3 1Dept. of Earth Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands 2Dept. of Earth Sciences, Universiteit Utrecht, 3584 CD, Utrecht, The Netherlands 3Dept. of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, U.K. The deposition of loess is generally attributed to a monsoonal climate system. Recently it has been shown that such a system existed already at the end of the Eocene on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau (Licht et al., 2014). One of the main arguments to prove the supply of loess by monsoonal winds is the use of grain size properties. The lower part of the Shuiwan section (Eocene) consists of metre-scale alternations of mudstone and gypsum beds; the upper part (Oligocene) is mainly mudstone (Dupont-Nivet et al., 2007; Abels et al., 2010). Sediments are categorized in six grain-size types based on the grain-size distribution and the mode of the silt grain sizes as measured using laser diffraction. Sediments of type 1, the only type with a unimodal grain-size distribution, consist exclusively of clay-sized particles (modal value of 2-2.5 µm). Types 2-6 have a multimodal composition. They contain an additional silt-sized fraction with a modal size of c. 16 µm in type 2; c. 26 µm in type 3 and c. 31 µm in type 4. Type 5 is a mixture of previous types, and type 6 contains in addition a slight amount of sand. Similar bimodal grain-size distributions occur in the Neogene Red Clay and in the Pleistocene loess of the Chinese Loess Plateau. All three silt fractions (with modal sizes 16, 26 and 31 µm) represent typical loess sediments, transported by dust storms in suspension at different altitudes. Their exact grain size depends on wind velocity, source material and transport distance. The 'clay component' may have settled from high suspension clouds in the air down to dry ground or to

  13. A 37,000-year environmental magnetic record of aeolian dust deposition from Burial Lake, Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, J. M.; Stoner, J. S.; Finkenbinder, M. S.; Abbott, M. B.; Xuan, C.; St-Onge, G.

    2015-11-01

    Environmental magnetism and radiocarbon dating of Burial Lake sediments constrain the timing and magnitude of regional aeolian deposition for the Noatak region of western Arctic Alaska for the last ˜37,000 years. Burial Lake (68.43°N, 159.17°W, 21.5 m water depth) is optimally located to monitor regional dust deposition because it is perched above local drainage and isolated from glacial processes. Cores collected in the summer of 2010 were studied through the application of magnetizations and progressive alternating field (AF) demagnetization of u-channel samples, with additional data provided by computed tomography (CT) derived density, hysteresis measurements, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition experiments, organic carbon content, biogenic silica, physical grain size, radiocarbon dating of wood, seeds, and plant macrofossils, point source magnetic susceptibility, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). With similar magnetic properties to regional Alaskan loess deposits, low coercivity, highly magnetic material deposited during the late-Pleistocene contrasts with a high coercivity, weakly magnetic component found throughout the record, consistent with locally-derived detritus. The relative proportion of low coercivity to high coercivity magnetic material, defined by the S-Ratios, is used to reconstruct the regional input of dust to the basin over time. A four-fold decrease in the low coercivity component through the deglacial transition is interpreted to reflect diminished dust input to the region. Comparisons with potential sources of dust show that the timing of deposition in Burial Lake is largely consistent with general aridity, lack of vegetative cover, and increased windiness, rather than glacial advances or retreats. The influence from subaerial exposure of continental shelves cannot be ruled out as a significant far-field source of dust to interior Alaska during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but is unlikely to have been the sole source, or to

  14. Downwind changes in grain size of aeolian dust; examples from marine and terrestrial archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Prins, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    Aeolian dust in the atmosphere may have a cooling effect when small particles in the high atmosphere block incoming solar energy (e.g., Claquin et al., 2003) but it may also act as a 'greenhouse gas' when larger particles in the lower atmosphere trap energy that was reflected from the Earth's surface (e.g., Otto et al., 2007). Therefore, it is of vital importance to have a good understanding of the particle-size distribution of aeolian dust in space and time. As wind is a very size-selective transport mechanism, the sediments it carries typically have a very-well sorted grain-size distribution, which gradually fines from proximal to distal deposition sites. This fact has been used in numerous paleo-environmental studies to both determine source-to-sink changes in the particle size of aeolian dust (e.g., Weltje and Prins, 2003; Holz et al., 2004; Prins and Vriend, 2007) and to quantify mass-accumulation rates of aeolian dust (e.g., Prins and Weltje 1999; Stuut et al., 2002; Prins et al., 2007; Prins and Vriend, 2007; Stuut et al., 2007; Tjallingii et al., 2008; Prins et al., 2009). Studies on modern wind-blown particles have demonstrated that particle size of dust not only is a function of lateral but also vertical transport distance (e.g., Torres-Padron et al., 2002; Stuut et al., 2005). Nonetheless, there are still many unresolved questions related to the physical properties of wind-blown particles like e.g., the case of "giant" quartz particles found on Hawaii (Betzer et al., 1988) that can only originate from Asia but have a too large size for the distance they travelled through the atmosphere. Here, we present examples of dust particle-size distributions from terrestrial (loess) as well as marine (deep-sea sediments) sedimentary archives and their spatial and temporal changes. With this contribution we hope to provide quantitative data for the modelling community in order to get a better grip on the role of wind-blown particles in the climate system. Cited

  15. Effects of particle optical properties on grain size measurements of aeolian dust deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    Particle size data are holding crucial information on the sedimentary environment at the time the aeolian dust deposits were accumulated. Various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed from proper grain size distribution data. Laser diffraction methods provide much more accurate and reliable information on the major granulometric properties of wind-blown sediments compared to the sieve and pipette methods. The Fraunhofer and Mie scattering theories are generally used for laser diffraction grain size measurements. () The two different approaches need different 'background' information on the medium measured. During measurements following the Fraunhofer theory, the basic assumption is that parcticles are relatively large (over 25-30 µm) and opaque. The Mie theory could offer more accurate data on smaller fractions (clay and fine silt), assuming that a proper, a'priori knowledge on refraction and absorption indices exists, which is rarely the case for polymineral samples. This study is aimed at determining the effects of different optical parameters on grain size distributions (e.g. clay-content, median, mode). Multiple samples collected from Hungarian red clay and loess-paleosol records have been analysed using a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 laser diffraction particle sizer (with a Hydro LV unit). Additional grain size measurements have been made on a Fritsch Analysette 22 Microtec and a Horiba Partica La-950 v2 instrument to investigate possible effects of the used laser sources with different wavelengths. XRF and XRD measurements have also been undertaken to gain insight into the geochemical/mineralogical compositions of the samples studied. Major findings include that measurements using the Mie theory provide more accurate data on the grain size distribution of aeolian dust deposits, when we use a proper optical setting. Significant

  16. Global connections between aeolian dust, climate and ocean biogeochemistry at the present day and at the last glacial maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, B. A.; Prospero, J. M.; Mackie, D.; Gaiero, D.; Hesse, P. P.; Balkanski, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Palaeo-dust records in sediments and ice cores show that wind-borne mineral aerosol ('dust') is strongly linked with climate state. During glacial climate stages, for example, the world was much dustier, with dust fluxes two to five times greater than in interglacial stages. However, the influence of dust on climate remains a poorly quantified and actively changing element of the Earth's climate system. Dust can influence climate directly, by the scattering and absorption of solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly, by modifying cloud properties. Dust transported to the oceans can also affect climate via ocean fertilization in those regions of the world's oceans where macronutrients like nitrate are abundant but primary production and nitrogen fixation are limited by iron scarcity. Dust containing iron, as fine-grained iron oxides/oxyhydroxides and/or within clay minerals, and other essential micronutrients (e.g. silica) may modulate the uptake of carbon in marine ecosystems and, in turn, the atmospheric concentration of CO 2. Here, in order to critically examine past fluxes and possible climate impacts of dust in general and iron-bearing dust in particular, we consider present-day sources and properties of dust, synthesise available records of dust deposition at the last glacial maximum (LGM); evaluate the evidence for changes in ocean palaeo-productivity associated with, and possibly caused by, changes in aeolian flux to the oceans at the LGM; and consider the radiative forcing effects of increased LGM dust loadings.

  17. 26Al/10Be dating of an aeolian dust mantle soil in western New South Wales, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Adrian; Fink, David; Chappell, John; Melville, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Aeolian dust mantle soils are an important element of many landscapes in south-eastern Australia, though the age of these aeolian deposits has not been radiometrically determined. At Fowlers Gap in western New South Wales, surface cobbles of silcrete and quartz overlie a stone-free, aeolian dust mantle soil, which has a thickness of about 1.6 m. The clay-rich aeolian dust deposit in turn lies upon a buried silcrete and quartz stone layer. Modelling in-situ cosmogenic 26Al and 10Be concentrations measured in both the surface quartz stones and in the buried quartz layer of rocks, reveals that each has experienced a complex exposure-burial history. Due to the absence of quartz stones or sand at intermediate depths, our cosmogenic 26Al and 10Be modelling was not able to determine a definitive mechanism of stone pavement formation and stone burial. Various scenarios of stone formation, transport, burial and exhumation were tested that constrain the age of the deposit to range from 0.9 ± 0.2 Ma to 1.8 ± 0.2 Ma, based largely on different assumptions taken for the time-dependency of the net sedimentation rate. This corresponds with the initiation of the Simpson Desert dune fields and the deflation of lakes in central Australia, which probably responded to the shift to longer-wavelength, larger-amplitude Quaternary glacial cycles at around 1 Ma. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to identify those parameters which better constrained model outputs. Within model errors, which largely are the result of analytical errors in measured 26Al and 10Be concentrations, all three competing theories of colluvial wash, upward displacement of stones, and cumulic pedogenesis are possible mechanisms for the formation of the surface stone pavement.

  18. Atmospheric dust in modern soil on aeolian sandstone, Colorado Plateau (USA): Variation with landscape position and contribution to potential plant nutrients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.; Neff, J.; Reheis, M.; Lamothe, P.

    2006-01-01

    Rock-derived nutrients in soils originate from both local bedrock and atmospheric dust, including dust from far-distant sources. Distinction between fine particles derived from local bedrock and from dust provides better understanding of the landscape-scale distribution and abundance of soil nutrients. Sandy surficial deposits over dominantly sandstone substrates, covering vast upland areas of the central Colorado Plateau, typically contain 5-40% silt plus clay, depending on geomorphic setting and slope (excluding drainages and depressions). Aeolian dust in these deposits is indicated by the presence of titanium-bearing magnetite grains that are absent in the sedimentary rocks of the region. Thus, contents of far-traveled aeolian dust can be estimated from magnetic properties that primarily reflect magnetite content, such as isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM). Isothermal remanent magnetization was measured on bulk sediment samples taken along two transects in surficial sediment down gentle slopes away from sandstone headwalls. One transect was in undisturbed surficial sediment, the other in a setting that was grazed by domestic livestock until 1974. Calculation of far-traveled dust contents of the surficial deposits is based on measurements of the magnetic properties of rock, surficial deposits, and modern dust using a binary mixing model. At the undisturbed site, IRM-based calculations show a systematic down-slope increase in aeolian dust (ranging from 2% to 18% of the surface soil mass), similar to the down-slope increase in total fines (18-39% of surface soil mass). A combination of winnowing by wind during the past and down-slope movement of sediment likely accounts for the modern distribution of aeolian dust and associated nutrients. At the previously grazed site, dust also increases down slope (5-11%) in sediment with corresponding abundances of 13-25% fines. Estimates of the contributions of aeolian dust to the total soil nutrients range widely

  19. Aeolian processes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1989-01-01

    This review assesses the potential aeolian regime on Venus as derived from spacecraft observations, laboratory simulations, and theoretical considerations. The two requirements for aeolian processes (a supply of small, loose particles and winds of sufficient strength to move them) appear to be met on Venus. Venera 9, 10, 13, and 14 images show particles considered to be sand and silt size on the surface. In addition, dust spurts (grains 5 to 50 microns in diameter) observed via lander images and inferred from the Pioneer-Venus nephalometer experiments suggest that the particles are loose and subject to movement. Although data on near surface winds are limited, measurements of 0.3 to 1.2 m/sec from the Venera lander and Pioneer-Venus probes appear to be well within the range required for sand and dust entrainment. Aeolian activity involves the interaction of the atmosphere, lithosphere, and loose particles. Thus, there is the potential for various physical and chemical weathering processes that can effect not only rates of erosion, but changes in the composition of all three components. The Venus Simulator is an apparatus used to simulate weathering under venusian conditions at full pressure (to 112 bars) and temperature (to 800 K). In one series of tests, the physical modifications of windblown particles and rock targets were assessed and it was shown that particles become abraded even when moved by gentle winds. However, little abrasion occurs on the target faces. Thus, compositional signatures for target rocks may be more indicative of the windblown particles than of the bedrock. From these and other considerations, aeolian modifications of the venusian surface may be expected to occur as weathering, erosion, transportation, and deposition of surficial materials. Depending upon global and local wind regimes, there may be distinctive sources and sinks of windblown materials. Radar imaging, especially as potentially supplied via the Magellan mission, may enable the

  20. Contemporary geochemical composition and flux of aeolian dust to the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, Corey R.; Painter, T. H.; Landry, C. C.; Neff, J. C.

    2010-09-01

    Dust deposition in the Rocky Mountains may be an important biogeochemical flux from upwind ecosystems. Seasonal (winter/spring) dust mass fluxes to the San Juan Mountains during the period from 2004 to 2008 ranged from 5 to 10 g m-2, with individual deposition events reaching as high as 2 g m-2. Dust deposited in the San Juan Mountains was primarily composed of silt- and clay-sized particles, indicating a regional source area. The concentrations of most major and minor elements in this dust were similar to or less than average upper continental crustal concentrations, whereas trace element concentrations were often enriched. In particular, dust collected from the San Juan Mountain snowpack was characterized by enrichments of heavy metals including As, Cu, Cd, Mo, Pb, and Zn. The mineral composition of dust partially explained dust geochemistry; however, based on results of a sequential leaching procedure it appeared that trace element enrichments were associated with the organic-, and not the mineral-, fraction of dust. Our observations show that the dust-derived fluxes of several nutrients and trace metals are substantial and, because many elements are deposited in a mobile form, could be important controls of vegetation, soil, or surface water chemistry. The flux measurements reported here are useful benchmarks for the characterization of ecosystem biogeochemical cycling in the Rocky Mountains.

  1. Contrasting sediment melt and fluid signatures for magma components in the Aeolian Arc: Implications for numerical modeling of subduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, Denis; Gazel, Esteban; Ryan, Jeffrey G.; Cannatelli, Claudia; Lucchi, Federico; Atlas, Zachary D.; Trela, Jarek; Mazza, Sarah E.; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2016-06-01

    The complex geodynamic evolution of Aeolian Arc in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea resulted in melts with some of the most pronounced along the arc geochemical variation in incompatible trace elements and radiogenic isotopes worldwide, likely reflecting variations in arc magma source components. Here we elucidate the effects of subducted components on magma sources along different sections of the Aeolian Arc by evaluating systematics of elements depleted in the upper mantle but enriched in the subducting slab, focusing on a new set of B, Be, As, and Li measurements. Based on our new results, we suggest that both hydrous fluids and silicate melts were involved in element transport from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. Hydrous fluids strongly influence the chemical composition of lavas in the central arc (Salina) while a melt component from subducted sediments probably plays a key role in metasomatic reactions in the mantle wedge below the peripheral islands (Stromboli). We also noted similarities in subducting components between the Aeolian Archipelago, the Phlegrean Fields, and other volcanic arcs/arc segments around the world (e.g., Sunda, Cascades, Mexican Volcanic Belt). We suggest that the presence of melt components in all these locations resulted from an increase in the mantle wedge temperature by inflow of hot asthenospheric material from tears/windows in the slab or from around the edges of the sinking slab.

  2. Rates and environmental controls of aeolian dust accumulation, Athabasca River Valley, Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Wolfe, Stephen A.

    2010-09-01

    Despite an abundance of sedimentary archives of mineral dust (i.e. loess) accumulations from cold, humid environments, the absence of contemporary process investigations limits paleoenvironmental interpretations in these settings. Dust accumulations measured at Jasper Lake, a seasonally-filled reach of the glacially-fed Athabasca River in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, are some of the highest contemporary rates recorded to date. High deposition rates, including a maximum of 27,632 kg ha -1 month -1, occur during river low-flow periods, but even the lowest deposition rates, occurring during bankfull periods, exceed other contemporary rates of deposition. High rates of dust deposition may be attributed to geomorphic and climatic controls affecting sediment supply, availability and transport, and biologic factors affecting accumulation. Localized confinement of the Jasper River by tributary river alluvial fans has caused channel expansion upstream, and formation of the shallow depositional basin known as Jasper Lake. This localized sedimentary basin, coupled with large seasonal water level fluctuations and suitably high wind speeds, favors seasonal dust production. In addition, a dense source-proximal coniferous forest stand encourages high dust accumulation, via increased aerodynamic roughness and airflow deceleration. The forest stand also appears to act as an efficient dust filter, with the interception and storage of dust by the forest canopy playing a significant role with regards to secondary fallout and sediment accumulation. Overall, these results provide new insights on the environmental controls of dust entrainment and accumulation in cold, humid settings, and help clarify controls on the formation of Holocene river-sourced loess deposits.

  3. Carbonaceous Components in the Comet Halley Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; Mukhin, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary grains containing large amounts of carbon and/or organic matter (CHON) were discovered by in situ measurements of comet Halley dust composition during VEGA and GIOTTO flyby missions. In this paper, we report the classification of these cometary, grains by means of cluster analysis, discuss the resulting compositional groups, and compare them with substances observed or hypothesized in meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and the interstellar medium. Grains dominated by carbon and/or organic matter (CHON grains) represent approx. 22% of the total population of measured cometary dust particles. They, usually contain a minor abundance of rock-forming elements as well. Grains having organic material are relatively more abundant in the vicinity of the nucleus than in the outer regions of the coma, which suggests decomposition of the organics in the coma environment. The majority of comet Halley organic particles are multicomponent mixtures of carbon phases and organic compounds. Possibly, the cometary CHON grains may be related to kerogen material of an interstellar origin in carbonaceous meteorites. Pure carbon grains, hydrocarbons and polymers of cyanopolyynes, and multi-carbon monoxides are present in cometary dust as compositionally simple and distinctive components among a variety of others. There is no clear evidence of significant presence of pure formaldehyde or HCN polymers in Halley dust particles. The diversity of types of cometary organic compounds is consistent with the inter-stellar dust model of comets and probably reflects differences in composition of precursor dust. Preservation of this heterogeneity among submicron particles suggest the gentle formation of cometary, nucleus by aggregation of interstellar dust in the protosolar nebula without complete mixing or chemical homogenization at the submicron level.

  4. Geochemical variations in aeolian mineral particles from the Sahara-Sahel Dust Corridor.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Castillo, Sonia; Alastuey, Andrés; Cuevas, Emilio; Herrmann, Ludger; Mounkaila, Mohammed; Elvira, Josep; Gibbons, Wes

    2006-10-01

    The Sahara-Sahel Dust Corridor runs from Chad to Mauritania and expels huge amounts of mineral aerosols into the Atlantic Ocean. Data on samples collected from Algeria, Chad, Niger, and Western Sahara illustrate how corridor dust mineralogy and chemistry relate to geological source and weathering/transport history. Dusts sourced directly from igneous and metamorphic massifs are geochemically immature, retaining soluble cations (e.g., K, Na, Rb, Sr) and accessory minerals containing HFSE (e.g., Zr, Hf, U, Th) and REE. In contrast, silicate dust chemistry in desert basins (e.g., Bodélé Depression) is influenced by a longer history of transport, physical winnowing (e.g., loss of Zr, Hf, Th), chemical leaching (e.g., loss of Na, K, Rb), and mixing with intrabasinal materials such as diatoms and evaporitic salts. Mineral aerosols blown along the corridor by the winter Harmattan winds mix these basinal and basement materials. Dusts blown into the corridor from sub-Saharan Africa during the summer monsoon source from deeply chemically weathered terrains and are therefore likely to be more kaolinitic and stripped of mobile elements (e.g., Na, K, Mg, Ca, LILE), but retain immobile and resistant elements (e.g., Zr, Hf, REE). Finally, dusts blown southwestwards into the corridor from along the Atlantic Coastal Basin will be enriched in carbonate from Mesozoic-Cenozoic marine limestones, depleted in Th, Nb, and Ta, and locally contaminated by uranium-bearing phosphate deposits. PMID:16600327

  5. Physicochemical Characterization of Aeolian Mine Tailings Dust in the Southwest USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betterton, E. A.; Barbaris, B.; Conant, W.; Csavina, J.; Gao, S.; Lund, L.; Rheinheimer, P.; Saez, E.; Wonaschutz, A.

    2008-12-01

    Census data reveal that the Southwest is the fastest growing region of the USA, while NOAA GFDL coupled- model results suggest that precipitation is expected to decline in the same region over the coming decades. Besides the obvious impact on water resources, the drier conditions will most likely also result in increased atmospheric dust loads that could impact the health of a rapidly increasing population. This year the US EPA began site assessment and remediation at two mine tailings piles in Arizona contaminated with arsenic, lead, chromium and cadmium. The first is located in the twin towns of Hayden and Winkleman, and the second at the Iron King mine near Humbolt. At a concentration of approximately 0.1 microgram per cubic meter, the level of arsenic in PM10 collected at Hayden/Winkelman sometimes exceeds the Arizona ambient hazardous air pollutant standard (HAPS) by several orders of magnitude. Lead, cadmium and chromium are also sometimes orders of magnitude higher than the HAPS. A top priority is to determine the physicochemical speciation of wind-blown dust as a function of particle diameter because this information can a) help with source apportionment of airborne pollutants (e.g., smelter emissions vs. tailings dust), and b) help to assess the potential health impacts of contaminated dust, since deposition efficiency in human lungs is a strong function of particle diameter. We will present the chemical and physical characteristics of mine tailings dust collected with 10-stage multiple orifice uniform deposit impactors (MOUDI) located at Hayden/Winkleman and Iron King. We will also present scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS) data obtained from the same sites. The MOUDI yields particle composition by size fraction (0.056-18 micrometer aerodynamic diameter) while the SMPS yields particle number by size fraction (0.0025 to 1.0 micrometer diameter). Size selective characteristics such as these have never been previously reported for mine tailings

  6. Mineral composition of TALDICE aeolian ice core dust by means of synchrotron radiation XAS and XRF techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Sala, M.; Hampai, D.; Maggi, V.; Marino, F.; Delmonte, B.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we present the first accurate non-destructive comparison of the mineral composition of atmospheric dusts contained in a deep ice core from Antarctica using synchrotron radiation. Different mineral assemblages reaching glaciated areas could be correlated to sources areas starting from the knowledge of the dust composition. In this investigation we demonstrate the possibility to characterize with SR the mineral composition of the dust in order to perform its geochemical characterization and to understand the pattern of the transport and the trajectories of the aerosol. This study has been focused on the elemental characterization and the identification of the iron oxidation state of aeolian Antarctic dust by means of synchrotron radiation X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy. A set of twelve ice samples from the TALDICE (TD, 72˚ 46'S, 159˚ 04'E, 2316 m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 80 kg*m-2*yr-1) ice core, corresponding to the warm climatic period, Holocene, and to the cold climatic period, Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (MIS 3) have been measured. To obtain both the elemental composition and the iron oxidation state of the mineral dust we performed experiments on specially prepared samples at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) laboratory in the framework of the Proposal N.3082B. Actually, melted ice samples were filtered and then mineral particles were deposited onto Nuclepore polycarbonate membranes in a 1000 class clean room under a 100 class laminar flow bench for both XRF and XAS experiments. A dedicated HV experimental chamber, that allows performing different type of experimental technique on very low absorber concentration samples was developed and tested in Italy. The original experimental setup, including an in-vacuum sample micromanipulator and a special alignment and docking sample system was installed at the beamline 10-2 at SSRL. For the x-ray detection a 7 mm2 high sensitive Silicon Drift Detector was

  7. Temporal Dynamics of Sodic Playa Salt Crust Patterns: Implications for Aeolian Dust Emission Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; King, J.; Bryant, R. G.; Wiggs, G.; Eckardt, F. D.; Thomas, D. S.; Washington, R.

    2013-12-01

    Salt pans (or playas) are common in arid environments and can be major sources of windblown mineral dust, but there are uncertainties associated with their dust emission potential. These landforms typically form crusts which modify both their erosivity and erodibility by limiting sediment availability, modifying surface and aerodynamic roughness and limiting evaporation rates and sediment production. Here we show the relationship between seasonal surface moisture change and crust pattern development based on both remote-sensing and field surface and atmospheric measurements. We use high resolution (sub-cm) terrestrial laser scanning (TLS; ground-based lidar) surveys over weekly, monthly and annual timescales to accurately characterise crustal ridge thrusting and collapse. This can be as much as 2 mm/day on fresh pan areas that have recently been reset by flooding. Over a two month period, this ridge growth can change aerodynamic roughness length values by 6.5 mm. At the same time, crack densities across the surface increase and this raises the availability of erodible fluffy, low density dust source sediment stored below the crust layer. Ridge spaces are defined in the early stages of crust development, as identified by Fourier Transform analysis, but wider wavelengths become more pronounced over time. We present a conceptual model accounting for the driving forces (subsurface, surface and atmospheric moisture) and feedbacks between these and surface shape that lead to crust pattern trajectories between highly emissive degraded surfaces and less emissive ridged or continuous crusts. These findings improve our understanding of temporal changes in dust availability and supply from playa source regions.

  8. Planktonic foraminiferal rare earth elements as a potential new aeolian dust proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C.; Liu, Y.; Lo, L.; Wei, K.; Shen, C.

    2012-12-01

    Characteristics of rare earth elements (REEs) have widely been used as important tracers in many fields of earth sciences, including lithosphere research, environmental change, ocean circulation and other natural carbonate materials. Foraminiferal test REE signatures have been suggested to reflect ambient seawater conditions and serve as valuable proxies in the fields of paleoceanography and paleoclimate. Here we present a 60-kyr planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white, 250-300 μm) REE record of a sediment core MD05-2925 (9°20.61'S, 151°27.61'E, water depth 1660 m) from the Solomon Sea. The REE diagram shows two dominant sources of local seawater and nearby terrestrial input. The variability of foraminiferal REE/Ca time series is different from Mg/Ca-inferred sea surface temperature and δ18O records during the past 60-kyr. This inconsistency suggests that planktonic foraminiferal REE content cannot result only from changes in ice volume and temperature. Synchroneity between high planktonic foraminiferal REE content and Antarctic ice core dust amount record implies the same dust sources, probably from Australia or mainland China. Our results suggest that foraminiferal REE can potentially be as a new dust proxy and record dry/humid conditions at the source area.

  9. The Dynamics and Characteristics of Aeolian Dust in Dryland Central Asia: Possible Impacts on Respiratory Health in the Aral Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, G. F.; O'Hara, S.; Wegerdt, J.; van der Meer, J.; Small, I.; Hubbard, R.

    2003-12-01

    Over the last 40 years over 36,000 km2 of the former Aral Sea bed have been exposed creating a potentially significant aeolian dust source. It is widely believed, but little researched, that increased dust storm activity in the region has had a major impact on human health. In this paper we report the findings of a study into the link between dust exposure and respiratory health amongst children in the Autonomous Republic of Karakalpakstan, located on the southern shore of the Aral Sea. Data were collected over a 12 month period at 16 sites located within a broad transect running north to south through Karakalpakstan. At each site monthly measurements of dust deposition were undertaken linked with daily meteorological data at 6 stations. At 3 sites weekly measurements of PM10 were also carried out. Approximately 100 children (aged 7-10 years) were randomly selected within 5 km of each dust trap site and data were collected on their respiratory health and environmental exposures. Lung function data were also collected using a handheld spirometer. A linear regression model was used to predict lung function for the children incorporating variables for Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), age, gender, height and weight and we estimated the impact of dust deposition rates on the odds of having abnormal lung function using logistic regression. The findings indicate that dust deposition rates across the region are high with sites located near the former shore of the sea being the worst affected. For these northerly regions the former Aral Sea bed is the most likely source of dust. The situation for the rest of the country seems to be far more complex. In these regions it appears that local sources (agricultural fields, abandoned irrigation grounds, overgrazed dunes, and unpaved roads) and more distant sources to the south and south-west represent significant sediment providers, particularly in the early summer when agricultural fields are ploughed. We found some

  10. The Organic Component of Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne

    2003-01-01

    birthsite for the carrier of the 3.4 micrometers band in the outflow region of evolved carbon stars. Comparisons of dust from our own galaxy with that of distant galaxies suggests that the organic component of interstellar dust is widespread and may be an important universal reservoir of prebiotic organic carbon.

  11. Aeolian sediment and dust fluxes during predominant “background” wind conditions for unburned and burned semiarid grassland: Interplay between particle size and temporal scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino-Martín, Luis; Field, Jason P.; Villegas, Juan Camilo; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Breshears, David D.; Law, Darin J.; Urgeghe, Anna M.

    2014-09-01

    Monitoring of aeolian transport is needed for assessment and management of human health risks as well as for soil resources. Human health risks are assessed based on duration of exposure as well as concentration. Many aeolian studies focus on periods of high wind speed when concentrations are greatest but few studies focus on “background” conditions when concentrations are likely lower but which represent the most prevalent conditions. Such “background” conditions might be especially important at sites with recent disturbance such as fire. Exposure assessments also require improved understanding relating longer-term (days to weeks) measurements of saltation of larger particles to shorter-term (minutes to hours) measurements of smaller inhalable dust particles. To address these issues, we employed three commonly used instruments for measuring dust emissions for unburned and recently-burned sites: Big Springs Number Eight (BSNE) samplers for larger saltating soil particles (>50 μm) with weekly to monthly sampling resolution, DustTraks for suspended particles (diameters <10 μm) with 1-s sampling resolution, and Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) filter samplers for measuring with hourly to daily sampling resolution. Significant differences in concentrations between burned and unburned sites were detectable in either short (1-s maximum) interval DustTrak PM10 measurements, or in longer term (weekly) BSNE horizontal sediment flux measurements, but not in intermediate-term (daily 5-h means) for either DustTrak PM10 or TSP measurements. The results highlight ongoing dust emissions during less windy periods and provide insight into the complex interplay among particle-size dependent measures and typical time scales measured.

  12. Composition of aeolian dust in natural traps on isolated surfaces of the central Mojave Desert - Insights to mixing, sources, and nutrient inputs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, R.L.; Reheis, M.; Yount, J.; Lamothe, P.

    2006-01-01

    The recognition and characterization of aeolian dust in soil contribute to a better understanding of landscape and ecosystem dynamics of drylands. Results of this study show that recently deposited dust, sampled in isolated, mostly high-ground settings, is chemically and mineralogically similar on varied geologic substrates over a large area (15 000 km2) in the Mojave Desert. The silt-plus-clay fraction (fines) on these isolated surfaces is closely alike in magnetic-mineral composition, in contrast to greatly dissimilar magnetic compositions of rock surfaces of vastly different lithologies, on which the fines have accumulated. The fines, thus, are predominantly deposited dust. The amounts of potential nutrients in the sampled dust are much more uniform than might be provided by direct, local weathering of bedrock or by dust locally derived from nearby weathered products. The compositional similarity of the dust on these surfaces is interpreted to result from mixing of fines in the atmosphere as well as in fluvial, alluvial, and lacustrine depositional settings prior to dust emission.

  13. Contemporary research in aeolian geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, B. O.

    2009-04-01

    The first International Conference on Aeolian Geomorphology (ICAR) was held in 1986, and every four years since then, aeolian geomorphologists from around the world have assembled to discuss their research and to showcase recent advancements in understanding and modeling of aeolian processes. A content analysis of the "Bibliography of Aeolian Research" [Stout, J.E., Warren, A., Gill, T.E., 2009. Publication trends in aeolian research: An analysis of the Bibliography of Aeolian Research. Geomorphology 105, 6-17 (this volume)] shows that the number of publications on aeolian topics has increased exponentially from the mid-20th Century with approximately 50 publications per year to about 500 publications per year when the first ICAR was held, to almost 1000 publications per year currently. Areas of focus have shifted historically from initial concerns with aeolian erosion and dust events as isolated phenomenon of localized curiosity or only regional importance, to comprehensive physically-based investigations and modeling of the mechanics of aeolian transport. Recently, more applied studies have been motivated by the recognition of the importance of aeolian processes to dust emissions into the atmosphere (with relevance for human health and for meteorological conditions and climate change) and within regional management contexts (especially on coasts where impending sea-level rise is of great concern and in arid and semi-arid environments given the dependence of sediment surface stability and remobilization on meteorological and ecological conditions). Aeolian geomorphology is a rapidly growing sub-discipline of Geomorphology that offers rich opportunities for interdisciplinary collaborations with colleagues from the Atmospheric Sciences, Climatology, Sedimentology, Quaternary Geology, Fluid Mechanics, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, Physical Geography, Ecology, and Agricultural Sciences, as well as our counterparts in fluvial, coastal, and arid

  14. Lunar Dust Simulant in Mechanical Component Testing - Paradigm and Practicality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, T.; Street, K.; Abel, P.; Richmond, R.

    2008-01-01

    Due to the uniquely harsh lunar surface environment, terrestrial test activities may not adequately represent abrasive wear by lunar dust likely to be experienced in mechanical systems used in lunar exploration. Testing to identify potential moving mechanism problems has recently begun within the NASA Engineering and Safety Center Mechanical Systems Lunar Dust Assessment activity in coordination with the Exploration Technology and Development Program Dust Management Project, and these complimentary efforts will be described. Specific concerns about differences between simulant and lunar dust, and procedures for mechanical component testing with lunar simulant will be considered. In preparing for long term operations within a dusty lunar environment, the three fundamental approaches to keeping mechanical equipment functioning are dust avoidance, dust removal, and dust tolerance, with some combination of the three likely to be found in most engineering designs. Methods to exclude dust from contact with mechanical components would constitute mitigation by dust avoidance, so testing seals for dust exclusion efficacy as a function of particle size provides useful information for mechanism design. Dust of particle size less than a micron is not well documented for impact on lunar mechanical components. Therefore, creating a standardized lunar dust simulant in the particulate size range of ca. 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer is useful for testing effects on mechanical components such as bearings, gears, seals, bushings, and other moving mechanical assemblies. Approaching actual wear testing of mechanical components, it is beneficial to first establish relative wear rates caused by dust on commonly used mechanical component materials. The wear mode due to dust within mechanical components, such as abrasion caused by dust in grease(s), needs to be considered, as well as the effects of vacuum, lunar thermal cycle, and electrostatics on wear rate.

  15. On the origin of P/Halley dust component

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhin, L.M.; Grechinskii, A.D.; Ruzmaikina, T.V.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to the origin of organic compound-containing dust particles in Comet Halley, detected by the Puma dust impact mass-spectrometer on the Vega spacecraft. Calculations of the cometary dust temperature and data on the thermostability of organic compounds are discussed. The differences between the mineral content of cometary gas and of meteorite matter and the possible survival of dust particles organic shells during the formation of the protoplanetary disk are examined. It is suggested that the organic compounds in the dust component of Comet Halley probably originated in interstellar dust. 18 refs.

  16. The origin of bimodal grain-size distribution for aeolian deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yongchong; Mu, Guijin; Xu, Lishuai; Zhao, Xue

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric dust deposition is a common phenomenon in arid and semi-arid regions. Bimodal grain size distribution (BGSD) (including the fine component and coarse component) of aeolian deposits has been widely reported. But the origin of this pattern is still debated. Here, we focused on the sedimentary process of modern dust deposition, and analyzed the grain size distribution of modern dust deposition, foliar dust, and aggregation of the aeolian dust collected in Cele Oasis, southern margin of Tarim Basin. The results show that BGSD also appear in a dust deposition. The content of fine components (<20 μm size fraction) change with temporal and spatial variation. Fine component from dust storm is significant less than that from subsequent floating dust. Fine component also varies with altitude. These indicate that modern dust deposition have experienced changing aerodynamic environment and be reworked during transportation and deposition, which is likely the main cause for BGSD. The dusts from different sources once being well-mixed in airflow are hard to form multiple peaks respectively corresponding with different sources. In addition, the dust deposition would appear BGSD whether aggregation or not. Modern dust deposition is the continuation of ancient dust deposition. They both may have the same cause of formation. Therefore, the origin of BGSD should provide a theoretical thinking for reconstructing the palaeo-environmental changes with the indicator of grain size.

  17. Martian aeolian processes, sediments, and features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Lancaster, Nicholas; Lee, Steven; Thomas, Peter

    1992-01-01

    In this review of the aeolian regime on Mars, consideration is given to the sources and characteristics of the particles that are involved in aeolian processes and the winds that are required to set grains into motion. Dust storms are reviewed and previous observations and the mechanisms of dust-storm generation are assessed. Various aeolian features, including dunes and albedo features, as well as windblown mantle deposits are discussed. In planning for future missions to Mars, aeolian processes must be taken into account. Surface modifications by the wind and windblown deposits can influence remote-sensing observations, affect sampling strategies, and have detrimental effects on manned and unmanned spacecraft on the surface.

  18. Aeolian Transport of Invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, T. E.; Walsh, E. J.; Wallace, R. L.; Rojo, L.; Rivas, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Playas and other ephemeral desert wetlands are preferential terrestrial landforms for dust emission. These sites also are habitat for a diverse assemblage of minute invertebrates. When wetlands desiccate, these invertebrates survive as resting stages (propagules). Thus, playas serve as isolated, ephemeral, biogeographical islands for aquatic invertebrates, but it is unclear how propagules disperse across distances as far as hundreds of kilometers to colonize hydrologically disconnected basins. Aeolian transport (anemochory) may provide the mechanism, especially since many invertebrate propagules are long-lived, aerodynamically shaped, possess low-density, and their size (30-600 μm) falls within the same texture as aeolian dust and sand grains. We are collecting and culturing wind-transported sediment to document its ability to serve in the dispersal of aridland invertebrate propagules. Deposited aeolian sediment was collected from marble-type traps placed on the roof of the Biological Sciences Building at the University of Texas, El Paso, during 19 individual regional-scale Chihuahuan Desert blowing dust/sand events between April 2010 and May 2012. Known source areas for these dust events include playas and ephemeral streams ~40- 150 km upwind. The mean dry grain size of the deposited sediment for each event ranged from 66 to 141 μm. Clean-water rinses of material from each event or standard rehydrations for culturing invertebrates were monitored microscopically for the appearance of organisms. Invertebrates hatched from the sediment of 13 events. Ciliates were detected in each of those samples: gastrotrichs appeared in three samples, nematodes and bdelloid rotifers in two samples, and clam shrimp in one. We have also rehydrated aeolian sediments, collected in standard dust traps, from many dust-emitting playas in Southwest North America and hatched viable organisms including all those previously mentioned as well as branchiopods, fairy shrimp, copepods

  19. Nano-metric Dust Particles as a Hardly Detectable Component of the Interplanetary Dust Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, I.; Nabiyev, Sh.

    2015-09-01

    The present work introduces the hypothesis of existence of a hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud and demonstrates that such a component is a dust formation consisting of the dust particles of nano-metric dimensions. This work describes the main physical properties of such a kind of nano-dust, and its possible chemical and mineralogical peculiarities proposes new explanations related to reddening of the dynamically cold transneptunian objects on account of scattering their light by nano-dust of the hardly detectable component of the interplanetary dust cloud. We propose the relation for the coefficient of absorption by the nano-dust and provide results of the statistical analysis of the TNO color index-orbital inclinations. We also present a critical assessment of the proposed hypothesis.

  20. Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzan, Cynthia M.; Edwards, Jonathan L.

    1991-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor 3 provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 Lunar Module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future Lunar Lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

  1. Lunar dust transport and potential interactions with power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Katzan, C.M.; Edwards, J.L.

    1991-11-01

    The lunar surface is covered by a thick blanket of fine dust. This dust may be readily suspended from the surface and transported by a variety of mechanisms. As a consequence, lunar dust can accumulate on sensitive power components, such as photovoltaic arrays and radiator surfaces, reducing their performance. In addition to natural mechanisms, human activities on the Moon will disturb significant amounts of lunar dust. Of all the mechanisms identified, the most serious is rocket launch and landing. The return of components from the Surveyor III provided a rare opportunity to observe the effects of the nearby landing of the Apollo 12 lunar module. The evidence proved that significant dust accumulation occurred on the Surveyor at a distance of 155 m. From available information on particle suspension and transport mechanisms, a series of models was developed to predict dust accumulation as a function of distance from the lunar module. The accumulation distribution was extrapolated to a future lunar lander scenario. These models indicate that accumulation is expected to be substantial even as far as 2 km from the landing site. Estimates of the performance penalties associated with lunar dust coverage on radiators and photovoltaic arrays are presented. Because of the lunar dust adhesive and cohesive properties, the most practical dust defensive strategy appears to be the protection of sensitive components from the arrival of lunar dust by location, orientation, or barriers.

  2. Aeolian bedforms, yardangs, and indurated surfaces in the Tharsis Montes as seen by the HiRISE Camera: Evidence for dust aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Banks, M. E.; Beyer, R. A.; Chuang, F. C.; Noe Dobrea, E. Z.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Fishbaugh, K. E.; McEwen, A. S.; Michaels, T. I.; Thomson, B. J.; Wray, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    HiRISE images of Mars with ground sampling down to 25 cm/pixel show that the dust-rich mantle covering the surfaces of the Tharsis Montes is organized into ridges whose form and distribution are consistent with formation by aeolian saltation. Other dusty areas near the volcanoes and elsewhere on the planet exhibit a similar morphology. The material composing these "reticulate" bedforms is constrained by their remote sensing properties and the threshold curve combined with the saltation/suspension boundary, both of which vary as a function of elevation (atmospheric pressure), particle size, and particle composition. Considering all of these factors, dust aggregates are the most likely material composing these bedforms. We propose that airfall dust on and near the volcanoes aggregates in situ over time, maybe due to electrostatic charging followed by cementation by salts. The aggregates eventually reach a particle size at which saltation is possible. Aggregates on the flanks are transported downslope by katabatic winds and form linear and "accordion" morphologies. Materials within the calderas and other depressions remain trapped and are subjected to multidirectional winds, forming an interlinked "honeycomb" texture. In many places on and near the volcanoes, light-toned, low thermal inertia yardangs and indurated surfaces are present. These may represent "duststone" formed when aggregates reach a particle size below the threshold curve, such that they become stabilized and subsequently undergo cementation.

  3. Aeolian bedforms, yardangs, and indurated surfaces in the Tharsis Montes as seen by the HiRISE Camera: Evidence for dust aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Banks, M.E.; Beyer, R.A.; Chuang, F.C.; Noe Dobrea, E.Z.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Fishbaugh, K.E.; McEwen, A.S.; Michaels, T.I.; Thomson, B.J.; Wray, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    HiRISE images of Mars with ground sampling down to 25 cm/pixel show that the dust-rich mantle covering the surfaces of the Tharsis Montes is organized into ridges whose form and distribution are consistent with formation by aeolian saltation. Other dusty areas near the volcanoes and elsewhere on the planet exhibit a similar morphology. The material composing these "reticulate" bedforms is constrained by their remote sensing properties and the threshold curve combined with the saltation/suspension boundary, both of which vary as a function of elevation (atmospheric pressure), particle size, and particle composition. Considering all of these factors, dust aggregates are the most likely material composing these bedforms. We propose that airfall dust on and near the volcanoes aggregates in situ over time, maybe due to electrostatic charging followed by cementation by salts. The aggregates eventually reach a particle size at which saltation is possible. Aggregates on the flanks are transported downslope by katabatic winds and form linear and "accordion" morphologies. Materials within the calderas and other depressions remain trapped and are subjected to multidirectional winds, forming an interlinked "honeycomb" texture. In many places on and near the volcanoes, light-toned, low thermal inertia yardangs and indurated surfaces are present. These may represent "duststone" formed when aggregates reach a particle size below the threshold curve, such that they become stabilized and subsequently undergo cementation. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Magnetic characteristics of aeolian and fluvial sediments and onset of dust accumulation at Lake Yoa (northern Chad) during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, Janna; Kröpelin, Stefan; Karls, Jens; Rethemeyer, Janet; Melles, Martin

    2014-05-01

    samples will be analyzed using a cryogenic magnetometer. The magnetic grain size will be used to identify the initiation of increased accumulation of aeolian material. By analyzing Isothermal Remanent Magnetization acquisition curves, fluvial and aeolian end-members will be characterized in terms of magnetic mineralogy. Furthermore, a possible climate-induced impact on the formation of pedogenetic magnetic minerals in the source area of fluvial and aeolian sediments will be evaluated by a comparison of the environmental magnetic with organic proxies.

  5. Ice nucleation by soil dusts: relative importance of mineral dust and biogenic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, D.; Murray, B. J.; Malkin, T. L.; Whale, T.; Umo, N. S.; Atkinson, J. D.; Price, H. C.; Baustian, K. J.; Browse, J.; Webb, M. E.

    2013-08-01

    Agricultural dust emissions have been estimated to contribute around 20% to the global dust burden. In contrast to dusts from arid source regions, the ice-nucleating abilities of which have been relatively well studied, soil dusts from fertile sources often contain a substantial fraction of organic matter. Using an experimental methodology which is sensitive to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice-nucleating activities of dusts extracted from fertile soils collected at four locations around England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from 10-12 to 10-6 L, we have been able to determine the ice nucleation behaviour of soil dust particles at temperatures ranging from 267 K (-6 °C) down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at about 237 K (-36 °C). At temperatures above 258 K (-15 °C) we find that the ice-nucleating activity of soil dusts is diminished by heat treatment or digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the ice nuclei stem from biogenic components in the soil. However, below 258 K, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts, in particular the K-feldspar fraction, becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at lower temperatures. We conclude that although only a relatively minor contributor to the global atmospheric dust burden, the enhanced IN activities of dusts generated from agricultural activities may play an important role in cloud glaciation, particularly at temperatures above 258 K.

  6. Ice Nucleation by Soil Dusts: Relative Importance of Mineral Dust and Biogenic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, B. J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Malkin, T. L.; Whale, T.; Umo, N.; Atkinson, J.; Price, H.; Baustian, K. J.; Browse, J.; Webb, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural dust emissions have been estimated to contribute around 20 % to the global dust burden. In contrast to dusts from arid source regions, the ice-nucleating abilities of which have been relatively well studied, soil dusts from fertile sources often contain a substantial fraction of organic matter. Using an experimental methodology which is sensitive to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice-nucleating activities of dusts extracted from fertile soils collected at four locations around England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from pico- to micro- Liter , we have been able to determine the ice nucleation behaviour of soil dust particles at temperatures ranging from 267 K (-6 °C) down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at about 237 K (-36 °C). At temperatures above 258 K (-15 °C) we find that the ice-nucleating activity of soil dusts is diminished by heat treatment or digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the ice nuclei stem from biogenic components in the soil. However, below 258 K, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts, in particular the K-feldspar fraction, becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at lower temperatures. We conclude that although only a relatively minor contributor to the global atmospheric dust burden, the enhanced IN activities of dusts generated from agricultural activities may play an important role in cloud glaciation, particularly at temperatures above 258 K.

  7. PTV measurement of the spanwise component of aeolian transport in steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Patrick; McKenna Neuman, Cheryl

    2016-03-01

    This paper outlines and validates an improved particle tracking technique (PTV-EPAS) with automated trajectory detection capabilities, and then reports on a novel set of wind tunnel experiments aimed at measuring all three velocity components simultaneously. In order to study a fully adjusted particle cloud, the entire floor of the tunnel was filled with quartz sand (median diameter 550 μm) and the freestream velocity set to 8 ms-1 at an elevation of 0.35 m, above the threshold for particle entrainment at 6.5 ms-1. This produced a friction velocity (u∗) of ∼0.38 ms-1 with u∗/u∗t = 1.3. Measurement of particle trajectories aligned at a spanwise angle (θ) relative to the mean airflow along the center-line of the wind tunnel involved incrementally adjusting the light sheet orientation from 0° to 60°. Three replicate experiments were carried out for each of 13 angles. Only 12% of all 2 × 105 trajectories sampled were strictly aligned with the mean streamwise air flow, while 95% were contained within 45°. As θ increases, a greater proportion of the particle transport consists of slow moving ejecta that ascend from and then impact the bed surface at higher angles than observed for saltation.

  8. The thermal structure of the atmospheric surface boundary layer on Mars as modified by the radiative effect of aeolian dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallmann, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A computational simulation, based on Mariner 9 data, was performed for the thermal characteristics of the Martian atmospheric surface boundary layer in clear and dust-filled conditions. A radiative transfer model consisting of the atmospheric enthalpy rate equation, the radiative flux integrated over the 0.2-50 microns, the solid angle interval, and 0.50 km altitudes, broken into 52 levels. Mariner 9 IR data for CO2 absorption lines were included in the form of a temperture-dependent equation, while the line-widths were interpreted in terms of the pressure dependene as well as temperature. The lines covered the regions from 1-50 microns and varying conditions of dust content in the atmosphere. Attention was given to the thermal coupling between the ground and the atmosphere. It was found that convective heat exchange develops quickly due to radiative heating of the Martian desert surface, but does not cool the surface because of the attenuated atmosphere. The model predictd the 100 K temperature variations in the dusty atmosphere, as observed by the Viking thermal mapper. It is suggested that radiative flux convergence is as important as convection at equivalent efficiencies.

  9. Voids within the two-component dust model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haager, Gernot

    1998-11-01

    A new family within the spherically symmetric two-component dust metrics (Haager G 1997 Class. Quantum Grav. 14 2219) with an additional homothetic vector is investigated in detail. These metrics are regular except for a big bang singularity and can be given by an asymptotic expansion of the metric coefficients for large times after the big bang. Using this family, voids can be described whose edge is not comoving in comparison with its surroundings. A concrete example is given where the edge of the void is contracting, while the dust background is expanding.

  10. First X-Ray absorption spectroscopy results on Aeolian dust archived in Antarctica and Alpine firn cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelli, A.; Maggi, V.; Cibin, G.; Sala, M.; Marino, F.; Delmonte, B.

    2006-12-01

    We present the first x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data at the Fe K-edge collected on insoluble mineral dust from Talos Dome firn core (TDC, 159°04'E, 72°46'S, 2316 m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 8 g cm-2 yr- 1), drilled in the framework of the International Trans Antarctic Scientific Expedition (ITASE), and from a Colle del Lys 2003 firn core (CDL03, 45°92'N, 7°86'E, 4248m a.s.l., mean accumulation rate 134 g cm-2 yr-1, Lys Glacier, Mt. Rosa, Italy). The low concentration of mineral particles, obtained by filtering each firn core melted samples on Nuclepore membranes in a 1000 class clean room, required a specific procedure to prepare the samples necessary to the successful collection of the XAS data. The firn samples were decontaminated in clean room under laminar flow bench by means of a ceramic knife and discarding the external part of the cores. Analyses of the insoluble particle content were performed by particle counter Beckman CounterãMultisizer III in order to defined concentration and size distribution of particles in each samples. A dedicated HV experimental chamber, devoted to the realization of XAS experiments on very low absorber concentration samples, was developed and realized in the framework of the CryoAlp collaboration at IMONT, the Italian National Institute for Mountains. The original experimental setup, thanks to the presence of an in-vacuum sample micromanipulator and special sample alignment and docking system installed for these experiments at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at the beamline 6-2, allows both normal-incidence X-ray Fluorescence detection using a Ketek SDD detector having an energy resolution of about 150 eV and extremely low energy detection limit, and Total X-ray Reflection Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopy measurements. The high quality of the XANES experiments performed, using both normal incidence and Total Reflection XAS measurements, allowed recognizing iron-inclusion mineral fractions

  11. Size-differentiated chemical characteristics of Asian paleo dust: records from aeolian deposition on Chinese Loess Plateau.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Chow, Judith C; An, Zhisheng; Watson, John G; Cao, Junji

    2011-02-01

    The Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) receives and potentially contributes to Asian dust storms that affect particulate matter (PM) concentrations, visibility, and climate. Loess on the CLP has experienced little weathering effect and is regarded as an ideal record to represent geochemical characteristics of Asian paleo dust. Samples were taken from 2-, 9-, and 15-m depths (representing deposition periods from approximately 12,000 to approximately 200,000 yr ago) in the Xi Feng loess profile on the CLP. The samples were resuspended and then sampled through total suspended particulates (TSP), PM10, PM2.5, and PM1 (PM with aerodynamic diameters < approximately 30, 10, 2.5, and 1 microm, respectively) inlets onto filters for mass, elemental, ionic, and carbon analyses using a Desert Research Institute resuspension chamber. The elements Si, Ca, Al, Fe, K, Mg, water-soluble Ca (Ca2+), organic carbon, and carbonate carbon are the major constituents (> 1%) in loess among the four PM fractions (i.e., TSP, PM10, PM2.5, and PM1). Much of Ca is water soluble and corresponds with measures of carbonate, indicating that most of the calcium is in the form of calcium carbonate rather than other calcium minerals. Most of the K is insoluble, indicating that loess can be separated from biomass burning contributions when K+ is measured. The loess has elemental abundances similar to those of the upper continental crust (UCC) for Mg, Fe, Ti, Mn, V, Cr, and Ni, but substantially different ratios for other elements such as Ca, Co, Cu, As, and Pb. These suggest that the use of UCC as a reference to represent pure or paleo Asian dust needs to be further evaluated. The aerosol samples from the source regions have similar ratios to loess for crustal elements, but substantially different ratios for species from anthropogenic sources (e.g., K, P, V, Cr, Cu, Zn, Ni, and Pb), indicating that the aerosol samples from the geological-source-dominated environment are not a "pure" soil product as compared

  12. Studies in Martian Aeolian Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    This report gives the results from the investigation through March 15, 1999 for the first two years of the three year investigation (year 3 runs from March 1, 1999 to February 27, 2000). The investigation included three tasks, all involving windblown dust (particles a few micrometers in diameter) to simulate the aeolian regime on Mars. Experiments were conducted primarily in the Mars Surface Wind Tunnel (MARSWIT) at NASA-Ames Research Center.

  13. A model to study the grain size components of the sediment deposited in aeolian-fluvial interplay erosion watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Li, Zhanbin; Li, Peng; Cheng, Shengdong; Zhang, Yang; Tang, Shanshan; Wang, Tian

    2015-12-01

    Aeolian-fluvial interplay erosion areas with complex dynamics and physical sources are the main suppliers of coarse sediment in the Yellow River. Understanding the composition, distribution, and sources of deposited sediments in such areas is of great importance for the control of sediment transport in rivers. In this paper, a typical aeolian-fluvial interplay erosion watershed - the Dongliu Gully - was studied and the frequency distribution curves of sediments deposited in the stream channel were fitted using the Weibull function. Sources of deposited sediment in the stream channel were analyzed based on the law of the conservation of matter. Results showed that the hilly zone accounted for 78% of deposited sediments, which were dominated by material with a median grain size (d50) of 0.093 mm, and the desert zone accounted for 22% of deposited sediments, which were dominated by material with a d50 of 0.01 mm. Wind erosion dynamics accounted for 72% of deposited sediments, while water erosion dynamics accounted for only 28%. This research provides a theoretical basis for the control and management of rivers with high sediment content.

  14. The Warm Dust Component in the S106 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Joseph D.; Herter, Terry; Lau, Ryan M.; Hora, Joseph L.; Schneider, Nicola; Smith, Howard Alan; Guzman, Andres; Simon, Robert; Staguhn, Johannes; Hankins, Matt; Spitzer Cygnus-X Legacy Team, Herschel Cygnus-X Team

    2015-01-01

    We present SOFIA/FORCAST images of S106 at the wavelengths 19, 25, 31, and 37 microns. We use these images to produce color temperature and optical depth maps in order to analyze the warm (~ 60 - 150 K) dust component. We resolve the disk shadow region into several relatively cool (~ 60 - 78 K) lanes with a radially dependent temperature gradient and warmer (~ 75 - 85 K) pockets of dust with a more uniform temperature distribution. The warmer pockets are spatially correlated with pockets of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and HI emission as seen in the images presented by Smith et al. (2001). These results indicate that the disk is clumpy or contains holes with relatively higher UV throughput than the most obscuring parts. We also combine the SOFIA data with data from Spitzer/IRAC (3.6 - 8.0 microns), Herschel/PACS (70 and 160 microns), and the literature to produce the infrared spectral energy distributions of dust at locations in the disk shadow, bipolar lobes, compact sources, and the southwestern edge of the photodissociation region. From the SEDs and radiative transfer modeling, we constrain the mass abundances and size distributions of PAHs and dust grains such as silicates, carbonaceous grains, and very small, transiently heated grains, in these dramatically different regions.

  15. CHON as a component of dust from Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, Mark E.; Brownlee, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Three sets of particle mass spectra are used here to investigate the relationship between CHON (dust composed predominantly of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen) and silicate materials in Comet Halley. It is found that there are essentially no pure CHON particles in the 0.1-1 micron size range sampled; instead, essentially all Halley particles sampled by the mass spectrometers are a mixture of both CHON and silicate components. The data show that the CHON and silicate components are interdispersed at submicron scales, and there is evidence that sublimation of volatile organic material occurs, bringing many particles to a common proportion of CHON and silicate material.

  16. Aeolian geomorphology from the global perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1985-01-01

    Any planet or satellite having a dynamic atmosphere and a solid surface has the potential for experiencing aeolian (wind) processes. A survey of the Solar System shows at least four planetary objects which potentially meet these criteria: Earth, Mars, Venus, and possibly Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn. While the basic process is the same among these four objects, the movement of particles by the atmosphere, the aeolian environment is drastically different. It ranges from the hot (730 K), dense atmosphere of Venus to the extremely cold desert (218 K) environment of Mars where the atmospheric surface pressure is only approximately 7.5 mb. In considering aeolian processes in the planetary perspective, all three terrestrial planets share some common areas of attention for research, especially in regard to wind erosion and dust storms. Relevant properties of planetary objects potentially subject to aeolian processes are given in tabular form.

  17. Reconstructing transport pathways for late Quaternary dust from eastern Australia using the composition of trace elements of long traveled dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Lynda M.; McGowan, Hamish A.; Kamber, Balz S.

    2009-04-01

    The southeast Australian dust transport corridor is the principal pathway through which continental emissions of dust from central and eastern Australia are carried to the oceans by the prevailing mid-latitude westerly circulation. The analysis of trace elements of aeolian dust, preserved in lake sediment on North Stradbroke Island, southeast Queensland, is used to reconstruct variation in the intensity and position of dust transport to the island over the past 25,000 yrs. Separation of local and long traveled dust content of lake sediments is achieved using a unique, four-element (Ga, Ni, Tl and Sc) separation method. The local and continental chronologies of aeolian deposition developed by this study show markedly different records, and indicate varied responses to climate variability on North Stradbroke Island (local aeolian sediment component) and in eastern and central Australia (long traveled dust component). The provenance of the continental component of the record to sub-geologic catchment scales was accomplished using a ternary mixing model in which the chemical identification of dusts extracted, from the lake sediments, was compared to potential chemical characteristics of surface dust from the source areas using 16 trace elements. The results indicate that the position and intensity of dust transport pathways during the late Quaternary varied considerably in response to changing atmospheric circulation patterns as well as to variations in sediment supply to dust source areas, which include the large anabranching river systems of the Lake Eyre and Murray-Darling Basins.

  18. "CHON" particles: The interstellar component of cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Interstellar dust is characterized by strong absorption in the ultraviolet and the mid-IR. Current models of interstellar dust are based on three chemically distinct components: a form of carbon (usually graphite), a silicate, and a blend of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or other carbonaceous material. Previous work using effective medium theories to understand the optical properties of cometary dust suggested that an amalgam of materials could reproduce the observed interstellar and cometary dust features. Recently, Lawler and Brownlee (1992) re-analyzed the PIA and PUMA-1 data sets from the Giotto flyby of P/Halley and discovered that the so-called "CHON" particles were actually composed of a blend of carbon-bearing and silicon-bearing materials. Based on effective medium theories, the absorption spectrum of such a material would display the spectral features of each of the components - strong UV absorption from the carbonaceous component and strong absorption in the IR from the silicate component. To test this idea, vapor-deposited samples were created using two different deposition techniques: sputtering with an argon RF magnetron and deposition from an argon plasma torch. Two different compositions were tested: a blend of graphite and silica in a 7:1 ratio and an amalgam of materials whose approximate composition matches the "CHON"-silicate abundances for the uncompressed PIA data set of Lawler and Brownlee: graphite, iron oxide, magnesium oxide, ammonium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica in mass ratios of 6:4.3:4:2.2:1:9. The samples were finely ground and pressed into 2" diameter disks using a 40 ton press. In all, four different experiments were performed: one with each of the compositions (C:SiO and "CHON") in both the RF magnetron and the plasma torch chambers. The RF magnetron created a uniform dark thin film on the substrate surface, and the plasma torch created a coating of small (<100 micron) diameter grey particles. The spectra of all four

  19. Origin of the hydrocarbon component of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wdowiak, Thomas J.; Lee, Wei

    1994-01-01

    Using experiments as a basis, we have developed a scenario for the origin of the hydrocarbon material of carbonaceous chondrites. This scenario can also serve as an explanation for the origin of the hydrocarbon component of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). The formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in the atmospheres of C stars undergoing a late stage of stellar evolution is indicated by the observed unidentified infrared (UIR) emission bands. Those molecules are then transported through interstellar space where they become enriched with D through ion molecule reactions when passing through cold, dark clouds. Many of those PAH molecules are subsequently hydrogenated and cracked in a H-dominated plasma such as would have occurred in the solar nebula. The resulting mixture of alkanes and residual D-rich PAH molecules was then incorporated into the mineral fraction of the parent bodies of carbonaceous chondrites and IDP's.

  20. The Martian Dust Cycle: Investigation of the Surface Lifting Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the nature of the annual cycle of suspended dust in the martian atmosphere. This has been undertaken to understand the dynamical processes responsible for lifting dust from the surface, locations where dust is preferentially lifted, and preferred sites for dust deposition upon the surface. Our efforts have involved carrying out a number of numerical simulations with the Ames Mars General Circulation Model (GCM) interactively coupled with an aerosol transport/ micro-physical model. The model generates an annual dust cycle similar to that observed. Various feedbacks are present in the atmosphere/ surface system which enter into the generation of the cycle. Several locations are primary surface sources of dust, while much of the remaining planet's surface acts a sink for suspended dust.

  1. Publication trends in aeolian research: An analysis of the Bibliography of Aeolian Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, John E.; Warren, Andrew; Gill, Thomas E.

    2009-04-01

    An analysis of the Bibliography of Aeolian Research has provided information regarding publication trends in aeolian research. Results suggest that there has been a significant increase in the number of publications per year since the first aeolian-research publication appeared in 1646. Rates of publication have increased from only three publications in the 17th Century to nearly three publications per day in the 21st Century. The temporal distribution of publications follows a complex pattern that is influenced by many factors. In the 17th and 18th Centuries, publications appear as isolated clusters indicating limited interest in aeolian research and limited opportunities for individuals to contribute to scientific literature. With time, many new scientific societies are formed and many new scientific journals are established, opening new opportunities for scientists to contribute to scientific discourse. Landmark publications open up new research areas and define new directions for aeolian research. General advances in science and technology provide new techniques for sampling blowing sand and dust. In addition, clear signs exist that publication rates respond to major environmental and climatic events, especially large-scale disasters that focus attention on wind erosion and blowing dust. The Sirocco dust events of 1901-1903, the North American Dust Bowl of the1930s, and the recent sand and dust storm problems in China have all led to significant increases in the number of publications in aeolian research. Rates of publication are negatively influenced by major political and social upheavals, especially global conflicts such as World Wars I and II. Sudden shifts in government structure and support can also influence publication rates. A good example is the increased publication rates in China following the end of the Cultural Revolution, a trend that continues today.

  2. Semiarid landscapes response to Aeolian processes during Holocene in Baikal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan'ko, Lidia; Opekunova, Marina

    2010-05-01

    Arid and semiarid landscapes play a significant role in global climate, biogeochemical, and hydrological processes. Regional analysis of the past aeolian processes is essential for improve our understanding of how various landscape and ecosystems responded to climate change in the past. Our investigation presents details on sand dunes and on loess-like sediments. The study areas are situated in the northern part of Baikal Region (Eastern Siberia). In its depressions, the so-called Barguzinskaya and Tunkinskaya Valley surrounded mountain ranges local dunefieds and loess-like sediments have developed. Present climate in the study areas is continental, characterized by low precipitation(mean annual 250-450 mm) and wide annual range of temperature. Field investigations indicate that the Holocene deposits of the Barguzinskaya and Tunkinskaya Valley are sealed the pedo-sedimentary interface. The analytical results suggest that one's represents a changeover from intensified soil formation to accelerated aeolian dust accumulation. The original content of calcium carbonate and gypsum at the base of some sections of loess-like sediments indicates the aeolian origin of these sediments. In whole, the soil horizons are a proof for humid phases. The change was forced by climatic aridity. Absolute dating of the organogenic components of soils (14C) indicate the age positions of the arid and humid climate phases. Our results indicate not only 1-4 long-time episodes of aeolian dust accumulation during the Holocene, but shot-time aeolian accumulation episodes, that were specific for Late Holocene. For example, in the Tunkinskaya Valley the Late Holocene soil formation replaced by aeolian deposit at 1700 - 1900, 800 and 200-250 years ago, in the Barguzinskaya Valley - about 3100 - 2900, 2300 and 600 years ago. It can be concluded that a periodical formation of the aeolian deposits in the semiarid landscapes during Holocene can be postulated. Aeolian and loess-like sediments of the

  3. Late Pleistocene aeolian dust provenances and wind direction changes reconstructed by heavy mineral analysis of the sediments of the Dehner dry maar (Eifel Mountains, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmkuhl, Frank; Römer, Wolfgang; Sirocko, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The study presents the results of a heavy mineral analysis from a 38 m long record of aeolian sediments from a core section of the Dehner dry maar (Eifel Mountains, Germany). The record encompasses the period from 30 to about 12.5 ka. Heavy-mineral analysis of the silt fraction has been performed at a sampling interval of 1 m. Statistical analyses enabled the distinction of local and regional source areas of aeolian material and revealed pronounced changes in the amounts of different heavy mineral species and corresponding changes in the grain size index (GSI). The results indicate that during the early stages of MIS 2 (40 to 30m depth) aeolian sediments were supplied mostly from local sources. This period is characterized by a low GSI ratio resulting from a reduced mobility of material due to a vegetation cover. The climax of the LGM is characterized by a higher supply of heavy minerals from regional and more distant sources. Changes in the provenance areas are indicated in inverse relationships between zircon, rutile, tourmaline (ZRT) and carbonate particles. Shifts in the wind direction are documented in pronounced peaks of carbonate particles indicating easterly winds that have crossed the limestone basins in the Eifeler North South Zone. ZRT-group minerals on the other hand suggest a westerly source area and a supply from areas consisting of Paleozoic clastic sedimentary rocks. In the periods following the LGM the analyses indicate an increasing degree of mixing of heavy minerals from various provinces. This suggests the existence of a presumably incomplete, thin cover of deflatable loessic sediments that has been repeatedly reworked on the elevated surfaces of the Eifel.

  4. Towards a phoenix phase in aeolian research: shifting geophysical perspectives from fluvial dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Field, Jason P; Breshears, David D

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian processes are a fundamental driver of earth surface dynamics, yet the importance of aeolian processes in a broader geosciences context may be overshadowed by an unbalanced emphasis on fluvial processes. Here we wish to highlight that aeolian and fluvial processes need to be considered in concert relative to total erosion and to potential interactions, that relative dominance and sensitivity to disturbance vary with mean annual precipitation, and that there are important scale-dependencies associated with aeolian-fluvial interactions. We build on previous literature to present relevant conceptual syntheses highlighting these issues. We then highlight the relative investments that have been made in aeolian research on dust emission and management relative to that in fluvial research on sediment production. Literature searches highlight that aeolian processes are greatly understudied relative to fluvial processes when considering total erosion in different environmental settings. Notably, within the USA, aeolian research was triggered by the Dust Bowl catastrophe of the 1930s, but the resultant research agencies have shifted to almost completely focusing on fluvial processes, based on number of remaining research stations and on monetary investments in control measures. However, numerous research issues associated with intensification of land use and climate change impacts require a rapid ramping up in aeolian research that improves information about aeolian processes relative to fluvial processes, which could herald a post-Dust Bowl Phoenix phase in which aeolian processes are recognized as broadly critical to geo- and environmental sciences.

  5. Robotic Measurement of Aeolian Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S.; Duperret, J. M.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Lancaster, N.; Nikolich, G.; Shipley, T. F.; Van Pelt, R. S.; Zobeck, T. M.; Koditschek, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Local and regional measurements of sand transport and dust emission in complex natural settings presently lack spatiotemporal resolution adequate to inform models relevant for land management, climate policy, and the basic science of geomorphology. Deployments of wind, sand and dust sensors sophisticated enough to begin unpacking the complex relations among wind turbulence, surface roughness, sand flux and dust emission remain largely stationary. Aerial observations from satellites, planes and even UAVs help fill in, but none of these modalities offer the hope of "capturing the action" by being at the right place at the right time relative to the highly localized nature of sediment transport during wind storms. We have been developing a legged robot capable of rapidly traversing desert terrain, and are now adapting it to serve as a platform for scientific instrumentation. We aim to field a semi-autonomous, reactive mobile sensory package suited to the needs of aeolian science that can address the limitations of existing alternatives. This presentation reports on early trials in the Jornada LTER and White Sands National Monument aimed at gathering measurements of airflow and rates of sand transport on a dune face, assessing the role of roughness elements such as vegetation in modifying the wind shear stresses incident on the surface, and estimating erosion susceptibility in a natural arid soil. We will solicit ideas from the audience about other potentially interesting and viable measurement targets. Future close collaboration between aeolian, cognitive and robotics scientists such as we hope to promote through this presentation may yield machines with scientifically relevant sensory suites possessing sufficient autonomy to operate in-situ at the most intense episodes of wind and sediment movement under conditions far too uncomfortable and hazardous for human presence.

  6. Studies in Aeolian geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the research was to assess the significance of aeolian (windblown) processes in the evolution of planetary surfaces. The approach was to use wind tunnel simulations, field studies of possible analogs, and analyses of spacecraft data.

  7. Geochemical investigation of dry- and wet-deposited dust during the same dust-storm event in Harbin, China: Constraint on provenance and implications for formation of aeolian loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yuanyun; Chi, Yunping

    2016-04-01

    A strong dust-storm event occurred in Harbin, China on May 11, 2011. The dry- and wet-deposited dust depositions in this dust-storm event, together with the surface sediments from the potential sources, were collected to study grain size distributions, carbonate content and carbon isotopic composition of carbonate, major element, trace element and rare earth elements (REE), and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions. The results indicate as follows. The dry-deposited dusts are characterized by bimodal grain-size distributions with a fine mode at 3.6 μm and a coarse mode at 28 μm whereas the wet-deposited dusts are indicative of unimodal grain-size modes with a fine mode at 6 μm. The dust-storm depositions are influenced to a certain extent by sedimentary sorting and are of a derivation from the recycled sediments. Based on identifying the immobility of element pairs before constraining sources of dust-storm deposits using geochemical elements, in conjunction with REE and especially Sr-Nd isotopic compositions, the primary and strengthening sources for the dust-storm event were detected, respectively. The Hunsandake Sandy Land as the primary source and the Horqin Sandy Land as the strengthening source were together responsible for the derivation of dust depositions during dust-storm event. The Hunsandake Sandy Land, however, contributes less dust to the dust-storm event in Harbin compared to the Horqin Sandy Land, and the Hulun Buir Sandy Land is undoubtedly excluded from being one of the sources for dust-storm depositions in Harbin. There are not notable differences in geochemical (especially Sr-Nd isotopic) compositions between dry- and wet-deposited dusts, indicating that the wet-deposited dust is of identical derivation to the dry-deposited dust. Based on our observations, it is of interest to suggest that fine and coarse particles in the CLP (Chinese Loess Plateau) loess possibly have the same sources.

  8. MECA Worksop on Dust on Mars 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Steven (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Topics addressed include: sedimentary debris; mineralogy; Martian dust cycles; Mariner 9 mission; Viking observations; Mars Observer; atmospheric circulation; aeolian features; aerosols; and landslides.

  9. Aeolian Morphodynamics of Loess Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, J. A.; Hanson, P. R.; Sweeney, M.; Loope, H. M.; Miao, X.; Lu, H.

    2012-12-01

    Striking aeolian landforms characterize loess landscapes of the Great Plains and Upper Mississippi Valley, USA, shaped in Late Pleistocene environments with many characteristics of modern deserts including large active dunefields. Similar aeolian morphodynamics are evident in northern China and the Columbia Basin, USA, and are clearly important for interpreting the paleoenvironmental record of loess. Four zones spanning the upwind margin of thick loess can be defined from landforms and surficial deposits. From upwind to downwind, they are: A) A largely loess-free landscape, with patchy to continuous aeolian sand mantling bedrock. B) Patchy loess deposits, often streamlined and potentially wind-aligned, intermingled with dunes and sand sheets; interbedding of loess and sand may be common. C) Thick, coarse loess with an abrupt upwind edge, with troughs, yardang-like ridges, and/or wind-aligned scarps recording large-scale wind erosion. D) Thinner, finer loess with little evidence of post-depositional wind erosion. The degree of development and spatial scale of these zones varies among the loess regions we studied. To explain this zonation we emphasize controls on re-entrainment of loess by the wind after initial deposition, across gradients of climate and vegetation. The role of saltating sand in dust entrainment through abrasion of fine materials is well known. Using the Portable In situ Wind Erosion Laboratory (PI-SWERL), we recently demonstrated that unvegetated Great Plains loess can also be directly entrained under wind conditions common in the region today (Sweeney et al., 2011, GSA Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 43, No. 5, p. 251). Rainfall-induced crusts largely prevent direct entrainment in fine loess, but appear less effective in coarse loess. We propose that in zone A, any loess deposited was both abraded by saltating sand and directly re-entrained, so none accumulated. Sparse vegetation in this zone was primarily an effect of climate, but the resulting

  10. Ice nucleation by fertile soil dusts: relative importance of mineral and biogenic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, D.; Murray, B. J.; Malkin, T. L.; Whale, T. F.; Umo, N. S.; Atkinson, J. D.; Price, H. C.; Baustian, K. J.; Browse, J.; Webb, M. E.

    2014-02-01

    Agricultural dust emissions have been estimated to contribute around 20% to the global dust burden. In contrast to dusts from arid source regions, the ice-nucleating abilities of which have been relatively well studied, soil dusts from fertile sources often contain a substantial fraction of organic matter. Using an experimental methodology which is sensitive to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice-nucleating activities of dusts (d < 11 µm) extracted from fertile soils collected at four locations around England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from 10-12 to 10-6 L (concentration = 0.02 to 0.1 st% dust), we have been able to determine the ice nucleation behaviour of soil dust particles at temperatures ranging from 267 K (-6° C) down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at about 237 K (-36° C). At temperatures above 258 K (-15° C) we find that the ice-nucleating activity of soil dusts is diminished by heat treatment or digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that a major fraction of the ice nuclei stems from biogenic components in the soil. However, below 258 K, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts, in particular the K-feldspar fraction, becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at lower temperatures. We conclude that dusts from agricultural activities could contribute significantly to atmospheric IN concentrations, if such dusts exhibit similar activities to those observed in the current laboratory study.

  11. Evaluation of a new model of aeolian transport in the presence of vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeolian transport is an important characteristic of many arid and semiarid regions worldwide that affects dust emission and ecosystem processes. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a recent model of aeolian transport in the presence of vegetation [Okin, 2008]. This approach differs from previou...

  12. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission with Two Components: Application to the Planck High Frequency Instrument Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales.

  13. MODELING THERMAL DUST EMISSION WITH TWO COMPONENTS: APPLICATION TO THE PLANCK HIGH FREQUENCY INSTRUMENT MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P. E-mail: dfinkbeiner@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-01-10

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales.

  14. The aeolian wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The aeolian wind tunnel is a special case of a larger subset of the wind tunnel family which is designed to simulate the atmospheric surface layer winds to small scale (a member of this larger subset is usually called an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel or environmental wind tunnel). The atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel is designed to simulate, as closely as possible, the mean velocity and turbulence that occur naturally in the atmospheric boundary layer (defined as the lowest portion of the atmosphere, of the order of 500 m, in which the winds are most greatly affected by surface roughness and topography). The aeolian wind tunnel is used for two purposes: to simulate the physics of the saltation process and to model at small scale the erosional and depositional processes associated with topographic surface features. For purposes of studying aeolian effects on the surface of Mars and Venus as well as on Earth, the aeolian wind tunnel continues to prove to be a useful tool for estimating wind speeds necessary to move small particles on the three planets as well as to determine the effects of topography on the evolution of aeolian features such as wind streaks and dune patterns.

  15. Silicon carbide: A possible component of the cometary dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orofino, V.; Blanco, A.; Fonti, S.

    1994-02-01

    The 10 micrometer emission band observed in four different comets (Kohoutek, Wilson, Halley and Bradfield) has been generally attributed to silicates. In particular, the 11.3 micrometer substructure of the band has been fitted, up to now, using labortory data of crystalline olivine grains contained in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Also terrestrial olivine grains exhibit an 11.3 micrometer absorption feature when they are embedded in potassium bromide (KBr) matrices for infrared spectrosocpy. Therefore, since the grains are not in vacuum, a shift of about 0.3 micrometers of the peak position must be considered in order to take into account matrix effects. Such effects could also influence the spectrum of olivine-IDPs due to the experimental technique used to obtain the spectroscopic data In this case the attribution to olivine of the 11.3 micrometers, cometary substructure may be questioned. Another suitable candidate could be silicon carbon (SiC) which exhibits an absorption band in vacuum at 11.3 micrometers. To investigate such possiblity, we present here fits of the four cometary spectra obtained using a mixture of synthetic amorphous olivine and SiC particles. Using the results found for our best-fit parameters we estimate that the ratio between the mass of silicon locked in SiC grains and the total mass of this element in the cometary dust is of the order of 3 x 10-2.

  16. Mega-ripples in Iran: A new analog for transverse aeolian ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroutan, M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    A new terrestrial analog site for transverse aeolian ridges (TARs) is described in this study. The Lut desert of Iran hosts large ripple-like aeolian bedforms, with the same horizontal length scales and patterns of TARs on Mars. Different classes of TARs and different types of other aeolian features such as sand dunes, zibars, dust devil tracks and yardangs can be found in this area, which signify an active aeolian region. This area represents a unique site to study the formation and evolution of these enigmatic features, with potential relevance toward a better understanding of TARs on Mars.

  17. The Nature and Origin of Interplanetary Dust: High Temperature Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.

    2004-01-01

    The specific parent bodies of individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are un-known, but the anhydrous chondritic-porous (CP) sub-set has been linked directly to cometary sources [1]. The CP IDPs escaped the thermal processing and water-rock interactions that have severely modified or destroyed the original mineralogy of primitive meteorites. Their origin in the outer regions of the solar system suggests they should retain primitive chemical and physical characteristics from the earliest stages of solar system formation (including abundant presolar materials). Indeed, CP IDPs are the most primitive extraterrestrial materials available for laboratory studies based on their unequilibrated mineralogy [2], high concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and volatile trace elements relative to CI chondrites [3, 4, 5], presolar hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic signatures [6, 7] and abundant presolar silicates [8].

  18. Threshold wind velocity dynamics as a driver of aeolian sediment mas flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horizontal (saltation) mass flux is a key driver of aeolian dust emission. Estimates of the horizontal mass flux underpin assessments of the global dust budget and influence our understanding of the dust cycle and its interactions. Current equations for predicting horizontal mass flux are based on l...

  19. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a four-component adiabatic magnetized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, T. Mannan, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-07-15

    Theoretical investigation has been made on obliquely propagating dust-acoustic (DA) solitary waves (SWs) in a magnetized dusty plasma which consists of non-inertial adiabatic electron and ion fluids, and inertial negatively as well as positively charged adiabatic dust fluids. The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries equation which admits a solitary wave solution for small but finite amplitude limit. It has been shown that the basic features (speed, height, thickness, etc.) of such DA solitary structures are significantly modified by adiabaticity of plasma fluids, opposite polarity dust components, and the obliqueness of external magnetic field. The SWs have been changed from compressive to rarefactive depending on the value of {mu} (a parameter determining the number of positive dust present in this plasma model). The present investigation can be of relevance to the electrostatic solitary structures observed in various dusty plasma environments (viz. cometary tails, upper mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, etc.)

  20. Sorting during Migration of Aeolian Megaripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aeolian sediments commonly are well sorted. However, aeolian megaripples (aka coarse-grained ripples or granule ripples) have bimodal grain size-frequencies. Distinguishing aeolian megaripple deposits from mixed grain size fluvial deposits is important, particularly for martian sedimentary rocks where implications for flowing water in the martian past (if revealed by legitimate fluvial deposits) are important mission drivers for rovers and landers. Aeolian megaripples are relatively minor components of terrestrial aeolian settings (e.g., as interdune features), but on Mars, megaripples have been encountered in many locations by landers and rovers, are durable due to indurated, armoring surface layers of very coarse sand, and therefore are likely candidates for preservation in the martian sedimentary rock record. Unfortunately, megaripple deposits preserved in martian sedimentary rocks must be recognized with much less data or context than obtained typically during terrestrial fieldwork. We have undertaken wind tunnel experiments and fieldwork to assist interpretations distinguishing aeolian megaripple deposits from mixed grain fluvial materials. Lags of coarse or very coarse sand from ancient aeolian environments within the White Rim Sandstone, Canyonlands NP, UT, and at some localities along the J2 Unconformity at Buckhorn Wash, UT, are well sorted, with a sharply defined maximum grain size in each case. We conducted wind tunnel experiments to explore whether the well-sorted, sharp cutoff in maximum grain size of the coarse fraction in these deposits could be diagnostic of aeolian megaripple formation and migration. Wind tunnel experiments involved 250 μm sand saltating against 600-2800 μm grains. For a given wind tunnel speed, only a narrow grain size range appeared on megaripple surfaces as these bedforms developed spontaneously from the bed; somewhat finer grains migrated rapidly downwind, while slightly coarser grains remained immobile. The physics of

  1. Activation of the components of an explosion using sorption on the surface of coal dust

    SciTech Connect

    Iskhakov, K.A.; Egoshin, V.V.; Zaostrovskii, A.N.

    2006-05-15

    The components of an explosion are under consideration. It is established that methane, hydrogen, oxygen and water steams, when sorbing on surface of coal dust, generate ion-radical forms. These forms promote fast chain-type reactions; mineral constituents of coals and fusinite group ingredients perform a role of catalysts.

  2. Spitzer Space Telescope Observations of Kepler's Supernova Remnant: A Detailed Look at the Circumstellar Dust Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, William P.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Long, Knox S.; Williams, Brian J.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2007-06-01

    We present 3.6-160 μm infrared images of Kepler's supernova remnant (SN 1604) obtained with the IRAC and MIPS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We also present MIPS SED low-resolution spectra in the 55-95 μm region. The observed emission in the MIPS 24 μm band shows the entire shell. Emission in the MIPS 70 μm and IRAC 8 μm bands is seen only from the brightest regions of 24 μm emission, which also correspond to the regions seen in optical Hα images. Shorter wavelength IRAC images are increasingly dominated by stars, although faint filaments are discernible. The SED spectrum of shows a faint continuum dropping off to longer wavelengths and confirms that strong line emission does not dominate the mid-IR spectral region. The emission we see is due primarily to warm dust emission from dust heated by the primary blast wave; no excess infrared emission is observed in regions where supernova ejecta are seen in X-rays. We use models of the dust to interpret the observed 70/24 μm ratio and constrain the allowed range of temperatures and densities. We estimate the current mass of dust in the warm dust component to be 5.4×10-4 Msolar, and infer an original mass of about 3×10-3 Msolar before grain sputtering. The MIPS 160 μm band shows no emission belonging to the remnant. We place a conservative but temperature-dependent upper limit on any cold dust component roughly a factor of 10 below the cold dust mass inferred from SCUBA observations. Finally, we comment on issues relevant to the possible precursor star and the supernova type. Based on observations made with the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. Spitzer is operated for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Lab.

  3. Infrared extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol: Single components and complex mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra and aerosol size distributions have been measured for some components of mineral dust aerosol including feldspars (albite, oligoclase) and diatomaceous earth, as well as more complex authentic dust samples that include Iowa loess and Saharan sand. Spectral simulations for single-component samples, derived from Rayleigh-theory models for characteristic particle shapes, better reproduce the experimental spectra including the peak position and band shape compared to Mie theory. The mineralogy of the authentic dust samples was inferred using analysis of FTIR spectra. This approach allows for analysis of the mineralogy of complex multicomponent dust samples. Extinction spectra for the authentic dust samples were simulated from the derived sample mineralogy using published optical constant data for the individual mineral constituents and assuming an external mixture. Nonspherical particle shape effects were also included in the simulations and were shown to have a significant effect on the results. The results show that the position of the peak and the shape of the band of the IR characteristic features in the 800 to 1400 cm-1 spectral range are not well simulated by Mie theory. The resonance peaks are consistently shifted by more than +40 cm-1 relative to the experimental spectrum in the Mie simulation. Rayleigh model solutions for different particle shapes better predict the peak position and band shape of experimental spectra, even though the Rayleigh condition may not be strictly obeyed in these experiments.

  4. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in inhomogeneous four-component dusty plasma with opposite charge polarity dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    El-Taibany, W. F.

    2013-09-15

    The reductive perturbation technique is employed to investigate the propagation properties of nonlinear dust acoustic (DA) waves in a four-component inhomogeneous dusty plasma (4CIDP). The 4CIDP consists of both positive- and negative-charge dust grains, characterized by different mass, temperature, and density, in addition to a background of Maxwellian electrons and ions. The inhomogeneity caused by nonuniform equilibrium values of particle densities, fluid velocities, and electrostatic potential leads to a significant modification to the nature of nonlinear DA solitary waves. It is found that this model reveals two DA wave velocities, one slow, λ{sub s}, and the other is fast, λ{sub f}. The nonlinear wave evolution is governed by a modified Kortweg-de Vries equation, whose coefficients are space dependent. Both the two soliton types; compressive and rarefactive are allowed corresponding to λ{sub s}. However, only compressive soliton is created corresponding to λ{sub f}. The numerical investigations illustrate the dependence of the soliton amplitude, width, and velocity on the plasma inhomogeneities in each case. The relevance of these theoretical results with 4CIDPs observed in a multi-component plasma configurations in the polar mesosphere is discussed.

  5. Ice nucleation by soil dusts: relative importance of mineral and biological components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Daniel; Murray, Ben; Webb, Michael; Whale, Thomas; Atkinson, James; Baustian, Kelly; Malkin, Tamsin

    2013-04-01

    Dusts emitted from agricultural soils may represent a significant source of atmospheric particulates at mid-latitudes. Such dusts, which can be aerosolised by anthropogenic agricultural activities, have previously been estimated to be present in the atmosphere at sufficient number densities that they could potentially compete with other known ice nuclei. In contrast to soils from arid regions, such as the Sahara, fertile soils contain a larger fraction of biological material, which can lead to an enhancement in the ice nucleating ability of their associated dusts. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the relative efficacy of soil dust particles from fertile soils as IN. In particular, the relative contribution to the overall ice nucleating activity from both the biological and mineral components present remains unclear. Using a novel experimental methodology designed to increase sensitivity to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice nucleating activities of PM10 extracted from soils collected in England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from 10-12 to 10-6L, we have been able to characterise the ice active site densities in soils (estimated using a time-independent framework) at temperatures ranging from -5° C down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at ~ -36° C. To distinguish between biological and mineral IN in the soil dusts, we examined the effects of heat treatment and organic matter digestion with hydrogen peroxide on the ice nucleating activities of the soils. Both heat and H2O2 treatment reduced the ice nucleating ability of the soil dust particles at low supercoolings (T >-15° C) by up to two orders of magnitude, suggesting that the ice nucleating active sites are primarily biological in nature within this regime. However, below -15° C, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the

  6. Aeolian transport pathways along the transition from Tibetan highlands towards northwestern Chinese deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottebaum, Veit; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Stauch, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The identification and semi-quantification of aeolian transport pathways enhances the understanding of aeolian sediment archive formation and thus supports reliability and explanatory power concerning palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. Grain size analysis of 279 surface sediment samples from the transition of Tibetan highlands (Qilian Shan) towards northwestern Chinese deserts allows the differentiation of contributing pathways among three types of aeolian sediments: silty loess, sandy loess, and aeolian sands. The study area exhibits a high diversity of geomorphological surfaces due to varieties in relief, elevation and climatic conditions. Therefore, it provides the opportunity to investigate the characteristics of sediments in different geomorphological settings. Using the peaks of grain size frequency's standard deviation of primary loess allows identification of the most sensitive fractions to varying accumulation conditions. mU/fS-ratio (7 - 13 μm / 58 - 84 μm) of primary silty loess relates the far-travelled dust proportion to the locally transported fine sand component. In vicinity to fluvial channels in the foreland mU/fS-values are significantly decreased, whereas mU/fS-values increase with altitude (r2 = 0.74). This indicates higher contribution of long distance transport compared to lower regions. A prominent increase of mU/fS-values above 3000 m asl likely indicates an increasing contribution of fine and medium silt particles transported by Westerlies in higher altitudes. In contrast, lower areas seem to be more strongly influenced by low altitude monsoon currents (NW-Winter- / SE-summer monsoon). The difference in grain size properties is additionally enhanced by the contrasting geomorphologic settings along the mountain declivity: Plain foreland alluvial fans support fine sand supply and availability whereas steep high mountain topography provides only limited potential for fine sand deflation. Similarly, the relatively low relief in intramontane

  7. [Characteristics of Chemical Components in PM₂.₅ from the Coal Dust of Power Plants].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-xiu; Peng, Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Teng; Liu, Hai-li; Mu, Ling

    2016-01-15

    The ashes under dust catcher of typical power plants in Yangquan was collected and the contents of elements, irons, EC (elemental carbon) and OC (organic carbon) were measured in PM₂. The characteristics of its chemical composition was studied and the degree of similarity of coal dust's source profiles of PM₂.₅ between Yangquan and other cities were compared using the coefficient of divergence method. The result indicated that the main chemical components of PM₂.₅ from the coal dust were SO₄²⁻,Ca, NO₃⁻, OC, EC, Al, Si, Na, Fe, Mg and Cl⁻, accounting for 57.22% of the total mass. The enrichment factor of Pb in PM₂.₅ of coal dust was the largest with a significant enrichment condition, reaching 10.66-15.91. The coefficient of divergence of source profiles of PM₂.₅ between blind coal and fault coal was 0.072, so it was believed that they must be similar. Compared with other cities, the chemical composition of coal dust in Yangquan had specificity, in particular, the content of Ca was obviously higher than those in other domestic cities. PMID:27078941

  8. Variation in aeolian environments recorded by the particle size distribution of lacustrine sediments in Ebinur Lake, northwest China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Wu, Jinglu; Abuduwaili, Jilili

    2016-01-01

    Particle size analysis of lacustrine core sediments and atmospheric natural dust were conducted in the drainage area of Ebinur Lake in arid northwest China. Using a combination of (137)Cs and (210)Pb dating, a continuous record of aeolian transportation to the lake sediments and related factors over about the past 150 years was analyzed. Factor analysis revealed the particle-size distributions of riverine and aeolian sediments composed of the terrigenous materials of the lake deposits. Compared with the grain-size distributions of natural dust samples, the results showed that the coarser particle size fraction of lake sediments was mainly derived from the sediments that had experienced aeolian transport to the drainage surface, and the finer sediments came from hydraulic inputs. Then, the method of variations in particle-size standard deviation was used to extract the grain size intervals with the highest variability along a sedimentary sequence. The coarser grain-size populations dominated the variation patterns of the sedimentary sequence. During the last 150 years, strong intensity aeolian transportation occurred during three periods, 1915-1935, 1965-1975 and since the beginning of the 2000s. The climate was dry around 1910s-1930s in this region associated with the appropriate dynamic condition, which provided the enhanced source materials and wind power for the aeolian dust transport. Since 1950s, the climate controlled the foundation of aeolian dust transport, and the aeolian dust transport won't be increased under the humid climate. PMID:27217996

  9. The Icelandic volcanic aeolian environment: Processes and impacts - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalds, Olafur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Olafsson, Haraldur

    2016-03-01

    Iceland has the largest area of volcaniclastic sandy desert on Earth or 22,000 km2. The sand has been mostly produced by glacio-fluvial processes, leaving behind fine-grained unstable sediments which are later re-distributed by repeated aeolian events. Volcanic eruptions add to this pool of unstable sediments, often from subglacial eruptions. Icelandic desert surfaces are divided into sand fields, sandy lavas and sandy lag gravel, each with separate aeolian surface characteristics such as threshold velocities. Storms are frequent due to Iceland's location on the North Atlantic Storm track. Dry winds occur on the leeward sides of mountains and glaciers, in spite of the high moisture content of the Atlantic cyclones. Surface winds often move hundreds to more than 1000 kg m-1 per annum, and more than 10,000 kg m-1 have been measured in a single storm. Desertification occurs when aeolian processes push sand fronts and have thus destroyed many previously fully vegetated ecosystems since the time of the settlement of Iceland in the late ninth century. There are about 135 dust events per annum, ranging from minor storms to >300,000 t of dust emitted in single storms. Dust production is on the order of 30-40 million tons annually, some traveling over 1000 km and deposited on land and sea. Dust deposited on deserts tends to be re-suspended during subsequent storms. High PM10 concentrations occur during major dust storms. They are more frequent in the wake of volcanic eruptions, such as after the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption. Airborne dust affects human health, with negative effects enhanced by the tubular morphology of the grains, and the basaltic composition with its high metal content. Dust deposition on snow and glaciers intensifies melting. Moreover, the dust production probably also influences atmospheric conditions and parameters that affect climate change.

  10. Atmospheric ice nucleation by fertile soil dusts particles: Relative importance of mineral and biological components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Daniel; Murray, B. J.; Malkin, T. L.; Webb, M. E.; Whale, T. F.; Atkinson, J. D.; Baustian, K. J.

    2013-05-01

    Dusts emitted from agricultural soils may represent a significant source of atmospheric particulates at mid-latitudes. Such dusts, which can be aerosolised by anthropogenic agricultural activities, have previously been estimated to be present in the atmosphere at sufficient number densities that they could potentially compete with other known ice nuclei (IN). In contrast to soils from arid regions, such as the Sahara, fertile soils contain a larger fraction of biological material, which can lead to an enhancement in the ice nucleating ability of their associated dusts. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the relative efficacy of soil dust particles from fertile soils as IN. Using an experimental methodology designed to increase sensitivity to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterized the immersion mode ice nucleating activities of sub 11 μm particles extracted from surface soils collected in four locations around England. By using a variety of droplet sizes, from pico-to micro-litre, we have been able to characterize the ice active site densities in soils (estimated using a time-independent framework) at temperatures ranging from -5°C down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at ˜ -36°C. At temperatures below -15°C, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at large supercoolings. Conversely, above -15°C we find that the ice nucleating activity of the soils dusts was larger than expected from the mineral composition of the soils. The sites responsible for this high temperature ice nucleating activity were sensitive to heat treatment and digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that they are biological in origin. We conclude that although only being a relatively minor contributor to the global atmospheric dust burden, the

  11. Extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol components in an environmental aerosol chamber: IR resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogili, Praveen K.; Yang, K. H.; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. To better understand the impact that mineral dust aerosol may have on climate forcing and on remote sensing, we have initiated a study of the optical properties of important components of mineral dust aerosol including silicate clays (illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite), quartz, anhydrite, and calcite. The extinction spectra are measured in an environmental simulation chamber over a broad wavelength range, which includes both the IR (650-5000 cm -1) and UV-vis (12,500-40,000 cm -1) spectral regions. In this paper, we focus on the IR region from 800 to 1500 cm -1, where many of these mineral dust constituents have characteristic vibrational resonance features. Experimental spectra are compared with Mie theory simulations based on published mineral optical constants. We find that Mie theory generally does a poor job in fitting the IR resonance peak positions and band profiles for nonspherical aerosols in the accumulation mode size range ( D˜0.1-2.5 μm). We explore particle shape effects on the IR resonance line profiles by considering analytic models for extinction of particles with characteristic shapes (i.e. disks, needles, and ellipsoids). Interestingly, Mie theory often appears to give more accurate results for the absorption line profiles of larger particles that fall in the coarse mode size range.

  12. Airborne Fungal and Bacterial Components in PM1 Dust from Biofuel Plants

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Anne Mette; Schlünssen, Vivi; Olsen, Tina; Sigsgaard, Torben; Avci, Hediye

    2009-01-01

    Fungi grown in pure cultures produce DNA- or RNA-containing particles smaller than spore size (<1.5 μm). High exposures to fungi and bacteria are observed at biofuel plants. Airborne cultivable bacteria are often described to be present in clusters or associated with larger particles with an aerodynamic diameter (dae) of 2–8 μm. In this study, we investigate whether airborne fungal components smaller than spore size are present in bioaerosols in working areas at biofuel plants. Furthermore, we measure the exposure to bacteria and fungal components in airborne particulate matter (PM) with a D50 of 1 μm (called PM1 dust). PM1 was sampled using Triplex cyclones at a working area at 14 Danish biofuel plants. Millipore cassettes were used to sample ‘total dust’. The PM1 particles (29 samples) were analysed for content of 11 different components and the total dust was analysed for cultivable fungi, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase), and (1 → 3)-β-D-glucans. In the 29 PM1 samples, cultivable fungi were found in six samples and with a median concentration below detection level. Using microscopy, fungal spores were identified in 22 samples. The components NAGase and (1 → 3)-β-D-glucans, which are mainly associated with fungi, were present in all PM1 samples. Thermophilic actinomycetes were present in 23 of the 29 PM1 samples [average = 739 colony-forming units (CFU) m−3]. Cultivable and ‘total bacteria’ were found in average concentrations of, respectively, 249 CFU m−3 and 1.8 × 105 m−3. DNA- and RNA-containing particles of different lengths were counted by microscopy and revealed a high concentration of particles with a length of 0.5–1.5 μm and only few particles >1.5 μm. The number of cultivable fungi and β-glucan in the total dust correlated significantly with the number of DNA/RNA-containing particles with lengths of between 1.0 and 1.5 μm, with DNA/RNA-containing particles >1.5 μm, and with other fungal components in PM1

  13. Nonplanar dust-acoustic Gardner solitons in a four-component dusty plasma.

    PubMed

    Mannan, A; Mamun, A A

    2011-08-01

    The nonlinear propagation of Gardner solitons (GSs) in a nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) four-component dusty plasma (composed of inertial positively and negatively dust, Boltzmann electrons, and ions) is studied by the reductive perturbation method. The modified Gardner equation is derived and numerically solved. It has been found that the basic characteristics of the dust-acoustic (DA) GSs, which are shown to exist for μ around its critical value μ(c) [where μ=Z(dp)m(dn)/Z(dn)m(dp), Z(dn) (Z(dp)) is the number of electrons (protons) residing on a negative (positive) dust, m(dp) (m(dn)) is the mass of the positive (negative) dust, μ(c) is the value of μ corresponding to the vanishing of the nonlinear coefficient of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, e.g., μ(c)≃0.174 for μ(e)=n(e0)/Z(dn)n(dn0)=0.2, μ(i)=n(i0)/Z(d)}n(dn0)=0.4, and σ=T(i)/T(e)=0.1, n(e0), n(i0), and n(dn0) are, respectively, electron, ion, and dust number densities, and T(i) (T(e)) is the ion (electron) temperature], are different from those of the KdV solitons, which do not exist for μ around μ(c). It has been also found that the propagation characteristics of nonplanar DA GSs significantly differ from those of planar ones. PMID:21929121

  14. Nonplanar dust-acoustic Gardner solitons in a four-component dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mannan, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2011-08-15

    The nonlinear propagation of Gardner solitons (GSs) in a nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) four-component dusty plasma (composed of inertial positively and negatively dust, Boltzmann electrons, and ions) is studied by the reductive perturbation method. The modified Gardner equation is derived and numerically solved. It has been found that the basic characteristics of the dust-acoustic (DA) GSs, which are shown to exist for {mu} around its critical value {mu}{sub c}[where {mu}=Z{sub dp}m{sub dn}/Z{sub dn}m{sub dp}, Z{sub dn} (Z{sub dp}) is the number of electrons (protons) residing on a negative (positive) dust, m{sub dp} (m{sub dn}) is the mass of the positive (negative) dust, {mu}{sub c} is the value of {mu} corresponding to the vanishing of the nonlinear coefficient of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation, e.g., {mu}{sub c}{approx_equal}0.174 for {mu}{sub e}=n{sub e0}/Z{sub dn}n{sub dn0}=0.2, {mu}{sub i}=n{sub i0}/Z{sub dn}n{sub dn0}=0.4, and {sigma}=T{sub i}/T{sub e}=0.1, n{sub e0}, n{sub i0}, and n{sub dn0} are, respectively, electron, ion, and dust number densities, and T{sub i} (T{sub e}) is the ion (electron) temperature], are different from those of the KdV solitons, which do not exist for {mu} around {mu}{sub c}. It has been also found that the propagation characteristics of nonplanar DA GSs significantly differ from those of planar ones.

  15. Aeolian sand ripples around plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-Hua; Miao, Tian-De

    2003-05-01

    Plants in the desert may locally change the aeolian process, and hence the pattern of sand ripples traveling nearby. The effect of plants on ripples is investigated using a coupled map lattice model with nonuniform coupling coefficients. PMID:12786143

  16. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  17. Mars sampling strategy and aeolian processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    It is critical that the geological context of planetary samples (both in situ analyses and return samples) be well known and documented. Apollo experience showed that this goal is often difficult to achieve even for a planet on which surficial processes are relatively restricted. On Mars, the variety of present and past surface processes is much greater than on the Moon and establishing the geological context of samples will be much more difficult. In addition to impact hardening, Mars has been modified by running water, periglacial activity, wind, and other processes, all of which have the potential for profoundly affecting the geological integrity of potential samples. Aeolian, or wind, processes are ubiquitous on Mars. In the absence of liquid water on the surface, aeolian activity dominates the present surface as documented by frequent dust storms (both local and global), landforms such as dunes, and variable features, i.e., albedo patterns which change their size, shape, and position with time in response to the wind.

  18. Compressive and rarefactive dust-ion-acoustic Gardner solitons in a multi-component dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, S. A.; Ferdousi, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-04-15

    The linear and nonlinear propagations of dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) in a collisionless four-component unmagnetized dusty plasma system containing nonextensive electrons, inertial negative ions, Maxwellian positive ions, and negatively charged static dust grains have been investigated theoretically. The linear properties are analyzed by using the normal mode analysis and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the nonlinear equations, namely, the Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), the modified K-dV (mK-dV), and the Gardner equations. The basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of Gardner solitons (GS) are found to exist beyond the K-dV limit and these dust-ion-acoustic GS are qualitatively different from the K-dV and mK-dV solitons. It is observed that the basic features of DIASWs are affected by various plasma parameters (viz., electron nonextensivity, negative-to-positive ion number density ratio, electron-to-positive ion number density ratio, electron-to-positive ion temperature ratio, etc.) of the considered plasma system. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the nonlinear structures and the characteristics of DIASWs propagating in both space and laboratory plasmas.

  19. Strengthening of North American dust sources during the late Pliocene (2.7 Ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naafs, B. David A.; Hefter, Jens; Acton, Gary; Haug, Gerald H.; Martínez-Garcia, Alfredo; Pancost, Richard; Stein, Ruediger

    2012-02-01

    Here we present orbitally-resolved records of terrestrial higher plant leaf wax input to the North Atlantic over the last 3.5 Ma, based on the accumulation of long-chain n-alkanes and n-alkanl-1-ols at IODP Site U1313. These lipids are a major component of dust, even in remote ocean areas, and have a predominantly aeolian origin in distal marine sediments. Our results demonstrate that around 2.7 million years ago (Ma), coinciding with the intensification of the Northern Hemisphere glaciation (NHG), the aeolian input of terrestrial material to the North Atlantic increased drastically. Since then, during every glacial the aeolian input of higher plant material was up to 30 times higher than during interglacials. The close correspondence between aeolian input to the North Atlantic and other dust records indicates a globally uniform response of dust sources to Quaternary climate variability, although the amplitude of variation differs among areas. We argue that the increased aeolian input at Site U1313 during glacials is predominantly related to the episodic appearance of continental ice sheets in North America and the associated strengthening of glaciogenic dust sources. Evolutional spectral analyses of the n-alkane records were therefore used to determine the dominant astronomical forcing in North American ice sheet advances. These results demonstrate that during the early Pleistocene North American ice sheet dynamics responded predominantly to variations in obliquity (41 ka), which argues against previous suggestions of precession-related variations in Northern Hemisphere ice sheets during the early Pleistocene.

  20. Meteoric streams as an adequacy criterion for models of carryover of the dust component from cometary nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, G.V.

    1995-11-01

    The possibility to use structural and spatial characteristics of meteoric streams as a criterion for the adequacy of physical models of carryover of the dust component from cometary nuclei is considered. Correctness of the physical models of ejection of dust particles is evaluated by comparison between measured and simulated structural characteristics of meteor streams. A special mathematical technique, which enables one to simulate the distribution functions for orbital elements of dust particles and their flux density in the ecliptic plane, is developed for this purpose. It is shown that, by using the Whipple model for ejection of the dust component from cometary nuclei, the simulated characteristics of meteoric streams cannot be fitted to those found from observations.

  1. Persistent Aeolian Activity at Endeavour Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnacki, M.; Michaels, T. I.; Fenton, L. K.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term monitoring of sites that are known to have active dunes and ripples is generally limited to 3 Mars-Years (MY). Here, we discuss new results of dune activity and albedo change in Endeavour crater (EC), Meridiani Planum (MP) that record eight MY of aeolian activity. MP dune fields often show large yearly variations in albedo; EC darkened by ~12% in TES albedo between MY 24 and 26 (from 0.14 to 0.12). THEMIS VIS albedo of dunes did not change significantly from MY 26 to 29, but did decrease notably (~15 %) in MY 30. These darkening events are most likely related to aeolian-driven dust cleaning (e.g., removal by saltating sand, dust devils). For example, the Opportunity rover (poised on the western rim of EC) observed evidence for a MY 31 dune field dust-clearing event. HiRISE monitoring of MP has shown it be one of the most active regions outside of north polar latitudes. Paired images of western EC taken 3 MY apart show clear evidence for dune modification that include: ripple migration, change in dune perimeters, exposure of previously buried light-toned rock, and/or burial of rock by sand (Fig. 1a-1b). Dune slip face movement is evident for most dunes, where crests and aprons advanced (2-7 m) in the downwind direction (to the SSE) at rates of 0.7-2.3 m per MY. Small dome dunes in the eastern EC were found to have a large degree of aeolian activity (e.g., deflation and/or translation) by an earlier study that used MGS-MRO images (MY 24-30). New MY 31 images validate earlier observations, showing clear evidence for bedform deflation where dunes often occupy less area (~50%) than in earlier MY 29 images (Fig. 1c-1d). Areal removal rates are on par with earlier estimates. Bedform modification and sand streamer orientation appear to be caused by a NNW wind regime, consistent with earlier observations, mesoscale modeling, and the transport direction of barchans to the west. Dunes in EC are now known to be periodically (consistently?) active from over a decade

  2. Laboratory Simulations of Martian and Venusian Aeolian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work was to conduct research in the Planetary Aeolian Facility (PAF) at NASA-Ames Research Center as a laboratory for the planetary science community and to carry-out experiments on the physics and geology of particles moved by winds, and for the development of instruments and spacecraft components for planetary missions.

  3. Detecting Patterns of Aeolian Transport Direction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The magnitude and direction of aeolian transport are of direct interest to those engaged in the study of aeolian processes. Although the magnitude of sediment transport has been studied extensively, the study of aeolian transport direction has garnered less attention. This paper describes the deve...

  4. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  5. Cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, Donald E.; Sandford, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    Dust is a ubiquitous component of our galaxy and the solar system. The collection and analysis of extraterrestrial dust particles is important to exobiology because it provides information about the sources of biogenically significant elements and compounds that accumulated in distant regions of the solar nebula and that were later accreted on the planets. The topics discussed include the following: general properties of interplanetary dust; the carbonaceous component of interplanetary dust particles; and the presence of an interstellar component.

  6. Aeolian Sand Transport with Collisional Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, James T.; Pasini, Jose Miguel; Valance, Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    Aeolian transport is an important mechanism for the transport of sand on Earth and on Mars. Dust and sand storms are common occurrences on Mars and windblown sand is responsible for many of the observed surface features, such as dune fields. A better understanding of Aeolian transport could also lead to improvements in pneumatic conveying of materials to be mined for life support on the surface of the Moon and Mars. The usual view of aeolian sand transport is that for mild winds, saltation is the dominant mechanism, with particles in the bed being dislodged by the impact of other saltating particles, but without in-flight collisions. As the wind becomes stronger, turbulent suspension keeps the particles in the air, allowing much longer trajectories, with the corresponding increase in transport rate. We show here that an important regime exists between these two extremes: for strong winds, but before turbulent suspension becomes dominant, there is a regime in which in-flight collisions dominate over turbulence as a suspension mechanism, yielding transport rates much higher than those for saltation. The theory presented is based on granular kinetic theory, and includes both turbulent suspension and particle-particle collisions. The wind strengths for which the calculated transport rates are relevant are beyond the published strengths of current wind tunnel experiments, so these theoretical results are an invitation to do experiments in the strong-wind regime. In order to make a connection between the regime of saltation and the regime of collisional suspension, it is necessary to better understand the interaction between the bed and the particles that collide with it. This interaction depends on the agitation of the particles of the bed. In mild winds, collisions with the bed are relatively infrequent and the local disturbance associated with a collision can relax before the next nearby collision. However, as the wind speed increases, collision become more frequent

  7. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  8. Infrared extinction spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy of select components of mineral dust mixed with organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2013-06-01

    Radiative transfer calculations as well as satellite and ground-based retrieval algorithms often use Mie theory to account for atmospheric mineral dust. However, the approximations used in Mie theory are often not appropriate for mineral dust and can lead to inaccuracies in modeling optical properties. Analytic models that are based on Rayleigh theory and account for particle shapes can offer significant advantages when used to model the IR extinction of mineral dust in the accumulation size mode. Here we extend our investigations of the IR optical properties of mineral dust to include samples that have been processed with organic acids. In particular, we aerosolize several individual components of mineral dust with organic compounds that are common in the atmosphere. Through online and offline analysis of the resulting aerosol particles combining Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we have identified three distinct outcomes of the interactions, which depend on the nature of the mineral and the organic acid: reactions with segregation of the products within the particle, formation of a uniform coating on the particle, or a formation of external mixture when there is no significant chemical interaction. Analysis of FTIR extinction spectra of the different dust components that have undergone processing shows red shifts of the prominent IR resonance peaks. The extent of the red shift, which varies from 2 to 10 cm-1, depends on the mineral and the nature of the interaction. Spectral simulations showed that the deviation from Mie theory becomes even more pronounced for these processed mineral dust aerosol components.

  9. Immunoglobulin E to allergen components of house dust mite in Korean children with allergic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan Soo; Kang, Sung Hee; Won, Sulmui; Lee, Eu Kyoung; Chun, Yoon Hong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Kim, Jin Tack

    2015-01-01

    Background House dust mites (HDMs) are important sources of indoor allergens. Seventeen components have been identified from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p). Objective Our aim was to define the prevalence of specific IgE to components of Der p in Korea and investigate the clinical features of them in children with allergic disease. Methods We performed a prospective evaluation of 80 HDM sensitized patients with history of allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD), asthma and urticaria (UC). Patients underwent ImmunoCAP for total IgE, Der p, Der f, Der p 1, Der p 2, and Der p 10. Results Seventy-nine patients had detectable serum IgE to Der p, 80 patients were sensitized to Der f, 66 patients were sensitized to Der p 1, 63 patients to Der p 2, and 7 patients were sensitized to Der p 10. Der p 1 specific IgE was significantly lower in the UC group compared with the AD and AR group. Total IgE was significantly higher in the Der p 10 sensitized group. Der p 10 serum IgE level was highly correlated with crab and shrimp specific IgE. There was a significant positive correlation between total IgE and specific IgE to Der p and its components and Der f. Conclusion Sensitization to HDM and its components in Korea is similar to previous studies from temperate climate. The determination of Der p 1, Der p 2, and Der p 10 specific IgE helps in obtaining additional information in regards to allergic disease. PMID:26240792

  10. Temporal and spatial variations in provenance of Eastern Mediterranean Sea sediments: Implications for Aegean and Aeolian arc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, Martijn; Djuly, Thomas; de Graaf, Stefan; Sakes, Alex; Wijbrans, Jan; Davies, Gareth; Vroon, Pieter

    2015-03-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) is the last remnant of the Tethys Ocean that has been subducted to the north since the Jurassic. Subduction has led to the formation of multiple island arcs in the EMS region where the Aeolian and Aegean arcs are currently active. The EMS is surrounded by continents and receives a large sediment input, part of which is transported down with the subducting slab into the mantle and potentially contributes a major flux to the arc volcanism. An along-arc gradient in the composition of subducting sediment has been evoked to explain the distinct geochemical signature of the easternmost volcanic centre of the Aegean arc, but direct evidence for this proposal is lacking. We present a detailed study of the mineralogical, major-, trace elements and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope composition of 45 Neogene EMS sediment samples obtained from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drill sites and box cores to characterise their geochemical composition, distinguish provenance components and investigate the temporal and spatial variation in provenance to evaluate the potential changing contribution of subducted EMS sediment to Aegean and Aeolian arc volcanism. Based on trace element characteristics of EMS sediments, we can distinguish four provenance components. Nile sediment and Sahara dust are the main components, but contributions from the Tethyan ophiolite belt and arc volcanic rocks in the north are also recognised. Pliocene and Quaternary EMS sediment records a strong geochemical gradient where Nile River sediment entering the EMS in the east is progressively diluted by Sahara Desert dust towards the west. Pre-Messinian samples, however, have a remarkably homogeneous composition with Nile sediment characteristics. We relate this rapid increase in Sahara dust contribution to a late Miocene climate shift leading to decreased Nile runoff and aridification of the Sahara region. EMS sediment has a restricted range in Pb isotopes

  11. Seasonal contribution of mineral dust and other major components to particulate matter at two remote sites in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Schulze, Justin P.; Shafer, Martin; Schauer, James J.; Heo, Jongbae; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Artamonova, Maria; Chen, Boris; Imashev, Sanjar; Sverdlik, Leonid; Carmichael, Greg; DeMinter, Jeff

    2015-10-01

    Dust storms are significant contributors to ambient levels of particulate matter (PM) in many areas of the world. Central Asia, an area that is relatively understudied in this regard, is anticipated to be affected by dust storms due to its proximity to several major deserts that are in and generally surround Central Asia (e.g., the Aral Sea region, the Taklimakan desert in Western China). To investigate the relative importance of mineral dust (dust specifically composed of soil related minerals and oxides) in Central Asia, PM10 and PM2.5, and by difference, coarse particles (particles with diameters between 2.5 and 10 μm) were measured at two sites, Bishkek and Lidar Station Teplokluchenka (Lidar), in the Kyrgyz Republic. Samples were collected every other day from July 2008 to July 2009. Daily samples were analyzed for mass and organic and elemental carbon. Samples were also composited on a bi-weekly basis and analyzed for elemental constituents and ionic components. In addition, samples collected on days with relatively high and low PM concentrations were analyzed before, and separately, from the biweekly composites to investigate the chemical differences between the episodic events. Data from the episodic samples were averaged into the composited averages. Using the elemental component data, several observational models were examined to estimate the contribution of mineral dust to ambient PM levels. A mass balance was also conducted. Results indicate that at both sites, mineral dust (as approximated by the "dust oxide" model) and organic matter (OM) were the dominant contributors to PM10 and PM2.5. Mineral dust was a more significant contributor to the coarse PM (PM10-2.5) during high event samples at both sites, although the relative contribution is greater at the Lidar site (average ± standard deviation = 42 ± 29%) as compared with the Bishkek site (26 ± 16%). Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was performed using data from both sites, and PCA indicated

  12. Addition of alarm pheromone components improves the effectiveness of desiccant dusts against Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Joshua B; Phillips, Seth A; Croxall, Travis J; Christensen, Brady S; Yoder, Jay A; Denlinger, David L

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate that the addition of bed bug, Cimex lectularius, alarm pheromone to desiccant formulations greatly enhances their effectiveness during short-term exposure. Two desiccant formulations, diatomaceous earth (DE) and Dri-die (silica gel), were applied at the label rate with and without bed bug alarm pheromone components, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, and a (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend. First-instar nymphs and adult females were subjected to 10-min exposures, and water loss rates were used to evaluate the response. Optimal effectiveness was achieved with a pheromone concentration of 0.01 M. With Dri-die alone, the water loss was 21% higher than in untreated controls, and water loss increased nearly two times with (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal and three times with the (E)-2-hexenal: (E)-2-octenal blend. This shortened survival of first-instar nymphs from 4 to 1 d, with a similar reduction noted in adult females. DE was effective only if supplemented with pheromone, resulting in a 50% increase in water loss over controls with the (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend, and a survival decrease from 4 to 2 d in first-instar nymphs. Consistently, the addition of the pheromone blend to desiccant dust was more effective than adding either component by itself or by using Dri-die or DE alone. Based on observations in a small microhabitat, the addition of alarm pheromone components prompted bed bugs to leave their protective harborages and to move through the desiccant, improving the use of desiccants for control. We concluded that short exposure to Dri-die is a more effective treatment against bed bugs than DE and that the effectiveness of the desiccants can be further enhanced by incorporation of alarm pheromone. Presumably, the addition of alarm pheromone elevates excited crawling activity, thereby promoting cuticular changes that increase water loss. PMID:19496429

  13. Addition of Alarm Pheromone Components Improves the Effectiveness of Desiccant Dusts Against Cimex lectularius

    PubMed Central

    BENOIT, JOSHUA B.; PHILLIPS, SETH A.; CROXALL, TRAVIS J.; CHRISTENSEN, BRADY S.; YODER, JAY A.; DENLINGER, DAVID L.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the addition of bed bug, Cimex lectularius, alarm pheromone to desiccant formulations greatly enhances their effectiveness during short-term exposure. Two desiccant formulations, diatomaceous earth (DE) and Dri-die (silica gel), were applied at the label rate with and without bed bug alarm pheromone components, (E)-2-hexenal, (E)-2-octenal, and a (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend. First-instar nymphs and adult females were subjected to 10-min exposures, and water loss rates were used to evaluate the response. Optimal effectiveness was achieved with a pheromone concentration of 0.01 M. With Dri-die alone, the water loss was 21% higher than in untreated controls, and water loss increased nearly two times with (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal and three times with the (E)-2-hexenal: (E)-2-octenal blend. This shortened survival of first-instar nymphs from 4 to 1 d, with a similar reduction noted in adult females. DE was effective only if supplemented with pheromone, resulting in a 50% increase in water loss over controls with the (E)-2-hexenal:(E)-2-octenal blend, and a survival decrease from 4 to 2 d in first-instar nymphs. Consistently, the addition of the pheromone blend to desiccant dust was more effective than adding either component by itself or by using Dri-die or DE alone. Based on observations in a small microhabitat, the addition of alarm pheromone components prompted bed bugs to leave their protective harborages and to move through the desiccant, improving the use of desiccants for control. We concluded that short exposure to Dri-die is a more effective treatment against bed bugs than DE and that the effectiveness of the desiccants can be further enhanced by incorporation of alarm pheromone. Presumably, the addition of alarm pheromone elevates excited crawling activity, thereby promoting cuticular changes that increase water loss. PMID:19496429

  14. Enhancement of inorganic Martian dust simulant with carbon component and its effects on key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    Evidence on the past existence of subsurface organic-bearing fluids on Mars was recently achieved basing on the investigation of organic carbon from the Tissint Martian meteorite (Lin et al., 2014). Tremendous amount of meteorites containing abundant carbon and carbon-enriched dust particles have reached the Earth daily (Pizzarello and Shock 2010). National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Institute of Health panel of research scientists revealed recently that accumulating evidences suggest that nano-sized air pollution may have a significant impact on central nervous system in health and disease (Block et al., Neurotoxicology, 2012). During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Based on above facts, the aims of this study were: 1) to upgrade inorganic Martian dust stimulant derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, nanodiamonds; 2) to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission and to compare its effects with those of inorganic dust and carbon components per se. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in Na+-dependent uptake of L-[14C]glutamate that is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of isolated rat brain nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon-contained Martian dust analogue. This fact indicated that carbon component of native Martian dust can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the CNS, and so glutamatergic neurtransmission.

  15. Saharan dust deposition in the Carpathian Basin and its possible effects on interglacial soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Cserháti, Csaba; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Several hundred tons of windblown dust material are lifted into the atmosphere and are transported every year from Saharan dust source areas towards Europe having an important climatic and other environmental effect also on distant areas. According to the systematic observations of modern Saharan dust events, it can be stated that dust deflated from North African source areas is a significant constituent of the atmosphere of the Carpathian Basin and Saharan dust deposition events are identifiable several times in a year. Dust episodes are connected to distinct meteorological situations, which are also the determining factors of the different kinds of depositional mechanisms. By using the adjusted values of dust deposition simulations of numerical models, the annual Saharan dust flux can be set into the range of 3.2-5.4 g/m2/y. Based on the results of past mass accumulation rates calculated from stratigraphic and sedimentary data of loess-paleosol sequences, the relative contribution of Saharan dust to interglacial paleosol material was quantified. According to these calculations, North African exotic dust material can represent 20-30% of clay and fine silt-sized soil components of interglacial paleosols in the Carpathian Basin. The syngenetic contribution of external aeolian dust material is capable to modify physicochemical properties of soils and hereby the paleoclimatic interpretation of these pedogene stratigraphic units.

  16. Publication trends in Aeolian research: An analysis of the biblography of Aeolian research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analysis of the Bibliography of Aeolian Research has provided information regarding publication trends in aeolian research. Overall, results suggest that there has been a significant increase in the number of publications per year since the first aeolian-research publication appeared in 1646. P...

  17. Effects of particle shape, hematite content and semi-external mixing with carbonaceous components on the optical properties of accumulation mode mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Tripathi, S. N.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Arola, A.

    2010-12-01

    The radiative forcing estimation of the polluted mineral dust is limited due to lack of morphological analysis, mixing state with the carbonaceous components and the hematite content in the pure dust. The accumulation mode mineral dust has been found to mix with anthropogenically produced black carbon, organic carbon and brown carbon during long range transport. The above features of the polluted dust are not well accounted in the optical models and lead the uncertainty in the numerical estimation of their radiative impact. The Semi-external mixing being a prominent mixing of dust and carbonaceous components has not been studied in details so for compared to core-shell, internal and external mixing studies. In present study, we consider the pure mineral dust composed of non-metallic components (such as Quartz, Feldspar, Mica and Calcite) and metalic component like hematite (Fe2O3). The hematite percentage in the pure mineral dust governs its absorbance. Based on this hematite variation, the hematite fraction in pure mineral dust has been constrained between 0-8%. The morphological and mineralogical characterization of the polluted dust led to consider the three sphere, two sphere and two spheroid model shapes for polluted dust particle system. The pollution gives rise to various light absorbing aerosol components like black carbon, brown carbon and organic carbon (comprising of HUmic-Like Substances, HULIS) in the atmosphere. The entire above discussed model shapes have been considered for the mineral dust getting polluted with (1) organic carbon (especially HULIS component) (2) Brown carbon and (3) black carbon by making a semi-external mixture with pure mineral dust. The optical properties (like Single Scattering Albedo, SSA; Asymmetry parameter, g and Extinction efficiency, Qext) of above model shapes for the polluted dust have been computed using Discrete Dipole Approximation, DDA code. For above model shapes, the SSA was found to vary depending on hematite

  18. Interstellar matter in Shapley-Ames elliptical galaxies. IV. A diffusely distributed component of dust and its effect on colour gradients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, P.; de Jong, T.

    1995-06-01

    We have investigated IRAS far-infrared observations of a complete, blue magnitude limited sample of 56 elliptical galaxies selected from the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog. Data from a homogeneous optical CCD imaging survey as well as published X-ray data from the EINSTEIN satellite are used to constrain the infrared data. Dust masses as determined from the IRAS flux densities are found to be roughly an order of magnitude higher than those determined from optical extinction values of dust lanes and patches, in strong contrast with the situation in spiral galaxies. This "mass discrepancy" is found to be independent of the (apparent) inclination of the dust lanes. To resolve this dilemma we postulate that the majority of the dust in elliptical galaxies exists as a diffusely distributed component of dust which is undetectable at optical wavelengths. Using observed radial optical surface brightness profiles, we have systematically investigated possible heating mechanisms for the dust within elliptical galaxies. We find that heating of the dust in elliptical galaxies by the interstellar radiation field is generally sufficient to account for the dust temperatures as indicated by the IRAS flux densities. Collisions of dust grains with hot electrons in elliptical galaxies which are embedded in a hot, X-ray-emitting gas is found to be another effective heating mechanism for the dust. Employing model calculations which involve the transfer of stellar radiation in a spherical distribution of stars mixed with a diffuse distribution of dust, we show that the observed infrared luminosities imply total dust optical depths of the postulated diffusely distributed dust component in the range 0.1<~τ_V_<~0.7 and radial colour gradients 0.03<~{DELTA}(B-I)/{DELTA}log r<~0.25. The observed IRAS flux densities can be reproduced within the 1σ uncertainties in virtually all ellipticals in this sample by this newly postulated dust component, diffusely distributed over the inner few kpc of

  19. Evaluation of aeolian desertification from 1975 to 2010 and its causes in northwest Shanxi Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhanjin; Qin, Zuodong; Li, Hongjian; Ding, Guangwei; Meng, Xianwen

    2013-08-01

    Efforts to control aeolian desertification in China have focused on the arid and semiarid regions. However, the direct dust emission rates, sediment characteristics and local-scale controls, as well as the measures needed to combat desertification, remain poorly understood in northwest Shanxi Province. Aeolian desertification is regarded as an obstacle to local sustainable socioeconomic development. This paper investigated changes in aeolian desertification between 1975 and 2010 on the northwestern Shanxi Plateau. In this study, remote sensing images were used to classify land suffering from aeolian desertification into four categories: light, moderate, severe, and extremely severe. To evaluate the evolution and status of aeolian desertification as well as its causes, we interpreted and analyzed Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) image (acquired in 1975) and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images (acquired in 1991, 2000, 2006, and 2010) as well as meteorological and socioeconomic data. Results revealed 11,866 km2, 13,362 km2, 14,051 km2, 13,613 km2, and 12,318 km2 of aeolian desertified land (ADL) in the above 5 periods, respectively. The spatial dynamics and patterns showed two stages: expansion during 1975-2000 at a rate of 87.37 km2 a- 1, and spatial transfer of affected areas during 2000-2010 with a net decrease of 173.27 km2 a- 1. During the evolution of aeolian desertification, areas of moderate ADL had the greatest dynamic response (11.45%). The factors controlling ADL dynamics were analyzed from the perspectives of two groups of factors: natural factors and human activities. Our results indicated that the climate-dominated natural factors contribute greatly to the occurrence and development of ADL. However, they are not the fundamental causes of its development. The human factors are the primary and direct driving forces responsible for the increase in ADL area. More thorough quantitative analysis, with more frequent remotely sensed data is needed to assess

  20. Effects of mineral dust on the semivolatile inorganic aerosol components in a polluted Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Molina, L. T.; Pandis, S. N.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosols play a significant role in the atmosphere having adverse impacts on human health and directly affecting air quality, visibility and climate change. One of the most challenging tasks for models is the prediction of the partitioning of the semivolatile inorganic aerosol components (ammonia, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, etc) between the gas and particulate phases. Moreover, the effects of mineral aerosols in the atmosphere remain largely uncertain. As a result, most current models have serious difficulties in reproducing the observed particulate nitrate and chloride concentrations. The improved aerosol thermodynamic model ISORROPIA II (Fountoukis and Nenes, 2007) simulating explicitly the chemistry of Ca, Mg, and K salts has been linked to the regional chemical transport model PMCAMx (Gaydos et al., 2007). PMCAMx also includes the CMU inorganic aerosol growth module (Gaydos et al., 2003; Koo et al., 2003a) and the VSRM aqueous-phase chemistry module (Fahey and Pandis, 2001). The hybrid approach (Koo et al., 2003b) for modeling aerosol dynamics is applied in order to accurately simulate the inorganic components in the coarse mode. This approach assumes that the smallest particles are in equilibrium, while the condensation/evaporation equation is solved for the larger ones. PMCAMx is applied to the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The emission inventory has been improved and now includes more accurate dust and NaCl emissions. The April 2003 (MCMA Campaign) and the March 2006 (MILAGRO campaign) datasets are used to evaluate the inorganic aerosol module of PMCAMx in order to test our understanding of inorganic aerosol. The results from the new modeling framework are also compared with the results from the previous version of PMCAMx in order to investigate the influence of each of the added features to the formation of the semivolatile inorganic components. References Fountoukis, C. and Nenes, A., (2007). ISORROPIA II: a computationally efficient

  1. Aeolian Processes at the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Calvin, W.; Fike, D.; Golombek, M.; Greeley, R.; Grotzinger, J.; Herkenhoff, K.; Jerolmack, D.; Malin, M.

    2005-01-01

    The traverse of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity across its Meridiani Planum landing site has shown that wind has affected regolith by creating drifts, dunes, and ubiquitous ripples, by sorting grains during aeolian transport, by forming bright wind streaks downwind from craters seen from orbit, and by eroding rock with abrading, wind-blown material. Pre-landing orbiter observations showed bright and dark streaks tapering away from craters on the Meridiani plains. Further analysis of orbiter images shows that major dust storms can cause bright streak orientations in the area to alternate between NW and SE, implying bright wind streak materials encountered by Opportunity are transient, potentially mobilized deposits. Opportunity performed the first in situ investigation of a martian wind streak, focusing on a bright patch of material just outside the rim of Eagle crater. Data from Pancam, the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES), the Alpha-Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), and the Mossbauer spectrometer either are consistent with or permit an air fall dust interpretation. We conclude that air fall dust, deposited in the partial wind shadow of Eagle crater, is responsible for the bright streak seen from orbit, consistent with models involving patchy, discontinuous deposits of air fall dust distributed behind obstacles during periods of atmospheric thermal stability during major dust storms.

  2. The birth and death of transverse aeolian ridges on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Transverse aeolian ridges (TARs) are small bright windblown deposits found throughout the Martian tropics that stand a few meters tall and are spaced a few tens of meters apart. The origin of these features remains mysterious more than 20 years after their discovery on Mars. This paper presents a new hypothesis, that some of the TARs could be indurated dust deposits emplaced millions of years ago during periods of higher axial obliquity. It suggests that these TARs are primary depositional bed forms that accumulated in place from dust carried by the winds in suspension, perhaps in a manner comparable to antidunes on Earth, and were subsequently indurated and eroded to their current states by eons of sandblasting. It points out examples of modern dust drifts and dune-like features that appear to have been recently formed by dust accumulating directly onto the surface from atmospheric suspension. It shows how these pristine dust deposits could evolve to explain the range of morphologies of the TARs. Finally, it explains how the known properties of many TARs are consistent with this hypothesis, including their composition, thermal behavior, and distribution.

  3. Aeolian Coastal Landscapes in changes (a study from Tahkuna, Estonia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, A.

    2012-04-01

    The openness of the coast to the winds and storm waves has an important part in changing aeolian coastal landscapes as well as anthropogenic factor. The aeolian coastal landscapes are probably the most dynamic areas. Occurrence of aeolian coastal landscapes in Estonia is limited. They consist of sandy beaches, sandy beach ridges and dunes. The coastal ecosystems are strongly affected by their topography, based on the character of deposits and moisture conditions. The majority of their ecosystems are quite close to the specific natural habitat. These ecosystems are represented in the list of the European Union Habitats (Natura 2000). In recent decades human influence has changed the landscape over time in different activities (recreation, trampling, off-road driving) and their intensities, which has led to destruction or degradation of various habitats. Previously coastal landscapes were used for forestry and pasture. Nowadays one of the most serious threats to open landscape is afforestation. This study examines the relationships between landscape components during last decades. Trying to find out how much aeolian coastal landscapes are influenced by natural processes or human activities. The results are based on cartographic analysis, fieldwork data. The method of landscape complex profile was used. The profiles show a cross-sections of landforms and interrelationships between landscape components, most frequently describing the relations between soils and vegetation. In each sample point the mechanical composition of sediments, vegetation cover and soil is determined. Results show that changes in landscapes are induced by their own development as well as changes in environmental factors and human activities. Larger changes are due to increase of coastal processes activity. These processes can be observed in sandy beaches, which are easily transformed by waves. Higher sea levels during storm surges are reaching older beach formation, causing erosion and creating

  4. Mixing of Asian dust with pollution aerosol and the transformation of aerosol components during the dust storm over China in spring 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kan; Zhuang, Guoshun; Li, Juan; Wang, Qiongzhen; Sun, Yele; Lin, Yanfen; Fu, Joshua S.

    2010-04-01

    An intensive spring aerosol sampling campaign over northwestern and northern China and a megacity in eastern China was conducted in the spring of 2007 to investigate the mixing of Asian dust with pollution aerosol during its long-range transport. On the basis of the results of the three sites near dust source regions (Tazhong, Yulin, and Duolun) and a metropolitan city (Shanghai), three dust sources, i.e., the western high-Ca dust in the Taklimakan Desert, the northwestern high-Ca dust and the northeastern low-Ca dust in Mongolia Gobi, were identified on the basis of the air mass trajectories and the elemental tracer analysis (e.g., Ca/Al, SO42-/S, Ca2+/Ca, and Na+/Na). The western dust was least polluted in comparison to the other two dust sources. The results evidently indicated that the dust could have already mixed with pollution aerosol even in near dust source regions. The concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, and S were elevated several times at all sites during dust days, showing the entrainment of pollution elements by dust. The secondary SO42- was observed to show much higher concentration due to the heterogeneous reaction on the alkaline dust during dust storm, while the concentrations of NO3- and NH4+ decreased owing to the dilution of the local pollution by the invaded dust. The western dust contained relatively low anthropogenic aerosols, and it mainly derived from the Taklimakan Desert, a paleomarine source. The northwestern dust had a considerable chemical reactivity and mixing with sulfur precursors emitted from the coal mines on the pathway of the long-range transport of dust. The northeastern dust reached Shanghai with high acidity, and it became the mixed aerosol with the interaction among dust, local pollutants, and sea salts. Comparison of the speciation of the water-soluble ions on both nondust and dust days at all sites illustrated the evolution of major ion species from different dust sources during the long-range transport of dust. The

  5. Mineralogical controls on dust emissions in the Bodele Depression, Chad

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface mineralogy is critical in the understanding of aeolian processes, however its role in dust production is currently underestimated. Recent research indicates that discrepancies between predicted and observed dust loads by dust models may be attributed to inadequacies within their associated d...

  6. Distinguishing and characterising point-source mining dust and diffuse-source dust deposits in a semi-arid district of eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattle, Stephen R.; Hemi, Karl; Pearson, Garry L.; Sanderson, Todd

    The routine monitoring of dust deposition around mines does not typically distinguish between allochthonous and locally-sourced dust. In this paper, contemporary aeolian dust deposition within a semi-arid part of eastern Australia is examined to determine the contribution of an open-pit gold mine to local dust dynamics. Over a 2.5 year period, monthly deposited dust samples were obtained from 12 sites located around the Cowal Gold Mine (CGM), and analysed for inorganic and organic proportions and granulometric properties. Although there was considerable variation in deposition between the gauges and sampling periods, there was a moderate and statistically significant seasonal trend, with mineral dust deposition lowest in winter. Imprinted over this seasonal pattern was a distinct spatial pattern of dust deposition, with gauges downwind of the CGM receiving significantly more dust than those gauges upwind (20 t/km2/yr). This effect was most pronounced adjacent to the mine (dust deposition of 60 t/km2/yr), where coarse-grained particles comprised a large proportion of the deposited dust, and diminished with distance east of the mine. Such a spatial trend is typical of a point source of dust. Average dust deposition at gauges located 8 km downwind of the mine was only slightly greater than that of gauges upwind of the mine. The 'background' dust populations captured at the upwind locations were dominated by fine particles, with modal particle diameters of 3-5 and 13-16 μm common. The macro-organic component of dust deposits also tended to vary seasonally, but the spatial distribution of this material was quite erratic.

  7. Environmental Sequencing of Biotic Components of Dust in the Chihuahuan Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, E.; Gill, T. E.; Rivas, J. A., Jr.; Leung, M. Y.; Mohl, J.

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of studies mark the role of wind in dispersing biota. Most of these approaches have used traditional methods to assess taxonomic diversity. Here we used next generation sequencing to characterize microbiota in dust collected from the Chihuahuan Desert. Atmospheric dust was collected during events during 2011-2014 using dry deposition collectors placed at two sites in El Paso Co., TX. In parallel experiments, we rehydrated subsamples of dust and conducted PCR amplifications using conserved primers for 16S and 18S ribosomal genes. Sequenced reads were de-multiplexed, quality filtered, and processed using QIIME. Taxonomy was assigned based on pairwise identity using BLAST for microbial eukaryotes. All samples were rarefied to a set number of sequences per sample prior to downstream analyses. Bioinformatic analysis of four of the dust samples yielded a diversity of biota, including zooplankton, bacteria, fungi, algae, and protists, but fungi predominate (>90% of both 10K and 3K reads). In our rehydrations of dust samples from the U.S. southwest nematodes, gastrotrichs, tardigrades, monogonont and bdelloid rotifers, branchiopods and numerous ciliates have been recovered. Variability in genetic diversity among samples is based, in part, on the source and extent of the particular dust event. We anticipate the same patterns will be seen in the complete data set. These preliminary results indicate that wind is a major transporter of not only fungi, bacteria and other unicellular organisms but may also be important in shaping the distribution patterns of multi-cellular organisms such as those that inhabit aquatic environments in the arid southwestern US.

  8. Process to eliminate hazardous components from the electric arc furnace flue dust and recovering of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lazcano-Navarro, A.

    1988-08-09

    This patent describes a method to recover metals from flue dust generated in an electric arc furnace, the method comprising: charging pelletized or powder flue dust into an electric induction furnace between induction susceptors; sealing of the furnace top to prevent entry of air; injecting natural gas through the bottom of the electric induction furnace as a solitary reducing agent; heating the charge by electromagnetic induction of the susceptors to provide reduction energy; recovering of heavy metals as a zinclead-cadmium alloy in a condenser at the top of the furnace; burning and scrubbing exiting gases in the condenser; and melting the remaining iron to produce steel and slag.

  9. The implementation of NEMS GFS Aerosol Component (NGAC) Version 1.0 for global dust forecasting at NOAA/NCEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Hsuan; da Silva, Arlindo; Wang, Jun; Moorthi, Shrinivas; Chin, Mian; Colarco, Peter; Tang, Youhua; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Chen, Shen-Po; Chuang, Hui-Ya; Juang, Hann-Ming Henry; McQueen, Jeffery; Iredell, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) implemented the NOAA Environmental Modeling System (NEMS) Global Forecast System (GFS) Aerosol Component (NGAC) for global dust forecasting in collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). NGAC Version 1.0 has been providing 5-day dust forecasts at 1° × 1° resolution on a global scale, once per day at 00:00 Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), since September 2012. This is the first global system capable of interactive atmosphere aerosol forecasting at NCEP. The implementation of NGAC V1.0 reflects an effective and efficient transitioning of NASA research advances to NCEP operations, paving the way for NCEP to provide global aerosol products serving a wide range of stakeholders, as well as to allow the effects of aerosols on weather forecasts and climate prediction to be considered.

  10. Bursts in discontinuous Aeolian saltation.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, M V; Rasmussen, K R; Herrmann, H J

    2015-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of discontinuous flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the fluid threshold Shields number θc. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain discontinuous flux even below the fluid threshold. PMID:26073305

  11. Bursts in discontinuous Aeolian saltation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, M. V.; Rasmussen, K. R.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of discontinuous flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the fluid threshold Shields number θc. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain discontinuous flux even below the fluid threshold. PMID:26073305

  12. Aerosol characteristics and surface radiative forcing components during a dust outbreak in Gwangju, Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ogunjobi, K O; Kim, Y J

    2008-02-01

    Atmospheric surface aerosol radiative forcing (SARF) DeltaF, forcing efficiency DeltaF(e) and fractional forcing efficiency DeltaFF(e) evaluated from cloud-screened narrowband spectral and thermal-offset-corrected radiometric observations during the Asia dust outbreak episodes in Gwangju, Republic of Korea are reported in this study. Columnar aerosol optical properties (aerosol optical depth (AOD), tau (alambda), Angstrom exponent alpha, mass concentration of fine and coarse mode particles) were also reported for the station between January 2000 and May 2001 consisting of 211cloud-free days. Results indicate that majority of the AOD were within the range 0.25-0.45 while some high aerosol events in which AODs > or = 0.6 were observed during the severe dust episodes. For example, AOD increases from annual average value of 0.34 +/- 0.13 at 501 nm to values >0.60 during the major dust events of March 27-30 and April 7-9, 2000, respectively. The alpha (501-870 nm) which is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size had values ranging from 0.01 to 1.77. The diurnal forcing efficiency DeltaDF(e) at Gwangju was estimated to be -81.10 +/- 5.14 W m (-2)/tau (501 nm) and -47.09 +/- 2.20 W m (-2)/tau (501 nm) for the total solar broadband and visible band pass, respectively while the fractional diurnal forcing efficiency DeltaFDF(e) were -15.8 +/- 0.64%/tau (501 nm) and -22.87 +/- 1.13%/tau (501 nm) for the same band passes. Analyses of the 5-day air-mass back trajectories were further developed for Gwangju in order to classify the air-mass and types of aerosol reaching the site during the Asia dust episodes. PMID:17458510

  13. Flood Induced Increases in Aeolian Transport Along the Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benthem, A. J.; Strong, L.; Schenk, E.; Skalak, K.; Hupp, C. R.; Galloway, J.

    2014-12-01

    In 2011, heavy winter snow melt combined with extensive spring rains caused the Missouri River to experience the most extensive flooding since the river was dammed in the 1950s. Large sections of the river banks, islands, and floodplains experienced weeks of prolonged inundation, resulting in extensive sand deposition as up to1 km inland from the established channel. Though locally variable, deposits of up to 3m of loose sand were deposited on the floodplain and extensive areas of shrub, grasslands, and agricultural fields were completely buried or had vegetation washed away in the inundation zone. The flooding also created a number of new unvegetated islands which provide important habitat for endangered species including the Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus). These newly created sand surfaces are unconsolidated and have very little vegetation to prevent aeolian transport. Strong sustained regional winds of up to 20m/s (45mph) cause substantial sediment fluxes which modify landscape topography, shift river morphology, and increase regional dust levels. Our study monitors and quantifies the increase in aeolian transport that occurred following flooding along the Garrison Reach, a 110 km section of free flowing Missouri River in North Dakota. In 2012 and 2013 we measured sand transport and accumulation rates using Leatherman style sand traps and erosion pins to at 9 sites of varying vegetation densities. We apply these flux rates to a high resolution remote sensing vegetation map to estimate the total flux of sand for this segment of the river. We also quantify total available new sand for transport using repeat Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) coverage from before and after the flood and examine the relationship between sand deposition and the rate of reestablishment of vegetation. All of these results are used to estimate the scale of flood induced aeolian processes and predict where they may continue to influence the landscape.

  14. Evaluation of a new model of aeolian transport in the presence of vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Belnap, Jayne; Miller, Mark E.; Vest, Kimberly; Draut, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Aeolian transport is an important characteristic of many arid and semiarid regions worldwide that affects dust emission and ecosystem processes. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a recent model of aeolian transport in the presence of vegetation. This approach differs from previous models by accounting for how vegetation affects the distribution of shear velocity on the surface rather than merely calculating the average effect of vegetation on surface shear velocity or simply using empirical relationships. Vegetation, soil, and meteorological data at 65 field sites with measurements of horizontal aeolian flux were collected from the Western United States. Measured fluxes were tested against modeled values to evaluate model performance, to obtain a set of optimum model parameters, and to estimate the uncertainty in these parameters. The same field data were used to model horizontal aeolian flux using three other schemes. Our results show that the model can predict horizontal aeolian flux with an approximate relative error of 2.1 and that further empirical corrections can reduce the approximate relative error to 1.0. The level of error is within what would be expected given uncertainties in threshold shear velocity and wind speed at our sites. The model outperforms the alternative schemes both in terms of approximate relative error and the number of sites at which threshold shear velocity was exceeded. These results lend support to an understanding of the physics of aeolian transport in which (1) vegetation's impact on transport is dependent upon the distribution of vegetation rather than merely its average lateral cover and (2) vegetation impacts surface shear stress locally by depressing it in the immediate lee of plants rather than by changing the bulk surface's threshold shear velocity. Our results also suggest that threshold shear velocity is exceeded more than might be estimated by single measurements of threshold shear stress and roughness length

  15. Evaluation of a new model of aeolian transport in the presence of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Belnap, Jayne; Miller, Mark E.; Vest, Kimberly; Draut, Amy E.

    2013-03-01

    Aeolian transport is an important characteristic of many arid and semiarid regions worldwide that affects dust emission and ecosystem processes. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a recent model of aeolian transport in the presence of vegetation. This approach differs from previous models by accounting for how vegetation affects the distribution of shear velocity on the surface rather than merely calculating the average effect of vegetation on surface shear velocity or simply using empirical relationships. Vegetation, soil, and meteorological data at 65 field sites with measurements of horizontal aeolian flux were collected from the Western United States. Measured fluxes were tested against modeled values to evaluate model performance, to obtain a set of optimum model parameters, and to estimate the uncertainty in these parameters. The same field data were used to model horizontal aeolian flux using three other schemes. Our results show that the model can predict horizontal aeolian flux with an approximate relative error of 2.1 and that further empirical corrections can reduce the approximate relative error to 1.0. The level of error is within what would be expected given uncertainties in threshold shear velocity and wind speed at our sites. The model outperforms the alternative schemes both in terms of approximate relative error and the number of sites at which threshold shear velocity was exceeded. These results lend support to an understanding of the physics of aeolian transport in which (1) vegetation's impact on transport is dependent upon the distribution of vegetation rather than merely its average lateral cover and (2) vegetation impacts surface shear stress locally by depressing it in the immediate lee of plants rather than by changing the bulk surface's threshold shear velocity. Our results also suggest that threshold shear velocity is exceeded more than might be estimated by single measurements of threshold shear stress and roughness length

  16. Reduction in soil aggregation in response to dust emission processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swet, Nitzan; Katra, Itzhak

    2016-09-01

    Dust emission by aeolian (wind) soil erosion depends on the topsoil properties of the source area, especially on the nature of the aggregates where most dust particles are held. Although the key role of soil aggregates in dust emission, the response of soil aggregation to aeolian processes and its implications for dust emission remain unknown. This study focuses on aggregate size distribution (ASD) analyses before and after in-situ aeolian experiments in semiarid loess soils that are associated with dust emission. Wind tunnel simulations show that particulate matter (PM) emission and saltation rates depend on the initial ASD and shear velocity. Under all initial ASD conditions, the content of saltator-sized aggregates (63-250 μm) increased by 10-34% due to erosion of macro-aggregates (> 500 μm), resulting in a higher size ratio (SR) between the saltators and macro-aggregates following the aeolian erosion. The results revealed that the saltator production increases significantly for soils that are subjected to short-term (anthropogenic) disturbance of the topsoil. The findings highlight a decrease in soil aggregation for all initial ASD's in response to aeolian erosion, and consequently its influence on the dust emission potential. Changes in ASD should be considered as a key parameter in dust emission models of complex surfaces.

  17. Aeolian Sediments on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauch, G.; Lehmkuhl, F.

    2013-12-01

    The timing and spatial distribution of aeolian sediments on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau have gained increasing interest during the last decades. The formation of the aeolian deposits is often related to cold and dry climate conditions. However, further important parameters are the local geomorphological setting and sediment availability in the source areas of the sediments. Aeolian sediments including loess, sandy loess and sands are widespread in the catchment of the Donggi Cona on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau at around 4000 m asl. Detailed geomorphological mapping of the deposits and geochemical analyses of the sediments revealed varying sources throughout the Holocene. The timing of the sediment deposition is based on 43 OSL (optical stimulated luminescence) ages. Several phases of enhanced aeolian deposition took place during the Holocene. The accumulation of aeolian sands lasted from 10.5 until 7 ka. The main source area of these sands was a large alluvial fan. Parallel to the formation of the dunes loess was deposited on the adjacent slopes from 10.5 until 7.5 ka. These sediments most probably originate in the nearby Qaidam Basin. In contrast to the general linkage of aeolian sediments to dryer climate conditions formation of these aeolian deposits is related to wetter conditions due to a strengthening of the Asian Summer Monsoons. The wetter climate enhanced the trapping and continuous fixation of the aeolian sediments by vegetation. With the further strengthening of the Monsoon fluvial processes eroded the aeolian deposits at least until 6 ka. From about 3 ka to the present a reactivation of aeolian sands and the formation of new dunes took place. This reactivation is related to drier conditions on the north-eastern Tibetan Plateau. Additionally, an increased human influence might have enhanced the aeolian activity. Similar phases of enhanced aeolian activity have been documented in more than 170 available OSL ages from loess and aeolian sands in

  18. More on the dynamics of dust generation: the effects of mixing and sanding chrysotile, calcium carbonate, and other components on the characteristics of joint-compound dusts.

    PubMed

    Berman, D Wayne; Brorby, Gregory P; Sheehan, Patrick J; Bogen, Kenneth T; Holm, Stewart E

    2012-08-01

    An ongoing research effort designed to reconstruct the character of historical exposures associated with use of chrysotile-containing joint compounds naturally raised questions concerning how the character (e.g. particle size distributions) of dusts generated from use of recreated materials compares to dusts from similar materials manufactured historically. This also provided an opportunity to further explore the relative degree that the characteristics of dusts generated from a bulk material are mediated by the properties of the bulk material versus the mechanical processes applied to the bulk material by which the dust is generated. In the current study, the characteristics of dusts generated from a recreated ready mix and recreated dry mix were compared to each other, to dusts from a historical dry mix, and to dusts from the commercial chrysotile fiber (JM 7RF3) used in the recreated materials. The effect of sanding on the character of dusts generated from these materials was also explored. Dusts from the dry materials studied were generated and captured for analysis in a dust generator-elutriator. The recreated and historical joint compounds were also prepared, applied to drywall, and sanded inside sealed bags so that the particles produced from sanding could be introduced into the elutriator and captured for analysis. Comparisons of fiber size distributions in dusts from these materials suggest that dust from commercial fiber is different from dusts generated from the joint compounds, which are mixtures, and the differences persist whether the materials are sanded or not. Differences were also observed between sanded recreated ready mix and either the recreated dry mix or a historical dry mix, again whether sanded or not. In all cases, however, such differences disappeared when variances obtained from surrogate data were used to better represent the 'irreducible variation' of these materials. Even using the smaller study-specific variances, no differences were

  19. Aeolian Slipface Processes on Earth and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornwall, Carin; Jackson, Derek; Bourke, Mary; Cooper, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The surface of Mars is dominated by aeolian features and many locations show ripple and dune migration over the past decade with some sediment fluxes comparable to terrestrial dunes. One of the leading goals in investigating aeolian processes on Mars is to explore the boundary conditions of sediment transport, accumulation, and dune mor-phology in relation to wind regime as well as to quantify migration rates and sediment flux. We combine terrestrial field observations, 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and remote sensing data to investigate com-plex, small scale wind patterns and grainflow processes on terrestrial and martian dunes. We aim to constrain grain flow magnitudes and frequencies that occur on slipface slopes of dunes in order to improve estimates of martian dune field migration and sediment flux related to wind velocity and flow patterns. A series of ground-based, high resolution laser scans have been collected in the Maspalomas dune field in Gran Canaria, Spain to investigate grainflow frequency, morphology and slipface advancement. Analysis of these laser scans and simultaneous video recordings have revealed a variety of slipface activity. We identify 6 different grain-flow morphologies including, hourglass shape (classic alcove formation with deposit fan below), superficial flow (thin lenses), narrow trough (vertical lines cm in width), sheet, column (vertical alcove walls), and complex (combi-nation of morphologies triggered simultaneously in the same location). Hourglass grainflow morphologies were the most common and occurred regularly. The superficial and narrow trough morphologies were the second most com-mon and frequently occurred in between large grain flows. Sheet grainflows were rare and unpredictable. These flows involved large portions of the slipface (metres across) and mobilized a substantial amount of sediment in one event. We have compared these grainflow morphologies from Maspalomas to those in martian dune fields and

  20. Dust storms on Mars: Considerations and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Iverson, J. D.; Leach, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    Aeolian processes are important in modifying the surface of Mars at present, and appear to have been significant in the geological past. Aeolian activity includes local and global dust storms, the formation of erosional features such as yardangs and depositional features such as sand dunes, and the erosion of rock and soil. As a means of understanding aeolian processes on Mars, an investigation is in progress that includes laboratory simulations, field studies of earth analogs, and interpretation of spacecraft data. This report describes the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel, an experimental facility established at NASA-Ames Research Center, and presents some results of the general investigation. Experiments dealing with wind speeds and other conditions required for the initiation of particle movement on Mars are described and considerations are given to the resulting effectiveness of aeolian erosion.

  1. Epsilon carbide - A low-temperature component of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Buseck, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope study of a chondritic interplanetary dust particle has revealed the presence of epsilon iron-nickel carbide, a low-temperature carbide previously encountered only in metallurgical studies. In these studies epsilon-carbide was synthesized by carburization of iron or nickel grains in a stream of carbon monoxide or carbon monoxide plus hydrogen. Similar carburization of an iron-nickel metal in situ may have produced epsilon-carbide during particle heating on atmospheric entry or in solar orbit. Alternatively, the epsilon-carbide may be a by-product of Fischer-Tropsch reactions in the solar nebula. Such reactions have been proposed as the mechanism of hydrocarbon formation in the early solar system.

  2. Persistent aeolian activity at Endeavour crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars; new observations from orbit and the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Moersch, Jeffrey E.; Fenton, Lori K.; Michaels, Timothy I.; Bell, James F., III

    2015-05-01

    Aeolian-driven bedform activity is now known to occur in many regions of Mars, based on surface and orbital observation of contemporary martian ripple and dune mobility events. Many of these sites have only been monitored with sufficient resolution data for the last few Mars years, when the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) began acquiring images of Mars. One exception is the well-monitored Endeavour crater in Meridiani Planum, which was one of the first known sites of unambiguous dune activity (migration and deflation). However, those early detections used lower resolution images over longer temporal baselines (versus the HIRISE data now available), leaving some measurements poorly constrained. New orbital and surface observations of Endeavour show multiple spatial (cm, m, km) and temporal (seasons, Mars year) scales of aeolian-driven surface change, which confirms earlier reports. Dome dunes in the eastern portion of the crater persistently deflate, disseminating dark sand across lighter-toned regolith and/or eroded bright dust, and likely contribute to the crater interior's episodic decreases in orbital albedo measurements. Other dome dunes are detected with the highest migration rates (4-12 m per Mars year) and volumetric sand fluxes reported yet for Mars. Estimated dune construction times or "turnover times" here and elsewhere on Mars are significantly shorter than martian obliquity cycles, implying that it is not necessary to invoke paleoclimate wind regimes to explain current dune morphologies. Located on the crater rim, the Opportunity rover detected evidence for near- and far-field aeolian-driven activity, with observations of spherules/sand movement in the rover workspace, bedform albedo alteration, and dust-lifting events. Observations of intracrater dunes show periodic shifting dark streaks that significantly constrain local wind regimes (directionality and seasonality). Constraints on wind directions from surface and orbital images

  3. Triton's streaks as windblown dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, Carl; Chyba, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Explanations for the surface streaks observed by Voyager 2 on Triton's southern hemisphere are discussed. It is shown that, despite Triton's tenuous atmosphere, low-cohesion dust trains with diameters of about 5 micron or less may be carried into suspension by aeolian surface shear stress, given expected geostrophic wind speeds of about 10 m/s. For geyser-like erupting dust plumes, it is shown that dust-settling time scales and expected wind velocities can produce streaks with length scales in good agreement with those of the streaks. Thus, both geyserlike eruptions or direct lifting by surface winds appear to be viable mechanisms for the origin of the streaks.

  4. A theoretical note on aerodynamic lifting in dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Ting

    2016-02-01

    The stress distribution of a known rotating flow near the ground in fluid mechanics indicates that the horizontal aerodynamic entrainment of particles within dust devils is attributed to friction force rather than pressure force. The expression of dust emission rate on Earth was theoretically discussed based on simulated flow field and our current understanding of the physics of aeolian dust. It seems that transition flow is vital to dust devils on Mars.

  5. The Origin of Transverse Aeolian Ridges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P.

    2015-12-01

    Transverse aeolian ridges, or TARs, are found throughout the tropics of Mars and typically appear as rows of bright ripples that are several meters tall and spaced semi-regularly several tens of meters apart. The origin of these features remained mysterious for decades after their discovery in Viking and Mars Global Surveyor images. A new hypothesis (Geissler, 2014, 10.1002-2014JE004633) suggests that TARs might be deposits left behind by dusty turbidity currents in the Martian atmosphere. The hypothesis assumes that the micron-sized dust particles are transported in suspension in turbulent flows, driven both by the winds and by gravity. The dust is concentrated near the surface, much like turbidity currents on Earth. Because of the difference in density, however, the dust clouds behave as a fluid distinct from the clear sky above. In particular, waves can appear at the surface of the dense "fluid" when the flows encounter topographic obstacles along their paths. Such gravity waves travel at speeds that are determined by gravity and the thickness of the flow, much like waves in shallow water on Earth. When the wave propagation speed matches the speed of the flow, stationary waves are produced that persist in fixed locations. The bedforms deposited by such stationary waves are called "antidunes" (Gilbert, 1914, USGS Prof. Paper 86) because, unlike dunes, they can migrate upstream in a supercritical flow. Antidunes are commonly seen in shallow, high energy fluvial deposits on Earth. They are usually destroyed as quickly as they form, and are rarely preserved. The Martian TARs survive because the dust is sticky; TARs are deposited by currents that are much slower than the wind speeds needed to lift the dust again. Subaerial antidunes are much rarer on Earth and less well studied, and so the giant subaerial stationary antidunes of Mars, if that is what the TARs turn out to be, may teach us much about a geological process that is poorly known on our planet.

  6. Evaluation of aeolian emissions from gold mine tailings on the Witwatersrand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojelede, M. E.; Annegarn, H. J.; Kneen, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Witwatersrand is known for the high frequency of aeolian dust storm episodes arising from gold mine tailings storage facilities (TSFs). Source and ambient atmosphere are poorly characterized from the point of view of particle size distribution and human health risk assessment. For years, routine monitoring was limited to sampling of dust fallout ⩾30 μm. Sampling and analyses of source and receptor material was conducted. Thirty-two bulk soils were collected from TSF along the east-west mining corridor, and size distribution analysis was performed in the range 0.05-900 μm using a Malvern® MS-14 Particle Size Analyser. Ambient aerosols in the range 0.25-32 μm were monitored at two separate locations using a Grimm® aerosol monitor, in the vicinity of three large currently active and a dormant TSF. Statistical analyses indicate that TSFs are rich in fine erodible materials, particularly active TSFs. Concentration of ⩽PM5 and ⩽PM10 components in source material was: recent slimes (14-24 vol.%; 22-38 vol.%), older slimes (6-17 vol.%; 11-26 vol.%) and sand (1-8 vol.%; 2-12 vol.%). Concentrations of airborne aerosols were below the South African Department of Environmental Affairs 24-h limit value of 120 μg m -3. With wind speeds exceeding 7 ms -1, ambient concentration reached 2160 μg m -3. This maximum is several times higher than the limit value. Erosion of tailings storage facilities is a strong driver influencing ambient particulate matter loading with adverse health implications for nearby residents.

  7. A conceptual framework for dryland aeolian sediment transport along the grassland-forest continuum: Effects of woody plant canopy cover and disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breshears, D.D.; Whicker, J.J.; Zou, C.B.; Field, J.P.; Allen, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    range of rates in grasslands and associated systems with no woody plants (e.g., agricultural fields), an intermediate range in shrublands, and a relatively small range in woodlands and forests. These trends are consistent with previous observations relating large rates of wind erosion to intermediate values for spatial density of roughness elements. The framework for aeolian sediment transport, which is also relevant to dust fluxes, wind erosion, and related aeolian processes, is applicable to a diverse suite of environmental challenges, including land degradation and desertification, dust storms, contaminant transport, and alterations of the hydrological cycle. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  8. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jasper F; Parteli, Eric J R; Michaels, Timothy I; Karam, Diana Bou

    2012-10-01

    The transport of sand and dust by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This paper presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan. PMID:22982806

  9. Experimental modeling of impact of space dust and debris on flying vehicles and their components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristoforov, B. D.

    2011-06-01

    For modeling the space dust and debris effect on flying vehicles, an investigation of the low-velocity impact of corundum and tungsten powders, accelerated by explosion, with particle size up to 50 microns on steel and duralumin targets was carried out. Also studied was the impact of sewing needles against metal and dielectric barriers, antimeteor shield models, and duralumin containers with hard materials, gunpowder, and explosives. At impact of powders at velocities of up to 2 km/s and needles at a velocity of up to 0.5 km/s against metals, the channels arose with lengths greater than 100 and 50 diameters of a striker. At impact of needles, the containers with hard explosive materials were destroyed because of ignition of their contents, and containers with plastic explosive were punched through, and no burning occurred. The energy, released at destruction of plexiglas blocks and containers with hard materials, many times exceeded the impact energy due to release of the elastic energy stored in them.

  10. The MECA Payload as a Dust Analysis Laboratory on the MSP 2001 Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Anderson, M.; Buehler, M.; Frant, M.; Fuerstenau, S.; Hecht, M.; Keller, U.; Markiewicz, W.; Meloy, T.; Pike, T.

    1999-01-01

    In a companion abstract, the "Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment" (MECA) payload for Mars Surveyor Program 2001 (MSP 2001) is described in terms of its capabilities for addressing exobiology on Mars. Here we describe how the same payload elements perform in terms of gathering data about surface dust on the planet. An understanding of the origin and properties of dust is important to both human exploration and planetary geology. The MECA instrument is specifically designed for soil/dust investigations: it is a multifunctional laboratory equipped to assess particulate properties with wet chemistry, camera imagery, optical microscopy (potentially with LTV fluorescence capability), atomic force microscopy (AFM; potentially with mineral-discrimination capabilities), electrometry, active & passive external materials-test panels, mineral hardness testing, and electrostatic & magnetic materials testing. Additionally, evaluation of soil chemical and physical properties as a function of depth down to about 50 cm will be facilitated by the Lander/MECA robot arm on which the camera (RAC) and electrometer are mounted. Types of data being sought for the dust include: (1) general textural and grain-size characterization of the soil as a whole --for example, is the soil essentially dust with other components or is it a clast-supported material in which dust resides only in the clast interstices, (2) size frequency distribution for dust particles in the range 0.01 to 10.00 microns, (3) particle-shape distribution of the soil components and of the fine dust fraction in particular, (4) soil fabric such as grain clustering into clods, aggregates, and cemented/indurated grain amalgamations, as well as related porosity, cohesiveness, and other mechanical soil properties, (5) cohesive relationship that dust has to certain types of rocks and minerals as a clue to which soil materials may be prime hosts for dust "piggybacking", (6) particle, aggregate, and bulk soil electrostatic

  11. The MECA Payload as a Dust Analysis Laboratory on the MSP 2001 Lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Anderson, M.; Buehler, M.; Frant, M.; Fuerstenau, S.; Hecht, M.; Keller, U.; Markiewicz, W.; Meloy, T.; Pike, T.

    1999-09-01

    In a companion abstract, the "Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment" (MECA) payload for Mars Surveyor Program 2001 (MSP 2001) is described in terms of its capabilities for addressing exobiology on Mars. Here we describe how the same payload elements perform in terms of gathering data about surface dust on the planet. An understanding of the origin and properties of dust is important to both human exploration and planetary geology. The MECA instrument is specifically designed for soil/dust investigations: it is a multifunctional laboratory equipped to assess particulate properties with wet chemistry, camera imagery, optical microscopy (potentially with LTV fluorescence capability), atomic force microscopy (AFM; potentially with mineral-discrimination capabilities), electrometry, active & passive external materials-test panels, mineral hardness testing, and electrostatic & magnetic materials testing. Additionally, evaluation of soil chemical and physical properties as a function of depth down to about 50 cm will be facilitated by the Lander/MECA robot arm on which the camera (RAC) and electrometer are mounted. Types of data being sought for the dust include: (1) general textural and grain-size characterization of the soil as a whole --for example, is the soil essentially dust with other components or is it a clast-supported material in which dust resides only in the clast interstices, (2) size frequency distribution for dust particles in the range 0.01 to 10.00 microns, (3) particle-shape distribution of the soil components and of the fine dust fraction in particular, (4) soil fabric such as grain clustering into clods, aggregates, and cemented/indurated grain amalgamations, as well as related porosity, cohesiveness, and other mechanical soil properties, (5) cohesive relationship that dust has to certain types of rocks and minerals as a clue to which soil materials may be prime hosts for dust "piggybacking", (6) particle, aggregate, and bulk soil electrostatic

  12. Preliminary Assessment of Seals for Dust Mitigation of Mechanical Components for Lunar Surface Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Irebert R.; Handschuh, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Component tests were conducted on spring-loaded Teflon seals to determine their performance in keeping lunar simulant out of mechanical component gearbox, motor, and bearing housings. Baseline tests were run in a dry-room without simulant for 10,000 cycles to determine wear effects of the seal against either anodized aluminum or stainless steel shafts. Repeat tests were conducted using lunar simulants JSC-1A and LHT-2M. Finally, tests were conducted with and without simulant in vacuum at ambient temperature. Preliminary results indicate minimal seal and shaft wear through 10,000 cycles, and more importantly, no simulant was observed to pass through the seal-shaft interface. Future endurance tests are planned at relevant NASA Lunar Surface System architecture shaft sizes and operating conditions.

  13. Mixing relationships in the Martian regolith and the composition of globally homogeneous dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSween, Harry Y.; Keil, Klaus

    2000-06-01

    Comparison of the chemical compositions of Martian soils reveals distinct mixing trends, resulting from admixture of variable amounts of sulfate/chloride cement at Viking landing sites and of the local andesitic rock fragments at the Mars Pathfinder site. These trends, most easily visualized in plots of oxides versus SO 3, intersect approximately at a common composition, thought to represent a global dust that has been homogenized by pervasive aeolian activity. The source rocks that were weathered to produce the global dust are inferred to have been basalts rather than felsic rocks, based on the observation that the dust lies along well-established chemical weathering trends for terrestrial basalts. The basaltic protolith was chemically similar (e.g., high Fe/Mg, low Al 2O 3) to basaltic shergottite meteorites. Chemical changes during the weathering of Martian basaltic rocks are apparently not as drastic as in terrestrial weathering, perhaps because of evaporation of hydrous fluids that leave soluble components behind in the residue. Comparison with chemical trends for previously proposed Martian soil-formation mechanisms suggests that palagonitization of basalts more readily explains the dust composition than do hydrothermal alteration at higher temperatures or reactions of rocks with an acid fog produced by volcanic exhalations. Local or temporal processing of dust into soil involves not only cementation by salts and mixing with rock fragments, but also chemical fractionations of Fe 2O 3/TiO 2 presumably resulting from aeolian sorting by grain size and density. If the global dust represents a broad average of the Martian surficial or upper crustal composition, the planet's surface geology is dominated by basaltic volcanic rocks and evaporitic salts.

  14. Abstracts for the Planetary Geology Field Conference on Aeolian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R. (Editor); Black, D. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The Planetary Geology Field Conference on Aeolian Processes was organized at the request of the Planetary Geology Program office of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to bring together geologists working on aeolian problems on earth and planetologists concerned with similar problems on the planets. Abstracts of papers presented at the conference are arranged herein by alphabetical order of the senior author. Papers fall into three broad categories: (1) Viking Orbiter and Viking Lander results on aeolian processes and/or landforms on Mars, (2) laboratory results on studies of aeolian processes, and (3) photogeology and field studies of aeolian processes on Earth.

  15. Roughness configuration matters for aeolian sediment flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parameterisation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Roughness effects are typically represented by bulk drag-partitioning schemes that scale the threshold friction velocity (u*t) for soil entrainment by the ratio of s...

  16. Coastal chevron deposits - sedimentology, methods and aeolian versus tsunamigenic origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiske, Michaela; Garcia Garcia, Anna-Marietta; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Schmidt, Volkmar

    2013-04-01

    The origin of v-shaped sediment bodies, so-called "chevrons", is currently controversially discussed. The term "chevron" is presently only defined in terms of the morphology of the sediment body, but not in terms of its genesis. Both an aeolian and an impact-tsunami origin are discussed. In this study, the sedimentology and origin of chevrons is investigated, examining deposits from the US west coast and the coast of Western Australia. We use internal structures obtained in trenches or by ground penetrating radar surveys, trenches, ages gained by radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence dating, grain size analysis and the general sediment composition. If the chevrons were deposited by a tsunami, all chevrons along one coastline should possess the same depositional ages, the grain-size distribution should be polymodal indicating various sediment sources and internal structures should be restricted mainly to normal grading. In case of an aeolian origin, the ages of the individual chevrons may vary and internal ages will reflect the migration of the sediment body. Furthermore, cross bedding should be present throughout the sediment body and soil horizons may represent inactive phases. Preliminary results indicate the presence of internal cross bedding and an unimodal grain-size distribution of the surveyed chevrons. Ages decrease in landward transport direction and to the top within vertical successions. At some locations soil layers intercalate between well sorted sands. The mean grain size of the chevron sands is 0.11-0.25 mm. A comparison of the chevron components with the mineral content of possible sediment sources (e.g., rivers, beaches, cliffs) shows that the chevrons are composed of the fine grain size fraction of the respective sources. Sediments of this grain size can easily be transported by aeolian forces under the local prevailing wind conditions. Terrestrial gastropods found within the chevrons give evidence of a long term development of these

  17. Aeolian sedimentary processes at the Bagnold Dunes, Mars: Implications for modern dune dynamics and sedimentary structures in the aeolian stratigraphic record of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Bridges, Nathan T.; Sullivan, Rob; Lapotre, Mathieu G. A.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Lamb, Mike P.; Rubin, David M.; Lewis, Kevin W.; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2016-04-01

    Wind-blown sand dunes are ubiquitous on the surface of Mars and are a recognized component of the martian stratigraphic record. Our current knowledge of the aeolian sedimentary processes that determine dune morphology, drive dune dynamics, and create aeolian cross-stratification are based upon orbital studies of ripple and dune morphodynamics, rover observations of stratification on Mars, Earth analogs, and experimental and theoretical studies of sand movement under Martian conditions. In-situ observations of sand dunes (informally called the Bagnold Dunes) by Curiosity Rover in Gale Crater, Mars provide the first opportunity to make observations of dunes from the grain-to-dune scale thereby filling the gap in knowledge between theory and orbital observations and refining our understanding of the martian aeolian stratigraphic record. We use the suite of cameras on Curiosity, including Navigation Camera (Navcam), Mast Camera (Mastcam) and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), to make observations of the Bagnold Dunes. Measurements of sedimentary structures are made where stereo images are available. Observations indicate that structures generated by gravity-driven processes on the dune lee slopes, such as grainflow and grainfall, are similar to the suite of aeolian sedimentary structures observed on Earth and should be present and recognizable in Mars' aeolian stratigraphic record. Structures formed by traction-driven processes deviate significantly from those found on Earth. The dune hosts centimeter-scale wind ripples and large, meter-scale ripples, which are not found on Earth. The large ripples migrate across the depositional, lee slopes of the dune, which implies that these structures should be present in Mars' stratigraphic record and may appear similar to compound-dune stratification.The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover Team is acknowledged for their support of this work.

  18. Mid to late Holocene aeolian activity revealed by a multiproxy peat record in continental CE Europe (Northern Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panait, Andrei Marian; Feurdean, Angelica; Hutchinson, Simon Mark; Tanţǎu, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    Peat bogs, and especially ombrogenous mire, are increasingly used as continental archives of aeolian dust and sand deposition. Since ombrogenous peat is formed above ground water level all the inputs are atmospheric. Dust is more influenced by regional climatic patterns due to its small size, whereas sand tends to record local patterns in storm frequency and intensity reflecting its larger particle size. However, both size fractions are significantly underused proxies of past climate variability. Here, an ombrogenous peat profile from Tǎul Muced in the Rodnei Mountains (Northern Romanian Carpathians), located in a temperate continental climate, with Atlantic and Baltic influences, provides the very first record of mid to late Holocene aeolian activity from Romania highlighting the interplay between local and regional controls in a continental area of CE Europe. We use a multiproxy approach combining radiocarbon dating, the physical properties of the peat (loss-on-ignition, bulk density), mineral magnetic measurements (ARM, SIRM), geochemical (Ti and Zr) and particle size analysis (via both laser diffraction and the manual counting of sand particles under a steromicroscope) to determine changes in: i) atmospheric dust deposition and ii) wind velocities during the last 7800 years. We found that the aeolian particles are mainly silt (3.9-63 μm) (dust) and sand (63-1200 μm). The mineralogical composition of the aeolian sediment in peat is mainly quartz, more rarely calcite and very rarely other minerals such as feldspar, sulphur, mica (biotite and muscovite), magnetite and other melanocrate minerals. The roundness of the sand particles varies from well-rounded to sub-angular and angular, and suggests that the sand particles have different source areas. Results from this study show that over the last 7600 years the pattern of wind frequency changed several times: there are periods characterised by a low aeolian input around 6950-6550, 5000-3900, 3500-2900, 1650

  19. Niamey Dust Observations

    DOE Data Explorer

    Flynn, Connor

    2008-10-01

    Niamey aerosol are composed of two main components: dust due to the proximity of the Sahara Desert, and soot from local and regional biomass burning. The purpose of this data product is to identify when the local conditions are dominated by the dust component so that the properties of the dust events can be further studied.

  20. Atmospheric mineral dust in dryland ecosystems: Applications of environmental magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Miller, Mark E.

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic properties of shallow (<10-cm depth), fine-grained surficial sediments contrast greatly with those of immediately underlying bedrock across much of the dry American Southwest. At 26 study sites in fine-grained (<63 μm) surficial sediments isolated from alluvial inputs, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM; mean of 67 samples = 6.72 × 10-3 Am2 kg-1) is more than two orders of magnitude greater than that for underlying Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. This contrast is mainly caused by the presence of silt-size, titanium-bearing magnetite particles in the surficial deposits and their absence in bedrock. Because of their size, composition, and isolated location, the magnetite particles represent a component of atmospheric dust likely deposited over the past few centuries. The positive correlation of sediment-IRM values with amounts of potential plant nutrients reveals the importance of atmospheric dust to soil fertility over much of the American Southwest. Subsequent disturbance of landscapes, by domestic livestock grazing as an example, commonly results in wind erosion, which then depletes exposed surfaces of original aeolian magnetite and associated fine-grained sediment. Declines in soil fertility and water-holding capacity in these settings can be estimated in some field settings via decreases in magnetic susceptibility, relative to nearby undisturbed areas. Along gentle hillslope gradients of the Colorado Plateau, field measures for aeolian magnetite demonstrate that the redistribution of deposited atmospheric dust influences landscape-level patterns in the distribution of invasive exotic plant species. Our results indicate that environmental magnetism has high potential for assessing the development and degradation of dry landscapes elsewhere.

  1. Seasonal Contribution of Mineral Dust and Otlher Major Components to Particulate Matter at Two Remote Sites in Central Asia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dust storms are significant contributors to ambient levels of particulate matter (PM) in many areas of the world. Central Asia, an area that is relatively understudied in this regard, is anticipated to be affected by dust storms due to its proximity to several major deserts that ...

  2. The dust-scattering component of X-ray extinction: effects on continuum fitting and high-resolution absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, L. R.; García, J.; Wilms, J.; Baganoff, F.

    2016-05-01

    Small angle scattering by dust grains causes a significant contribution to the total interstellar extinction for any X-ray instrument with sub-arcminute resolution (Chandra, Swift, XMM-Newton). However, the dust-scattering component is not included in the current absorption models: phabs, TBabs, and TBnew. We simulate a large number of Chandra spectra to explore the bias in the spectral fit and NH measurements obtained without including extinction from dust scattering. We find that without incorporating dust scattering, the measured NH will be too large by a baseline level of 25 per cent. This effect is modulated by the imaging resolution of the telescope, because some amount of unresolved scattered light will be captured within the aperture used to extract point source information. In high-resolution spectroscopy, dust scattering significantly enhances the total extinction optical depth and the shape of the photoelectric absorption edges. We focus in particular on the Fe-L edge at 0.7 keV, showing that the total extinction template fits well to the high-resolution spectrum of three X-ray binaries from the Chandra archive: GX 9+9, XTE J1817-330, and Cyg X-1. In cases where dust is intrinsic to the source, a covering factor based on the angular extent of the dusty material must be applied to the extinction curve, regardless of angular imaging resolution. This approach will be particularly relevant for dust in quasar absorption line systems and might constrain clump sizes in active galactic nuclei.

  3. Dust emission from different sol types and geomorphic units in the Sahara - implications for modeling dust emission and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan; Enzel, Yehouda

    2014-05-01

    Mineral dust plays multiple roles in mediating physical and biogeochemical exchanges among the atmosphere, land and ocean, and thus is an active component of the global climate system. To estimate the past, current, and future impacts of dust on climate, sources of dust and their erodibility should be identified. The Sahara is the major source of dust on Earth. Based on qualitative analysis of remotely sensed data with low temporal resolution, the main sources of dust that have been identified are topographic depressions comprised of dry lake and playa deposits in hyprarid regions. Yet, recent studies cast doubts on these as the major sources and call for a search for others. Moreover, the susceptibility of soils to aeolian erosion (wind land erodibility) in the Sahara is still poorly known. In this study we identify and determine the soil types and geomorphic units most important as Saharan dust sources by correlating between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types/geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. Few dust storms originated from dry lake beds and playas. Land erodibility by wind for each soil type/geomorphic unit was estimated by a regression of the NDS and the number of days with high-speed wind events; the regression is relatively high for sand dunes and gypsisols. We use these regressions to differentiate between sources of dust that are supply-limited to those that are transport-limited. We propose that the fracturing of saltating sand and the removal of clay coatings from sand grains through eolian abrasion is the dominant dust-emission mechanism for the sand-rich areas covering large portion of the Sahara. Our results also explain the increased dustiness during the last glacial period, when sand dunes activity has been more common than during the Holocene

  4. The composition of Martian aeolian sands: Thermal emissivity from Viking IRTM observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1992-01-01

    Aeolian sands provide excellent surfaces for the remote determination of the mineralogic composition of Martian materials, because such deposits consist of relatively well-sorted, uniform particle sizes and might consist of chemically unaltered, primary mineral grains derived from bedrock. Dark features on the floors of Martian craters are controlled by aeolian processes and many consist largely of unconsolidated, windblown sand. Measurement of the thermal emissivity of geologic materials provides a way to identify mid-infrared absorption bands, the strength and positions of which vary with mineral structure and composition. The Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) had four surface-sensing mid-IR bands, three of which, the 7, 9, and 11 micron channels, correspond to absorption features characteristic of carbonates, sialic, and mafic minerals, respectively. In this study, the highest quality IRTM data were constrained so as to avoid the effects of atmospheric dust, clouds, surface frosts, and particle size variations (the latter using data obtained between 7 and 9 H, and they were selected for dark intracrater features such that only data taken directly from the dark feature were used, so as to avoid thermal contributions from adjacent but unrelated materials. Three-point emissivity spectra of Martian dart intracrater features were compared with laboratory emission spectra of minerals and terrestrial aeolian sands convolved using the IRTM response function to the four IRTM spectral channels.

  5. Aeolian processes at the Mars Exploration Rover Meridiani Planum landing site.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, R; Banfield, D; Bell, J F; Calvin, W; Fike, D; Golombek, M; Greeley, R; Grotzinger, J; Herkenhoff, K; Jerolmack, D; Malin, M; Ming, D; Soderblom, L A; Squyres, S W; Thompson, S; Watters, W A; Weitz, C M; Yen, A

    2005-07-01

    The martian surface is a natural laboratory for testing our understanding of the physics of aeolian (wind-related) processes in an environment different from that of Earth. Martian surface markings and atmospheric opacity are time-variable, indicating that fine particles at the surface are mobilized regularly by wind. Regolith (unconsolidated surface material) at the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site has been affected greatly by wind, which has created and reoriented bedforms, sorted grains, and eroded bedrock. Aeolian features here preserve a unique record of changing wind direction and wind strength. Here we present an in situ examination of a martian bright wind streak, which provides evidence consistent with a previously proposed formational model for such features. We also show that a widely used criterion for distinguishing between aeolian saltation- and suspension-dominated grain behaviour is different on Mars, and that estimated wind friction speeds between 2 and 3 m s(-1), most recently from the northwest, are associated with recent global dust storms, providing ground truth for climate model predictions. PMID:16001061

  6. Aeolian processes at the Mars Exploration Rover Meridiani Planum landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, R.; Banfield, D.; Bell, J.F., III; Calvin, W.; Fike, D.; Golombek, M.; Greeley, R.; Grotzinger, J.; Herkenhoff, K.; Jerolmack, D.; Malin, M.; Ming, D.; Soderblom, L.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Thompson, S.; Watters, W.A.; Weitz, C.M.; Yen, A.

    2005-01-01

    The martian surface is a natural laboratory for testing our understanding of the physics of aeolian (wind-related) processes in an environment different from that of Earth. Martian surface markings and atmospheric opacity are time-variable, indicating that fine particles at the surface are mobilized regularly by wind. Regolith (unconsolidated surface material) at the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site has been affected greatly by wind, which has created and reoriented bedforms, sorted grains, and eroded bedrock. Aeolian features here preserve a unique record of changing wind direction and wind strength. Here we present an in situ examination of a martian bright wind streak, which provides evidence consistent with a previously proposed formational model for such features. We also show that a widely used criterion for distinguishing between aeolian saltation- and suspension-dominated grain behaviour is different on Mars, and that estimated wind friction speeds between 2 and 3 m s-1, most recently from the northwest, are associated with recent global dust storms, providing ground truth for climate model predictions.

  7. Principle Component Analysis of the Evolution of the Saharan Air Layer and Dust Transport: Comparisons between a Model Simulation and MODIS Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, S.; Colarco, P. R.; Dessler, A.

    2006-01-01

    The onset and evolution of Saharan Air Layer (SAL) episodes during June-September 2002 are diagnosed by applying principal component analysis to the NCEP reanalysis temperature anomalies at 850 hPa, where the largest SAL-induced temperature anomalies are located. The first principal component (PC) represents the onset of SAL episodes, which are associated with large warm anomalies located at the west coast of Africa. The second PC represents two opposite phases of the evolution of the SAL. The positive phase of the second PC corresponds to the southwestward extension of the warm anomalies into the tropical-subtropical North Atlantic Ocean, and the negative phase corresponds to the northwestward extension into the subtropical to mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean and the southwest Europe. A dust transport model (CARMA) and the MODIS retrievals are used to study the associated effects on dust distribution and deposition. The positive (negative) phase of the second PC corresponds to a strengthening (weakening) of the offshore flows in the lower troposphere around 10deg - 20degN, causing more (less) dust being transported along the tropical to subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. The variation of the offshore flow indicates that the subseasonal variation of African Easterly Jet is associated with the evolution of the SAL. Significant correlation is found between the second PC time series and the daily West African monsoon index, implying a dynamical linkage between West African monsoon and the evolution of the SAL and Saharan dust transport.

  8. Reconciling historical and contemporary evidence of aeolian-based, gully annealing processes in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, J. B.; Draut, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    historical annealing using aerial photos from select reaches of the river from the 1930s to present. We examine contemporary evidence of annealing potential through analysis of the connectivity of active aeolian sediment sources with existing gullies. This includes remote sensing analyses of active aeolian sediment based on a multispectral biological soil crust index as a proxy for erodibility, vegetation cover and spacing derived from image classification, gully feature extraction from digital surface (elevation) models, and physically-based investigation of connectivity between these important landscape components. Results highlight the importance of interactions between aeolian and hillslope processes for counteracting contemporary gully erosion of concern for cultural and natural resource management.

  9. Measuring aeolian sand transport using acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poortinga, Ate; van Rheenen, Hans; Ellis, Jean T.; Sherman, Douglas J.

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic sensors are frequently used to measure aeolian saltation. Different approaches are used to process the signals from these instruments. The goal of this paper is to describe and discuss a method to measure aeolian saltation with acoustic sensors. In a laboratory experiment, we measured the output from an advanced signal processing scheme on the circuit board of the saltiphone. We use a software implementation of this processing scheme to re-analyse data from four miniphones obtained during a field experiment. It is shown that a set of filters remove background noise outside the frequency spectrum of aeolian saltation (at 8 kHz), whereas signals within this frequency spectrum are amplified. The resulting analogue signal is a proxy of the energy. Using an AC pulse convertor, this signal can be converted into a digital and analogue count signal or an analogue energy signal, using a rectifier and integrator. Spatio-temporal correlation between field deployed miniphones increases by using longer integration times for signal processing. To quantify aeolian grain impact, it is suggested to use the analogue energy output, as this mode is able to detect changes in frequency and amplitude. The analogue and digital count signals are able to detect an increase in frequency, but are not able to detect an increase in signal amplitude. We propose a two-stage calibration scheme consisting of (1) a factory calibration, to set the frequency spectrum of the sensor and (2) a standardized drop-test conducted before and after the experiment to evaluate the response of the sensor.

  10. Formation of aeolian ripples and sand sorting.

    PubMed

    Manukyan, Edgar; Prigozhin, Leonid

    2009-03-01

    We present a continuous model capable of demonstrating some salient features of aeolian sand ripples: the realistic asymmetric ripple shape, coarsening of the ripple field at the nonlinear stage of ripple growth, saturation of ripple growth for homogeneous sand, typical size segregation of sand, and formation of armoring layers of coarse particles on ripple crests and windward slopes if the sand is inhomogeneous. PMID:19391931

  11. Aeolian particle flux profiles and transport unsteadiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Bernard O.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin G. D.

    2014-07-01

    Vertical profiles of aeolian sediment flux are commonly modeled as an exponential decay of particle (mass) transport with height above the surface. Data from field and wind-tunnel studies provide empirical support for this parameterization, although a large degree of variation in the precise shape of the vertical flux profile has been reported. This paper explores the potential influence of wind unsteadiness and time-varying intensity of transport on the geometry (slope, curvature) of aeolian particle flux profiles. Field evidence from a complex foredune environment demonstrates that (i) the time series of wind and sediment particle flux are often extremely variable with periods of intense transport (referred to herein as sediment "flurries") separated by periods of weak or no transport; (ii) sediment flurries contribute the majority of transport in a minority of the time; (iii) the structure of a flurry includes a "ramp-up" phase lasting a few seconds, a "core" phase lasting a few seconds to many tens of seconds, and a "ramp-down" phase lasting a few seconds during which the system relaxes to a background, low-intensity transport state; and (iv) conditional averaging of flux profiles for flurry and nonflurry periods reveals differences between the geometry of the mean profiles and hence the transport states that produce them. These results caution against the indiscriminate reliance on regression statistics derived from time-averaged sediment flux profiles, especially those with significant flurry and nonflurry periods, when calibrating or assessing the validity of steady state models of aeolian saltation.

  12. Aeolian processes in Proctor Crater on Mars: Sedimentary history as analyzed from multiple data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenton, L.K.; Bandfield, J.L.; Ward, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Proctor Crater is a 150 km diameter crater in Noachis Terra, within the southern highlands of Mars. The analysis leading to the sedimentary history incorporates several data sets including imagery, elevation, composition, and thermal inertia, mostly from the Mars Global Surveyor mission. The resulting stratigraphy reveals that the sedimentary history of Proctor Crater has involved a complex interaction of accumulating and eroding sedimentation. Aeolian features spanning much of the history of the crater interior dominate its surface, including large erosional pits, stratified beds of aeolian sediment, sand dunes, erosional and depositional streaks, dust devil tracks, and small bright bed forms that are probably granule ripples. Long ago, up to 450 m of layered sediment filled the crater basin, now exposed in eroded pits on the crater floor. These sediments are probably part of an ancient deposit of aeolian volcaniclastic material. Since then, some quantity of this material has been eroded from the top layers of the strata. Small, bright dune forms lie stratigraphically beneath the large dark dune field. Relative to the large dark dunes, the bright bed forms are immobile, although in places, their orientations are clearly influenced by the presence of the larger dunes. Their prevalence in the crater and their lack of compositional and thermal distinctiveness relative to the crater floor suggests that these features were produced locally from the eroding basin fill. Dust devil tracks form during the spring and summer, following a west-southwesterly wind. Early in the spring the dust devils are largely restricted to dark patches of sand. As the summer approaches, dust devil tracks become more plentiful and spread to the rest of the crater floor, indicating that the entire region acquires an annual deposit of dust that is revealed by seasonal dust devils. The dark dunes contain few dust devil tracks, suggesting that accumulated dust is swept away directly by saltation

  13. Introducing a New International Society of Aeolian Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobeck, T. M.; Lee, J.; Lancaster, N.; Bullard, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Aeolian research is a long-standing and rapidly growing area of geological study where scientists of many disciplines meet to investigate the effects of wind on the surface of the Earth and other planetary bodies such as Mars and Titan. Fields of study in aeolian research cover a broad spectrum ranging from developing a basic scientific understanding of the fundamental physical processes of grain motion to the effects of soil erosion on landscape health and environmental sustainability. Aeolian research also includes studies of the effects of aeolian particles on global climate, air quality, and human health, coastal sand transport processes, land degradation, dune migration, the formation of sand seas, and much more. A growing number of international conferences have been organized to focus specifically on aeolian phenomena and a vast number of scholarly publications have been produced to support the science. One popular bibliography includes over 30,000 citations and hundreds of peer-reviewed papers are published each year. Until very recently, no scientific society specifically dealing with aeolian research has been available. The new International Society of Aeolian Research (ISAR) that has been organized to bring together aeolian scientists from around the world. The new society was created to promote contacts among researchers in aeolian processes and related subjects for discussion and comparison of research, to initiate conferences (such as the International Conference on Aeolian Research), to organize excursions, and support the publication of a peer-reviewed scientific journal. The International Society of Aeolian Research sponsors the new Elsevier journal Aeolian Research in support of these activities. This paper will provide further details about the new society and the journal. Please see www.aeolianresearch.org for details.

  14. The aeolian sedimentary system in the northern Qilian Shan and Hexi Corridor (N-China) - geomorphologic, sedimentologic and climatic drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nottebaum, Veit; Lehmkuhl, Frank; Stauch, Georg

    2015-04-01

    The formation of aeolian deposits depends on the influence of climatic factors but also on non-climatic controls, such as local geomorphological setting and tectonic activity. Unravelling the environmental history needs a careful consideration of a set of sections to capture spatial variability and a detailed investigation of depositing processes and chronology. Along the northern margin of the Qilian Shan mountain range 22 OSL-dated loess and aeolian sand sections and additional surface samples reveal the interactions between climatic, geomorphologic and sedimentologic factors. Thin loess covers (~1-2 m) occur in elevations of 2000 to 3800 m asl, which were mainly accumulated during the Holocene. End-member modelling of loess grain size data exhibits three dominant aeolian transport pathways representing local transport from fluvial storages, dust storm contribution and background dust deposition. Their relative contributions show a clear dependence on geomorphological setting, and additionally, synchronous trends throughout the Holocene. Their relative changes allow conclusions about Holocene environmental conditions. Discontinuous archives (aeolian sand, lacustrine, and alluvial deposition) in the lower forelands of the Qilian Shan show a distinct spatial pattern contrasting western and eastern forelands. The comparison of OSL ages exhibits high sediment accumulation (~2 m/ka) in the drier western part during the Late Glacial, while the lack of Holocene ages indicates sediment discharge / deflation. In contrast, moister areas in the eastern foreland yield scattered Holocene ages. This indicates high sediment dynamics, benefiting from fluvial reworking and thus provided sediment availability. Fluvial sediment supply plays an important role in sediment recycling. Meanwhile, western forelands lack efficient sand sources and fluvial reworking agents. The study exemplifies the complex sedimentary systems acting along mountain to foreland transects which often host

  15. The ecology of dust: local- to global-scale perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Field, Jason P; Belnap, Jayne; Breshears, David D; Neff, Jason; Okin, Gregory S; Painter, Thomas H; Ravi, Sujith; Reheis, Marith C; Reynolds, Richard L

    2009-01-01

    Emission and redistribution of dust due to wind erosion in drylands drives major biogeochemical dynamics and provides important aeolian environmental connectivity at scales from individual plants up to the global scale. Yet, perhaps because most relevant research on aeolian processes has been presented in a geosciences rather than ecological context, most ecological studies do not explicitly consider dust-driven processes. To bridge this disciplinary gap, we provide a general overview of the ecological importance of dust, examine complex interactions between wind erosion and ecosystem dynamics from the plant-interspace scale to regional and global scales, and highlight specific examples of how disturbance affects these interactions and their consequences. Changes in climate and intensification of land use will both likely lead to increased dust production. To address these challenges, environmental scientists, land managers and policy makers need to more explicitly consider dust in resource management decisions.

  16. [The effect produced by fine-dust extracts on cells in vitro, with particular regard to cancerogenic components (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Seemayer, N; Manojlovic, N; Brockhaus, A

    1976-07-01

    Airborne dust is toxic for cells cultured in vitro and able to transform these cells to cancerous. The effect of extracts from atmospheric dust has been investigated. The dust samples were extracted by means of DMSO alone or in combination acetone-DMSO. Dosage of the extract was done according to its benzo(a)pyrene content (mug/ml medium). Dust extract with a concentration of 1 mug benzo(a)pyrene/ml exerted a toxic effect upon mouse macrophages (cell line IC-21) and human lymphocytes after stimulation. The degree of toxicity was estimated from the percentage of damaged cells seen in the dye exclusion test and from the amount of lactate dehydrogenase and lactate released into the medium in the case of macrophages. In the case of lymphocytes the degree of toxicity was estimated from the extent of inhibition of DNA synthesis. In the carcinogenicity test, hamster kidney cells were first treated with the extract and then incubated with Simian Virus (SV-)40. Treatment of the cell cultures with extract from airborne dust in a concentration of 0.01 and 0.1 mug benzo(a)pyrene/ml clearly enhances the rate of transformation caused by SV 40. PMID:186983

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients have greater systemic responsiveness to ex vivo stimulation with swine dust extract and its components versus healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Harting, Janel R.; Gleason, Angela; Romberger, Debra J.; Von Essen, Susanna G.; Qiu, Fang; Alexis, Neil; Poole, Jill A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an airway and systemic inflammatory response. Bioaerosols/organic dusts are important agricultural pollutants that may lead to COPD. These environments are complex containing a rich source of various microbial components. The objective of this study was to determine whether individuals with COPD have enhanced systemic responsiveness to settled swine facility organic dust extract (ODE) or its main pathogenic components (peptidoglycan [PGN], lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) versus healthy volunteers. A modified whole blood assay (WBA) that included occupational levels of ODE and concentrations of LPS and PGN found in ODE was used to determine systemic responsiveness (mediator release), and sputum inflammatory markers were measured to explore for systemic and airway associations. Sputum samples were evaluated for cell counts, and TNF-α, IL-8/CXCL8, IL-6, and IL-10. Ex vivo whole blood stimulation with ODE, LPS, and PGN each resulted in significant mediator release in all subjects, the highest occurring with ODE; PGN resulted in significantly enhanced TNF-α and IL-8 as compared to LPS. COPD subjects demonstrated greater systemic responsiveness using the modified WBA versus healthy controls. Within COPD subjects, blood baseline TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10 and ODE, PGN, and LPS-stimulated IL-8 levels significantly correlated with lung function. In conclusion, dust-induced mediator release was robust, and PGN, in part, resembled dust-induced mediator release. Subjects with COPD demonstrated increased mediator release following ex vivo whole blood stimulation with bioaerosol components suggesting that circulating blood cells in COPD subjects may be primed to respond greater to microbial/inflammatory insult. PMID:23116451

  18. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scanza, R. A.; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, S.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-07-02

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore » in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05 W m−2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 W m−2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, −0.05 and −0.17 W m−2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  19. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scanza, R. A.; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, S.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Albani, S.

    2015-01-15

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale, using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore » in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as + 0.05 Wm−2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy. We compare this to the radiative forcing from simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 Wm−2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, −0.05 and −0.17 Wm−2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  20. Environmental history recorded in aeolian deposits under stone pavements, Mojave Desert, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael; Dietze, Elisabeth; Lomax, Johanna; Fuchs, Markus; Kleber, Arno; Wells, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of arid landscapes is challenged by limited availability of appropriate environmental archives. A widespread surface feature - stone pavement - traps aeolian fines and forms a special accretionary archive. Seven stone pavement-covered sections on basalt flows in the eastern Mojave Desert are condensed into a composite section, comprising five sedimentological units supported by an OSL-based chronology. Three of the units are of accretionary nature and each is covered by a stone pavement. They were deposited > 50.9-36.6 ka, < 36.6-14.2 ka and < 14.2 ka, and they are intimately coupled with the history of nearby Lake Mojave, which advances the current understanding of regional aeolian activity. End-member modeling analysis of grain-size distributions yielded seven sediment transport regimes. The accretionary system operates in two modes: A) episodic formation of a stone pavement by lateral processes once a vesicular horizon has formed on a barren surface; and B) accretion of dust and eventual burial of the clast layer. These findings improve current concepts about stone pavement evolution and their environmental proxy function in arid landscapes. Stone pavement-covered accretionary deposits are a new key archive that allows quantifying the relative importance of dust accretion, slope processes, soil formation and vegetation cover.

  1. Aeolian Processes and Features on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Bender, Kelly C.; Saunders, Stephen; Schubert, Gerald; Weitz, Catherine M.

    1997-01-01

    Aeolian features on Venus include dune fields, eroded hills (yardangs), wind streaks, (miniature dunes of 10 to 30 cm wavelength). Although and possibly microdunes (in repetitive imaging by Magellan did show changes in the appearance of the surface, these changes are attributed to radar artifacts as a consequence of look direction rather than to physical changes of the surface. Nonetheless, measurements of wind speeds near the surface of Venus and wind tunnel simulations suggest that aeolian processes could be currently active on Venus. Study of radar images of terrestrial analogs shows that radar wavelength, polarization, and viewing geometry, including look direction and incidence angle, all influence the detection of dunes, yardangs, and wind streaks. For best detection, dune crests and yardangs should be oriented perpendicular to look direction. Longer wavelength systems can penetrate sand sheets a meter or more thick, rendering them invisible, especially in arid regions. For wind streaks to be visible, there must be a contrast in surface properties between the streak and the background on which it occurs. Nonetheless, more than 6000 aeolian features have been found on Magellan images of Venus, the most common of which are various wind streaks. Mapping wind streak orientations enables near-surface wind patterns to be inferred for the time of their formation. Type P streaks are associated with parabolic ejecta crater deposits and are considered to have formed in association with the impact event. Most Type P streaks are oriented westward, indicative of the upper altitude superrotation winds of Venus. Non Type P streaks have occurrences and orientations consistent with Hadley circulation. Some streaks in the southern hemisphere are oriented to the northeast, suggesting a Coriolis effect.

  2. Aeolian processes and the bioshpere: Interactions and feedback loops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeolian processes affect landform evolution, biogeochemical cycles, regional climate, human health, and desertification. The entrainment, transport and deposition of aeolian sediments are recognized as major drivers in the dynamics of the earth system and there is a growing interest in the scientif...

  3. Introducing a New International Society of Aeolian Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeolian research is long-standing and rapidly growing area of study where scientists of many disciplines meet to investigate the effects of wind on the surface of the Earth and other planetary bodies, such as Mars and Titan. Fields of study in aeolian research cover a broad spectrum ranging from dev...

  4. House-Dust Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    House-dust allergy is a common cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and extrinsic asthma. Symptoms tend to be worse when the patient is in bed. A positive skin test properly performed and interpreted confirms the diagnosis. The house-dust mite is the most important antigenic component of house-dust. Treatment consists of environmental control directed at reducing the mite content of bedroom dust, plus control of symptoms with drugs. Immunotherapy is controversial. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:21286201

  5. Recent Aeolian Dune Change on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourke, M. C.; Edgett, K. S.; Cantor, B. A.

    2007-01-01

    Previous comparisons of Martian aeolian dunes in satellite images have not detected any change in dune form or position. Here, we show dome dunes in the north polar region that shrank and then disappeared over a period of 3.04 Mars years (5.7 Earth years), while larger, neighboring dunes showed no erosion or movement. The removal of sand from these dunes indicates that not only is the threshold wind speed for saltation exceeded under present conditions on Mars, but that any sand that is available for transport is likely to be moved. Dunes that show no evidence of change could be crusted, indurated. or subject to infrequent episodes of movement.

  6. Use of radar to assess aeolian processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Lancaster, N.; Gaddis, L.; Blumberg, D.; Debrovolskis, A.; Saunders, R. S.; Wall, S.; Iversen, J. D.; White, B.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between wind and desert surfaces has important implications for sediment transport on Earth, Mars, and Venus, and for understanding the relationship between radar backscatter and aerodynamic roughness. Here, researchers report results from measurements of atmospheric boundary layer profiles, assessment of radar backscatter at P, L, and C wavelengths, and surface roughness in Death Valley, the Mojave Desert, and Lunar Lake, NV, and discuss the implications for aeolian process. The sites include playas, gravel and sand regs, alluvial fans, and lava flows. Boundary layer wind profiles were measured using anemometers at heights of 0.75, 1.25, 2.07, 3.44, 5.72, and 9.5 m; temperature sensors at heights of 1.3 and 9.6 m; and wind vanes at 9.7 and 1.5 m. Microtopographic measurements were made using a template and a laser-photo device to obtain RMS height. This study demonstrates that radar backscatter coefficients obtained from airborne and perhaps orbiting instruments could permit the derivation of aerodynamic roughness values for large areas. Such values, when combined with wind frequency data, could enable assessment of aeolian processes on a regional scale.

  7. Aeolian deposition change in the Peruvian central continental shelf during the last millennium and its relationship with atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, F. J., Sr.; Sifeddine, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a record of laminated sediment cores retrieved in the Pisco region (14 °S) characterized by local aeolian inputs. This record covers the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) to Little Ice Age (LIA) and the Current Warm Period (CWP) at centennial to sub-decadal resolution. The aim of the study is to reconstruct the patterns of aeolian sedimentation as well as the most important processes that control the input of this material to understand how these components reflect atmospheric climate variability during the last millennium. Assuming that the mineral fraction of the sediment is composed of several lognormally distributed particle populations, we applied an iterative least-square fitting routine to determine the number and the characteristics of the individual particles populations. This allows inferring the spatial and temporal variation of particles populations and thus transport mechanisms involved. Two components with grain size modes at 54±11 μm and 90±11 μm related with local aeolian erosion over the Pisco region were found. Our results showed active aeolian erosion during the second half of the MCA and rapid decrease from the MCA to the LIA. During the LIA the aeolian deposition exhibited a decreasing activity. During the CWP the aeolian deposition increased progressively. Comparison with others South American records indicates that those changes are linked to change in the meridional position of the Intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) and South Pacific Subtropical High (SPSH) at the centennial time resolution. Finally the CWP period showed an increase in the aeolian deposition and thus in the wind intensity over the past two centuries. This likely represents the result of the modern position of the ITCZ-SPSH system and the associated intensification of the local and regional winds. Nevertheless, the aeolian deposition and in consequence the wind intensity and variability of the last 100 yr are stronger than during the second sequence of the MCA

  8. Nonthermal and positron effects on the dust acoustic surface wave in a semi-bounded multi-component Lorentzian dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-09-01

    Nonthermal and positron effects on the dust acoustic surface waves propagating at the interface between a multi-component Lorentzian dusty plasma and a vacuum are investigated. The dispersion relation is kinetically derived by employing the specular reflection boundary condition and the dielectric permittivity for dusty plasma containing positrons. We found that there exist two modes of the dust acoustic surface wave; high- and low-frequency modes. We observe that both H- and L-modes are enhanced by the increase of the pair annihilation rate. However, the effects of positron density are duplex depending on the ratio of annihilated positrons. The effects of nonthermal plasmas are also investigated on the H- and L-modes of dust acoustic surface waves. We found that the nonthermal plasmas suppress the frequencies both H- and L-modes. This research was supported by Nuclear Fusion Research Program through NRF funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (Grant No. 2015M1A7A1A01002786).

  9. A Fractal Model for the Capacitance of Lunar Dust and Lunar Dust Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Keller, John W.; Farrell, William M.; Marshall, John; Richard, Denis Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lunar dust grains and dust aggregates exhibit clumping, with an uneven mass distribution, as well as features that span many spatial scales. It has been observed that these aggregates display an almost fractal repetition of geometry with scale. Furthermore, lunar dust grains typically have sharp protrusions and jagged features that result from the lack of aeolian weathering (as opposed to space weathering) on the Moon. A perfectly spherical geometry, frequently used as a model for lunar dust grains, has none of these characteristics (although a sphere may be a reasonable proxy for the very smallest grains and some glasses). We present a fractal model for a lunar dust grain or aggregate of grains that reproduces (1) the irregular clumpy nature of lunar dust, (2) the presence of sharp points, and (3) dust features that span multiple scale lengths. We calculate the capacitance of the fractal lunar dust analytically assuming fixed dust mass (i.e. volume) for an arbitrary number of fractal levels and compare the capacitance to that of a non-fractal object with the same volume, surface area, and characteristic width. The fractal capacitance is larger than that of the equivalent non-fractal object suggesting that for a given potential, electrostatic forces on lunar dust grains and aggregates are greater than one might infer from assuming dust grains are sphericaL Consequently, electrostatic transport of lunar dust grains, for example lofting, appears more plausible than might be inferred by calculations based on less realistic assumptions about dust shape and associated capacitance.

  10. Earth and planetary aeolian streaks: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Zada, Aviv Lee; Blumberg, Dan Gabriel; Maman, Shimrit

    2016-03-01

    Wind streaks are abundant aeolian features that have been observed on planetary surfaces by remote sensing means. They have been widely studied, particularly on Mars and Venus and to a much lesser extent on Earth. In imagery, these streaks appear as elongated features that are easily distinguishable from their surroundings. Geomorphologically, these streaks have, thus far, been interpreted as the presence or absence of small loose particles on the surface, deposited or eroded, respectively, by wind. However, the use of different (optical and radar) remote-sensing tools to study wind streaks has led to uncertain interpretations of these features and has hindered their geomorphological definition. Since wind streaks indicate the prevailing wind direction at the time of their formation, they may be used to map near-surface winds and to estimate atmospheric circulation patterns. The aim of this article is to review the main studies focusing on wind streaks and to present the most up-to-date knowledge on this topic. Moreover, a new perspective for wind streak research is suggested: As 'wind streak' is a collective term for a variety of aeolian features that when viewed from above appear as distinctive albedo surface patterns, we suggest that the term should not be used to refer to a geomorphological feature. Since the definition of wind streaks is constrained to remote sensing rather than to geomorphology and is affected by the inherent biases of remote sensing methods, we suggest that 'wind streaks' should be used as a collective term for aeolian surfaces that are discernable from above as bright and dark patterns due to alterations in the characteristics of the surface or to the presence of bedforms. To better understand the mechanisms, time-frames, climate compatibility of wind streaks and the influences of remote sensing on their appearance, we have compiled a new database containing more than 2,900 Earth wind streaks. A comprehensive study of these Earth wind

  11. Aeolian Abrasion, a Dominant Erosion Agent in the Martian Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, N.; Cooper, G.; Eddlemon, E.; Greeley, R.; Laity, J.; Phoreman, J.; Razdan, A.; van Note, S.; White, B.; Wilson, G.

    2004-12-01

    Aeolian abrasion is one of the predominant erosion mechanisms on Mars today. Martian ventifacts record the climate under which the rocks were modified (wind direction, wind speeds and particle flux) and therefore tie into the overall climatic regime of the planet. By better understanding the rates at which rocks abrade and the features diagnostic of specific climatic conditions, we can gain insight into past climates. Herein we report on numerical models, wind tunnel experiments, and field work to determine 1) Particle and kinetic fluxes on Earth and Mars, 2) the degree to which these parameters control abrasion, and 3) how, in detail, rocks of various shapes and compositions erode over time. Kinetic energy generally increases with height, whereas flux decreases, and impact angles, which affect energy transfer, and rebound effects are functions of the rock facet angle. This results in a non-linear relationship between abrasion potential and height that is a function of wind speed, planetary environment, and target geometry. We have computed the first three of these parameters numerically using a numerical saltation code, combined with published flux calculations These results have been compared to wind tunnel tests of flux vs. height, abrasion of erodible targets, and high speed video analysis under terrestrial and Martian pressures. We are also using high resolution laser scanning to characterize textures, shapes, and weathering changes for terrestrial and Martian rocks at the 100s of microns scale. We find that facet angle, texture, and rock heterogeneity are of critical importance in determining the rate and style of abrasion. Field and theoretical results demonstrate that high speed winds, not the integrated flux of lower speeds, and sand, not dust, produce most rock abrasion. On Mars, this requires sustained winds above 20-25 m/s at the near surface, a challenge in the current environment.

  12. Threshold wind velocity dynamics as a driver of aeolian sediment mass flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Galloza, Magda S.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.

    2016-03-01

    Horizontal (saltation) mass flux is a key driver of aeolian dust emission. Estimates of the horizontal mass flux underpin assessments of the global dust budget and influence our understanding of the dust cycle and its interactions. Current equations for predicting horizontal mass flux are based on limited field data and are constrained to representing transport-limited equilibrium saltation, driven by the wind momentum flux in excess of an entrainment threshold. This can result in large overestimation of the sediment mass flux. Here we compare measurements of the soil entrainment threshold, horizontal mass flux, and their temporal variability for five undisturbed dryland soils to explore the role of threshold in controlling the magnitude of mass flux. Average and median entrainment threshold showed relatively small variability among sites and relatively small variability between seasons, despite significant differences in soil surface conditions. Physical and biological soil crusts had little effect on the threshold value, and threshold appeared to play a minor role in determining the magnitude of sediment transport. Our results suggest that horizontal mass flux was controlled more by the supply limitation and abrasion efficiency of saltators present as loose erodible material or originating from neighboring soil sources. The omission of sediment supply and explicit representation of saltation bombardment from horizontal flux equations is inconsistent with the process representation in dust emission schemes and contributes to uncertainty in model predictions. This uncertainty can be reduced by developing greater process fidelity in models to predict horizontal mass flux under both supply- and transport-limited conditions.

  13. High Latitude Dust in the Earth System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Baddock, Matthew; Bradwell, Tom; Crusius, John; Darlington, Eleanor; Gaiero, Diego; Gasso, Santiago; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Hodgkins, Richard; McCulloch, Robert; McKenna-Neuman, Cheryl; Mockford, Tom; Stewart, Helena; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2016-01-01

    Natural dust is often associated with hot, subtropical deserts, but significant dust events have been reported from cold, high latitudes. This review synthesizes current understanding of high-latitude (> or = 50degN and > or = 40degS) dust source geography and dynamics and provides a prospectus for future research on the topic. Although the fundamental processes controlling aeolian dust emissions in high latitudes are essentially the same as in temperate regions, there are additional processes specific to or enhanced in cold regions. These include low temperatures, humidity, strong winds, permafrost and niveo-aeolian processes all of which can affect the efficiency of dust emission and distribution of sediments. Dust deposition at high latitudes can provide nutrients to the marine system, specifically by contributing iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceans; it also affects ice albedo and melt rates. There have been no attempts to quantify systematically the expanse, characteristics, or dynamics of high-latitude dust sources. To address this, we identify and compare the main sources and drivers of dust emissions in the Northern (Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Iceland) and Southern (Antarctica, New Zealand, and Patagonia) Hemispheres. The scarcity of year-round observations and limitations of satellite remote sensing data at high latitudes are discussed. It is estimated that under contemporary conditions high-latitude sources cover >500,000 sq km and contribute at least 80-100 Tg/yr1 of dust to the Earth system (approx. 5% of the global dust budget); both are projected to increase under future climate change scenarios.

  14. Dust in the Earth system: the biogeochemical linking of land, air and sea.

    PubMed

    Ridgwell, Andy J

    2002-12-15

    Understanding the response of the Earth's climate system to anthropogenic perturbation has been a pressing priority for society since the late 1980s. However, recent years have seen a major paradigm shift in how such an understanding can be reached. Climate change demands analysis within an integrated 'Earth-system' framework, taken to encompass the suite of interacting physical, chemical, biological and human processes that, in transporting and transforming materials and energy, jointly determine the conditions for life on the whole planet. This is a highly complex system, characterized by multiple nonlinear responses and thresholds, with linkages often between apparently disparate components. The interconnected nature of the Earth system is wonderfully illustrated by the diverse roles played by atmospheric transport of mineral 'dust', particularly in its capacity as a key pathway for the delivery of nutrients essential to plant growth, not only on land, but perhaps more importantly, in the ocean. Dust therefore biogeochemically links land, air and sea. This paper reviews the biogeochemical role of mineral dust in the Earth system and its interaction with climate, and, in particular, the potential importance of both past and possible future changes in aeolian delivery of the micro-nutrient iron to the ocean. For instance, if, in the future, there was to be a widespread stabilization of soils for the purpose of carbon sequestration on land, a reduction in aeolian iron supply to the open ocean would occur. The resultant weakening of the oceanic carbon sink could potentially offset much of the carbon sequestered on land. In contrast, during glacial times, enhanced dust supply to the ocean could have 'fertilized' the biota and driven atmospheric CO(2) lower. Dust might even play an active role in driving climatic change; since changes in dust supply may affect climate, and changes in climate, in turn, influence dust, a 'feedback loop' is formed. Possible feedback

  15. Abrasion by aeolian particles: Earth and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; White, B. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Marshall, J.; Krinsley, D.

    1984-01-01

    Estimation of the rate of aeolian abrasion of rocks on Mars requires knowledge of: (1) particle flux, (2) susceptibilities to abrasion of various rocks, and (3) wind frequencies on Mars. Fluxes and susceptibilities for a wide range of conditions were obtained in the laboratory and combined with wind data from the Viking meteorology experiment. Assuming an abundant supply of sand-sized particles, estimated rates range up to 2.1 x 10 to the minus 2 power cm of abrasion per year in the vicinity of Viking Lander 1. This rate is orders of magnitude too great to be in agreement with the inferred age of the surface based on models of impact crater flux. The discrepancy in the estimated rate of abrasion and the presumed old age of the surface cannot be explained easily by changes in climate or exhumation of ancient surfaces. The primary reason is thought to be related to the agents of abrasion. At least some sand-sized (approx. 100 micrometers) grains appear to be present, as inferred from both lander and orbiter observations. High rates of abrasion occur for all experimental cases involving sands of quartz, basalt, or ash. However, previous studies have shown that sand is quickly comminuted to silt- and clay-sized grains in the martian aeolian regime. Experiments also show that these fine grains are electrostatically charged and bond together as sand-sized aggregates. Laboratory simulations of wind abrasion involving aggregates show that at impact velocities capable of destroying sand, aggregates from a protective veneer on the target surface and can give rise to extremely low abrasion rates.

  16. Laboratory and observational study of the interrelation of the carbonaceous component of interstellar dust and solar system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sanford, S. A.; Schutte, W. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1991-01-01

    By studying the chemical and isotopic composition of interstellar ice and dust, one gains insight into the composition and chemical evolution of the solid bodies in the solar nebula and the nature of the material subsequently brought into the inner part of the solar system by comets and meteorites. It is now possible to spectroscopically probe the composition of interstellar ice and dust in the mid-infrared, the spectral range which is most diagnostic of fundamental molecular vibrations. We can compare these spectra of various astronomical objects (including the diffuse and dense interstellar medium, comets, and the icy outer planets and their satellites) with the spectra of analogs we produce in the laboratory under conditions which mimic those in these different objects. In this way one can determine the composition and abundances of the major constituents of the various ices and place general constraints on the types of organics coating the grains in the diffuse interstellar medium. In particular we have shown the ices in the dense clouds contain H2O, CH3OH, CO, perhaps some NH3 and H2CO, we well as nitriles and ketones or esters. Furthermore, by studying the photochemistry of these ice analogs in the laboratory, one gains insight into the chemistry which takes place in interstellar/precometary ices. Chemical and spectroscopic studies of photolyzed analogs (including deuterated species) are now underway. The results of some of these studies will be presented and implications for the evolution of the biogenic elements in interstellar dust and comets will be discussed.

  17. Asian dust transport during the last century recorded in Lake Suigetsu sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashima, Kana; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Irino, Tomohisa; Nakagawa, Takeshi; Tada, Ryuji; Hara, Yukari; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Kurosaki, Yasunori

    2016-03-01

    Asian dust has a significant impact on the natural environment. Its variability on multiple timescales modulates the ocean biogeochemistry and climate. We demonstrate that temporal changes in the deposition flux of Aeolian dust recorded in sediments from Lake Suigetsu, central Japan, during the last century exhibit a continuous decreasing trend and a decadal-scale decrease in 1952-1974. The former decreasing trend can be explained by a decrease in the dust storm frequency at source regions due to the warming of Mongolia in the twentieth century, suggesting future decrease of Asian dust transport with further warming in Mongolia. Decadal-scale decrease of Aeolian dust is explained by weaker westerlies in lower latitudes in central Japan, reflecting a weaker Aleutian Low during the corresponding period. Decadal-scale westerly change probably causes north-south shifts of the dominant dust transport path, which affects subarctic northern Pacific Ocean biogeochemistry by changing the micronutrient iron supply.

  18. Holocene aeolian activities in the southeastern Mu Us Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Feifei; Lu, Ruijie; Gao, Shangyu; Li, Jinfeng; Liu, Xiaokang

    2015-12-01

    Aeolian deposits from three sites in the Mu Us Desert were used to reconstruct the history of aeolian activities during the Holocene. The results of the lithologies, chronologies and proxy indicators showed that aeolian activities occurred at ∼9.96 cal ka BP, 7.9-6.9 ka BP, 6.4 ka BP and 3.8 cal ka BP∼. The cold event that occurred around 6.4 ka BP interrupted the Holocene Optimum period, which is largely consistent with the findings from sediments in adjacent regions and the monsoon areas of China. Combined with punished OSL and 14C ages of aeolian deposits samples in this region, the environmental changes in the Mu Us Desert were divided into four stages. Active sand dunes dominated before 11 ka BP. Aeolian activities occurred regionally from 11 to 8.5 ka BP and typical sandy paleosol widely developed with episodic aeolian activities between 8.5 and 4 ka BP. Dunes have reactivated and active sand dunes have gradually increased since 4 ka BP. Comparisons with the other paleoclimatic records indicated that the evolution of the Mu Us Desert was closely related to the East Asian monsoon. Paleosol development depended more on the precipitation brought by the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM). The stronger East Asian winter monsoon (EAMW) and higher isolation resulted in the aeolian activities in the early Holocene, while during the mid-Holocene the fluctuating EAWM played a more important role in inducing episodic aeolian activities. The environmental deterioration during the late Holocene can be related to weakened EASM or to increased anthropogenic influence.

  19. A note on the stochastic nature of particle cohesive force and implications to threshold friction velocity for aerodynamic dust entrainment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is considerable interest to determine the threshold for aeolian dust emission on Earth and Mars. Existing schemes for threshold friction velocity are all deterministic in nature, but observations show that in the dust particle size range the threshold friction velocity scatters strongly due t...

  20. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  1. Multi-Resolution Analysis of LiDAR data for Characterizing a Stabilized Aeolian Landscape in South Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrineau, C. P.; Dobreva, I. D.; Bishop, M. P.; Houser, C.

    2014-12-01

    Aeolian systems are ideal natural laboratories for examining self-organization in patterned landscapes, as certain wind regimes generate certain morphologies. Topographic information and scale dependent analysis offer the opportunity to study such systems and characterize process-form relationships. A statistically based methodology for differentiating aeolian features would enable the quantitative association of certain surface characteristics with certain morphodynamic regimes. We conducted a multi-resolution analysis of LiDAR elevation data to assess scale-dependent morphometric variations in an aeolian landscape in South Texas. For each pixel, mean elevation values are calculated along concentric circles moving outward at 100-meter intervals (i.e. 500 m, 600 m, 700 m from pixel). The calculated average elevation values plotted against distance from the pixel of interest as curves are used to differentiate multi-scalar variations in elevation across the landscape. In this case, it is hypothesized these curves may be used to quantitatively differentiate certain morphometries from others like a spectral signature may be used to classify paved surfaces from natural vegetation, for example. After generating multi-resolution curves for all the pixels in a selected area of interest (AOI), a Principal Components Analysis is used to highlight commonalities and singularities between generated curves from pixels across the AOI. Our findings suggest that the resulting components could be used for identification of discrete aeolian features like open sands, trailing ridges and active dune crests, and, in particular, zones of deflation. This new approach to landscape characterization not only works to mitigate bias introduced when researchers must select training pixels for morphometric investigations, but can also reveal patterning in aeolian landscapes that would not be as obvious without quantitative characterization.

  2. Soil heterogeneity of an East and West facing ridge above timberline due to differences in snow and aeolian deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traver, E.

    2015-12-01

    Hans Jenny's soil forming factors—time, parent material, climate, topography, and organisms—represent the major components of his system to describe and quantify soil development. In almost all situations, it is difficult to hold even one of these factors constant while focusing on another factor; however, in our study site—the East and West side of a narrow North-South running ridge, above timberline in SE Wyoming—we can hold three factors nearly constant (time, parent material, and climate) and focus on how topography, in particular, has influenced the soil differences on the two sides. The East side is the leeside of prevailing and strong westerly winds and receives a large snow pack while the West is consistently snow-free during winter creating a very different moisture and soil temperature regime. The East receives aeolian dust deposition while the West loses surface material from wind scour. A standard chemical and physical analysis found that while the two sides are nearly identical textually, with a similar pH and low electrical conductivity, the East side is richer in minerals. During the short growing season, soil moisture results show that the West side is holding more water than the East side; however, the East side has a higher percentage of organic matter and is more shrub and forb rich. An isotope analysis shows that the C:N ratios are very similar on the two sides. Microbial biomass and functional groups will be analyzed in the soil samples as well as a seismic study conducted to quantity depth of soil to bedrock. Using all these results will help quantify the differences on the two sides of this narrow ridge and add to our understanding of fine-scale soil heterogeneity and its relationship to watershed hydrology.

  3. Employing lidar to detail vegetation canopy architecture for prediction of aeolian transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Law, Darin J.; Breshears, David D.; Munson, Seth M.; Webb, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The diverse and fundamental effects that aeolian processes have on the biosphere and geosphere are commonly generated by horizontal sediment transport at the land surface. However, predicting horizontal sediment transport depends on vegetation architecture, which is difficult to quantify in a rapid but accurate manner. We demonstrate an approach to measure vegetation canopy architecture at high resolution using lidar along a gradient of dryland sites ranging from 2% to 73% woody plant canopy cover. Lidar-derived canopy height, distance (gaps) between vegetation elements (e.g., trunks, limbs, leaves), and the distribution of gaps scaled by vegetation height were correlated with canopy cover and highlight potentially improved horizontal dust flux estimation than with cover alone. Employing lidar to estimate detailed vegetation canopy architecture offers promise for improved predictions of horizontal sediment transport across heterogeneous plant assemblages.

  4. Evolution of the dust and water ice plume components as observed by the LCROSS visible camera and UV-visible spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heldmann, Jennifer L.; Lamb, Justin; Asturias, Daniel; Colaprete, Anthony; Goldstein, David B.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Varghese, Philip L.

    2015-07-01

    The LCROSS (Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite) impacted the Cabeus crater near the lunar South Pole on 9 October 2009 and created an impact plume that was observed by the LCROSS Shepherding Spacecraft. Here we analyze data from the ultraviolet-visible spectrometer and visible context camera aboard the spacecraft. We use these data to constrain a numerical model to understand the physical evolution of the resultant plume. The UV-visible light curve peaks in brightness 18 s after impact and then decreases in radiance but never returns to the pre-impact radiance value for the ∼4 min of observation by the Shepherding Spacecraft. The blue:red spectral ratio increases in the first 10 s, decreases over the following 50 s, remains constant for approximately 150 s, and then begins to increase again ∼180 s after impact. Constraining the modeling results with spacecraft observations, we conclude that lofted dust grains remained suspended above the lunar surface for the entire 250 s of observation after impact. The impact plume was composed of both a high angle spike and low angle plume component. Numerical modeling is used to evaluate the relative effects of various plume parameters to further constrain the plume properties when compared with the observational data. Dust particle sizes lofted above the lunar surface were micron to sub-micron in size. Water ice particles were also contained within the ejecta cloud and simultaneously photo-dissociated and sublimated after reaching sunlight.

  5. Laboratory studies of aeolian sediment transport processes on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; Valance, Alexandre; Merrison, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    , but not all, older or recent wind tunnel observations. Similarly some measurements performed with uniform sand samples having grain diameters of the order of 0.25-0.40 mm indicate that ripple spacing depends on friction velocity in a similar way as particle jump length. The observations are thus in agreement with a recent ripple model that link the typical jump length to ripple spacing. A possible explanation for contradictory observations in some experiments may be that long observation sequences are required in order to assure that equilibrium exists between ripple geometry and wind flow. Quantitative understanding of saltation characteristics on Mars still lacks important elements. Based upon image analysis and numerical predictions, aeolian ripples have been thought to consist of relatively large grains (diameter > 0.6 mm) and that saltation occurs at high wind speeds (> 26 m/s) involving trajectories that are significantly longer than those on Earth (by a factor of 10-100). However, this is not supported by recent observations from the surface of Mars, which shows that active ripples in their geometry and composition have characteristics compatible with those of terrestrial ripples (Sullivan et al., 2008). Also the highest average wind speeds on Mars have been measured to be < 20 m/s, with even turbulent gusts not exceeding 25 m/s. Electrification is seen as a dominant factor in the transport dynamics of dust on Mars, affecting the structure, adhesive properties and detachment/entrainment mechanisms specifically through the formation of aggregates (Merrison et al., 2012). Conversely for terrestrial conditions electric fields typically observed are not intense enough to significantly affect sand transport rates while little is known in the case of extra-terrestrial environments.

  6. Quantifying the Impact of Mineral Dust and Dissolved Iron Deposition on Marine Biological Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Gassó, S.; Solmon, F.

    2009-12-01

    Aeolian dust deposition has proven to be a critical source of iron (Fe) to remote oceanic regions where it can play an important role in regulating marine ecosystem productivity. Increases in marine biological activity have been suggested to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and enhance oceanic emissions of marine primary organic aerosols and biologically produced trace gases leading to secondary aerosol formation. These mechanisms can affect climate directly by enhancing carbon sequestration rates, and through organic aerosols influencing incoming solar radiation or modulating shallow marine cloud properties. Due to dust emissions and transport also being dependent upon climatic conditions, the relationship between aeolian dust deposition and oceanic emissions (e.g., primary organic matter, dimethylsulphide, halocarbons, and several types of non-methane hydrocarbons) presents a possible ocean-atmosphere feedback cycle. The Southern Ocean (SO) is characterized as being the largest oceanic region with marine primary productivity that is limited by the micronutrient Fe. Despite the potentially important role of dust laden-Fe in this region, few studies exist that can help to constrain the impact of dust-laden Fe fluxes on biological productivity in the Atlantic sector of the SO. Patagonia has been estimated to supply the majority of aeolian-Fe deposited to the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO). Thus, the focus of this study is to quantify the influence of Patagonian dust storms on marine primary productivity in the SAO and assess the potential climatic effect of variability in aeolian dust deposition. In this work we use the global chemistry transport model GEOS-Chem, implemented with a prognostic Fe dissolution scheme (GEOS-Chem/DFeS), to evaluate the deposition of Patagonian dust and associated dissolved iron (DFe) fluxes to the SAO. Model predicted fluxes of DFe were then used to quantify the impact of Patagonian dust on marine primary productivity in the surface

  7. Potential source regions of dust accumulated in northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowska, S.; Woronko, B.

    2012-04-01

    Sahara is the largest source of the dust in the world. The material sampled from dust storms in Tunisia (Nefta Oasis, El Kantoui Harbor), north Egypt (Alexandria) and Morocco (Mhamid Oasis) (March 2001, March and April 2009) was taken to identify the potential sources of dust accumulation and transport paths in North Africa. The samples were analyzed on grain size, micromorphology of silt grain surfaces in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), elemental composition of grains and their surface crusts, loss on ignition, mineralogical composition of samples and carbonate content. Additionally the meteorological situation was analyzed during the dust storm occurrences and preceding periods. The results of grain size analyses show that all studied sediments belong to the small dust type, and dust accumulated in Mhamid is the clay mineral agglomerated (CMA) dust. The source of the CMA are the old dry lake beds. Dust particles are mobilized as aggregates of clay minerals, what is controlled by structure (particle packing) of the original lake sediment, and accumulation is dry and wet as well. The results of the analysis of the quartz grain surface micromorphology, the elemental composition and loss on ignition indicate that dust accumulated in Morocco originated from a relatively homogenous sediment source and, on the other hand, dust found in Alexandria comes from a diversified source. Dust sampled in Tunisia is characterized by the highest content of carbonates and organic matter which suggests the intensive dispelling acting on the weathered material from carbonate rocks and local Mediterranean soil covers rich in CaCO3. The analyses of meteorological conditions during the dust storms and the analyses of the textural characteristics of deposits show that it is highly probable that analysed aeolian dust was transported both for shorter and longer distances. Hypothetic source areas of dust accumulated in Mhamid could be the old ergs, some located 300-500 km away like

  8. Modeling aeolian erosion in presence of vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, S.; Bergametti, G.; Simoëns, S.

    2014-02-01

    Semiarid landscapes are characterized by vegetated surfaces. Understanding the impact of vegetation on aeolian soil erosion is important for reducing soil erosion or limiting crop damage through abrasion or burial. In the present study, a saltation model fully coupled with a large-eddy simulation airflow model is extended to vegetated landscapes. From this model, the sensitivity of sand erosion to different arrangements and type of plants (shrub versus tree) representative of semiarid landscapes is investigated and the wind erosion reduction induced by plants is quantified. We show that saltation processes over vegetated surfaces have a limited impact on the mean wind statistics, the momentum extracted from the flow by saltating particles being negligible compared to that extracted by plants. Simulated sand erosion patterns resulting from plant distribution, i.e., accumulation and erosion areas, appear qualitatively consistent with previous observations. It is shown that sand erosion reduction depends not only on vegetation cover but also on plant morphology and plant distribution relative to the mean wind direction. A simple shear stress partitioning approach applied in shrub cases gives similar trends of sand erosion reduction as the present model following wind direction and vegetation cover. However, the magnitude of the reduction appears significantly different from one approach to another. Although shrubs trap saltating particles, trees appear more efficient than shrubs to reduce sand erosion. This is explained by the large-scale sheltering effect of trees compared to the local shrub one.

  9. Direct numerical simulations of aeolian sand ripples

    PubMed Central

    Durán, Orencio; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Aeolian sand beds exhibit regular patterns of ripples resulting from the interaction between topography and sediment transport. Their characteristics have been so far related to reptation transport caused by the impacts on the ground of grains entrained by the wind into saltation. By means of direct numerical simulations of grains interacting with a wind flow, we show that the instability turns out to be driven by resonant grain trajectories, whose length is close to a ripple wavelength and whose splash leads to a mass displacement toward the ripple crests. The pattern selection results from a compromise between this destabilizing mechanism and a diffusive downslope transport which stabilizes small wavelengths. The initial wavelength is set by the ratio of the sediment flux and the erosion/deposition rate, a ratio which increases linearly with the wind velocity. We show that this scaling law, in agreement with experiments, originates from an interfacial layer separating the saltation zone from the static sand bed, where momentum transfers are dominated by midair collisions. Finally, we provide quantitative support for the use of the propagation of these ripples as a proxy for remote measurements of sediment transport. PMID:25331873

  10. Direct numerical simulations of aeolian sand ripples.

    PubMed

    Durán, Orencio; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

    2014-11-01

    Aeolian sand beds exhibit regular patterns of ripples resulting from the interaction between topography and sediment transport. Their characteristics have been so far related to reptation transport caused by the impacts on the ground of grains entrained by the wind into saltation. By means of direct numerical simulations of grains interacting with a wind flow, we show that the instability turns out to be driven by resonant grain trajectories, whose length is close to a ripple wavelength and whose splash leads to a mass displacement toward the ripple crests. The pattern selection results from a compromise between this destabilizing mechanism and a diffusive downslope transport which stabilizes small wavelengths. The initial wavelength is set by the ratio of the sediment flux and the erosion/deposition rate, a ratio which increases linearly with the wind velocity. We show that this scaling law, in agreement with experiments, originates from an interfacial layer separating the saltation zone from the static sand bed, where momentum transfers are dominated by midair collisions. Finally, we provide quantitative support for the use of the propagation of these ripples as a proxy for remote measurements of sediment transport. PMID:25331873

  11. Avalanche grainflow on a simulated aeolian dune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, S. L. F.; McKenna Neuman, C.; Nickling, W.

    2013-09-01

    Avalanches maintain the slipface of aeolian dunes, which alters their airflow characteristics and sediment dynamics, and results in the development of grainflow cross-bedding. We report on a series of experiments in which avalanches were observed on a 1:1 replica of a small (1.2 m brink height) transverse dune in the Dune Simulation Wind Tunnel under wind velocities of 8-11 m s-1. Changes in slipface topography were observed photographically and measured utilizing a 3-D laser scanner with 1 mm2 spatial resolution. Avalanches in noncohesive sands were observed to progress through scarp recession from the point of initiation and continue until the slope angle is reduced. Changes in local slope confirm that the steep, pre-avalanche mean slope relaxes to a uniform value equal to the angle of repose of the test sand (32°) over all involved portions of the slipface. Avalanche volumes are measured, and demonstrate that avalanche magnitude is independent of wind speed over the range of velocities observed. This independence provides the potential to significantly simplify the modeling of grainflow as a function of only the total cross brink sediment transport.

  12. Potential dust emissions from the southern Kalahari's dunelands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattachan, Abinash; D'Odorico, Paolo; Okin, Gregory S.; Dintwe, Kebonyethata

    2013-03-01

    The Southern Hemisphere shows relatively low levels of atmospheric dust concentrations. Dust concentrations could, however, increase as a result of losses of vegetation cover in the southern Kalahari. There is some evidence of an ongoing remobilization of stabilized dunefields in the southern Kalahari where dune crests with sparse vegetation cover are reactivated during dry and windy periods, a phenomenon that is predicted to intensify with increased land degradation, overgrazing, and droughts. Despite the potentially important climatic and biogeochemical implications of dust emissions from the Kalahari, it is still unclear whether the predicted remobilization of the Kalahari dunes could be associated with increased dust emissions from this region. The dependence of sediment fluxes and dust emissions on vegetation cover in the Kalahari dunelands remains poorly understood, which prevents a quantitative assessment of possible changes in aeolian activity in this region under different land use and land cover scenarios. In this study, we report the results of an aeolian sediment sampling campaign over a variety of land covers in the southern Kalahari. We use these results to quantify the potential rate of dust emissions and its dependence on vegetation cover and to make an estimate of dust fluxes from a portion of the southern Kalahari. The results show that the loss of vegetation could lead to substantial increases in dust emission and nutrient loss.

  13. From Desert to Dessert: Why Australian Dust Matters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, K. A.; Mackie, D. S.; Boyd, P. W.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2006-12-01

    The growth of some types of phytoplankton in several parts of the world ocean, including much of the Southern Ocean, is limited by the supply of iron. Large Australian dust storms uplift, transport and abrade soils, to produce aeolian dust that is a significant source iron to the Southern Ocean. Atmospheric processes that enhance the dissolution of iron from aeolian dusts are of interest and have been studied for material from major dust producing regions like the Sahara, Gobi and Australian deserts; the reported solubility of iron from aeolian dusts ranges from <0.01% to 80%. The characteristic red soils, sands and dusts from Australia are generally believed to consist of quartz grains with a coating of fine grains and crystals of iron oxides, primarily hematite and goethite. The precise mineralogy of soil and dust grain coatings is poorly understood and it also not well known how the coatings are altered during uplift and transport to the ocean. Current models to understand the processes operating during the transport and atmospheric processing of dust include some generalisations and simplifications that are not always warranted and our work has shown the overlooked complexity of the system. Models for aeolian-iron dissolution based on Northern Hemisphere data commonly include the pollutants SOx and NOx. The modern Southern Hemisphere is less polluted and thus resembles past environmental systems. The dissolution of iron from soils of the Saharan, Gobi and Australian deserts in the presence of protons only (i.e. without SOx and NOx) occurs in two phases. The first, faster phase, representing up to 20% of total iron is via a surface-controlled mechanism. The rate determining variable is the exposed surface area of the iron oxides and not the size of the underlying quartz grain. The second, slower, phase of dissolution occurs via the transport-controlled formation of a leached layer. During the simulated aeolian abrasion of Australian soils from dust producing

  14. Cometary dust composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Hanner, M. S.

    1988-01-01

    The earth based measurements and in situ sampling of Comet Halley have provided new data about the chemical composition of cometary grains. Recent progress in laboratory studies of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) complement the comet data, allowing inferences about the mineralogy and physical structure of the comet dust to be drawn from the observed elemental composition and infrared spectra. The in situ dust composition measurements at Halley, the composition of IDPs and their relation to comet dust, and the origin of the 3.4 micron hydrocarbon feature is discussed. Related discussion is also presented on aromatic components in comets and the 3.4 micron feature. These topics are briefly summarized.

  15. The north-eastern aeolian 'European Sand Belt' as potential record of environmental changes: A case study from Eastern Latvia and Southern Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalińska-Nartiša, Edyta; Thiel, Christine; Nartišs, Māris; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Murray, Andrew S.

    2016-09-01

    The Latvian and Estonian inland dunes belong to the north-eastern part of the 'European Sand Belt' (ESB). These dunes are widely distributed over broad glaciolacustrine plains and Late Glacial alluvial deltas, considered to be potential sources for the aeolian material. Little is known about these aeolian sediments and their substratum; here we present a detailed sedimentary structural and textural characterisation together with a luminescence-based chronology. Through a comparison between grain-size, rounding of quartz grains and surface characteristics in medium/coarse (0.5-0.8 mm) sand, and the light mineral content, we found an alternation of aeolian and periglacial components. Further, short-lasting aeolian abrasion and/or transportation periods, and a significant contribution of a nearby sediment source are suggested. Luminescence dating points to aeolian sand accumulation and dune formation between ∼16 ka and ∼9 ka. However, we also observed some presumably watertable controlled environmental conditions at ∼13 ka; this corresponds with the occurrence of an ice-dammed/proglacial lake.

  16. Mass-height profile and total mass transport of wind eroded aeolian sediments from rangelands of the Indian Thar Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertia, R. S.; Santra, Priyabrata; Kandpal, B. K.; Prasad, R.

    2010-11-01

    Wind erosion is an active land degradation process in the Indian Thar Desert and severe dust storm events during hot summer months in the region are very common. Assessment of soil loss due to dust storm events from major land use systems of the Indian Thar Desert is highly essential for proper environmental planning. Characterization of the mass-height profile of wind eroded aeolian sediment is an important step to compute soil loss/mass transport but was not previously studied in the region. In the present study, aeolian mass fluxes (kg m -2) at different heights from soil surface were measured at two major rangelands in the Indian Thar Desert: Overgrazing rangeland at Jaisalmer (26°55'N and 70°57'E), and controlled grazing rangeland at Chandan (27°01'N and 71°01'E). Evaluation of several mass-height profile models revealed that a power decay function [ q( z) = az-b, where q( z) is the measured mass flux at an height of z (m) from soil surface; a and b are parameters of the equation] was best to characterize the mass-height relationship of aeolian sediments from the Indian Thar Desert. The average mass transport rate (kg m -1 day -1) or the total soil loss during hot summer months was significantly higher at the overgrazed rangeland site than at the controlled grazing rangeland site. Therefore, protection of existing rangelands, which comprise about 80% geographical area of the Indian Thar Desert may check the land degradation process due to wind erosion.

  17. Simulation of the mineral dust emission over Northern Africa and Middle East using an aerodynamic roughness length map derived from the ASCAT/PARASOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Jorba, Oriol; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Prigent, Catherine; Baldasano, Jose M.

    2014-05-01

    Aeolian aerodynamic roughness length in arid regions is a key parameter to predict the vulnerability of the surface to wind erosion, and, as a consequence, the related production of mineral aerosol (e.g. Laurent et al., 2008). Recently, satellite-derived roughness length at the global scale have emerged and provide the opportunity to use them in advanced emission schemes in global and regional models (i.e. Menut et al., 2013). A global map of the aeolian aerodynamic roughness length at high resolution (6 km) is derived, for arid and semi-arid regions merging PARASOL and ASCAT data to estimate aeolian roughness length. It shows very good consistency with the existing information on the properties of these surfaces. The dataset is available to the community, for use in atmospheric dust transport models. The present contribution analyses the behaviour of the NMMB/BSC-Dust model (Pérez et al., 2011) when the ASCAT/PARASOL satellite-derived global roughness length (Prigent et al, 2012) and the State Soil Geographic database Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (STATSGO-FAO) soil texture data set (based on wet techniques) is used. We explore the sensitivity of the drag partition scheme (a critical component of the dust emission scheme) and the dust vertical fluxes (intensity and spatial patterns) to the roughness length. An annual evaluation of NMMB/BSC-Dust (for the year 2011) over Northern Africa and the Middle East using observed aerosol optical depths (AODs) from Aerosol Robotic Network sites and aerosol satellite products (MODIS and MISR) will be discussed. Laurent, B., Marticorena, B., Bergametti, G., Leon, J. F., and Mahowald, N. M.: Modeling mineral dust emissions from the Sahara desert using new surface properties and soil database, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D14218, doi:10.1029/2007JD009484, 2008. Menut, L., C. Pérez, K. Haustein, B. Bessagnet, C. Prigent, and S. Alfaro, Impact of surface roughness and soil texture on mineral dust emission

  18. Laboratory Simulations of Martian and Venusian Aeolian Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    With the flyby of the Neptune system by Voyager, the preliminary exploration of the Solar System was accomplished. Data have been returned for all major planets and satellites except the Pluto system. Results show that the surfaces of terrestrial planets and satellites have been subjected to a wide variety of geological processes. On solid- surface planetary objects having an atmosphere, aeolian processes are important in modifying their surfaces through the redistribution of fine-grained material by the wind. Bedrock may be eroded to produce particles and the particles transported by wind for deposition in other areas. This process operates on Earth today and is evident throughout the geological record. Aeolian processes also occur on Mars, Venus, and possibly Titan and Triton, both of which are outer planet satellites that have atmospheres. Mariner 9 and Viking results show abundant wind-related landforms on Mars, including dune fields and yardangs (wind-eroded hills). On Venus, measurements made by the Soviet Venera and Vega spacecraft and extrapolations from the Pioneer Venus atmospheric probes show that surface winds are capable of transporting particulate materials and suggest that aeolian processes may operate on that planet as well. Magellan radar images of Venus show abundant wind streaks in some areas, as well as dune fields and a zone of possible yardangs. The study of planetary aeolian processes must take into account diverse environments, from the cold, low-density atmosphere of Mars to the extremely hot, high- density Venusian atmosphere. Factors such as threshold wind speeds (minimum wind velocity needed to move particles), rates of erosion and deposition, trajectories of windblown particles, and aeolian flow fields over various landforms are all important aspects of the problem. In addition, study of aeolian terrains on Earth using data analogous to planetary data-collection systems is critical to the interpretation of spacecraft information and

  19. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Martian Aeolian and Mass Wasting Processes: Blowing and Flowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session Martian Aeolian and Mass Wasting Processes: BLowing and Flowing included the following topics: 1) Three Decades of Martian Surface Changes; 2) Thermophysical Properties of Isidis Basin, Mars; 3) Intracrater Material in Eastern Arabia Terra: THEMIS, MOC, and MOLA Analysis of Wind-blown Deposits and Possible High-Inertia Source Material; 4) Thermal Properties of Sand from TES and THEMIS: Do Martian Dunes Make a Good Control for Thermal Inertia Calculations? 5) A Comparative Analysis of Barchan Dunes in the Intra-Crater Dune Fields and the North Polar Sand Sea; 6) Diluvial Dunes in Athabasca Valles, Mars: Morphology, Modeling and Implications; 7) Surface Profiling of Natural Dust Devils; 8) Martian Dust Devil Tracks: Inferred Directions of Movement; 9) Numerical Simulations of Anastomosing Slope Streaks on Mars; 10) Young Fans in an Equatorial Crater in Xanthe Terra, Mars; 11) Large Well-exposed Alluvual Fans in Deep Late-Noachian Craters; 12) New Evidence for the Formation of Large Landslides on Mars; and 13) What Can We Learn from the Ages of Valles Marineris Landslides on Martian Impact History?

  20. Aeolian desertification from the mid-1970s to 2005 in Otindag Sandy Land, Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulin; Wang, Tao

    2007-01-01

    Aeolian desertification in Otindag Sandy Land has expanded dramatically during the past 50 years. This research explored processes and causes of aeolian desertification in the study area. The results showed that aeolian desertification development in Zhenglan Qi of typical region located at the center in the study area can be divided into three stages including rapid occurrence before 1987, parts of rehabilitation and most of deterioration from 1987 to 2000 and little rapid rehabilitation occurrence from 2000 to 2005, according to remote sensing images and field investigations. Gradually declining MI indicated that climate change was not the major cause of aeolian desertification development during the last 40 years, while increasing population should be the underlying cause of local aeolian desertification. Irrational human activities mainly including unsuitable reclamation in the 1960s and lasting over-grazing after 1980 are direct causes contributing to local aeolian desertification, especially over-grazing, while climate change often played a revealer of irrational human activities mainly through drought events. Over-grazing and undesirable climate have different functions during the whole aeolian desertification process. Over-grazing gradually changed grasslands to slight aeolian desertified lands at the initial stage, while climate with windy days or droughts often accelerated formation of serious aeolian desertified lands. Aeolian desertification in the study area both possesses occurrence possibility and great rehabilitative potential. At present, more integrated countermeasures combating local aeolian desertification still are expected.

  1. Aeolian Sediment Transport Pathways and Aerodynamics at Troughs on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourke, Mary C.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Barnouin-Jha, Olivier S.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between wind regimes and topography can give rise to complex suites of aeolian landforms. This paper considers aeolian sediment associated wit11 troughs on Mars and identifies a wider range of deposit types than has previously been documented. These include wind streaks, falling dunes, "lateral" dunes, barchan dunes, linear dunes, transverse ridges, sand ramps, climbing dunes, sand streamers, and sand patches. The sediment incorporated into these deposits is supplied by wind streaks and ambient Planitia sources as well as originating within the trough itself, notably from the trough walls and floor. There is also transmission of sediment between dneTsh. e flow dynamics which account for the distribution of aeolian sediment have been modeled using two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. The model predicts flow separation on the upwind side of the trough followed by reattachment and acceleration at the downwind margin. The inferred patterns of sediment transport compare well with the distribution of aeolian forms. Model data indicate an increase of wind velocity by approx. 30 % at the downwind trough margin. This suggests that the threshold wind speed necessary for sand mobilization on Mars will be more freqentmlye t in these inclined locations.

  2. Agriculture as a source of Aeolian sediment affecting air quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeolian processes on agricultural lands have been examined for the past several decades on nearly every continent and has led to a better understanding of detachment, entrainment, transport, and deposition. Relatively little is known concerning the effect of these processes on air quality. In fact, ...

  3. Change in dust and fluvial deposition variability in the Peruvian central continental coast during the last millennium: Response of the ocean atmospheric systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sifeddine, A.; Briceño, F. J., Sr.; Caquineau, S.; Velazco, F.; Salvatecci, R.; Ortlieb, L.; Gutierrez, D.; Cardich, J.; Almeida, C.

    2014-12-01

    The particles from aeolian or fluvial origin are a useful proxy for the reconstruction of atmospheric condition patterns in the past. Changes in continental aridity and the atmospheric condition determine the composition and amount of lithogenic material and the way of transport from the continent. Here we present a record of laminated sediments (core B040506) retrieved in the continental shelf off Peru. Wind long-term suspension (regional) and local aeolian transport during the last millennium (transition from Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) to Little Ice Age (LIA) and the current warm period (CWP)) at centennial to decadal resolution are characterized. The particle provenance and grain size components are discussed using a mathematical model of fractionation. This model assumes that lithological composition of the sediment is an assemblage of several log-normally distributed particle populations. In this way, an interactive least square fitting routine is used to fit the particle grain size collected with the mathematical expression. This allows inferring the spatial and temporal variation of particle populations and thus the transport mechanisms involved. Our results showed a decrease in aeolian transport from the MCA - LIA transition and during the LIA with except of the local aeolian transport that shows peaks during the LIA. This decrease during LIA is accompanied by an enhanced fluvial transport. During the CWP the aeolian transport (Paracas dust storm and wind long-term suspension) display a high variability and tendency to increase in detriment of runoff. Comparison with other South American records indicates that those changes are linked to change in the shift of the ITCZ and Pacific high at the centennial time resolution. Finally the great increase of the fluvial transport within the transition of the LIA to the CWP is synchronous to severe drought period recorded in the Indo-Pacific region indicating higher frequency of El Niño events. Hence these

  4. Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients and imaginary part of the complex refractive indices of mineral dust components measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients (MACs) and the imaginary part (κ) of the refractive indices of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at the wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. The MAC values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. Values of κ were calculated from the measured and particle-loss-corrected data by using a Mie-theory-based retrieval algorithm. The determined values could be used for comparisons with calculated wavelength-dependent κ values typically deduced from bulk-phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk-phase measurements.

  5. Character and provenance of aeolian sediments in northeast Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Janet E.; Nichol, Douglas W.

    2015-12-01

    Aeolian activity is not generally associated with the humid tropics, and although reports of loess-like soils in various locations in southeast Asia exist, these mainly lack the detailed analysis to set them in meaningful spatial or historical context. This paper examines the red and yellow sandy sediments of the Khorat Plateau in northeast Thailand which have been variously referred to as 'cover sands', 'loessial soils' or 'loess'. The sediments are referred to as having alluvial, biological as well as aeolian origin, and a date of 9-35 ka is reported. The study compares the Khorat sediments physically and geochemically with loess and aeolian sediments from other regions, as well as with other sites in southeast Asia which are reported here. The moderate degree of particle sorting and unimodal sizes of the sediments along with a sub-spherical sub-rounded form, supports previous diagnoses of an aeolian origin. Geochemical analysis of the Khorat sediments indicates severe depletion in both mobile and immobile elements, which are even more depleted than other southeast Asian loessic soils examined. This depletion, along with the only moderate particle sorting, suggests the source of the sediments to be the local weathered sandstones outcropping around the edge of the Khorat Plateau. The dissimilarity of the Khorat sediments from Upper Continental Crust (UCC) elemental values supports this, as homogenisation would occur if diverse source areas were involved. The study suggests that aeolian sediments of humid tropical regions warrant more attention as climate proxy markers, due to the dissimilarity between the present climate and conditions required for their formation.

  6. Impact of Lunar Dust on the Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Vondrak, R. R.; Farrell, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    From the Apollo era it is known that dust on the Moon can cause serious problems for exploration activities. Such problems include adhering to clothing and equipment, reducing external visibility on landings, and causing difficulty to breathing and vision within the spacecraft. An important step in dealing with dust-related problems is to understand how dust grains behave in the lunar environment. All astronauts who walked on the Moon reported difficulties with lunar dust. Eugene Cernan, commander of Apollo 17, stated that one of the most aggravating, restricting facets of lunar surface exploration is the dust and its adherence to everything no matter what kind of material, whether it be skin, suit material, metal, no matter what it be and it's restrictive friction-like action to everything it gets on. Dust has also been highlighted as a priority by the Mars Exploration Program Assessment Group (MEPAG): 1A. Characterize both aeolian dust and particulates that would be kicked up from the martian regolith by surface operations of a human mission with fidelity sufficient to establish credible engineering simulation labs and/or software codes on Earth. We shall briefly describe the properties of lunar dust and its impact on the Apollo astronauts, and then summarize three main problems areas for understanding its behavior: Dust Adhesion and Abrasion, Surface Electric Fields and Dust Transport. These issues are all inter-related and must be well understood in order to minimize the impact of dust on lunar surface exploration.

  7. Dust Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a recent sounding rocket experiment which found charged dust in the Earth's tropical mesosphere. The dust detector was designed to measure small (5000 - 10000 amu.) charged dust particles, most likely of meteoric origin. A 5 km thick layer of positively charged dust was found at an altitude of 90 km, in the vicinity of an observed sporadic sodium layer and sporadic E layer. The observed dust was positively charged in the bulk of the dust layer, but was negatively charged near the bottom.

  8. High-latitude dust in the Earth system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Baddock, Matthew; Bradwell, Tom; Crusius, John; Darlington, Eleanor; Gaiero, Diego; Gassó, Santiago; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Hodgkins, Richard; McCulloch, Robert; McKenna-Neuman, Cheryl; Mockford, Tom; Stewart, Helena; Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    2016-06-01

    Natural dust is often associated with hot, subtropical deserts, but significant dust events have been reported from cold, high latitudes. This review synthesizes current understanding of high-latitude (≥50°N and ≥40°S) dust source geography and dynamics and provides a prospectus for future research on the topic. Although the fundamental processes controlling aeolian dust emissions in high latitudes are essentially the same as in temperate regions, there are additional processes specific to or enhanced in cold regions. These include low temperatures, humidity, strong winds, permafrost and niveo-aeolian processes all of which can affect the efficiency of dust emission and distribution of sediments. Dust deposition at high latitudes can provide nutrients to the marine system, specifically by contributing iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceans; it also affects ice albedo and melt rates. There have been no attempts to quantify systematically the expanse, characteristics, or dynamics of high-latitude dust sources. To address this, we identify and compare the main sources and drivers of dust emissions in the Northern (Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Iceland) and Southern (Antarctica, New Zealand, and Patagonia) Hemispheres. The scarcity of year-round observations and limitations of satellite remote sensing data at high latitudes are discussed. It is estimated that under contemporary conditions high-latitude sources cover >500,000 km2 and contribute at least 80-100 Tg yr-1 of dust to the Earth system (~5% of the global dust budget); both are projected to increase under future climate change scenarios.

  9. Mineral dust deposition in Western Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Julie; Laurent, Benoit; Bergmatti, Gilles; Losno, Rémi; Bon Nguyen, Elisabeth; Chevaillier, Servanne; Roulet, Pierre; Sauvage, Stéphane; Coddeville, Patrice; Ouboulmane, Noura; Siour, Guillaume; Tovar Sanchez, Antonio; Massanet, Ana; Morales Baquero, Rafael; Di Sarra, Giogio; Sferlazzo, Damiano; Dulac, François; Fornier, Michel; Coursier, Cyril

    2014-05-01

    North African deserts are the world's largest sources of atmospheric mineral dust produced by aeolian erosion. Saharan dust is frequently transported toward Europe over the Mediterranean basin. When deposited in oceanic areas, mineral dust can constitute a key input of nutrients bioavailable for the oceanic biosphere. For instance, Saharan dust deposited in the in the Mediterranean Sea can be a significant source of nutrient like Fe, P and N during summer and autumn. Our objective is to study the deposition Saharan mineral dust in the western Mediterranean basin and to improve how deposition processes are parameterized in 3D regional models. To quantify the deposition flux of Saharan dust in the western Mediterranean region a specific collector (CARAGA) to sample automatically the insoluble atmospheric particle deposition was developed (LISA-ICARE) and a network of CARAGA collectors have been set up. Since 2011, eight CARAGA are then deployed in Frioul, Casset, Montandon and Ersa in France, Mallorca and Granada in Spain, Lampedusa in Italia, and Medenine in Tunisia, along a South-North gradient of almost 2000km from the North African coast to the South of Europe. We observe 10 well identified dust Saharan deposition events at Lampedusa and 6 at Mallorca for a 1-yr sampling period. These dust events are sporadic and the South-North gradient of deposition intensity and frequency is observed (the highest dust mass sampled at the stations are : 2,66 g.m-2 at Lampedusa ; 0,54 g.m-2 at Majorque ; 0,33 g.m-2 at Frioul ; 0,16 g.m-2 at Casset). The ability of the CHIMERE model to reproduce the deposition measurements is tested. The mineral dust plumes simulated over the western Mediterranean basin are also compared to satellite observations (OMI, MODIS) and in-situ measurements performed during the ChArMEx campaign and in the AERONET stations.

  10. Holocene aeolian sediments on the NE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauch, G.; Lehmkuhl, F.; Hilgers, A.; Zhao, H.

    2012-04-01

    The semiarid climate of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau supports the formation of different types of aeolian sediments and landforms during the Holocene. Aeolians silts and sands in the catchment of the Donggi Cona in an elevation above 4000m to 4800 m asl reflect variable climate conditions during that time as well as different sediment sources. Based on 51 OSL datings and catchment wide geomorphological mapping a complex pattern of long and short distance sediment transport has been reconstructed. Only few aeolian archives are preserved from the late Pleistocene in this mountain environment indicating cold and dry climate conditions which prevented a continuous accumulation. During the early Holocene a phase of increased aeolian sedimentation of sand at the slopes of the mountains has been reconstructed. The sand originated from a large alluvial fan which was highly active during the Pleistocene. In addition, a thin loess cover is preserved at a few sites in the neighboring mountains ranges. The sedimentation of the loess started around 2000 years later than the sedimentation of the sand at the foot slope. Both archives are related to an increase in precipitation at the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau which was related to a strengthening of the Asian Monsoon during that time. The wetter climate conditions favored the development of a vegetation cover which leads to the trapping and fixation of the aeolian sediments. However, with a further strengthening of the Monsoon systems these archives subsequently eroded due to higher run off and accumulated as colluvial and fluvial deposits in the basins. These phase lasted until 6 ka. A second aeolian period started at around 3 ka with the formation new dunes in the basins. This period can be associated with dry and cold climate of the late Holocene supporting the reactivation of the sand in the area. This might be further enhanced by an increased human impact by grazing during the late Holocene and resulting

  11. Study of dust re-suspension at low pressure in a dedicated wind-tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondeau, Anthony; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Chassefière, Eric

    2015-04-01

    The atmosphere of several telluric planets or satellites are dusty. Such is the case of Earth, Venus, Mars and Titan, each bearing different aeolian processes linked principally to the kinematic viscosity of the near-surface atmosphere. Studies of the Martian atmosphere are particularly relevant for the understanding of the dust re-suspension phenomena at low pressure (7 mbar). It turns out that operation of fusion reactors of the tokamak design produces significant amount of dust through the erosion of plasma-facing components. Such dust is a key issue, both regarding the performance and the safety of a fusion reactor such as ITER, under construction in Cadarache, France. Indeed, to evaluate the explosion risk in the ITER fusion reactor, it is essential to quantify the re-suspended dust fraction as a function of the dust inventory that can be potentially mobilized during a loss of vacuum accident (LOVA), with air or water vapour ingress. A complete accident sequence will encompass dust re-suspension from near-vacuum up to atmospheric pressure. Here, we present experimental results of particles re-suspension fractions measured at 1000, 600 and 300 mbar in the IRSN BISE (BlowIng facility for airborne releaSE) wind tunnel. Both dust monolayer deposits and multilayer deposits were investigated. In order to obtain experimental re-suspension data of dust monolayer deposits, we used an optical microscope allowing to measure the re-suspended particles fraction by size intervals of 1 µm. The deposits were made up of tungsten particles on a tungsten surface (an ubiquitous plasma facing component) and alumina particles on a glass plate, as a surrogate. A comparison of the results with the so-called Rock'nRoll dust re-suspension model (Reeks and Hall, 2001) is presented and discussed. The multilayer deposits were made in a vacuum sedimentation chamber allowing to obtain uniform deposits in terms of thickness. The re-suspension experimental data of such deposits were obtained

  12. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Massive Dust Storm over Australia     View ... at JPL September 22, 2009 - Massive dust storm over Australia. project:  MISR category:  ... Sep 22, 2009 Images:  Dust Storm location:  Australia and New Zealand ...

  13. Sahara Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  Casting Light and Shadows on a Saharan Dust Storm     ... (nadir) camera. High-altitude cirrus clouds cast shadows on the underlying ocean and dust layer, which are visible in shades of ... was unable to retrieve elevation data. However, the edges of shadows cast by the cirrus clouds onto the dust (indicated by blue and cyan ...

  14. Saharan dust storms: nature and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudie, A. S.; Middleton, N. J.

    2001-12-01

    This paper reviews recent work on the role of Saharan dust in environmental change, the location and strength of source areas, the transport paths of material away from the desert, the rates of Saharan dust deposition, the nature of that material (including PeriSaharan loess) and the changing rates of dust activity in response to long and short-term climatic changes. The Sahara produces more aeolian soil dust than any other world desert, and Saharan dust has an important impact on climatic processes, nutrient cycles, soil formation and sediment cycles. These influences spread far beyond Africa, thanks to the great distances over which Saharan dust is transported. The precise locations of Saharan dust source areas are not well known, but data from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) suggest two major source areas: the Bodélé depression and an area covering eastern Mauritania, western Mali and southern Algeria. Trajectories of long-distance transport are relatively well documented, but the links between source areas and seasonal Saharan dust pathways are not. However, it is possible that Harmattan dust from the Bodélé depression may not be the source of the prominent winter plume over the tropical North Atlantic, as is often suggested in the literature. Few of the data on particle size characteristics of Saharan dust are derived from major source areas or from Africa itself. Saharan dusts sampled from the Harmattan plume and over Europe are dominated by SiO 2 and Al 2O 3, a characteristic they share with North American and Chinese dusts. The concentrations of these two major elements are similar to those found in world rocks. PeriSaharan loess is conspicuous by its relative absence, considering the Sahara's dominance of the global desert dust cycle both in the contemporary era and through the geological past. In recent decades, the frequency of Saharan dust events has varied markedly in response to climatic factors such as drought and anthropogenic

  15. Analysis of topsoil aggregation with linkage to dust emission potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swet, Nitzan; Katra, Itzhak

    2015-04-01

    Dust emission by soil erosion has environmental and socioeconomic significances due to loss of a natural resource and air pollution. Topsoil resistance to erosion depends on its physicochemical properties, especially on the soil aggregation. Aggregate size distribution of soil samples is commonly used for the assessment of soil stability and fertility. It is suggested that aggregates larger than 840 µm in their effective diameter are stable to aeolian (wind) soil erosion. However the physicochemical properties of aggregates should be considered in determining the dust emission potential from soils. This study focuses on quantitative analyses of physical and chemical properties of aggregates in order to develop a soil stability index for dust emission. The study integrates laboratory analyses of soil samples and aeolian experiments of dust emission. Soil samples were taken from different land uses in a semi-arid loess soil that is subjected to aeolian erosion and dust emission. Laboratory tests include particle size distribution (PSD), soil organic carbon (SOC), inorganic carbon (CaCO3), water content (WC), and elemental composition by XRF technique. The size analysis shows significant differences in aggregation between natural-soil plots (N) and grazing-soil plots (G). The MWD index was higher in N (1204 µm) than that of G (400 µm). Basic aeolain experiments with a boundary layer wind tunnel showed dust emission of particulate matter (PM10) from both soils, although the concentrations were significantly lower in N plots. Aggregates at specific size fractions are characterized by different content of cementing agents. The content of fine particles (< 20 µm) and SOM were higher in macro-aggregates (500-2000 µm), while the CaCO3 content was higher in aggregate fraction of 63-250 µm. WC values were highest in micro-aggregates (< 63 µm). However the lowest content of these cementing agents were mostly found in the aggregate size fraction of 1000 µm. Differences

  16. A tunnel and a traffic jam: How transition disks maintain a detectable warm dust component despite the presence of a large planet-carved gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, P.; Klarmann, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Benisty, M.; Dominik, C.; Dullemond, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transition disks are circumstellar disks that show evidence of a dust cavity, which may be related to dynamical clearing by embedded planet(s). Most of these objects show signs of significant accretion, indicating that the inner disks are not truly empty, but that gas is still streaming through to the star. A subset of transition disks, sometimes called pre-transition disks, also shows a strong near-infrared excess, interpreted as an optically thick dusty belt located close to the dust sublimation radius within the first astronomical unit. Aims: We study the conditions for the survival and maintenance of such an inner disk in the case where a massive planet opens a gap in the disk. In this scenario, the planet filters out large dust grains that are trapped at the outer edge of the gap, while the inner regions of the disk may or may not be replenished with small grains. Methods: We combined hydrodynamical simulations of planet-disk interactions with dust evolution models that include coagulation and fragmentation of dust grains over a large range of radii and derived observational properties using radiative transfer calculations. We studied the role of the snow line in the survival of the inner disk of transition disks. Results: Inside the snow line, the lack of ice mantles in dust particles decreases the sticking efficiency between grains. As a consequence, particles fragment at lower collision velocities than in regions beyond the snow line. This effect allows small particles to be maintained for up to a few Myr within the first astronomical unit. These particles are closely coupled to the gas and do not drift significantly with respect to the gas. For lower mass planets (1 MJup), the pre-transition appearance can be maintained even longer because dust still trickles through the gap created by the planet, moves invisibly and quickly in the form of relatively large grains through the gap, and becomes visible again as it fragments and gets slowed down

  17. Should precipitation influence dust emission in global dust models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okin, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture modulates the threshold shear stress required to initiate aeolian transport and dust emission. Most of the theoretical and laboratory work that has confirmed the impact of soil moisture has appropriately acknowledged that it is the soil moisture of a surface layer a few grain diameters thick that truly controls threshold shear velocity. Global and regional models of dust emission include the effect of soil moisture on transport threshold, but most ignore the fact that only the moisture of the very topmost "active layer" matters. The soil moisture in the active layer can differ greatly from that integrated through the top 2, 5, 10, or 100 cm (surface layers used by various global models) because the top 2 mm of heavy texture soils dries within ~1/2 day while sandy soils dry within less than 2 hours. Thus, in drylands where dust emission occurs, it is likely that this top layer is drier than the underlying soil in the days and weeks after rain. This paper explores, globally, the time between rain events in relation to the time for the active layer to dry and the timing of high wind events. This analysis is carried out using the same coarse reanalyses used in global dust models and is intended to inform the soil moisture controls in these models. The results of this analysis indicate that the timing between events is, in almost all dust-producing areas, significantly longer than the drying time of the active layer, even when considering soil texture differences. Further, the analysis shows that the probability of a high wind event during the period after a rain where the surface is wet is small. Therefore, in coarse global models, there is little reason to include rain-derived soil moisture in the modeling scheme.

  18. A Mars Dust Model with Interactive Dynamics, Radiation, and Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwick, Victoria; Toon, O. Brian

    2014-11-01

    Variability of the present day Martian climate is dominated by globally enveloping dust storms that recur with a frequency of approximately three years. Small-scale aeolian processes predictably generate local seasonal storms. However, factors that enhance local storm strength and grow local phenomenon to global scales are poorly understood. Research with Martian general circulation models (GCM) has recently demonstrated a strong correlation between dust storm generation, strength and long-term stability and the global distribution of dust reservoirs and their temporal permanence. Here we present results from the NCAR Mars Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) coupled with a fully interactive dust microphysics scheme. Dust devil lifting and saltation wind driven lifting are parameterized in the emission scheme. Mass is distributed into 20 size bins with a radius range of 0.1 to 8 microns. The initial radial size distribution is log-normal with a sigma value of 1.5. Dust is allowed to advect horizontally and is removed from the atmosphere by dry deposition. Dust also impacts the radiative heating rate, as do water clouds.The large number of dust bins allows for the opportunity to track the size distribution of dust deposits and investigate the long term stability of dust source regions as a function of particle size.

  19. A Mars Dust Model with Interactive Dynamics, Radiation, and Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwick, V.; Toon, B.

    2014-12-01

    Variability of the present day Martian climate is dominated by globally enveloping dust storms that recur with a frequency of approximately three years. Small-scale aeolian processes predictably generate local seasonal storms. However, factors that enhance local storm strength and grow local phenomenon to global scales are poorly understood. Research with Martian general circulation models (GCM) has recently demonstrated a strong correlation between dust storm generation, strength and long-term stability and the global distribution of dust reservoirs and their temporal permanence. Here we present results from the NCAR Mars Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) coupled with a fully interactive dust microphysics scheme. Dust devil lifting and saltation wind driven lifting are parameterized in the emission scheme. Mass is distributed into 20 size bins with a radius range of 0.1 to 8 microns. The initial radial size distribution is log-normal with a sigma value of 1.5. Dust is allowed to advect horizontally and is removed from the atmosphere by dry deposition. Dust also impacts the radiative heating rate, as do water clouds.The large number of dust bins allows for the opportunity to track the size distribution of dust deposits and investigate the long term stability of dust source regions as a function of particle size.

  20. Australian dust deposits: modern processes and the Quaternary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, Paul P.; McTainsh, Grant H.

    2003-09-01

    Dust raising and transport are common and important processes in Australia today. The aridity of the Australian continent and high climatic variability result in widespread dust raising in the arid and semi-arid areas and transport to the humid margins and surrounding oceans. The supply of erodible particles appears to be the greatest limitation on total flux of transported dust. Dust raising is greatest in the Lake Eyre Basin, including the Simpson Desert, and Murray-Darling Basin where internal drainage renews supplies of fine particles to the arid zone. In the west and northwest dust entrainment is low, despite considerable aridity. The marine record of dust flux shows at least a threefold increase in dust flux, compared with the Holocene, in the last glacial maximum in both tropical and temperate Australia, driven by weakened Australian monsoon rains and drier westerly circulation, respectively. Despite the widespread confirmation of aeolian dust deposits in southeastern and southwestern Australia, dated or quantified records are extremely rare. The dominant model of Australian dust deposits, the clay-rich 'parna', is shown to be poorly substantiated while modern and ancient dust deposits examined in detail are shown to bear a strong similarity to conventional definitions of loess.

  1. The National Wind Erosion Research Network: Building a standardized long-term data resource for aeolian research, modeling and land management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Van Zee, Justin W.; Courtright, Ericha M.; Hugenholtz, Christopher H.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Okin, Gregory S.; Barchyn, Thomas E.; Billings, Benjamin J.; Boyd, Robert; Clingan, Scott D.; Cooper, Brad F.; Duniway, Michael C.; Derner, Justin D.; Fox, Fred A.; Havstad, Kris M.; Heilman, Philip; LaPlante, Valerie; Ludwig, Noel A.; Metz, Loretta J.; Nearing, Mark A.; Norfleet, M. Lee; Pierson, Frederick B.; Sanderson, Matt A.; Sharratt, Brenton S.; Steiner, Jean L.; Tatarko, John; Tedela, Negussie H.; Toledo, David; Unnasch, Robert S.; Van Pelt, R. Scott; Wagner, Larry

    2016-09-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the United States Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for a long-term research program to meet critical challenges in wind erosion research and management in the United States. The Network has three aims: (1) provide data to support understanding of basic aeolian processes across land use types, land cover types, and management practices, (2) support development and application of models to assess wind erosion and dust emission and their impacts on human and environmental systems, and (3) encourage collaboration among the aeolian research community and resource managers for the transfer of wind erosion technologies. The Network currently consists of thirteen intensively instrumented sites providing measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions, and soil and vegetation properties that influence wind erosion. Network sites are located across rangelands, croplands, and deserts of the western US.

  2. Effects of aeolian erosion on microbial release from solids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustan, E. A.; Olson, R. L.; Taylor, D. M.; Green, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    This study was initiated to determine the percentage of spores that would be expected to be released from the interior of solid materials by aeolian erosion on a planetary surface. Methyl methacrylate and Eccobond disks were fabricated so that each disk contained approximately 40,000 Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores. The disks were placed in a specially designed sandblasting device and eroded. Exposure periods of 0.5, 2 and 24 hours were investigated using filtered air to accelerate the sand. A series of tests was also conducted for a 0.5 hour period using carbon dioxide. Examination of the erosion products showed that less than 1% of the spores originally contained in the solids was released by aeolian erosion.

  3. Soil Response to Aeolian Disturbance in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, R. C.; Culler, L. E.; Chipman, J. W.; Virginia, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic soils are a critical ecological resource, yet are increasingly vulnerable to global change. In the Kangerlussuaq region of West Greenland, aeolian disturbance is the greatest threat to soil stability, with strong katabatic winds eroding vegetation and soil down to the underlying glacial till or bedrock. Little is known about what controls the distribution and rate of the aeolian erosion, which initially results in a state change from tundra to a deflated and nearly unvegetated ground. It is unclear if vegetation can eventually reestablish after erosion occurs, potentially aided by the biological soil crust (BSC) that develops within the eroded areas, or if this soil loss is an irreversible change in vegetation and soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. Our analysis of high-resolution satellite imagery shows that across the entire study region, deflated ground covers 22% of the terrestrial landscape. Aeolian erosion occurs more frequently closer to the Greenland Ice Sheet and on S-facing slopes. Using lichenometry, we estimate that erosional fronts move across the landscape at rates of 2.5 cm yr-1, leaving unproductive ground in their wake. The onset of widespread aeolian erosion occurred roughly 700-1000 years ago, pointing toward regional cooling and aridity as the drivers behind erosion. Finally, we consider whether the BSCs can improve soil quality enough to allow for full vegetation regrowth. Preliminary results show that while the BSCs fix atmospheric N and increase C storage, the rate of soil quality recovery is extremely slow. Understanding the thresholds between vegetated tundra and eroded ground is critical for predicting how the Kangerlussuaq landscape will respond to anticipated changes in climate and ice sheet dynamics.

  4. The potential scale of aeolian structures on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Greeley, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    Simulations of the Venusian aeolian environment with the Venus Wind Tunnel have shown that microdunes are formed during the entrainment of sand-sized material. These structures are several tens of centimeters long (2-3 cm high) and combine the morphological and behavioral characteristics of both full-scale terrestrial dunes and current ripples formed in subaqueous environments. Their similarity to both reflects the fact that the Venusian atmosphere has a density intermediate between air and water. Although the development of microdunes in the wind tunnel experiments was limited by tunnel dimensions, it is possible to make some predictions about their potential size on Venus, and the potential size of related aeolian structures. Microdunes are fluid-filled structures (as are dunes and current ripples) and as such have no theoretical upper limit to their size from a fluid dynamics viewpoint. Limitations to size observed in subaqueous structures are set by, for example, water depth; limitations to the size of dunes are set by, for example, sand supply. It is therefore reasonable to suppose that the microdunes on Venus could evolve into much larger features than those observed in experiments. In addition, the researchers note that current ripples (which are closely related to microdunes) are often found in association with giant ripples that have dimensions similar to aeolian dunes. Thus, it may be reasonable to assume that analogous large scale structures occur on Venus. Both (terrestrial) aeolian and subaqueous environments generate structures in excess of one hundred meters in wavelength. Such dimensions may therefore be applicable to Venusian bedforms. Analysis of Magellan data may resolve the issue.

  5. Circumstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    1986-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred from the extinction, polarization, and scattering of starlight; the presence of dark nebulae; interstellar depletions; the observed infrared emission around certain stars and various types of interstellar clouds. Interstellar grains are subject to various destruction mechanisms that reduce their size or even completely destroy them. A continuous source of newly formed dust must therefore be present for dust to exist in the various phases of the interstellar medium (ISM). The working group has the following goals: (1) review the evidences for the formation of dust in the various sources; (2) examine the clues to the nature and composition of the dust; (3) review the status of grain formation theories; (4) examine any evidence for the processing of the dust prior to its injection into the interstellar medium; and (5) estimate the relative contribution of the various sources to the interstellar dust population.

  6. Substantial dust loss of bioavailable phosphorus from agricultural soils

    PubMed Central

    Katra, Itzhak; Gross, Avner; Swet, Nitzan; Tanner, Smadar; Krasnov, Helena; Angert, Alon

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element in terrestrial ecosystems. Knowledge on the role of dust in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very limited with no quantitative information on aeolian (by wind) P fluxes from soils. The aim of this study is to focus on P cycling via dust emissions under common land-use practices in an arid environment by integration of sample analyses and aeolian experiments. The experiments indicate significant P fluxes by PM10 dust due to agricultural land use. Even in a single wind-dust event at moderate velocity (7.0 m s−1), P flux in conventional agricultural fields can reach 1.83 kg km−2, that accumulates to a considerable amount per year at a regional scale. The results highlight a negative yearly balance in P content (up to hundreds kg km−2) in all agricultural soils, and thus more P nutrition is required to maintain efficient yield production. In grazing areas where no P nutrition is applied, the soil degradation process can lead to desertification. Emission of P from soil dust sources has significant implications for soil nutrient resources and management strategies in agricultural regions as well as for loading to the atmosphere and global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27095629

  7. Substantial dust loss of bioavailable phosphorus from agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katra, Itzhak; Gross, Avner; Swet, Nitzan; Tanner, Smadar; Krasnov, Helena; Angert, Alon

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element in terrestrial ecosystems. Knowledge on the role of dust in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very limited with no quantitative information on aeolian (by wind) P fluxes from soils. The aim of this study is to focus on P cycling via dust emissions under common land-use practices in an arid environment by integration of sample analyses and aeolian experiments. The experiments indicate significant P fluxes by PM10 dust due to agricultural land use. Even in a single wind-dust event at moderate velocity (7.0 m s‑1), P flux in conventional agricultural fields can reach 1.83 kg km‑2, that accumulates to a considerable amount per year at a regional scale. The results highlight a negative yearly balance in P content (up to hundreds kg km‑2) in all agricultural soils, and thus more P nutrition is required to maintain efficient yield production. In grazing areas where no P nutrition is applied, the soil degradation process can lead to desertification. Emission of P from soil dust sources has significant implications for soil nutrient resources and management strategies in agricultural regions as well as for loading to the atmosphere and global biogeochemical cycles.

  8. Substantial dust loss of bioavailable phosphorus from agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Katra, Itzhak; Gross, Avner; Swet, Nitzan; Tanner, Smadar; Krasnov, Helena; Angert, Alon

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element in terrestrial ecosystems. Knowledge on the role of dust in the biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus is very limited with no quantitative information on aeolian (by wind) P fluxes from soils. The aim of this study is to focus on P cycling via dust emissions under common land-use practices in an arid environment by integration of sample analyses and aeolian experiments. The experiments indicate significant P fluxes by PM10 dust due to agricultural land use. Even in a single wind-dust event at moderate velocity (7.0 m s(-1)), P flux in conventional agricultural fields can reach 1.83 kg km(-2), that accumulates to a considerable amount per year at a regional scale. The results highlight a negative yearly balance in P content (up to hundreds kg km(-2)) in all agricultural soils, and thus more P nutrition is required to maintain efficient yield production. In grazing areas where no P nutrition is applied, the soil degradation process can lead to desertification. Emission of P from soil dust sources has significant implications for soil nutrient resources and management strategies in agricultural regions as well as for loading to the atmosphere and global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27095629

  9. Niveo-aeolian and Denivation Deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, M. C.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen abundance data from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on board the Mars Odyssey platform indicate that large areas of the North Polar Sand Sea have high concentrations (40-60% weight) of hydrogen molecules in the surface deposits. On Earth, cold region sand dunes often contain inter-bedded sand, snow and ice. These niveo-aeolian deposits have unique morphologies and sedimentary structures that are generally not found in warm desert dunes. An atlas of dune niveo-aeolian and denivation features was compiled from published studies of polar deserts on Earth. Features occur at a range of scales and signatures are both morphologic and stratigraphic. The atlas is used to identify similar features on Mars. Examination of high resolution Mars Orbiter Camera images of the North Polar Sand Sea and Southern Crater dune fields have identified several potential signatures of niveo-aeolian and denivation processes on Mars. These include: over steepened lee slopes, cornices, rounded slipface and/or crest, protruding ice cemented beds, alluvial meltwater channels and fans and sublimation avalanches. Other smaller-scale forms probably occur but are not detectable with current resolution data. While these findings have implications for our understanding of martian dune geomorphology, mobility and the geological evolution of the sand seas, they also highlight the potential for a significant volatile reservoir and biological habitat in sand dunes on Mars.

  10. Quantifying the provenance of aeolian sediments using multiple composite fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Benli; Niu, Qinghe; Qu, Jianjun; Zu, Ruiping

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new fingerprinting method that uses multiple composite fingerprints for studies of aeolian sediment provenance. We used this method to quantify the provenance of sediments on both sides of the Qinghai-Tibetan Railway (QTR) in the Cuona Lake section of the Tibetan Plateau (TP), in an environment characterized by aeolian and fluvial interactions. The method involves repeatedly solving a linear mixing model based on mass conservation; the model is not limited to spatial scale or transport types and uses all the tracer groups that passed the range check, Kruskal-Wallis H-test, and a strict analytical solution screening. The proportional estimates that result from using different composite fingerprints are highly variable; however, the average of these fingerprints has a greater accuracy and certainty than any single fingerprint. The results show that sand from the lake beach, hilly surface, and gullies contribute, respectively, 48%, 31% and 21% to the western railway sediments and 43%, 33% and 24% to the eastern railway sediments. The difference between contributions from various sources on either side of the railway, which may increase in the future, was clearly related to variations in local transport characteristics, a conclusion that is supported by grain size analysis. The construction of the QTR changed the local cycling of materials, and the difference in provenance between the sediments that are separated by the railway reflects the changed sedimentary conditions on either side of the railway. The effectiveness of this method suggests that it will be useful in other studies of aeolian sediments.

  11. Characterizing the instability of aeolian environments using analytical reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.; Bishop, M. P.; Dobreva, I. D.; Barrineau, C. P.; Weymer, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Characterization of aeolian systems is complicated by rapidly changing surface-process regimes, spatio-temporal scale dependencies, and subjective interpretation of imagery and spatial data. Stability and instability of the South Texas sand sheet is addressed using an artificial intelligence approach that integrates spatial information and analytical reasoning. Specifically, the purpose of this study is to determine if landscape evolutionary sequences could be mapped and characterized based on simple conceptual relationships amongst biophysical variables including topography, vegetation, surface moisture, wind speed, and surface erosion and deposition. A digital elevation model was derived from airborne LiDAR data and combined with moisture and vegetation indices computed using Spectral feature extraction from Landsat Thematic Mapper data. Our analysis reveals unique scale dependent spatial patterns and the use of fuzzy cognitive maps provides an analytical reasoning approach to address the complexity of aeolian environments in response to changes in climate forcing. The application to other Holocene aeolian deposits and the potential for this approach to model landscape evolution are also discussed.

  12. The National Wind Erosion Research Network: Building a standardized long-term data resource for aeolian research, modeling and land management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Van Zee, Justin W; Courtright, Ericha M; Hugenholtz, Ted M; Zobeck, Ted M; Okin, Gregory S.; Barchyn, Thomas E; Billings, Benjamin J; Boyd, Robert A.; Clingan, Scott D; Cooper, Brad F; Duniway, Michael C.; Derner, Justin D; Fox, Fred A; Havstad, Kris M.; Heilman, Philip; LaPlante, Valerie; Ludwig, Noel A; Metz, Loretta J; Nearing, Mark A; Norfleet, M Lee; Pierson, Frederick B; Sanderson, Matt A; Sharrat, Brenton S; Steiner, Jean L; Tatarko, John; Tedela, Negussie H; Todelo, David; Unnasch, Robert S; Van Pelt, R Scott; Wagner, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the United States Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for a long-term research program to meet critical challenges in wind erosion research and management in the United States. The Network has three aims: (1) provide data to support understanding of basic aeolian processes across land use types, land cover types, and management practices, (2) support development and application of models to assess wind erosion and dust emission and their impacts on human and environmental systems, and (3) encourage collaboration among the aeolian research community and resource managers for the transfer of wind erosion technologies. The Network currently consists of thirteen intensively instrumented sites providing measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions, and soil and vegetation properties that influence wind erosion. Network sites are located across rangelands, croplands, and deserts of the western US. In support of Network activities, http://winderosionnetwork.org was developed as a portal for information about the Network, providing site descriptions, measurement protocols, and data visualization tools to facilitate collaboration with scientists and managers interested in the Network and accessing Network products. The Network provides a mechanism for engaging national and international partners in a wind erosion research program that addresses the need for improved understanding and prediction of aeolian processes across complex and diverse land use types and management practices.

  13. Atmospheric significance of aeolian salts in the sandy deserts of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.-Q.

    2015-12-01

    Large sandy deserts in the middle latitudes of northwestern China were investigated for soluble salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore the environmental significance of "aeolian salts". Results revealed that aeolian salt variations have a clear relationship with the changing meridional and zonal gradients of the desert locations and the aeolian differentiation effect, but are weakly linked to local geological conditions. It suggests that the natural system of aeolian salts is hydrologically open and the chemistry of the parent brines are different from that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. Atmospheric depositions of water-soluble chemical species are an important process/source contributing to aeolian salt. Sequential variations of soluble salts in sedimentary profiles interbedded with aeolian and non-aeolian deposits and their palaeoenvironmental implications in the hinterland areas of these deserts were further evaluated, based on the constraints of OSL dating and radiocarbon dating data. The results indicate that the inorganic salts may be a latent geoproxy in revealing regional palaeoclimatic changes in desert areas for the sediments deposited under onefold depositional environment, but the interpretation should be more careful for the sediments deposited under diverse depositional conditions. This study presents the evidence of atmospheric origin of aeolian salt in sandy deserts, with limited climatic significance in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction.

  14. Effects of river regulation on aeolian landscapes, Colorado River, southwestern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.

    2012-01-01

    Connectivity between fluvial and aeolian sedimentary systems plays an important role in the physical and biological environment of dryland regions. This study examines the coupling between fluvial sand deposits and aeolian dune fields in bedrock canyons of the arid to semiarid Colorado River corridor, southwestern USA. By quantifying significant differences between aeolian landscapes with and without modern fluvial sediment sources, this work demonstrates for the first time that the flow- and sediment-limiting effects of dam operations affect sedimentary processes and ecosystems in aeolian landscapes above the fluvial high water line. Dune fields decoupled from fluvial sand supply have more ground cover (biologic crust and vegetation) and less aeolian sand transport than do dune fields that remain coupled to modern fluvial sand supply. The proportion of active aeolian sand area also is substantially lower in a heavily regulated river reach (Marble–Grand Canyon, Arizona) than in a much less regulated reach with otherwise similar environmental conditions (Cataract Canyon, Utah). The interconnections shown here among river flow and sediment, aeolian sand transport, and biologic communities in aeolian dunes demonstrate a newly recognized means by which anthropogenic influence alters dryland environments. Because fluvial–aeolian coupling is common globally, it is likely that similar sediment-transport connectivity and interaction with upland ecosystems are important in other dryland regions to a greater degree than has been recognized previously.

  15. Effects of river regulation on aeolian landscapes, Colorado River, southwestern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draut, Amy E.

    2012-06-01

    Connectivity between fluvial and aeolian sedimentary systems plays an important role in the physical and biological environment of dryland regions. This study examines the coupling between fluvial sand deposits and aeolian dune fields in bedrock canyons of the arid to semiarid Colorado River corridor, southwestern USA. By quantifying significant differences between aeolian landscapes with and without modern fluvial sediment sources, this work demonstrates for the first time that the flow- and sediment-limiting effects of dam operations affect sedimentary processes and ecosystems in aeolian landscapes above the fluvial high water line. Dune fields decoupled from fluvial sand supply have more ground cover (biologic crust and vegetation) and less aeolian sand transport than do dune fields that remain coupled to modern fluvial sand supply. The proportion of active aeolian sand area also is substantially lower in a heavily regulated river reach (Marble-Grand Canyon, Arizona) than in a much less regulated reach with otherwise similar environmental conditions (Cataract Canyon, Utah). The interconnections shown here among river flow and sediment, aeolian sand transport, and biologic communities in aeolian dunes demonstrate a newly recognized means by which anthropogenic influence alters dryland environments. Because fluvial-aeolian coupling is common globally, it is likely that similar sediment-transport connectivity and interaction with upland ecosystems are important in other dryland regions to a greater degree than has been recognized previously.

  16. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Shadowed regions on the lunar surface acquire a negative potential. In particular, shadowed craters can have a negative potential with respect to the surrounding lunar regolith in sunlight, especially near the terminator regions. Here we analyze the motion of a positively charged lunar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum. Previous models describing the transport of charged lunar dust close to the surface have typically been limited to one-dimensional motion in the vertical direction, e.g. electrostatic levitation; however, the electric fields in the vicinity of shadowed craters will also have significant components in the horizontal directions. We propose a model that includes both the horizontal and vertical motion of charged dust grains near shadowed craters. We show that the dust grains execute oscillatory trajectories and present an expression for the period of oscillation drawing an analogy to the motion of a pendulum.

  17. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Shadowed regions on the lunar surface acquire a negative potential. In particular, shadowed craters can have a negative potential with respect to the surrounding lunar regolith in sunlight, especially near the terminator regions. Here we analyze the motion of a positively charged lnnar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum. Previous models describing the transport of charged lunar dust close to the surface have typically been limited to one-dimensional motion in the vertical direction, e.g. electrostatic levitation; however. the electric fields in the vicinity of shadowed craters will also have significant components in the horizontal directions. We propose a model that includes both the horizontal and vertical motion of charged dust grains near shadowed craters. We show that the dust grains execute oscillatory trajectories and present an expression for the period of oscillation drawing an analogy to the motion of a pendulum.

  18. Transverse Aeolian Ridges on Mars: Sediment sources, volumes, and ages.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, D. C.; Balme, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Transverse Aeolian Ridges (TARs) are aeolian bedforms that are morphologically and dimensionally distinct from Large Dark Dune (LDD) fields, being generally brighter than, or of similar albedo to, the surrounding terrain. These features are significantly smaller than the LDDs, appear to form normal to local winds, and tend to have simple, transverse, ripple-like morphologies. Whether these small martian bedforms represent large granule ripples, small transverse dunes, or something else entirely is currently under debate. The spatial distribution of TARs provides important information about where on Mars aeolian sediments are concentrated, and determining their volume can help us constrain the sediment transport regime on Mars. Also, if we can determine if TARs were active only in the past, or whether TARs are mobile under today's wind conditions, then we can begin to assess when and where TARs are/were active over Mars' recent geological history. Thus TARs have the potential for being indicators/records of climate change on Mars. In this work we build on previous work [1,2] and focus on the local/regional scale. We have identified six regional study areas, each 5° by 5°, to investigate the behavior of TARs in detail; one in the northern hemisphere, three in the equatorial band, and two in the southern hemisphere. We have systematically mapped TAR and LDD deposits in each study area to constrain sediment transport pathways and identify sediment sources. In general, TAR sediments appear to be tied to local sources such as LDDs or layered terrains. HiRISE DTMs were utilized to measure TAR heights, widths, wavelengths, and lengths to calculate sediment volumes and estimate volumes over entire study areas based on mapping. Crater count analyses on contiguous TAR fields in the equatorial regions, where the bedforms appear more lithified, reveal ages of several million years. Mid-latitude TAR fields do not show any superposed craters, suggesting much younger deposits

  19. Dust in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Christa

    2012-07-01

    Dust grains are an essential component influencing the formation and evolution history of stars and galaxies in the early Universe. Large amounts of dust detected in sub-millimeter galaxies and quasars at high redshift, where the epoch of cosmic evolution was only about 1 Gyr, bear witness to a rapid production of dust. However, the origin of these large dust masses remains unclear. Massive stars ending their lives as either asymptotic giant branch stars or supernovae have been contemplated as the prime sources of dust. Stars more massive than ~3 Msun are short-lived but whether their dust production efficiency is sufficient to account for the large dust masses is unknown. I shall address the challenge of reproducing current dust mass estimates arising from the strong sensitivity to the overall dust productivity of the sources involved, the initial mass function and star formation history. I will discuss the contribution of the stellar dust sources and alternatives, such as grain growth in the interstellar medium, to the dust budget in the high redshift as well as Local Group galaxies.

  20. Gully annealing by aeolian sediment: field and remote-sensing investigation of aeolian-hillslope-fluvial interactions, Colorado River corridor, Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Draut, Amy E.

    2014-09-01

    Processes contributing to development of ephemeral gully channels are of great importance to landscapes worldwide, and particularly in dryland regions where soil loss and land degradation from gully erosion pose long-term land-management problems. Whereas gully formation has been relatively well studied, much less is known of the processes that anneal gullies and impede their growth. This study of gully annealing by aeolian sediment, spanning 95 km along the Colorado River corridor in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA, employed field and remote sensing observations, including digital topographic modelling. Results indicate that aeolian sediment activity can be locally effective at counteracting gully erosion. Gullies are less prevalent in areas where surficial sediment undergoes active aeolian transport, and have a greater tendency to terminate in active aeolian sand. Although not common, examples exist in the record of historical imagery of gullies that underwent infilling by aeolian sediment in past decades and evidently were effectively annealed. We thus provide new evidence for a potentially important interaction of aeolian-hillslope-fluvial processes, which could affect dryland regions substantially in ways not widely recognized. Moreover, because the biologic soil crust plays an important role in determining aeolian sand activity, and so in turn the extent of gully development, this study highlights a critical role of geomorphic-ecologic interactions in determining arid-landscape evolution.

  1. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, Dániel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2010-01-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  2. Protoplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apai, D.´niel; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2014-02-01

    Preface; 1. Planet formation and protoplanetary dust Daniel Apai and Dante Lauretta; 2. The origins of protoplanetary dust and the formation of accretion disks Hans-Peter Gail and Peter Hope; 3. Evolution of protoplanetary disk structures Fred Ciesla and Cornelius P. Dullemond; 4. Chemical and isotopic evolution of the solar nebula and protoplanetary disks Dmitry Semenov, Subrata Chakraborty and Mark Thiemens; 5. Laboratory studies of simple dust analogs in astrophysical environments John R. Brucato and Joseph A. Nuth III; 6. Dust composition in protoplanetaty dust Michiel Min and George Flynn; 7. Dust particle size evolution Klaus M. Pontoppidan and Adrian J. Brearly; 8. Thermal processing in protoplanetary nebulae Daniel Apai, Harold C. Connolly Jr. and Dante S. Lauretta; 9. The clearing of protoplanetary disks and of the protosolar nebula Ilaira Pascucci and Shogo Tachibana; 10. Accretion of planetesimals and the formation of rocky planets John E. Chambers, David O'Brien and Andrew M. Davis; Appendixes; Glossary; Index.

  3. Use of Rare Earth Elements in investigations of aeolian processes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The representation of the dust cycle in atmospheric circulation models hinges on an accurate parameterization of the vertical dust flux at emission. However, existing parameterizations of the vertical dust flux vary substantially in their scaling with wind friction velocity, require input parameters...

  4. Mineral dust transport in the Arctic modelled with FLEXPART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Grythe, Henrik; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian transport of mineral dust is suggested to play an important role in many processes. For instance, mineral aerosols affect the radiation balance of the atmosphere, and mineral deposits influence ice sheet mass balances and terrestrial and ocean ecosystems. While many efforts have been done to model global dust transport, relatively little attention has been given to mineral dust in the Arctic. Even though this region is more remote from the world's major dust sources and dust concentrations may be lower than elsewhere, effects of mineral dust on for instance the radiation balance can be highly relevant. Furthermore, there are substantial local sources of dust in or close to the Arctic (e.g., in Iceland), whose impact on Arctic dust concentrations has not been studied in detail. We therefore aim to estimate contributions of different source regions to mineral dust in the Arctic. We have developed a dust mobilization routine in combination with the Lagrangian dispersion model FLEXPART to make such estimates. The lack of details on soil properties in many areas requires a simple routine for global simulations. However, we have paid special attention to the dust sources on Iceland. The mobilization routine does account for topography, snow cover and soil moisture effects, in addition to meteorological parameters. FLEXPART, driven with operational meteorological data from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, was used to do a three-year global dust simulation for the years 2010 to 2012. We assess the model performance in terms of surface concentration and deposition at several locations spread over the globe. We will discuss how deposition and dust load patterns in the Arctic change throughout seasons based on the source of the dust. Important source regions for mineral dust found in the Arctic are not only the major desert areas, such as the Sahara, but also local bare-soil regions. From our model results, it appears that total dust load in the

  5. Circumstellar Dust in Symbiotic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, T.; Kotnik-Karuza, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the near-IR photometry, ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code. A compact circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel shows the presence of an equatorially enhanced dust density during minimum obscuration. Obscuration events are explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust. The mass loss rates are significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras but in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.

  6. An integrated coastal model for aeolian and hydrodynamic sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; den Bieman, J.; van Koningsveld, M.; Luijendijk, A. P.; Parteli, E. J. R.; Plant, N. G.; Roelvink, J. A.; Storms, J. E. A.; de Vries, S.; van Thiel de Vries, J. S. M.; Ye, Q.

    2012-04-01

    Dunes are formed by aeolian and hydrodynamic processes. Over the last decades numerical models were developed that capture our knowledge of the hydrodynamic transport of sediment near the coast. At the same time others have worked on creating numerical models for aeolian-based transport. Here we show a coastal model that integrates three existing numerical models into one online-coupled system. The XBeach model simulates storm-induced erosion (Roelvink et al., 2009). The Delft3D model (Lesser et al., 2004) is used for long term morphology and the Dune model (Durán et al., 2010) is used to simulate the aeolian transport. These three models were adapted to be able to exchange bed updates in real time. The updated models were integrated using the ESMF framework (Hill et al., 2004), a system for composing coupled modeling systems. The goal of this integrated model is to capture the relevant coastal processes at different time and spatial scales. Aeolian transport can be relevant during storms when the strong winds are generating new dunes, but also under relative mild conditions when the dunes are strengthened by transporting sand from the intertidal area to the dunes. Hydrodynamic transport is also relevant during storms, when high water in combination with waves can cause dunes to avalanche and erode. While under normal conditions the hydrodynamic transport can result in an onshore transport of sediment up to the intertidal area. The exchange of sediment in the intertidal area is a dynamic interaction between the hydrodynamic transport and the aeolian transport. This dynamic interaction is particularly important for simulating dune evolution at timescales longer than individual storm events. The main contribution of the integrated model is that it simulates the dynamic exchange of sediment between aeolian and hydrodynamic models in the intertidal area. By integrating the numerical models, we hope to develop a model that has a broader scope and applicability than

  7. Particle atlas of World Trade Center dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowers, Heather; Meeker, Gregory P.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has begun a reassessment of the presence of World Trade Center (WTC) dust in residences, public buildings, and office spaces in New York City, New York. Background dust samples collected from residences, public buildings, and office spaces will be analyzed by multiple laboratories for the presence of WTC dust. Other laboratories are currently studying WTC dust for other purposes, such as health effects studies. To assist in inter-laboratory consistency for identification of WTC dust components, this particle atlas of phases in WTC dust has been compiled.

  8. Distribution of Atmospheric Mineral Dust across Dryland Ecosystems (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, R. L.; Goldstein, H.; Miller, M. E.; Neff, J. C.; Fernandez, D.; Reheis, M. C.

    2010-12-01

    Deposited atmospheric dust in surface sediments of dry landscapes can be identified using geochemical, isotopic, mineralogical, and textural methods that provide compositional contrasts between surficial sediment and local bedrock. In some settings, detrital minerals that are present in surficial sediment but absent in nearby bedrock can be used as proxies for concentration of far-traveled dust. For example, silt-sized, titanium-bearing magnetite is found in silty sediment on high, isolated landforms underlain by Mesozoic and Paleozoic sandstone, which lack such magnetite, from the Mojave Desert eastward across the Colorado Plateau. Magnetite amounts within the top 10 cm of these sediments correlate (r2= 0.54) with amounts of potential plant nutrients, revealing the importance of mineral dust to fertility across ecosystems. Systematic eastward declines in magnetite (determined using magnetic susceptibility or isothermal remanent magnetization, IRM) and Ti indicate dominant dust sources from igneous terrain in the west. Variations in lead isotopes imply that most anthropogenic dust contributions are sourced from the west, consistent with the regional distribution of urban sources. Similar relations are found across gently sloping, dominantly sandy grassland surfaces that have undergone sediment sorting by aeolian and slope-wash processes. In undisturbed settings, fertility indicators and dust amounts (derived from IRM) correlate tightly (r2 as high as 0.96 between IRM and plant nutrients), and the dust amounts are significantly greater than for settings currently grazed by domestic livestock and even those at which grazing ceased 35 years ago. These results, complemented by other field and compositional studies, reveal that disturbance of dry, upland landscapes commonly promotes wind erosion, which then depletes surfaces of originally deposited dust, including aeolian magnetite. Declines in soil fertility, soil fines, and water-holding capacity in these settings can

  9. Dust Storm

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... contrast strongly with the dust storm that swept across Iraq and Saudi Arabia on May 13, 2004 (bottom panels). These data products from ... as yellowish ripples that obscure a large part of southern Iraq. The dust is easy to discern over the dark waters of the teardrop-shaped ...

  10. Mars Atmospheric Chemistry in Electrified Dust Devils and Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Delory, G. T.; Atreya, S. K.; Wong, A.-S.; Renno, N. O.; Sentmann, D. D.; Marshall, J. G.; Cummer, S. A.; Rafkin, S.; Catling, D.

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory studies, simulations and desert field tests all indicate that aeolian mixing dust can generate electricity via contact electrification or "triboelectricity". In convective structures like dust devils or storms, grain stratification (or charge separation) occurs giving rise to an overall electric dipole moment to the aeolian feature, similar in nature to the dipolar electric field generated in terrestrial thunderstorms. Previous simulation studies [1] indicate that this storm electric field on Mars can approach atmospheric breakdown field strength of 20 kV/m. In terrestrial dust devils, coherent dipolar electric fields exceeding 20 kV/m have been measured directly via electric field instrumentation. Given the expected electrostatic fields in Martian dust devils and storms, electrons in the low pressure CO2 gas can be energized via the electric field to values exceeding the electron dissociative attachment energy of both CO2 and H2O, resulting in the formation of new chemical products CO and O- and OH and H- within the storm. Using a collisional plasma physics model we present a calculation of the CO/O- and OH/H- reaction and production rates. We demonstrate that these rates vary geometrically with ambient electric field, with substantial production of dissociative products when fields approach breakdown levels of 20-30 kV/m.

  11. Atmospheric significance of aeolian salts in the sandy deserts of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.-Q.

    2016-02-01

    Large sandy deserts in the middle latitudes of northwestern China were investigated for soluble salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore the environmental significance of "aeolian salts". Results revealed that aeolian salt variations have a clear relationship with the changing meridional and zonal gradients of the desert locations and the aeolian differentiation effect, but are weakly linked to local geological conditions. Atmospheric depositions of water-soluble chemical species are an important process/source contributing to aeolian salt. Sequential variations of soluble salts in sedimentary profiles interbedded with aeolian and non-aeolian deposits and their palaeoenvironmental implications in the hinterland areas of these deserts were further evaluated, based on the constraints of OSL dating and radiocarbon dating data. The results indicate that inorganic salts may be a latent geoproxy in revealing regional palaeoclimatic changes in desert areas for sediments deposited under a single depositional environment, but the interpretation should be more cautious for sediments deposited under diverse depositional conditions. This study presents evidence of the atmospheric origin of aeolian salt in sandy deserts, with limited climatic significance in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction.

  12. Andromeda's dust

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G.; Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian; Braun, Robert; Leroy, Adam E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  13. MECA Workshop on Dust on Mars 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Steven (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Articles and abstracts of articles presented at this workshop are given. It was the goal of the workshop to stimulate cooperative research on, and discussion of, dust related processes on Mars, and to provide background information and help in planning of the Mars Observer mission. These topics are considered: How is dust ejected from the Martian surface into the atmosphere; How does the global atmospheric circulation affect the redistribution of dust on Mars; Are there sources and sinks of dust on Mars, if so, where are they and how do they vary in time; and How many components of dust are there on Mars, and what are their properties. There were four primary discussion sessions: (1) Dust in the atmosphere; (2) Dust on the surface; (3) Dust properties; and (4) Dust observations from future spacecraft missions.

  14. Aeolian sand ripples: experimental study of fully developed states.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Bruno; Claudin, Philippe; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2006-01-20

    We report an experimental investigation of aeolian sand ripples, performed both in a wind tunnel and on stoss slopes of dunes. Starting from a flat bed, we can identify three regimes: appearance of an initial wavelength, coarsening of the pattern, and finally saturation of the ripples. We show that both initial and final wavelengths, as well as the propagative speed of the ripples, are linear functions of the wind velocity. Investigating the evolution of an initially corrugated bed, we exhibit nonlinear stable solutions for a finite range of wavelengths, which demonstrates the existence of a saturation in amplitude. These results contradict most of the models. PMID:16486644

  15. Responses of aeolian desertification to a range of climate scenarios in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xunming; Hua, Ting; Ma, Wenyong

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian desertification plays an important role in earth-system processes and ecosystems, and has the potential to greatly impact global food production. The occurrence of aeolian desertification has traditionally been attributed to increases in wind speed and temperature and decreases in rainfall. In this study, by integrating the aeolian desertification monitoring data and climate and vegetation indices, we found that although aeolian desertification is influenced by complex climate patterns and human activities, increases in rainfall and temperature and decreases in wind speed may not be the key factors of aeolian desertification controls in some regions of China. Our results show that, even when modern technical approaches are used, different approaches to desertification need to be applied to account for regional differences. These results have important implications for future policy decisions on how best to combat desertification.

  16. Post-disturbance dust emissions in dry lands: the role of anthropogenic and climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi, S.; Zobeck, T. M.; Sankey, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Disturbances, which cause a temporary reduction in vegetation cover, can greatly accelerate soil erosion by wind and subsequent dust emissions from desert grasslands and shrublands. These ecosystems worldwide are threatened by contemporary shifts in vegetation composition (e.g. encroachment by shrubs, invasion by exotic grasses) and climatic changes (e.g. increase in aridity, droughts), which alter the frequency and intensity of disturbances and dust emissions. Considering the deleterious impact of dust-borne contaminants on regional air quality and human health, accelerated post-disturbance aeolian transport is an increasingly serious concern for ecosystem management and risk assessment. Here, using extensive wind tunnel studies, field experiments (in grasslands and shrublands of North America) and modeling, we investigated the role of disturbances (fires, grazing) and changes in hydroclimatic factors (air humidity, soil moisture) in altering aeolian processes in desert grassland and shrublands. Our results indicate that the degree of post-disturbance aeolian transport and its attenuation with time was found to be strongly affected by the antecedent vegetation type and post-disturbance climatic conditions. The interactions among sediment transport processes, disturbances and hydroclimatic factors are explored from patch to landscape scales and their roles in dust emissions and land degradation are discussed.

  17. Gully annealing by aeolian sediment: field and remote-sensing investigation of aeolian-hillslope-fluvial interactions, Colorado River corridor, Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; Draut, Amy E.

    2014-01-01

    Processes contributing to development of ephemeral gully channels are of great importance to landscapes worldwide, and particularly in dryland regions where soil loss and land degradation from gully erosion pose long-term land-management problems. Whereas gully formation has been relatively well studied, much less is known of the processes that anneal gullies and impede their growth. This study of gully annealing by aeolian sediment, spanning 95 km along the Colorado River corridor in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA, employed field and remote sensing observations, including digital topographic modelling. Results indicate that aeolian sediment activity can be locally effective at counteracting gully erosion. Gullies are less prevalent in areas where surficial sediment undergoes active aeolian transport, and have a greater tendency to terminate in active aeolian sand. Although not common, examples exist in the record of historical imagery of gullies that underwent infilling by aeolian sediment in past decades and evidently were effectively annealed. We thus provide new evidence for a potentially important interaction of aeolian–hillslope–fluvial processes, which could affect dryland regions substantially in ways not widely recognized. Moreover, because the biologic soil crust plays an important role in determining aeolian sand activity, and so in turn the extent of gully development, this study highlights a critical role of geomorphic–ecologic interactions in determining arid-landscape evolution.

  18. Synthesis on Quaternary aeolian research in the unglaciated eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markewich, Helaine W.; Litwin, Ronald J.; Wysocki, Douglas A.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2015-06-01

    Late-middle and late Pleistocene, and Holocene, inland aeolian sand and loess blanket >90,000 km2 of the unglaciated eastern United States of America (USA). Deposits are most extensive in the Lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) and Atlantic Coastal Plain (ACP), areas presently lacking significant aeolian activity. They provide evidence of paleoclimate intervals when wind erosion and deposition were dominant land-altering processes. This study synthesizes available data for aeolian sand deposits in the LMV, the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain (EGCP) and the ACP, and loess deposits in the Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain (MACP). Data indicate: (a) the most recent major aeolian activity occurred in response to and coincident with growth and decay of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS); (b) by ∼40 ka, aeolian processes greatly influenced landscape evolution in all three regions; (c) aeolian activity peaked in OIS2; (d) OIS3 and OIS2 aeolian records are in regional agreement with paleoecological records; and (e) limited aeolian activity occurred in the Holocene (EGCP and ACP). Paleoclimate and atmospheric-circulation models (PCMs/ACMs) for the last glacial maximum (LGM) show westerly winter winds for the unglaciated eastern USA, but do not resolve documented W and SW winds in the SEACP and WNW and N winds in the MACP. The minimum areal extent of aeolian deposits in the EGCP and ACP is ∼10,000 km2. For the LMV, it is >80,000 km2. Based on these estimates, published PCMs/ACMs likely underrepresent the areal extent of LGM aeolian activity, as well as the extent and complexity of climatic changes during this interval.

  19. Factors controlling magnetism of reddish brown soil profiles from calcarenites in Southern Spain: Dust input or in-situ pedogenesis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Chunxia; Torrent, José; Barrón, Vidal; Hu, Pengxiang; Jiang, Zhaoxia; Duan, Zongqi

    2016-05-01

    Under aerobic conditions, the A and B horizons of soils are magnetically enhanced due to neoformation of ferrimagnets through pedogenesis. This study systematically investigated soils developed on calcarenites of Neogene age in southern Spain to determine the dominant factors controlling the soil magnetism. Geochemical and clay mineral analyses indicate that aeolian dust significantly contribute to the A and B horizon material of the Spanish soil. Nevertheless, the magnetic enhancement of soils can be simply attributed to the pedogenically produced ferrimagnets in-situ. Therefore, the magnetism of Spanish soils is still linked to paleoclimatic variations regardless of the complexities of aeolian inputs from the Northwestern Africa.

  20. Transport of Alaskan Dust into the Gulf of Alaska and Comparison with Similar High-Latitude Dust Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crusium, John; Levy, Rob; Wang, Jun; Campbell, Rob; Schroth, Andrew W.

    2012-01-01

    Transport of Alaskan dust into the Gulf of Alaska and comparison with similar high-latitude dust environments. An airborne flux of the micronutrient iron, derived from dust originating from coastal regions may be an important contributor of iron to the Gulf of Alaska's (GoA) oligotrophic waters. Dust blowing off glacier termini and dry riverbeds is a recurring phenomenon in Alaska, usually occurring in the autumn. Since previous studies assumed that dust originating in the deserts of Asia was the largest source of . airborne iron to the GoA, the budget of aeolian deposition of iron needs to be reassessed. Since late 20 I 0, our group has been monitoring dust activity using satellites over the Copper River Delta (CRD) where the most vigorous dust plumes have been observed. Since 2011, sample aerosol concentration and their composition are being collected at Middleton Island (100km off shore of CRD). This presentation will show a summary of the ongoing dust observations and compare with other similar environments (Patagonia, Iceland) by showing case studies. Common features will be highlighted

  1. Dust and Sand Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 10 November 2003

    The bright and dark tones observed in this THEMIS image of part of an unnamed impact crater (85 km in diameter) near the larger impact crater Schiaparelli are due to variable amounts of bright dust and dark sand covering the surface. Wind Shadows observed around small impact craters at the top of the image and small grooves and ripple-like marks observed throughout the scene illustrate dynamic and continued aeolian processes on Mars.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -1.4, Longitude 10.9 East (349.1 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Soil genesis on the island of Bermuda in the Quaternary: The importance of African dust transport and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Budahn, James R.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Skipp, Gary; Herwitz, Stanley R.

    2012-09-01

    The origin of terra rossa, red or reddish-brown, clay-rich soils overlying high-purity carbonate substrates, has intrigued geologists and pedologists for decades. Terra rossa soils can form from accumulation of insoluble residues during dissolution of the host limestones, addition of volcanic ash, or addition of externally derived, long-range-transported (LRT) aeolian particles. We studied soils and paleosols on high-purity, carbonate aeolianites of Quaternary age on Bermuda, where terra rossa origins have been debated for more than a century. Potential soil parent materials on this island include sand-sized fragments of local volcanic bedrock, the LRT, fine-grained (<20μm) component of distal loess from the lower Mississippi River Valley, and LRT dust from Africa. These parent materials can be characterized geochemically using trace elements that are immobile in the soil-forming environment. Results indicate that local volcanic bedrock on Bermuda has Sc-Th-La, Cr-Ta-Nd, and Eu/Eu*, LaN/YbN, GdN/YbNthat can be distinguished from African dust and lower Mississippi River valley loess. Bermuda soils have Sc-Th-La, Cr-Ta-Nd, and Eu/Eu*, LaN/YbN, GdN/YbN that indicate derivation from a combination of LRT dust from Africa and local volcanic bedrock. Our results indicate that soils on islands in a very broad latitudinal belt of the western Atlantic margin have been influenced by African LRT dust inputs over much of the past ˜500 ka.

  3. Circumstellar dust in symbiotic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, Tomislav; Kotnik-Karuza, Dubravka

    2015-08-01

    Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding evolution of symbiotic binaries. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the long-term near-IR photometry, infrared ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. Pulsation properties and long-term variabilities were found from the near-IR light curves. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code which solves the radiative transfer. No changes in pulsational parameters were found, but a long-term variations with periods of 20-25 years have been detected which cannot be attributed to orbital motion.Circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel showed the presence of an optically thin CS dust envelope and an optically thick dust region outside the line of sight, which was further supported by the detailed modelling using the 2D LELUYA code. Obscuration events in RR Tel were explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust leading to the formation of a compact dust shell. HM Sge showed permanent obscuration and a presence of a compact dust shell with a variable optical depth. Scattering of the near-IR colours can be understood by a change in sublimation temperature caused by the Mira variability. Presence of large dust grains (up to 4 µm) suggests an increased grain growth in conditions of increased mass loss. The mass loss rates of up to 17·10-6 MSun/yr were significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras and in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.Despite the nova outburst, HM Sge remained enshrouded in dust with no significant dust destruction. The existence of unperturbed dust shell suggests a small influence of the hot component and strong dust shielding from the UV flux. By the use

  4. 2002 Kuiper prize lecture: Dust Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf; Krüger, Harald; Kempf, Sascha; Dikarev, Valeri; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg

    2005-03-01

    Dust particles, like photons, carry information from remote sites in space and time. From knowledge of the dust particles' birthplace and their bulk properties, we can learn about the remote environment out of which the particles were formed. This approach is called "Dust Astronomy" which is carried out by means of a dust telescope on a Dust Observatory in space. Targets for a dust telescope are the local interstellar medium and nearby star forming regions, as well as comets and asteroids. Dust from interstellar and interplanetary sources is distinguished by accurately sensing their trajectories. Trajectory sensors may use the electric charge signals that are induced when charged grains fly through the detector. Modern in-situ dust impact detectors are capable of providing mass, speed, physical and chemical information of dust grains in space. A Dust Observatory mission is feasible with state-of-the-art technology. It will (1) provide the distinction between interstellar dust and interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin, (2) determine the elemental composition of impacting dust particles, and (3) monitor the fluxes of various dust components as a function of direction and particle masses.

  5. Exozodiacal dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchner, Marc Jason

    Besides the sun, the most luminous feature of the solar system is a cloud of "zodiacal" dust released by asteroids and comets that pervades the region interior to the asteroid belt. Similar clouds of dust around other stars---exozodiacal clouds---may be the best tracers of the habitable zones of extra-solar planetary systems. This thesis discusses three searches for exozodiacal dust: (1) We observed six nearby main-sequence stars with the Keck telescope at 11.6 microns, correcting for atmosphere-induced wavefront aberrations and deconvolving the point spread function via classical speckle analysis. We compare our data to a simple model of the zodiacal dust in our own system based on COBE DIRBE observations and place upper limits on the density of exozodiacal dust in these systems. (2) We observed Sirius, Altair, and Procyon with the NICMOS Coronagraph on the Hubble Space Telescope to look for scattered light from exozodiacal dust and faint companions within 10 AU from these stars. (3) The planned nulling capability of the Keck Interferometer should allow it to probe the region <200 milliarcsecond from a bright star and to suppress on-axis starlight by factors of 10 -3 to reveal faint circumstellar material. We model the response of the Keck Interferometer to hypothetical exozodiacal clouds to derive detection limits that account for the effects of stellar leakage, photon noise, noise from null depth fluctuations, and the fact that the cloud's shape is not known a priori. We also discuss the interaction of dust with planets. We used the COBE DIRBE Sky and Zodi Atlas and the IRAS Sky Survey Atlas to search for dynamical signatures of three different planets in the solar system dust complex: (1) We searched the COBE DIRBE Sky and Zodi Atlas for a wake of dust trailing Mars. We compare the DIRBE images to a model Mars wake based on the empirical model of the Earth's wake as seen by the DIRBE. (2) We searched the COBE DIRRE Sky and Zodi Atlas for Tiojan dust near

  6. Element geochemical analysis of the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment in desert stream flash floods.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream. PMID:25089295

  7. Element Geochemical Analysis of the Contribution of Aeolian Sand to Suspended Sediment in Desert Stream Flash Floods

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream. PMID:25089295

  8. Some Pharmacological Actions of Cotton Dust and Other Vegetable Dusts

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. J.

    1962-01-01

    Aqueous extracts of cotton and other vegetable dusts cause contraction of the isolated ileum and tracheal muscle of the guinea-pig, and of isolated human bronchial muscle. The levels of this contractor activity place the dusts of cotton, flax, and jute in the order of the probable incidence of byssinosis occurring in the mills spinning these fibres. Extracts of cotton dust possess a histamine-liberating activity and contain a permeability-increasing component. These actions are of plant origin and are found in the pericarp and bracts of the cotton boll. Histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine have also been found in some cotton dust samples. The formation of histamine by bacterial action in cotton dust does not take place under conditions found in cotton mills. The smooth muscle contractor substance is organic in nature, relatively heat-stable, and dialysable. The relevance of these results to the symptoms of byssinosis is discussed. PMID:14479451

  9. "Dust Devils": Gardening Agents on the Surface of Mars, and Hidden Hazards to Human Exploration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Smith, P.; White, B.; Farrell, W.

    1999-01-01

    Dust devils are familiar sites in the and regions of the world: they can produce quite spectacular displays of dust lofting when the vortices scavenge very loose dust from a dry lake bed or from recently disturbed agricultural fields. If one were to arrive at the center of an arid region, take one photograph, or even a series of photographs over a period of several days, then return the images for laboratory analysis, it would be most likely concluded that the region was inactive from an aeolian perspective. No images of general dust movement were obtained, nor were any dust devils "caught on camera" owing to their ephemeral and unpredictable appearance, and the fact that there was deceptively little residue of their actions. If, however, a camera were to take a 360 degree continuous recording over a period of a year, and the film were then to be shown at high speed over a period a several minutes, the impression might be that of a region ravaged by air vorticity and dust movement. Extrapolate this over geological time, and it is possible to visualize dust devils as prime aeolian agents, rather than insignificant vagaries of nature, On Mars, the thin atmosphere permits the surface of the planet to be heated but it does not itself retain heat with the capacity of the earth's atmosphere. This gives rise to greater thermal instability near the surface of Mars as "warm" air pockets diapiritically inject themselves into higher atmospheric layers. Resulting boundary-layer vorticity on Mars might therefore be expected to produce dust devils in abundance, if only seasonally. The spectacular images of dust devils obtained by Pathfinder within its brief functional period on the planet testify to the probability of highly frequent surface vorticity in light of the above reasoning about observational probability. Notably, the Pathfinder devils appeared to be at least a kilometer in height. There are several consequences for the geology of Mars, and for human exploration, if

  10. "Dust Devils": Gardening Agents on the Surface of Mars, and Hidden Hazards to Human Exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Smith, P.; White, B.; Farrell, W.

    1999-09-01

    Dust devils are familiar sites in the and regions of the world: they can produce quite spectacular displays of dust lofting when the vortices scavenge very loose dust from a dry lake bed or from recently disturbed agricultural fields. If one were to arrive at the center of an arid region, take one photograph, or even a series of photographs over a period of several days, then return the images for laboratory analysis, it would be most likely concluded that the region was inactive from an aeolian perspective. No images of general dust movement were obtained, nor were any dust devils "caught on camera" owing to their ephemeral and unpredictable appearance, and the fact that there was deceptively little residue of their actions. If, however, a camera were to take a 360 degree continuous recording over a period of a year, and the film were then to be shown at high speed over a period a several minutes, the impression might be that of a region ravaged by air vorticity and dust movement. Extrapolate this over geological time, and it is possible to visualize dust devils as prime aeolian agents, rather than insignificant vagaries of nature, On Mars, the thin atmosphere permits the surface of the planet to be heated but it does not itself retain heat with the capacity of the earth's atmosphere. This gives rise to greater thermal instability near the surface of Mars as "warm" air pockets diapiritically inject themselves into higher atmospheric layers. Resulting boundary-layer vorticity on Mars might therefore be expected to produce dust devils in abundance, if only seasonally. The spectacular images of dust devils obtained by Pathfinder within its brief functional period on the planet testify to the probability of highly frequent surface vorticity in light of the above reasoning about observational probability. Notably, the Pathfinder devils appeared to be at least a kilometer in height. There are several consequences for the geology of Mars, and for human exploration, if

  11. Particle-size fractionation of aeolian sand along a climatic and geomorphic gradient of the Sinai-Negev erg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskin, Joel; Katra, Itzhak; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2015-04-01

    This study examines changes in the aeolian sand fractions along the west-east aeolian transport path of the northern Sinai Peninsula - northwestern (NW) Negev erg of Egypt and Israel. This erg originates from the Nile Delta and is composed of currently active linear (seif) dunes in northern Sinai (its western part), and currently stabilized vegetated linear dunes (VLDs) in the NW Negev dunefield (its eastern part). Sand samples from the Nile Delta, northern Sinai and NW Negev were analyzed for particle-size distribution and sand grain morphology in accordance to their Eastern Mediterranean INQUA Dunes Atlas luminescence and radiocarbon chronologies. Linear seif dunes differ from VLDs in their vegetation cover, linearity, and dynamics. Although both are continuous landforms with similar orientations and sand-grain roundness values, the linear dunes of Sinai are coarser-grained than the Negev VLDs. The VLDs have a significantly higher proportion of very fine sand (125-50 μm) content and a varying but lower sand fining ratio defined as the ratio of fine sand percentage to very fine sand percentage. Very fine sands are suggested to have been winnowed by saltation and low suspension from source deposits and sand sheets. Detailed semi-quantitative examinations of sand grains by a SEM of a Negev VLD shows that most grains do not exhibit features that can be attributed to aeolian abrasion by sand grain-grain collisions. From these observations we infer that fractionation of sand was a major process leading to downwind fining along the studied aeolian transport path. We suggest that the very fine sand fraction of Nile Delta and Sinai sands has been transported downwind since the late middle Pleistocene. In the late Pleistocene, sand reached the NW Negev in the form of VLDs due to last-glacial period windiness of intensities unprecedented today and probably larger sediment supply. Generally current and inferred past decreasing wind velocities and increasing precipitation

  12. Characterizing subsurface complexity of aeolian morphotypes with georadar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Andrew Phillip Keller

    Aeolian landforms are classified based on their plan morphology, which is a function of sediment transport volume, wind direction, and vegetation. In the case of compound landforms or two-dimensional exposures (outcrops), there is insufficient information for discriminating between 3D morphotypes (e.g., barchans vs. parabolic dunes). To characterize the dip-section architecture of near end-member morphologies (interacting barchans and sparsely vegetated parabolics), a series of axial transects were selected from >25 km of high-resolution (500 MHz) ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data from the gypsum dune field of White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. For dunes of comparable size (6-7 m high), a series of attributes were analyzed for unsaturated portions along the thickest (axial) radargram sections. Given the limitations in vertical resolution (7 cm in dry sand), the average measureable slipface thickness in barchans ranged between 10-22 cm, whereas parabolic slipfaces were thinner at 10-14 cm. High-amplitude diffractions produced by buried vegetation, semi-lithified pedestals, and bioturbation structures were rare within barchans (point-source diffraction density = 0.03/m2; hyperbolics per 1-m-wide cross-sectional area of the image), in contrast to a point-source density of 0.07/m2 in parabolics. An aeolian internal complexity threshold (pi) is proposed, which incorporates standardized scores of slipface thickness, point-source diffraction density, and continuity of major bounding surfaces at mesoscale range determined through semivariogram analysis. For the study region, these variables were sufficient for discriminating barchans (pi = -2.39 to -0.25; pib= -1.65) from parabolic (pi = 0.13 to 2.87; pip= 1.65) dunes. This threshold has the potential for differentiating dune morphotypes in areas where surface morphology is masked and for identifying compound landforms (e.g., a re-activated parabolic dune converted into a barchan in situ ). Ultimately

  13. Theoretical analysis of particle number density in steady aeolian saltation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Liqiang; Zou, Xueyong

    2014-01-01

    Particle number density or particle concentration in aeolian saltation is one important input parameter to calculate the sand flux, kinetic energy and mid-air collision probability in the aeolian saltation and particle concentration is also related to the wind erosion capacity, hence, in the present paper, the vertical distribution of particle number density in steady aeolian saltation is analyzed based on two different types of probability density functions of vertical lift-off velocity of saltating particles: one is the PDF (probability density function) of vertical velocity of lift-off particles in the three-dimensional space defined as a type-A PDF which considers the number of particles in various velocity bins per unit volume; and the other is the PDF of vertical velocity of lift-off particles ejected from the sand bed surface in a period of time as a type-B PDF which considers the number flux of particles in various velocity bins per unit surface area. These two types of PDFs are from two different perspectives (i.e., volume- and surface-based perspectives, respectively), and can be deduced from each other. The half-normal and exponential distributions are recommended for the type-A PDF, and the corresponding type-B PDF is expressed by Rayleigh and Gamma(2) distributions. The PDF distribution pattern of vertical velocity of lift-off particles has an important influence on the vertical profile of particle number density. If the type-A PDF of vertical velocity of ejected particles is a half-normal distribution, the particle number density decays exponentially with height. If the type-A PDF is an exponential distribution, the particle number density also decreases with height. If the type-A PDF is Gamma(3) and Rayleigh distributions, the particle number density first increases, then decreases with height. The type-A and type-B height parameters, which are calculated according to the mean vertical lift-off velocity from the type-A and type-B PDFs, respectively

  14. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angeli, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Laguardia, L.; Ripamonti, D.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Apicella, M. L.; Conti, C.; Giacomi, G.; Grosso, G.

    2015-08-01

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO2, LiOH, and Li2CO3. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li2CO3 is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  15. 2-DUST: Dust radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Meixner, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    2-DUST is a general-purpose dust radiative transfer code for an axisymmetric system that reveals the global energetics of dust grains in the shell and the 2-D projected morphologies of the shell that are strongly dependent on the mixed effects of the axisymmetric dust distribution and inclination angle. It can be used to model a variety of axisymmetric astronomical dust systems.

  16. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  17. Oxidant enhancement in martian dust devils and storms: storm electric fields and electron dissociative attachment.

    PubMed

    Delory, Gregory T; Farrell, William M; Atreya, Sushil K; Renno, Nilton O; Wong, Ah-San; Cummer, Steven A; Sentman, Davis D; Marshall, John R; Rafkin, Scot C R; Catling, David C

    2006-06-01

    Laboratory studies, numerical simulations, and desert field tests indicate that aeolian dust transport can generate atmospheric electricity via contact electrification or "triboelectricity." In convective structures such as dust devils and dust storms, grain stratification leads to macroscopic charge separations and gives rise to an overall electric dipole moment in the aeolian feature, similar in nature to the dipolar electric field generated in terrestrial thunderstorms. Previous numerical simulations indicate that these storm electric fields on Mars can approach the ambient breakdown field strength of approximately 25 kV/m. In terrestrial dust phenomena, potentials ranging from approximately 20 to 160 kV/m have been directly measured. The large electrostatic fields predicted in martian dust devils and storms can energize electrons in the low pressure martian atmosphere to values exceeding the electron dissociative attachment energy of both CO2 and H2O, which results in the formation of the new chemical products CO/O- and OH/H-, respectively. Using a collisional plasma physics model, we present calculations of the CO/O- and OH/H- reaction and production rates. We demonstrate that these rates vary geometrically with the ambient electric field, with substantial production of dissociative products when fields approach the breakdown value of approximately 25 kV/m. The dissociation of H2O into OH/H- provides a key ingredient for the generation of oxidants; thus electrically charged dust may significantly impact the habitability of Mars. PMID:16805701

  18. Multiple dust sources in the Sahara Desert: The importance of sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan R.; Enzel, Yehouda

    2012-07-01

    We determine the current sources of dust in the Sahara Desert using quantitative correlation between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types and geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was found to be sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. In contrast to previous studies, only few dust storms originated from playas and dry lake beds. Land erodibility was estimated by regressing the NDS to the number of days with high-speed wind events, and was found to be high for sand dunes. Clay and fine-silt grains and aggregates are scarce in sand dunes, which most likely produce dust particles through aeolian abrasion of sand grains. Thus, saltating sand grains impacting clay aggregates on playa surfaces cannot be the sole process for generating dust in the Sahara.

  19. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, Cyrille; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World's major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  20. Derivation of an observation-based map of North African dust emission

    SciTech Connect

    Evan, Amato T.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Zhao, Chun; Menut, Laurent; Schepanski, Kerstin; Flamant, C.; Doherty, Owen

    2015-03-01

    Changes in the emission, transport and deposition of aeolian dust have profound effects on regional climate, so that characterizing the lifecycle of dust in observations and improving the representation of dust in global climate models is necessary. A fundamental aspect of characterizing the dust cycle is quantifying surface dust fluxes, yet no spatially explicit estimates of this flux exist for the World’s major source regions. Here we present a novel technique for creating a map of the annual mean emitted dust flux for North Africa based on retrievals of dust storm frequency from the Meteosat Second Generation Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) and the relationship between dust storm frequency and emitted mass flux derived from the output of five models that simulate dust. Our results suggest that 64 (±16)% of all dust emitted from North Africa is from the Bodélé depression, and that 13 (±3)% of the North African dust flux is from a depression lying in the lee of the Aïr and Hoggar Mountains, making this area the second most important region of emission within North Africa.

  1. Aeolian features and processes at the Mars Pathfinder landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael; Sullivan, Robert; Wilson, Gregory; Bridges, Nathan; Herkenhoff, Ken; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Malin, Michael; Ward, Wes

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder landing site contains abundant features attributed to aeolian, or wind, processes. These include wind tails, drift deposits, duneforms of various types, ripplelike features, and ventifacts (the first clearly seen on Mars). Many of these features are consistant with formation involving sand-size particles. Although some features, such as dunes, could develop from saltating sand-size aggregates of finer grains, the discovery of ventifact flutes cut in rocks strongly suggests that at least some of the grains are crystalline, rather than aggregates. Excluding the ventifacts, the orientations of the wind-related features correlate well with the orientations of bright wind steaks seen on Viking Orbiter images in the general area. They also correlate with wind direction predictions from the NASA-Ames General Circulation Model (GCM) which show that the strongest winds in the area occur in the northern hemisphere winter and are directed toward 209°. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Microdunes and other aeolian bedforms on Venus - Wind Tunnel simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; Leach, R. N.

    1984-10-01

    The development of aeolian bedforms in the simulated Venusian environment has been experimentally studied in the Venus Wind Tunnel. It is found that the development of specific bedforms, including ripples, dunes, and 'waves', as well as their geometry, are controlled by a combination of factors including particle size, wind speed, and atmospheric density. Microdunes are formed which are analogous to full-size terrestrial dunes and are characterized by the development of slip faces, internal cross-bedding, a low ratio of saltation path length to dune length, and a lack of particle-size sorting. They begin to develop at wind speeds just above saltation threshold and evolve into waves at higher velocities. At wind speeds of about 1.5 m/sec and higher, the bed is flat and featureless. This evolution is explained by a model based on the interaction of alternating zones of erosion and deposition and particle saltation distances.

  3. Microdunes and Other Aeolian Bedforms on Venus: Wind Tunnel Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; Leach, R. N.

    1985-01-01

    The development of aeolian bedforms in the simulated Venusian environment has been experimentally studied in the Venus Wind tunnel. It is found that the development of specific bedforms, including ripples, dunes, and waves, as well as their geometry, are controlled by a combination of factors including particle size, wind speed, and atmospheric density. Microdunes are formed which are analogous to full-size terrestrial dunes and are characterized by the development of slip faces, internal cross-bedding, a low ratio of saltation path length to dune length, and a lack of particle-size sorting. They begin to develop at wind speeds just above saltation threshold and evolve into waves at higher velocities. At wind speeds of about 1.5 m/sec and higher, the bed is flat and featureless. This evolution is explained by a model based on the interaction of alternating zones of erosion and deposition and particle saltation distances.

  4. Microdunes and other aeolian bedforms on Venus - Wind Tunnel simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Marshall, J. R.; Leach, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    The development of aeolian bedforms in the simulated Venusian environment has been experimentally studied in the Venus Wind Tunnel. It is found that the development of specific bedforms, including ripples, dunes, and 'waves', as well as their geometry, are controlled by a combination of factors including particle size, wind speed, and atmospheric density. Microdunes are formed which are analogous to full-size terrestrial dunes and are characterized by the development of slip faces, internal cross-bedding, a low ratio of saltation path length to dune length, and a lack of particle-size sorting. They begin to develop at wind speeds just above saltation threshold and evolve into waves at higher velocities. At wind speeds of about 1.5 m/sec and higher, the bed is flat and featureless. This evolution is explained by a model based on the interaction of alternating zones of erosion and deposition and particle saltation distances.

  5. Downslope coarsening in aeolian grainflows of the Navajo Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loope, David B.; Elder, James F.; Sweeney, Mark R.

    2012-07-01

    Downslope coarsening in grainflows has been observed on present-day dunes and generated in labs, but few previous studies have examined vertical sorting in ancient aeolian grainflows. We studied the grainflow strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in the southern Utah portion of its outcrop belt from Zion National Park (west) to Coyote Buttes and The Dive (east). At each study site, thick sets of grainflow-dominated cross-strata that were deposited by large transverse dunes comprise the bulk of the Navajo Sandstone. We studied three stratigraphic columns, one per site, composed almost exclusively of aeolian cross-strata. For each column, samples were obtained from one grainflow stratum in each consecutive set of the column, for a total of 139 samples from thirty-two sets of cross-strata. To investigate grading perpendicular to bedding within individual grainflows, we collected fourteen samples from four superimposed grainflow strata at The Dive. Samples were analyzed with a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser diffraction particle analyser. The median grain size of grainflow samples ranges from fine sand (164 μm) to coarse sand (617 μm). Using Folk and Ward criteria, samples are well-sorted to moderately-well-sorted. All but one of the twenty-eight sets showed at least slight downslope coarsening, but in general, downslope coarsening was not as well-developed or as consistent as that reported in laboratory subaqueous grainflows. Because coarse sand should be quickly sequestered within preserved cross-strata when bedforms climb, grain-size studies may help to test hypotheses for the stacking of sets of cross-strata.

  6. Boundary Conditions for Aeolian Activity in North American Dune Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, A. F.; Lancaster, N.; Wolfe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Geomorphic and chronological data for dune fields are evaluated for three contrasting areas of North America: 1) the Prairie-Parkland-Boreal ecozones of the northern Great Plains in Canada; 2) the Central Great Plains of the USA; and 3) the deserts of southwestern USA and northern Mexico. Luminescence and radiocarbon ages for periods of dune accumulation and stability are compared with palaeoenvironment proxies to provide an assessment of the boundary conditions of dune system response to changes in sediment supply, availability, and mobility. Dune fields in the northern Great Plains were formed from sediment originating from glaciofluvial or glaciolacustrine sediments deposited during deglaciation 16-11 ka. Subsequent aeolian deposition occurred in Parkland and Prairie dune fields as a result of mid-Holocene (8-5 ka) and late-Holocene (< 3.5 ka) activity related to drought conditions that reworked pre-existing aeolian sands. In the Central Great Plains, dune fields are closely linked to fluvial sediment sources. Sediment supply was high during deglaciation of the Rocky Mountains and resulted in widespread dune construction 16-10 ka. Multiple periods of Holocene reactivation are recorded and reflect increased sediment availability during drought episodes. Dune fields in the southwestern deserts experienced periods of construction as a result of enhanced supply of sediment from fluvial and lacustrine sources during the period 11.8-8 ka and at multiple intervals during the late Holocene. Despite spatial and temporal gaps in chronometric data as a result of sampling biases, the record from North American dune fields indicates the strong influence of sediment supply on dune construction, with changes in sediment availability as a result of drought episodes resulting in dune field reactivation and reworking of pre-existing sediment.

  7. Mean flow and Reynolds stress structure over aeolian ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bailiang; McKenna Neuman, Cheryl; Bédard, Otto; O'Brien, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Mean flow and turbulence structure on transverse ripples have been well documented in hydrodynamic literature. However, very few studies have described the flow characteristics over aeolian ripples. This study adopted laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) to measure the wind field above granular ripples with different bimodal particle size distributions in a wind tunnel. Multiple runs were conducted to examine the vertical profiles of time-averaged horizontal and vertical velocities and Reynolds stress above four different locations: crest, lee slope, trough, and stoss slope. The rippled sand bed has a fine beige fraction with grain size smaller than 0.542 mm concentrated in the troughs and a coarse fraction dyed in red with grain size greater than 0.542 mm concentrated in the crests. The magnitude of the ripples at equilibrium is controlled by both wind velocity and the ratio of beige sand to red sand. Freestream velocity has a range between 8-11 m/s (above the saltation threshold of beige sand and below the threshold of red sand) and the percentage coarse by mass varies from 5.2% to 27.5% with median grain size from 0.289 mm to 0.399 mm. Experimental results indicate that the ripples have the wave length ranged between 20 mm and 140 mm with a characteristic ripple index (wave length/wave height) of 15. Flow streamlines are generally parallel to the bed surface, which is inconsistent with previous hydrodynamic observations that a return flow is usually found at the lee side of the ripples. Reynolds stress has demonstrated a strong spatial differentiation near the sand surface: greatest at crests and smallest at the troughs, however, this difference diminishes with elevation. This is an exploratory study on the turbulence characteristics of air flow above aeolian ripples, and we believe the finding of this research will enhance the understanding the interaction mechanisms between the air and bed morphology.

  8. Molecular imprint of dust evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimkin, Vitaly; Zhukovska, Svitlana; Wiebe, Dmitri; Semenov, Dmitry; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Vasyunin, Anton; Birnstiel, Til; Henning, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Evolution of sub-micron grains is an essential process during early stages of planet formation. The dust growth and sedimentation to the midplane affect a spectral energy distribution. At the same time dust evolution can alter significantly the distribution of gas that is a factor of 100 more massive than dust and can be traced with molecular line observations. We present simulations of protoplanetary disk structure with grain evolution using the ANDES code ("AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation"). ANDES comprises (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain chemical network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. Such a set of physical processes allows us to assess the impact of dust evolution on the gas component, which is primarily related to radiation field and total available surface for chemical reactions. Considering cases of (i) evolved dust (2 Myr of grain coagulation, fragmentation and sedimentation) and (ii) pristine dust (well- mixed 0.1 micron grains), we found a sufficient changes in disk physical and chemical structure caused by the dust evolution. Due to higher transparency of the evolved disk model UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the midplane. The presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO, while the depletion is still effective in adjacent upper layers. Molecular concentrations of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution (CO2, NH2CN, HNO, H2O, HCOOH, HCN, CO) which provides an opportunity to use these molecules as tracers of dust evolution.

  9. Dust accretion under stone pavements: A complementary environmental archive in arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, Michael; Fuchs, Markus; Kleber, Arno

    2014-05-01

    Stone pavements are widespread surface covers in arid environments. They form predominantly by the trapping of aeolian dust, which trickles below the surficial clast layer, where it forms a continuous layer of fine-grained material with a prominent foamy structure: the vesicular horizon (Av). Successive accretion of dust leads to a thickening of the aeolian mantle and detaches clasts from bedrock. Since this process is dependent on environmental conditions, stone pavement-covered accretionary sections can be used as palaeoenvironmental archive. In the eastern Mojave Desert, correlation of six sediment sections on a 560 ka old basalt flow yield a standard section, comprising at least three distinct units of pulsed aeolian sediment input, interrupted by phases of stone pavement formation, their burial and subsequent pedogenetic alteration. Formation and subsequent burial of stone pavements requires lateral re-formation processes. Two such processes - clast drag by unconcentrated overland flow and clast creep by air release from the soil - are presented, along with their environmental boundary conditions. The different sedimentary units under stone pavements in the eastern Mojave Desert must be interpreted in the light of both, the prominent climatic changes during the Pleistocene/Holocene and the young drainage system in this region. Accretionary dust sections under stone pavements receive their sediment predominantly from modern playas. However, they typically start trapping sediment and thus environmental information when the lake level drops and the lacustrine archive deceases. Hence, they appear to be complementary archives with a the potential to fill the stratigraphic gaps in lacustrine records.

  10. Palaeomagnetism of welded, pyroclastic-fall scoriae at Vulcano, Aeolian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, E.; De Astis, G.; Lanza, R.

    2001-06-01

    This paper deals with the magnetic fabric and remanent magnetization of welded scoriae fall deposits. Four scoriae blankets were emplaced on Vulcano (Aeolian Islands) from about 50 to 8 ka. Their detailed chronostratigraphic position has been debated in the literature and they have therefore been given a different interpretation in the reconstruction of the Vulcano's eruptive history. The aims of the study were a better understanding of the magnetic features of the scoriae fall deposits, which have so far been given little attention, and to set the chronostratigraphic relationships of the sampled deposits on the ground of their palaeomagnetic directions. Overall, the magnetic properties of the four deposits are alike. Investigation of isothermal remanence and susceptibility versus temperature measurements point to low-Ti titanomagnetite as the main ferromagnetic mineral. Magnetic foliation is well developed, moderately dispersed and in most cases close to horizontal. Lineation is either clustered or dispersed within the foliation plane. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetization shows that secondary components are negligible in two units. In the other two, they are always completely removed in the first steps, below 20 mT or 400°C. Thereafter, the characteristic component (ChRM) is clearly isolated and the within-site dispersion of its direction is small ( α95<4° at 16 out of 23 sites). The within-site consistency of the directional features of both magnetic fabric and remanence shows that no en masse movement of welded scoria occurred nor did individual spatter move with respect to one another after their emplacement. The scoriae therefore welded and cooled in situ. The between-site dispersion of the ChRM directions also is very small ( α95<3.5°) for three units, and their mean palaeomagnetic direction is consistent with the palaeosecular variation curve for Aeolian Islands. Statistical analysis of the results from two units whose isotopic ages

  11. Changes in the Airborne Bacterial Community in Outdoor Environments following Asian Dust Events

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Park, Jonguk; Kodama, Makiko; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Baba, Takashi; Nasu, Masao

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial abundance and community compositions have been examined in aeolian dust in order to clarify their possible impacts on public health and ecosystems. The influence of transcontinentally transported bacterial cells on microbial communities in the outdoor environments of downwind areas should be determined because the rapid influx of a large amount of bacterial cells can disturb indigenous microbial ecosystems. In the present study, we analyzed bacteria in air samples (approximately 100 m3 d−1) that were collected on both Asian dust days and non-Asian dust days over 2 years (between November 2010 and July 2012). Changes in bacterial abundance and community composition were investigated based on their 16S rRNA gene amount and sequence diversity. Seasonal monitoring revealed that airborne bacterial abundance was more than 10-fold higher on severe dust days, while moderate dust events did not affect airborne bacterial abundance. A comparison of bacterial community compositions revealed that bacteria in Asian dust did not immediately disturb the airborne microbial community in areas 3,000–5,000 km downwind of dust source regions, even when a large amount of bacterial cells were transported by the atmospheric event. However, microbes in aeolian dust may have a greater impact on indigenous microbial communities in downwind areas near the dust source. Continuous temporal and spatial analyses from dust source regions to downwind regions (e.g., from the Gobi desert to China, Korea, Japan, and North America) will assist in estimating the impact of atmospherically transported bacteria on indigenous microbial ecosystems in downwind areas. PMID:24553107

  12. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic rhinitis - dust ... make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are said to have a dust allergy. ...

  13. PREFACE: WMO/GEO Expert Meeting On An International Sand And Dust Storm Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science presents a selection of papers that were given at the WMO/GEO Expert Meeting on an International Sand and Dust Storm Warning System hosted by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center - Centro Nacional de Supercomputación in Barcelona (Spain) on 7-9 November 2007 (http://www.bsc.es/wmo). A sand and dust storm (SDS) is a meteorological phenomenon common in arid and semi-arid regions and arises when a gust front passes or when the wind force exceeds the threshold value where loose sand and dust are removed from the dry surface. After aeolian uptake, SDS reduce visibility to a few meters in and near source regions, and dust plumes are transported over distances as long as thousands of kilometres. Aeolian dust is unique among aerosol phenomena: (1) with the possible exception of sea-salt aerosol, it is globally the most abundant of all aerosol species, (2) it appears as the dominating component of atmospheric aerosol over large areas of the Earth, (3) it represents a serious hazard for life, health, property, environment and economy (occasionally reaching the grade of disaster or catastrophic event) and (4) its influence, impacts, complex interactions and feedbacks within the Earth System span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. From a political and societal point of view, the concern for SDS and the need for international cooperation were reflected after a survey conducted in 2005 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in which more than forty WMO Member countries expressed their interest for creating or improving capacities for SDS warning advisory and assessment. In this context, recent major advances in research - including, for example, the development and implementation of advanced observing systems, the theoretical understanding of the mechanisms responsible for sand and dust storm generation and the development of global and regional dust models - represent the basis for

  14. Long-Term Observations of Dust Storms in Sandy Desert Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hye-Won; Kim, Jung-Rack; Choi, Yun-Soo

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dust occupies the largest portion of atmospheric aerosol. Considering the numerous risks that dust poses for socioeconomic and anthropogenic activities, it is crucial to understand sandy desert environments, which frequently generate dust storms and act as a primary source of atmospheric aerosol. To identify mineral aerosol mechanisms, it is essential to monitor desert environmental factors involving dust storm generation in the long term. In this study, we focused on two major environmental factors: local surface roughness and soil moisture. Since installments of ground observation networks in sandy deserts are unfeasible, remote sensing techniques for mining desert environmental factors were employed. The test area was established within the Badain Jaran and Kubuqi Deserts in Inner Mongolia, China, where significant seasonal aeolian processes emit mineral dust that influences all of East Asia. To trace local surface roughness, we employed a multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) image sequence to extract multi-angle viewing (MAV) topographic parameters such as normalized difference angular index, which represents characteristics of the target desert topography. The backscattering coefficient from various space-borne SAR and stereotopography were compared with MAV observations to determine calibrated local surface roughness. Soil moisture extraction techniques from InSAR-phase coherence stacks were developed and compiled with advanced scatterometer (ASCAT) soil moisture data. Combined with metrological information such as the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA interim, correlations between intensity of sand dune activity as a proxy of aeolian processes in desert environments, surface wind conditions, and surface soil moisture were traced. Overall, we have confirmed that tracking sandy desert aeolian environments for long-term observations is feasible with space-borne, multi-sensor observations when combined with

  15. Dust structures in cryogenic dc discharge: Some suggestions for future research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, S. N.; Vasiliev, M. M.; Petrov, O. F.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, the cryogenic dusty plasma, which is represented by a mixture of two dust components with different structural and dynamical properties, was experimentally investigated. Experiments were conducted in dc glow discharge at temperatures 10 and 77 K using CeO2 micron powder as a dust. In dust structures obtained one of the components consists of dust particles with chain-like ordering (dust chains) and another component consists of fast- moving particles orbiting horizontally through the first component (“crazy” particles). Dust particle velocity distribution functions were obtained. The possible reasons of two-component dust structure formation were discussed.

  16. Hydrological indications of aeolian salts in mid-latitude deserts of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Large sandy deserts in middle latitude of northwestern China were studied on salt variations in modern and ancient aeolian sediments, aiming to explore their hydrological indications at the present and past. Globally, sulphate is rich in arid to semi-arid deserts, including the aeolian loess sediments in China and soils in low-latitude deserts, but is less common in the aeolian sediments from the mid-latitude deserts in this study. The compositional differences between aeolian salts and local natural waters is evident, indicating the chemistry of aeolian salts and the associated parent brines may be significantly different than that predicted for hydrologically closed systems. The formation of aeolian salts in the studied deserts is strongly controlled by earth surface processes in a large scale but not in a local scale. Vertical changes in facies and salinities are abrupt in the studied palaeo-aeolian sediment samples, which were interbedded by lacustrine/fluvial sediments with OSL and 14C ages ranging between 40 and 2 ka BP, reflecting rapid high-amplitude changes in hydrological settings during late Pleistocene to later Holocene in these ancient playa systems. A great difference in salt composition between aeolian and lacustrine sediments suggests that the inorganic salt is a latent geoproxy in revealing local hydrological variations and climate change in the desert areas. But the environmental indications could be amphibolous for the sedimentary sequences with dual/multiple depositional end-members; under this situation an increase in sequence salinity does not always represent an enhanced environmental aridity. Ancient playas are arid or humid at the same time based on several sporadic records is not a valid approach to correlation of salt deposits in adjacent saline playa basin in the studied areas. Effects of earth surface processes including erosion, deposition and other processes on sediment properties will bias the hydrological implications of sediment

  17. Evidence for different episodes of aeolian construction and a new type of wind streak in the 2016 ExoMars landing ellipse in Meridiani Planum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D. A.; Di Achille, G.; Popa, I. C.; Esposito, F.

    2015-04-01

    We present evidence for a complex, multigenerational bed form pattern and a new type of wind streak (the ripple streak) in the landing site ellipse of the 2016 ExoMars Entry descent and landing Demonstrator Module (EDM) in Meridiani Planum (Mars). We identified three main groups of bright-toned bed forms. Population 3, represented by NE-SW trending bed forms located inside craters, was emplaced by winds coming from the NW or the SE. Population 2, emplaced by strong easterlies, formed by intracrater transverse aeolian ridges (TARs) and N-S trending megaripples (plains ripples). Population 1 consists of a relict bed form pattern emplaced by winds coming from the north or south. Alternatively, population 1 can represent a sand ribbon pattern that formed together with the plain ripples. We also report the presence of a new type of wind streak, the ripple streak, which is formed by the population 2 bed forms clustered in the wake zone of impact craters. Based on the results of this work, we now know the EDM module is set to land in a complex aeolian environment. Data from the Dust Characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface onboard the EDM can help to better decipher the wind regime in Meridiani Planum.

  18. Source Characterization of African Dust Using CCSEM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, R.; Hunt, A.; Oldfield, F.

    2013-12-01

    A preliminary investigation is underway to determine whether African dust is developed through Pedogenic or Aeolian processes. 85 dust samples were taken from the Sahel and Saharan region of Africa and analyzed using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM). Optimized secondary electron detectors (SED) and back-scattered electron detectors (BSED) with adjustable quadrants was used with a light element Peltier-cooled energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer. A variable pressure system was utilized for the analysis of insulating materials, which eliminated the need for special specimen coating to dissipate charge and remove artifacts. Data from these samples are being used to address two primary questions: (1) Can CCSEM technology accurately describe elemental compounds derived from dust samples and therefore derive mineral content and (2) Are African dusts created through Pedogenic or Aeolian processes. The creation of a 19-point elemental classification system was used to separate and analyze each of the 4000 data points that were taken from 85 samples. Initial findings show large amounts of Fe, Si, and Al-rich minerals. The Al-Si-rich minerals show a close correlation in relative elemental amounts. This is to be expected from clay minerals of the pyroxene group. The Fe, Si-rich minerals trend towards an inverse relationship, which is also consistent with iron oxides of the spinel group that generally consist of magnetite. Other elemental constituents within the samples include varying amounts of Ti, Ca, and K. An initial run of samples, 6 Burkina Soils and 6 Burkina Laterites, show a similarity in chemical composition, leading to the hypothesis that the Burkina Soils originated from the Burkina Laterites. As the experiment progresses we expect to see similar Aeolian processes contributing to the mineral content of other surface dusts. Further research on the effects of these wind driven dusts is needed to assess the potential health impacts and

  19. Identification of a late Quaternary alluvial-aeolian sedimentary sequence in the Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jin-Liang; Ju, Jian-Ting; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhao-Guo; Zhao, Xiang; Gao, Shao-Peng

    2016-03-01

    The late Quaternary sedimentary sequence in the northwestern part of the Sichuan Basin consists of five lithological units and with increasing depth include the: Chengdu Clay; Brown Clay; Red Clay; Sandy Silt; and basal Muddy Gravel. The genesis, provenance and age of the sediments, as well as the possible presence of hiatuses within this sequence are debated. Measurements of grain-size, magnetic susceptibility, quartz content, quartz δ18O values, element composition, and Sr-Nd isotopic concentrations of samples from a typical sedimentary sequence in the area provides new insights into the genesis and history of the sequence. The new data confirm that the sediments in study site are alluvial-aeolian in origin, with basal alluvial deposits overlain by aeolian deposits. Like the uppermost Chengdu Clay, the underlying Brown Clay and Red Clay are aeolian in origin. In contrast, the Silty Sand, like the basal Muddy Gravel, is an alluvial deposit and not an aeolian deposit as previously thought. Moreover, the succession of the aeolian deposits very likely contains two significant sedimentary hiatuses. Sedimentological analysis demonstrates that the source materials for the aeolian deposits in the northwestern part of the Sichuan Basin and those on the eastern Tibetan Plateau are different. Furthermore, the loess deposits on the eastern Tibetan Plateau are derived from heterogeneous local sources.

  20. The likelihood of observing dust-stimulated phytoplankton growth in waters proximal to the Australian continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, R. A.; Gabric, A. J.; Levasseur, M.; McTainsh, G. H.; Bowie, A.; Hassler, C. S.; Law, C. S.; McGowan, H.; Tindale, N.; Viscarra Rossel, R.

    2013-05-01

    We develop a tool to assist in identifying a link between naturally occurring aeolian dust deposition and phytoplankton response in the ocean. Rather than examining a single, or small number of dust deposition events, we take a climatological approach to estimate the likelihood of observing a definitive link between dust deposition and a phytoplankton bloom for the oceans proximal to the Australian continent. We use a dust storm index (DSI) to determine dust entrainment in the Lake Eyre Basin (LEB) and an ensemble of modelled atmospheric trajectories of dust transport from the basin, the major dust source in Australia. Deposition into the ocean is computed as a function of distance from the LEB source and the local over-ocean precipitation. The upper ocean's receptivity to nutrients, including dust-borne iron, is defined in terms of time-dependent, monthly climatological fields for light, mixed layer depth and chlorophyll concentration relative to the climatological monthly maximum. The resultant likelihood of a dust-phytoplankton link being observed is then mapped as a function of space and time. Our results suggest that the Southern Ocean (north of 45°S), the North West Shelf, and Great Barrier Reef are ocean regions where a rapid biological response to dust inputs is most likely to be observed. Conversely, due to asynchrony between deposition and ocean receptivity, direct causal links appear unlikely to be observed in the Tasman Sea and Southern Ocean south of 45°S.

  1. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV) wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness), the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution), a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014). 2nd Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  2. Heart of darkness: dust obscuration of the central stellar component in globular clusters younger than ˜100 Myr in multiple stellar population models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, S. N.

    2015-03-01

    To explain the observed anomalies in stellar populations within globular clusters, many globular cluster formation theories require two independent episodes of star formation. A fundamental prediction of these models is that the clusters must accumulate large gas reservoirs as the raw material to form the second stellar generation. We show that young clusters containing the required gas reservoir should exhibit the following observational signatures: (i) a dip in the measured luminosity profile or an increase in measured reddening towards the cluster centre, with AV > 10 mag within a radius of a few pc; (ii) bright (sub)mm emission from dust grains; (iii) bright molecular line emission once the gas is dense enough to begin forming stars. Unless the initial mass function is anomalously skewed towards low-mass stars, the clusters should also show obvious signs of star formation via optical emission lines (e.g. Hα) after the stars have formed. These observational signatures should be readily observable towards any compact clusters (radii of a few pc) in the nearby Universe with masses ≳106 M⊙ and ages ≲100 Myr. This provides a straightforward way to directly test globular cluster formation models which predict large gas reservoirs are required to form the second stellar generation. The fact that no such observational evidence exists calls into question whether such a mechanism happens regularly for young massive clusters in galaxies within a few tens of Mpc.

  3. Source-to-sink cycling of aeolian sediment in the north polar region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2012-12-01

    Aeolian sand dunes are prominent features on the landscapes of Earth, Mars, Venus and Titan and sedimentary deposits interpreted as aeolian in origin are found in the rock records of Earth and Mars. The widespread occurrence of aeolian dunes on the surface of these worlds and within their deep-time depositional records suggests that aeolian systems are and likely have been a default depositional environment for the Solar System. Within an aeolian source-to-sink context, we hypothesize that planet-specific boundary conditions strongly impact production, transport, accumulation and preservation of aeolian sediment, whereas dunes and dune-field patterns remain largely similar. This hypothesis is explored within the north polar region of Mars, which hosts the most extensive aeolian dune fields and aeolian sedimentary deposits yet recognized on Mars and appears to be a region of dynamic source-to-sink cycling of aeolian sediments. The Planum Boreum Cavi Unit rests beneath north polar ice cap of Mars and is composed of several hundred meters of niveo-aeolian dune cross-stratification. The overall architecture of the unit consists of sets of preserved dune topography with an upward increase in the abundance of ice. Dune sets are defined by stabilized, polygonally fractured bounding surfaces, erosional bounding surfaces and typical internal lee foresets made of sediment and ice. The accumulation of the Cavi Unit is interpreted as occurring through freezing and serves as an example of a cold temperature boundary condition on aeolian sediment accumulation. Preservation of the Cavi Unit arises because of deposition of the overlying ice cap and contrasts with preservation of aeolian sediment on Earth, which is largely driven by eustasy and tectonics. The Cavi Unit is thought to be one source of sediment for the north polar Olympia Undae Dune Field. The region of Olympia Undae near the Cavi Unit shows a reticulate dune field pattern composed of two sets of nearly orthogonal

  4. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  5. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars: Wind, Dust Sand, and Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars: Wind, Dust Sand, and Debris" included: Mars Exploration Rovers: Laboratory Simulations of Aeolian Interactions; Thermal and Spectral Analysis of an Intracrater Dune Field in Amazonis Planitia; How High is that Dune? A Comparison of Methods Used to Constrain the Morphometry of Aeolian Bedforms on Mars; Dust Devils on Mars: Scaling of Dust Flux Based on Laboratory Simulations; A Close Encounter with a Terrestrial Dust Devil; Interpretation of Wind Direction from Eolian Features: Herschel Crater, Mars Erosion Rates at the Viking 2 Landing Site; Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distributions; Simple Non-fluvial Models of Planetary Surface Modification, with Application to Mars; Comparison of Geomorphically Determined Winds with a General Circulation Model: Herschel Crater, Mars; Analysis of Martian Debris Aprons in Eastern Hellas Using THEMIS; Origin of Martian Northern Hemisphere Mid-Latitude Lobate Debris Aprons; Debris Aprons in the Tempe/Mareotis Region of Mars;and Constraining Flow Dynamics of Mass Movements on Earth and Mars.

  6. Video monitoring of meso-scale aeolian activity on a narrow beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Pam; Ruessink, Gerben

    2014-05-01

    The morphologic evolution of coastal dunes is inextricably linked to the neighbouring beach through the incessant exchange of sand. Intense storm-wave processes erode the foredune within a few hours and transport its sand sand seaward, while aeolian processes return the eroded sand from the beach into the dune system, although at a much lower pace (months to years, or meso scale). Here we use an 8-year long data set of half-hourly snapshot video images, collected from an ≡ 50 m high tower on Egmond Beach (The Netherlands), and a concurrent meteorological and water level data set, to examine which factors affect aeolian sand delivery into the dunes. Egmond is a north-south oriented, micro- to meso-tidal, wave-dominated site that faces the North Sea. Its beach is relatively narrow ( ~ 100 m at spring low tide) and mildly sloping (~ 1 : 30), and consists of quartz sand with a median diameter of about 300 μm. Aeolian activity is clearly visible on the images as sand streamers and, in particular, sand strips, defined as low-amplitude, large-wavelength and slipfaceless deposits that migrate slowly in the wind direction and, depending on wind direction, can have orientations from almost shore-parallel to shore-normal. Beach width in combination with wind direction appeared to be the dominant factors in controlling aeolian activity. Many high wind (>≡ 13 m/s) events, especially from the west and northwest, were associated with a storm surge that inundated almost the entire beach with, accordingly, no possibility for aeolian transport. In contrast, sand-strip fields covered the entire beach during medium wind (≡ 12 - 13 m/s) events, especially when the wind was nearly shore-parallel. Many sand-strip events were observed to be regulated by the tide. Prominent sand-strip fields on the intertidal and upper beach were largely limited to low-tide situations with a wide beach, with a rising tide obviously destroying the intertidal sand strips and sometimes also negatively

  7. Effects of River Regulation on Aeolian Landscapes, Grand Canyon National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draut, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment deposits in the Colorado River corridor include fluvial sandbars and aeolian dune fields, and the fluvial deposits are the primary sediment source for sand in the aeolian dunes. This 7-year study examined the effects of river regulation at Glen Canyon Dam (alteration of flow regime, sediment-supply reduction, and consequent loss of fluvial sandbars) on aeolian landscapes downstream in Grand Canyon National Park. A comparative study was developed between aeolian landscapes in Grand Canyon, Arizona, and Cataract Canyon, Utah, upstream of Glen Canyon Dam and its reservoir (Lake Powell), where hydrology and sediment supply of the Colorado River are affected substantially less by artificial river regulation than occurs in Grand Canyon. Before closure of Glen Canyon Dam in 1963, sediment-rich floods (mean annual peak 2400 m3/s) formed sandbars from which wind moved sand inland to form aeolian dunes. After dam operations reduced the amplitude and frequency of high flows, and eliminated the mainstream fluvial sediment supply, Grand Canyon’s fluvial sandbars lost open sand area owing to erosion by river flows and the spread of riparian vegetation. Two types of aeolian landscapes now occur in Grand Canyon: (1) modern fluvial sourced, those downwind of post-dam sandbars; and (2) relict fluvial sourced, whose primary sediment source was deposits from pre-dam floods that were larger than any post-dam flows have been. Sediment supply has been reduced to type (1) dune fields because post-dam sandbars are smaller than in the pre-dam era; new sediment supply to type (2) dune fields essentially has been eliminated. Type 1 aeolian landscapes can receive new windblown sand from sandbars formed by controlled floods (1160 m3/s), which occurred in 1996, 2004, and 2008. Type 1 dune fields, being downwind and within 100 m of controlled-flood sandbars, have significantly higher aeolian sand-transport rates, more open sand, and less biologic soil crust than relict type 2 dune

  8. Aeolian process-induced hyper-concentrated flow in a desert watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Wanquan; Wang, Haibin; Jia, Xiaopeng

    2014-04-01

    Ephemeral desert channels are characterized by very high rates of sediment transport during infrequent flood events. Here we show that aeolian process-induced hyper-concentrated (AHC) flows occur in the Sudalaer desert watershed in the Ordos Plateau of China, which primarily transport 0.08-0.25 mm non-cohesive aeolian sand and have a peak suspended sediment concentration of 1.1-1.4 × 106 mg l-3. Aeolian sand supply and storage in the channel play a crucial role in causing hyper-concentrated flow. Our results indicate that non-cohesive aeolian sand can be entrained from the bed and suspended in the turbulent flow when the channel bed slope exceeds a critical threshold (0.0003). We also show that if the frequency ratio of wind-blown sandstorms to rainstorms Tw/Tp exceeds β(γ - γ0)/α (P/V3) (A/L) (where α is the wind-blown sand transport coefficient, β is the runoff coefficient, γ - γ0 is the increase in suspension concentration caused by addition of aeolian sands, P is the density of rainstorms, V is the wind speed of sandstorms, A is the runoff-generating area, L is the aeolian sand-filled channel length), an AHC flow occurs during the passage of a flood in a desert channel. Since high-frequency aeolian processes provide an adequate quantity of transportable sediment and promote AHC flow, most of the infrequent rainfall-induced floods occurring in arid zones can develop as AHC flows.

  9. Natural gamma-radiation in the Aeolian volcanic arc.

    PubMed

    Chiozzi, P; Pasquale, V; Verdoya, M; Minato, S

    2001-11-01

    Pulse-height distributions of gamma-rays, obtained with a field NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer in numerous sites of the Lipari and Vulcano islands (Aeolian volcanic arc, Italy), were measured to determine the U, Th and K concentrations of the bedrock and the relative values of the air absorbed dose rate. U is spatially related to both Th and K and the Th/U ratio is on average 3.1-3.5. The magmatic evolution is reflected by the concentration of the three radioelements, as they are more abundant within the more felsic units of the volcanic series. The higher values of U (15.7-20.0 ppm) coincide with higher Th (48.3-65.9 ppm) and K (4.9-6.1%) concentrations associated with rhyolitic rocks of the third cycle (< 50 ky). The air absorbed dose rate varies from 20 to 470 nGy h(-1). The highest values (> 350 nGy h(-1)) are observed on outcrops of rhyolitic obsidian lava flows. The cosmic-ray contribution is also evaluated to estimate the total background radiation dose rate. PMID:11573810

  10. Understanding early-stage dune development: morphodynamics of aeolian protodunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddock, Matthew; Wiggs, Giles; Nield, Joanna

    2016-04-01

    For such a fundamental aspect of bedform development, the initiation and early-stage growth of sand dunes remain poorly understood. Protodunes are bedforms within the continuum of early-stage depositional aeolian features that exist between flat sand patches and small dunes. As transitory bedforms with the potential to develop into dunes, the detailed study of protodune morphodynamics can provide significant insights into nascent dune development. As part of a multi-annual study investigating bedform change through repeat morphological surveys of bedforms with differing maturity, measurements of near-surface airflow and sand transport were conducted over a protodune in a small Namibian barchan dune field. The protodune was approximately 85 m in length and 1 m high, and was without a slipface. Data show that over the course of a week, patterns of airflow and transport flux variation were linked with accretion at the crest, and erosion of the leeside edge showing an increase in protodune height, and providing evidence of the dune's vertical development. Surveys reveal the longer term evolution of the protodune, in the context of changes exhibited by nearby, fully developed barchan dunes, and long term monitoring of wind regime at the site.

  11. Energy regimes for aeolian sand grain surface textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. R.; Bull, P. A.; Morgan, R. M.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study of aeolian sand grain surface texture development was undertaken with an air-driven grain-recirculating desktop apparatus. Scanning electron microscope analysis of resulting textures indicated that different texture types can be associated with distinct zones in a grain-shape/grain speed matrix. In particular, for subrounded and rounded grains, low and high energy transport can be unequivocally distinguished by the occurrence of upturned plates and Hertzian frustra respectively. Textural development does not have a simple relationship to grain velocity, but appears to relate to the energy expended per unit area within the contact zone generated by elastic deformation during impact. Hertzian theory was adapted to irregular sand grain shapes and close agreement was found between experimental results and theoretical predictions for textural development. Results of this study improve our ability to reconstruct palaeoaeolian environments and therefore our ability to determine grain provenance; in particular, the latter is shown to have direct relevance to forensic inquiries and terrorism investigations.

  12. Predicting aeolian sand transport rates: A reevaluation of models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Douglas J.; Li, Bailiang

    2012-01-01

    Eight aeolian sand-transport models are evaluated using a field data set and a new approach to estimating shear velocity. The models are those of Bagnold (1937), Kawamura (1951), Zingg (1953), Owen (1964), Kadib (1965), Hsu (1971), Lettau and Lettau (1978) and Sørensen (2004). All of these models predict transport as a function of shear velocity to the third power. Shear velocities are estimated using wind profile data (log-linear slope) with the von Kármán constant and with the apparent von Kármán parameter and the results of the different approaches are evaluated based on comparison of regression statistics and RMS error. The models were not adjusted to account for sediment moisture content or local surface slope effects. All of the models have about the same statistical explanatory power, so evaluations were made by comparing slopes and intercepts of best fit (least-squares) lines and RMSE. From this basis, we conclude that predictions made with the Bagnold (1937) model best match our observations, with the models of Kadib (1965) and Hsu (1971) performing nearly as well. The Lettau and Lettau (1978) and Kawamura (1951) model predictions match observations least.

  13. Multi-spatial analysis of aeolian dune-field patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; McDonald, George D.; Hayes, Alex G.

    2015-07-01

    Aeolian dune-fields are composed of different spatial scales of bedform patterns that respond to changes in environmental boundary conditions over a wide range of time scales. This study examines how variations in spatial scales of dune and ripple patterns found within dune fields are used in environmental reconstructions on Earth, Mars and Titan. Within a single bedform type, different spatial scales of bedforms emerge as a pattern evolves from an initial state into a well-organized pattern, such as with the transition from protodunes to dunes. Additionally, different types of bedforms, such as ripples, coarse-grained ripples and dunes, coexist at different spatial scales within a dune-field. Analysis of dune-field patterns at the intersection of different scales and types of bedforms at different stages of development provides a more comprehensive record of sediment supply and wind regime than analysis of a single scale and type of bedform. Interpretations of environmental conditions from any scale of bedform, however, are limited to environmental signals associated with the response time of that bedform. Large-scale dune-field patterns integrate signals over long-term climate cycles and reveal little about short-term variations in wind or sediment supply. Wind ripples respond instantly to changing conditions, but reveal little about longer-term variations in wind or sediment supply. Recognizing the response time scales across different spatial scales of bedforms maximizes environmental interpretations from dune-field patterns.

  14. Shallow Submarine Hydrothermal Systems in the Aeolian Volcanic Arc, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monecke, Thomas; Petersen, Sven; Lackschewitz, Klas; Hügler, Michael; Hannington, Mark D.; Gemmell, J. Bruce

    2009-03-01

    The majority of known high-temperature hydrothermal vents occur at mid-ocean ridges and back-arc spreading centers, typically at water depths from 2000 to 4000 meters. Compared with 30 years of hydrothermal research along spreading centers in the deep parts of the ocean, exploration of the approximately 700 submarine arc volcanoes is relatively recent [de Ronde et al., 2003]. At these submarine arc volcanoes, active hydrothermal vents are located at unexpectedly shallow water depth (95% at <1600-meter depth), which has important consequences for the style of venting, the nature of associated mineral deposits, and the local biological communities. As part of an ongoing multinational research effort to study shallow submarine volcanic arcs, two hydrothermal systems in the submerged part of the Aeolian arc have been investigated in detail during research cruises by R/V Poseidon (July 2006) and R/V Meteor (August 2007). Comprehensive seafloor video surveys were conducted using a remotely operated vehicle, and drilling to a depth of 5 meters was carried out using a lander-type submersible drill. This research has resulted in the first detailed, three-dimensional documentation of shallow submarine hydrothermal systems on arc volcanoes.

  15. Dust Complex onboard the ExoMars-2018 lander for investigations of Martian dust dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Alexander; Horanyi, Mihaly; Afonin, Valeri; Esposito, Francesca; Seran, Elena; Gotlib, Vladimir; Koepke, Mark; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Lyash, Andrey; Dolnikov, Gennady

    The load of suspended dust in the Martian atmosphere varies dramatically but never drops entirely to zero. Effects of airborne dust contribute to the dynamic and thermodynamic evolution of the atmosphere and its large-scale circulation processes on diurnal, seasonal and annual time-scales. Suspended dust plays a key role in determining the present climate of Mars and probably influenced the past climatic conditions and surface evolution. Atmosphere dust and windblown dust are responsible for erosion, redistribution of dust on the surface, and surface weathering. The mechanisms for dust entrainment in the atmosphere are not completely understood, as the current data available so far do not allow us to identify the efficiency of the various processes. Dust-grain transport on the surface of Mars has never been directly measured despite great interest in and high scientific and technological ramifications of the associated phenomena. This paper describes planned, future investigations of the Martian dust environment made possible by the proposed scientific payload “Dust Complex” (DC) of the ExoMars-2018 mission’s landing platform. DC is a suite of four sensors devoted to the study of Aeolian processes on Mars with a primary aim of monitoring the diurnal, seasonal, and annual dust-environment cycles by Martian-ground-based measurements of dust flux in situ, i.e., in the near-surface atmosphere of Mars. This suite includes 1) an Impact Sensor, for the measurement of the sand-grain dynamics and electrostatics, 2) a particle-counter sensor, MicroMED, for the measurement of airborne dust size distribution and number density, 3) an Electric Probe, for the measurement of the ambient electric field, and 4) a radiofrequency antenna. Besides outlining design details of DC and the characterisation of its capabilities, this presentation reviews various dust effects and dust phenomena that are anticipated to occur in the near-surface environment on Mars and that are possible

  16. Status and Future of Dust Storm Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westphal, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    In recent years, increased attention has been given to the large amounts of airborne dust derived from the deserts and desertified areas of the world and transported over scales ranging from local to global. This dust can have positive and negative impacts on human activities and the environment, including modifying cloud formation, fertilizing the ocean, degrading air quality, reducing visibility, transporting pathogens, and inducing respiratory problems. The atmospheric radiative forcing by the dust has implications for global climate change and presently is one of the largest unknowns in climate models. These uncertainties have lead to much of the funding for research into the sources, properties, and fate of atmospheric dust. As a result of advances in numerical weather prediction over the past decades and the recent climate research, we are now in a position to produce operational dust storm forecasts. International organizations and national agencies are developing programs for dust forecasting. The approaches and applications of dust detection and forecasting are as varied as the nations that are developing the models. The basic components of a dust forecasting system include atmospheric forcing, dust production, and dust microphysics. The forecasting applications include air and auto traffic safety, shipping, health, national security, climate and weather. This presentation will summarize the methods of dust storm forecasting and illustrate the various applications. The major remaining uncertainties (e.g. sources and initialization) will be discussed as well as approaches for solving those problems.

  17. Spectral characterisation of mineralogical components of dust, HULIS and winter time aerosol using multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer. A laboratory and a field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, Tibor; Utry, Noémi; Filep, Ágnes; Tátrai, Dávid; Bozóki, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol can interact with solar radiation via scattering and absorption. The back scattering fraction of incoming solar irradiation has cooling effect, while the forward scattering redistributes electromagnetic energy into the atmosphere. The photon energy transformed into thermal energy via the light absorption, therefore the absorption process heating absorbing particles and also their surroundings While scattering can be measured fairly accurately, the assessment of the radiative effect of light absorption by aerosol can only be determined with limited accuracy, in part, because of the lack of reliable instrument for absorption measurement. The photoacoustic (PA) spectroscopy is the only method that can measure light absorption by aerosol in-situ (without sampling artifacts) with high sensitivity and temporal resolution, but not widespread in its application yet. Recently, multi-wavelength photoacoustic instruments including excitation at UVs have become available and open up a new perspective on in-situ investigation of light absorption by aerosol as well as its wavelength dependency. In this study we present novel results of an in-situ study of aerosol light absorption measurement of re-dispersed mineralogical composition of dust such as illit, caolinite, quartz, rutile, limestone, hematite and HULIS aerosols using state-of-the-art multi-wavelength photoacoustic instrument (4λ-PAS). We experimentally demonstrated that the absorption feature of MAC (mass specific aerosol absorption) could be used as chemically selective parameter. We also demonstrated the results of an in-situ winter time ambient aerosol measurement. The hourly concentration of trace elements(i.e. K, Ca, Fe, and Si), gaseous pollutants (CO and NOx), as well as the size distribution of ambient aerosol were also analyzed during the measurement campaign. The levoglucosan measurement was made to confirm that the daily fluctuation of ambient AAE (absorption Angstrom Exponent) governed by the

  18. Abundances of Volatile - Bearing Species from Evolved Gas Analysis of Samples from the Rocknest Aeolian Bedform in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. D., Jr.; Franc, H. B.; Sutter, B.; McAdam, A.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) recently ran four samples from an aeolian bedform named Rocknest. SAM detected the evolution of H2O, CO2, O2, and SO2, indicative of the presence of multiple volatile bearing species (Fig 1). The Rocknest bedform is a windblown deposit selected as representative of both the windblown material in Gale crater as well as the globally-distributed martian dust. Four samples of Rocknest material were analyzed by SAM, all from the fifth scoop taken at this location. The material delivered to SAM passed through a 150 m sieve and is assumed to have been well mixed during the sample acquisition/preparation/handoff process. SAM heated the Rocknest samples to approx.835 C at a ramp rate of 35 C/min with a He carrier gas flow rate of apprx.1.5 standard cubic centimeters per minute and at an oven pressure of 30 mbar [1]. Evolved gases were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). This abstract presents the molar abundances of H2O, CO2, O2, and SO2 as well as their concentration in rocknest samples using an estimated sample mass.

  19. Aeolian sediment transport on a beach with a varying sediment supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, S.; Arens, S. M.; de Schipper, M. A.; Ranasinghe, R.

    2014-12-01

    Variability in aeolian sediment transport rates have traditionally been explain by variability in wind speed. Although it is recognised in literature that limitations in sediment supply can influence sediment transport significantly, most models that predict aeolian sediment transport attribute a dominant role to the magnitude of the wind speed. In this paper it is proposed that spatio-temporal variability of aeolian sediment transport on beaches can be dominated by variations in sediment supply rather than variations in wind speed. A new dataset containing wind speed, direction and sediment transport is collected during a 3 day field campaign at Vlugtenburg beach, The Netherlands. During the measurement campaign, aeolian sediment transport varied in time with the tide while wind speed remained constant. During low tide, measured transport was significantly larger than during high tide. Measured spatial gradients in sediment transport at the lower and upper beaches during fairly constant wind conditions suggest that aeolian sediment transport on beaches may be partly governed by the spatial variability in sediment supply, with relatively large supply in the intertidal zone when exposed and small supply on the upper beach due to sorting processes. The measurements support earlier findings that the intertidal zone can be significant source of sediment for sediment transport on beaches. Both a traditional cubic model (with respect to the wind speed) and a newly proposed linear model are fitted to the field data. The fit quality of both types of models are found to be similar.

  20. A tribute to Michael R. Raupach for contributions to aeolian fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yaping; Nickling, William; Bergametti, Gilles; Butler, Harry; Chappell, Adrian; Findlater, Paul; Gillies, John; Ishizuka, Masahide; Klose, Martina; Kok, Jasper F.; Leys, John; Lu, Hua; Marticorena, Beatrice; McTainsh, Grant; McKenna-Neuman, Cheryl; Okin, Gregory S.; Strong, Craig; Webb, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Since the pioneering work of Bagnold in the 1940s, aeolian research has grown to become an integral part of earth-system science. Many individuals have contributed to this development, and Dr. Michael R. Raupach (1950-2015) has played a pivotal role. Raupach worked intensively on wind erosion problems for about a decade (1985-1995), during which time he applied his deep knowledge of turbulence to aeolian research problems and made profound contributions with far-reaching impact. The beauty of Raupach's work lies in his clear conceptual thinking and his ability to reduce complex problems to their bare essentials. The results of his work are fundamentally important and have many practical applications. In this review we reflect on Raupach's contribution to a number of important aspects of aeolian research, summarise developments since his inspirational work and place Raupach's efforts in the context of aeolian science. We also demonstrate how Raupach's work provided a foundation for new developments in aeolian research. In this tribute, we concentrate on five areas of research: (1) drag partition theory; (2) saltation roughness length; (3) saltation bombardment; (4) threshold friction velocity and (5) the carbon cycle.

  1. Aeolian and fluvial processes in dryland regions: the need for integrated studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Munson, Seth M.; Field, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    Aeolian and fluvial processes play a fundamental role in dryland regions of the world and have important environmental and ecological consequences from local to global scales. Although both processes operate over similar spatial and temporal scales and are likely strongly coupled in many dryland systems, aeolian and fluvial processes have traditionally been studied separately, making it difficult to assess their relative importance in drylands, as well as their potential for synergistic interaction. Land degradation by accelerated wind and water erosion is a major problem throughout the world's drylands, and although recent studies suggest that these processes likely interact across broad spatial and temporal scales to amplify the transport of soil resources from and within drylands, many researchers and land managers continue to view them as separate and unrelated processes. Here, we illustrate how aeolian and fluvial sediment transport is coupled at multiple spatial and temporal scales and highlight the need for these interrelated processes to be studied from a more integrated perspective that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Special attention is given to how the growing threat of climate change and land-use disturbance will influence linkages between aeolian and fluvial processes in the future. We also present emerging directions for interdisciplinary needs within the aeolian and fluvial research communities that call for better integration across a broad range of traditional disciplines such as ecology, biogeochemistry, agronomy, and soil conservation.

  2. Sand transport by wind, erosion and deposition and the origin of aeolian bedforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran Vinent, Orencio

    2014-05-01

    Aeolian processes involve the wind action on a sedimentary substrate, namely erosion, sand transport and deposition. They are responsible for the emergence of aeolian dunes and ripples. Here, we discuss the physics of aeolian sediment transport from a physical point of view. Relevant time and length scales associated to turbulent wind fluctuations are summarized using aerodynamic theory. At the microscopic scale, the main forces acting on the grains are detailed. Sand transport is then studied using two phase numerical simulations based on a discrete element method for particles coupled to a continuum Reynolds averaged description of hydrodynamics. We then introduce the concepts - e.g. saturated flux, saturation length - and the relevant framework for the development of a continuum (macroscopic) quantitative description of transport at the core of our current understanding of aeolian dunes formation. At smaller scales, aeolian ripples arise from the interaction of sediment transport and topography. At larger scales, the nonlinear nature of the interaction between dunes leads to the formation of dune fields.

  3. Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: Magnitude, mechanisms and its implications for the carbon cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion is an important component of the global carbon cycle. However, little attention has been given to the role of aeolian processes in influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) flux and the release of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon-dioxide (CO2), to the atmosphere. Understanding the magnitu...

  4. Dust-regulated galaxy formation and evolution: a new chemodynamical model with live dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-05-01

    Interstellar dust plays decisive roles in the conversion of neutral to molecular hydrogen (H2), the thermodynamical evolution of interstellar medium (ISM), and the modification of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies. These important roles of dust have not been self-consistently included in previous numerical simulations of galaxy formation and evolution. We have therefore developed a new model by which one can investigate whether and how galaxy formation and evolution can be influenced by dust-related physical processes such as photoelectric heating, H2 formation on dust, and stellar radiation pressure on dust in detail. A novel point of the model is that different dust species in a galaxy are represented by `live dust' particles (i.e. not test particles). Therefore, dust particles in a galaxy not only interact gravitationally with all four components of the galaxy (i.e. dark matter, stars, gas, and dust) but also are grown and destroyed through physical processes of ISM. First, we describe a way to include dust-related physical processes in N-body+hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution in detail. Then, we show some preliminary results of dust-regulated galaxy evolution. The preliminary results suggest that the evolution of dust distributions driven by radiation pressure of stars is very important for the evolution of star formation rates, chemical abundances, H2 fractions, and gas distributions in galaxies.

  5. Mars Environmental Chamber for Dynamic Dust Deposition and Statics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, L. E.; Tuller, M.; Islam, M. R.; Baker, L.; Kuhlman, K.

    2004-01-01

    Recent observations of the 2001 dust storms encircling Mars confirm predictions of environmental challenges for exploration. Martian dust has been found to completely mantle the Martian surface over thousands of square kilometers and the opacity of airborne dust has been shown to be capable of modifying atmospheric temperature, radiative transfer and albedo. Planetary dust cycling dynamics are suggested to be a key factor in the evolution of the Martian surface. Long-term robotic and manned exploration of Mars will be confronted by dust deposition in periods of atmospheric calm and violent wind storms. Aeolian dust deposition recorded during the Mars Pathfinder mission was estimated to fall at rates of 20-45 microns per Earth year. Although many tools of exploration will be challenged by coating, adhesion, abrasion and possible chemical reaction of deposited, wind blown and actively disturbed Martian dust, solar cells are thought to be of primary concern. Recent modeling work of power output by gallium arsenide/germanium solar cells was validated by the Pathfinder Lander data and showed power output decreases of 0.1 to 0.5% per Martian day. A major determinant for the optimal positioning angle of solar panels employed in future missions is the angle of repose of the settling dust particles that is dependent on a variety of physical and chemical properties of the particles, the panel surface, and the environmental conditions on the Mars surface. While the effects of many of these factors are well understood qualitatively, quantitative analyses, especially under physical and chemical conditions prevailing on the Mars surface are lacking.

  6. Sedimentology of coastal chevron deposits - tsunamigenic versus aeolian origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Garcia, A.; Spiske, M.; Tsukamoto, S.; Schmidt, V.

    2012-12-01

    The genesis of v-shaped coastal chevrons is currently controversially discussed. So far, chevrons are only described regarding their morphology, but not in terms of their origin. Two possible origins of chevrons are proposed: both aeolian transport and tsunami inundation are discussed as depositing processes. We present initial results of a detailed sedimentological survey of Holocene coastal chevrons from the American and Australian west coasts. The chevrons were measured and levelled using a differential GPS system. Large scale internal structures were recorded by ground penetrating radar imaging. Trenches were dug for sampling and analyzing small scale internal structures. The sediment samples were used for the analysis of grain-size distributions, mineral composition and content of marine microorganisms. Additional samples were taken for optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and radiocarbon dating. Furthermore, we took reference samples from beaches, cliffs and rivers, which could act as potential sediment sources for the surveyed chevrons. Tsunami deposits are commonly polymodal, exhibit a grain-size decrease and tend to show better sorting in landward direction. Such trends are not present in the surveyed chevrons. Most samples are well to moderately well sorted and unimodal. The OSL ages decrease in transport direction and indicate a long term generation process, such as dune migration, rather than a short term event like a tsunami. This fact is additionally underlined by land snails found in different stratigraphic levels within the Australian chevrons. Furthermore, the occurrence of intercalated soil horizons implies a change of stable and active migration phases. The initial results of this study point out to an aoelian origin of coastal chevrons and do not support the previously supposed thesis of a tsunamigenic origin.

  7. Erupted cumulate fragments in rhyolites from Lipari (Aeolian Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, Francesca; Ellis, Ben S.; Bachmann, Olivier; Lucchi, Federico; Tranne, Claudio A.; Agostini, Samuele; Dallai, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Over the last ~267 ky, the island of Lipari has erupted magmas ranging in compositions from basaltic andesites to rhyolites, with a notable compositional gap in the dacite field. Bulk geochemical and isotopic compositions of the volcanic succession, in conjunction with major and trace elemental compositions of minerals, indicate that the rhyolites were dominantly generated via crystal fractionation processes, with subordinate assimilation. Radiogenic (Sr, Nd, and Pb) and stable (O) isotopes independently suggest ≤30 % of crustal contamination with the majority of it occurring in mafic compositions, likely relatively deep in the system. Within the rhyolites, crystal-rich, K2O-rich enclaves are common. In contrast to previous interpretations, we suggest that these enclaves represent partial melting, remobilization and eruption of cumulate fragments left-over from rhyolite melt extraction. Cumulate melting and remobilization is supported by the presence of (1) resorbed, low-temperature minerals (biotite and sanidine), providing the potassic signature to these clasts, (2) reacted Fo-rich olivine, marking the presence of mafic recharge, (3) An38-21 plagioclase, filling the gap in feldspar composition between the andesites and the rhyolites and (4) strong enrichment in Sr and Ba in plagioclase and sanidine, suggesting crystallization from a locally enriched melt. Based on Sr-melt partitioning, the high-Sr plagioclase would require ~2300 ppm Sr in the melt, a value far in excess of Sr contents in Lipari and Vulcano magmas (50-1532 ppm) but consistent with melting of a feldspar-rich cumulate. Due to the presence of similar crystal-rich enclaves within the rhyolites from Vulcano, we propose that the eruption of remobilized cumulates associated with high-SiO2 rhyolites may be a common process at the Aeolian volcanoes, as already attested for a variety of volcanic systems around the world.

  8. Aeolian dunes as ground truth for atmospheric modeling on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayward, R.K.; Titus, T.N.; Michaels, T.I.; Fenton, L.K.; Colaprete, A.; Christensen, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Martian aeolian dunes preserve a record of atmosphere/surface interaction on a variety of scales, serving as ground truth for both Global Climate Models (GCMs) and mesoscale climate models, such as the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). We hypothesize that the location of dune fields, expressed globally by geographic distribution and locally by dune centroid azimuth (DCA), may record the long-term integration of atmospheric activity across a broad area, preserving GCM-scale atmospheric trends. In contrast, individual dune morphology, as expressed in slipface orientation (SF), may be more sensitive to localized variations in circulation, preserving topographically controlled mesoscale trends. We test this hypothesis by comparing the geographic distribution, DCA, and SF of dunes with output from the Ames Mars GCM and, at a local study site, with output from MRAMS. When compared to the GCM: 1) dunes generally lie adjacent to areas with strongest winds, 2) DCA agrees fairly well with GCM modeled wind directions in smooth-floored craters, and 3) SF does not agree well with GCM modeled wind directions. When compared to MRAMS modeled winds at our study site: 1) DCA generally coincides with the part of the crater where modeled mean winds are weak, and 2) SFs are consistent with some weak, topographically influenced modeled winds. We conclude that: 1) geographic distribution may be valuable as ground truth for GCMs, 2) DCA may be useful as ground truth for both GCM and mesoscale models, and 3) SF may be useful as ground truth for mesoscale models. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. PREFACE: WMO/GEO Expert Meeting On An International Sand And Dust Storm Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, C.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    This volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science presents a selection of papers that were given at the WMO/GEO Expert Meeting on an International Sand and Dust Storm Warning System hosted by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center - Centro Nacional de Supercomputación in Barcelona (Spain) on 7-9 November 2007 (http://www.bsc.es/wmo). A sand and dust storm (SDS) is a meteorological phenomenon common in arid and semi-arid regions and arises when a gust front passes or when the wind force exceeds the threshold value where loose sand and dust are removed from the dry surface. After aeolian uptake, SDS reduce visibility to a few meters in and near source regions, and dust plumes are transported over distances as long as thousands of kilometres. Aeolian dust is unique among aerosol phenomena: (1) with the possible exception of sea-salt aerosol, it is globally the most abundant of all aerosol species, (2) it appears as the dominating component of atmospheric aerosol over large areas of the Earth, (3) it represents a serious hazard for life, health, property, environment and economy (occasionally reaching the grade of disaster or catastrophic event) and (4) its influence, impacts, complex interactions and feedbacks within the Earth System span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. From a political and societal point of view, the concern for SDS and the need for international cooperation were reflected after a survey conducted in 2005 by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in which more than forty WMO Member countries expressed their interest for creating or improving capacities for SDS warning advisory and assessment. In this context, recent major advances in research - including, for example, the development and implementation of advanced observing systems, the theoretical understanding of the mechanisms responsible for sand and dust storm generation and the development of global and regional dust models - represent the basis for

  10. Dust agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    John Marshall, an investigator at Ames Research Center and a principal investigator in the microgravity fluid physics program, is studying the adhesion and cohesion of particles in order to shed light on how granular systems behave. These systems include everything from giant dust clouds that form planets to tiny compressed pellets, such as the ones you swallow as tablets. This knowledge should help us control the grains, dust, and powders that we encounter or use on a daily basis. Marshall investigated electrostatic charge in microgravity on the first and second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory shuttle missions to see how grains aggregate, or stick together. With gravity's effects eliminated on orbit, Marshall found that the grains of sand that behaved ever so freely on Earth now behaved like flour. They would just glom together in clumps and were quite difficult to disperse. That led to an understanding of the prevalence of the electrostatic forces. The granules wanted to aggregate as little chains, like little hairs, and stack end to end. Some of the chains had 20 or 30 grains. This phenomenon indicated that another force, what Marshall believes to be an electrostatic dipole, was at work.(The diagram on the right emphasizes the aggregating particles in the photo on the left, taken during the USML-2 mission in 1995.)

  11. Canyon Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03682 Canyon Dust

    These dust slides are located on the wall of Thithonium Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -4.1N, Longitude 275.7E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Dust Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03677 Linear Clouds

    Dust slides are common in the dust covered region called Lycus Sulci. A large fracture is also visible in this image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 28.1N, Longitude 226.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  13. Dust collector

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.T.

    1986-10-21

    This patent describes a dust collector comprising: (a) a housing having inlet means for receiving air to be cleaned; (b) a plurality of filter units within the housing; (c) a first centrifugal fan arranged for drawing air through the units for removing dust from the air; (d) a plurality of ducts each connected to a corresponding one of the units at one end and to the first fan at the other end to provide passages for air from the units to the first fan, the ducts through a portion of their length being arranged in side-by-side relationship; (e) a second centrifugal fan for providing reverse flow of air through the ducts to the units, the second fan providing a high volume of air at low pressure; (f) a transverse duct connected to the second fan and extending transversely of the portion of the plurality of ducts and adjacent thereto: (g) a plurality of openings providing communication between the transverse duct and each of the plurality of ducts; (i) rotatable means engaging the vanes for sequentially moving the vanes between the first and second positions.

  14. Aeolian sand preserved in Silver Lake: a new signal of Holocene high stands of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Loope, Walter L.

    2005-01-01

    Aeolian sand within lake sediment from Silver Lake, Michigan can be used as a proxy for the timing of high lake levels of Lake Michigan.We demonstrate that the sand record from Silver Lake plotted as percent weight is in-phase with the elevation curve of Lake Michigan since the mid-Holocene Nipissing Phase. Because fluctuations in Lake Michigan's lake level are recorded in beach ridges, and are a response to climate change, the aeolian sand record within Silver Lake is also a proxy for climate change. It appears that increases in dune activity and lake sand are controlled by similar climatic shifts that drive fluctuations in lake level of Lake Michigan. High lake levels destabilize coastal bluffs that drive dune sand instability, and along with greater wintertime storminess, increase niveo-aeolian transport of sand across lake ice. The sand is introduced into the lake each spring as the ice cover melts.

  15. Vegetation and substrate properties of aeolian dune fields in the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes vegetation and substrate properties of aeolian landscapes in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Arizona, in Grand Canyon National Park. Characterizing these parameters provides a basis from which to assess future changes in this ecosystem, including the spread of nonnative plant species. Differences are apparent between aeolian dune fields that are downwind of where modern controlled flooding deposits new sandbars (modern-fluvial-sourced dune fields) and those that have received little or no new windblown sand since river regulation began in the 1960s (relict-fluvial-sourced dune fields). The most substantial difference between modern- and relict-fluvial-sourced aeolian dune fields is the greater abundance of biologic soil crust in relict dune fields. These findings can be used with similar investigations in other geomorphic settings in Grand Canyon and elsewhere in the Colorado River corridor to evaluate the health of the Colorado River ecosystem over time.

  16. 10 years of aeolian geomorphology at the EGU: past achievements and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baas, Andreas C. W.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Claudin, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    On this tenth anniversary of the Aeolian Processes & Landforms session at the EGU the original conveners review and reflect on the recent achievements and expansion in aeolian geomorphological research, focussing on advances in our understanding of sand transport processes, dune development and dynamics, and the mechanisms and scalings involved. This talk will highlight the variety and impact of the dramatic increase in the extent and interest of research on aeolian processes and landforms in the last ten years, including the increasingly strong community presence at international meetings, the diversity and extent of collaborations across subject boundaries, and the application of new measurement technologies and mathematical approaches. We conclude with a forward-looking prospectus of exciting future challenges and open research questions.

  17. Sand ripple dynamics in the case of out-of-equilibrium aeolian regimes.

    PubMed

    Misbah, C; Valance, A

    2003-12-01

    From a phenomenological hydrodynamical model, we analyze the aeolian sand ripple evolution in an out-of-equilibrium aeolian regime where erosion exceeds accretion (and vice versa). We find, in particular, that the ripple structure can be destroyed in favor of a flat sand bed. In the ripple regime we report on a new class of generic dynamics described by the Benney equation. This equation reveals either order or disorder depending on whether wave dispersion is strong or weak. In both cases, the average wavelength of the pattern is fixed in time. This markedly contrasts with the regime of equilibrium aeolian regime -reached when erosion balances deposition- where ripples undergo a coarsening process at long time (i.e., the wavelength increases indefinitely with time). PMID:15007749

  18. A 1400-year terrigenous dust record on a coral island in South China Sea

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Sun, Liguang; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Yuhan; Huang, Wen; Yang, Chengyun; Wang, Yuhong; Huang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    We present analyses of a lacustrine sediment core (DY6) on Dongdao Island, which provides high-resolution paleoclimate records for the South China Sea (SCS). Results of element analyses indicate that the concentrations of Ti and Al in DY6 are much higher than the background on the island. Morphological characteristics of acidic insoluble particles are similar to aeolian in East China. Sr and Nd isotope compositions in these particles are consistent with those in Asian aeolian dust. We inferred that dust in DY6 may have been transported by East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM) from inland Asia. The continuous dust records for the past 1400 years in North SCS were presented based on the measured Ti flux, which revealed an opposite trend to the variations in the EAWM for the past 50 years. A comparison of wind fields between cold and warm years shows that north surface wind in southeast China was stronger in cold years. However, 850 hPa wind vector along the east coast of China, the key level of wind for long-distance dust transmission, weakened in cold years. We conclude that differences in the EAWM records can be attributed to the 850 hPa wind pattern in different areas. PMID:24845372

  19. Halo dust detection around NGC 891

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchio, M.; Bianchi, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Schneider, R.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Observations of edge-on galaxies allow us to investigate the vertical extent and properties of dust, gas and stellar distributions. NGC 891 has been studied for decades and represents one of the best studied cases of an edge-on galaxy. Aims: We use deep Photoconductor Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) data together with Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) data to study the vertical extent of dust emission around NGC 891. We also test for the presence of a more extended, thick dust component. Methods: By performing a convolution of an intrinsic vertical profile emission with each instrument point spread function (PSF) and comparing it with observations we derived the scale height of a thin and thick dust-disc component. Results: The emission is best fit with the sum of a thin and a thick dust component for all wavelengths considered. The scale height of both dust components shows a gradient goes from 70 μm to 250 μm. This could be due either to a drop in dust heating (and thus the dust's temperature) with the distance from the plane, or to a sizable contribution (~15-80%) of an unresolved thin disc of hotter dust to the observed surface brightness at shorter wavelengths. The scale height of the thick dust component, using observations from 70 μm to 250 μm, has been estimated at (1.44 ± 0.12) kpc, which is consistent with previous estimates (i.e. extinction and scattering in optical bands and mid-infrared (MIR) emission). The amount of dust mass at distances greater than ~2 kpc from the midplane represents 2-3.3% of the total galactic dust mass, and the abundance of small grains relative to large grains is almost halved compared to levels in the midplane. Conclusions: The paucity of small grains high above the midplane might indicate that dust is hit by interstellar shocks or galactic fountains and entrained together with gas. The halo dust component is

  20. Dust emissions and dune mobilization in the southern Kalahari: possible effects on biotic-abiotic interactions in the Earth system (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, P.; Bhattachan, A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Baddock, M.; Dintwe, K.; Okin, G. S.

    2010-12-01

    Dust emissions from terrestrial landscapes affect global biogeochemical cycles, climate, and human health. Most sources of atmospheric dust are located in the northern hemisphere, while the southern hemisphere remains relatively dust free. The activation of new sources of dust emission is typically associated either with losses/reductions in vegetation cover or with the drying of lakes and rivers. Here we show how, by mobilizing ancient aeolian deposits at the southern and south-western edges of the Kalahari’s sand sea, the loss of vegetation cover resulting from overgrazing and rangeland degradation may activate important new dust sources in the southern hemisphere. We investigate the implications of these dust emissions on local soil nutrient availability, the stability and resilience of the stabilizing vegetation, and the fertilization of the Southern Ocean.

  1. Interstellar Dust: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor); Allamandola, Louis J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A coherent picture of the dust composition and its physical characteristics in the various phases of the interstellar medium was the central theme. Topics addressed included: dust in diffuse interstellar medium; overidentified infrared emission features; dust in dense clouds; dust in galaxies; optical properties of dust grains; interstellar dust models; interstellar dust and the solar system; dust formation and destruction; UV, visible, and IR observations of interstellar extinction; and quantum-statistical calculations of IR emission from highly vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules.

  2. Ice nucleation by soil dust compared to desert dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Steinke, I.; Ullrich, R.; Höhler, K.; Schiebel, T.; Hoose, C.; Funk, R.

    2015-12-01

    A minor fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles, so-called ice-nucleating particles (INPs), initiates the formation of the ice phase in tropospheric clouds and thereby markedly influences the Earth's weather and climate systems. Whether an aerosol particle acts as an INP depends on its size, morphology and chemical compositions. The INP fraction of certain aerosol types also strongly depends on the temperature and the relative humidity. Because both desert dust and soil dust aerosols typically comprise a variety of different particles, it is difficult to assess and predict their contribution to the atmospheric INP abundance. This requires both accurate modelling of the sources and atmospheric distribution of atmospheric dust components and detailed investigations of their ice nucleation activities. The latter can be achieved in laboratory experiments and parameterized for use in weather and climate models as a function of temperature and particle surface area, a parameter called ice-nucleation active site (INAS) density. Concerning ice nucleation activity studies, the soil dust is of particular interest because it contains a significant fraction of organics and biological components, both with the potential for contributing to the atmospheric INP abundance at relatively high temperatures compared to mineral components. First laboratory ice nucleation experiments with a few soil dust samples indicated their INP fraction to be comparable or slightly enhanced to that of desert dust. We have used the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud simulation chamber to study the immersion freezing ability of four different arable soil dusts, sampled in Germany, China and Argentina. For temperatures higher than about -20°C, we found the INP fraction of aerosols generated from these samples by a dry dispersion technique to be significantly higher compared to various desert dust aerosols also investigated in AIDA experiments. In this contribution, we

  3. Aeolian cliff-top deposits and buried soils in the White River Badlands, South Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawling, J. E., III; Fredlund, G.G.; Mahan, S.

    2003-01-01

    Aeolian deposits in the North American Great Plains are important sources of Holocene palaeo-environmental records. Although there are extensive studies on loess and dune records in the region, little is known about records in aeolian cliff-top deposits. These are common on table (mesa) edges in the White River Badlands. These sediments typically have loam and sandy-loam textures with dominantly very fine sand, 0.5-1% organic carbon and 0.5-5% CaCO3. Some of these aeolian deposits are atypically coarse and contain granules and fine pebbles. Buried soils within these deposits are weakly developed with A-C and A-AC-C profiles. Beneath these are buried soils with varying degrees of pedogenic development formed in fluvial, aeolian or colluvial deposits. Thickness and number of buried soils vary. However, late-Holocene soils from several localities have ages of approximately 1300, 2500 and 3700 14C yrs BP. The 1300 14C yr BP soil is cumulic, with a thicker and lighter A horizon. Soils beneath the cliff-top deposits are early-Holocene (typically 7900 but as old as 10000 14C yrs BP) at higher elevation (???950 m) tables, and late-Holocene (2900 14C yrs BP) at lower (???830 m) tables. These age estimates are based on total organic matter 14C ages from the top 5 cm of buried soils, and agreement is good between an infrared stimulated luminescence age and bracketing 14C ages. Our studies show that cliff-top aeolian deposits have a history similar to that of other aeolian deposits on the Great Plains, and they are another source of palaeoenvironmental data.

  4. Active aeolian processes on Mars: A regional study in Arabia and Meridiani Terrae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D.A.; Fenton, L.K.; Geissler, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    We present evidence of widespread aeolian activity in the Arabia Terra/Meridiani region (Mars), where different kinds of aeolian modifications have been detected and classified. Passing from the regional to the local scale, we describe one particular dune field in Meridiani Planum, where two ripple populations are distinguished by means of different migration rates. Moreover, a consistent change in the ripple pattern is accompanied by significant dune advancement (between 0.4-1 meter in one Martian year) that is locally triggered by large avalanche features. This suggests that dune advancement may be common throughout the Martian tropics. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. "Dust Devils": Gardening Agents on the Surface of Mars, and Hidden Hazards to Human Exploration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Smith, P.; White, B.; Farrell, W.

    1999-01-01

    Dust devils are familiar sites in the and regions of the world: they can produce quite spectacular displays of dust lofting when the vortices scavenge very loose dust from a dry lake bed or from recently disturbed agricultural fields. If one were to arrive at the center of an arid region, take one photograph, or even a series of photographs over a period of several days, then return the images for laboratory analysis, it would be most likely concluded that the region was inactive from an aeolian perspective. No images of general dust movement were obtained, nor were any dust devils "caught on camera" owing to their ephemeral and unpredictable appearance, and the fact that there was deceptively little residue of their actions. If, however, a camera were to take a 360 degree continuous recording over a period of a year, and the film were then to be shown at high speed over a period a several minutes, the impression might be that of a region ravaged by air vorticity and dust movement. Extrapolate this over geological time, and it is possible to visualize dust devils as prime aeolian agents, rather than insignificant vagaries of nature, On Mars, the thin atmosphere permits the surface of the planet to be heated but it does not itself retain heat with the capacity of the earth's atmosphere. This gives rise to greater thermal instability near the surface of Mars as "warm" air pockets diapiritically inject themselves into higher atmospheric layers. Resulting boundary-layer vorticity on Mars might therefore be expected to produce dust devils in abundance, if only seasonally. The spectacular images of dust devils obtained by Pathfinder within its brief functional period on the planet testify to the probability of highly frequent surface vorticity in light of the above reasoning about observational probability. Notably, the Pathfinder devils appeared to be at least a kilometer in height. There are several consequences for the geology of Mars, and for human exploration, if

  6. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  7. Evaluation of noise level and site response at Mt. Etna volcano and Aeolian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D Amico, S.; Giampiccolo, E.; Maiolino, V.; Patanè, D.; Ursino, A.

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this work was to test the quality of the sites where the stations of the INGV-CT seismic network are installed. This because most of the installations will be soon improved with new broad-band sensors, which require a low level of background noise. Therefore, we investigated the noise level and estimated the site response at the seismic stations deployed at Mt. Etna and at Aeolian Islands, in order to evidence possible disturbs which can be related to anthropic activity, environmental factors and/or to the local soil conditions. Noise measurements were carried out using a portable digital seismic station equipped with a 3-component, 20 s sensor. The acquisition was performed both inside the vault structures where the remote stations are located and in proximity of them, on the outcropping terrain. The noise spectra were compared with the NLNM (New Low Noise Model) and NHNM (New High Noise Model) models described by Peterson (1993). A preliminary estimate of site response at each station, by applying the Nakamura (1989) technique, was also performed. The obtained results show, for some stations, higher noise levels mainly due to volcanic tremor and/or bad soil conditions. Moreover, in several cases, vault design need to be deeply reviewed and for some installations the substitution of the sites is required. References Nakamura, Y., (1989). A method for dynamic characteristics estimation of subsurface using microtremor on the ground surface. Quarterly R of Report RTRI, 30, 25-33. Peterson, J., (1993). Observations and modelling of background seismic noise. Open File Report 93-322, U. S. Geological Survey, Albuquerque, NM.

  8. [Effect of lunar dust on humans: -lunar dust: regolith-].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yasuo; Miki, Takeo; Higashi, Toshiaki; Horie, Seichi; Tanaka, Kazunari; Mukai, Chiaki

    2010-09-01

    We reviewed the effect of lunar dust (regolith) on humans by the combination of the hazard/exposure of regolith and microgravity of the moon. With regard to the physicochemical properties of lunar dust, the hazard-related factors are its components, fibrous materials and nanoparticles. Animal exposure studies have been performed using a simulant of lunar dust, and it was speculated that the harmful effects of the simulant lies between those of crystalline silica and titanium dioxide. Fibrous materials may not have a low solubility judging from their components. The nanoparticles in lunar dust may have harmful potentials from the view of the components. As for exposure to regolith, there is a possibility that particles larger than ones in earth (1 gravity) are respirable. In microgravity, 1) the deposition of particles of less than 1 µm in diameter in the human lung did not decrease, 2) the functions of macrophages including phagocytosis were suppressed, 3) pulmonary inflammation was changed. These data on hazard/exposure and microgravity suggest that fine and ultrafine particles in regolith may have potential hazards and risks for humans. PMID:20885072

  9. Dust-climate couplings over the past 800,000 years from the EPICA Dome C ice core.

    PubMed

    Lambert, F; Delmonte, B; Petit, J R; Bigler, M; Kaufmann, P R; Hutterli, M A; Stocker, T F; Ruth, U; Steffensen, J P; Maggi, V

    2008-04-01

    Dust can affect the radiative balance of the atmosphere by absorbing or reflecting incoming solar radiation; it can also be a source of micronutrients, such as iron, to the ocean. It has been suggested that production, transport and deposition of dust is influenced by climatic changes on glacial-interglacial timescales. Here we present a high-resolution record of aeolian dust from the EPICA Dome C ice core in East Antarctica, which provides an undisturbed climate sequence over the past eight climatic cycles. We find that there is a significant correlation between dust flux and temperature records during glacial periods that is absent during interglacial periods. Our data suggest that dust flux is increasingly correlated with Antarctic temperature as the climate becomes colder. We interpret this as progressive coupling of the climates of Antarctic and lower latitudes. Limited changes in glacial-interglacial atmospheric transport time suggest that the sources and lifetime of dust are the main factors controlling the high glacial dust input. We propose that the observed approximately 25-fold increase in glacial dust flux over all eight glacial periods can be attributed to a strengthening of South American dust sources, together with a longer lifetime for atmospheric dust particles in the upper troposphere resulting from a reduced hydrological cycle during the ice ages. PMID:18385736

  10. Gully annealing by fluvially-sourced Aeolian sand: remote sensing investigations of connectivity along the Fluvial-Aeolian-hillslope continuum on the Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sankey, Joel B.; East, Amy E.; Collins, Brian D.; Caster, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Processes contributing to development of ephemeral gully channels are of great importance to landscapes worldwide, and particularly in dryland regions where soil loss and land degradation from gully erosion pose long-term, land-management problems. Whereas gully formation has been relatively well studied, much less is known of the processes that anneal gullies and impede their growth. This work investigates gully annealing by aeolian sediment, along the Colorado River downstream of Glen Canyon Dam in Glen, Marble, and Grand Canyons, Arizona, USA (Figure 1). In this segment of the Colorado River, gully erosion potentially affects the stability and preservation of archaeological sites that are located within valley margins. Gully erosion occurs as a function of ephemeral, rainfall-induced overland flow associated with intense episodes of seasonal precipitation. Measurements of sediment transport and topographic change have demonstrated that fluvial sand in some locations is transported inland and upslope by aeolian processes to areas affected by gully erosion, and aeolian sediment activity can be locally effective at counteracting gully erosion (Draut, 2012; Collins and others, 2009, 2012; Sankey and Draut, 2014). The degree to which specific locations are affected by upslope wind redistribution of sand from active channel sandbars to higher elevation valley margins is termed “connectivity”. Connectivity is controlled spatially throughout the river by (1) the presence of upwind sources of fluvial sand within the contemporary active river channel (e.g., sandbars), and (2) bio-physical barriers that include vegetation and topography that might impede aeolian sediment transport. The primary hypothesis of this work is that high degrees of connectivity lead to less gullying potential.

  11. 1.2 million years of aeolian activity in northwestern Western Australian recorded in a deep-sea core in the eastern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temmesfeld, Felix; Stuut, Jan-Berend; Bassinot, Franck; Heslop, David; De Deckker, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    There is no continuous record of aridity from the Australian continent and we are presenting here, for the first time, a record of aeolian activity for northwestern Western Australia. Our data are based on a 32m long deep-sea core taken offshore North West Cape, the northwestern tip of Western Australia. Our data rely on 2 adjacent studies: (a) a complete XRF scan of the core which provide elemental ratios which are translated into an aeolian component as well as a fluvial discharge-to-sea component. The first one relates to periods of aridity inland Australia, whereas the second one is interpreted as river discharge during periods of monsoonal activity; (b) a close examination of grain size analyses and observations of wind-blown quartz grains found in close to 600 samples taken from the core. Our results clearly show a cyclic record of alternating dry and wet periods spanning the last 1.2 million years. Our findings also indicate that monsoonal activity as well as desertification were already in place in northern Australia so long ago, and this has clear implications for the evolution of the arid zone biota, associated fire activities and geomorphological features in northern Australia.

  12. Overview of Dust Model Inter-comparison (DMIP) in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, I.

    2004-12-01

    Dust transport modeling plays an important role in understanding the recent increase of Asian Dust episodes and its impact to the regional climate system. Several dust models have been developed in several research institutes and government agencies independently since 1990s. Their numerical results either look very similar or different. Those disagreements are caused by difference in dust modules (concepts and basic mechanisms) and atmospheric models (meteorological and transport models). Therefore common understanding of performance and uncertainty of dust erosion and transport models in the Asian region becomes very important. To have a better understanding of dust model application, we proposed the dust model intercomparison under the international cooperation networks as a part of activity of ADEC (Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact) project research. Current participants are Kyusyu Univ. (Japan), Meteorological Research Institute (Japan), Hong-Kong City Univ. (China), Korean Meteorological Agency METRI (Korea), US Naval Research Laboratory (USA), Chinese Meteorological Agency (China), Institute of Atmospheric Physics (China), Insular Coastal Dynamics (Malta) and Meteorological Service of Canada (Canada). As a case study episode, we set two huge dust storms occurred in March and April 2002. Results from the dust transport model from all the participants are compiled on the same methods and examined the model characteristics against the ground and airborne measurement data. We will also examine the dust model results from the horizontal distribution at specified levels, vertical profiles, concentration at special check point and emission flux at source region, and show the important parameters for dust modeling. In this paper, we will introduce the general overview of this DMIP activity and several important conclusions from this activity.

  13. Dust deposition on the Mars Exploration Rover Panoramic Camera (Pancam) calibration targets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinch, K.M.; Sohl-Dickstein, J.; Bell, J.F., III; Johnson, J. R.; Goetz, W.; Landis, G.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Panoramic Camera (Pancam) on the Mars Exploration Rover mission has acquired in excess of 20,000 images of the Pancam calibration targets on the rovers. Analysis of this data set allows estimates of the rate of deposition and removal of aeolian dust on both rovers. During the first 150-170 sols there was gradual dust accumulation on the rovers but no evidence for dust removal. After that time there is ample evidence for both dust removal and dust deposition on both rover decks. We analyze data from early in both rover missions using a diffusive reflectance mixing model. Assuming a dust settling rate proportional to the atmospheric optical depth, we derive spectra of optically thick layers of airfall dust that are consistent with spectra from dusty regions on the Martian surface. Airfall dust reflectance at the Opportunity site appears greater than at the Spirit site, consistent with other observations. We estimate the optical depth of dust deposited on the Spirit calibration target by sol 150 to be 0.44 ?? 0.13. For Opportunity the value was 0.39 ?? 0.12. Assuming 80% pore space, we estimate that the dust layer grew at a rate of one grain diameter per ???100 sols on the Spirit calibration target. On Opportunity the rate was one grain diameter per ???125 sols. These numbers are consistent with dust deposition rates observed by Mars Pathfinder taking into account the lower atmospheric dust optical depth during the Mars Pathfinder mission. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Dust feed mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Milliman, Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

  15. Modeling Europa's Dust Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, B.; Kempf, S.; Schmidt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of Europa maintaining a probably sporadic water vapor plume constitutes a huge scientific opportunity for NASA's upcoming mission to this Galilean moon. Measuring the properties of material emerging from interior sources offers a unique chance to understand conditions at Europa's subsurface ocean. Exploiting results obtained for the Enceladus plume, we adjust the ejection model by Schmidt et al. [2008] to the conditions at Europa. In this way, we estimate properties of a possible, yet unobserved dust component of the Europa plume. For a size-dependent speed distribution of emerging ice particles we use the model from Kempf et al. [2010] for grain dynamics, modified to run simulations of plumes on Europa. Specifically, we model emission from the two plume locations determined from observations by Roth et al. [2014] and also from other locations chosen at the closest approach of low-altitude flybys investigated in the Europa Clipper study. This allows us to estimate expected fluxes of ice grains on the spacecraft. We then explore the parameter space of Europa dust plumes with regard to particle speed distribution parameters, plume location, and spacecraft flyby elevation. Each parameter set results in a 3-dimensional particle density structure through which we simulate flybys, and a map of particle fallback ('snowfall') on the surface of Europa. Due to the moon's high escape speed, a Europa plume will eject few to no particles that can escape its gravity, which has several further consequences: (i) For given ejection velocity a Europa plume will have a smaller scale height, with a higher particle number densities than the plume on Enceladus, (ii) plume particles will not feed the diffuse Galilean dust ring, (iii) the snowfall pattern on the surface will be more localized about the plume location, and will not induce a global m = 2 pattern as seen on Enceladus, and (iv) safely observing an active plume will require low altitude flybys, preferably at 50

  16. Electric Dust Devils and Dust Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, N. O.; Yana, C.

    2004-12-01

    Electrical fields measurements in terrestrial dust devils show that they maintain tremendous charge separation and that their electric fields exceeds the breakdown potential (~10 kV/m) of the Martian atmosphere (Farrell et al., 2002, 2003; Krauss et al., 2002; Renno et al., 2004). Typical Martian dust devils are be up to 100 times larger and much stronger than the small terrestrial analogues. Martian dust devils have higher dust content and may produce even stronger electrical fields. Indeed, the dust devils observed in the Pathfinder images have about 700 times the dust content of the local background atmosphere (Metzger et al., 1999). Thus, strong charge separations and electric-field breakdown are likely to occur on Martian dust devils and dust storms. Our theory (Renno et al., 2004) and laboratory experiments in a Mars chamber shows that collisions between sand and dust particles produce non-thermal microwave radiation. The non-thermal microwave emission allows not only the indirect detection of electric activity but also the determination of the physical properties of Martian sand and dust by remote sensing. Besides being geologically important, electrically charged Martian dust devils and dust storms are potential hazards to Landers and will be dangerous to future astronauts exploring its surface. Indeed, the design of adequate mechanical and electrical systems for these Landers cannot progress effectively without a better understanding of Martian dust devils and dust storms. Moreover, ancillary phenomena associated with electrically charged vortices can ionize atmospheric gases and might have important implications for atmosphere chemistry and even habitability.

  17. Detection and Preliminary Assessment of Source Areas of the 15 December 2003 Dust Storm in the Chihuahuan Desert, Southwestern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Rivera, N. I.; Gill, T. E.; Bleiweiss, M. P.; Hand, J. L.; Dominguez A., M.; Ruiz, A.; Perez, A. E.; Emmert, S. P.; Lee, J. A.; Mulligan, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    Dust storms can disperse large quantities of fine aeolian sediment regionally and even globally. These extreme aerosol events frequently originate with multiple dust plumes developing simultaneously over a large region. Dust outbreaks originating in the southwestern USA and northern Mexico seasonally transport aerosols long distances across continental North America. However, dust sources in this region are not well characterized. Remote sensing data can be used to assess the frequency and magnitude of these dust events for potential impacts on climate, visibility and health-related air quality issues. We applied a technique that consists of examining visible spectral bands, as well as difference "split-window" images for far-infrared (far-IR) channels using a variety of satellite imagery (NOAA/GOES/GVAR/Imager, NOAA/POES/AVHRR and NASA/TERRA/MODIS). This technique was used to locate the origin of multiple dust plumes in the Chihuahuan Desert region of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico during a significant dust event that occurred on December 15, 2003. After dust sources were identified, we superimposed their locations on Landsat-7 images to assess surface features of these aeolian "hotspots," and visited many of these sites to determine the geomorphology, soil/sediment properties, and land use associated with these dust sources. Dust plumes in the Chihuahuan Desert on 15 December 2003 emanated from several land types, including saline playas, bare desert soils, disturbed/abandoned lands, and agricultural areas. In Mexico, sources included several sites along the edges of pluvial Lake Palomas near the contacts between sand sheets and lacustrine sediments, small dry lake beds (lagunas secas) and several sites in the Casas Grandes river basin in Chihuahua. In the United States, dust emission hotspots included dry, unvegetated saline playas (the White Sands near the E and SE edges of Lake Lucero, New Mexico, and the northern Salt Basin west of the

  18. Observed high aerosol loading during dust events in Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Khem; Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Jha, Arvind K.; Singh, Nahar; Soni, Daya; Gupta, Prabhat K.

    2012-07-01

    The present study reports aerosol mass loadings and their chemical property during integrated campaign for aerosol and radiation budget (ICARB) in the month of March to May 2006, at NPL, New Delhi. The Thar Desert in Rajasthan is located on the western end of India and south-west of Delhi is hot and arid region with intense aeolian activity and transport of aerosol by the prevailing southwest-west summer wind. Several dust episodes were observed in Delhi during summer 2006. The dust storm peaked on 29th April, 1 ^{st} and 8 ^{th} May 2006, with very high suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations 1986μg/m ^{3}, 1735μg/m ^{3} and 1511μg/m ^{3}, respectively. The average concentration of SPM in the month of March, April and May 2006 was 338 μg/m ^{3}, 698 μg/m ^{3} and 732 μg/m ^{3}, respectively. The SPM filter samples were analysed for water-soluble major cations (Na ^{+}, Ca ^{2+}, K ^{+}, and Mg ^{2+}) by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Na ^{+} and Ca ^{2+} contribute about 54% and 20%, respectively of the total identified cation mass, indicating that they were most abundant cations. Strong correlations between Na ^{+}, Ca ^{2+}, K ^{+}, and Mg ^{2+} suggest their soil and dust origin. Such a high particle concentration observed during dust events may also be useful for study the effect of these aerosols on communication medium.

  19. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth’s dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics. PMID:27444949

  20. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth’s dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics.

  1. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth's dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics. PMID:27444949

  2. Atmospheric stability and diurnal patterns of aeolian saltation on the Llano Estacado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aeolian transport is driven by aerodynamic surface stress imposed by turbulent winds in the Earth’s atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). ABL regime is influenced by stratification, which can either enhance or suppress production of turbulence by shear associated with the vertical gradient of streamwise...

  3. Trickle-down boundary conditions in aeolian dune-field pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2015-12-01

    One the one hand, wind-blown dune-field patterns emerge within the overarching boundary conditions of climate, tectonics and eustasy implying the presence of these signals in the aeolian geomorphic and stratigraphic record. On the other hand, dune-field patterns are a poster-child of self-organization, in which autogenic processes give rise to patterned landscapes despite remarkable differences in the geologic setting (i.e., Earth, Mars and Titan). How important are climate, tectonics and eustasy in aeolian dune field pattern formation? Here we develop the hypothesis that, in terms of pattern development, dune fields evolve largely independent of the direct influence of 'system-scale' boundary conditions, such as climate, tectonics and eustasy. Rather, these boundary conditions set the stage for smaller-scale, faster-evolving 'event-scale' boundary conditions. This 'trickle-down' effect, in which system-scale boundary conditions indirectly influence the event scale boundary conditions provides the uniqueness and richness of dune-field patterned landscapes. The trickle-down effect means that the architecture of the stratigraphic record of dune-field pattern formation archives boundary conditions, which are spatially and temporally removed from the overarching geologic setting. In contrast, the presence of an aeolian stratigraphic record itself, reflects changes in system-scale boundary conditions that drive accumulation and preservation of aeolian strata.

  4. A modeling study of aeolian erosion enhanced by surface wind confluences over Mexico City

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using erosion and air quality models, a study on the effect of PM10 episodes in Mexico City is presented. The important contribution of Aeolian erosion on urban air quality, its genesis, morphology, location and regional implications such as the role played by surface confluences, the dry Lake of T...

  5. Aeolian nutrient fluxes following wildfire in sagebrush steppe: Implications for soil carbon storage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hasselquist, N.J.; Germino, M.J.; Sankey, J.B.; Ingram, L.J.; Glenn, N.F.

    2011-01-01

    Pulses of aeolian transport following fire can profoundly affect the biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in semi-arid and arid ecosystems. Our objective was to determine horizontal nutrient fluxes during an episodic pulse of aeolian transport that occurred following a wildfire in a semi-arid sagebrush steppe ecosystem in southern Idaho, USA. We also examined how temporal trends in nutrient fluxes were affected by changes in particle sizes of eroded mass as well as nutrient concentrations associated with different particle size classes. In the burned area, total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) fluxes were as high as 235 g C m????'1 d????'1 and 19 g N m????'1 d????'1 during the first few months following fire, whereas C and N fluxes were negligible in an adjacent unburned area throughout the study. Temporal variation in C and N fluxes following fire was largely attributable to the redistribution of saltation-sized particles. Total N and organic C concentrations in the soil surface were significantly lower in the burned relative to the unburned area one year after fire. Our results show how an episodic pulse of aeolian transport following fire can affect the spatial distribution of soil C and N, which, in turn, can have important implications for soil C storage. These findings demonstrate how an ecological disturbance can exacerbate a geomorphic process and highlight the need for further research to better understand the role aeolian transport plays in the biogeochemical cycling of C and N in recently burned landscapes. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  6. Feedbacks between aeolian processes, vegetation productivity, and nutrient flux in deserts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind is a key abiotic factor that influences the dynamics of arid and semiarid systems. A series of experiments and models will be presented that show the important feedbacks that exist between Aeolian processes and biotic process in deserts. Wind impacts vegetation by both changing the composition ...

  7. A tribute to Michael R. Raupach for contributions to aeolian fluid dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since the early work of Bagnold in the 1940s, aeolian research has grown to become a major integral part of earth-system studies. Many individuals have contributed to this development, and Dr. Michael R. Raupach (MR2, 1950 – 2015) was one of the most outstanding. MR2 worked for about a decade (1985 ...

  8. Atmospheric stability and diurnal patterns of aeolian saltation on the Llano Estacado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanigan, David; Stout, John; Anderson, William

    2016-06-01

    Aeolian transport is driven by aerodynamic surface stress imposed by turbulent winds in the Earth's atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). ABL regime is influenced by stratification, which can either enhance or suppress production of turbulence by shear associated with the vertical gradient of streamwise velocity. During the day and night, surface heat fluxes induce a negative (unstable) and positive (stable) vertical gradient of potential temperature, respectively, which modifies the role of buoyancy in turbulence production. During the brief morning and evening transition periods, the vertical gradient of potential temperature vanishes (neutral stratification). The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory describes how the vertical gradient of streamwise velocity varies with stratification. Simultaneous field measurement of wind speed and aeolian activity were obtained over a 218-day period on a bare, sandy surface on the high plains of the Llano Estacado region of west Texas. Wind speed was measured at a height of 2 m with a propeller-type anemometer and aeolian activity was measured at the surface with a piezoelectric saltation sensor. We have used the wind speed measurements within the framework of the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to estimate "typical" shear velocity, u∗ , of the ABL as stratification is varied (characterized with the stability parameter). This approach results in a color flood contour of u∗ against time of day and stability parameter: the procedure demonstrates that aeolian activity is most likely to occur during the day, when buoyancy acts in conjunction with mechanical shear to increase u∗ .

  9. A Fuzzy Cognitive Model of aeolian instability across the South Texas Sandsheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houser, C.; Bishop, M. P.; Barrineau, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Characterization of aeolian systems is complicated by rapidly changing surface-process regimes, spatio-temporal scale dependencies, and subjective interpretation of imagery and spatial data. This paper describes the development and application of analytical reasoning to quantify instability of an aeolian environment using scale-dependent information coupled with conceptual knowledge of process and feedback mechanisms. Specifically, a simple Fuzzy Cognitive Model (FCM) for aeolian landscape instability was developed that represents conceptual knowledge of key biophysical processes and feedbacks. Model inputs include satellite-derived surface biophysical and geomorphometric parameters. FCMs are a knowledge-based Artificial Intelligence (AI) technique that merges fuzzy logic and neural computing in which knowledge or concepts are structured as a web of relationships that is similar to both human reasoning and the human decision-making process. Given simple process-form relationships, the analytical reasoning model is able to map the influence of land management practices and the geomorphology of the inherited surface on aeolian instability within the South Texas Sandsheet. Results suggest that FCMs can be used to formalize process-form relationships and information integration analogous to human cognition with future iterations accounting for the spatial interactions and temporal lags across the sand sheets.

  10. On the large-scale impact of arid dust on precipitation chemistry of the continental northern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sequeira, Ronald

    Airborne calcium is an indicator of a major alkaline component, calcite, when associated with soil-derived dust. Hence, a study of the distribution of calcium in aerosol and precipitation is as important as sulphate, and ammonium nitrate for a balanced understanding of the distribution of background acidity in precipitation. The large-scale distribution of the concentration of dissolved continental calcium in north hemispheric precipitation has been examined critically in relation to the geographical distribution of the arid zones and loessial belts—inside and outside the desert margins. Some unfamiliar but potential aeolian impacts are also discussed. The two distributions are closely tied, one long-distance transports are explained. Available data point to the vast arid region to the east and north of the Caspian Sea in the southwestern part of the Asian C.I.S. (Commonwealth of Independent States) to be housing the most energetic and frequent dust-producers in the Northern Hemisphere. Some of the weakest and less frequent sources seem to lie in the region of southwestern U.S.A. Intermediate positions are occupied by the central Asian deserts and the vast Saharan belt. Some large-scale implications of these data to neutralization of precipitation acidity are suggested. It is apparent that the usual distribution of calcium concentration is bracketed by the range 0.5-8 mg ℓ -1 with anomalous maxima in individual samples exceeding 10 mgℓ -1, sometimes reaching a little over 40 mg ℓ -1. Such high maxima are attributed mainly to calcareous silt particles of loessial origin. The sudden temporal decrease in the annual average calcium concentration from 1.4 ppm to ˜ 0.5 ppm between the mid-1950s to the early 1980s is almost identical for the eastern U.S.A. and northern Europe. Temporal decrease in soil aridity and/or identical recent changes in precipitation sampling strategy in the U.S.A. and Scadinavia may have caused this change.

  11. Global potential of dust devil occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemmett-Smith, Bradley; Marsham, John; Knippertz, Peter; Gilkeson, Carl

    2014-05-01

    Mineral dust is a key constituent in the climate system. Airborne mineral dust forms the largest component of the global aerosol budget by mass and subsequently affects climate, weather and biogeochemical processes. There remains large uncertainty in the quantitative estimates of the dust cycle. Dry boundary-layer convection serves as an effective mechanism for dust uplift, typically through a combination of rotating dust devils and non-rotating larger and longer-lived convective plumes. These microscale dry-convective processes occur over length scales of several hundred metres or less. They are difficult to observe and model, and therefore their contribution to the global dust budget is highly uncertain. Using an analytical approach to extrapolate limited observations, Koch and Renno (2006) suggest that dust devils and plumes could contribute as much as 35%. Here, we use a new method for quantifying the potential of dust devil occurrence to provide an alternative perspective on this estimate. Observations have shown that dust devil and convective plume occurrence is favoured in hot arid regions under relatively weak background winds, large ground-to-air temperature gradients and deep dry convection. By applying such known constraints to operational analyses from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), we provide, to the best of the authors' knowledge, the first hourly estimates of dust devil occurrence including an analysis of sensitivity to chosen threshold uplift. The results show the expected diurnal variation and allow an examination of the seasonal cycle and day-to-day variations in the conditions required for dust devil formation. They confirm that desert regions are expected to have by far the highest frequency of dry convective vortices, with winds capable of dust uplift. This approach is used to test the findings of Koch and Renno (2006). Koch J., Renno N. (2006). The role of convective plumes and vortices on the global aerosol

  12. 30 CFR 27.40 - Test to determine resistance to dust.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test to determine resistance to dust. 27.40... determine resistance to dust. Components, subassemblies, or assemblies, the normal functioning of which might be affected by dust, such as coal or rock dust, shall be tested in an atmosphere containing...

  13. Geochemical characterization of a Holocene aeolian profile in the Zhongba area (southern Tibet, China) and its paleoclimatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tuoyu; Wu, Yongqiu; Du, Shisong; Huang, Wenmin; Hao, Chengzhi; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Mei; Fu, Tianyang

    2016-03-01

    The Zhongba area lies in the valley of the Maquan River in southern Tibet, where there are both strong modern aeolian activities and ancient aeolian sand sediments. A Holocene aeolian sand and paleosol profile in the Zhongba area was selected for study and termed (Zhuzhu (ZZ) profile). The chronology of the ZZ profile was established by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C dating. Based on the grain size and geochemical elements of the ZZ profile, the geochemical characterization was analyzed, the Holocene aeolian activity processes were reconstructed in the study area, and the paleoclimatic implications were discussed. The major elements and the chemical indicators are highly correlated with different grain-sizes in the ZZ profile. The evolutionary sequence of the aeolian activities and the paleoclimate in Holocene reveal four stages: before 7.3 ka BP, the climate was warm and wet with weak winds when the sand paleosol developed; at 7.3-3.8 ka BP, the climate turned dry, with strong aeolian activities; at 3.8-0.7 ka BP, the climate became wetter and the winds weakened when the silt paleosol developed; and since 0.7 ka BP, it was cold and dry with strong aeolian activities.

  14. Aeolian processes over gravel beds: Field wind tunnel simulation and its application atop the Mogao Grottoes, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weimin; Tan, Lihai; Zhang, Guobin; Qiu, Fei; Zhan, Hongtao

    2014-12-01

    The aeolian processes of erosion, transport and deposition are threatening the Mogao Grottoes, a world culture heritage site. A field wind tunnel experiment was conducted atop the Mogao Grottoes using weighing sensors to quantify aeolian processes over protective gravel beds. Results reveal that aeolian erosion and deposition over gravel beds are basically influenced by gravel coverage and wind speed. Erosion is a main aeolian process over gravel beds and its strength level is mainly determined by gravel coverage: strong (<30%), medium (30-50%) and slight (>50%). Aeolian deposition only occurs when gravel coverage is equal to or greater than 30% and wind speeds are between 8 and 12 m s-1, and this process continues until the occurrence of the equilibrium coverage. In addition, the change in conditions of external sand supply affects the transition between aeolian deposition and erosion over gravel beds, and the quantity of sand transport at the height of 0-24 mm is an important indicator of aeolian deposition and erosion over gravel beds. Our results also demonstrate that making the best use of wind regime atop the Mogao Grottoes and constructing an artificial gobi surface in staggered arrays, with 30% coverage and 30-mm-high gravels and in 40 mm spacing can trap westerly invading sand flow and enable the stronger easterly wind to return the deposited sand on the gravel surface back to the Mingsha Mountain so as to minimize the damage of the blown sand flux to the Mogao Grottoes.

  15. Selective deposition response to aeolian-fluvial sediment supply in the desert braided channel of the upper Yellow River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Jia, X.; Li, Y.; Peng, W.

    2015-09-01

    Rivers flow across aeolian dunes and develop braided stream channels. Both aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies regulate sediment transport and deposition in such cross-dune braided rivers. Here we show a significant selective deposition in response to both aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies in the Ulan Buh desert braided channel. The Ulan Buh desert is the main coarse sediment source for this desert braided channel, and the mean percentage of the coarser (> 0.08 mm) grains on the aeolian dunes surface is 95.34 %. The lateral selective deposition process is developed by the interaction between the flows and the aeolian-fluvial sediment supplies, causing the coarser sediments (> 0.08 mm) from aeolian sand supply and bank erosion to accumulate in the channel centre and the finer fluvial sediments (< 0.08 mm) to be deposited on the bar and floodplain surfaces, forming a coarser-grained thalweg bed bounded by finer-grained floodplain surfaces. This lateral selective deposition reduces the downstream sediment transport and is a primary reason for the formation of an "above-ground" river in the braided reach of the upper Yellow River in response to aeolian and fluvial sediment supplies.

  16. Dust Avalanches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Crater wall dust avalanches in southern Arabia Terra.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 10.3, Longitude 24.5 East (335.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  17. New insights in the geodynamics of the Lipari-Vulcano area (Aeolian Archipelago, southern Italy) from geological, geodetic and seismological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreca, G.; Bruno, V.; Cultrera, F.; Mattia, M.; Monaco, C.; Scarfì, L.

    2014-12-01

    Geological, geodetic and seismological data have been analyzed in order to frame the Lipari-Vulcano complex (Aeolian archipelago, southern Italy) into the geodynamic context of the southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea. It is located at the northern end of a major NNW-SSE trending right-lateral strike-slip fault system named "Aeolian-Tindari-Letojanni" which has been interpreted as a lithospheric discontinuity extending from the Aeolian Islands to the Ionian coast of Sicily and separating two different tectonic domains: a contractional one to the west and an extensional one to the north-east. Structural field data consist of structural measurements performed on well-exposed fault planes and fractures. The mesostructures are mostly represented by NW-SE striking normal faults with a dextral-oblique component of motion. Minor structures are represented by N-S oriented joints and tension gashes widespread over the whole analyzed area and particularly along fumarolized sectors. The analyzed seismological dataset (from 1994 to 2013) is based on earthquakes with magnitude ranging between 1.0 and 4.8. The hypocenter distribution depicts two major alignments corresponding to the NNW-SSE trending Aeolian-Tindari-Letojanni fault system and to the WNW-ESE oriented Sisifo-Alicudi fault system. GPS data analysis displays ∼3.0 mm/yr of active shortening between the two islands, with a maximum shortening rate of about 1.0 × 10-13 s-1, between La Fossa Caldera and south of Vulcanello. This region is bounded to the north by an area where the maximum values of shear strain rates, of about 0.7 × 10-13 s-1 are observed. This major change occurs in the area south of Vulcanello that is also characterized by a transition in the way of the vertical axis rotation. Moreover, both the islands show a clear subsidence process, as suggested by negative vertical velocities of all GPS stations which exhibit a decrease from about -15 to -7 mm/yr from north to south. New data suggest that the current

  18. Dust particle dynamics in atmospheric dust devils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekova, Yulia; Popel, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    Dust particle dynamics is modeled in the Dust Devils (DDs). DD is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small (half a meter wide and a few meters tall) to large (more than 100 meters wide and more than 1000 meters tall) in Earth's atmosphere. We develop methods for the description of dust particle charging in DDs, discuss the ionization processes in DDs, and model charged dust particle motion. Our conclusions are consistent with the fact that DD can lift a big amount of dust from the surface of a planet into its atmosphere. On the basis of the model we perform calculations and show that DDs are important mechanism for dust uplift in the atmospheres of Earth and Mars. Influence of DD electric field on dynamics of dust particles is investigated. It is shown that influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is significant near the ground. At some altitude (more then a quarter of the height of DD) influence of the electric field on dust particles trajectories is negligible. For the calculation of the dynamics of dust electric field can be approximated by effective dipole located at a half of the height of DD. This work was supported by the Russian Federation Presidential Program for State Support of Young Scientists (project no. MK-6935.2015.2).

  19. 2008 Weather and Aeolian Sand-Transport Data from the Colorado River Corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Sondossi, Hoda A.; Hazel, Joseph E., Jr.; Andrews, Timothy; Fairley, Helen C.; Brown, Christopher R.; Vanaman, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents measurements of weather parameters and aeolian (windblown) sand transport made in 2008 near selected archaeological sites in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Ariz. The quantitative methods and data discussed here form a basis for monitoring ecosystem processes that affect archeological-site stability. Combined with forthcoming work to evaluate landscape evolution at nearby archaeological sites, these data can be used to document the relationship between physical processes, including weather and aeolian sand transport, and their effects on the physical integrity of archaeological sites. Data collected in 2008 reveal event- and seasonal-scale variations in rainfall, wind, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. Broad seasonal changes in aeolian sediment flux are also apparent at most study sites. The continuation of monitoring that began in 2007, and installation of equipment at several new sites in early 2008, allowed evaluation of the effects of the March 2008 high-flow experiment (HFE) on aeolian sand transport. At two of the nine sites studied, spring and summer winds reworked 2008 HFE sandbars to form new aeolian dunes, at which sand moved inland toward larger, well-established dune fields. At the other seven study sites, neither dune formation nor enhanced sand transport after the HFE were observed. At several of those sites, dominant wind directions in spring 2008 were not oriented such that much HFE sand would have moved inland; at other sites, lack of increased inland sand flux is attributable to lack of sandbar enlargement near the study sites or to inhibition of sand movement by vegetation or local topography.

  20. Mineral dust transport to the Sierra Nevada, California: Loading rates and potential source areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicars, William C.; Sickman, James O.

    2011-03-01

    The transport and deposition of aeolian dust represents an important material input pathway for many marine and terrestrial ecosystems and may be an ecologically significant source of exogenous phosphorus (P) to alpine lakes. In order to assess the abundance and elemental composition of atmospheric mineral dust over the Sierra Nevada of California, we collected size-fractionated atmospheric particulate matter (PM) samples during July 2008 to March 2009 at a mixed conifer site located in Sequoia National Park. PM concentrations were at their highest levels during the dry season, averaging 8.8 ± 3.7 and 11.1 ± 7.5 μg m-3 for the coarse (1 μm < Da < 15 μm) and fine (Da < 1 μm) fractions, respectively, while winter months were characterized by low (<1 μg m-3) PM concentrations in both size fractions. Using Al as a diagnostic tracer for mineral aerosol, we observed a significant and uniform contribution (50-80%) from aeolian dust to the total coarse PM load, whereas submicron particles contained comparatively little crustal material (7-33%). The mass concentrations of elements (Fe, Ca, Mg, P, and V) in the coarse PM fraction were significantly correlated with Al throughout the study, and coarse PM exhibited elemental signatures that were temporally consistent and distinguishable from those of other sites. Conversely, higher elemental enrichments were observed in the fine PM fraction for Fe, V, and P, indicating a greater contribution from anthropogenic emissions to the fine particle load. Fe/Al and Fe/Ca ratios suggest a mixture of mineral dust from regional agricultural activities and long-range transport of mineral dust from Asia. Asian sources comprised 40-90% of mineral dust in July 2008 and then declined to between 10 and 30% in August and early September.

  1. The most unusual dust event cases from Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagsson Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Olafur; Olafsson, Haraldur; Meinander, Outi; Gritsevich, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Iceland has the largest area of volcaniclastic sandy desert on Earth where dust is originating from volcanic, but also glaciogenic sediments. Total Icelandic desert areas cover over 44,000 km2 suggesting Iceland being the largest Arctic as well as European desert. Satelite MODIS pictures have revealed dust plumes traveling over 1000 km at times. The mean frequency of days with dust suspension was to 135 dust days annually in 1949-2011. The annual dust deposition was calculated as 31 - 40.1 million tons yr-1 affecting the area of > 500,000 km2, which places Iceland among the most active dust sources on Earth. Volcanic dust is distributed over local glaciers (about 4.5 million t annually) and surrounding oceans (6 - 14 million t annually). Mean dust emissions were calculated for minor, medium and major dust events as 0.1, 0.3 and 1 million tons per event, respectively. Three unusual dust events were observed and measured: The first, an extreme wind erosion event of the fresh Eyjafjallajokull 2010 volcanic ash, the second, a Snow-Dust Storm in 2013, and the third, a suspended dust during moist and low wind conditions. Frequent volcanic eruptions in Iceland (new eruption each 3-4 years on average) represent important inputs to dust variability. Freshly deposited ash prolongs impacts of volcanic eruptions as we observed after the 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption. In September 2010, an extreme storm was recorded with the maximum wind speed of 38.7 ms-1. The maximum saltation was 6825 pulses per minute while the aeolian transport over one m wide transect and 150 cm height reached 11,800 kg m-1. The largest previously measured amount in Iceland in one storm was about 4,200 kg m-1. This storm is among the most extreme wind erosion events recorded on Earth. Dust events in South Iceland often take place in winter or at sub-zero temperatures. The Snow-Dust Storm occurred in March 6-7th 2013 when snow was nearly black with several mm thick dark layer of dust deposited on snow

  2. Effect of non-Maxwellian particle trapping and dust grain charging on dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rubab, N.; Murtaza, G.; Mushtaq, A.

    2006-11-15

    The role of adiabatic trapped ions on a small but finite amplitude dust acoustic wave, including the effect of adiabatic dust charge variation, is investigated in an unmagnetized three-component dusty plasma consisting of electrons, ions and massive micron sized negatively charged dust particulates. We have assumed that electrons and ions obey (r,q) velocity distribution while the dust species is treated fluid dynamically. It is found that the dynamics of dust acoustic waves is governed by a modified r dependent Korteweg-de Vries equation. Further, the spectral indices (r,q) affect the charge fluctuation as well as the trapping of electrons and ions and consequently modify the dust acoustic solitary wave.

  3. Surface Dust Redistribution on Mars as Observed by the Mars Global Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szwast, M. A.; Richardson, M. I.; Vasavada, A. R.

    2005-01-01

    The global redistribution of dust by the atmosphere is geologically and climatologically important. Dust deposition and removal at the surface represents ongoing sedimentary geology: a vestige of aeolian processes responsible for the concentration of vast dustsheets and potentially for ancient layered units at various locations on Mars. The varying amount of dust on the surface has also long been hypothesized as a factor in determining whether regional or global dust storms occur in a given year. Indeed, the atmosphere has a very short, sub-seasonal time-scale (or memory) and as such, any inter-annual variability in the climate system that is not simply ascribable to stochastic processes, must involve changing conditions on the surface. An excellent, multi-year dataset is provided by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Mars Orbiter Camera Wide Angle imager (MOC-WA). This dataset allows investigation into the degree to which surface dust deposits on Mars really change: over decadal time scales, over the course of the annual cycle, and as a result of global and regional dust storms. The MGS mapping orbit data set extends over almost 3 Martian years at the time of writing. These data sets include one global dust storm and smaller regional storms (one in the first TES mapping year and two in the third).

  4. Peat bog Records of Atmospheric Dust fluxes - Holocene palaeoenvironmental and paleoclimatic implications for South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vleeschouwer, François; Vanneste, Heleen; Bertrand, Sébastien; Coronata, Andrea; Gaiero, Diego; Le Roux, Gael

    2013-04-01

    Little attention has been given to pre-anthropogenic signals recorded in peat bogs, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. Yet they are important to 1/ better understand the different particle sources during the Holocene and 2/ to tackle the linkage between atmospheric dust loads and climate change and 3/ to better understand the impact of dust on Holocene palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironments in a critical area for ocean productivity. In the PARAD project, we will explore the use of a broad range of trace elements and radiogenic isotopes (Pb, Nd, Hf) as dust proxies. Coupling these findings with biological proxies (plant macrofossils, pollen) and detailed age-depth modelling, we expect not only to identify and interpret new links between atmospheric dust chemistry and climate change. In this contribution, we will present the preliminary results on two peat records of natural atmospheric dust using the elemental and isotopic signature in Tierra del Fuego. Preliminary results on two peat sections covering the Holocene (Karukinka Bog, Chile, 8kyrs and Harberton bog, Argentina, 14kyrs) will be discussed. This encompasses density, ash content, elemental and isotopic geochemistry, macrofossil determination and radiocarbon dating. More specifically, Karukinka bog display several mineral peaks, which possible origin (soil particles, volcanism, cosmogenic dusts, marine aerosols…) will be discussed here as well as in Vanneste et al. (this conference, session Aeolian dust: Initiator, Player, and Recorder of Environmental Change).

  5. An improvement on the dust emission scheme in the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, T.; Peng, Y.; Feichter, J.; Tegen, I.

    2007-09-01

    Formulation of the dust emission scheme in the global aerosol-climate modeling system ECHAM5-HAM has been improved. Modifications on the surface aerodynamic roughness length, soil moisture and East-Asian soil properties are included in the parameterization, which result in a large impact on the threshold wind friction velocity for aeolian erosion and thus influence the simulated dust emission amount. The annual global mean of dust emission in the year 2000 is reduced by 76.5% and 2.2%, respectively, due to changes in the aerodynamic roughness length and the soil moisture. An inclusion of detailed East-Asian soil properties leads to an increase of 16.6% in the annual global mean of dust emission, which exhibits mainly in the arid and semi-arid areas of northern China and southern Mongolia. Reasonable values of annual global mean of dust emission, dust burden and total aerosol optical thickness can be obtained in the improved model. In addition, measurements of the surface dust concentrations are collected in dust source regions of East Asia, and verify a more realistic spatial distribution of dust emission in the improved model.

  6. Holocene dust records from the West African Sahel and their implications for changes in climate and land surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockerton, Helen E.; Holmes, Jonathan A.; Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Ficken, Katherine J.

    2014-07-01

    We reconstructed aeolian dust accumulation during the Holocene from two radiocarbon-dated lake-sediment sequences from the Manga Grasslands in northeastern Nigeria in order to investigate long-term changes in the Harmattan dust system over West Africa and evaluate their possible causes. Flux values were low in the early Holocene, decreasing further to a minimum at around 6.2 kyr B.P. after which time they increased, steadily until around 2 kyr B.P. and then more sharply after this time. The long-term variations in dust flux agree broadly with changes in the exposed area of the Lake Chad Basin to the northeast of the study sites, which vary inversely with the volume of Paleolake Megachad. More proximal sources of dust, including the fine fraction of local dune sand and floodplains of nearby rivers, have also made a contribution to the total dust load during times of enhanced dune and fluvial activity. Sharp rises in dust flux over the past century may be related to human activity. Broad patterns of change in dust flux during the Holocene agree with other reconstructions over the same period. However, we see no evidence for a stepped rise during the middle Holocene, as seen at some sites from the northeastern tropical Atlantic, suggesting that controls on the Harmattan dust system have differed from those affecting dust deposition elsewhere across northern Africa.

  7. Monitoring Saharan dust from source to sink: from Iwik [Mauritania] to Statia [Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hateren, Hans; van der Does, Michelle; Friese, Carmen; Korte, Laura; Munday, Chris; Stuut, Jan-Berend

    2015-04-01

    The particle-size distribution and composition of mineral dust is often used as a tool to reconstruct palaeo-environmental conditions in the source(s) of the dust. In on-land (loess), lacustrine, and marine archives, the size of dust deposits is considered a proxy for paleo-wind intensity. However, next to wind strength, the particle size of aeolian deposits is also influenced by various other parameters such as source-to-sink distance, altitude at which the particles have been transported, and various environmental conditions in the sources of the dust. To verify if we can quantify a relationship between the size and composition of mineral dust particles and prevailing environmental conditions, we study "modern" dust. Within three ongoing projects, funded by the Dutch NWO, German DFG, and the ERC, we are studying dust collected on land in Mauritania (Iwik, in the Parc National de Banc d'Arguin, sampling on a monthly resolution) with an array of marine sediment-traps (five moorings at 12°N across the Atlantic Ocean with two sediment traps each between 23° and 57°W, sampling on a 2-weekly resolution) as well as automated mineral-dust collection at sea (on dust-collecting buoys at 12°N/38°W and 12°N/49°W, sampling on a 2-weekly resolution), and finally with a high-volume dust collector on St Eustatius (17°N/63°W, sampling on a 2-weekly resolution). Here we compare initial results of the particle-size distributions of the "minimally-disturbed" fraction of the on-land dust collectors with the terrigenous sediment fraction from the sediment traps, and discuss temporal and spatial trends.

  8. Hazards of explosives dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Bureau of Mines has investigated the hazards of military explosives dispersed as dust clouds in a 20-L test chamber. For purposes of personnel safety, the spark ignitability of the explosives in the form of unconfined dust layers was also studied. The 20-L data show that most of the explosive dusts were capable of sustaining explosions as dust clouds dispersed in air and some dusts were even capable of sustaining explosions when dispersed in nitrogen. The finest sizes of explosive dusts were less reactive than the larger sizes; this is opposite to the particle size effect observed previously for the pure fuel dusts. The data for the explosive dusts were compared to those for pure fuel dusts.

  9. The Cosmic Dust Analyzer for Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Gruen, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf

    1996-01-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) is designed to characterize the dust environment in interplanetary space, in the Jovian and in the Saturnian systems. The instrument consists of two major components, the Dust Analyzer (DA) and the High Rate Detector (HRD). The DA has a large aperture to provide a large cross section for detection in low flux environments. The DA has the capability of determining dust particle mass, velocity, flight direction, charge, and chemical composition. The chemical composition is determined by the Chemical Analyzer system based on a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The DA is capable of making full measurements up to one impact/second. The HRD contains two smaller PVDF detectors and electronics designed to characterize dust particle masses at impact rates up to 10(exp 4) impacts/second. These high impact rates are expected during Saturn ring, plane crossings.

  10. Effects of non-erodible particles on aeolian erosion: Wind-tunnel simulations of a sand oblong storage pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furieri, B.; Russeil, S.; Santos, J. M.; Harion, J. L.

    2013-11-01

    Non-erodible particles have strong influence on the aeolian erosion phenomena. An oblong stockpile model of sand (bimodal granulometry) was implemented to perform wind-tunnel experiments as similar literature works have only carried out experimental investigations on a flat bed of particles. Thus, the influence of the fluid flow structures around the complex obstacle will be analysed. The tested configurations consisted of two different values of non-erodible particles cover rate (10% and 20%), and three free stream velocities (6, 7 and 8 m s-1). Good repeatability was found. The results showed that the largest amount of particles emitted was for the highest wind velocity and the smallest cover rate. The temporal decreasing of emitted mass flux was found steeper for larger amount of non-erodible particles and higher velocity. The mass flux of particles decreases very strongly in the first four minutes of measurements and the cover rate influences this downward sloping. The same analysis applies for the effects of the free stream velocity. The qualitative analysis (high quality photographic system) of the stockpile surface gradual change has shown that non-erodible particles aggregation induces a pavement effect on some areas of the pile. This analysis indicated typical wind erosion zones: high wall friction on the crest line and lateral sides; low wall friction on the windward wall near the ground and on the recirculation downstream the leeward wall. The results and discussions presented here allows for the understanding of the impact of non-erodible particle on dust emissions.

  11. Spatial variations of the aerosols in river-dust episodes in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chung-Yih; Lin, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Long-Ming; Wang, Shizoom; Shieh, Ping-Fei; Lin, Yan-Ruei; Wang, Jing-Ya

    2010-07-15

    Daily and hourly average data of PM(10) from 17 air-quality monitoring stations distributed throughout four counties and along four rivers (the Ta-an River, the Tachia River, the Wu River and the Choshui River) in central Taiwan were collected from November 15 to 21, 2008. During this period, the wind speed and daily PM(10) concentrations increased drastically from the 17th to the 19th, and reached a maximum level on the 19th. Six air-quality monitoring stations (Dajia, Wurih, Siansi, Dungnan, Lunbei and Taisi) in the central Taiwan were selected for sampling fine (PM(2.5)) and coarse (PM(10-2.5)) aerosols samples during and after the river-dust episode. Most of the ratios of [crustal elements (Fe or Al)/reference elements (Cd or Mo)] for the samples obtained during episode are higher than those obtained after episode. The values of Fe(10-2.5)/Cd(10-2.5) and Fe(10-2.5)/Mo(10-2.5) were very high in Lubei, Taisi, and Dungnan stations where heavy aeolian river dust occurred. These data suggest that the ratios of Fe(10-2.5)/Cd(10-2.5) and Fe(10-2.5)/Mo(10-2.5) can be successfully used as indexes to evaluate the comparative degree of effect of aeolian river dust on the atmosphere of multiple stations. PMID:20456865

  12. Ocean biogeochemistry exhibits contrasting responses to a large scale reduction in dust deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, A.; Bopp, L.; Aumont, O.

    2008-01-01

    Dust deposition of iron is thought to be an important control on ocean biogeochemistry and air-sea CO2 exchange. In this study, we examine the impact of a large scale, yet climatically realistic, reduction in the aeolian Fe input during a 240 year transient simulation. In contrast to previous studies, we find that the ocean biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen are relatively insensitive (globally) to a 60% reduction in Fe input from dust. Net primary productivity (NPP) is reduced in the Fe limited regions, but the excess macronutrients that result are able to fuel additional NPP elsewhere. Overall, NPP and air-sea CO2 exchange are only reduced by around 3% between 1860 and 2100. While the nitrogen cycle is perturbed more significantly (by ~15%), reduced N2 fixation is balanced by a concomitant decline in denitrification. Feedbacks between N2 fixation and denitrification are controlled by variability in surface utilization of inorganic nitrogen and subsurface oxygen consumption, as well as the direct influence of Fe on N2 fixation. Overall, there is relatively little impact of reduced aeolian Fe input (<4%) on cumulative CO2 fluxes over 240 years. The lower sensitivity of our model to changes in dust input is primarily due to the more detailed representation of the continental shelf Fe, which was absent in previous models.

  13. Ocean biogeochemistry exhibits contrasting responses to a large scale reduction in dust deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, A.; Bopp, L.; Aumont, O.

    2007-08-01

    Dust deposition of iron is thought to be an important control on ocean biogeochemistry and air-sea CO2 exchange. In this study, we examine the impact of a large scale, yet climatically realistic, reduction in the aeolian Fe input during a 240 year transient simulation. In contrast to previous studies, we find that the ocean biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen are relatively insensitive to a 60% reduction in Fe input from dust. Net primary productivity (NPP) is reduced in the Fe limited regions, but the excess macronutrients that result are able to fuel additional NPP elsewhere. Overall, NPP and air-sea CO2 exchange are only reduced by around 3% between 1860 and 2100. While the nitrogen cycle is perturbed more significantly (by ~15%), reduced N2 fixation is balanced by a concomitant decline in denitrification. Feedbacks between N2 fixation and denitrification are controlled by variability in surface utilization of inorganic nitrogen and subsurface oxygen consumption, as well as the direct influence of Fe on N2 fixation. Overall, there is relatively little impact of reduced aeolian Fe input (<4%) on cumulative CO2 fluxes over 240 years. The lower sensitivity of our model to changes in dust input is primarily due to the more detailed representation of the continental shelf Fe, which was absent in previous models.

  14. Impact of desert dust on the biogeochemistry of phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okin, Gregory S.; Mahowald, Natalie; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2004-06-01

    Leaching, biomass removal, and partitioning of phosphorus (P) into reservoirs not available to plants can limit the long-term productivity of terrestrial ecosystems. We evaluate the importance of atmospheric P inputs to the world's soils by estimating the total soil P turnover time with respect to dustborne P additions. Estimated turnover times range from ˜104 to ˜107 years. Our estimates provide a unique perspective on the importance and patterns of aeolian deposition to terrestrial landscapes. Dust source regions are areas of intense soil P cycling on large scales, but are too water-limited for this rapid cycling to have a major influence on ecosystem dynamics. By contrast, semiarid desert margins receive significant aeolian P from neighboring deserts and are likely influenced by dustborne P additions for the long-term maintenance of productivity. This is particularly true for the semiarid steppes of Africa and Eurasia. The prevalence of large dust sources in Africa and Eurasia indicates that these areas may generally be more influenced by dustborne P additions than soils in the Americas. Significant western hemisphere exceptions to this pattern occur on very old landscapes, such as the forests of the southeastern United States and the Amazon Basin. The Amazon Basin is highly dependent on aeolian deposition for the maintenance of long-term productivity. Dust deposition to terrestrial environments has not been constant with time. Variability in past P deposition related to geologically recent climate change may provide the strongest controls on present and future soil P in the Amazon and elsewhere.

  15. Fluid transport on earth and aeolian transport on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Bagnold, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental data on cohesion-free particle transport in fluid beds are applied, via a universal scaling relation, to atmospheric transport of fine grains on Mars. It may be that cohesion due to impact vitrification, vacuum sintering, and adsorbed thin films of water are absent on Mars - in which case the curve of threshold velocity versus grain size may show no turnup to small particle size, and one micron diameter grains may be injected directly by saltation into the Martian atmosphere more readily than 100 micron diameter grains. Curves for threshold and terminal velocities are presented for the full range of Martian pressures and temperatures. Suspension of fine grains is significantly easier at low temperatures and high pressures; late afternoon brightenings of many areas of Mars, and the generation of dust storms in such deep basins as Hellas, may be due to this effect.

  16. Interannual variability of global dust storms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Under the assumption that the cross-equatorial Hadley circulation plays a key role in the onset of Martian global dust storms, numerical simulations indicate that a northern hemisphere dust haze weakens its intensity and, thereby, its contribution to the surface stress in the southern hemisphere. Since this in turn reduces the possibility of global dust storm development, the interannual variability observed is the result of either a competition between circulations in opposite hemispheres, in which case the variability has a random component, or it is the result of dust cycling between hemispheres, so that the variability is related to the characteristics of the global dust storms themselves.

  17. The Significant Roles of Landscape Pattern and Spatial Scale in Assessing Aeolian Desertification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, W.; Kang, S.

    2015-12-01

    One of research focus in combating desertification is monitoring and assessing aeolian desertification by temporal satellite remote sensing imageries. Landscape heterogeneity hampers robust interpretation from the satellite imagery on the status and process of aoelian desertification in arid regions, for which scale effect on satellite-imagery interpretation must be investigated. In this study, area and degree of aeolian desertification were assessed at different spatial scales from 30m to 1km by using TM and Landsat8 imageries, respectively. Then, landscape pattern index was utilized to explain effect of spatial resolution on the satellite-based assessment of aeolian desertification in the middle of Mu Us and the west of Otindag Sandy Lands in Inner Mongolia of China. Our results indicate: (1) The middle of Mu Us was rehabilitated from 2000 to 2014 by reduction of desertified area from 12,861 km2 to 11,700 km2. Whereas, the desertified area of the west of Otindag fluctuated but rebounded during the last five years; (2) scale effects on the area and degree of desertified land were not significant, along the spatial resolution, the desertified area fluctuated from12,962km2 to 12,861km2 for Mu Us hinterland and from 7,752km2to 7,700km2 for Otindag west, which corresponds 0.78% and 0.67 % of relative variations, respectively. The aeolian desertification degree index(ADI) fluctuated from 0.36 to 0.35 for Mu Us hinterland and from 0.17 to 0.16 for Otindag west, which corresponds 2.78% and 5.88 % of relative variations, respectively. (3) scale effects on landscape pattern indices were significant, particular in landscape fragment; the correlation of spatial resolution and landscape fragment are positive(RMu Us2=0.76-0.77, ROtindag2=0.73-0.78). It was found substantial uncertainty in satellite-based assessment on aeolian desertification in Mu Us and Otindag Sandy Lands and the relevance of the uncertainty with the landscape pattern indices. Our study proposes more

  18. 2009 weather and aeolian sand-transport data from the Colorado River corridor, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Sondossi, Hoda A.; Dealy, Timothy P.; Hazel, Joseph E., Jr.; Fairley, Helen C.; Brown, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents measurements of weather parameters and aeolian sand transport made in 2009 near selected archeological sites in the Colorado River corridor through Grand Canyon, Ariz. The quantitative methods and data discussed here form a basis for monitoring ecosystem processes that affect archeological-site stability. Combined with forthcoming work to evaluate landscape evolution at nearby archeological sites, these data can be used to document the relation between physical processes, including weather and aeolian sand transport, and their effects on the physical integrity of archeological sites. Data collected in 2009 reveal event- and seasonal-scale variations in rainfall, wind, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure. Broad seasonal changes in aeolian sediment flux are also apparent at most study sites. Differences in weather patterns between 2008 and 2009 included an earlier spring windy season, greater spring precipitation even though 2009 annual rainfall totals were in general substantially lower than in 2008, and earlier onset of the reduced diurnal barometric-pressure fluctuations commonly associated with summer monsoon conditions. Weather patterns in middle to late 2009 were apparently affected by a transition of the ENSO cycle from a neutral phase to the El Ni?o phase. The continuation of monitoring that began in 2007, and installation of additional equipment at several new sites in early 2008, allowed evaluation of the effects of the March 2008 high-flow experiment (HFE) on aeolian sand transport. As reported earlier, at 2 of the 9 sites studied, spring and summer winds in 2008 reworked the HFE sandbars to form new aeolian dunes, where sand moved inland toward larger, well-established dune fields. Observations in 2009 showed that farther inland migration of the dune at one of those two sites is likely inhibited by vegetation. At the other location, the new aeolian dune form was found to have moved 10 m inland toward older, well

  19. Development of a Technique to Relate Aeolian Roughness to Radar Backscatter using Multiparameter SIR-C Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Blumberg, Dan; Dobrovolskis, A.; Iverson, James; Lancaster, Nicholas; White, Bruce; Rasmussen, Keld; Saunders, Stephen; vanZyl, Jakob; Wall, Stephen; Zebker, Howard

    1996-01-01

    Progress and future plans for the following objectives are presented: (1) To develop a technique to obtain values of aeolian roughness for geologic surfaces from values of surface roughness determined from calibrated L- and C-band, like- and cross-polarized, multiple incidence angle radar data from SIR-C; (2) To define the optimal combination of radar parameters from which aeolian roughness can be derived; and (3) To gain an understanding of the physical processes behind the empirical relationship.

  20. Dust Plume off Mauritania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A thick plume of dust blew off the coast of Mauritania in western Africa on October 2, 2007. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite observed the dust plume as it headed toward the southwest over the Atlantic Ocean. In this image, the dust varies in color from nearly white to medium tan. The dust plume is easier to see over the dark background of the ocean, but the plume stretches across the land surface to the east, as well. The dust plume's structure is clearest along the coastline, where relatively clear air pockets separate distinct puffs of dust. West of that, individual pillows of dust push together to form a more homogeneous plume. Near its southwest tip, the plume takes on yet another shape, with stripes of pale dust fanning out toward the northwest. Occasional tiny white clouds dot the sky overhead, but skies are otherwise clear.

  1. Kinetic theory of magnetized dusty plasmas with dust particles charged by collisional processes and by photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, R. A.; Ziebell, L. F.

    2012-09-15

    In this work, we detail the derivation of a plasma kinetic theory leading to the components of the dielectric tensor for a magnetized dusty plasma with variable charge on the dust particles, considering that the dust component of the plasma contains spherical dust particles with different sizes, which are charged both by inelastic collisions of electrons and ions and by photoionization.

  2. Dynamics of Solar System Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2002-01-01

    The ongoing aim of the research is to investigate the dynamical and physical evolution of interplanetary dust particles in order to produce a detailed global model of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components that is capable of predicting thermal fluxes in mid-infrared wave bands to an accuracy of 1% or better; with the additional aim of exploiting this research as a basis for predicting structure in exozodiacal clouds that may be signatures of unseen planets.

  3. Saharan dust and Florida red tides: The cyanophyte connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, John J.; Steidinger, Karen A.

    2001-06-01

    Prediction of the consequences of harmful algal blooms for humans and other vertebrates is constrained by an inadequate understanding of the factors that promote their initiation. A simple exponential growth model of net production is used for analysis of four time series at different sampling intervals over ˜40 years of red tide strandings, associated fish kills, and concomitant dust loadings on the West Florida shelf. At least large summer blooms of a toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve appear to be primed regularly by an aeolian supply of nutrients. Wet deposition of Saharan mineral aerosols may alleviate iron limitation of diazotrophic cyanophytes, which in turn fuel the nitrogen economy of red tides in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. Vagaries of the wind-induced circulation and of selective grazing pressure on phytoplankton competitors within phosphorus replete coastal waters then determine each year the residence times for exposure of G. breve-mediated neurotoxins to fish, manatees, and humans along the southeastern United States.

  4. Geochemical and microbiological fingerprinting of airborne dust that fell in Canberra, Australia, in October 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Deckker, Patrick; Abed, Raeid M. M.; de Beer, Dirk; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; O'Loingsigh, Tadhg; Schefuß, Enno; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.; Tapper, Nigel J.; van der Kaars, Sander

    2008-12-01

    During the night of 22-23 October 2002, a large amount of airborne dust fell with rain over Canberra, located some 200 km from Australia's east coast, and at an average altitude of 650 m. It is estimated that during that night about 6 g m-2 of aeolian dust fell. We have conducted a vast number of analyses to "fingerprint" some of the dust and used the following techniques: grain size analysis; scanning electron microscope imagery; major, trace, and rare earth elemental, plus Sr and Nd isotopic analyses; organic compound analyses with respective compound-specific isotope analyses; pollen extraction to identify the vegetation sources; and molecular cloning of 16S rRNA genes in order to identify dust bacterial composition. DNA analyses show that most obtained 16S rRNA sequences belong mainly to three groups: Proteobacteria (25%), Bacteriodetes (23%), and gram-positive bacteria (23%). In addition, we investigated the meteorological conditions that led to the dust mobilization and transport using model and satellite data. Grain sizes of the mineral dust show a bimodal distribution typical of proximal dust, rather than what is found over oceans, and the bimodal aspect of size distribution confirms wet deposition by rain droplets. The inorganic geochemistry points to a source along/near the Darling River in NW New South Wales, a region that is characteristically semiarid, and both the organic chemistry and palynoflora of the dust confirm the location of this source area. Meteorological reconstructions of the event again clearly identify the area near Bourke-Cobar as being the source of the dust. This study paves the way for determining the export of Australian airborne dust both in the oceans and other continents.

  5. Evolution of interstellar dust and stardust in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovska, S.; Gail, H.-P.; Trieloff, M.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:We studied the evolution of the abundance in interstellar dust species that originate in stellar sources and from condensation in molecular clouds in the local interstellar medium of the Milky Way. We determined from this the input of dust material to the Solar System. Methods: A one-zone chemical evolution model of the Milky Way for the elemental composition of the disk combined with an evolution model for its interstellar dust component similar to that of Dwek (1998) is developed. The dust model considers dust-mass return from AGB stars as calculated from synthetic AGB models combined with models for dust condensation in stellar outflows. Supernova dust formation is included in a simple parametrised form that is gauged by observed abundances of presolar dust grains with a supernova origin. For dust growth in the ISM, a simple method is developed for coupling this with disk and dust evolution models. Results: A chemical evolution model of the solar neighbourhood in the Milky Way is calculated, which forms the basis for calculating a model of the evolution of the interstellar dust population at the galactocentric radius of the Milky Way. The model successfully passes all standard tests for the reliability of such models. In particular the abundance evolution of the important dust-forming elements is compared with observational results for the metallicity-dependent evolution of the abundances for G-type stars from the solar neighbourhood. It is found that the new tables of Nomoto et al. (2006) for the heavy element production give much better results for the abundance evolution of these important elements than the widely used tables of Woosley & Weaver (1995). The time evolution for the abundance of the following dust species is followed in the model: silicate, carbon, silicon carbide, and iron dust from AGB stars and from supernovae, as well as silicate, carbon, and iron dust grown in molecular clouds. It is shown that the interstellar dust population is

  6. Vertical structure of aeolian turbulence in a boundary layer with sand transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Zoe S.; Baas, Andreas C. W.

    2016-04-01

    Recently we have found that Reynolds shear stress shows a significant variability with measurement height (Lee and Baas, 2016), and so an alternative parameter for boundary layer turbulence may help to explain the relationship between wind forcing and sediment transport. We present data that were collected during a field study of boundary layer turbulence conducted on a North Atlantic beach. High-frequency (50 Hz) 3D wind velocity measurements were collected using ultrasonic anemometry at thirteen different measurement heights in a tight vertical array between 0.11 and 1.62 metres above the surface. Thanks to the high density installation of sensors a detailed analysis of the boundary layer flow can be conducted using methods more typically used in studies where data is only available from one or just a few measurement heights. We use quadrant analysis to explore the vertical structure of turbulence and track the changes in quadrant signatures with measurement elevation and over time. Results of quadrant analysis, at the 'raw' 50 Hz timescale, demonstrates the tendency for event clustering across all four quadrants, which implies that at-a-point quadrant events are part of larger-scale turbulent structures. Using an HSV colour model, applied to the quadrant analysis data and plotted in series, we create colour maps of turbulence, which can provide a clear visualisation of the clustering of event activity at each height and illustrate the shape of the larger coherent flow structures that are present within the boundary layer. By including a saturation component to the colour model, the most significant stress producing sections of the data are emphasised. This results in a 'banded' colour map, which relates to clustering of quadrant I (Outward Interaction) and quadrant IV (Sweep) activity, separate from clustering of quadrant II (Burst) and quadrant III (Inward Interaction). Both 'sweep-type' and 'burst-type' sequences are shown to have a diagonal structure

  7. The developmental trend and influencing factors of aeolian desertification in the Zoige Basin, eastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guangyin; Dong, Zhibao; Lu, Junfeng; Yan, Changzhen

    2015-12-01

    The Zoige Basin is located in the northeastern region of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and covers an area of 19,400 km2. At a mean altitude of 3500 m, the basin is highly sensitive to global environmental change and human disturbance due to its high elevation and fragile cold environment. The process of aeolian desertification in the basin can be clearly recognized in Landsat images that show the development of sand sheets and dunes over time. To monitor the spatial and temporal changes of aeolian desertification in the Zoige Basin, we analyzed Landsat images recorded in 1975, 1990, 2000, 2005, and 2010. Results showed that aeolian desertification increased rapidly from 1975 to 1990, was stable from 1990 to 2000, decreased slightly from 2000 to 2005, and decreased sharply from 2005 to 2010. Increasing temperature, overgrazing, rodent damage, and drainage of wetlands were considered the key driving factors of the expansion of aeolian desertification. A number of political measures were initiated in the 1990s to slow desertification, but the countermeasures of grazing prohibition, enclosures, and paving straw checkerboard barriers were not implemented until around 2005. These measures resulted in a dramatic recovery of aeolian desertified land between 2005 and 2010. Based on the cause analysis, anthropogenic factors were identified as the dominant driving force for both development and recovery of aeolian desertified land.

  8. Photoluminescence by Interstellar Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijh, U. P.

    2005-08-01

    In this dissertation, we report on our study of interstellar dust through the process of photoluminescence (PL). We present the discovery of a new band of dust PL, blue luminescence (BL) with λpeak˜370 nm in the proto-planetary nebula known as the Red Rectangle (RR). We attribute this to fluorescence by small, 3-4-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. Further analysis reveals additional independent evidence for the presence of small PAHs in this nebula. Detection of BL using long-slit spectroscopic observations in other ordinary reflection nebulae suggests that the BL carrier is an ubiquitous component of the ISM and is not restricted to the particular environment of the RR. We present the spatial distribution of the BL in these nebulae and find that the BL is spatially correlated with IR emission structures attributed to aromatic emission features (AEFs), attributed to PAHs. The carrier of the dust-associated photoluminescence process causing the extended red emission (ERE), known now for over twenty five years, remains unidentified. We constrain the character of the ERE carrier by determining the wavelengths of the radiation that initiates the ERE -- λ < 118 nm. We note that under interstellar conditions most PAH molecules are ionized to the di-cation stage by photons with E > 10.5 eV and that the electronic energy level structure of PAH di-cations is consistent with fluorescence in the wavelength band of the ERE. In the last few chapters of the dissertation we present first results from ongoing work: i) Using narrow-band imaging, we present the optical detection of the circum-binary disk of the RR in the light of the BL, and show that the morphology of the BL and ERE emissions in the RR nebula are almost mutually exclusive. It is very suggestive to attribute them to different ionization stages of the same family of carriers such as PAH molecules. ii) We also present a pure spectrum of the BL free of scattered light, resolved into seven

  9. China Dust and Sand

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Dust and Sand Sweep Over Northeast China     View Larger Image ... these views of the dust and sand that swept over northeast China on March 10, 2004. Information on the height of the dust and an ...

  10. Middle East Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... only some of the dust over eastern Syria and southeastern Turkey can be discerned. The dust is much more obvious in the center panel, ... 18, 2002 - A large dust plume extends across Syria and Turkey. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  11. Dust in the Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Armosky, Brad J.

    2004-01-01

    Space is seeming less and less like empty space as new discoveries and reexaminations fill in the gaps. And, ingenuity and technology, like the Spitzer Space Telescope, is allowing examination of the far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. Even dust is getting its due, but not the dust everyone is familiar with. People seldom consider the dust in…

  12. DUST PROPERTIES OF LOCAL DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES WITH THE SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Andrews, Sean M.; Geller, Margaret J. E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-11-01

    We report Submillimeter Array observations of the 880 μm dust continuum emission for four dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the local universe. Two DOGs are clearly detected with S{sub ν}(880 μm) =10-13 mJy and S/N > 5, but the other two are not detected with 3σ upper limits of S{sub ν}(880 μm) =5-9 mJy. Including an additional two local DOGs with submillimeter data from the literature, we determine the dust masses and temperatures for six local DOGs. The infrared luminosities and dust masses for these DOGs are in the ranges of 1.2-4.9 × 10{sup 11}(L{sub ☉}) and 4-14 × 10{sup 7}(M{sub ☉}), respectively. The dust temperatures derived from a two-component modified blackbody function are 23-26 K and 60-124 K for the cold and warm dust components, respectively. Comparison of local DOGs with other infrared luminous galaxies with submillimeter detections shows that the dust temperatures and masses do not differ significantly among these objects. Thus, as argued previously, local DOGs are not a distinctive population among dusty galaxies, but simply represent the high-end tail of the dust obscuration distribution.

  13. HOT AND COLD DUST NEAR H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenilayam, Gopika; Fich, Michel

    2011-07-15

    We estimate the mass, temperature, and luminosity of the hot ({>=}100 K), cool (20-40 K), and cold ({<=}20 K) dust in the environs of Galactic H II regions using Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) and Submillimeter Common User Bolometric Array (SCUBA) data. A total of 83 clouds have been examined using IRAS data. A two-component model spectral energy distribution (SED) of hot and cool dust is used to fit the IRAS data. All of the SEDs use a graphite/silicate mix of grains in an MRN distribution. A three-component model SED is fitted to combined SCUBA and IRAS data for 15 clouds near H II regions to measure the cold dust component. Surprisingly, the ratio of the bolometric luminosity of the cool dust to the hot dust appears to be the same (2.8) in virtually all objects. The cool dust has typically four-five orders of magnitude greater mass than the hot dust. However, the mass in cold dust is much greater than the mass in cool and hot dust. We also find some evidence for a relationship between the cool and cold dust masses. These results may prove useful for using IR observations for estimating gas masses in extragalactic systems with active high-mass star formation.

  14. Dust emission: small-scale processes with global consequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Okin, Gregory S.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Ballantine, John-Andrew C.; Schepanski, Kerstin; Todd, Martin C.; Belnap, Jayne; Baddock, Matthew C.; Gill, Thomas E.; Miller, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Desert dust, both modern and ancient, is a critical component of the Earth system. Atmospheric dust has important effects on climate by changing the atmospheric radiation budget, while deposited dust influences biogeochemical cycles in the oceans and on land. Dust deposited on snow and ice decreases its albedo, allowing more light to be trapped at the surface, thus increasing the rate of melt and influencing energy budgets and river discharge. In the human realm, dust contributes to the transport of allergens and pathogens and when inhaled can cause or aggravate respiratory diseases. Dust storms also represent a significant hazard to road and air travel. Because it affects so many Earth processes, dust is studied from a variety of perspectives and at multiple scales, with various disciplines examining emissions for different purposes using disparate strategies. Thus, the range of objectives in studying dust, as well as experimental approaches and results, has not yet been systematically integrated. Key research questions surrounding the production and sources of dust could benefit from improved collaboration among different research communities. These questions involve the origins of dust, factors that influence dust production and emission, and methods through which dust can be monitored.

  15. Experimental research on dust lifting by propagating shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żydak, P.; Oleszczak, P.; Klemens, R.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the presented work was to study the dust lifting process from a layer of dust behind a propagating shock wave. The experiments were conducted with the use of a shock tube and a specially constructed, five-channel laser optical device enabling measurements at five positions located in one vertical plane along the height of the tube. The system enabled measurements of the delay in lifting up of the dust from the layer, and the vertical velocity of the dust cloud was calculated from the dust concentration measurements. The research was carried out for various initial conditions and