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Sample records for aerated concrete blocks

  1. Microstructural investigations on aerated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, N.; Ramamurthy, K.

    2000-03-01

    Aerated concrete is characterized by the presence of large voids deliberately included in its matrix to reduce the density. This study reports the investigations conducted on the structure of cement-based autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) and non-AAC with sand or fly ash as the filler. The reasons for changes in compressive strength and drying shrinkage are explained with reference to the changes in the microstructure. Compositional analysis was carried out using XRD. It was observed that fly ash responds poorly to autoclaving. The process of pore refinement in fly ash mixes is discussed with reference to the formation of Hadley grains as well as fly ash hydration. The paste-void interface in aerated concrete investigated in relation to the paste-aggregate interface in normal concrete revealed the existence of an interfacial transition zone.

  2. Aerated concrete with mineral dispersed reinforcing additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdov, G. I.; Ilina, L. V.; Mukhina, I. N.; Rakov, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    To guarantee the production of aerated concrete with the lowest average density while ensuring the required strength it is necessary to use a silica component with a surface area of 250-300 m2 / kg. The article presents experimental data on grinding the silica component together with clinker to the optimum dispersion. This allows increasing the strength of non-autoclaved aerated concrete up to 33%. Furthermore, the addition to aerated concrete the mixture of dispersed reinforcing agents (wollastonite, diopside) and electrolytes with multiply charged cations and anions (1% Fe2 (SO4)3; Al2 (SO4)3) provides the growth of aerated concrete strength at 30 - 75%. As a cohesive the clinker, crushed together with silica and mineral supplements should be used. This increases the strength of aerated concrete at 65% in comparing with Portland cement.

  3. Thermal inertia properties of autoclaved aerated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Ropelewski, L.; Neufeld, R.D.

    1999-08-01

    Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) is a lightweight, porous concrete with advanced thermal properties. AAC is unique among construction materials in combining excellent thermal resistance and thermal inertia. Generally, low-density construction materials do not provide good thermal inertia, while heavier ones commonly have poor thermal resistance. Five different 10.2 cm (4 in.) AAC samples made from US electric utility fly ash as the silica source, along with three 10.2 cm (4 in.) conventional building material specimens, were tested for thermal inertia properties. Three primary issues addressed by these experiments were: (1) to develop and compare AAC thermal inertia to conventional building materials; (2) to document differences in thermal inertia characteristics of the AAC blocks produced by the various utilities; and (3) to determine if a periodic heat flow model using the thermal inertia approach adequately predicts the observed thermal inertia parameters of a material. A theoretical periodic heat flow model in the literature for thermal inertia did an adequate job of predicting the observed thermal inertia parameters for the AAC and conventional construction samples.

  4. Structural properties of autoclaved aerated concrete masonry

    SciTech Connect

    Matthys, J.H.; Nelson, R.L.

    1999-07-01

    Autoclaved aerated concrete masonry units are manufactured from portland cement, quartz sand, water, lime, gypsum and a gas forming agent. The units are steam cured under pressure in an autoclave transforming the material into a hard calcium silicate. The autoclaved aerated concrete masonry units are large-size solid rectangular prisms which are laid using thin-bed mortar layers into masonry assemblages. The system and product are not new--patented in 1924 by Swedish architect Johan Eriksson. Over a period of 60 years this product has been used in all areas of residential and industrial construction and in virtually all climates. However, the principal locations of application have been generally outside the US Little information in the US is available on the structural properties of this product. Due to the interest in use of this product in the construction industry and the construction of production plants in the US, the Construction Research Center at the University of Texas at Arlington and Robert L. Nelson & Associates conducted a series of tests to determine some of the basic structural properties of this product. This paper presents the findings of those investigations.

  5. The carbonation of autoclaved aerated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hanecka, K.; Koronthalyova, O.; Matiasovsky, P.

    1997-04-01

    During the long-term investigation of the physical properties of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) in the indoor environment with changing relative humidity and temperature the significant increase of the AAC density was found. It was proved that the increase of the density was a consequence of carbonation process. For the investigated types of the AAC the ultimate increase of density was proportional to initial dry density of the AAC. It was found as well that relative volumes of the micropores (with radius from 3.5 nm to 7,500 nm) of the investigated types of the AAC are proportional to their dry densities. The simulation of the time courses of density increase due to carbonation based on solution of modified diffusion equation was done. In spite of using simplifications (constant value of CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient, neglecting the relative humidity changes), the calculated time courses coincided sufficiently with the measured ones.

  6. Concrete Block Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    1967, Cedergren 1974, Federal Highway .’,U .. V,47 -’":: 37 Administration 1980). Block pavements have essentially the same prob- lems with moisture...Vicksburg, Miss. Cedergren , H. R. 1974. Drainage of Highway and Airfield Pavements, John Wiley and Sons, New VOk. I Cement and Concrete Association

  7. Non-autoclaved aerated concrete with mineral additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, L. V.; Rakov, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of joint grinding of Portland cement clinker, silica and carbonate components and mineral additives to specific surface of 280 - 300 m2/kg on the properties (strength, average density and thermal conductivity) of non-autoclaved aerated concrete, and the porosity of the hardened cement paste produced from Portland cement clinker with mineral additives. The joint grinding of the Portland cement clinker with silica and carbonate components and mineral additives reduces the energy consumption of non-autoclaved aerated concrete production. The efficiency of mineral additives (diopside, wollastonite) is due to the closeness the composition, the type of chemical bonds, physical and chemical characteristics (specific enthalpy of formation, specific entropy) to anhydrous clinker minerals and their hydration products. Considering the influence of these additions on hydration of clinker minerals and formation of hardened cement paste structure, dispersed wollastonite and diopside should be used as mineral additives. The hardness and, consequently, the elastic modulus of diopside are higher than that of hardened cement paste. As a result, there is a redistribution of stresses in the hardened cement paste interporous partitions and hardening, both the partitions and aerated concrete on the whole. The mineral additives introduction allowed to obtain the non-autoclaved aerated concrete with average density 580 kg/m3, compressive strength of 3.3 MPa and thermal conductivity of 0.131 W/(m.°C).

  8. Ergonomic evaluation of masons laying concrete masonry units and autoclaved aerated concrete.

    PubMed

    Hess, Jennifer A; Kincl, Laurel; Amasay, Tal; Wolfe, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Masons working with concrete masonry unit block have high rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders to the low back and shoulders associated with repetitively lifting and buttering heavy block. A new material, autoclaved aerated concrete, may reduce the risk of shoulder and back injury but, ergonomic evaluation is needed. This study evaluated shoulder exposure parameters, low back stress, and worker perceptions in two groups of journey level masons, one using CMU and the other using AAC block. Results indicate that for the left arm AAC masons spent significantly more time than CMU masons in static (38.2% versus 31.1%, respectively), and less time in slow motions (48.2% versus 52.2%, respectively) and faster motions (13.6% versus 16.7%, respectively) (p<0.05). CMU masons had significantly greater shoulder and low back pain (p=0.009) and they held block significantly longer than AAC masons (p<0.001). Low back compressive forces were high for both materials. Masons handling AAC demonstrated less left upper extremity stress but both materials were estimated to be hazardous to the low back.

  9. Cracking in autoclaved aerated concrete: Experimental investigation and XFEM modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ferretti, D.

    2015-01-15

    The paper aims to investigate and model cracking development in beams and deep-beams made of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC). Fracture mechanics of AAC has been first studied by performing three-point bending tests on beams, similar to those commonly used for ordinary concrete elements. In some of these tests, crack growth has been also monitored by using ESPI laser technique. In this way, it has been possible to calibrate the main parameters of a proper cohesive law by means of extended finite element inverse analysis. Subsequently, cracking tests have been also performed on deep-beams, whose behavior is more representative of full scale walls. To validate the proposed cohesive law, deep-beam experimental behavior has been finally simulated through XFEM.

  10. Methane biofiltration using autoclaved aerated concrete as the carrier material.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Mercado-Garcia, Daniel; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Boeckx, Pascal; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-09-01

    The methane removal capacity of mixed methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) culture in a biofilter setup using autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) as a highly porous carrier material was tested. Batch experiment was performed to optimize MOB immobilization on AAC specimens where optimum methane removal was obtained when calcium chloride was not added during bacterial inoculation step and 10-mm-thick AAC specimens were used. The immobilized MOB could remove methane at low concentration (~1000 ppmv) in a biofilter setup for 127 days at average removal efficiency (RE) of 28.7 %. Unlike a plug flow reactor, increasing the total volume of the filter by adding a biofilter in series did not result in higher total RE. MOB also exhibited a higher abundance at the bottom of the filter, in proximity with the methane gas inlet where a high methane concentration was found. Overall, an efficient methane biofilter performance could be obtained using AAC as the carrier material.

  11. Microstructural investigations of naturally and artificially weathered autoclaved aerated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kus, Huelya; Carlsson, Thomas

    2003-09-01

    The microstructural changes in autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC), particularly due to chemical degradation, have been investigated. The carbonation process has been studied on naturally and artificially weathered AAC by spectrographic and microscopic analysis. Visual inspections of unexposed and aged AAC were made by means of light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while chemical and structural analysis were based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results obtained from two different experimental exposure set-ups, i.e., natural and artificial weathering, are presented. Thin-section images clearly indicate leaching out of the surface layer resulting in open larger air voids. Both naturally and artificially weathered samples displayed similar ageing characteristics in terms of mineralogical changes. The XRD patterns confirm that tobermorite were gradually transforming into calcium carbonate with exposure time. Calcite and gypsum were the two main crystal structures growing during weathering as detected in the SEM+EDS examinations.

  12. Numerical modelling of the strength of highly porous aerated autoclaved concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Schenider, T.; Greil, P.; Schober, G.

    1998-12-31

    Highly porous building materials like aerated autoclaved concrete are characterized by low thermal conductivity and high mechanical strength, which both strongly depend on porosity. The influence of porosity distribution on the compressive strength of aerated autoclaved concrete was investigated by using finite element analysis and multiaxial Weibull theory. Calculations of failure probability of microstructures with ordered as well as random pore configurations show a dependence of compressive strength on the Weibull modulus of the matrix material and the size and arrangement of pores. The results of the calculations are compared to experimental data of aerated autoclaved concrete.

  13. Binary Effect of Fly Ash and Palm Oil Fuel Ash on Heat of Hydration Aerated Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin; Rafique Bhutta, Muhammad Aamer; Samadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    The binary effect of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on heat of hydration of aerated concrete was studied. Three aerated concrete mixes were prepared, namely, concrete containing 100% ordinary Portland cement (control sample or Type I), binary concrete made from 50% POFA (Type II), and ternary concrete containing 30% POFA and 20% PFA (Type III). It is found that the temperature increases due to heat of hydration through all the concrete specimens especially in the control sample. However, the total temperature rises caused by the heat of hydration through both of the new binary and ternary concrete were significantly lower than the control sample. The obtained results reveal that the replacement of Portland cement with binary and ternary materials is beneficial, particularly for mass concrete where thermal cracking due to extreme heat rise is of great concern. PMID:24696646

  14. Binary effect of fly ash and palm oil fuel ash on heat of hydration aerated concrete.

    PubMed

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin; Rafique Bhutta, Muhammad Aamer; Samadi, Mostafa; Sajjadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    The binary effect of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on heat of hydration of aerated concrete was studied. Three aerated concrete mixes were prepared, namely, concrete containing 100% ordinary Portland cement (control sample or Type I), binary concrete made from 50% POFA (Type II), and ternary concrete containing 30% POFA and 20% PFA (Type III). It is found that the temperature increases due to heat of hydration through all the concrete specimens especially in the control sample. However, the total temperature rises caused by the heat of hydration through both of the new binary and ternary concrete were significantly lower than the control sample. The obtained results reveal that the replacement of Portland cement with binary and ternary materials is beneficial, particularly for mass concrete where thermal cracking due to extreme heat rise is of great concern.

  15. Structure formation of aerated concrete containing waste coal combustion products generated in the thermal vortex power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. I.; Stolboushkin, A. Yu; Temlyanstev, M. V.; Syromyasov, V. A.; Fomina, O. A.

    2016-10-01

    The results of fly ash research, generated in the process of waste coal combustion in the thermal vortex power units and used as an aggregate in aerated concrete, are provided. It is established that fly ash can be used in the production of cement or concrete with low loss on ignition (LOI). The permitted value of LOI in fly ash, affecting the structure formation and operational properties of aerated concrete, are defined. During non-autoclaved hardening of aerated concrete with fly ash aggregate and LOI not higher than 2%, the formation of acicular crystals of ettringite, reinforcing interporous partitions, takes place.

  16. Fly ash from cellulose industry as secondary raw material in autoclaved aerated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, A.; Eggenberger, U.; Mumenthaler, T.

    1999-03-01

    Because fly ash from cellulose industries contains considerable amounts of free lime and sulfate, they are potential secondary raw materials for the production of autoclaved aerated concrete. Laboratory experiments were performed by replacing lime and sulfate in conventional autoclaved aerated concrete mixtures by fly ash. Compared to a reference series, samples with even higher compressive strength could be produced with lime-sulfate ash. At higher proportions of fly ash, the formation of calcium silicate hydrate phases is delayed and the presence of unreacted portlandite and newly formed scawtite produce a drop in strength and an increase in shrinkage. Low strength resulted by using Al-bearing ash with a lower amount of free CaO, which makes this type of ash not applicable in practice.

  17. Investigation of Electromagnetic Wave Absorber Based on Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aerated Concrete, Using Time-Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laukaitis, A.; Sinica, M.; Balevičius, S.; Levitas, B.

    2008-03-01

    The electromagnetic wave absorbers prepared from autoclaved aerated concrete containing carbon fibers as additions in the shape of slabs with pyramids cut on one plane of these slabs were tested using dc microwave source and the time-domain method. It was demonstrated that autoclaved aerated concrete allows one to fabricate electromagnetic wave absorbers which have a reflection coefficient up to -30 dB in the frequency range from 2 GHz to 18 GHz.

  18. Concrete Paving Blocks: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-11

    REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS C)gErE PAVING’ S0C4(S: At4N OVERVIEW 6. AUTHOR(S) tlCHfL K. AM U EUT5Av-T) C1 VI L...C13p c~cTE ePvI4G 3LCas PA\\I~f1EpJT W~f 40MIANCE (0~ PA ;Fs eAVrEENT DES 1I6M PVEA Y~~f~F C _S a~ 9L CONCRETE PAVING BLODCKS AN OVERVIEW by LT MCHAEL K...papers are published elsewhere. This report examines CBP’s from several perspectives in order to provide an overview of this alternative pavement

  19. CONCRETE BLOCKS' ADVERSE EFFECTS ON INDOOR AIR AND RECOMMENDED SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air infiltration through highly permeable concrete blocks can allow entry of various serious indoor air pollutants. An easy approach to avoiding these pollutants is to select a less–air-permeable concrete block. Tests show that air permeability of concrete blocks can vary by a fa...

  20. Strength of masonry blocks made with recycled concrete aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Pierre; Dalati, Rouba El

    The idea of recycling concrete of demolished buildings aims at preserving the environment. Indeed, the reuse of concrete as aggregate in new concrete mixes helped to reduce the expenses related to construction and demolition (C&D) waste management and, especially, to protect the environment by reducing the development rate of new quarries. This paper presents the results of an experimental study conducted on masonry blocks containing aggregates resulting from concrete recycling. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of recycled aggregates on compressive strength of concrete blocks. Tests were performed on series of concrete blocks: five series each made of different proportions of recycled aggregates, and one series of reference blocks exclusively composed of natural aggregates. Tests showed that using recycled aggregates with addition of cement allows the production of concrete blocks with compressive strengths comparable to those obtained on concrete blocks made exclusively of natural aggregates.

  1. Application of automatic image analysis for the investigation of autoclaved aerated concrete structure

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, I.; Schlegel, E. . Inst. fuer Silikattechnik)

    1994-01-01

    Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) is formed from small-grained mixtures of raw materials and Al-powder as an air entraining agent. Owing to its high porosity AAC has a low bulk density which leads to very good heat insulating qualities. Automatic image analysis in connection with stereology and stochastic geometry was used to describe the size distribution of air pores in autoclaved concrete. The experiments were carried out an AAC samples with extremely different bulk densities and compressive strengths. The assumption of an elliptic shape of pores leads to an unambiguous characterization of structure by bi-histograms. It will be possible to calculate the spatial pore size distribution by these histograms, if the pores are assumed as being spheroids. A marked point field model and the pair correlation function g[sub a](r) were used to describe the pore structure.

  2. DETAIL OF THE CONCRETE PAVING BLOCKS AT THE REAR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE CONCRETE PAVING BLOCKS AT THE REAR OF THE BUILDING. SHOWING THE PIVOTING METAL LOOP RECESSED INTO THE CONCRETE. VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type A, 601 Boquet Boulevard, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  3. 56. photographer unknown 14 October 1935 CONCRETE BLOCKS OF SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. photographer unknown 14 October 1935 CONCRETE BLOCKS OF SOUTH HALF OF SPILLWAY SHOWING STEEL REINFORCING OF BAFFLES. - Bonneville Project, Bonneville Dam, Columbia River, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  4. Measurement of the gas permeability of autoclaved aerated concrete in conjunction with its physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Waegner, F.; Moertel, H.; Schober, G.

    1995-12-01

    The technique for determining the gas permeability of autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) which was developed here allows one to identify differences in the evolution of the porous structure caused by various manufacturing conditions. A comparison of permeability and compressive strength in relation to density illustrates a contradictor tendency on the part of these two physical properties, i.e. as the raw density increases, compressive strength and permeability decline. Small cracks arising during the rising process result in decreased compressive strength in the direction of rising and an increased gas permeability perpendicular to that direction. This anisotropy in AAC can be more precisely illustrated by measuring the gas permeability than by determining the compressive strength, especially with lower classes of density.

  5. Strain rate sensitivity of autoclaved aerated concrete from quasi-static regime to shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mespoulet, Jérôme; Plassard, Fabien; Hereil, Pierre Louis

    2015-09-01

    The quasi-static mechanical behavior of autoclaved aerated concrete is well-known and can be expressed as a function of its density. There are however not much studies dealing with its dynamic behavior and its damping ability when subjected to a mechanical shock or a blast. This study presents experimental results obtained at the Shock Physics Laboratory of THIOT INGENIERIE company. The test specimens are made of YTONG(TM ) cellular concrete with porosity in the range of 75 to 80%. Experimental tests cover a large strain rate amplitude (higher than 104 s-1) for specimens up to 250 mm. They were carried out with a small compression press and with two facilities dedicated to dynamic material characterization: JUPITER dynamic large press (2 MN, 3 ms rising time) and TITAN multi-caliber single-stage gas gun. Results in un-confined conditions show an increase of the compressive strength when strain rate increases (45% increase at 5.102 s-1) but dynamic tests induce damage early in the experiment. This competition between dynamic strength raise and specimen fracture makes the complete compaction curve determination not to be done in unconfined dynamic condition. A 25% increase of the compressive strength has been observed between unconfined and confined condition in Q.S. regime.

  6. Friction evaluation of concrete paver blocks for airport pavement applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    The development and use of concrete paver blocks is reviewed and some general specifications for application of this type of pavement surface at airport facilities are given. Two different shapes of interlocking concrete paver blocks installed in the track surface at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) are described. Preliminary cornering performance results from testing of 40 x 14 radial-belted and bias-ply aircraft tires are reviewed. These tire tests are part of a larger, ongoing joint NASA/FAA/Industry Surface Traction and Radial Tire (START) Program involving several different tire sizes. Both dry and wet surface conditions were evaluated on the two concrete paver block test surfaces and a conventional, nongrooved Portland cement concrete surface. Future test plans involving evaluation of other concrete paver block designs at the ALDF are indicated.

  7. Impact of External Heat Insulation on Drying Process of Autoclaved Aerated Concrete Masonry Constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubene, S.; Vilnitis, M.; Noviks, J.

    2015-11-01

    In the time when sustainable construction as well as cost saving on heating and cooling of buildings is one of the most important construction trends, it is important to acknowledge the possibilities of application of construction materials with high heat insulation parameters and the ways in which these parameters can be obtained. Autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) is a load bearing construction material, which has high heat insulation parameters, although it has one significant disadvantage. If the AAC masonry construction has high moisture content, it loses its heat insulation properties. This is the reason why it is important to detect the humidity distribution throughout the cross section of the masonry elements in order to conduct the drying process of the AAC construction. Therefore, the question about non-destructive detection of humidity distribution throughout the cross section of the material arises. Humidity distribution throughout the cross section of AAC masonry constructions has a significant impact on its heat resistivity properties. Application of electrical impedance spectrometry (EIS) method for determination of humidity distribution throughout the cross section of AAC constructions has been a subject of research recently. The EIS method is an easily applicable non-destructive testing method for detection of the humidity distribution throughout the cross section of a construction. Research on the impact of the external heat insulation layer on the speed of humidity distribution changes is described in this paper.

  8. Autoclaved aerated concrete: Shaping the evolution of residential construction in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bukoski, S.C.

    1998-08-14

    Precast Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC) is a proven construction material used in Europe for over 70 years. Introduced to the United States in 1990, construction thus far is limited to commercial and custom borne applications. Premium benefits include energy efficiency and resistance to natural disaster and pests. Despite being the leading residential construction material in Europe and Japan, lumber is the leading material of choice in the United States. AAC is clearly a superior residential construction product in its current form, but the economic position of lumber and industry change hesitation demand a different marketing approach than is used elsewhere in the world. Using an internet-based survey, home buyers provide data surrounding three core issues: the important characteristics of a house, how much are they willing to pay for superior benefits, and the expected payback period. Adapting current product form and installation methods can make AAC cost competitive with traditional residential framing systems. Consumer education is essential in this evolution to understand the connection between building products and their benefits. As an option to lumber construction, consumers will benefit from its low utility and life cycle costs. The environment will benefit from its energy efficiency and natural resource conservation.

  9. 78. Left to right: concrete block workshop, barge and boat ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. Left to right: concrete block workshop, barge and boat alongside Pier #1, Machine Shop, Monitor visible in background. - Thames Tow Boat Company, Foot of Farnsworth Street, New London, New London County, CT

  10. 23. VIEW SHOWING BROWN CONCRETE BLOCK STRUCTURES AND SOUTHERN EDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW SHOWING BROWN CONCRETE BLOCK STRUCTURES AND SOUTHERN EDGE OF RADAR SITE Everett Weinreb, photographer, March 1988 - Los Pinetos Nike Missile Site, Santa Clara Road, Los Angeles National Forest, Sylmar, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 23. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW LOOKING TOWARD EAST SHOWING CONCRETE BLOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS VIEW LOOKING TOWARD EAST SHOWING CONCRETE BLOCK CONSTRUCTION. INEEL PHOTO NUMBER NRTS-59-4305. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. Credit BG. Southeast and northeast facades of concrete block structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Southeast and northeast facades of concrete block structure built in the late 1960s. It is now used to store miscellaneous equipment - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Liquid Oxygen Storage Facility, Second Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite <5mm) in the concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks.

  14. Concrete blocks` adverse effects on indoor air and recommended solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppersberger, J.S.

    1995-04-01

    Air infiltration through highly permeable concrete blocks can allow entry of various serious indoor air pollutants including radon. An easy approach to avoiding these pollutants is to select a less-air-permeable concrete block. Tests show that air permeability of concrete blocks can vary by a factor greater than 50 (0.63--35 standard L/min/m{sup 2} at 3 Pa). The surface texture of the blocks correlates well with air permeability; test results of smoother, closed-surface-texture blocks were usually less air-permeable. During construction, air infiltration can be minimized by capping walls and carefully sealing around openings for utilities or other penetrations. Structures with indoor air-quality problems due to soil-gas entry can be mitigated more effectively with less coating material if the blocks have a closed surface texture. All coatings evaluated--cementaceous block filler (which has the lowest applied cost and is more than 99.5% effective), surface bonding cement, water-based epoxy, polysulfide vinyl acrylic, and latex (three coats)--were highly effective (more than 98%) in reducing air permeability when adequately applied. Coating selection should be influenced by expected service life, considering surface condition and cost.

  15. Credit BG. Southwest and southeast facades of concrete block structure ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit BG. Southwest and southeast facades of concrete block structure built in the late 1960s. Fire House No. 4 (Building 4456) appears in background at right - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Liquid Oxygen Repair Facility, Second Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. Use of recycled glass for concrete masonry blocks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, C.; Baxter, S.

    1997-11-01

    A two-year research project was conducted to study the technical and economic feasibility of using mixed-color crushed waste glass for concrete masonry. From a technical standpoint, two problems had to be confronted. First, it was known that the silica in glass is highly reactive in the alkaline environment of portland cement concrete. Second, there was the possibility of strength loss, as crushed glass particles with smooth surfaces were substituted for regular aggregate. Both problems were solved in the course of this research. It was found that waste glass ground to mesh size No. 30 or smaller does not exhibit any expansion due to alkali-silica reaction (ASR). Another significant research finding was that very finely ground glass exhibits pozzolanic properties and therefore is suitable as a partial replacement for portland cement. The economic feasibility of concrete block masonry with glass both as aggregate and cement substitution was evaluated and found to be encouraging.

  17. Investigations into the fire hazard of a composite made from aerated concrete and crushed expanded polystyrene waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kligys, M.; Laukaitis, A.; Sinica, M.; Sezemanas, G.; Dranseika, N.

    2008-03-01

    The study deals with experimental investigations into the fire hazard of a composite of density 150-350 kg/m3 made of aerated concrete and crushed expanded polystyrene waste. The results of fire tests showed that a single-flame source of low heat output (0.07 kW) did not influence the origination and spread of flame on the surface of test specimens, regardless their density. Upon exposing the specimens to a single burning item of moderate heat output (30.0 kW), during the first 600 s of exposure, neither flaming particles nor droplets originated, nor a lateral flame spread on the long specimen wing was observed. In the case of high heat output (112 kW), the specimens of densities 150 and 250 kg/m3 started to burn, but those of density 150 kg/m3, in addition, lost their integrity.

  18. Ultrasonic linear array validation via concrete test blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hoegh, Kyle Khazanovich, Lev; Ferraro, Chris; Clayton, Dwight

    2015-03-31

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) comparatively evaluated the ability of a number of NDE techniques to generate an image of the volume of 6.5′ X 5.0′ X 10″ concrete specimens fabricated at the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) NDE Validation Facility in Gainesville, Florida. These test blocks were fabricated to test the ability of various NDE methods to characterize various placements and sizes of rebar as well as simulated cracking and non-consolidation flaws. The first version of the ultrasonic linear array device, MIRA [version 1], was one of 7 different NDE equipment used to characterize the specimens. This paper deals with the ability of this equipment to determine subsurface characterizations such as reinforcing steel relative size, concrete thickness, irregularities, and inclusions using Kirchhoff-based migration techniques. The ability of individual synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) B-scan cross sections resulting from self-contained scans are compared with various processing, analysis, and interpretation methods using the various features fabricated in the specimens for validation. The performance is detailed, especially with respect to the limitations and implications for evaluation of a thicker, more heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  19. Ultrasonic linear array validation via concrete test blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoegh, Kyle; Khazanovich, Lev; Ferraro, Chris; Clayton, Dwight

    2015-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) comparatively evaluated the ability of a number of NDE techniques to generate an image of the volume of 6.5' X 5.0' X 10″ concrete specimens fabricated at the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) NDE Validation Facility in Gainesville, Florida. These test blocks were fabricated to test the ability of various NDE methods to characterize various placements and sizes of rebar as well as simulated cracking and non-consolidation flaws. The first version of the ultrasonic linear array device, MIRA [version 1], was one of 7 different NDE equipment used to characterize the specimens. This paper deals with the ability of this equipment to determine subsurface characterizations such as reinforcing steel relative size, concrete thickness, irregularities, and inclusions using Kirchhoff-based migration techniques. The ability of individual synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) B-scan cross sections resulting from self-contained scans are compared with various processing, analysis, and interpretation methods using the various features fabricated in the specimens for validation. The performance is detailed, especially with respect to the limitations and implications for evaluation of a thicker, more heavily reinforced concrete structures.

  20. The diagnostic X-ray protection characteristics of Ytong, an aerated concrete based building material.

    PubMed

    Tsalafoutas, I A; Yakoumakis, E; Manetou, A; Flioni-Vyza, A

    1998-09-01

    Ytong is a widely used building material. The X-ray attenuation properties of Ytong for broad beam geometry conditions and for tube potentials in the 50-140 kVp range are investigated. Comparisons with published data for concrete and other building materials are made. The results suggest that Ytong is not suitable for primary X-ray shielding in common diagnostic installations. However, walls of Ytong, typically 15-20 cm thick, may offer adequate protection in dental and mammography installations, as well as in low workload diagnostic installations as a secondary barrier.

  1. Are Abstract and Concrete Concepts Organized Differently? Evidence from the Blocked Translation Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Han, Zaizhu; Bi, Yanchao

    2013-01-01

    Using the blocked-translation paradigm with healthy participants, we examined Crutch and Warrington's hypothesis that concrete and abstract concepts are organized by distinct principles: concrete concepts by semantic similarities and abstract ones by associations. In three experiments we constructed two types of experimental blocking (similar…

  2. Use of wastes derived from earthquakes for the production of concrete masonry partition wall blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Zhao; Ling, Tung-Chai; Kou, Shi-Cong; Wang Qingyuan; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Solved the scientific and technological challenges impeding use of waste rubble derived from earthquake, by providing an alternative solution of recycling the waste in moulded concrete block products. > Significant requirements for optimum integration on the utilization of the waste aggregates in the production of concrete blocks are investigated. > A thorough understanding of the mechanical properties of concrete blocks made with waste derived from earthquake is reported. - Abstract: Utilization of construction and demolition (C and D) wastes as recycled aggregates in the production of concrete and concrete products have attracted much attention in recent years. However, the presence of large quantities of crushed clay brick in some the C and D waste streams (e.g. waste derived collapsed masonry buildings after an earthquake) renders the recycled aggregates unsuitable for high grade use. One possibility is to make use of the low grade recycled aggregates for concrete block production. In this paper, we report the results of a comprehensive study to assess the feasibility of using crushed clay brick as coarse and fine aggregates in concrete masonry block production. The effects of the content of crushed coarse and fine clay brick aggregates (CBA) on the mechanical properties of non-structural concrete block were quantified. From the experimental test results, it was observed that incorporating the crushed clay brick aggregates had a significant influence on the properties of blocks. The hardened density and drying shrinkage of the block specimens decreased with an increase in CBA content. The use of CBA increased the water absorption of block specimens. The results suggested that the amount of crushed clay brick to be used in concrete masonry blocks should be controlled at less than 25% (coarse aggregate) and within 50-75% for fine aggregates.

  3. Comminution and sizing processes of concrete block waste as recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gomes, P C C; Ulsen, C; Pereira, F A; Quattrone, M; Angulo, S C

    2015-11-01

    Due to the environmental impact of construction and demolition waste (CDW), recycling is mandatory. It is also important that recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) are used in concrete to meet market demands. In the literature, the influence of RCAs on concrete has been investigated, but very limited studies have been conducted on how the origin of concrete waste and comminution processes influence RCA characteristics. This paper aims to investigate the influence of three different comminution and sizing processes (simple screening, crushing and grinding) on the composition, shape and porosity characteristics of RCA obtained from concrete block waste. Crushing and grinding implies a reduction of RCA porosity. However, due to the presence of coarse quartz rounded river pebbles in the original concrete block mixtures, the shape characteristics deteriorated. A large amount of powder (<0.15 mm) without detectable anhydrous cement was also generated.

  4. Use of wastes derived from earthquakes for the production of concrete masonry partition wall blocks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhao; Ling, Tung-Chai; Kou, Shi-Cong; Wang, Qingyuan; Poon, Chi-Sun

    2011-08-01

    Utilization of construction and demolition (C&D) wastes as recycled aggregates in the production of concrete and concrete products have attracted much attention in recent years. However, the presence of large quantities of crushed clay brick in some the C&D waste streams (e.g. waste derived collapsed masonry buildings after an earthquake) renders the recycled aggregates unsuitable for high grade use. One possibility is to make use of the low grade recycled aggregates for concrete block production. In this paper, we report the results of a comprehensive study to assess the feasibility of using crushed clay brick as coarse and fine aggregates in concrete masonry block production. The effects of the content of crushed coarse and fine clay brick aggregates (CBA) on the mechanical properties of non-structural concrete block were quantified. From the experimental test results, it was observed that incorporating the crushed clay brick aggregates had a significant influence on the properties of blocks. The hardened density and drying shrinkage of the block specimens decreased with an increase in CBA content. The use of CBA increased the water absorption of block specimens. The results suggested that the amount of crushed clay brick to be used in concrete masonry blocks should be controlled at less than 25% (coarse aggregate) and within 50-75% for fine aggregates.

  5. 24 CFR 3285.306 - Design procedures for concrete block piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Design procedures for concrete....306 Design procedures for concrete block piers. (a) Frame piers less than 36 inches high. (1) Frame piers less than 36 inches high are permitted to be constructed of single, open, or closed-cell...

  6. 24 CFR 3285.306 - Design procedures for concrete block piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Design procedures for concrete....306 Design procedures for concrete block piers. (a) Frame piers less than 36 inches high. (1) Frame piers less than 36 inches high are permitted to be constructed of single, open, or closed-cell...

  7. 24 CFR 3285.306 - Design procedures for concrete block piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Design procedures for concrete....306 Design procedures for concrete block piers. (a) Frame piers less than 36 inches high. (1) Frame piers less than 36 inches high are permitted to be constructed of single, open, or closed-cell...

  8. 24 CFR 3285.306 - Design procedures for concrete block piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Design procedures for concrete....306 Design procedures for concrete block piers. (a) Frame piers less than 36 inches high. (1) Frame piers less than 36 inches high are permitted to be constructed of single, open, or closed-cell...

  9. 24 CFR 3285.306 - Design procedures for concrete block piers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Design procedures for concrete....306 Design procedures for concrete block piers. (a) Frame piers less than 36 inches high. (1) Frame piers less than 36 inches high are permitted to be constructed of single, open, or closed-cell...

  10. Design Review Report for Concrete Cover Block Replaced by Steel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    JAKA, O.M.

    2000-07-27

    The design for the steel cover plates to replace concrete cover blocks for U-109 was reviewed and approved in a design review meeting. The design for steel plates to replace concrete blocks were reviewed and approved by comparison and similarity with U-109 for the following additional pits: 241-U-105. 241-I-103, 241-Ax-101. 241-A-101, 241-SX-105, 241-S-A, 241-S-C, 241-SX-A.

  11. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction of tobermorite formation in autoclaved aerated concrete: Influence of silica source reactivity and Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kunio; Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sato, Masugu

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal formation of tobermorite during the processing of autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly developed autoclave cell and a photon-counting pixel array detector were used. To investigate the effects of the silica source, reactive quartz from chert and less-reactive quartz from quartz sand were used as starting materials. The effect of Al addition on tobermorite formation was also studied. In all cases, C-S-H, hydroxylellestadite and katoite were clearly observed as intermediates. Acceleration of tobermorite formation by Al addition was clearly observed. However, Al addition did not affect the dissolution rate of quartz. Two pathways, via C-S-H and katoite, were also observed in the Al-containing system. These results suggest that the structure of initially formed C-S-H is important for the subsequent tobermorite formation reactions.

  12. TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA666. WEST SIDE. CAMERA FACING EAST. CONCRETE BLOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRITIUM LABORATORY, TRA-666. WEST SIDE. CAMERA FACING EAST. CONCRETE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-38-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 4/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. STEAM PLANT, TRA609. ELEVATIONS. CONCRETE BLOCK WALLS. HIGHBAY SECTION AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STEAM PLANT, TRA-609. ELEVATIONS. CONCRETE BLOCK WALLS. HIGH-BAY SECTION AND VENTILATORS ON NORTH SIDE. BLAW-KNOX 3150-809-4, 8/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0609-00-098-100686, REV. 1. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Effect of concrete block weight and wall height on electromyographic activity and heart rate of masons.

    PubMed

    Anton, D; Rosecrance, J C; Gerr, F; Merlino, L A; Cook, T M

    2005-08-15

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are common among construction workers, such as masons. Few interventions are available to reduce masons' exposure to heavy lifting, a risk factor for MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether one such intervention, the use of light-weight concrete blocks (LWBs), reduces physiological loads compared to standard-weight blocks (SWBs). Using a repeated measures design, 21 masons each constructed two 32-block walls, seven courses (rows) high, entirely of either SWBs or LWBs. Surface electromyography (EMG), from arm and back muscles, and heart rate was sampled. For certain muscles, EMG amplitudes were slightly lower when masons were laying LWBs compared to SWBs. Upper back and forearm extensor EMG amplitudes were greater for the higher wall courses for both block weights. There were no significant differences in heart rate between the two blocks. Interventions that address block weight and course height may be effective for masons.

  15. Inspection of a large concrete block containing embedded defects using ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, David; Margetan, Frank J.; Koester, Lucas; Clayton, Dwight

    2016-02-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR), also known as impulse response radar, was used to examine a thick concrete block containing reinforcing steel bars (rebar) and embedded defects. The block was located at the University of Minnesota, measured approximately 7 feet tall by 7 feet wide by 40 inches deep, and was intended to simulate certain aspects of a concrete containment wall at a nuclear power plant. This paper describes the measurements that were made and various analyses of the data. We begin with a description of the block itself and the GPR equipment and methods used in our inspections. The methods include the application of synthetic aperture focusing techniques (SAFT). We then present and discuss GPR images of the block's interior made using 1600-MHz, 900-MHz, and 400-MHz antennas operating in pulse/echo mode. A number of the embedded defects can be seen, and we discuss how their relative detectability can be quantified by comparison to the response from nearby rebar. We next discuss through-transmission measurements made using pairs of 1600-MHz and 900-MHz antennas, and the analysis of that data to deduce the average electromagnetic (EM) wave speed and attenuation of the concrete. Through the 40-inch thickness, attenuation rises approximately linearly with frequency at a rate near 0.7 dB/inch/GHz. However, there is evidence that EM properties vary with depth in the block. We conclude with a brief summary and a discussion of possible future work.

  16. 78 FR 76402 - Notice of Proposed Buy America Waiver for the Pad and Rubber Boot of a Concrete Block for a Low...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... Concrete Block for a Low Vibration Track System AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice... Buy America waiver for the pad and rubber boot of a concrete block for its Low Vibration Track (LVT...-availability waiver for the procurement of the pad and rubber boot of the concrete block used in its LVT...

  17. Photocatalytic activity of titanium dioxide nanoparticle coatings applied on autoclaved aerated concrete: effect of weathering on coating physical characteristics and gaseous toluene removal.

    PubMed

    Maury-Ramirez, Anibal; Demeestere, Kristof; De Belie, Nele

    2012-04-15

    Autoclaved aerated concrete has been coated by TiO(2) nanoparticles through a dip-coating (DC) and a novel vacuum saturation (VS) method to investigate the weathering resistance and gaseous toluene removal potential of both coating types. The effect of intensive weathering - corresponding to a period of about 25 years - on the coating characteristics was studied in terms of TiO(2) content, coating thickness and color changes. Toluene removal was investigated in a lab-scale flow-through photoreactor at 24°C and 52% relative humidity, and results obtained immediately after application of the coatings and after two weathering stages were compared. Weathering of the DC and VS coated samples resulted into a decrease of the coating layer thickness of more than 98%, confirmed by a decline in TiO(2) content by more than 99% and 93%, respectively. Surprisingly, toluene removal efficiencies before and after weathering kept constant at about 95% for both coating types, corresponding to an elimination rate of 60-70 mg/(m(2)h) at an initial toluene concentration of 15 ppm(v) and a gas residence time of 3 min. Increasing the toluene load by applying higher toluene inlet concentrations (up to 35 ppm(v)) and lower gas residence times (1 min) did decrease the toluene removal efficiency to 32-41%, but elimination rates increased up to 214 mg/(m(2)h), being a factor of 1.6-4.5 times higher than reported in recent work.

  18. Microfouling studies on experimental test blocks of steel-making slag and concrete exposed to seawater off Chiba, Japan.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Kanavillil; Matsunaga, Hisahiro; Takagi, Masato

    2003-08-01

    Microfouling studies with the emphasis on microalgae (Bacillariophyceae) were carried out on test blocks of steel-making slag in comparison with concrete. Two types of slag test blocks, with and without fly-ash as an additional source of silica, and concrete test blocks of size 75 x 26 x 26 mm were used to study microfouling build-up for a period of 30 d, with intermittent samplings after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d. The species composition, cell density, biomass and surface pH of the test pieces were determined, in addition to the hydrographic parameters of the water column. Microfouling studies showed higher numbers of algal species as well as a greater cell density on the slag than on the concrete blocks. This was true with respect to biomass measured as dry weight also. Colonization was significantly delayed in the case of concrete. Navicula spp. and Nitzschia spp. were the initial colonizers on all three types of substrata and were the dominant genera throughout the study period. While the number of species increased, several disappeared after colonization, as a part of community build-up. The surface pH of the slag blocks was near neutral, whilst that of the concrete was highly alkaline during the initial period of exposure. This alkaline surface reduced the rate of species colonization on the concrete blocks initially. The study showed severe biofouling on the slag blocks compared to concrete and thus they were considered an environmentally benign construction material for land protection. The use of slag as the construction material for land protection would greatly reduce the expense compared to concrete.

  19. Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, M.L.

    1995-06-19

    Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

  20. Laboratory analysis of the infiltration capacity of interlocking concrete block pavements in car parks.

    PubMed

    Sañudo-Fontaneda, Luis A; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Jorge; Vega-Zamanillo, Angel; Castro-Fresno, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Interlocking concrete block pavements (ICBPs) have been widely used in car parks to reduce runoff. Researches have demonstrated that clogging is the most influential factor in the reduction of the infiltration capacity of this type of permeable pavement. Nevertheless, there is no laboratory study of the infiltration performance of ICBPs that combines clogging levels with variables related with the topography of car parks such as runoff surface length (R(SL)) and surface slope (S(S)). This paper studies the infiltration behaviour of ICBP during their operational life in a car park using an improved version of the Cantabrian Fixed (CF) Infiltrometer. This laboratory device simulates direct rainfall and runoff from adjacent impervious areas over an ICBPs surface of 0.25 m(2) for different slopes (0, 3, 5, 7 and 10%) and three scenarios of clogging (surface newly built, surface clogged and surface clogged with maintenance). This paper presents the results of the tests and a statistical analysis based on three regression models (corresponding to each clogging scenario) depending on the R(SL) and S(S) variables. All models passed a confidence level of 95%, presenting high R(2) values and showing that R(SL) is a more influential variable than the S(S) for all clogging scenarios.

  1. Experimental stress analysis of large plastic deformations in a hollow sphere deformed by impact against a concrete block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental plastic strain measurement system is presented for use on the surface of high velocity impact test models. The system was used on a hollow sphere tested in impact against a reinforced concrete block. True strains, deviatoric stresses, and true stresses were calculated from experimental measurements. The maximum strain measured in the model was small compared to the true failure strain obtained from static tensile tests of model material. This fact suggests that a much greater impact velocity would be required to cause failure of the model shell structure.

  2. Laboratory Study of Crack Development and Crack Interaction in Concrete Blocks due to Swelling of Cracking Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frühwirt, Thomas; Plößer, Arne; Konietzky, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    The main focus of this work was to investigate temporary and spatial features of crack development in concrete blocks due to the action of a swelling agent. A commercial available cement-based mortar which shows heavily swelling behaviour when hydrating is used to provide inside pressure in boreholes in conrete blocks and hence serves as cracking agent. As no data for the swelling behaviour of the cracking agent were available the maximum axial swelling stress and axial free swelling strain were determined experimentally. In a first series of tests on concrete blocks the influence of an external mechanical, unidirectional stress on the development-time and orientation of cracks has been investigated for a range of loading levels. The stress state in the blocks prepared with a single borehole was determined by a superposition of internal stresses caused by swelling pressure and external mechanical loading. For a second series of tests prismatic blocks with two boreholes where prepared. This test setup allowed to realize different orientation of boreholes with respect to the uniaxial loading direction. Complementary tests were done using the cracking agent in both, only one or none of the boreholes. Different modes of crack interaction and influence of filled or unfilled boreholes have been observed. Features of crack development showed significant sensitivity to external loading. Starting even at very low load levels crack orientation was primarely determined by the direction of the external load. Temporal change in crack development due to the different load levels was insignificant and no consistent conclusion could be drawn. Crack interaction phenomena only were observed with two boreholes orientated primarely in direction of the external loading. Even in these cases crack orientation was mainly determined by the external stress field and only locally influenced by other cracks or the unfilled borehole. The work provides us with an extensive catalogue of

  3. USING AERATION FOR CORROSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aeration is a useful drinking water treatment process. Aeration has been used to remove hydrogen sulfide, methane, radon, iron, manganese, and volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) from drinking water. Aeration is also effective in removing carbon dioxide which directly impacts ...

  4. Teko: A block preconditioning capability with concrete example applications in Navier--Stokes and MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Cyr, Eric C.; Shadid, John N.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.

    2016-10-27

    This study describes the design of Teko, an object-oriented C++ library for implementing advanced block preconditioners. Mathematical design criteria that elucidate the needs of block preconditioning libraries and techniques are explained and shown to motivate the structure of Teko. For instance, a principal design choice was for Teko to strongly reflect the mathematical statement of the preconditioners to reduce development burden and permit focus on the numerics. Additional mechanisms are explained that provide a pathway to developing an optimized production capable block preconditioning capability with Teko. Finally, Teko is demonstrated on fluid flow and magnetohydrodynamics applications. In addition to highlighting the features of the Teko library, these new results illustrate the effectiveness of recent preconditioning developments applied to advanced discretization approaches.

  5. Teko: A block preconditioning capability with concrete example applications in Navier--Stokes and MHD

    DOE PAGES

    Cyr, Eric C.; Shadid, John N.; Tuminaro, Raymond S.

    2016-10-27

    This study describes the design of Teko, an object-oriented C++ library for implementing advanced block preconditioners. Mathematical design criteria that elucidate the needs of block preconditioning libraries and techniques are explained and shown to motivate the structure of Teko. For instance, a principal design choice was for Teko to strongly reflect the mathematical statement of the preconditioners to reduce development burden and permit focus on the numerics. Additional mechanisms are explained that provide a pathway to developing an optimized production capable block preconditioning capability with Teko. Finally, Teko is demonstrated on fluid flow and magnetohydrodynamics applications. In addition to highlightingmore » the features of the Teko library, these new results illustrate the effectiveness of recent preconditioning developments applied to advanced discretization approaches.« less

  6. Diffusion of radon through concrete block walls: A significant source of indoor radon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Goldberg, L.F.

    1999-01-01

    Basement modules located in southern Minnesota have been the site of continuous radon and environmental measurements during heating seasons since 1993. Concentrations of radon within the basement modules ranged from 70 Bq.m-3 to over 4000 Bq.m-3 between November to April during the three measurement periods. In the soil gas for the same times, concentrations of radon ranged between 25,000 and 70,000 Bq.m-3. Levels of radon within the basement modules changed by factors of five or more within 24 h, in concert with pressure gradients of 4 to 20 Pa that developed between the basement modules and their surroundings. Diffusion is identified as the principal method by which radon is transferred into and out of the basement modules, and appears to be relatively independent of insulating materials and vapour retarders. The variability of radon and correlations with differential pressure gradients may be related to air currents in the block walls and soil that interrupt radon diffusing inward. This yields a net decrease of radon in the basement modules by decay and outward diffusion. Levels of radon within the basement modules increase when the pressure differential is zero and air flow ceases, allowing diffusion gradients to be re-established. Radon levels in both the soil and the basement modules then increase until an equilibrium is achieved.

  7. Improved Photodegradation of Organic Contaminants Using Nano-TiO2 and TiO2 -SiO2 Deposited on Portland Cement Concrete Blocks.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Hoda; Afshar, Shahrara

    2016-01-01

    The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2 ) and its hybrid with SiO2 (nano-TiO2 -SiO2 ) for degradation of some organic dyes on cementitious materials was studied in this work. Nanohybrid photocatalysts were prepared using an inorganic sol-gel precursor and then characterized using XRD, SEM and UV-Vis. The grain sizes were estimated by Scherrer's equation to be around 10 nm. Then, a thin layer was applied to Portland cement concrete (PCC) blocks by dipping them into nano-TiO2 and nano-TiO2 -SiO2 solution. The efficiency of coated PCC blocks for the photocatalytic decomposition of two dyes, Malachite Green oxalate (MG) and Methylene Blue (MB), was examined under UV and visible irradiation and then monitored by the chemical oxygen demand tests. The results showed that more than 80% and 92% of MG and MB were decomposed under UV-Vis irradiation using blocks coated with nano-TiO2 -SiO2 . TiO2 /PCC and TiO2 -SiO2 /PCC blocks showed a significant ability to oxidize dyes under visible and UV lights and TiO2 -SiO2 /PCC blocks require less time for dye degradation. Based on these results, coated blocks have increased photocatalytic activity which can make them commercially accessible photocatalysts.

  8. Lawson Aerator applications on rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland drills, brush hogs, Dixie harrows, tandem discs and other equipment have played an important role in treating degraded rangeland environments. The Lawson Aerator is one of the newer implements to enter the scene for rangeland improvements. The Lawson Aerator was designed as a pasture renov...

  9. Determinations of PCB within a project to develop cleanup methods for PCB-containing elastic sealant used in outdoor joints between concrete blocks in buildings.

    PubMed

    Sundahl, M; Sikander, E; Ek-Olausson, B; Hjorthage, A; Rosell, L; Tornevall, M

    1999-08-01

    Determinations of PCB were carried out as part of a project aimed at developing cleanup methods for PCB-containing elastic sealant used in outdoor joints between concrete blocks. The goals of the project were to develop methods, which minimise the spread of PCB to the outdoor environment and to indoor air, and which keep the PCB levels as low as reasonably possible in the workplace environment whilst removing the elastic sealant. The following PCB determinations were carried out: (1) concentration in the elastic sealant; (2) concentration in the concrete close to the sealant; (3) concentration in soil; (4) concentration in the indoor air; and (5) concentration in the air in the workplace environment. The cleanup process consisted of a number of different steps: (1) cutting the elastic sealant with an oscillating knife; (2) grinding the concrete with a mechanical machine; (3) sawing the concrete with a mechanical saw and (4) cutting the concrete with a mechanical chisel. In all these different steps a high capacity vacuum cleaner connected to the machines was used. The elastic sealant contained 4.7 to 8.1% total PCB of a technical product with a composition most similar to Clophene A40. The concrete close to the sealant (first 2 mm) contained 0.12 and 1.7% total PCB at two different places. The pattern of the PCB in the concrete resembled that of the sealant. PCB concentrations in the soil from the ground close to the building were 0.1 and 0.3 ppm at two different places before the remedial action. The source of the PCB in the soil is most likely the sealant as the PCB pattern is similar for the two materials. The PCB levels in the workplace air at the beginning of the project, when the techniques were not fully developed, were generally above the occupational exposure limit of 10 micrograms m-3 (up to 120 micrograms m-3). Later when the techniques were optimised to better take care of dust and gases produced during the cutting and grinding etc., the levels were

  10. Variations of electric resistance and H2 and Rn emissions of concrete blocks under increasing uniaxial compression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, C.-Y.; Luo, G.

    1990-01-01

    Electric resistance and emissions of hydrogen and radon isotopes of concrete (which is somewhat similar to fault-zone materials) under increasing uniaxial compression were continuously monitored to check whether they show any pre- and post-failure changes that may correspond to similar changes reported for earthquakes. The results show that all these parameters generally begin to increase when the applied stresses reach 20% to 90% of the corresponding failure stresses, probably due to the occurrence and growth of dilatant microcracks in the specimens. The prefailure changes have different patterns for different specimens, probably because of differences in spatial and temporal distributions of the microcracks. The resistance shows large co-failure increases, and the gas emissions show large post-failure increases. The post-failure increase of radon persists longer and stays at a higher level than that of hydrogen, suggesting a difference in the emission mechanisms for these two kinds of gases. The H2 increase may be mainly due to chemical reaction at the crack surfaces while they are fresh, whereas the Rn increases may be mainly the result of the increased emanation area of such surfaces. The results suggest that monitoring of resistivity and gas emissions may be useful for predicting earthquakes and failures of concrete structures. ?? 1990 Birkha??user Verlag.

  11. Aeration equipment for small depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluše, Jan; Pochylý, František

    2015-05-01

    Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena "algal bloom" appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  12. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  13. Applying fine bubble aeration to small aeration tanks.

    PubMed

    Duchène, P; Cotteux, E; Capela, S

    2001-01-01

    Because the aeration system in an activated sludge plant typically represents a large part of the total energy requirements, designers and operators need accurate oxygen transfer information to make the aeration system as energy efficient as possible. This paper presents clean water tests performed at 38 wastewater treatment plants. The Specific Aeration Efficiency results (SAE, kgO2/kWh) are reported for: (1) large open channels (volume higher than 1000 m3), (2) small open channels, (3) total floor coverage cylindrical tanks, and (4) cylindrical tanks with a grid arrangement. Some practical guidelines can be drawn, some of them being: (1) high SAE can be achieved at small aeration tanks (< 1000 m3), applying cylindrical tanks with a total floor coverage arrangement of diffusers, volumetric blowers, and moderate air flow rates per diffuser area; (2) the high investment cost of this configuration can be justified with respect to a grid layout characterized by spiral liquid circulation which affects the oxygen transfer; (3) small open channels can meet sufficient SAE values but fail to meet in this range of tank volumes those of total floor coverage cylindrical tanks.

  14. The Effects of Friction on the Performance of A Concrete Block Mine Seal with Pressurized Grout Bags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Kyle A.

    2014-10-01

    Mine seals are necessary in nearly every underground coal mine to isolate mined-out areas from the ventilation network. Many seals are already in place in active mines and more need to be constructed to keep up with the development of underground coal reserves. The accidents involving seal failures at Sago and Darby prompted MSHA to create and implement new regulations regarding the strength of the seals. These regulations require the design and construction of seals that are larger and stronger than ever before. Structural seals capable of withstanding the new required design loads are now designed by an engineer and no longer approved through explosion testing. Prior to the seal failure accidents, a solid-block wall with pressurized grout bags at the wall/ribs and wall/roof interfaces was a popular design which met the 137.9 kPa (20 psi) requirement. After implementation of the new 344.7 kPa (50 psi) or 827.4 kPa (120 psi) design regulations depending on whether the atmosphere is kept inert inby the seal, a re-design of the seal was necessary. This paper discusses the quantification of the coefficients of friction which are then implemented into finite element modeling.

  15. Moisture and Thermal Conductivity of Lightweight Block Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosep, R.

    2015-11-01

    This article examines thermal properties of lightweight block walls and their changes over the course of time. Three different types of lightweight blocks and two types of heat insulation are used in construction. Aeroc aerated concrete blocks are in use, as well as compacted LECA (Lightweight Expanded Clay Aggregate) Fibo blocks made from burned clay and Silbet blocks produced from oil shale ash. Expanded Thermisol EPS60F polystyrene plates and glass wool Isover OL-P plates are used for thermal insulation. The actual and computational values of thermal conductivity and the water draining properties of walls over time are compared in this article. Water draining from glass wool walls is relatively fast. Water-draining can take over a year in polystyrene insulated walls. All four wall constructions can be used as external walls, but care must be taken regarding the moisture content of the blocks during construction (the construction should be handled with care to minimise the moisture in the blocks), especially in polystyrene board-insulated walls.

  16. Concrete Geometry: Playing with Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luescher, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a design/build exercise conducted in an Architectural Materials and Methods class to achieve three interrelated objectives: (1) to apply physically the semester's theoretical focus on the constituent process and languages of architecture investigations, (2) to capitalise on the physical and aesthetic properties of concrete…

  17. Adaptive Model of Wastewater Aeration Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sniders, Andris; Laizans, Aigars

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses the methodology of oxygen transfer virtual simulation in a wastewater biological treatment process, using the MATLAB/SIMULINK technology. A self-tuning adaptive model of a wastewater aeration tank, as a non-stationary object, with variable time dependent sensitivity and inertia indexes, as the functions of input variable - air pneumatic supply capacity Lg(t) (m3/min), output variable - dissolved oxygen concentration C(t) (g/m3) and oxygen expenditure, as a load - q(t) (g/min), required for wastewater complete purification, is expounded. Virtual models, applying Laplace transforms and SIMULINK blocks library, are composed in order to compare the transient processes of dissolved oxygen concentration in the simplified stationary model with constant sensitivity and inertia coefficients, and in the non-stationary model with variable sensitivity and inertia indexes. The simulation block-diagram for non-stationary model adoption to the variable parameters is developed, using informative links from input variable Lg(t), from variable load q(t) and feedback from output variable C(t) as inputs of calculation modulus, allowing to instantly re-calculate the variable indexes during simulation time. Comparison of the simplified stationary model and the non-stationary model shows that the simulation results of oxygen transfer differ up to 50%.

  18. Aerated Lagoons. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This student manual contains the textual material for a unit which focuses on the structural and operationally unique features of aerated lagoons. Topic areas discussed include: (1) characteristics of completely mixed aerated lagoons; (2) facultative aerated lagoons; (3) aerated oxidation ponds; (4) effects of temperature on aerated lagoons; (5)…

  19. Purging dissolved oxygen by nitrogen bubble aeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    We apply aeration with nitrogen microbubbles to water in order to see whether oxygen gas originally dissolved in the water at one atmosphere is purged by the aeration. The concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) is detected by a commercial DO meter. To detect the dissolved nitrogen (DN) level, we observe the growth of millimetre-sized bubbles nucleated at glass surfaces in contact with the aerated water and compare it with the Epstein-Plesset theory that accounts for DO/DN diffusions and the presence of the glass surfaces. Comparisons between the experiment and the theory suggest that the DO in the water are effectively purged by the aeration.

  20. High performance aerated lagoon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, L.

    1999-08-01

    At a time when less money is available for wastewater treatment facilities and there is increased competition for the local tax dollar, regulatory agencies are enforcing stricter effluent limits on treatment discharges. A solution for both municipalities and industry is to use aerated lagoon systems designed to meet these limits. This monograph, prepared by a recognized expert in the field, provides methods for the rational design of a wide variety of high-performance aerated lagoon systems. Such systems range from those that can be depended upon to meet secondary treatment standards alone to those that, with the inclusion of intermittent sand filters or elements of sequenced biological reactor (SBR) technology, can also provide for nitrification and nutrient removal. Considerable emphasis is placed on the use of appropriate performance parameters, and an entire chapter is devoted to diagnosing performance failures. Contents include: principles of microbiological processes, control of algae, benthal stabilization, design for CBOD removal, design for nitrification and denitrification in suspended-growth systems, design for nitrification in attached-growth systems, phosphorus removal, diagnosing performance.

  1. Lightweight polymer concrete composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.; Steinberg, M.; Reams, W.

    1985-08-01

    Lightweight polymer concrete composites have been developed with excellent insulating properties. The composites consist of lightweight aggregates such as expanded perlites, multicellular glass nodules, or hollow alumina silicate microspheres bound together with unsaturated polyester or epoxy resins. These composites, known as Insulating Polymer Concrete (IPC), have thermal conductivites from 0.09 to 0.19 Btu/h-ft-/sup 0/F. Compressive strengths, dependent upon the aggregates used, range from 1000 to 6000 psi. These materials can be precast or cast-in-place on concrete substrates. Recently, it has been demonstrated that these materials can also be sprayed onto concrete and other substrates. An overlay application of IPC is currently under way as dike insulation at an LNG storage tank facility. The composites have numerous potentials in the construction industry such as insulating building blocks or prefabricated insulating wall panels.

  2. Corrosion Behavior of Steel Fibrous Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    Crvtaiue wi ,rerse sido it necessaty m’d Identify by block number) steel fibrous concrete corrosion cracked fibrous concrete 20 ABST RACT (Continue...dissolved gas in liq- Although chloride ions affect the rate of steel corro- uids. sion in concrete , corrosion can occur without them. Verbeck has...repcrted that steel subjected to a concrete Corrosion of steel will not occur without water. Not environment normally develops a protective oxide film

  3. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  4. Oxygen transfer in circular surface aeration tanks.

    PubMed

    Rao, Achanta Ramakrishna; Patel, Ajey Kumar; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2009-06-01

    Surface aeration systems employed in activated sludge plants are the most energy-intensive units of the plants and typically account for a higher percentage of the treatment facility's total energy use. The geometry of the aeration tank imparts a major effect on the system efficiency. It is said that at optimal geometric conditions, systems exhibits the maximum efficiency. Thus the quantification of the optimal geometric conditions in surface aeration tanks is needed. Optimal geometric conditions are also needed to scale up the laboratory result to the field installation. In the present work, experimental studies have been carried out on baffled and unbaffled circular surface aeration tanks to ascertain the optimal geometric conditions. It is found that no optimal geometric conditions exist for the liquid/water depth in circular surface aeration tanks; however, for design purposes, a standard value has been assumed. Based on the optimal geometric conditions, a scale-up equation has been developed for the baffled circular surface aeration tanks.

  5. Biopulsing: An in situ aeration remediation strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, H.S.; Marshall, T.R.

    1997-12-31

    In situ soil aeration is an accepted technology for remediation of soil and groundwater impacted with petroleum hydrocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons. This technology was utilized for remediating soil and groundwater at an aerospace components manufacturing facility located in southern California, Soil and groundwater had been impacted at the facility from historical releases of petroleum and halogenated hydrocarbons. Innovations in remediation system design, installation and monitoring strategies are described in this paper. The following tasks were conducted; (1) evaluation of the extent of impacted soil and groundwater; (2) collection of site-specific data necessary to evaluate and implement an appropriate remediation system to address the hydrocarbon-impacted soil; and (3) design, installation and operation of an in situ aeration system for remediation of soil and groundwater. The in situ aeration system operates on the principles of bioventing. Air was injected weekly into the subsurface by a system of wells placed at selected locations in short pulses lasting several hours. Oxygen utilization in the subsurface was monitored using subsurface sensors. Subsurface oxygen utilization rates of up to 1.5 percent resulted in an estimate of mass reduction of 71 pounds of hydrocarbons. The concentration of halogenated hydrocarbons was reduced in groundwater following commencement of aeration was observed in subsequent sampling events. The contribution of vadose zone aeration in reducing the concentrations of halogenated hydrocarbons in groundwater is currently being evaluated.

  6. Soil Aeration deficiencies in urban sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltecke, Katharina; Gaertig, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    Soil aeration deficiencies in urban sites Katharina Weltecke and Thorsten Gaertig On urban tree sites reduction of soil aeration by compaction or sealing is an important but frequently underestimated factor for tree growth. Up to 50% of the CO2 assimilated during the vegetation period is respired in the root space (Qi et al. 1994). An adequate supply of the soil with oxygen and a proper disposal of the exhaled carbon dioxide are essential for an undisturbed root respiration. If the soil surface is smeared, compacted or sealed, soil aeration is interrupted. Several references show that root activity and fine root growth are controlled by the carbon dioxide concentration in soil air (Qi et al.1994, Burton et al. 1997). Gaertig (2001) found that decreasing topsoil gas permeability leads to reduced fine root density and hence to injury in crown structure of oaks. In forest soils a critical CO2 concentration of more than 0.6 % indicates a bad aeration status (Gaertig 2001). The majority of urban tree sites are compacted or sealed. The reduction of soil aeration may lead to dysfunctions in the root space and consequently to stress during periods of drought, which has its visible affects in crown structure. It is reasonable to assume that disturbances in soil aeration lead to reduced tree vigour and roadworthiness, resulting in high maintenance costs. The assessment of soil aeration in urban sites is difficult. In natural ecosystems the measurement of gas diffusivity and the gas-chromatical analysis of CO2 in soil air are accepted procedures in analyzing the state of aeration (Schack-Kirchner et al. 2001, Gaertig 2001). It has been found that these methods can also be applied for analyzing urban sites. In particular CO2 concentration in the soil atmosphere can be considered as a rapidly assessable, relevant and integrating indicator of the aeration situation of urban soils. This study tested the working hypothesis that soil aeration deficiencies lead to a decrease of fine

  7. Landfill aeration worldwide: Concepts, indications and findings

    SciTech Connect

    Ritzkowski, M.; Stegmann, R.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different landfill aeration concepts and accordant application areas are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examples of full scale projects are provided for Europe, North-America and Asia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Major project findings are summarised, including prospects and limitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inconsistencies between laboratory and full scale results have been elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An explanatory approach in connection with the inconsistencies is provided. - Abstract: The creation of sustainable landfills is a fundamental goal in waste management worldwide. In this connection landfill aeration contributes towards an accelerated, controlled and sustainable conversion of conventional anaerobic landfills into a biological stabilized state associated with a minimised emission potential. The technology has been successfully applied to landfills in Europe, North America and Asia, following different strategies depending on the geographical region, the specific legislation and the available financial resources. Furthermore, methodologies for the incorporation of landfill aeration into the carbon trade mechanisms have been developed in recent years. This manuscript gives an overview on existing concepts for landfill aeration; their application ranges and specifications. For all of the described concepts examples from different countries worldwide are provided, including details regarding their potentials and limitations. Some of the most important findings from these aeration projects are summarised and future research needs have been identified. It becomes apparent that there is a great demand for a systematisation of the available results and implications in order to further develop and optimise this very promising technology. The IWWG (International Waste Working Group) Task Group 'Landfill Aeration' contributes towards the achievement of this goal.

  8. Nondestructive Concrete Characterization System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-20

    Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV), Impact-Echo, Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo, Ultrasonic Attenuation, STTR Report Aldo... ultrasonic testing in conjunction with the resonance frequency. All results were within the specified tolerance of ±1 ft. The compressive strength of the...concrete blocks was measured by measuring the P-wave and S-wave time of travel with the pitch-catch method of ultrasonic testing. All results were

  9. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  10. Microstructure of high-strength foam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Just, A.; Middendorf, B.

    2009-07-15

    Foam concretes are divided into two groups: on the one hand the physically foamed concrete is mixed in fast rotating pug mill mixers by using foaming agents. This concrete cures under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand the autoclaved aerated concrete is chemically foamed by adding aluminium powder. Afterwards it is cured in a saturated steam atmosphere. New alternatives for the application of foam concretes arise from the combination of chemical foaming and air curing in manufacturing processes. These foam concretes are new and innovative building materials with interesting properties: low mass density and high strength. Responsible for these properties are the macro-, meso- and microporosity. Macropores are created by adding aluminium powder in different volumes and with different particle size distributions. However, the microstructure of the cement matrix is affected by meso- and micropores. In addition, the matrix of the hardened cement paste can be optimized by the specific use of chemical additives for concrete. The influence of aluminium powder and chemical additives on the properties of the microstructure of the hardened cement matrices were investigated by using petrographic microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Package plant of extended aeration membrane bioreactors: a study on aeration intensity and biofouling control.

    PubMed

    Ujang, Z; Ng, S S; Nagaoka, H

    2005-01-01

    Biofouling control is important for effective process of membrane bioreactor (MBR). In this study, phenomena of biofouling for immersed type extended aeration MBR with two different anti-fouling aeration intensities were studied through a laboratory set up. The objectives of this study were (a) to observe biofouling phenomena of MBR that operates under different anti-fouling bubbling intensity, and simultaneously monitors performance of the MBR in organic carbon and nutrients removal; (b) to compare effectiveness of detergent and detergent-enzyme cleaning solutions in recovering biofouled membranes that operated in the extended aeration MBR. For MBR, which operated under continuous anti-fouling aeration, deposition and accumulation of suspended biomass on membrane surface were prohibited. However, flux loss was inescapable that biofilm layer was the main problem. Membrane cleaning was successfully carried out with detergent-enzyme mixture solutions and its effectiveness was compared with result from cleaning with just detergent solution.

  12. Aeration of groundwater at a superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Connors, P.

    1992-07-01

    One of the promising environmental cleanup activities underway at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is remediation of groundwater pollution by aeration techniques at the laboratory`s Site 300. The treatment facility extracts groundwater from a shallow aquifer and contaminants are removed by spraying the water into one end of a trailer mounted, polyethylene air-sparging tank. As the water passes through the tank, it is subjected to vigorous aeration from a large blower. By the time the water reaches the other end of the sparging tank, it has been stripped of volatile organic compounds(VOCs). The VOCs are stripped into the air and then collected by passing the air through two in-series, granular, activated-carbon canisters.

  13. CFD model of an aerating hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D.; Sabourin, M.; Beaulieu, S.; Papillon, B.; Ellis, C.

    2014-03-01

    Improving water quality in the tailrace below hydroelectric dams has become a priority in many river systems. In warm climates, water drawn by the turbine from deep in a reservoir can be deficient in dissolved oxygen (DO), a critical element in maintaining a healthy aquatic ecosystem. Many different solutions have been proposed in order to increase the DO levels in turbine discharge, including: turbine aeration systems (adding air to the water through either the turbine hub, the periphery or through distributed aeration in the runner blades); bubble diffusers in the reservoir or in the tailrace; aerating weirs downstream of the dams; and surface water pumps in the reservoir near the dam. There is a significant potential to increase the effectiveness of these solutions by improving the way that oxygen is introduced into the water; better distributions of bubbles will result in better oxygen transfer. In the present study, a two-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics model has been formulated using a commercial code to study the distribution of air downstream of a simple aerating hydrofoil. The two-phase model uses the Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Appropriate relations are used to model the interphase forces, including the Grace drag force model, the Favre averaged drag force and the Sato enhanced eddy viscosity. The model is validated using experimental results obtained in the water tunnel at the University of Minnesota's Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. Results are obtained for water velocities between 5 and 10 m/s, air flow rates between 0.5 and 1.5 sL/min and for angles of attack between 0° and -8°. The results of this study show that the CFD model provides a good qualitative comparison to the experimental results by well predicting the wake location at the different flow rates and angles of attack used.

  14. Supersonic Injection of Aerated Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhari, Abhijit; Sallam, Khaled

    2016-11-01

    A computational study of the exit flow of an aerated two-dimensional jet from an under-expanded supersonic nozzle is presented. The liquid sheet is operating within the annular flow regime and the study is motivated by the application of supersonic nozzles in air-breathing propulsion systems, e.g. scramjet engines, ramjet engines and afterburners. The simulation was conducted using VOF model and SST k- ω turbulence model. The test conditions included: jet exit of 1 mm and mass flow rate of 1.8 kg/s. The results show that air reaches transonic condition at the injector exit due to the Fanno flow effects in the injector passage. The aerated liquid jet is alternately expanded by Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan and compressed by oblique shock waves due to the difference between the back (chamber) pressure and the flow pressure. The process then repeats itself and shock (Mach) diamonds are formed at downstream of injector exit similar to those typical of exhaust plumes of propulsion system. The present results, however, indicate that the flow field of supersonic aerated liquid jet is different from supersonic gas jets due to the effects of water evaporation from the liquid sheet. The contours of the Mach number, static pressure of both cases are compared to the theory of gas dynamics.

  15. Effects of aeration method and aeration rate on greenhouse gas emissions during composting of pig feces in pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Li, Guoxue; Tang, Qiong; Ma, Xuguang; Wang, Gang; Schuchardt, Frank

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover ways to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and reduce energy consumption during the composting process. We assessed the effects of different aeration rates (0, 0.18, 0.36, and 0.54 L/(kg dry matter (dm)·min)) and methods (continuous and intermittent) on GHG emissions. Pig feces and corn stalks were mixed at a ratio of 7:1. The composting process lasted for 10 weeks, and the compost was turned approximately every 2 weeks. Results showed that both aeration rate and method significantly affected GHG emissions. Higher aeration rates increased NH3 and N2O losses, but reduced CH4 emissions. The exception is that the CH4 emission of the passive aeration treatment was lower than that of the low aeration rate treatment. Without forced aeration, the CH4 diffusion rates in the center of the piles were very low and part of the CH4 was oxidized in the surface layer. Intermittent aeration reduced NH3 and CH4 losses, but significantly increased N2O production during the maturing periods. Intermittent aeration increased the nitrification/denitrification alternation and thus enhanced the N2O production. Forced aeration treatments had higher GHG emission rates than the passive aeration treatment. Forced aeration accelerated the maturing process, but could not improve the quality of the end product. Compared with continuous aeration, intermittent aeration could increase the O2 supply efficiency and reduced the total GHG emission by 17.8%, and this reduction increased to 47.4% when composting was ended after 36 days.

  16. Clogging in permeable concrete: A review.

    PubMed

    Kia, Alalea; Wong, Hong S; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2017-05-15

    Permeable concrete (or "pervious concrete" in North America) is used to reduce local flooding in urban areas and is an important sustainable urban drainage system. However, permeable concrete exhibits reduction in permeability due to clogging by particulates, which severely limits service life. This paper reviews the clogging mechanism and current mitigating strategies in order to inform future research needs. The pore structure of permeable concrete and characteristics of flowing particulates influence clogging, which occurs when particles build-up and block connected porosity. Permeable concrete requires regular maintenance by vacuum sweeping and pressure washing, but the effectiveness and viability of these methods is questionable. The potential for clogging is related to the tortuosity of the connected porosity, with greater tortuosity resulting in increased potential for clogging. Research is required to develop permeable concrete that can be poured on-site, which produces a pore structure with significantly reduced tortuosity.

  17. Flow conditions of fresh mortar and concrete in different pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Stefan; Haugan, Lars; Hammer, Tor Arne; Kalogiannidis, Evangelos

    2009-11-15

    The variation in fresh concrete flow rate over the pipe cross section was investigated on differently coloured and highly flowable concrete mixes flowing through pipes of different materials (rubber, steel, acryl). First, uncoloured (gray) concrete was poured through the pipe and the pipe blocked. Similar but coloured (black) concrete was then poured into the pipe filled with gray concrete, flowing after the gray concrete for a while before being blocked and hardened. The advance of the colouring along the pipe wall (showing boundary flow rate) was observed on the moulded concrete surface appearing after removing the pipe from the hardened concrete. The shapes of the interfaces between uncoloured and coloured concrete (showing variation of flow rate over the pipe cross section) were observed on sawn surfaces of concrete half cylinders cut along the length axes of the concrete-filled pipe. Flow profiles over the pipe cross section were clearly seen with maximum flow rates near the centre of the pipe and low flow rate at the pipe wall (typically rubber pipe with reference concrete without silica fume and/or stabilizers). More plug-shaped profiles, with long slip layers and less variation of flow rate over the cross section, were also seen (typically in smooth acrylic pipes). Flow rate, amount of concrete sticking to the wall after flow and SEM-images of pipe surface roughness were observed, illustrating the problem of testing full scale pumping.

  18. FOULING OF FINE PORE DIFFUSED AERATORS: AN INTER- PLANT COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been increasing interest in fine pore aeration systems, along with concerned about diffuser fouling and the subsequent loss of aeration efficiency. The objective of this study was to assess the relative fouling tendency of fine bubble diffusers t nine activated sludge ...

  19. OXIDATION OF AS(III) BY AERATION AND STORAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the effects of aeration and storage on the oxidation of arsenic(III) was undertaken at three utilities in the US to establish the engineering significance of aeration as a potential pre-treatment method for arsenic removal. The results of this study clearly establish t...

  20. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... required to remove residual ethylene oxide (ETO) from wrapped medical devices that have undergone...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... required to remove residual ethylene oxide (ETO) from wrapped medical devices that have undergone...

  2. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... required to remove residual ethylene oxide (ETO) from wrapped medical devices that have undergone...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... required to remove residual ethylene oxide (ETO) from wrapped medical devices that have undergone...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... required to remove residual ethylene oxide (ETO) from wrapped medical devices that have undergone...

  5. Recirculation-aeration: Bibliography for aquaculture. Bibliographies and literature of agriculture (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Perschbacher, P.W.; Powell, R.V.; Freeman, D.W.; Lorio, W.J.; Hanfman, D.T.

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography includes literature citations through 1992 related to water recirculation and aeration in aquaculture. The focus is on filtration, aeration, and circulation techniques in various aquaculture situations.

  6. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years.

  7. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  8. Effect of aeration rate on composting of penicillin mycelial dreg.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Shihua; Wen, Qinxue; Zheng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Pilot scale experiments with forced aeration were conducted to estimate effects of aeration rates on the performance of composting penicillin mycelial dreg using sewage sludge as inoculation. Three aeration rates of 0.15, 0.50 and 0.90L/(min·kg) organic matter (OM) were examined. The principal physicochemical parameters were monitored during the 32day composting period. Results showed that the higher aeration rate of 0.90L/(min·kg) did not corresponded to a longer thermophilic duration and higher rates of OM degradation; but the lower aeration rate of 0.15L/(min·kg) did induce an accumulation of NH4(+)-N contents due to the inhibition of nitrification. On the other hand, aeration rate has little effect on degradation of penicillin. The results show that the longest phase of thermophilic temperatures≥55°C, the maximum NO3(-)-N content and seed germination, and the minimum C/N ratio were obtained with 0.50L/(min·kg) OM. Therefore, aeration rates of 0.50L/(min·kg) OM can be recommended for composting penicillin mycelial dreg.

  9. Refractory concretes

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3, Sm.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3, NH.sub.4 Cl, YCl.sub.3 and Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden.

  10. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  11. Enhancement of Nitrogen Removal in an Intermittent Aeration Membrane Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaojuan; Wisniewski, Christelle; Li, Xudong; Zhou, Qi

    2010-11-01

    An intermittent aerated membrane bioreactor was applied in laboratory scale to treat synthetic household wastewater. The system organic load and nitrogen load were 0.34 kgCODṡm-3ṡd-1 and 0.06 kgTNṡm-3ṡd-1, respectively. The hydraulic residence time was equal to 12 h and very long sludge residence times were imposed. Intermittent aeration, with anoxic-aerobic cycle of 30/60 minutes, was employed in the system. The results showed that 100% SS and >90% COD could be removed. The average removal efficiency of NH4-N and TN was 99.7% and 80%, respectively. A linear relationship between the fouling rate and the MLSS, MLVSS concentration was founded. The denitrification seemed to be the rate-limiting step for nitrogen removal. To enhance denitrification, the following strategies could be considered: 1) to select suitable aeration/non-aeration cycle, 2) to control the aeration intensity, 3) to feed the system at the beginning of non-aeration period, 4) to maintain high MLSS concentration.

  12. WEST FACADE. THREESTORY BRICK AND STEEL BUILDING WITH CONCRETE ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WEST FACADE. THREE-STORY BRICK AND STEEL BUILDING WITH CONCRETE ADDITION AT SOUTH FACE. NOTE OPENINGS INTO BUILDING ARE BOARDED OR BRICKED UP WITH WOODEN BOARDS OR CONCRETE BLOCK. (Duplicate color view of HAER MI-352-1) - National Can Company, 2566 East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI

  13. DETAIL OF THE SLOPING CONCRETE PAD AT THE SOUTH SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE SLOPING CONCRETE PAD AT THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE GUN EMPLACEMENT. NOTE ADDED BLOCK OF CAST CONCRETE AT THE LOW (RIGHT) END OF SLOPED PAD. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, East Gun Emplacement, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Characterization of Odorant Compounds from Mechanical Aerated Pile Composting and Static Aerated Pile Composting

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Priyanka; Lee, Joonhee; Choi, Hong-Lim

    2016-01-01

    We studied airborne contaminants (airborne particulates and odorous compounds) emitted from compost facilities in South Korea. There are primarily two different types of composting systems operating in Korean farms, namely mechanical aerated pile composting (MAPC) and aerated static pile composting (SAPC). In this study, we analyzed various particulate matters (PM10, PM7, PM2.5, PM1, and total suspended particles), volatile organic compounds and ammonia, and correlated these airborne contaminants with microclimatic parameters, i.e., temperature and relative humidity. Most of the analyzed airborne particulates (PM7, PM2.5, and PM1) were detected in high concentration at SAPC facilities compered to MAPC; however these differences were statistically non-significant. Similarly, most of the odorants did not vary significantly between MAPC and SAPC facilities, except for dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and skatole. DMS concentrations were significantly higher in MAPC facilities, whereas skatole concentrations were significantly higher in SAPC facilities. The microclimate variables also did not vary significantly between MAPC and SAPC facilities, and did not correlate significantly with most of the airborne particles and odorous compounds, suggesting that microclimate variables did not influence their emission from compost facilities. These findings provide insight into the airborne contaminants that are emitted from compost facilities and the two different types of composting agitation systems. PMID:26949962

  15. [Research of controlling condition for aeration stabilization pond dealing with sanitary waste of countryside].

    PubMed

    Li, Huai-Zheng; Yao, Shu-Jun; Xu, Zu-Xin; Chen, Wei-Bing

    2012-10-01

    According to research of some problems, such as the hydraulic detention time that aeration stabilization pond deals with sanitary waste of countryside, dissolved oxygen in pond during the process of aeration, the concentration distribution of sludge and different aeration periods affecting on the treatment efficiency, we can acquire good treatment efficiency and energy consumption of economy. The results indicate that under the aeration stabilization pond of this experiment, 4 d is the best hydraulic detention time with this aeration stabilization pond. Time of the discontinuous running aeration should be greater than 15 min. The concentration distribution of sludge can reach equilibrium at each point of aeration stabilization pond between 2 min and 10 min. The best aeration period of dislodging the pollutant is 0.5 h aeration/1.0 h cut-off.

  16. [Effects of nitrogen source and aeration mode on algae growth in freshwater].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Guang; Jin, Xiang-Can; Sun, Ling; Sun, Hong-Wen; Zhu, Lin; Yu, Yang; Dai, Shu-Gui; Zhuang, Yuan-Yi

    2006-01-01

    Aquarium microcosms were used to study the effects of nitrogen source and aeration mode on the growth and species changes of algae in freshwater. Nitrate nitrogen(NO3(-) -N) and ammonia nitrogen(NH4(+) -N) were used as nitrogen sources. For each nitrogen source, four modes of aeration were selected, including control, continuous aeration, aeration during the day, and aeration at night. In the early stage of the experiment, algae in the NH4(+) -N treatment experiment grew well. In the later stage, algae in the NO3(-) -N treatment experiment grew better. For different aeration modes, continuous aeration show varied effects on algae growth in the two nitrogen source treatments. Day-only aeration had little effect on algae growth. Night-only aeration inhibited algae growth considerably. In NH(+) -N treatments, cyanophyta became dominant species easily. In contrast, chlorophyta dominated in NO3(-) -N treatments.

  17. BRINE STORAGE PIT AND PUMP HOUSE, TRA631. ELEVATIONS. CONCRETE VAULT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRINE STORAGE PIT AND PUMP HOUSE, TRA-631. ELEVATIONS. CONCRETE VAULT FOR BRINE PITS. CONCRETE BLOCK BUILDING FOR BRINE PUMPS. CONCRETE PIPE TRENCH. BLAW-KNOX 3150-808-3, 1/1951. INL INDEX NO. 531-0608-00-098-100677. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Nondestructive evaluation of thick concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight A.

    2015-03-01

    Concrete has been used in the construction of nuclear power plants (NPPs) due to three primary properties: its low cost, structural strength, and ability to shield radiation. Examples of concrete structures important to the safety of Light Water Reactor (LWR) plants include the containment building, spent fuel pool, and cooling towers. Use in these structures has made concrete's long-term performance crucial for the safe operation of commercial NPPs. Extending LWR operating period to 60 years and beyond will likely increase susceptibility and severity of known forms of degradation. New mechanisms of materials degradation are also possible. This creates the need to be able to nondestructively evaluate the current subsurface concrete condition of aging concrete material in NPP structures. The size and complexity of NPP containment structures and heterogeneity of Portland cement concrete make characterization of the degradation extent a difficult task. Specially designed and fabricated test specimens can provide realistic flaws that are similar to actual flaws in terms of how they interact with a particular nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique. Artificial test blocks allow the isolation of certain testing problems as well as the variation of certain parameters. Representative large heavily reinforced concrete specimens would allow for comparative testing to evaluate the state-of-the-art NDE in this area and to identify additional developments necessary to address the challenges potentially found in NPPs.

  19. Influence of aeration rate on nitrogen dynamics during composting.

    PubMed

    de Guardia, A; Petiot, C; Rogeau, D; Druilhe, C

    2008-01-01

    The paper aimed to study the influence of aeration rate on nitrogen dynamics during composting of wastewater sludge with wood chips. Wastewater sludge was sampled at a pig slaughterhouse 24h before each composting experiment, and mixtures were made at the same mass ratio. Six composting experiments were performed in a lab reactor (300 L) under forced aeration. Aeration flow was constant throughout the experiment and aeration rates applied ranged between 1.69 and 16.63 L/h/kg DM of mixture. Material temperature and oxygen consumption were monitored continuously. Nitrogen losses in leachates as organic and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate, and losses in exhaust gases as ammonia were measured daily. Concentrations of total carbon and nitrogen i.e., organic nitrogen, total ammoniacal nitrogen, and nitrite and nitrate were measured in the initial substrates and in the composted materials. The results showed that organic nitrogen, which was released as NH4+/NH3 by ammonification, was closely correlated to the ratio of carbon removed from the material to TC/N(org) of the initial substrates. The increase of aeration was responsible for the increase in ammonia emissions and for the decrease in nitrogen losses through leaching. At high aeration rates, losses of nitrogen in leachates and as ammonia in exhaust gases accounted for 90-99% of the nitrogen removed from the material. At low aeration rates, those accounted for 47-85% of the nitrogen removed from the material. The highest concentrations of total ammoniacal nitrogen in composts occurred at the lowest aeration rate. Due to the correlation of ammonification with biodegradation and to the measurements of losses in leachates and in exhaust gases, the pool NH4+/NH3 in the composting material was calculated as a function of time. The nitrification rate was found to be proportional to the mean content of NH4+/NH3 in the material, i.e., initial NH4+/NH3 plus NH4+/NH3 released by ammonification minus losses in

  20. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations.

  1. Sludge reduction using aquatic worms under different aeration regimes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Gao, Ding; Wang, Kan; Liu, Hong-Tao; Wan, Xiao-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Adding aquatic worms to a wastewater treatment system can reduce sludge production through predation. The aeration level is crucial for success. To evaluate aeration impacts on sludge reduction and determine an optimal aeration regime, this study investigated the processes of in-situ sludge reduction, using aquatic worms exposed to different aeration levels. The experiment also compared treatment results between a conventional reactor and an aquatic worm reactor (WR). Results indicated that the recommended concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) was 2.5 mg L(-1). The removal rate of chemical oxygen demand remained steady at 80% when the DO concentration was higher than 2.5 mg L(-1), while the removal rate of ammonia nitrogen continued to moderately increase. Increasing the DO concentration to 5 mg L(-1) did not improve sludge reduction, and consumed more power. With a DO concentration of 2.5 mg L(-1) and a power of 0.19 kWh t(-1) water, the absolute sludge reduction and relative sludge reduction rates in the WR were 60.0% and 45.7%, respectively, and the daily aquatic worm growth rate was 0.150 d(-1) during the 17-d test. Therefore, at the recommended aeration regime, aquatic worms reduced the sludge without increasing the power consumption or deteriorating the effluent.

  2. Cardiopulmonary changes with aeration of the newborn lung.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stuart Brian; Polglase, Graeme Roger; Roehr, Charles Christoph

    2015-06-01

    The newborn's transition from fetal to neonatal life includes aeration of the lungs, establishment of pulmonary gas exchange and changing the fetal circulation into the adult phenotype. This review summarizes the latest research findings, which show that lung aeration, airway liquid clearance and cardiovascular changes are directly interconnected at birth. The mechanisms of airway liquid clearance at birth are reviewed and the particular importance of the transpulmonary pressure gradient during lung aeration is discussed. Further, we summarize research findings which prove that lung aeration triggers the increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) at birth, and how the increase in PBF secures the preload for left ventricular output. Consequently, we review animal experiments which suggest that delaying umbilical cord clamping until breathing commences facilitates hemodynamic stability during transition. These data are reviewed with respect to the clinical applicability: As lung aeration is the key to successful transition to newborn life, providing adequate respiratory support at birth must be the primary objective of neonatal staff attending to the newborn infant. Clinical studies are needed to demonstrate whether the obvious benefits of delaying cord clamping until breathing commences hold true in human babies.

  3. Cardiopulmonary changes with aeration of the newborn lung

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Stuart Brian; Polglase, Graeme Roger; Roehr, Charles Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The newborns transition from fetal to neonatal life includes aeration of the lungs, establishment of pulmonary gas exchange and a changing the fetal circulation into the adult phenotype. This review summarizes the latest research findings, which show that lung aeration, airway liquid clearance and cardiovascular changes are directly interconnected at birth. The mechanisms of airway liquid clearance at birth are reviewed and the particular importance of the transpulmonary pressure gradient during lung aeration is discussed. Further, we summarize research findings which prove that lung aeration triggers the increased in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) at birth, and how the increase in PBF secures the preload for left ventricular output. Consequently, we review animal experiments which suggest that delaying umbilical cord clamping until breathing commences facilitates hemodynamic stability during transition. These data are reviewed with respect to the clinical applicability: As lung aeration is the key to successful transition to newborn life, providing adequate respiratory support at birth must be the primary objective of neonatal staff attending to the newborn infant. Clinical studies are needed to demonstrate whether the obvious benefits of delaying cord clamping until breathing commences hold true in human babies. PMID:25870083

  4. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  5. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1992-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar base construction was discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the Moon are provided in this paper, along with specific conclusions from the existing database.

  6. Lunar concrete for construction

    SciTech Connect

    Cullingford, H.S.; Keller, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. In situ groundwater aeration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, B.D.; Linkenheil, R.; Pritchard, D.; Shanke, C.A.; Seep, D.

    1995-12-31

    At a former wood treating site in Minnesota, the feasibility of in situ groundwater aeration was investigated in a laboratory treatability setting, to evaluate biodegradability and optimal operation conditions of the site aquifer. After concluding that an aeration system would increase the dissolved oxygen concentrations in the groundwater enough to sustain microbial life, a field demonstration system was designed and installed. The system was operated for 1 year, during which groundwater quality at upgradient and downgradient wells was monitored to evaluate the system`s effectiveness. The groundwater aeration system successfully reduced groundwater polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations, especially naphthalene. Naphthalene concentrations were reduced from 1,319 {micro}g/L to below the laboratory detection limit of 0.5 {micro}g/L. Cumulative concentrations of other PAH compounds were reduced from 98 {micro}g/L to 23 {micro}g/L during the 1-year test.

  8. Properties of Sulfur Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-06

    This report summarizes the state of the art of sulfur concrete . Sulfur concrete is created by mixing molten sulfur with aggregate and allowing the...and many organic compounds. It works well as a rapid runway repair material. Sulfur concrete also has unfavorable properties. It has poor durability

  9. Aeration for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailong; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2005-06-01

    This paper investigates the tidal effects on aeration conditions for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh. We extend the work of Ursino et al. (2004) by using a two-phase model for air and water flows in the marsh. Simulations have been conducted to examine directly the link between the airflow dynamics and the aeration condition in the marsh soil. The results show that the effects of entrapped air on water movement in the vadose zone are significant in certain circumstances. Single-phase models based on Richards' equation, which neglect such effects, may not be adequate for quantifying the aeration condition in tidal marsh. The optimal aeration condition, represented by the maximum of the integral magnitude of tidally advected air mass (TAAM) flux, is found to occur near the tidal creek for the four soil textures simulated. This may explain the observation that some salt marsh plant species grow better near tidal creeks than in the inner marsh areas. Our analyses, based on the two-phase model and predicted TAAM flux magnitude, provide further insight into the "positive feedback" mechanism proposed by Ursino et al. (2004). That is, pioneer plants may grow successfully near the creek where the root aeration condition is optimal. The roots of the pioneer plants can soften and loosen the rhizosphere soil, which increases the evapotranspiration rate, the soil porosity, and absolute permeability and weakens the capillary effects. These, in turn, improve further the root aeration conditions and may lead to colonization by plants less resistant to anaerobic conditions.

  10. Aeration for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailong; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2005-06-01

    This paper investigates the tidal effects on aeration conditions for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh. We extend the work of Ursino et al. (2004) by using a two-phase model for air and water flows in the marsh. Simulations have been conducted to examine directly the link between the airflow dynamics and the aeration condition in the marsh soil. The results show that the effects of entrapped air on water movement in the vadose zone are significant in certain circumstances. Single-phase models based on Richards' equation, which neglect such effects, may not be adequate for quantifying the aeration condition in tidal marsh. The optimal aeration condition, represented by the maximum of the integral magnitude of tidally advected air mass (TAAM) flux, is found to occur near the tidal creek for the four soil textures simulated. This may explain the observation that some salt marsh plant species grow better near tidal creeks than in the inner marsh areas. Our analyses, based on the two-phase model and predicted TAAM flux magnitude, provide further insight into the ``positive feedback'' mechanism proposed by Ursino et al. (2004). That is, pioneer plants may grow successfully near the creek where the root aeration condition is optimal. The roots of the pioneer plants can soften and loosen the rhizosphere soil, which increases the evapotranspiration rate, the soil porosity, and absolute permeability and weakens the capillary effects. These, in turn, improve further the root aeration conditions and may lead to colonization by plants less resistant to anaerobic conditions.

  11. In-tank aeration, a necessary compliment of loaded systems in an airlift recirculating aquaculture system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water treatment components in recirculating aquaculture systems in generally address solids removal, nitrification, circulation, aeration, and degasification. Airlift pumps in a recirculating aquaculture system can address water circulation, aeration, and degasification. Recent data indicates oxygen...

  12. Contact Aeration Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrading Evaluation, Reese Air Force Base, Texas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    id* If negoeory sruidanilU y bl Wok nusm) A 1940 vintage contact aeration wastewater treatment (Hays Process ) plant at Reese APE TX was upgraded by...aeration process is presented. The pet.rmance effticiencies of the Reese APE contact aeration treatment plant before and after upgrading are presented...Efeve SE~CURITY CLASSIFICATION OF TbIISP AGECIWa.. Does #ntiorgo). contact aeration process . It was found that the performance efficiencies of the

  13. Integrating Concrete and Virtual Manipulatives in Early Childhood Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Dina; Hoffman, Jo

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood teachers around the country and the world guide children's mathematical learning through the use of manipulatives--pattern blocks, base blocks, geoboards, Unifx cubes, Cuisenaire rods, coins, clocks, and so on. Manipulatives allow concrete, hands-on exploration and representation of mathematical concepts. In the past few years,…

  14. Temperature stratification and insect pest populations in stored wheat with suction versus pressure aeration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-year study was conducted to compare temperature profiles in the headspace and in the bulk mass of wheat aerated through pressure aeration and suction aeration. Insect pitfall traps were used to measure naturally-occurring populations of stored product insects. Results show uniform distributi...

  15. Dissolved Oxygen management in catfish ponds using electric paddlewheel aerators: new approaches with old technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The electric paddlewheel aerator has been the main aerator used in the U.S. catfish industry for the post forty years. While it has its limitations, it is perhaps the most efficient shallow-water aerator yet to be developed. Its shortcomings result not so much from poor design, as from poor usage. U...

  16. Development and evaluation of a new aerator for the catfish industry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional paddle-wheel aerators have been used for supplemental and emergency aeration in the aquaculture industry for over 30 years but distribute a high volume of water which dilutes the aeration effort over the entire pond volume. Thus, a great deal of equipment and a large amount of power is r...

  17. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... not used to treat first-degree heart block. All types of heart block may increase your risk for other arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fih-brih-LA-shun). Talk with your doctor ...

  18. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  19. Landfill aeration for emission control before and during landfill mining.

    PubMed

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello; Heerenklage, Joern; Pivato, Alberto; Ritzkowski, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The landfill of Modena, in northern Italy, is now crossed by the new high velocity railway line connecting Milan and Bologna. Waste was completely removed from a part of the landfill and a trench for the train line was built. With the aim of facilitating excavation and further disposal of the material extracted, suitable measures were defined. In order to prevent undesired emissions into the excavation area, the aerobic in situ stabilisation by means of the Airflow technology took place before and during the Landfill Mining. Specific project features involved the pneumatic leachate extraction from the aeration wells (to keep the leachate table low inside the landfill and increase the volume of waste available for air migration) and the controlled moisture addition into a limited zone, for a preliminary evaluation of the effects on process enhancement. Waste and leachate were periodically sampled in the landfill during the aeration before the excavation, for quality assessment over time; the evolution of biogas composition in the landfill body and in the extraction system for different plant set-ups during the project was monitored, with specific focus on uncontrolled migration into the excavation area. Waste biological stability significantly increased during the aeration (waste respiration index dropped to 33% of the initial value after six months). Leachate head decreased from 4 to 1.5m; leachate recirculation tests proved the beneficial effects of moisture addition on temperature control, without hampering waste aerobization. Proper management of the aeration plant enabled the minimization of uncontrolled biogas emissions into the excavation area.

  20. Aerated Lagoons. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This unit (which consists of a single lesson) describes the structural and operationally unique features of aerated lagoons. In addition, special troubleshooting and maintenance problems are discussed. The instructor's guide for the unit includes: (1) an overview of the lesson; (2) lesson plan; (3) lecture outline (keyed to a set of slides used…

  1. Towards advanced aeration modelling: from blower to bubbles to bulk.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Andreia; Schraa, Oliver; Rieger, Leiv; Gillot, Sylvie; Fayolle, Yannick; Bellandi, Giacomo; Amerlinck, Youri; Mortier, Séverine T F C; Gori, Riccardo; Neves, Ramiro; Nopens, Ingmar

    2017-02-01

    Aeration is an essential component of aerobic biological wastewater treatment and is the largest energy consumer at most water resource recovery facilities. Most modelling studies neglect the inherent complexity of the aeration systems used. Typically, the blowers, air piping, and diffusers are not modelled in detail, completely mixed reactors in a series are used to represent plug-flow reactors, and empirical correlations are used to describe the impact of operating conditions on bubble formation and transport, and oxygen transfer from the bubbles to the bulk liquid. However, the mechanisms involved are very complex in nature and require significant research efforts. This contribution highlights why and where there is a need for more detail in the different aspects of the aeration system and compiles recent efforts to develop physical models of the entire aeration system (blower, valves, air piping and diffusers), as well as adding rigour to the oxygen transfer efficiency modelling (impact of viscosity, bubble size distribution, shear and hydrodynamics). As a result of these model extensions, more realistic predictions of dissolved oxygen profiles and energy consumption have been achieved. Finally, the current needs for further model development are highlighted.

  2. 5. AERATOR VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM. FLUSH VALVE AT RIGHT OPENS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERATOR VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM. FLUSH VALVE AT RIGHT OPENS TO CLEAR THE SYSTEM ABOVE THE SILT AND DEBRIS AND TO STOP THE FLOW OF WATER INTO THE SYSTEM DOWN LINE. BOX FLUME CONTINUES DOWN LINE TO SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  3. Renewable energy for the aeration of wastewater ponds.

    PubMed

    Hobus, I; Hegemann, W

    2003-01-01

    The application of a decentralised renewable energy supply for the aeration of wastewater ponds, and the influence of an unsteady oxygen supply on the specific conversion rate and biocoenose was investigated. With the discontinuous aeration the specific conversion rate is increased as compared to facultative ponds. The estimation of the microorganisms consortia was done with in situ hybridisation techniques. A significant shift in the bacteria population with the chosen specific probes for anaerobic, sulphate reducing and nitrifying bacteria could not be detected. Wastewater ponds have sufficient buffer volume to compensate for the fluctuating energy supply. But the efficiency of the energy supply of a photovoltaic plant decreases in shallow lakes (d < 1.5 m) corresponding to a high oxygen production of algae. For the layout of the individual components: photovoltaic and wind power plant, energy management, aeration system and wastewater pond, a simulation model was developed and tested. The application of renewable energy for the aeration of wastewater ponds is a useful alternative for the redevelopment of overloaded ponds as well as the construction of new wastewater ponds, especially in areas with an inadequate central electricity grid and a high availability of wind and solar energy.

  4. 4. AERATOR AT 525, CONSTRUCTED 19371938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERATOR AT 525, CONSTRUCTED 1937-1938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH SCREEN REMOVED FOR CLARITY), WATER FROM INTAKE FLOWS THROUGH FLUME, THEN DAMS, AND SPILLS OVER STEPS TO MIX WITH OXYGEN, THUS REDUCING ACIDITY LEVELS. ACID INDUCES FASTER CORROSION OF PIPES AND SPOILS TASTE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  5. Ventilation/perfusion mismatch during lung aeration at birth.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; te Pas, Arjan B; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Wheeler, Kevin I; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sonobe, Takashi; Hooper, Stuart B

    2014-09-01

    At birth, the transition to newborn life is triggered by lung aeration, which stimulates a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF). Current theories predict that the increase in PBF is spatially related to ventilated lung regions as they aerate after birth. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography we investigated the spatial relationships between lung aeration and the increase in PBF after birth. Six near-term (30-day gestation) rabbits were delivered by caesarean section, intubated and an intravenous catheter inserted, before they were positioned for X-ray imaging. During imaging, iodine was injected before ventilation onset, after ventilation of the right lung only, and after ventilation of both lungs. Unilateral ventilation increased iodine levels entering both left and right pulmonary arteries (PAs) and significantly increased heart rate, iodine ejection per beat, diameters of both left and right PAs, and number of visible vessels in both lungs. Within the 6th intercostal space, the mean gray level (relative measure of iodine level) increased from 68.3 ± 11.6 and 70.3 ± 7.5%·s to 136.3 ± 22.6 and 136.3 ± 23.7%·s in the left and right PAs, respectively. No differences were observed between vessels in the left and right lungs, despite the left lung not initially being ventilated. The increase in PBF at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration allowing a large ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or pulmonary shunting, to occur in the partially aerated lung at birth.

  6. The potential for aeration of MSW landfills to accelerate completion

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Charlotte; Gronow, Jan; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2008-07-01

    Landfilling is a popular waste disposal method, but, as it is practised currently, it is fundamentally unsustainable. The low short-term financial costs belie the potential long-term environmental costs, and traditional landfill sites require long-term management in order to mitigate any possible environmental damage. Old landfill sites might require aftercare for decades or even centuries, and in some cases remediation may be necessary. Biological stabilisation of a landfill is the key issue; completion criteria provide a yardstick by which the success of any new technology may be measured. In order for a site to achieve completion it must pose no risk to human health or the environment, meaning that attenuation of any emissions from the site must occur within the local environment without causing harm. Remediation of old landfill sites by aerating the waste has been undertaken in Germany, the United States, Italy and The Netherlands, with considerable success. At a pilot scale, aeration has also been used in newly emplaced waste to accelerate stabilisation. This paper reviews the use of aerobic landfill worldwide, and assesses the ways in which the use of aerobic landfill techniques can decrease the risks associated with current landfill practices, making landfill a more sustainable waste disposal option. It focuses on assessing ways to utilise aeration to enhance stabilisation. The results demonstrated that aeration of old landfill sites may be an efficient and cost-effective method of remediation and allow the date of completion to be brought forward by decades. Similarly, aeration of newly emplaced waste can be effective in enhancing degradation, assisting with completion and reducing environmental risks. However, further research is required to establish what procedure for adding air to a landfill would be most suitable for the UK and to investigate new risks that may arise, such as the possible emission of non-methane organic compounds.

  7. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at −150, −100 and −50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  8. Reinforced Concrete Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    AFWL-TR-82-9 AFWL-TR-82-9 REINFORCED CONCRETE MODELING H. L. Schreyer J. W. Jeter, Jr. New Mexico Engineering Reseprch Institute University of New...Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED REINFORCED CONCRETE MODELING Final Report 6. PERFORMING OtG. REPORT NUMBER NMERI TA8-9 7. AUTHORg) S...loading were identified and used to evaluate current concrete models . Since the endochronic and viscoplastic models provide satisfactory descriptions

  9. Abrasion-Erosion Evaluation of Concrete Mixtures for Repair of Low-Flow Channel, Los Angeles, River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Concrete-)Deteriorat ion. Concrete--Test ing Silica _19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number...Los Angeles. Concrete was placed in the field between 21 and 23 September 1983. Conclusions included (1) the mixtures tested could provide excellent...12 Discussion ............ .............................. . 12 PART IV: FIELD PLACEMENTS

  10. Effective pine bark composting with the Dome Aeration Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Trois, Cristina . E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za; Polster, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    In South Africa garden refuse is primarily disposed of in domestic landfills. Due to the large quantities generated, any form of treatment would be beneficial for volume reduction, waste stabilization and resource recovery. Dome Aeration Technology (DAT) is an advanced process for aerobic biological degradation of garden refuse and general waste [Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999a. Advantages of dome aeration in mechanical-biological waste treatment. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Cagliari, 4-8 October 1999; Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999b. Mechanical-biological waste stabilization by the dome aeration method. Environment Protection Engineering 25 (3/99). Mollekopf, N., Brummack, J., Paar, S., Vorster, K., 2002. Use of the Dome Aeration Technology for biochemical stabilization of waste prior to landfilling. In: Proceedings of the Wastecon 2002, Waste Congress and Exhibition, Durban, South Africa.]. It is a non-reactor open windrow composting process, with the main advantage being that the input material needs no periodic turning. A rotting time of only 3-4 months indicates the high efficiency. Additionally, the low capital/operational costs, low energy inputs and limited plant requirements provide potential for use in aerobic refuse stabilization. The innovation in the DAT process is the passive aeration achieved by thermally driven advection through open windrows caused by temperature differences between the degrading material and the outside environment. This paper investigates the application of Dome Aeration Technology to pine bark composting as part of an integrated waste management strategy. A full-scale field experiment was performed at the Bisasar Road Landfill Site in Durban to assess the influence of climate, waste composition and operational conditions on the process. A test windrow was constructed and measurements of temperature and airflow through the material were taken. The process

  11. BIOVENTING - Groundwater Aeration by Discontinuous Oxygen Gas Pulse Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater aeration by discontinuous oxygen gas pulse injections appears to be a promising concept for enhanced natural attenuation of dissolved contaminants that are susceptible for oxygenase enzyme attacks. Oxygen amendments facilitate indigenous microbiota to catabolize groundwater pollutants, such as aromatics, that are considered to be recalcitrant in absence of dissolved oxygen. As a rule, natural attenuation of many pollutants under aerobic conditions is considerably faster than under anaerobic conditions. Thus, enhancing the dissolved oxygen level appears to be worthwhile. In situ aeration of groundwater has been accomplished by air sparging, H2O2-supply, or by utilization of oxygen release compounds. However, continuous aeration of previously anaerobic groundwater is not desirable for several reasons: (a) economic efforts too high, (b) pollutant dislocation towards surface (desired only in air sparging), (c) risk of aquifer clogging (gas clogging, oxidation of ferrous iron, formation of bioslimes). In contrast, discontinuous oxygen gas sparging provides only for periodical groundwater aeration which is followed by microaerobic and suboxic conditions. Microaerobic conditions can prevail spatially (e.g., at plume fringes or within biofilms) or temporarily (e.g., at discontinuous bioventing). They still allow adapted bacteria to transform environmental pollutants to less toxic compounds, e.g., aromatic ring cleavage after dioxygenasis attack. Ring cleavage products, on the other hand, may be degraded more easily by anaerobic consortia than the initial aromatic compounds, making oxygen depletion periods highly intriguing in regard to an initiation of natural attenuation processes at plume fringes. In our work we outline the effect of oxygen depletion conditions on biodegradation of monchlorobenzene (MCB) as they occur subsequently to temporary aeration periods. For microaerobic conditions, relative to the oxygen supply, a stoichiometric transformation of MCB

  12. 51. DETAIL VIEW OF VIVIANNA ERA CONCRETE HOUSE WITH CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. DETAIL VIEW OF VIVIANNA ERA CONCRETE HOUSE WITH CONCRETE PATIO SLAB LOOKING SOUTHWEST. NOTICE MINE WORKINGS BACKGROUND LEFT. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  13. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  14. HIGH-COMPRESSIVE-STRENGTH CONCRETE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CONCRETE , COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES), PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), AGING(MATERIALS), MANUFACTURING, STRUCTURES, THERMAL PROPERTIES, CREEP, DEFORMATION, REINFORCED CONCRETE , MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, STRESSES, MIXTURES, TENSILE PROPERTIES

  15. Investigation and Discussion of Techniques for Hypolimnion Aeration/Oxygenation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    limnion and hypolimnion was 0.1 mg/f/day. The inflow assumption was based upon field data; the latter two assumptions were based upon the.. Fontane and...the meta- limnion and hypolimnion. Because the centerlines of the RBRR penstocks -’ are approximately 70 ft below the surface and significant...technic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Va.-.:..- Fast, A. W., Dorr, V. A., and Rosen, R. J. 1975. "A Submerged Hypo- limnion Aerator

  16. Diverse microbial communities in non-aerated compost teas suppress bacterial wilt.

    PubMed

    Mengesha, W K; Powell, S M; Evans, K J; Barry, K M

    2017-03-01

    Non-aerated compost teas (NCTs) are water extracts of composted organic materials and are used to suppress soil borne and foliar disease in many pathosystems. Greenhouse trials were used to test the effectiveness of NCTs to suppress potato bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum on plants grown in soils inoculated with a virulent isolate of the pathogen (biovar II). NCTs prepared from matured compost sources: agricultural waste (AWCT), vermicompost (VCT) and solid municipal waste (SMWCT) were evaluated at three initial application times (7 days before inoculation, at time of inoculation and 7 days after inoculation) prior to weekly applications, in a randomized complete-block design. AWCT applied initially at the time of inoculation resulted in the greatest disease suppression, with the disease severity index 2.5-fold less than the non-treated plants and the "area under the disease progress curve" (AUDPC) 3.2-fold less. VCT and SMWCT were less suppressive than AWCT regardless of initial application time. Next generation sequencing of the v4 region of 16S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) revealed that diversity and composition of the bacterial and fungal communities across the NCTs varied significantly. Dominant bacterial phyla such as Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, and a fungal phylum Ascomycota were detected in all NCTs. AWCT had optimum physico-chemical measurements with higher bacterial Shannon diversity indices (H) and fungal richness (S) than the other treatments. We conclude that bacterial wilt of potatoes grown in controlled conditions can be suppressed by a non-aerated compost tea with a high microbial diversity when applied at planting and weekly thereafter.

  17. Growth of Indigenous Organisms in Aerated Filtrate of Feedlot Waste

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, B. A.; Rhodes, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Filtrates from feedlot waste were incubated under aerobic conditions to evaluate the availability of nutrients for cell production and to assess the capacity of indigenous flora to produce stabilized effluents. Incubation was carried out in 9-liter aerated jar fermentors. Three-fourths of the organic material and one-third of the nitrogen were taken up in 4 days; 90% utilization of organic material and nitrogen required almost a month. Acid was produced initially, but aerated liquid thereafter rapidly became alkaline. With pH controlled at 7.0, a comparable pattern of carbon utilization occurred, but nitrogen was incompletely used. The numerically dominant organisms in the waste inoculum were almost immediately displaced by an emergent population of a few types of organisms not originally evident. Maximal viable populations of 109 to 3 × 109 cells/ml were obtained in aerated waste liquid within 48 h; subsequently, numbers declined quickly to initial levels. Numbers of fungi, yeasts, and streptomycetes slowly increased but never exceeded their initial concentration by more than tenfold. PMID:4609184

  18. Soil aeration status in a lowland wet grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, K. R.; Leeds-Harrison, P. B.; Lawson, C. S.; Gowing, D. J. G.

    2004-02-01

    The maintenance or development of plant community diversity in species-rich wet grasslands has been a focus of water management considerations in the UK for the past 20 years. Much attention has been given to the control of water levels in the ditch systems within these wet grassland systems. In this paper we report measurements of aeration status and water-table fluctuation made on a peat soil site at Tadham Moor in Somerset, UK, where water management has focused on the maintenance of wet conditions that often result in flooding in winter and wet soil conditions in the spring and summer. Measurement and modelling of the water-table fluctuation indicates the possibility of variability in the aeration of the root environment and anoxic conditions for much of the winter period and for part of the spring and summer. We have used water content and redox potential measurements to characterize the aeration status of the peat soil. We find that air-filled porosity is related to water-table depth in these situations. Redox potentials in the spring were generally found to be low, implying a reducing condition for nitrate and iron. A significant relationship (p < 0.01) between redox potential and water-table depth exists for data measured at 0.1 m depth, but no relationship could be found for data from 0.4 m depth.

  19. Sodium Exposure Tests on Limestone Concrete Used as Sacrificial Protection Layer in FBR

    SciTech Connect

    Parida, F.C.; Das, S.K.; Sharma, A.K.; Rao, P.M.; Ramesh, S.S.; Somayajulu, P.A.; Malarvizhi, B.; Kasinathan, N.

    2006-07-01

    Hot sodium coming in contact with structural concrete in case of sodium leak in FBR system cause damage as a result of thermo-chemical attack by burning sodium. In addition, release of free and bound water from concrete leads to generation of hydrogen gas, which is explosive in nature. Hence limestone concrete, as sacrificial layer on the structural concrete in FBR, needs to be qualified. Four concrete blocks of dimension 600 mm x 600 mm x 300 mm with 300 mm x 300 mm x 150 mm cavity were cast and subjected to controlled sodium exposure tests. They have composition of ordinary portland cement, water, fine and coarse aggregate of limestone in the ratio of 1: 0.58: 2.547: 3.817. These blocks were subjected to preliminary inspection by ultrasonic pulse velocity technique and rebound hammer tests. Each block was exposed for 30 minutes to about 12 kg of liquid sodium ({approx} 120 mm liquid column) at 550 deg. C in open air, after which sodium was sucked back from the cavity of the concrete block into a sodium tank. On-line temperature monitoring was carried out at strategic locations of sodium pool and concrete block. After removing sodium from the cavity and cleaning the surfaces, rebound hammer testing was carried out on each concrete block at the same locations where data were taken earlier at pre-exposed stage. The statistical analysis of rebound hammer data revealed that one of the concrete block alone has undergone damage to the extent of 16%. The loss of mass occurred for all the four blocks varied from 0.6 to 2.4% due to release of water during the test duration. Chemical analysis of sodium in concrete samples collected from cavity floor of each block helped in generation of depth profiles of sodium monoxide concentration for each block. From this it is concluded that a bulk penetration of sodium up to 30 mm depth has taken place. However it was also observed that at few local spots, sodium penetrated into concrete up to 50 mm. Cylindrical core samples of 50 mm

  20. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as the their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6 1/2 years in seawater.

  1. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  2. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as to their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete for OTEC plants. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6-1/2 years in seawater.

  3. Crack depth measurement in concrete using diffuse ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Chi Won; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, Laurence L.; Kurtis, Kimberly

    2012-05-01

    Cracking in concrete structures is problematic because these cracks can significantly influence the stability of a concrete structure and compromise its durability. The first step to evaluate the serviceability of an in-field concrete structure is to have accurate information on existing crack depth. It is thus of paramount importance to be able to accurately determine the depth of cracks in these concrete structures. This research employs a diffusive ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of surface cracks in concrete. Ultrasonic measurements on a 25.4 × 33 × 60.96 cm3 concrete block containing an artificial crack with varying depths from 2.54 to 10.16 cm are conducted. Contact transducers with one transmitting and the other receiving the ultrasonic signals are mounted on the concrete surface on opposite sides of the crack. A pulse signal with the duration of 2μs is transmitted. In this frequency regime, wavelengths are sufficiently short (comparable with the aggregate size) so that a diffuse ultrasonic signal is detected. The arrival of the diffuse ultrasonic energy at the receiver is delayed by the existence of the crack. This lag-time and the diffusivity of the concrete sample are measured, and a finite element model is employed to solve the inverse problem to determine the crack depth from these measured diffuse ultrasonic parameters.

  4. Effect of aeration rate on production of xylitol from corncob hemicellulose hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinghong; Xia, Liming

    2006-06-01

    The effects of different aeration conditions on xylitol production from corncob hemicellulose hydrolysate by Candida sp. ZU04 were investigated. Batch fermentations were carried out in a 3.7-L fermentor at 30 degrees C, pH 5.5, and agitation of 300 rpm. It was found that the two-phase aeration process was more effective than the one-phase aeration process in xylitol production. In the first 24 h of the aerobic phase, a high aeration rate was applied, glucose was soon consumed, and biomass increased quickly. In the second fermentation phase, aeration rate was reduced and an improved xylitol yield was obtained. The maximum xylitol yield (0.76 g/g) was obtained with an aeration rate of 1.5 vvm (KLa of 37 h-1) for the first 24 h and 0.3 vvm (KLa of 6 h-1) from 24 to 96 h.

  5. Effects of aeration position on organics, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in combined oxidation pond-constructed wetland systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoou; Tian, Yimei; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Sen; Wu, Qing; Yan, Lijian

    2015-12-01

    Given that few studies investigated the effects of aeration position (AP) on the performance of aerated constructed wetlands, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of AP on organics, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in lab-scale combined oxidation pond-constructed wetland (OP-CW) systems. Results showed that middle aeration allowed the CW to possess more uniform oxygen distribution and to achieve greater removals of COD and NH3-N, while the CW under bottom aeration and surface aeration demonstrated more distinct stratification of oxygen distribution and surface aeration brought about better TN removal capacity for the OP-CW system. However, no significant influence of artificial aeration or AP on TP removal was observed. Overall, AP could significantly affect the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen by influencing the oxygen diffusion paths in aerated CWs, thereby influencing the removal of pollutants, especially organics and nitrogen, which offers a reference for the design of aerated CWs.

  6. Biologically induced concrete deterioration in a wastewater treatment plant assessed by combining microstructural analysis with thermodynamic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, A.; Lothenbach, B.; Hoffmann, C.

    2010-08-15

    In the nitrification basins of wastewater treatment plants, deterioration of the concrete surface can occur due to acid attack caused by a nitrifying biofilm covering the concrete. To identify the mechanism of deterioration, concrete cubes of different composition were suspended in an aerated nitrification basin of a wastewater treatment plant for two years and analyzed afterwards. The microstructural investigation reveals that not only dissolution of hydrates takes place, but that calcite precipitation close to the surface occurs leading to the formation of a dense layer. The degree of deterioration of the different cubes correlates with the CaO content of the different cements used. Cements which contain a high fraction of CaO form more calcite offering a better protection against the acid attack. The presence of slag, which lowers the amount CaO in the cement, leads to a faster deterioration of the concrete than observed for samples produced with pure OPC.

  7. Prototype Evaluation of Sluiceway Aeration System Libby Dam, Kootenai River, Montana.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    during an emergency gate lowering operation.- Results of the data reduction indicated a virtual elimination of the cavitation-inducing negative... virtually been eliminated. the following tabulation lists The comparative data given in Plates 17 (without aerator) and 18 (with aerator, Series A). Sluice...pressures on the center sluice invert have been virtually eliminated with the introduction of the aerator. All calculated cavitation indices are

  8. Spray Structure in Near-Injector Region of Aerated Jet in Subsonic Crossflow (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    diameter by introducing gas bubbles into the liquid stream inside the injector. Aerated injection is similar to the flash atomization because it...produces gas bubbles inside the injector for promoting atomization. However, unlike flash atomizers, aerated injection can easily control the amount of... bubbles and their sizes without the complications of dissolving gas or heating the liquid to its boiling point. The aerated liquid injector allows a

  9. Electrokinetic Strength Enhancement of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  10. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  11. Selected Bibliography on Construction Methods for Architectural Concrete and Portland-Cement Plaster.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    ARCHITECTURAL CONCRETE AND PORTLAND - CEMENT PLASTER by Robert H. Denson Structures LaboratoryVQ UDEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Waterways Experiment Station...ARCHITECTURAL CONCRETE AND PORTLAND - CEMENT 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER PLASTER 7. AUTHOR(&) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(*) Robert H. Densn S...Ildentliy by block number) Architectural concrete Specifications Mixture proportions Portland - cement plaster Forms Exposed aggregate Plaster Cast-in-place

  12. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  13. Landfill aeration in the framework of a reclamation project in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello

    2014-03-01

    In situ aeration by means of the Airflow technology was proposed for landfill conditioning before landfill mining in the framework of a reclamation project in Northern Italy. A 1-year aeration project was carried out on part of the landfill with the objective of evaluating the effectiveness of the Airflow technology for landfill aerobization, the evolution of waste biological stability during aeration and the effects on leachate and biogas quality and emissions. The main outcomes of the 1-year aeration project are presented in the paper. The beneficial effect of the aeration on waste biological stability was clear (63% reduction of the respiration index); however, the effectiveness of aeration on the lower part of the landfill is questionable, due to the limited potential for air migration into the leachate saturated layers. During the 1-year in situ aeration project approx. 275 MgC were discharged from the landfill body with the extracted gas, corresponding to 4.6 gC/kgDM. However, due to the presence of anaerobic niches in the aerated landfill, approx. 46% of this amount was extracted as CH4, which is higher than reported in other aeration projects. The O2 conversion quota was lower than reported in other similar projects, mainly due to the higher air flow rates applied. The results obtained enabled valuable recommendations to be made for the subsequent application of the Airflow technology to the whole landfill.

  14. Bioreactor tests preliminary to landfill in situ aeration: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon and nitrogen mass balances in aerated landfill simulation reactors. ► Waste stabilization in aerated landfill simulation reactors. ► Effect of temperature on biodegradation processes in aerated landfills. - Abstract: Lab scale tests in bioreactor were carried out in the framework of the characterization studies of a landfill where in situ aeration (possibly followed by landfill mining) had been proposed as part of the novel waste management strategy in a region in northern Italy. The tests were run to monitor the effects produced by aerobic conditions at different temperatures on waste sampled at different depths in the landfill, with focus on the carbon and nitrogen conversion during aeration. Temperatures ranging from 35 to 45 °C were chosen, in order to evaluate possible inhibition of biodegradation processes (namely nitrification) at 45 °C in the landfill. The results obtained showed positive effects of the aeration on leachate quality and a significant reduction of waste biodegradability. Although a delay of biodegradation processes was observed in the reactor run at 45 °C, biodegradation rates increased after 2 months of aeration, providing very low values of the relevant parameters (as in the other aerated reactors) by the end of the study. Mass balances were carried out for TOC and N-NH{sub 4}{sup +}; the findings obtained were encouraging and provided evidence of the effectiveness of carbon and nitrogen conversion processes in the aerated landfill simulation reactors.

  15. Method and apparatus for energy efficient self-aeration in chemical, biochemical, and wastewater treatment processes

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Johnway [Richland, WA; Skeen, Rodney S [Pendleton, OR

    2002-05-28

    The present invention is a pulse spilling self-aerator (PSSA) that has the potential to greatly lower the installation, operation, and maintenance cost associated with aerating and mixing aqueous solutions. Currently, large quantities of low-pressure air are required in aeration systems to support many biochemical production processes and wastewater treatment plants. Oxygen is traditionally supplied and mixed by a compressor or blower and a mechanical agitator. These systems have high-energy requirements and high installation and maintenance costs. The PSSA provides a mixing and aeration capability that can increase operational efficiency and reduce overall cost.

  16. Improvement of oxygen transfer efficiency in aerated ponds using liquid-film-assisted approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Imai, T; Tani, K; Ukita, M; Sekine, M; Higuchi, T; Zhang, Z

    2007-01-01

    In aerated ponds, oxygen is generally supplied through either diffused or mechanical aeration means. Surface transfer and bubble transfer both contribute significantly to oxygen transfer in a diffused aeration system. In the present study, a liquid-film-forming apparatus (LFFA) is successfully developed on a laboratory scale to improve considerably the surface transfer via the unique liquid film transfer technique. The experimental results show that the volumetric mass transfer coefficient for LFFA alone is found to be as much as 5.3 times higher than that for water surface and that the total volumetric mass transfer coefficient for the liquid film aeration system increases by 37% in comparison with a conventional aeration system. Additionally, by tuning finely the structural parameters of the LFFA, it can also lead to high dissolved oxygen (DO) water with the DO percent saturation greater than 90%. More importantly, this result is accomplished by simply offering a single-pass aeration at a depth as shallow as 26 cm. As a result, the objective of economical energy consumption in aerated ponds can be realized by lowering the aeration depth without sacrificing the aeration efficiency. It is noteworthy that the data presented in this study are acquired either numerically or experimentally.

  17. Partial nitritation ANAMMOX in submerged attached growth bioreactors with smart aeration at 20 °C.

    PubMed

    Shannon, James M; Hauser, Lee W; Liu, Xikun; Parkin, Gene F; Mattes, Timothy E; Just, Craig L

    2015-01-01

    Submerged attached growth bioreactors (SAGBs) were operated at 20 °C for 30 weeks in smart-aerated, partial nitritation ANAMMOX mode and in a timer-controlled, cyclic aeration mode. The smart-aerated SAGBs removed 48-53% of total nitrogen (TN) compared to 45% for SAGBs with timed aeration. Low dissolved oxygen concentrations and cyclic pH patterns in the smart-aerated SAGBs suggested conditions favorable to partial nitritation ANAMMOX and stoichiometrically-derived and numerically modeled estimations attributed 63-68% and 14-44% of TN removal to partial nitritation ANAMMOX in these bioreactors, respectively. Ammonia removals of 36-67% in the smart-aerated SAGBs, with measured oxygen and organic carbon limitations, further suggest partial nitritation ANAMMOX. The smart-aerated SAGBs required substantially less aeration to achieve TN removals similar to SAGBs with timer-controlled aeration. Genomic DNA testing confirmed that the dominant ANAMMOX seed bacteria, received from a treatment plant utilizing the DEMON® sidestream deammonification process, was a Candidatus Brocadia sp. (of the Planctomycetales order). The DNA from these bacteria was also present in the SAGBs at the conclusion of the study providing evidence for attached growth and limited biomass washout.

  18. Effect of influent aeration on removal of organic matter from coffee processing wastewater in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Maike; Matos, Antonio Teixeira; Abreu, Edgar Carneiro; Silva, Fabyano Fonseca; Borges, Alisson Carraro

    2013-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of aeration and vegetation on the removal of organic matter in coffee processing wastewater (CPW) treated in 4 constructed wetlands (CWs), characterized as follows: (i) ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) cultivated system operating with an aerated influent; (ii) non-cultivated system operating with an aerated influent, (iii) ryegrass cultivated system operating with a non-aerated influent; and (iv) non-cultivated system operating with a non-aerated influent. The lowest average chemical oxygen demand (COD), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and total suspended solids (TSS) removal efficiencies of 87, 84 and 73%, respectively, were obtained in the ryegrass cultivated system operating with a non-aerated influent. However, ryegrass cultivation did not influence the removal efficiency of organic matter. Artificial aeration of the CPW, prior to its injection in the CW, did not improve the removal efficiencies of organic matter. On other hand it did contribute to increase the instantaneous rate at which the maximum COD removal efficiency was reached. Although aeration did not result in greater organic matter removal efficiencies, it is important to consider the benefits of aeration on the removal of the other compounds.

  19. Sustainable management and utilisation of concrete slurry waste: A case study in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Uzzal; Xuan, Dongxing; Poon, Chi Sun

    2017-03-01

    With the promotion of environmental protection in the construction industry, the mission to achieve more sustainable use of resources during the production process of concrete is also becoming important. This study was conducted to assess the environmental sustainability of concrete slurry waste (CSW) management by life cycle assessment (LCA) techniques, with the aim of identifying a resource-efficient solution for utilisation of CSW in the production of partition wall blocks. CSW is the dewatered solid residues deposited in the sedimentation tank after washing out over-ordered/rejected fresh concrete and concrete trucks in concrete batching plants. The reuse of CSW as recycled aggregates or a cementitious binder for producing partition wall blocks, and the life cycle environmental impact of the blocks were assessed and compared with the conventional one designed with natural materials. The LCA results showed that the partition wall blocks prepared with fresh CSW and recycled concrete aggregates achieved higher sustainability as it consumed 59% lower energy, emitted 66% lower greenhouse gases, and produced lesser amount of other environmental impacts than that of the conventional one. When the mineral carbonation technology was further adopted for blocks curing using CO2, the global warming potential of the corresponding blocks production process was negligible, and hence the carbonated blocks may be considered as carbon neutral eco-product.

  20. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  1. Strengthening lightweight concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auskern, A.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer absorption by lightweight concretes to improve bonding between cement and aggregate and to increase strength of cement is discussed. Compressive strength of treated cement is compared with strength of untreated product. Process for producing polymers is described.

  2. Shear Resistance between Concrete-Concrete Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačovic, Marek

    2013-12-01

    The application of precast beams and cast-in-situ structural members cast at different times has been typical of bridges and buildings for many years. A load-bearing frame consists of a set of prestressed precast beams supported by columns and diaphragms joined with an additionally cast slab deck. This article is focused on the theoretical and experimental analyses of the shear resistance at an interface. The first part of the paper deals with the state-of-art knowledge of the composite behaviour of concrete-concrete structures and a comparison of the numerical methods introduced in the relevant standards. In the experimental part, a set of specimens with different interface treatments was tested until failure in order to predict the composite behaviour of coupled beams. The experimental part was compared to the numerical analysis performed by means of FEM basis nonlinear software.

  3. Neuromuscular block

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them especially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are especially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of especial interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors. PMID:16402115

  4. Neuromuscular block.

    PubMed

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them specially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are specially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of special interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors.

  5. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  6. [Biological phosphorus removal in intermittent aerated biological filter].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Long-Yun; Yang, Chun-Ping; Guo, Jun-Yuan; Luo, Sheng-Lian

    2012-01-01

    Under intermittent aerated and continuous fed operation where the biofilm system was subjected to alternated anaerobic/aerobic condition, the effect of influent volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentrations, operation cycle and backwash on the biological phosphorus removal performance of the biofilter was studied. In the experiment, synthetic domestic wastewater was used, and the influent velocity was 5 L x h(-1) with gas versus liquid ratio of 8:1 and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 1.3 h, resulting in average COD, ammonium and phosphorus load of 4.7, 0.41 and 0.095 g x (L x d) (-1) respectively. Results show that, (1) effective release and uptake of phosphorus was achieved in a operation cycle; (2) when influent VFAs was 100 mg x L(-1) (calculated by COD value) and operation cycle was 6 h the filter performed best in phosphorus removal, the phosphorus loading removal rate can be as much as 0.059 g x (L x d)(-1) at the aerated phase with those of COD and ammonium being 3.8 g x (L x d)(-1) and 0.28 g x (L x d)(-1) respectively, and with average effluent phosphorus, COD and ammonium concentrations being 1.8, 43.6 and 8.7 mg x L(-1), which shows nitrogen loss also happened; (3) the pause of backwash decreased the phosphorus removal performance rapidly with the removal efficiency lower than 40% in two days, but the consequent daily backwash operation gave a short improvement on the phosphorus removal, which disappeared in another two days. Thus, it is shown that biological phosphorus removal achieved with better phosphorus loading removal performance in the biofilter under intermittent aerated and continuous fed operation, and that sufficient and stable influent VFAs concentration, proper operation cycle, and more frequent backwash favored the performance.

  7. Pseudomonads Rule Degradation of Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons in Aerated Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Jiri; Hroudova, Miluse; Jansa, Jan; Vrchotova, Blanka; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2015-01-01

    Given that the degradation of aromatic pollutants in anaerobic environments such as sediment is generally very slow, aeration could be an efficient bioremediation option. Using stable isotope probing (SIP) coupled with pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes, we identified naphthalene-utilizing populations in aerated polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-polluted sediment. The results showed that naphthalene was metabolized at both 10 and 20°C following oxygen delivery, with increased degradation at 20°C as compared to 10°C—a temperature more similar to that found in situ. Naphthalene-derived 13C was primarily assimilated by pseudomonads. Additionally, Stenotrophomonas, Acidovorax, Comamonas, and other minor taxa were determined to incorporate 13C throughout the measured time course. The majority of SIP-detected bacteria were also isolated in pure cultures, which facilitated more reliable identification of naphthalene-utilizing populations as well as proper differentiation between primary consumers and cross-feeders. The pseudomonads acquiring the majority of carbon were identified as Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas gessardii. Stenotrophomonads and Acidovorax defluvii, however, were identified as cross-feeders unable to directly utilize naphthalene as a growth substrate. PAH degradation assays with the isolated bacteria revealed that all pseudomonads as well as Comamonas testosteroni degraded acenaphthene, fluorene, and phenanthrene in addition to naphthalene. Furthermore, P. veronii and C. testosteroni were capable of transforming anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene. Screening of isolates for naphthalene dioxygenase genes using a set of in-house designed primers for Gram-negative bacteria revealed the presence of such genes in pseudomonads and C. testosteroni. Overall, our results indicated an apparent dominance of pseudomonads in the sequestration of carbon from naphthalene and potential degradation of other PAHs upon aeration of the sediment at both 20 and

  8. Pulverizing aeration as a method of lakes restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczorowska, E.; Podsiadłowski, S.

    2012-04-01

    The principal threat to lakes of the temperate zone is posed by factors accelerating their eutrophication and causing marked deoxygenation of the deeper layers of water, mainly the hypo- and metalimnion. Among their effects are frequent phytoplankton blooms, including those of blue-green algae, and general deterioration of water quality also affecting the abundance and health status of fish. The chief concern is a disturbed proportion between the amount of complex chemical compounds, especially organic, and the oxygen content of lake waters. Natural processes of water oxygenation are not too intensive, because they are practically limited to the epilimnion layer, connected as they are with the activity of aquatic plants of the littoral and sublittoral zone (which tends to disappear in contaminated lakes) and wind energy (the effect of waving). In summer conditions, with a relatively great chemical activity of bottom deposits, the intensity of those processes is usually inadequate. Hence, in 1995 a research was launched in the Institute of Agricultural Engineering of the Agricultural University in Poznań on an integrated lake restoration technology whose core was a self-powered aerator capable of oxygenating also the bottom layers of water (the hypolimnion) of deep lakes. The aerator uses energy obtained from a Savonius rotor mainly to diffuse gases: to release hydrogen sulphide, which usually saturates the hypolimnion water completely, and then to saturate this water with oxygen. Even early studies showed the constructed device to be highly efficient in improving oxygen conditions in the bottom zone. They also made it clear that it should be equipped with an autonomous system designed to inactivate phosphorus, one of the principal factors determining the rate of lake degradation. In 2003 the first wind-driven pulverising aerator equipped with such a system was installed in Town Lake in Chodzież. The aim of this work is to present the principles of operation of a

  9. In situ aeration: Air sparging, bioventing, and related remediation process

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Miller, R.N.; Johnson, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    This volume is part of a ten volume set of papers derived from the Third International In Situ and On-Site Bioreclamation Symposium which was held in San Diego, California, in April 1995. The purpose of the conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on bioremediation. This volume focuses on the use of air sparging, bioventing, and other aeration processes to remediate hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and groundwater. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  10. Influence of aeration implements, phosphorus fertilizers, and soil taxa on phosphorus losses from grasslands.

    PubMed

    Franklin, D H; Butler, D M; Cabrera, M L; Calvert, V H; West, L T; Rema, J A

    2011-01-01

    Attenuation of rainfall within the solum may help to move contaminants and nutrients into the soil to be better sequestered or utilized by crops. Surface application of phosphorus (P) amendments to grasslands may lead to elevated concentrations of P in surface runoff and eutrophication of surface waters. Aeration of grasslands has been proposed as a treatment to reduce losses of applied P. Here, results from two small-plot aeration studies and two field-scale, paired-watershed studies are supplemented with previously unpublished soil P data and synthesized. The overall objective of these studies was to determine the impact of aeration on soil P, runoff volume, and runoff P losses from mixed tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.]-bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) grasslands fertilized with P. Small-scale rainfall simulations were conducted on two soil taxa using three types of aeration implements: spikes, disks, and cores. The-field scale study was conducted on four soil taxa with slit and knife aeration. Small-plot studies showed that core aeration reduced loads of total P and dissolved reactive P (DRP) in runoff from plots fertilized with broiler litter and that aeration was effective in reducing P export when it increased soil P in the upper 5 cm. In the field-scale study, slit aeration reduced DRP losses by 35% in fields with well-drained soils but not in poorly drained soils. Flow-weighted concentrations of DRP in aerated fields were related to water-soluble P applied in amendments and soil test P in the upper 5 cm. These studies show that the overall effectiveness of mechanical soil aeration on runoff volume and P losses is controlled by the interaction of soil characteristics such as internal drainage and compaction, soil P, type of surface-applied manure, and type of aeration implement.

  11. Block 2. Photograph depicts close up of stair wall, which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 2. Photograph depicts close up of stair wall, which is located opposite of the fountain on block 2. Photograph reveals the porous quality of the concrete used within the park - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  12. Wooden concrete: High thermal efficiency using waste wood

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, J.

    1994-09-01

    Wood concrete mixture of wood shavings, lime and cement is widely used in European building construction. In spite of many advantages, this material is almost unknown in the US. Eventual application of wooden concrete in building block production is discussed in this paper. Based on finite difference computer modeling, the thermal performance of several masonry wall systems and their components have been analyzed. The total wall system thermal performance for a typical single-story ranch house also has been determined. At present, typical experimental wall measurements and calculations do not include the effects of building envelope subsystems such as comers, window and door openings, and structural joints with roofs, floors, ceilings, and other walls. In masonry wall systems, these details may represent significant thermal bridges because of the highly conductive structural concrete. Many of the typical thermal bridges may be reduced by application of wood concrete elements.

  13. The use of bottle caps as submerged aerated filter medium.

    PubMed

    Damasceno de Oliveira, Laurence; Motlagh, Amir Mohaghegh; Goel, Ramesh; de Souza Missagia, Beatriz; Alves de Abreu Filho, Benício; Lautenschlager, Sandro Rogério

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a submerged aerated filter (SAF) using bottle caps as a support medium was evaluated. The system was fed with effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system at ETE 2-South wastewater treatment plant, under different volumetric organic load rates (VOLRs). The population of a particular nitrifying microbial community was assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization with specific oligonucleotide probes. The system showed an average removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) equal to 76% for VOLRs between 2.6 and 13.6 kg COD m(-3)_media.day(-1). The process of nitrification in conjunction with the removal of organic matter was observed from applying VOLRs lower than 5.5 kg COD m(-3)_media.day(-1) resulting in 78% conversion of NH4(+)-N. As the applied organic load was reduced, an increase in the nitrifying bacteria population was observed compared with total 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) stained cells. Generally, SAF using bottle caps as a biological aerated filter medium treating wastewater from an anaerobic system showed promising removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and conversion of NH4(+)-N.

  14. Galvanic corrosion of nitinol under deaerated and aerated conditions.

    PubMed

    Pound, Bruce G

    2016-10-01

    Various studies have examined the corrosion rate of nitinol generally under deaerated conditions. Likewise, galvanic corrosion studies have typically involved deaerated solutions. This work addressed the effect of galvanic coupling on the corrosion current of electropolished nitinol in phosphate buffered saline and 0.9% sodium chloride under dearated and aerated conditions for times up to 24 h. Tests were performed on nitinol alone and coupled with MP35N in both the mechanically polished and passivated conditions. Aeration and galvanic coupling were found to have relatively little effect, indicating that the corrosion current is controlled by the anodic reaction. The current can be attributed entirely to Ni(2+) dissolution, which appears to be governed by solid-state mass transport of Ni(2+) through the passive oxide film. Because corrosion of EP nitinol is controlled by the anodic reaction, contact between EP nitinol and MP35N or other biomedical Co-Cr alloys is unlikely to result in significant galvanic effects in vivo. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1322-1327, 2016.

  15. Surfactant effects on alpha factors in full-scale wastewater aeration systems.

    PubMed

    Rosso, D; Larson, L E; Stenstrom, M K

    2006-01-01

    Aeration is an essential process in the majority of wastewater treatment processes, and accounts for the largest fraction of plant energy costs. Aeration systems can achieve wastewater oxygenation by shearing the surface (surface aerators) or releasing bubbles at the bottom of the tank (coarse- or fine-bubble aerators). Surfactants accumulate on gas-liquid interfaces and reduce mass transfer rates. This reduction in general is larger for fine-bubble aerators. This study was conducted to evaluate mass transfer effects on the characterization and specification of aeration systems in clean and process water conditions. Tests at different interfacial turbulence regimes were analysed, showing higher gas transfer depression for lower turbulence regimes. Higher turbulence regimes can offset contamination effects, at the expense of operating efficiency. This phenomenon is characteristic of surface aerators and coarse bubble diffusers and is here discussed. The results explain the variability of alpha factors measured at small scale, due to uncontrolled energy density. Results are also reported in dimensionless empirical correlations that describe mass transfer as a function of physiochemical and geometrical characteristics of the aeration process.

  16. Aerated Shewanella oneidensis in Continuously-fed Bioelectrochemical Systems for Power and Hydrogen Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of aeration of Shewanella oneidensis on potentiostatic current production, iron(III) reduction, hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, and electric power generation in a microbial fuel cell. The potentiostatic performance of aerated S. oneidensis was considerab...

  17. 18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. FOURTH FLOOR BLDG. 28, RAISED CONCRETE SLAB FLOOR WITH BLOCKS AND PULLEYS OVERHEAD LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Fafnir Bearing Plant, Bounded on North side by Myrtle Street, on South side by Orange Street, on East side by Booth Street & on West side by Grove Street, New Britain, Hartford County, CT

  18. Perspective view. Fivestory reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view. Five-story reinforced concrete factory building reveals the structural frame on the exterior of the facade. Twelve bay facade facing onto Clay Avenue (north facade) has first floor openings bricked up. Mix of typical factory windows and glass block windows fill the majority of the openings on the rest of building - Russell Industrial Center, 1600 Clay Avenue, Detroit, MI

  19. 13. Bottom floor, tower interior showing concrete floor and cast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Bottom floor, tower interior showing concrete floor and cast iron bases for oil butts (oil butts removed when lighthouse lamp was converted to electric power.) - Block Island Southeast Light, Spring Street & Mohegan Trail at Mohegan Bluffs, New Shoreham, Washington County, RI

  20. 13. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View of Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge facing south. Concrete barrier blocks access. Plaque was originally located where strioed traffic sign is posted at right. - Clark Fork Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Clark Fork River, serves Highway 200, Clark Fork, Bonner County, ID

  1. 2. VIEW, LOOKING FROM THE NORTHEAST. THESE THREE CONCRETE MORTAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW, LOOKING FROM THE NORTHEAST. THESE THREE CONCRETE MORTAR BLOCKS WERE FOR THE MILL'S 3-STAMP BATTERIES ERECTED IN 1903, NORTH OF THE TWO 1901 BATTERIES WHICH WERE MOUNTED ON WOODEN TIMBERS - Wilbur-Womble Mill, Southern Edge Of Salt Spring Valley, Copperopolis, Calaveras County, CA

  2. 26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, cableway tower, power line and derrick. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  3. Nitrogen removal in intermittently aerated vertical flow constructed wetlands: impact of influent COD/N ratios.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinlin; Wang, Wengang; Zhang, Bo; Guo, Yeye; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Haiming

    2013-09-01

    The performance response of eight vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) to different influent COD/N ratios and intermittent aeration in domestic wastewater treatment was investigated. Almost complete nitrification was obtained by intermittent aeration, which well developed alternate anaerobic and aerobic conditions for nitrification and denitrification. Sufficient carbon source supply resulted from influent COD/N ratio of 10 simultaneously obtained high removals of COD (96%), ammonia nitrogen (99%) and total nitrogen (90%) in intermittently aerated VFCWs. In all non-aerated VFCWs, poor nitrification was observed due to oxygen deficiency whilst high COD/N ratios further led to lower COD and nitrogen removal efficiency. The results suggest that intermittent aeration combined with high influent COD/N ratios could achieve high nitrogen removal in VFCWs.

  4. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lomasney, H.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  5. Structural Materials: 95. Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures and their materials of construction are described, and their operating experience noted. Aging and environmental factors that can affect the durability of the concrete structures are identified. Basic components of a program to manage aging of these structures are identified and described. Application of structural reliability theory to devise uniform risk-based criteria by which existing facilities can be evaluated to achieve a desired performance level when subjected to uncertain demands and to quantify the effects of degradation is outlined. Finally, several areas are identified where additional research is desired.

  6. Radon emanation from concrete and the influence of using flyash in cement.

    PubMed

    van der Lugt, G; Scholten, L C

    1985-10-01

    In the Netherlands both Portland cement and blast furnace cement (slags from blast furnaces with about 30% Portland cement) are used for concrete. Radon exhalation measurements were carried out on concrete blocks made with these two types of cement and blocks with 15, 25 and 35% of the cement substituted by three different types of flyash. The results show that substituting part of the cement by flyash has no drastic effect on the exhalation rate. For concrete with Portland cement the exhalation rate decreases using flyash with an average radium content. With blast furnace cement a slight increase may be expected. The exhalation of concrete is greater than the sum of the exhalation values of the constituting components. The water in the pores of the concrete plays an essential role in the emanation process.

  7. Thermochemical degradation of limestone aggregate concrete on exposure to sodium fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premila, M.; Sivasubramanian, K.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S.

    2008-04-01

    Limestone aggregate concrete blocks were subjected to sodium fire conforming to a realistic scenario in order to qualify them as protective sacrificial layers over structural concrete flooring in liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Mid infrared absorption measurements were carried out on these sodium fire-exposed samples as a function of depth from the affected surface. Definite signatures of thermochemical degradation indicating dehydration and structural modification of the limestone concrete have been obtained. Control runs were carried out to delineate the thermal effects of sodium fires from that of the chemical interaction effects. Measurements on limestone aggregate samples treated with fused NaOH provided direct evidence of the exact mechanism of the sodium attack on concrete. The observed degradation effects were correlated to the mechanical strength of the concrete blocks and to the intensity of the sodium fire experienced.

  8. Evolution of the health of concrete structures by electrically conductive GFRP (glass fiber reinforced plastic) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Soon-Gi

    2002-02-01

    The function and performance of self-diagnostic composites embedded in concrete blocks and piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurement. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced into glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composites to provide electrical conductivity. The CPGFRP composite displays generally good performance in various bending tests of concrete block and piles compared to the CFGFRP composite. The electrical resistance of the CPGFRP composite increases remarkably at small strains in response to microcrack formation at about 200 μm strain, and can be used to detect smaller deformations before crack formation. The CPGFRP composite shows continuous change in resistance up to a large strain level just before the final fracture for concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. It is concluded that self-diagnostic composites can be used to predict damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  9. A mouse model of orthotopic vascularized aerated lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, M; Krupnick, A S; Kornfeld, C G; Lai, J M; Ritter, J H; Richardson, S B; Huang, H J; Das, N A; Patterson, G A; Gelman, A E; Kreisel, D

    2007-06-01

    Outcomes after lung transplantation are markedly inferior to those after other solid organ transplants. A better understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms contributing to lung graft injury will be critical to improve outcomes. Advances in this field have been hampered by the lack of a mouse model of lung transplantation. Here, we report a mouse model of vascularized aerated single lung transplantation utilizing cuff techniques. We show that syngeneic grafts have normal histological appearance with minimal infiltration of T lymphocytes. Allogeneic grafts show acute cellular rejection with infiltration of T lymphocytes and recipient-type antigen presenting cells. Our data show that we have developed a physiological model of lung transplantation in the mouse, which provides ample opportunity for the study of nonimmune and immune mechanisms that contribute to lung allograft injury.

  10. Precast Concrete Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Gorsuch 1962, Kruse 1966, Jacoby 1967, and Hargett 1970). The final slab design used in construction is shown in Figure 2. These slabs were 6 ft wide, 24...Experiment Station, CE, Vicksburg, Miss. Gorsuch , R. F. 1962. "Preliminary Investigation of Precast Prestressed Concrete Pavements," MS Thesis, South Dakota

  11. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  12. Heidrun concrete TLP: Update

    SciTech Connect

    Munkejord, T.

    1995-10-01

    This paper gives a summary of the Heidrun substructure including tethers and foundations. The focus will although be on the concrete substructure. The Heidrun Field is located in 345 m water depth in the northern part of the Haltenbanken area, approximately 100N miles from the west coast of mid-Norway. The field is developed by means of a concrete Tension Leg Platform (TLP) by Conoco Norway Inc. The TLP will be moored by 16 steel tethers, arranged in groups of four per corner, which secure the substructure (hull) to the concrete foundations. A general view of the TLP is shown. The Heidrun TLP will be the northern most located platform in the North Sea when installed at Haltenbanken in 1995. Norwegian Contractors a.s (NC) is undertaking the Engineering, Procurement, Construction and Installation (EPCI) contract for the Heidrun TLP substructure. This comprises the complete delivery of the hull with two module support beams (MSB), including all mechanical outfitting. Furthermore, NC will perform all marine operations related to the substructure. For the concrete foundations NC has performed the detailed engineering work and has been responsible for the two to field and installation of the foundations.

  13. Micromechanics of Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-25

    reflects the dispersion of the coarse aggregates on the mesoscale. Specifically, the experimental measure- ments indicate ( Mindess and Young 1981, Zaitsev...Mecanique des Materiaux Solides, Dunod, Paris. Mindess , S. and J. Young (1981), Concrete, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Mura, T. (1982

  14. [Effects of substrate-aeration cultivation pattern on tomato growth].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping

    2010-01-01

    Aeroponics can increase the fruit yield of tomato plant, but its cost is very high. In this paper, tomato seedlings were planted with three cultures, i. e., whole perlite culture (CK), perlite-aeration culture (T1), and aeroponics (T2), and a comparative study was made on the seedlings growth. Compared with CK, T1 improved the gas environment in root zone significantly, with the CO2 and O2 concentrations in root zone being 0.2 and 1.17 times higher, and increased the plant height and stem diameter after 60 days of transplanting by 5.1% and 8.4%, respectively. The plant net photosynthetic rate of T1 was significantly higher than that of CK, with the maximum value after transplanting 45 days increased by 13%. T1 also increased the root activity and ion absorbing ability significantly, with the root activity after transplanting 45 days being 1.23 times of CK, and the root K, Ca, and Mg contents after transplanting 60 days increased by 31%, 37%, and 27%, respectively. The fruit yield of T1 was 1.16 times of CK. No significant differences in these indices were observed between T1 and T2, and less difference in the fruit soluble sugar and organic acid contents as well as the sugar-acid ratio was found among CK, T1, and T2. It was suggested that perlite-aeration cultivation pattern was an easy and feasible way to markedly improve the fruit yield of tomato plant.

  15. Intensification of aeration in treating natural water and mine water

    SciTech Connect

    Bochkarev, G.R.; Beloborodov, A.V.; Kondrat`ev, S.A.

    1995-03-01

    Apart from problems in supplying potable water for coal mining regions, other problems exist - and are becoming more acute - in protection of the environment against pollution by domestic and mine waters, where the most urgent task is biological treatment and disinfection of wastewater to eliminate organic and bacterial contaminants. The principal method of disinfection is chlorination, which has well-known adverse effects on the human organism. Hence there is a great demand for the replacement of chlorinating agents by the less toxic and more effective ozonation method; however, the practical application of ozone treatment is limited by its relatively high cost and the unavailability of commercial-scale ozonators. An analysis of the current problems in water treatment in coal mining regions of the country shows that the typical schemes used today to treat natural and mine waters are very ineffective and unwieldy; also, in most cases they do not meet the required treating standards. Any progress in solving these problems can be expected only on the basis of fundamental advances in understanding the mechanism of the processes on which water-system treating technology is based. The results from research on intensification of aeration processes of water treatment, based on new concepts of the mechanism of mass transfer in water-air systems are presented. It is known that the aeration process, which serves basically to saturate the water with oxygen, is accomplished through contact between the water and air phases in which the decisive factor is the state of the surfaces and the interacting phases.

  16. Enhancement of oxygen transfer efficiency in diffused aeration systems using liquid-film-forming apparatus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Imai, T; Tani, K; Ukita, M; Sekine, M; Higuchi, T; Zhang, Z J

    2007-05-01

    Surface transfer and bubble transfer both contribute significantly to oxygen transfer in a diffused aeration system. In the present study, liquid-film-forming apparatus is successfully developed on a laboratory scale to improve considerably the surface transfer via the unique liquid film transfer technique. The experimental results show that the volumetric mass transfer coefficient for liquid-film-forming apparatus alone is found to be as much as 5.3 times higher than that for water surface and that the total volumetric mass transfer coefficient for liquid film aeration system increases by 37 % in comparison with conventional aeration system. Additionally, by tuning finely the structural parameters of the liquid-film-forming apparatus, it can also lead to high dissolved oxygen water with the dissolved oxygen percent saturation greater than 90 %. More importantly, this result is accomplished by simply offering a single-pass aeration at the depth as shallow as 26 cm. As a result, the objective of economical energy consumption in diffused aeration systems can be realized by lowering the aeration depth without sacrificing the aeration efficiency.

  17. Development of a model for activated sludge aeration systems: linking air supply, distribution, and demand.

    PubMed

    Schraa, Oliver; Rieger, Leiv; Alex, Jens

    2017-02-01

    During the design of a water resource recovery facility, it is becoming industry practice to use simulation software to assist with process design. Aeration is one of the key components of the activated sludge process, and is one of the most important aspects of modelling wastewater treatment systems. However, aeration systems are typically not modelled in detail in most wastewater treatment process modelling studies. A comprehensive dynamic aeration system model has been developed that captures both air supply and demand. The model includes sub-models for blowers, pipes, fittings, and valves. An extended diffuser model predicts both oxygen transfer efficiency within an aeration basin and pressure drop across the diffusers. The aeration system model allows engineers to analyse aeration systems as a whole to determine biological air requirements, blower performance, air distribution, control valve impacts, controller design and tuning, and energy costs. This enables engineers to trouble-shoot the entire aeration system including process, equipment and controls. It also allows much more realistic design of these highly complex systems.

  18. Influence of aeration intensity on mature aerobic granules in sequencing batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Wen; Liu, Lin; Liang, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Aeration intensity is well known as an important factor in the formation of aerobic granules. In this research, two identical lab-scale sequencing batch reactors with aeration intensity of 0.8 (R1) and 0.2 m(3)/h (R2) were operated to investigate the characteristics and kinetics of matured aerobic granules. Results showed that both aeration intensity conditions induced granulation, but they showed different effects on the characteristics of aerobic granules. Compared with the low aeration intensity (R2), the aerobic granules under the higher aeration intensity (R1) had better physical characteristics and settling ability. However, the observed biomass yield (Y obs) in R1 [0.673 kg mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS)/kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)] was lower than R2 (0.749 kg MLVSS/kg COD). In addition, the maximum specific COD removal rates (q max) and apparent half rate constant (K) of mature aerobic granular sludge under the two aeration intensities were at a similar level. Therefore, the matured aerobic granule system does not require to be operated in a higher aeration intensity, which will reduce the energy consumption.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging studies of spontaneous capillary water imbibition in aerated gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyung-Min; Mitchell, Jonathan; Jaffel, Hamouda; Gladden, Lynn F.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we investigate both capillary water imbibition and the sorptivity of aerated gypsum plaster, and how these sorption characteristics are related to the pore structure of the material. These characteristics are examined by monitoring mass change using the conventional gravimetric method and by obtaining water content profiles using non-destructive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques during capillary imbibition of water. Here, three different gypsum samples are investigated: one non-aerated reference gypsum sample and two aerated gypsum samples produced with different volumetric air fractions. The capillary water absorption into the reference sample follows t1/2 kinetics (Fickian diffusion), where t is the time of ingress. However, in the aerated gypsum samples there are deviations from t1/2 kinetics. The MRI results show unambiguously that two wetting fronts advance through the aerated structure; an observation that cannot be made from the gravimetric data alone. The water content profiles of the aerated gypsum samples are therefore analysed by treating them as the sum of two separate absorption processes using sharp front analysis. The capillary water absorption properties of this material are well described as a parallel combination of fast absorption into fine matrix pores and slow absorption into a modified structure of matrix pores inter-connected to air voids introduced into the slurry by aeration.

  20. Influence of aeration during propagation of pitching yeast on fermentation and beer flavor.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Chul; Wackerbauer, Karl; Kang, Soon Ah

    2007-02-01

    The effect of yeast propagated at different aeration conditions on yeast physiology, fermentation ability, and beer quality was investigated using three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was shown that yeast cells grown under continuous aeration conditions during propagation were almost two times higher as compared with discontinuous aeration conditions. The maximum of cell growth of all samples reached between 36 h and 48 h. The concentration of trehalose was increased under continuous aerated yeasts, whereas glycogen was decreased. It was also observed that the concentration of glycogen and trehalose in yeast cells had no direct effect on subsequent fermentation ability. The effect of yeast propagated under different aeration conditions on subsequent fermentation ability was different from yeast strains, in which the influence will be most pronounced at the first fermentation. Later, the yeasts might regain its original characteristics in the following fermentations. Generally, continuously propagated yeast had a positive effect on beer quality in subsequent fermentation. Hence, the concentration of aroma compounds obtained with yeast propagated under 6 1/h for 48 h aeration was lower than those grown under other aeration conditions in the bottom yeasts; in particular, the amounts of phenylethyl alcohol, ester, and fatty acids were decreased.

  1. Demonstration of membrane aeration panels: City of Geneva Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and testing of membrane aeration panels at the Marsh Creek wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Geneva, NY. The operators at the Geneva plant have undertaken a long-term program to upgrade wastewater treatment processes and lower operating costs. The aging mechanical surface aerators at the Marsh Creek treatment plant were replaced by a state-of-the-art membrane panel system. This fine-bubble diffused air system offers higher oxygen transfer efficiency than surface aerators or other types of fine-bubble diffused-air systems. The project had four objectives: to decrease the amount of electricity used at the plant for aeration; to enable the plant`s existing aeration basins to accommodate higher organic loads and/or nitrify the wastewater should the need arise; to provide an even distribution of dissolved oxygen within the aeration basins to enhance biological wastewater treatment activity; and to provide technical data to assess the performance of the membrane panel system versus other forms of wastewater aeration.

  2. Induction of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase by submergence facilitates oxidation of acetaldehyde during re-aeration in rice.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Meguro, Naoki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Hirai, Atsushi; Nakazono, Mikio

    2003-07-10

    Post-hypoxic injuries in plants are primarily caused by bursts of reactive oxygen species and acetaldehyde. In agreement with previous studies, we found accumulations of acetaldehyde in rice during re-aeration following submergence. During re-aeration, acetaldehyde-oxidizing aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity increased, thereby causing the acetaldehyde content to decrease in rice. Interestingly, re-aerated rice plants showed an intense mitochondrial ALDH2a protein induction, even though ALDH2a mRNA was submergence induced and declined upon re-aeration. This suggests that rice ALDH2a mRNA is accumulated in order to quickly metabolize acetaldehyde that is produced upon re-aeration.

  3. Design of high efficiency and energy saving aeration device for aquaculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sibo

    2017-03-01

    Energy efficient aeration device for aquaculture, in line with "by more than a generation, dynamic aeration" train of thought for technical design and improvement. Removable aeration terminal as the core, multi-level water to improve the method, the mobile fading pore aeration, intelligent mobile and open and close as the main function, aimed at solving the existing pond aeration efficiency, low energy consumption is high, the function of a single problem. From energy saving, efficiency, biological bacteria on the three directions, the aquaculture industry of energy conservation and emissions reduction. Device of the main advantages are: 1, original mobile fading aerator on the one hand, to expand the scope of work, playing a micro porous aeration of dissolved oxygen with high efficiency and to achieve "by more than a generation", on the other hand, through the sports equipment, stir the mixture of water, the water surface of photosynthesis of plants rich in dissolved oxygen input parts of the tank, compared to the stillness of the aerator can be more fully dissolved oxygen.2, through the opening of the pressure sensor indirect control device, can make the equipment timely and stop operation, convenient in use at the same time avoid the waste of energy.3, the biofilm suspension in aeration terminal, can be accomplished by nitration of microbial multi-level water improvement, still can make biofilm increase rate of netting in the movement process, the biological and mechanical aerobic promote each other, improve the efficiency of both. In addition, the device has small power consumption, low cost of characteristics. And have a certain degree of technical barriers, have their own intellectual property rights, and high degree of product market demand, easily accepted by customers, has a very high popularization value.

  4. [Removal nitrogen of integrated vertical-flow constructed wetland under aeration condition].

    PubMed

    Tao, Min; He, Feng; Xu, Dong; Zhou, Qiao-Hong; Liang, Wei; Chen, Shui-Ping; Wu, Zhen-Bin

    2011-03-01

    Oxygen is an important limit factor of nitrogen removal in constructed wetlands, so it is the key point for improving nitrogen removal efficiency of constructed wetlands that the optimization of oxygen distribution within wetlands. Therefore, oxygen status, nitrogen removal and purification mechanism of integrated vertical-flow constructed wetland (IVCW) under aeration condition in summer and winter have been studied. The results showed that both oxygen levels and aerobic zones were increased in the wetland substrates. The area of oxic zone I (expressing with depth) extended from 22 cm, 17 cm to 53 cm, 44 cm, in summer and winter, respectively. The electric potential (Eh) profiling demonstrated that artificial aeration maintained the pattern of sequential oxic-anoxic-oxic (O-A-O) redox zones within the aerated IVCW in winter, while only two oxic-anoxic (O-A) zones were present inside the non-aerated IVCW in the cold season. The decomposition of organic matter and nitrification were obviously enhanced by artificial aeration since the removal efficiency of COD, TN and NH4(+) -N were increased by 12.2%, 6.9% and 15.1% in winter, respectively. There was no significant accumulation of NO3(-) -N in the effluent with an aeration cycle of 8 h on and 16 h off in this experiment. Moreover, we found that oxic zone I was the main region of pollutants removal in IVCW system, and artificial aeration mainly acted to enhance the purification capacity of this oxic zone in the aerated IVCW. These results suggest that aeration is important for optimization and application of IVCW system.

  5. Application of the self-diagnosis composite into concrete structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Hideaki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Nomura, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    2001-04-01

    The function and performance of the self-diagnosis composites embedded in mortar/concrete blocks and concrete piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurements. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced in glass fiber reinforced plastics composites to obtain electrical conductivity. The CP composite has commonly good performances in various bending tests of block and pile specimens, comparing to the CF composite. The electrical resistance of the CP composite increases in a small strain to response remarkably micro-crack formation at about 200 (mu) strain and to detect well to smaller deformations before the crack formation. The CP composite possesses a continuous resistance change up to a large strain level near the final fracture of concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. The cyclic bending tests showed that the micro crack closed at unloading state was able to be evaluated from the measurement of residual resistance. It has been concluded that the self- diagnosis composite is fairly useful for the measurement of damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  6. Enhanced long-term organics and nitrogen removal and associated microbial community in intermittently aerated subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinlin; Zhang, Jian; Guo, Wenshan; Liang, Shuang; Wu, Haiming

    2016-08-01

    The long-term enhanced removal efficiency of organics and nitrogen in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF CWs) with and without intermittent aeration for decentralized domestic wastewater was evaluated, and the function of intermittent aeration on microbial community was also investigated in this study. The high and long-term 95.6% COD, 96.1% NH4(+)-N and 85.8% TN removal efficiencies were achieved in experimental intermittently aerated SSF CW compared with non-aerated SSF CW. Aerated SSF CWs also exhibited the excellent removal performance when comparatively comparing with other strategies and techniques applied in CWs. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed that associated microbial abundance significantly increased owing to intermittent aeration. These results indicated intermittent aeration CWs might be an effective and sustainable strategy for wastewater treatment in rural areas, but require further full-scale investigation in future.

  7. Improving microalgal growth with reduced diameters of aeration bubbles and enhanced mass transfer of solution in an oscillating flow field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Lin, Richen; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-07-01

    A novel oscillating gas aerator combined with an oscillating baffle was proposed to generate smaller aeration bubbles and enhance solution mass transfer, which can improve microalgal growth in a raceway pond. A high-speed photography system (HSP) was used to measure bubble diameter and generation time, and online precise dissolved oxygen probes and pH probes were used to measure mass-transfer coefficient and mixing time. Bubble diameter and generation time decreased with decreased aeration gas rate, decreased orifice diameter, and increased water velocity in the oscillating gas aerator. The optimized oscillating gas aerator decreased bubble diameter and generation time by 25% and 58%, respectively, compared with a horizontal tubular gas aerator. Using an oscillating gas aerator and an oscillating baffle in a raceway pond increased the solution mass-transfer coefficient by 15% and decreased mixing time by 32%; consequently, microalgal biomass yield increased by 19%.

  8. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseney, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry Dean; Lindbergh, Charles

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar based subjected to one atmosphere internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design: (1) during construction; (2) under pressurization; and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the air-tightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the moon.

  9. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseny, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry D.; Lindbergh, Charles

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar base subjected to 1-atm internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design (1) during construction, (2) under pressurization, and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the airtightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the Moon.

  10. Penetration of concrete targets

    SciTech Connect

    Forrestal, M.J.; Cargile, J.D.; Tzou, R.D.Y.

    1993-08-01

    We developed penetration equations for ogive-nosed projectiles that penetrated concrete targets after normal impact. Our penetration equations predict axial force on the projectile nose, rigid-body motion, and final penetration depth. For target constitutive models, we conducted triaxial material experiments to confining pressures of 600 MPa and curve-fit these data with a linear pressure-volumetric strain relation and with a linear Mohr-Coulomb, shear strength-pressure relation. To verify our penetration equations, we conducted eleven penetration experiments with 0.90 kg, 26.9-mm-diameter, ogive-nosed projectiles into 1.37-m-diameter concrete targets with unconfined compressive strengths between 32-40 MPa. Predictions from our penetration equation are compared with final penetration depth measurements for striking velocities between 280--800 m/s.

  11. Concrete containment aging study

    SciTech Connect

    Pachner, J.; Tai, T.M.; Naus, D.

    1994-04-01

    In 1989, IAEA initiated a pilot study on the management of aging of nuclear power plant components. The Phase I and II studies of concrete containment are discussed. With the data base, plant owners will be able to review and enhance their existing programs. IAEA will analyze data provided by participating plants and the report is scheduled to be released by late 1994 (final report release mid-1995).

  12. Mechanics of Concrete II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-18

    diffusivity of undamaged concrete is a problem in itself since the diffusivity of the thin transition zones (at the aggregate- cement matrix interface...C3A anhydride remains in the cement after the hydration. Assuming that the amount of gypsum added to portland cement3 clinker is 4% of Mcm (Biczok 1972...enables establishment of rational relationships between the chemical composition of the hardened cement paste, morphology of the pore system, and defect

  13. Tonsil concretions and tonsilloliths.

    PubMed

    Pruet, C W; Duplan, D A

    1987-05-01

    Although infrequently seen in many clinical practices, tonsillar concretions can be the source of both fetor oris and physical and social concern for the patient. Though stones rarely form in the tonsil or peritonsillar area, the findings of calcified objects or stones anywhere within the body has long been a subject of interest. The salient features of these entities and their relevance to clinical practice are discussed in this article.

  14. Micro-aeration for hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duangmanee, Thanapong

    The presence of sulfur compounds (e.g. protein, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, etc.) in the feed stream generates highly corrosive and odorous hydrogen sulfide during anaerobic digestion. The high sulfide level in the biogas stream is not only poisonous to many novel metal catalysts employed in thermo-catalytic processes but also reduces the quality of methane to produce renewable energy. This study used an innovative, low-maintenance, low-cost biological sulfide removal technology to remove sulfides simultaneously from both gas and liquid phase. ORP (Oxidation-Reduction-Potential) was used as the controlling parameter to precisely regulate air injection to the sulfide oxidizing unit (SOU). The microaeration technique provided just enough oxygen to partially oxidize sulfides to elemental sulfur without inhibiting methanogenesis. The SOU was equipped with a diffuser at the bottom for the dispersion of sulfide-laden biogas and injected air throughout the column. The SOU can be operated as a standalone unit or coupled with an anaerobic digester to simultaneously remove sulfide from the biogas and effluent. The integrated system was capable of reducing hydrogen sulfide in biogas from 2,450 to less than 2 ppmV with minimal sulfate production at the highest available sulfide loading rate of 0.24 kg/m3-day. More than 98% of sulfide removed was recovered as elemental sulfur. However, the standalone SOU was able to operate at high hydrogen sulfide loading of 1.46 kg/m 3-day at inlet sulfide concentration of 3000 ppmV and reduce the off-gas hydrogen sulfide concentrations to less than 10 ppmV. The experiment also revealed that the ORP controlled aeration was sensitive enough to prevent oxygen overdosing (dampening effect) during unexpected surges of aeration. Using generalized linear regression, a model predicting output H2S concentration based on input H2S concentrations, SOU medium heights, and biogas flow rates, was derived. With 95% confidence, output H2S concentration

  15. Survival of Salmonella enterica in aerated and nonaerated wastewaters from dairy lagoons.

    PubMed

    Ravva, Subbarao V; Sarreal, Chester Z

    2014-10-29

    Salmonella is the most commonly identified foodborne pathogen in produce, meat and poultry. Cattle are known reservoirs of Salmonella and the pathogen excreted in feces ends up in manure flush lagoons. Salmonella enterica survival was monitored in wastewater from on-site holding lagoons equipped or not with circulating aerators at two dairies. All strains had poor survival rates and none proliferated in waters from aerated or settling lagoons. Populations of all three Salmonella serovars declined rapidly with decimal reduction times (D) of <2 days in aerated microcosms prepared from lagoon equipped with circulators. Populations of Salmonella decreased significantly in aerated microcosms (D = 4.2 d) compared to nonaerated waters (D = 7.4 d) and in summer (D = 3.4 d) compared to winter (D = 9.0 d). We propose holding the wastewater for sufficient decimal reduction cycles in lagoons to yield pathogen-free nutrient-rich water for crop irrigations and fertilization.

  16. Improving microalgal growth with small bubbles in a raceway pond with swing gas aerators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    A novel swing gas aerator was developed to generate small bubbles for improving the mass transfer coefficient and microalgal growth rate in a raceway pond. A high-speed photography system (HSP) was used to measure the bubble diameter and generation time, and online precise dissolved oxygen probes and pH probes were used to measure the mass transfer coefficient and mixing time. Bubble generation time and diameter decreased by 21% and 9%, respectively, when rubber gas aerators were swung in the microalgae solution. When water pump power and gas aeration rate increased in a raceway pond with swing gas aerators and oscillating baffles (SGAOB), bubble generation time and diameter decreased but solution velocity and mass transfer coefficient increased. The mass transfer coefficient increased by 25% and the solution velocity increased by 11% when SGAOB was used, and the microalgal biomass yield increased by 18%.

  17. Aeration effect on Spirulina platensis growth and γ-Linolenic acid production.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy; Bokka, Chandra Sekhar; Ketineni, Chandrika; Rijal, Binod; Allu, Prasada Rao

    2012-01-01

    The influence of aeration on algal growth and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) production in a bubble column photobioreactor was investigated. Studies were performed in a 20-L reactor at different aeration rates (0.2- 2.5 vvm). Static, continuous, and periodic operation of air resulted in 41.9%, 88.4%, and 108% air saturation of dissolved oxygen, for which the corresponding values of GLA were 2.3, 6.5, and 7.5 mg·g(-1) dry cell weight, respectively. An increase in the aeration rate from 0.2 to 2.5 vvm enhanced both the specific growth rate and GLA content under periodic sparging in the bicarbonate medium. With a 6-fold increase in the aeration rate, the GLA content of the alga increased by 69.64% (5.6-9.5 mg· g(-1) dry cell weight). In addition, the total fatty acid (TFA) content in dry biomass increased from 2.22% to 4.41%, whereas the algae maintained a constant GLA to TFA ratio within the aeration rate tested. The dependence of GLA production on the aeration rate was explained by interrelating the GLA production rate with the specific growth rate using the Luedeking and Piret mixed growth model.

  18. Bioreactor tests preliminary to landfill in situ aeration: a case study.

    PubMed

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello

    2013-04-01

    Lab scale tests in bioreactor were carried out in the framework of the characterization studies of a landfill where in situ aeration (possibly followed by landfill mining) had been proposed as part of the novel waste management strategy in a region in northern Italy. The tests were run to monitor the effects produced by aerobic conditions at different temperatures on waste sampled at different depths in the landfill, with focus on the carbon and nitrogen conversion during aeration. Temperatures ranging from 35 to 45°C were chosen, in order to evaluate possible inhibition of biodegradation processes (namely nitrification) at 45°C in the landfill. The results obtained showed positive effects of the aeration on leachate quality and a significant reduction of waste biodegradability. Although a delay of biodegradation processes was observed in the reactor run at 45°C, biodegradation rates increased after 2 months of aeration, providing very low values of the relevant parameters (as in the other aerated reactors) by the end of the study. Mass balances were carried out for TOC and NNH4(+); the findings obtained were encouraging and provided evidence of the effectiveness of carbon and nitrogen conversion processes in the aerated landfill simulation reactors.

  19. Ecophysiology of wetland plant roots: A modelling comparison of aeration in relation to species distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorrell, B.K.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; McKee, K.L.; Woods, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the potential for inter-specific differences in root aeration to determine wetland plant distribution in nature. We compared aeration in species that differ in the type of sediment and depth of water they colonize. Differences in root anatomy, structure and physiology were applied to aeration models that predicted the maximum possible aerobic lengths and development of anoxic zones in primary adventitious roots. Differences in anatomy and metabolism that provided higher axial fluxes of oxygen allowed deeper root growth in species that favour more reducing sediments and deeper water. Modelling identified factors that affected growth in anoxic soils through their effects on aeration. These included lateral root formation, which occurred at the expense of extension of the primary root because of the additional respiratory demand they imposed, reducing oxygen fluxes to the tip and stele, and the development of stelar anoxia. However, changes in sediment oxygen demand had little detectable effect on aeration in the primary roots due to their low wall permeability and high surface impedance, but appeared to reduce internal oxygen availability by accelerating loss from laterals. The development of pressurized convective gas flow in shoots and rhizomes was also found to be important in assisting root aeration, as it maintained higher basal oxygen concentrations at the rhizome-root junctions in species growing into deep water. (C) 2000 Annals of Botany Company.

  20. Improving arachidonic acid fermentation by Mortierella alpina through multistage temperature and aeration rate control in bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-Jie; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2016-05-18

    Effective production of arachidonic acid (ARA) using Mortierella alpina was conducted in a 30-L airlift bioreactor. Varying the aeration rate and temperature significantly influenced cell morphology, cell growth, and ARA production, while the optimal aeration rate and temperature for cell growth and product formation were quite different. As a result, a two-stage aeration rate control strategy was constructed based on monitoring of cell morphology and ARA production under various aeration rate control levels (0.6-1.8 vvm). Using this strategy, ARA yield reached 4.7 g/L, an increase of 38.2% compared with the control (constant aeration rate control at 1.0 vvm). Dynamic temperature-control strategy was implemented based on the fermentation performance at various temperatures (13-28°C), with ARA level in total cellular lipid increased by 37.1% comparing to a constant-temperature control (25°C). On that basis, the combinatorial fermentation strategy of two-stage aeration rate control and dynamic temperature control was applied and ARA production achieved the highest level of 5.8 g/L.

  1. Aeration effect on Spirulina platensis growth and γ-Linolenic acid production

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy; Bokka, Chandra Sekhar; Ketineni, Chandrika; Rijal, Binod; Allu, Prasada Rao

    2012-01-01

    The influence of aeration on algal growth and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) production in a bubble column photobioreactor was investigated. Studies were performed in a 20-L reactor at different aeration rates (0.2– 2.5 vvm). Static, continuous, and periodic operation of air resulted in 41.9%, 88.4%, and 108% air saturation of dissolved oxygen, for which the corresponding values of GLA were 2.3, 6.5, and 7.5 mg·g-1 dry cell weight, respectively. An increase in the aeration rate from 0.2 to 2.5 vvm enhanced both the specific growth rate and GLA content under periodic sparging in the bicarbonate medium. With a 6-fold increase in the aeration rate, the GLA content of the alga increased by 69.64% (5.6–9.5 mg· g-1 dry cell weight). In addition, the total fatty acid (TFA) content in dry biomass increased from 2.22% to 4.41%, whereas the algae maintained a constant GLA to TFA ratio within the aeration rate tested. The dependence of GLA production on the aeration rate was explained by interrelating the GLA production rate with the specific growth rate using the Luedeking and Piret mixed growth model. PMID:24031799

  2. Evaluation of aeration energy saving in two modified activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ingyu; Lim, Honglae; Jung, Byunghun; Colosimo, Mark F; Kim, Hyunook

    2015-12-01

    A variety of modified activated sludge processes are widely used in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) for removing organics and nutrients (N and P). Since energy consumption in aeration basin accounts for the major part of the overall energy usage in WWTPs, efforts have been made to find ways to reduce aeration energy. In this study, two modified activated sludge processes in a pilot scale designed for nutrient removal were evaluated for the extent of energy saving: (1) ABA(2) process - adjusting air on/off period (i.e., with a temporal change); and (2) MB-A(2)O process - changing volume ratio of aerobic tank to anoxic tank (i.e., with a spatial change). For the 1st process, the air on/off period was fixed at 60min/45min with aerobic fraction being 0.57, while for the 2nd process, the aerobic/anoxic volume ratio was reduced from 0.58 to 0.42. The results demonstrate that the effluent COD, TN, NH4(+) and TP concentrations are acceptable while reduced aeration time/volume certainly saves significant energy consumption. To the best of our knowledge, this is 1st attempt to reduce the aeration period or aeration volume to save the aeration energy in these two modified activated sludge processes. The implication of these observations is further discussed.

  3. [Oxygen transfer efficiency of four kinds substrates applied in artificial aeration vertical-flow wetland].

    PubMed

    Pan, Ji-Zheng; Li, Wen-Chao; Ke, Fan; Wang, Lei; Li, Xue-Juan

    2009-02-15

    In subsurface flow constructed wetlands, artificial aeration plays an important role in enhancing the ability of pollutant removal. Oxygenation capacity of four substrates, limestone, vesuvianite, 500 grade ceramisite and high-strength ceramisite, are tested under three kinds of gas volume [0.19, 0.38, 0.76 m3 x (m2 x h)(-1)] in artificial aeration vertical-flow wetland. When the gas volume is 0.19 m3 x (m2 x h)(-1), the results demonstrate that the oxygen utilization of 500 grade ceramisite and high-strength ceramisite are highest as 14.39% and 14.21%, and the oxygen utilization of limestone and vesuvianite are 11.68% and 13.11% respectively. With the increase of aeration intensity, oxygen transfer efficiency parameter KLa rises accordingly. However, the oxygen utilization of vesuvianite and two other kinds of ceramisite decreases with the increase of aeration intensity. The oxygen utilization of vesuvianite, 500 grad ceramisite and high-strength ceramisite are lower as 7.67%, 10.46% and 10.77% respectively when the aeration intensity is 0.76 m3 x (m2 x h)(-1). On the contrary, the oxygen utilization of limestone get its maximum value of 14.04% as the aeration intensity is 0.38 m3 x (m2 x h)(-1).

  4. Generating CO{sub 2}-credits through landfill in situ aeration

    SciTech Connect

    Ritzkowski, M.; Stegmann, R.

    2010-04-15

    Landfills are some of the major anthropogenic sources of methane emissions worldwide. The installation and operation of gas extraction systems for many landfills in Europe and the US, often including technical installations for energy recovery, significantly reduced these emissions during the last decades. Residual landfill gas, however, is still continuously produced after the energy recovery became economically unattractive, thus resulting in ongoing methane emissions for many years. By landfill in situ aeration these methane emissions can be widely avoided both, during the aeration process as well as in the subsequent aftercare period. Based on model calculations and online monitoring data the amount of avoided CO{sub 2-eq}. can be determined. For an in situ aerated landfill in northern Germany, acting as a case study, 83-95% (depending on the kind and quality of top cover) of the greenhouse gas emission potential could be reduced under strictly controlled conditions. Recently the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has approved a new methodology on the 'Avoidance of landfill gas emissions by in situ aeration of landfills' (). Based on this methodology landfill aeration projects might be considered for generation of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) in the course of CDM projects. This paper contributes towards an evaluation of the potential of landfill aeration for methane emissions reduction.

  5. Fiber reinforced concrete solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Slemmons, A. J.; Newgard, P. J.

    1985-05-07

    A solar collector is disclosed comprising a glass member having a solar selective coating thereon, and a molded, glass-reinforced concrete member bonded to the glass member and shaped to provide a series of passageways between the glass member and the fiber-reinforced concrete member capable of carrying heat exchanging fluid therethrough. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may be formed by spraying a thin layer of concrete and chopped fibers such as chopped glass fibers onto a mold to provide an inexpensive and lightweight, thin-walled member. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may have a lightweight cellular concrete backing thereon for insulation purposes. The collector is further characterized by the use of materials which have substantially matching thermal coefficients of expansion over the temperature range normally encountered in the use of solar collectors.

  6. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method.

  7. Transfer number in fine bubble diffused aeration systems.

    PubMed

    Capela, S; Roustan, M; Héduit, A

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of full-scale data from 58 clean water tests performed in 26 activated sludge tanks equipped with fine bubble diffusers and of a theoretical approach, it can be stated that fine bubble aeration systems with total floor coverage arrangement provide higher kLa values and the lowest spiral liquid circulation. An efficiency criterion for oxygen transfer (NT) was defined on the basis of the dimensional analysis. The transfer number NT allows us to take account of the impact of vertical liquid circulation movements on oxygen transfer. The values of NT calculated from the results of full scale nonsteady-state clean water tests vary from 5.3 x 10(-5) to 9.1 x 10(-5) and are directly dependent upon the arrangement of air diffusers. It has been shown that the highest transfer numbers corresponded to the total floor coverage arrangement and the average calculated NT values is 7.7 x 10(-5), independently of the diffuser density and of the gas velocity, over the ranges studied. The lowest transfer numbers are obtained when the diffusers are located in separate grids, and the transfer number is reduced with increasing air flow rate.

  8. Removal of pharmaceuticals in aerated biofilters with manganese feeding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Zhu, Hong; Szewzyk, Ulrich; Geissen, Sven Uwe

    2015-04-01

    A tertiary treatment step is required in current wastewater treatment plants to remove trace pollutants and thus to prevent their extensive occurrence in the aquatic environment. In this study, natural MnOx ore and natural zeolite were separately used to pack two lab-scale aerated biofilters, which were operated in approximately 1.5 years for the removal of frequently occurring pharmaceuticals, including carbamazepine (CBZ), diclofenac (DFC), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX), out of synthetic and real secondary effluents. Mn(2+) was added in the feeds to promote the growth of iron/manganese oxidizing bacteria which were recently found to be capable of degrading recalcitrant pollutants. An effective removal (80-90%) of DFC and SMX was observed in both biofilters after adaptation while a significant removal of CBZ was not found. Both biofilters also achieved an effective removal of spiked Mn(2+), but a limited removal of carbon and nitrogen contents. Additionally, MnOx biofilter removed 50% of UV254 from real secondary effluent, indicating a high potential on the removal of aromatic compounds.

  9. Atrazine removal from aqueous solutions using submerged biological aerated filter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atrazine is widely used in the agriculture as an herbicide. Due to its high mobility, Atrazine leaks into the groundwaters, surface waters, and drinking water wells. Many physical and chemical methods have been suggested for removing Atrazine from aquatic environments. However, these methods are very costly, have many performance problems, produce a lot of toxic intermediates which are very harmful and dangerous, and cannot completely mineralize Atrazine. In this study, biodegradation of Atrazine by microbial consortium was evaluated in the aquatic environment. In order to assess the Atrazine removal from the aquatic environment, submerged biological aerated filter (SBAF) was fed with synthetic wastewater based on sucrose and Atrazine at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The maximum efficiencies for Atrazine and Soluble Chemical Oxygen Demand (SCOD) removal were 97.9% and 98.9%, respectively. The study findings showed that Stover-Kincannon model had very good fitness (R2 > 99%) in loading Atrazine in the biofilter and by increasing the initial concentration of Atrazine, the removal efficiency increased. Aerobic mixed biofilm culture was observed to be suitable for the treatment of Atrazine from aquatic environment. There was no significant inhibition effect on mixed aerobic microbial consortia. Atrazine degradation depended on the strength of wastewater and the amount of Atrazine in the influent. PMID:24499572

  10. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  11. Fire Resistance of Geopolymer Concretes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-21

    1 Project report – Grant FA23860814096, "Fire resistance of geopolymer concretes" – J. Provis, University of Melbourne 1. Background and...experimental program This project provided funding for us to carry out fire testing of geopolymer concrete specimens and associated laboratory...testing. The focus of this report will be the outcomes of the series of pilot-scale (4’×4’×6”) tests on geopolymer concrete panels, which were conducted

  12. Convergence to Diagonal Form of Block Jacobi-type Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Vjeran

    2008-09-01

    The main result of recent research on convergence to diagonal form of block Jacobi-type processes is presented. For this purpose, all notions needed to describe the result are introduced. In particular, elementary block transformation matrices, simple and non-simple algorithms, block pivot strategies together with the appropriate equivalence relations are defined. The general block Jacobi-type process considered here can be specialized to take the form of almost any known Jacobi-type method for solving the ordinary or the generalized matrix eigenvalue and singular value problems. The assumptions used in the result are satisfied by many concrete methods.

  13. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara F.

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined. PMID:27500029

  14. Corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, D. D. L.

    2000-10-01

    The methods and materials for corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete are reviewed. The methods are steel surface treatment, the use of admixtures in concrete, surface coating on concrete, and cathodic protection.

  15. On the Development of Constitutive Relations for Plain and Reinforced Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-09

    by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB- GROUP ’ -PConstitutive Models; "-Mixture Theories, Plasticity. 11 2 Plain Concrete; -- Inelastic Response,’ i1...rate effects. The second group of terms noted above refer to the basic measures of material response: strength, stiffness, and ductility, and to the...pullout and long embedments producing concrete cracking failures or bar yielding. T Tigure 3-7 compare solid curves as a group and dashed curves as a

  16. SPERTI Reactor Pit Building (PER605) under construction. Poured concrete foundation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPERT-I Reactor Pit Building (PER-605) under construction. Poured concrete foundation will enclosure a "Pit" into which the reactor vessel will be placed. Steel framework has been erected. To left of view is instrument cell (PER-606), constructed of concrete block. Photographer: R.G. Larsen. Date: April 22, 1955. INEEL negative no. 55-1000 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Effects of intermittent and continuous aeration on accelerative stabilization and microbial population dynamics in landfill bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sang, Nguyen Nhu; Soda, Satoshi; Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari; Ike, Michihiko

    2009-10-01

    Performance and microbial population dynamics in landfill bioreactors were investigated in laboratory experiments. Three reactors were operated without aeration (control reactor, CR), with cyclic 6-h aeration and 6-h non-aeration (intermittently aerated reactor, IAR), and with continuous aeration (continuously aerated reactor, CAR). Each reactor was loaded with high-organic solid waste. The performance of IAR was highest among the reactors up to day 90. The respective solid weight, organic matter content, and waste volume on day 90 in the CR, IAR, and CAR were 50.9, 39.1, and 47.5%; 46.5, 29.3 and 35.0%; and 69, 38, and 53% of the initial values. Organic carbon and nitrogen compounds in leachate in the IAR and the CAR showed significant decreases in comparison to those in the CR. The most probable number (MPN) values of fungal 18S rDNA in the CAR and the IAR were higher than those in the CR. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that unique and diverse eubacterial and archaeal communities were formed in the IAR. The intermittent aeration strategy was favorable for initiation of solubilization of organic matter by the aerobic fungal populations and the reduction of the acid formation phase. Then the anaerobic H(2)-producing bacteria Clostridium became dominant in the IAR. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, which cannot use acetate/sulfate but which instead use various organics/sulfate as the electron donor/acceptor were also dominant in the IAR. Consequently, Methanosarcinales, which are acetate-utilizing methanogens, became the dominant archaea in the IAR, where high methane production was observed.

  18. Reducing aeration energy consumption in a large-scale membrane bioreactor: Process simulation and engineering application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianyu; Liang, Peng; Yan, Xiaoxu; Zuo, Kuichang; Xiao, Kang; Xia, Junlin; Qiu, Yong; Wu, Qing; Wu, Shijia; Huang, Xia; Qi, Meng; Wen, Xianghua

    2016-04-15

    Reducing the energy consumption of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is highly important for their wider application in wastewater treatment engineering. Of particular significance is reducing aeration in aerobic tanks to reduce the overall energy consumption. This study proposed an in situ ammonia-N-based feedback control strategy for aeration in aerobic tanks; this was tested via model simulation and through a large-scale (50,000 m(3)/d) engineering application. A full-scale MBR model was developed based on the activated sludge model (ASM) and was calibrated to the actual MBR. The aeration control strategy took the form of a two-step cascaded proportion-integration (PI) feedback algorithm. Algorithmic parameters were optimized via model simulation. The strategy achieved real-time adjustment of aeration amounts based on feedback from effluent quality (i.e., ammonia-N). The effectiveness of the strategy was evaluated through both the model platform and the full-scale engineering application. In the former, the aeration flow rate was reduced by 15-20%. In the engineering application, the aeration flow rate was reduced by 20%, and overall specific energy consumption correspondingly reduced by 4% to 0.45 kWh/m(3)-effluent, using the present practice of regulating the angle of guide vanes of fixed-frequency blowers. Potential energy savings are expected to be higher for MBRs with variable-frequency blowers. This study indicated that the ammonia-N-based aeration control strategy holds promise for application in full-scale MBRs.

  19. Evaluation of six aerator modules built on venturi air injectors using clean water test.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Zhu, J; Miller, C F

    2009-01-01

    Six aerator modules constructed using venturi air injectors connected in either series or parallel were evaluated and compared for their oxygen transfer coefficients (OTC), standard oxygen transfer rate (SOTR), and standard oxygenation efficiency (SOE) determined by clean water tests. Modules in series (module a, b, c) included one, two, and three venturi injectors, respectively. The aerator module with two (module d) and three (module e, f) venturi injectors in parallel were used, while module f had less friction and more even flow rate in each line compared with module e. The results showed that the OTC, SOTR, and SOE for the six different module configurations (module a, b, c, d, e, f) were 4.54, 3.79, 3.58, 8.37, 5.93 and 11.87 h(-1); 0.10, 0.09, 0.09, 0.18, 0.15, and 0.31 kgO(2)/h; and 0.07, 0.06, 0.06, 0.12, 0.10, and 0.21 kgO(2)/kWh, respectively. The observations indicate that a 3-fold increase in SOTR and 3.5-fold increase in SOE can be obtained by simply changing the way that venturi air injectors are connected, which suggests that it is possible to improve the aeration efficiency of a venturi type aeration system by innovative aerator module designs. In view of the situation that the venturi aeration systems currently used for swine manure lagoons need significant improvement in their performance in order to match the cost-effective requirement, more research in aerator module development is needed so that effective control of odor from liquid swine manure lagoons can be achieved at an affordable cost. The technology such developed can also be applied to other livestock species.

  20. Hydrolytic anaerobic reactor and aerated constructed wetland systems for municipal wastewater treatment - HIGHWET project.

    PubMed

    Pascual, A; de la Varga, D; Arias, C A; Van Oirschot, D; Kilian, R; Álvarez, J A; Soto, M

    2017-01-01

    The HIGHWET project combines the hydrolytic up-flow sludge bed (HUSB) anaerobic digester and constructed wetlands (CWs) with forced aeration for decreasing the footprint and improving effluent quality. The HIGHWET plant in A Coruña (NW of Spain) treating municipal wastewater consists of a HUSB and four parallel subsurface horizontal flow (HF) CWs. HF1, HF2 and HF3 units are fitted with forced aeration, while the control HF4 is not aerated. All the HF units are provided with effluent recirculation, but different heights of gravel bed (0.8 m in HF1 and HF2, and 0.5 m in HF3 and HF4) are implemented. Besides, a tobermorite-enriched material was added in the HF2 unit in order to improve phosphorus removal. The HUSB 76-89% of total suspended solids (TSS) and about 40% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD). Aerated HF units reached above 96% of TSS, COD and BOD at a surface loading rate of 29-47 g BOD5/m(2)·d. An aeration regime ranging from 5 h on/3 h off to 3 h on/5 h off was found to be adequate to optimize nitrogen removal, which ranged from 53% to 81%. Average removal rates of 3.4 ± 0.4 g total nitrogen (TN)/m(2)·d and 12.8 ± 3.7 g TN/m(3)·d were found in the aerated units, being 5.5 and 4.1 times higher than those of the non-aerated system. The tobermorite-enriched HF2 unit showed a distinct higher phosphate (60-67%) and total phosphorus (54%) removal.

  1. Impulse radar evaluation of concrete, asphalt and waterproofing membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T.; Carter, C. R.; Masliwec, T.; Manning, D. G.

    1994-04-01

    Impulse radar has proved to be effective in the nondestructive testing of bridge decks composed of layers of dielectric materials such as asphalt, waterproofing membrane, and reinforced concrete. In this work, the waveforms reflected from these materials are modeled and analyzed theoretically. The relative dielectric constants are measured using sample blocks, and the reflected radar waveforms are related to the actual physical structures. It is found that asphalt thickness and cover over reinforcement can be accurately determined.

  2. 5. "TEST STAND 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. "TEST STAND 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/17, Rev. A. Stamped: AS BUILT; NO CHANGES. Date of Revision A: 11/1/50. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  3. Combined carbonaceous removal and nitrification with biological aerated filters.

    PubMed

    Belgiorno, Vincenzo; De Feo, Giovanni; Napoli, Rodolfo M A

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a submerged biological aerated filter (BAFs), on a pilot plant scale, in the secondary nitrification of low strength domestic wastewater. The results, obtained throughout three months of tests, confirmed the ability of BAFs to obtain simultaneous carbonaceous removal and nitrification. In fact, alter a start-up period of 5 weeks, a remarkable steady state condition in the removal of suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrification was reached. For a hydraulic loading rate of 1.6 m3 m(-2) h(-1), the mean efficiency of the process in the removal of TSS and COD was 85% and 83% respectively. Mean concentrations in the influent flow of around 114 mg(TSS)/L and 140 mg(COD)/L were reduced to average values of below 17 mg(TSS)/L and 25 mg(COD)/L. Secondary nitrification was achieved with a mean efficiency of 85% for a mean volumetric loads of 0.45 kg(N-Namm) m(-3) d(-1) (25 degrees C). Through an intensive activity of nitrification, in the steady state condition, mean influent concentrations of around 12 mg(N-Namm)/L were reduced to average values of below 2 mg(N-Namm)/L. The removal loading rate increased linearly with the applied loading rate for volumetric loads of up to 0.7 kg(N-Namm) m(-3) d(-1). The nitrification was not sensitive to the applied COD loads because of the low level of carbon substrate.

  4. Concrete Operations and Attentional Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Michael; Lindenberger, Ulman

    1989-01-01

    To test predictions regarding the attentional capacity requirements of Piaget's stage of concrete operations, a battery of concrete operational tasks and two measures of attentional capacity were administered to 120 first-, second-, and third-graders. Findings concern class inclusion, transitivity of length and weight, and multiplication of…

  5. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  6. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  7. Yields and Nutritional of Greenhouse Tomato in Response to Different Soil Aeration Volume at two depths of Subsurface drip irrigation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Niu, Wenquan; Dyck, Miles; Wang, Jingwei; Zou, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 4 aeration levels (varied by injection of air to the soil through subsurface irrigation lines) at two subsurface irrigation line depths (15 and 40 cm) on plant growth, yield and nutritional quality of greenhouse tomato. In all experiments, fruit number, width and length, yield, vitamin C, lycopene and sugar/acid ratio of tomato markedly increased in response to the aeration treatments. Vitamin C, lycopene, and sugar/acid ratio increased by 41%, 2%, and 43%, respectively, in the 1.5 times standard aeration volume compared with the no-aeration treatment. An interaction between aeration level and depth of irrigation line was also observed with yield, fruit number, fruit length, vitamin C and sugar/acid ratio of greenhouse tomato increasing at each aeration level when irrigation lines were placed at 40 cm depth. However, when the irrigation lines were 15 cm deep, the trend of total fruit yields, fruit width, fruit length and sugar/acid ratio first increased and then decreased with increasing aeration level. Total soluble solids and titrable acid decreased with increasing aeration level both at 15 and 40 cm irrigation line placement. When all of the quality factors, yields and economic benefit are considered together, the combination of 40 cm line depth and “standard” aeration level was the optimum combination. PMID:27995970

  8. Yields and Nutritional of Greenhouse Tomato in Response to Different Soil Aeration Volume at two depths of Subsurface drip irrigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Niu, Wenquan; Dyck, Miles; Wang, Jingwei; Zou, Xiaoyang

    2016-12-20

    This study investigated the effects of 4 aeration levels (varied by injection of air to the soil through subsurface irrigation lines) at two subsurface irrigation line depths (15 and 40 cm) on plant growth, yield and nutritional quality of greenhouse tomato. In all experiments, fruit number, width and length, yield, vitamin C, lycopene and sugar/acid ratio of tomato markedly increased in response to the aeration treatments. Vitamin C, lycopene, and sugar/acid ratio increased by 41%, 2%, and 43%, respectively, in the 1.5 times standard aeration volume compared with the no-aeration treatment. An interaction between aeration level and depth of irrigation line was also observed with yield, fruit number, fruit length, vitamin C and sugar/acid ratio of greenhouse tomato increasing at each aeration level when irrigation lines were placed at 40 cm depth. However, when the irrigation lines were 15 cm deep, the trend of total fruit yields, fruit width, fruit length and sugar/acid ratio first increased and then decreased with increasing aeration level. Total soluble solids and titrable acid decreased with increasing aeration level both at 15 and 40 cm irrigation line placement. When all of the quality factors, yields and economic benefit are considered together, the combination of 40 cm line depth and "standard" aeration level was the optimum combination.

  9. Impact of post-infiltration soil aeration at different growth stages of sub-surface trickle-irrigated tomato plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Jia, Zong-xia; Niu, Wen-Quan; Wang, Jing-wei

    2016-07-01

    Sensitivity to low rhizosphere soil aeration may change over time and therefore plant response may also depend on different growth stages of a crop. This study quantified effects of soil aeration during 5 different periods, on growth and yield of trickle-irrigated potted single tomato plants. Irrigation levels were 0.6 to 0.7 (low level) or 0.7 to 0.8 (high level) of total water holding capacity of the pots. Soil was aerated by injecting 2.5 l of air into each pot through the drip tubing immediately after irrigation. Fresh fruit yield, above ground plant dry weight, plant height, and leaf area index response to these treatments were measured. For all these 4 response variables, means of post-infiltration aeration between 58 to 85 days after sowing were 13.4, 43.5, 13.7, and 37.7% higher than those for the non-aerated pots, respectively. The results indicated that: post-infiltration soil aeration can positively impact the yield and growth of sub-surface trickle-irrigated potted tomato plants; positive effects on plant growth can be obtained with aeration during the whole growth period or with aeration for partial periods; positive growth effects of partial periods of aeration appears to persist and result in yield benefit.

  10. Effect of artificial aeration on the performance of vertical-flow constructed wetland treating heavily polluted river water.

    PubMed

    Dong, Huiyu; Qiang, Zhimin; Li, Tinggang; Jin, Hui; Chen, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Three lab-scale vertical-flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs), including the non-aerated (NA), intermittently aerated (IA) and continuously aerated (CA) ones, were operated at different hydraulic loading rates (HLRs) to evaluate the effect of artificial aeration on the treatment efficiency of heavily polluted river water. Results indicated that artificial aeration increased the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in IA and CA, which significantly favored the removal of organic matter and NH(4+)-N. The DO grads caused by intermittent aeration formed aerobic and anoxic regions in IA and thus promoted the removal of total nitrogen (TN). Although the removal efficiencies of COD(Cr), NH(4+)-N and TN in the three VFCWs all decreased with an increase in HLR, artificial aeration enhanced the reactor resistance to the fluctuation of pollutant loadings. The maximal removal efficiencies of COD(Cr), NH(4+)-N and total phosphorus (TP) (i.e., 81%, 87% and 37%, respectively) were observed in CA at 19 cm/day HLR, while the maximal TN removal (i.e., 57%) was achieved in IA. Although the improvement of artificial aeration on TP removal was limited, this study has demonstrated the feasibility of applying artificial aeration to VFCWs treating polluted river water, particularly at a high HLR.

  11. Innovative Retrofit Insulation Strategies for Concrete Masonry Foundations

    SciTech Connect

    Huelman, P.; Goldberg, L.; Jacobson, R.

    2015-05-01

    Basements in climates 6 and 7 can account for a fraction of a home's total heat loss when fully conditioned. Such foundations are a source of moisture, with convection in open block cavities redistributing water from the wall base, usually when heating. Even when block cavities are capped, the cold foundation concrete can act as a moisture source for wood rim joist components that are in contact with it. Because below-grade basements are increasingly used for habitable space, cold foundation walls pose challenges for moisture contribution, energy use, and occupant comfort.

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  13. Application of self-diagnosis FRP to concrete pile for health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Hitoshi; Sugiyama, Takeshi; Okuhara, Yoshiki; Shin, Soon-Gi; Matsubara, Hideaki; Yanagida, Hiroaki

    2000-06-01

    The function and performance of the self-diagnosis composites embedded in concrete blocks and piles were investigated by bending tests and electrical resistance measurements. Carbon powder (CP) and carbon fiber (CF) were introduced in glass fiber reinforced plastics composites to obtain electrical conductivity. The CP composite has commonly good performances in various bending tests of block and pile specimens, comparing to the CF composite. The electrical resistance of the CP composite increases in a small strain to response remarkably micro-crack formation at about 200 μ strain and to detect well to smaller deformations before the crack formation. The CP composite posses a continuous resistance change up to a large strain level near the final fracture of concrete structures reinforced by steel bars. It has been concluded that the self-diagnosis composite is fairly useful for the measurement of damage and fracture in concrete blocks and piles.

  14. Laboratory testing of a building envelope segment based on cellular concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fořt, Jan; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Hygrothermal performance of a building envelope based on cellular concrete blocks is studied in the paper. Simultaneously, the strain fields induced by the heat and moisture changes are monitored. The studied wall is exposed to the climatic load corresponding to the winter climatic conditions of the moderate year for Prague. The winter climatic exposure is chosen in order to simulate the critical conditions of the building structure from the point of view of material performance and temperature and humidity loading. The evaluation of hygrothermal performance of a researched wall is done on the basis of relative humidity and temperature profiles measured along the cross section of the cellular concrete blocks. Strain gauges are fixed on the wall surface in expected orientation of the blocks expansion. The obtained results show a good hygrothermal function of the analyzed cellular concrete wall and its insignificant strain.

  15. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Prabir; Labbe, Pierre; Naus, Dan

    2013-01-01

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  16. Combined photosynthesis and mechanical aeration for nitrification in dairy waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    Sukias, J P S; Craggs, R J; Tanner, C C; Davies-Colley, R J; Nagels, J W

    2003-01-01

    New Zealand has 16,500 dairy farms (avg. 220 cows), with cows kept on pasture throughout the year. During the 9-month dairy season, the cows are milked twice a day (averaging 2.5-3 h per day in the dairy parlour). Urine and faecal wastes deposited in the dairy parlour are washed away with high pressure hoses, using large volumes of water. A common method of treatment is in simple two-pond (anaerobic/facultative) lagoon systems, which remove about 95% of suspended solids and BOD5, but only 75% of total-N prior to discharge. High concentrations of ammoniacal-N in the effluent can cause toxicity to aquatic organisms in receiving waters. Mechanical aeration of the second (facultative) lagoon to promote nitrification improves effluent quality by reducing oxygen demand and potential ammonia toxicity to streamlife. Mechanical aeration however is associated with considerable mixing, which may prevent algae from optimising photosynthesis in the facultative lagoon. A series of experiments was undertaken which tested the efficiency of mechanical aeration and then attempted to combine it with daytime algal oxygen production in order to maximise ammonia conversion to nitrate, while minimising costs to the farmer. An experimental facility was developed by dividing a large facultative lagoon into two, producing a matched pair of lagoons, operated in parallel with influent flow split equally. Over successive dairy seasons, various aeration regimes were compared. Continuous aeration promoted nearly complete nitrification of the ammoniacal-N (99% removal), and effluent BOD was approximately halved. However the continuous mixing reduced algal biomass, and thus daytime algal photosynthesis. Night-only aeration permitted greater algal photosynthesis to occur, as well as halving electrical power consumption. Ammoniacal-N removal reduced to 90% (10 g m(-3) remaining in the effluent), while BOD removal was also lower than in the continuously aerated lagoon (59 and 69% respectively

  17. Aerated Shewanella oneidensis in continuously fed bioelectrochemical systems for power and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-04-01

    We studied the effects of aeration of Shewanella oneidensis on potentiostatic current production, hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, and electric power generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The potentiostatic performance of aerated S. oneidensis was considerably enhanced to a maximum current density of 0.45 A/m(2) or 80.3 A/m(3) (mean: 0.34 A/m(2), 57.2 A/m(3)) compared to anaerobically grown cultures. Biocatalyzed hydrogen production rates with aerated S. oneidensis were studied within the applied potential range of 0.3-0.9 V and were highest at 0.9 V with 0.3 m(3) H(2)/m(3) day, which has been reported for mixed cultures, but is approximately 10 times higher than reported for an anaerobic culture of S. oneidensis. Aerated MFC experiments produced a maximum power density of 3.56 W/m(3) at a 200-Omega external resistor. The main reasons for enhanced electrochemical performance are higher levels of active biomass and more efficient substrate utilization under aerobic conditions. Coulombic efficiencies, however, were greatly reduced due to losses of reducing equivalents to aerobic respiration in the anode chamber. The next challenge will be to optimize the aeration rate of the bacterial culture to balance between maximization of bacterial activation and minimization of aerobic respiration in the culture.

  18. Achieving ethanol-type fermentation for hydrogen production in a granular sludge system by aeration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song; Liu, Min; Chen, Ying; Pan, Yu-Ting

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of aeration on hydrogen-producing granular system, experiments were performed in two laboratory-scale anaerobic internal circulation hydrogen production (AICHP) reactors. The preliminary experiment of Reactor 1 showed that direct aeration was beneficial to enhancing hydrogen production. After the direct aeration was implied in Reactor 2, hydrogen production rate (HPR) and hydrogen content were increased by 100% and 60%, respectively. In addition, mixed-acid fermentation was transformed into typical ethanol-type fermentation (ETF). Illumina MiSeq sequencing shows that the direct aeration did not change the species of hydrogen-producing bacteria but altered their abundance. Hydrogen-producing bacteria and ethanol-type fermentative bacteria were increased by 24.5% and 146.3%, respectively. Ethanoligenens sp. sharply increased by 162.2% and turned into predominant bacteria in the system. These findings indicated that appropriate direct aeration might be a novel and promising way to obtain ETF and enhance hydrogen production in practical use.

  19. Aeration strategy: a need for very high ethanol performance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae fed-batch process.

    PubMed

    Alfenore, S; Cameleyre, X; Benbadis, L; Bideaux, C; Uribelarrea, J-L; Goma, G; Molina-Jouve, C; Guillouet, S E

    2004-02-01

    In order to identify an optimal aeration strategy for intensifying bio-fuel ethanol production in fermentation processes where growth and production have to be managed simultaneously, we quantified the effect of aeration conditions--oxygen limited vs non limited culture (micro-aerobic vs aerobic culture)--on the dynamic behaviour of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultivated in very high ethanol performance fed-batch cultures. Fermentation parameters and kinetics were established within a range of ethanol concentrations (up to 147 g l(-1)), which very few studies have addressed. Higher ethanol titres (147 vs 131 g l(-1) in 45 h) and average productivity (3.3 vs 2.6 g l(-1) h(-1)) were obtained in cultures without oxygen limitation. Compared to micro-aerobic culture, full aeration led to a 23% increase in the viable cell mass as a result of the concomitant increase in growth rate and yield, with lower ethanol inhibition. The second beneficial effect of aeration was better management of by-product production, with production of glycerol, the main by-product, being strongly reduced from 12 to 4 g l(-1). We demonstrate that aeration strategy is as much a determining factor as vitamin feeding (Alfenore et al. 2002) in very high ethanol performance (147 g l(-1) in 45 h) in order to achieve a highly competitive dynamic process.

  20. Performance of a fixed-bed biofilm reactor with microbubble aeration in aerobic wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Junliang; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Jingliang

    2016-01-01

    Microbubble aeration is supposed to be highly efficient for oxygen supply in aerobic wastewater treatment. In the present study, the performance of a fixed-bed biofilm reactor microbubble-aerated using a Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane system was investigated when treating synthetic municipal wastewater. The biofilm formation on the carriers was enhanced with microbubble aeration due to the strong adhesion of microbubbles to the solid surface. The dissolved oxygen concentration, the removals of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen, and the oxygen utilization efficiency were influenced by the organic loading rate at a certain oxygen supply capacity. The relatively optimal organic loading rate was determined as 0.82 kgCOD/(m(3)d) when the oxygen supply capacity was 0.93 kgO(2)/(m(3)d), where COD and ammonia removal efficiencies were 91.7% and 53.9%, respectively. The corresponding SPG membrane area-based COD removal capacity was 6.88 kgCOD/(m(2)d). The oxygen utilization efficiency of microbubble aeration was obviously higher compared to conventional bubble aeration. The simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred in the biofilm reactor and the total nitrogen removal efficiency of 50.4% was achieved under these conditions. In addition, the increase in air supply capacity of the SPG membrane system was suggested to improve its energy utilization efficiency.

  1. Nitrogen transformations and retention in planted and artificially aerated constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Maltais-Landry, Gabriel; Maranger, Roxane; Brisson, Jacques; Chazarenc, Florent

    2009-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) processing in constructed wetlands (CWs) is often variable, and the contribution to N loss and retention by various pathways (nitrification/denitrification, plant uptake and sediment storage) remains unclear. We studied the seasonal variation of the effects of artificial aeration and three different macrophyte species (Phragmites australis, Typha angustifolia and Phalaris arundinacea) on N processing (removal rates, transformations and export) using experimental CW mesocosms. Removal of total nitrogen (TN) was higher in summer and in planted and aerated units, with the highest mean removal in units planted with T. angustifolia. Export of ammonium (NH(4)(+)), a proxy for nitrification limitation, was higher in winter, and in unplanted and non-aerated units. Planted and aerated units had the highest export of oxidized nitrogen (NO(y)), a proxy for reduced denitrification. Redox potential, evapotranspiration (ETP) rates and hydraulic retention times (HRT) were all predictors of TN, NH(4)(+) and NO(y) export, and significantly affected by plants. Denitrification was the main N sink in most treatments accounting for 47-62% of TN removal, while sediment storage was dominant in unplanted non-aerated units and units planted with P. arundinacea. Plant uptake accounted for less than 20% of the removal. Uncertainties about the long-term fate of the N stored in sediments suggest that the fraction attributed to denitrification losses could be underestimated in this study.

  2. Limited aeration of methanogenic systems for treatment of sulfate-containing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Zitomer, D.H.; Shrout, J.D.

    1998-07-01

    Wastewaters with high sulfate concentrations are often not readily amenable to methanogenic treatment due to production of potentially inhibitory hydrogen sulfide. Some reports indicate that treatment has been enhanced by air sparging of recycle flows to air-strip hydrogen sulfide and create a selective environment for reduction of sulfate to elemental sulfur, rather than sulfides and thiosulfate. In this report, direct aeration of methanogenic expanded beds was employed for treatment of high-sulfate wastewater and compared to a strictly anaerobic control. An influent wastewater COD:SO{sup {minus}2}{sub 4} ratio as low as 4,4:1 did not discernibly inhibit methane production in the anaerobic control. At a relatively high OLR of 30g COD/L{sub A}-d and a relatively short HRT of 4.2 hours, the COD removal of the control was 97%. Methanogenesis was also sustained in the aerated reactors which had oxygen transfer rates of between 2 to 5% of the OLR. These aerated reactors converted approximately 70% of the COD to methane. Future research will involve higher sulfate loadings and aeration rates to determine possible benefits of direct aeration of methanogenic expanded beds.

  3. Municipal waste stabilization in a reactor with an integrated active and passive aeration system.

    PubMed

    Kasinski, Slawomir; Slota, Monika; Markowski, Michal; Kaminska, Anna

    2016-04-01

    To test whether an integrated passive and active aeration system could be an effective solution for aerobic decomposition of municipal waste in technical conditions, a full-scale composting reactor was designed. The waste was actively aerated for 5d, passively aerated for 35 d, and then actively aerated for 5d, and the entire composting process was monitored. During the 45-day observation period, changes in the fractional, morphological and physico-chemical characteristics of the waste at the top of the reactor differed from those in the center of the reactor. The fractional and morphological analysis made during the entire process of stabilization, showed the total reduction of organic matter measured of 82 wt% and 86 wt% at the respective depths. The reduction of organic matter calculated using the results of Lost of Ignition (LOI) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) showed, respectively, 40.51-46.62% organic matter loss at the top and 45.33-53.39% in the center of the reactor. At the end of the process, moisture content, LOI and TOC at the top were 3.29%, 6.10% and 4.13% higher, respectively, than in the center. The results showed that application of passive aeration in larger scale simultaneously allows the thermophilic levels to be maintained during municipal solid waste composting process while not inhibiting microbial activity in the reactor.

  4. Leaching potential of pervious concrete and immobilization of Cu, Pb and Zn using pervious concrete.

    PubMed

    Solpuker, U; Sheets, J; Kim, Y; Schwartz, F W

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the leaching potential of pervious concrete and its capacity for immobilizing Cu, Pb and Zn, which are common contaminants in urban runoff. Batch experiments showed that the leachability of Cu, Pb and Zn increased when pH<8. According to PHREEQC equilibrium modeling, the leaching of major ions and trace metals was mainly controlled by the dissolution/precipitation and surface complexation reactions, respectively. A 1-D reactive transport experiment was undertaken to better understand how pervious concrete might function to attenuate contaminant migration. A porous concrete block was sprayed with low pH water (pH=4.3±0.1) for 190 h. The effluent was highly alkaline (pH~10 to 12). In the first 50 h, specific conductance and trace-metal were high but declined towards steady state values. PHREEQC modeling showed that mixing of interstitial alkaline matrix waters with capillary pore water was required in order to produce the observed water chemistry. The interstitial pore solutions seem responsible for the high pH values and relatively high concentrations of trace metals and major cations in the early stages of the experiment. Finally, pervious concrete was sprayed with a synthetic contaminated urban runoff (10 ppb Cu, Pb and Zn) with a pH of 4.3±0.1 for 135 h. It was found that Pb immobilization was greater than either Cu or Zn. Zn is the most mobile among three and also has the highest variation in the observed degree of immobilization.

  5. Leaching potential of pervious concrete and immobilization of Cu, Pb and Zn using pervious concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solpuker, U.; Sheets, J.; Kim, Y.; Schwartz, F. W.

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates the leaching potential of pervious concrete and its capacity for immobilizing Cu, Pb and Zn, which are common contaminants in urban runoff. Batch experiments showed that the leachability of Cu, Pb and Zn increased when pH < 8. According to PHREEQC equilibrium modeling, the leaching of major ions and trace metals was mainly controlled by the dissolution/precipitation and surface complexation reactions, respectively. A 1-D reactive transport experiment was undertaken to better understand how pervious concrete might function to attenuate contaminant migration. A porous concrete block was sprayed with low pH water (pH = 4.3 ± 0.1) for 190 h. The effluent was highly alkaline (pH ~ 10 to 12). In the first 50 h, specific conductance and trace-metal were high but declined towards steady state values. PHREEQC modeling showed that mixing of interstitial alkaline matrix waters with capillary pore water was required in order to produce the observed water chemistry. The interstitial pore solutions seem responsible for the high pH values and relatively high concentrations of trace metals and major cations in the early stages of the experiment. Finally, pervious concrete was sprayed with a synthetic contaminated urban runoff (10 ppb Cu, Pb and Zn) with a pH of 4.3 ± 0.1 for 135 h. It was found that Pb immobilization was greater than either Cu or Zn. Zn is the most mobile among three and also has the highest variation in the observed degree of immobilization.

  6. [Effect of intermittent artificial aeration on nitrogen and phosphorus removal in subsurface vertical-flow constructed wetlands].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xian-qiang; Li, Jin-zhong; Li, Xue-Ju; Liu, Xue-gong; Huang, Sui-liang

    2008-04-01

    Shale and T. latifolia were used as subsurface vertical-flow constructed wetland substrate and vegetation for eutrophic Jin River water treatment, and investigate the effect of intermittent aeration on nitrogen and phosphorus removal. In this study, hydraulic loading rate was equal to 800 mm/d, and ratio of air and water was 5:1. During the entire running period, maximal monthly mean ammonia-nitrogen (NH4+ -N), total nitrogen (TN), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and total phosphorus (TP) removal rates were observed in August 2006. In contrast to the non-aerated wetland, aeration enhanced ammonia-nitrogen, total nitrogen, soluble reactive phosphorus and total phosphorus removal: 10.1%, 4.7%, 10.2% and 8.8% for aeration in the middle, and 25.1%, 10.0%, 7.7% and 7.4% for aeration at the bottom of the substrate, respectively. However, aeration failed to improve the nitrate-nitrogen removal. During the whole experimental period, monthly mean NO3(-) -N removal rates were much lower for aerated constructed wetlands (regarding aeration in the middle and at the bottom) than those for non-aerated system. After finishing the experiment, aboveground plant biomass (stems and leaves) of T. latifolia was harvested, and its weight and nutrient content (total nitrogen and total phosphorus) were measured. Analysis of aboveground plant biomass indicated that intermittent aeration restrained the increase in biomass but stimulated assimilation of nitrogen and phosphorus into stems and leaves. Additional total nitrogen removal of 11.6 g x m(-2) and 12.6 g x m(-2) by aboveground T. latifolia biomass for intermittent artificial aeration in the middle and at the bottom of the wetland substrate, respectively, was observed.

  7. Environmental durability of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Palmese, G.R.; Chawalwala, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past two decades, polymer concrete has increasingly been used for a number of applications including piping, machine bases, chemically resistant flooring, and bridge overlays. Currently, the use of polymer concrete as a wear surface for polymeric composite bridge decks is being investigated. Polymer concrete is a particulate composite comprised of mineral aggregate bound by a polymeric matrix. Such materials possess significantly higher mechanical properties than Portland cement concrete. However, the mechanical characteristics and environmental durability of polymer concrete are influenced by a number of factors. Among these are the selection of aggregate and resin, surface treatment, and cure conditions. In this work the influence of matrix selection and cure history on the environmental durability of polymer concrete was investigated. Particular attention was given to the effects of water on composite properties and to the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. The basalt-based polymer concrete systems investigated were susceptible to attack by water. Furthermore, results suggest that property loss associated with water exposure was primarily a result of interfacial weakening.

  8. Importance of Hydrogen Sulfide, Thiosulfate, and Methylmercaptan for Growth of Thiobacilli during Simulation of Concrete Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Sand, W

    1987-07-01

    Biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete surfaces caused by thiobacilli was reproduced in simulation experiments. At 9 months after inoculation with thiobacilli, concrete blocks were severely corroded. The sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, thiosulfate, and methylmercaptan were tested for their corrosive action. With hydrogen sulfide, severe corrosion was noted. The flora was dominated by Thiobacillus thiooxidans. Thiosulfate led to medium corrosion and a dominance of Thiobacillus neapolitanus and Thiobacillus intermedius. Methylmercaptan resulted in negligible corrosion. A flora of heterotrophs and fungi grew on the blocks. This result implies that methylmercaptan cannot be degraded by thiobacilli.

  9. Importance of Hydrogen Sulfide, Thiosulfate, and Methylmercaptan for Growth of Thiobacilli during Simulation of Concrete Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Wolfgang

    1987-01-01

    Biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete surfaces caused by thiobacilli was reproduced in simulation experiments. At 9 months after inoculation with thiobacilli, concrete blocks were severely corroded. The sulfur compounds hydrogen sulfide, thiosulfate, and methylmercaptan were tested for their corrosive action. With hydrogen sulfide, severe corrosion was noted. The flora was dominated by Thiobacillus thiooxidans. Thiosulfate led to medium corrosion and a dominance of Thiobacillus neapolitanus and Thiobacillus intermedius. Methylmercaptan resulted in negligible corrosion. A flora of heterotrophs and fungi grew on the blocks. This result implies that methylmercaptan cannot be degraded by thiobacilli. PMID:16347391

  10. Recovery of ammonia from swine manure using gas-permeable membranes: effect of aeration.

    PubMed

    García-González, M C; Vanotti, M B; Szogi, A A

    2015-04-01

    The gas-permeable membrane process can recover ammonia from manure, reducing pollution whilst converting ammonia into an ammonium salt fertilizer. The process involves manure pH control to increase ammonium (NH4(+)) recovery rate that is normally carried out using an alkali. In this study a new strategy to avoid the use of alkali was tested applying low-rate aeration and nitrification inhibition. The wastewater used was raw swine manure with 2390 mg NH4(+)-N/L. Results showed that aeration increased pH above 8.5 allowing quick transformation of NH4(+) into gaseous ammonia (NH3) and efficient recovery by permeation through the submerged membrane. The overall NH4(+) recovery obtained with aeration was 98% and ammonia emissions losses were less than 1.5%. The new approach can substitute large amounts of alkali chemicals needed to obtain high NH4(+) recovery with important economic and environmental savings.

  11. Pilot scale experiment with MBR operated in intermittent aeration condition: analysis of biological performance.

    PubMed

    Capodici, M; Di Bella, G; Di Trapani, D; Torregrossa, M

    2015-02-01

    The effect of intermittent aeration (IA) on a MBR system was investigated. The study was aimed at analyzing different working conditions and the influence of different IA cycles on the biological performance of the MBR pilot plant, in terms of organic carbon and ammonium removal as well as extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) production. The membrane modules were placed in a separate compartment, continuously aerated. This configuration allowed to disconnect from the filtration stage the biological phenomena occurring into the IA bioreactor. The observed results highlighted good efficiencies, in terms of organic carbon and ammonium removal. It was noticed a significant soluble microbial products (SMPs) release, likely related to the higher metabolic stress that anoxic conditions exerted on the biomass. However, the proposed configuration, with the membranes in a separate compartment, allowed to reduce the EPSs in the membrane tank even during the non-aerated phase, thus lowering fouling development.

  12. Energy efficient aeration of wastewaters from the pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, M

    2010-01-01

    More than 50% of the electrical power needed to treat pulp and paper industry effluents is used for aeration in biological treatment stages. A large share of the oxygen that passes through the wastewater is not consumed and will be found in the off-gas. Energy can be saved by aerating under conditions where the oxygen transfer is most efficient, for example at low concentrations of dissolved oxygen Consider the sludge as an energy source; electricity can be saved by avoiding sludge reduction through prolonged aeration. High oxygen transfer efficiency can be retained by using the oxygen consumption of biosolids. Quantified savings in the form of needed volumes of air while still achieving sufficient COD reduction are presented. The tests have been made in a bubble column with pulp mill process water and sludge from a biological treatment plant. These were supplemented with case studies at three pulp and paper mills.

  13. Greenhouse gas production and efficiency of planted and artificially aerated constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Maltais-Landry, Gabriel; Maranger, Roxane; Brisson, Jacques; Chazarenc, Florent

    2009-03-01

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by constructed wetlands (CWs) could mitigate the environmental benefits of nutrient removal in these man-made ecosystems. We studied the effect of 3 different macrophyte species and artificial aeration on the rates of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and methane (CH(4)) production in CW mesocosms over three seasons. CW emitted 2-10 times more GHG than natural wetlands. Overall, CH(4) was the most important GHG emitted in unplanted treatments. Oxygen availability through artificial aeration reduced CH(4) fluxes. Plant presence also decreased CH(4) fluxes but favoured CO(2) production. Nitrous oxide had a minor contribution to global warming potential (GWP<15%). The introduction of oxygen through artificial aeration combined with plant presence, particularly Typha angustifolia, had the overall best performance among the treatments tested in this study, including lowest GWP, greatest nutrient removal, and best hydraulic properties.

  14. Effect of controlled aeration on glycerol production in a sulfite process by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Kalle, G.P.; Naik, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    In a conventional sulfite process for glycerol production from sugarcane molasses using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, maximum product concentration of only 40 g/L and productivities only up to 5 g/L/day are obtained, making the process industrially unattractive. Fermentation carried out under controlled conditions of aeration improved product concentration in the medium by twofold (96 g/L) and productivity by threefold (16 g/L/day), while permitting the yeast to tolerate higher initial concentration of sugar (400-465 g/L). There was a concomittant increase in glycerol concentration and productivity with increasing aeration rate (0-1.4 vvm), whereas ethanol concentration in the medium dropped by ca. twofold. At aeration rates greater than 1.4 vvm, all these parameters showed a sharp decline, indicating general inhibition of fermentation.

  15. Rapid Testing of Fresh Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    Cementforenlng, Oslo, 1952). 1.1 Orchard, 0. F., "The Effect of the Vacum Process on Concrete Mix Design ," Symposiwn on Mix Design and Qualify Control...ASTM, Vol 33, Part I (1933), pp 297-307. Orchard, D. F., "The Effect of the Vacuum Process on Concrete Mix Design ," Symposium on Mix Design and... Designed for Use in Determining Constituents of Fresh Concrete," Public floads, Vol 13, No. 9 (1932), p 151. 9 Cook, G. C, "Effect of Time of Haul

  16. Concrete Construction Using Slipform Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    Operations 75 4.1.3 Ramp, Curb, Gutter, Sidewalk and Median Paving "/ 4.1.4 Canal Lining 80 4.2 Cast-in-Place Pipe 82 4.3 Tunnel Inverts 83 4.4...101 APPENDIX B - Bibliography 102 b. -E CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 BACKGROUND The formwork for concrete structures represents a critical part of...concrete construction, in terms of cost and importance toward getting the job done properly and on time. In fact, concrete formwork frequently costs more

  17. Modelling the link amongst fine-pore diffuser fouling, oxygen transfer efficiency, and aeration energy intensity.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Baserba, Manel; Sobhani, Reza; Asvapathanagul, Pitiporn; McCarthy, Graham W; Olson, Betty H; Odize, Victory; Al-Omari, Ahmed; Murthy, Sudhir; Nifong, Andrea; Godwin, Johnnie; Bott, Charles B; Stenstrom, Michael K; Shaw, Andrew R; Rosso, Diego

    2017-03-15

    This research systematically studied the behavior of aeration diffuser efficiency over time, and its relation to the energy usage per diffuser. Twelve diffusers were selected for a one year fouling study. Comprehensive aeration efficiency projections were carried out in two WRRFs with different influent rates, and the influence of operating conditions on aeration diffusers' performance was demonstrated. This study showed that the initial energy use, during the first year of operation, of those aeration diffusers located in high rate systems (with solids retention time - SRT-less than 2 days) increased more than 20% in comparison to the conventional systems (2 > SRT). Diffusers operating for three years in conventional systems presented the same fouling characteristics as those deployed in high rate processes for less than 15 months. A new procedure was developed to accurately project energy consumption on aeration diffusers; including the impacts of operation conditions, such SRT and organic loading rate, on specific aeration diffusers materials (i.e. silicone, polyurethane, EPDM, ceramic). Furthermore, it considers the microbial colonization dynamics, which successfully correlated with the increase of energy consumption (r(2):0.82 ± 7). The presented energy model projected the energy costs and the potential savings for the diffusers after three years in operation in different operating conditions. Whereas the most efficient diffusers provided potential costs spanning from 4900 USD/Month for a small plant (20 MGD, or 74,500 m(3)/d) up to 24,500 USD/Month for a large plant (100 MGD, or 375,000 m(3)/d), other diffusers presenting less efficiency provided spans from 18,000USD/Month for a small plant to 90,000 USD/Month for large plants. The aim of this methodology is to help utilities gain more insight into process mechanisms and design better energy efficiency strategies at existing facilities to reduce energy consumption.

  18. Volatile emissions during storing of green food waste under different aeration conditions.

    PubMed

    Agapiou, A; Vamvakari, J P; Andrianopoulos, A; Pappa, A

    2016-05-01

    Controlled field experiments were carried out for monitoring the emissions of three plastic commercial household waste bins, which were adapted for studying the effect of aeration process in the evolved volatiles, during house storing of green food waste for 2 weeks, prior to collection. Three experimental scenarios were examined based on no aeration ("NA," closed commercial waste bin), diffusion-based aeration ("DA," closed commercial waste bin with tiny holes), and enforced aeration ("EA," closed commercial waste bin with tiny holes and enforced aeration). The monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from organic household kitchen waste was performed using solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) analysis. Portable sensors were also used for monitoring selected gases and parameters of environmental, bioprocess, and health interest (e.g., CO2, O2, H2S, CH4, NH3, % RH, waste temperatures). VOC emissions are strongly dependent on the waste material. The most frequent VOCs identified over the storing waste, showing over 50 % appearance in all examined samples, were terpenes (e.g., di-limonene, beta-myrcene, delta-3-carene, alpha-pinene, alpha-terpinolene, linalool, etc.), sulfides (dimethyl disulfide), aromatics (benzene, 1-methyl-2-(2-propenyl)), alkanes (e.g., decane, dodecane), ketones (2-propanone), esters (e.g., acetic acid ethyl ester, acetic acid methyl ester), and alcohols (e.g., 3-cyclohexen-1-ol, 4-methyl-1-(1-methylethyl)). The prominent role of terpenes in the "pre-compost" odor and especially that of di-limonene was highlighted. In all examined scenarios, the emitted volatiles were increased at raised temperatures and later decreased in time. Aeration of waste bins slightly affected the volatilization process resulting in higher profiles of VOCs; uniformity in the composition of VOCs was also noted. Slight modifications of commercial waste bins may favor the initiation of home composting.

  19. Effect of extra aeration on extracellular enzyme activities and ATP concentration of dairy Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Jaspe, A; Palacios, P; Fernández, L; Sanjosé, C

    2000-03-01

    The effect of forced aeration on extracellular enzyme synthesis during batch growth of a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain of dairy origin on pyruvate mineral salts medium at 7 degrees C was studied. Measurement of oxygen tension, electron micrographs to estimate cell volume, luciferase determination of ATP and plate counts were performed in the course of incubation. Cells from the stationary phase of growth had lower energy status (in terms of intracellular ATP concentration) in the cultures receiving surplus aeration. Those cells produced three times more extracellular proteinase and lipase than control cells. Onset time for production of both enzymes coincided with a sharp fall of intracellular ATP levels.

  20. Control of the aeration volume in an activated sludge process for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, P; Carlsson, B

    2002-01-01

    Biological nitrogen removal in an activated sludge process is obtained by two biological processes; nitrification and denitrification. Nitrifying bacteria need dissolved oxygen and a sufficiently large aeration volume for converting ammonium to nitrate in the wastewater. The objective of this paper is to develop an automatic control strategy for adjusting the aerated volume so that the effluent ammonium level can be kept close to a desired value despite major changes in the influent load. The strategy is based on applying exact linearization of the IAWO Activated Sludge Process Model No 1. Simulation results show that the suggested controller effectively attenuates process disturbances.

  1. Pathways of nitrobenzene degradation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: Effect of intermittent aeration and glucose addition.

    PubMed

    Kirui, Wesley K; Wu, Shubiao; Kizito, Simon; Carvalho, Pedro N; Dong, Renjie

    2016-01-15

    Intermittent aeration and addition of glucose were applied to horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in order to investigate the effect on pathways of nitrobenzene (NB) degradation and interactions with microbial nitrogen and sulphur transformations. The experiment was carried out in three phases A, B and C consisting of different NB loading and glucose dosing. For each phase, the effect of aeration was assessed by intermittently aerating one wetland and leaving one unaerated. Regardless of whether or not the wetland was aerated, at an influent NB concentration of 140 mg/L, both wetlands significantly reduced NB to less than 2 mg/L, a reduction efficiency of 98%. However, once the influent NB concentration was increased to 280 mg/L, the aerated wetland had a higher removal performance 82% compared to that of the unaerated wetland 71%. Addition of glucose further intensified the NB removal to 95% in the aerated wetlands and 92% in the unaerated. Aeration of wetlands enhanced NB degradation, but also resulted in higher NB volatilization of 6 mg m(-2) d(-1). The detected high concentration of sulphide 20-60 mg/L in the unaerated wetland gave a strong indication that NB may act as an electron donor to sulphate-reducing bacteria, but this should be further investigated. Aeration positively improved NB removal in constructed wetlands, but resulted in higher NB volatilization. Glucose addition induced co-metabolism to enhance NB degradation.

  2. Study of the liquid-film-forming apparatus as an alternative aeration system: design criteria and operating condition.

    PubMed

    Hongprasith, Narapong; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Painmanakul, Pisut

    2016-10-02

    Aeration is an important factor in aquaculture systems because it is a vital condition for all organisms that live in water and respire aerobically. Generally, mechanical surface aerators are widely used in Thailand due to their advantage for increasing dissolved oxygen (DO) and for their horizontal mixing of aquaculture ponds with large surface areas. However, these systems still have some drawbacks, primarily the low oxygen transfer efficiency (OTE) and energy. Regarding this issue, alternative aeration systems should be studied and applied. Therefore, this research aims to study the aeration mechanism obtained by the diffused-air aeration combined with a liquid-film-forming apparatus (LFFA). The effect of gas flow rates, types, and patterns of aerator installation were investigated in an aquaculture pond of 10 m × 10 m × 1.5 m. The analytical parameters were volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa), OTE, and aeration efficiency (AE). From the results, the '4-D' with partitions was proposed as the suitable pattern for the LFFA installation. The advantage could be obtained from high energy performance with 1.2 kg/kW h of AE. Then, the operation conditions can be applied as a design guideline for this alternative aeration system in the aquaculture ponds.

  3. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  4. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-22

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  5. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, Dann J.; Becker, David L.; Beem, William L.; Berry, Tommy C.; Cannon, N. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  6. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  7. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  8. PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE FOR ANTARCTICA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    formulation of recommended procedures for batching, mixing, placing, and curing of portland cement concrete in Antarctica. The pertinent features of the mix and design and related procedures are given. (Author)

  9. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  10. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  11. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  12. The influence of aeration and temperature on the structure of bacterial complexes in high-moor peat soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukharenko, O. S.; Pavlova, N. S.; Dobrovol'Skaya, T. G.; Golovchenko, A. V.; Pochatkova, T. N.; Zenova, G. M.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2010-05-01

    The number and taxonomic structure of the heterotrophic block of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were studied in monoliths from a high-moor peat (stored at room temperature and in a refrigerator) and in the peat horizons mixed in laboratory vessels. The monitoring lasted for a year. In the T0 horizon, spirilla predominated at room and low temperatures; in the T1 and T2 horizons, bacilli were the dominants. The continuous mixing of the peat layers increased the oxygen concentration and the peat decomposition; hence, the shares of actinomycetes and bacilli (bacteria of the hydrolytic complex) increased. In the peat studied, the bacilli were in the active state; i.e., vegetative cells predominated, whose amount ranged from 65 to 90%. The representatives of the main species of bacilli (the facultative anaerobic forms prevailed) hydrolyzed starch, pectin, and carboxymethylcellulose. Thus, precisely sporiferous bacteria can actively participate in the decomposition of plant polysaccharides in high-moor peat soils that are characterized by low temperatures and an oxygen deficit. The development of actinomycetes is inhibited by low temperatures; they can develop only under elevated temperature and better aeration.

  13. Concrete waterproofing in nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Scherbyna, Alexander N; Urusov, Sergei V

    2005-01-01

    One of the main points of aggregate safety during the transportation and storage of radioactive materials is to supply waterproofing for all constructions having direct contact with radiating substances and providing strength, seismic shielding etc. This is the problem with all waterside structures in nuclear industry and concrete installations in the treatment and storage of radioactive materials. In this connection, the problem of developing efficient techniques both for the repair of operating constructions and the waterproofing of new objects of the specified assignment is genuine. Various techniques of concrete waterproofing are widely applied in the world today. However, in conditions of radiation many of these techniques can bring not a profit but irreparable damage of durability and reliability of a concrete construction; for instance, when waterproofing materials contain organic constituents, polymers etc. Application of new technology or materials in basic construction elements requires in-depth analysis and thorough testing. The price of an error might be very large. A comparative analysis shows that one of the most promising types of waterproofing materials for radiation loaded concrete constructions is "integral capillary systems" (ICS). The tests on radiation, thermal and strength stability of ICS and ICS-treated concrete samples were initiated and fulfilled in RFNC-VNIITF. The main result is--ICS applying is increasing of waterproofing and strength properties of concrete in conditions of readiation The paper is devoted to describing the research strategy, the tests and their results and also to planning of new tests.

  14. Protective coatings for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    NAGY, KATHRYN L.; CYGAN, RANDALL T.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY; SELLINGER, ALAN

    2000-05-01

    The new two-layer protective coating developed for monuments constructed of limestone or marble was applied to highway cement and to tobermorite, a component of cement, and tested in batch dissolution tests. The goal was to determine the suitability of the protective coating in retarding the weathering rate of concrete construction. The two-layer coating consists of an inner layer of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) applied as a 25% solution in methanol and an outer layer of A2** sol-gel. In previous work, this product when applied to calcite powders, had resulted in a lowering of the rate of dissolution by a factor of ten and was shown through molecular modeling to bind strongly to the calcite surface, but not too strongly so as to accelerate dissolution. Batch dissolution tests at 22 C of coated and uncoated tobermorite (1.1 nm phase) and powdered cement from Gibson Blvd. in Albuquerque indicated that the coating exhibits some protective behavior, at least on short time scales. However, the data suggest that the outer layer of sol-gel dissolves in the high-pH environment of the closed system of cement plus water. Calculated binding configuration and energy of AEAPS to the tobermorite surface suggests that AEAPS is well-suited as the inner layer binder for protecting tobermorite.

  15. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  16. More economical but equally effective internally sealed concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. M.; Taylor, M. A.; Haxo, H. E., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    Wax beads of several lower melting, lower cost wax blends can seal concrete as effectively as the paraffin-montan wax beads currently used in internally sealed concrete bridge decks, without affecting other important properties of the concrete. Savings of 5% to 25% in raw material costs can be expected to lower the cost of wax beads by approximately 5% to 20%. Since the minimum temperature required for melting the wax beads is about 25 F (14 C) lower than for the current beads, the cost of heating a bridge deck to achieve effective sealing should be reduced by approximately 15%. Beads of two formulations: 10% montan wax, 15% firbark wax, 75% paraffin 140/142 (FMP), and 5% stearic acid, 20% hydrogenated tallow, 75% paraffin 150/152 (STP), were produced in pilot plant quantities and were evaluated on two field tests. Damage to the beads during extended mixing of the concrete was suspected to be one of the causes of low strength and poor resistance to scaling of the test slabs in the first test. Some blocking of the lower melting beads at temperatures between 100 and 110 F (38 and 43 C) occurred during production in hot weather or storage for long times in warm locations. Coating the beads with 10% cement restored them to a free-flowing condition.

  17. Biogenic concrete protection driven by the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    PubMed Central

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Wang, Jianyun; Ramos, Jose A.; Derluyn, Hannelore; Rahier, Hubert; Cnudde, Veerle; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Microbiologically Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) from the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP as an alternative process for concrete protection was investigated. MICP was induced on Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC), the model material, by immersing the material in 109 M. parvus cells mL−1 containing 5 g L−1 of calcium formate. A 2 days immersion of the material gave the maximum weight increase of the specimens (38 ± 19 mg) and this was likely due to the deposition of calcium carbonate, biomass, and unconverted calcium formate. The solid deposition mainly occurred in the micropores of the specimen, close to the outer surface. A significantly lower water absorption was observed in the bacterially treated specimens compared to the non-treated ones (up to 2.92 ± 0.91 kg m−2) and this could be attributed to the solid deposition. However, the sonication test demonstrated that the bacterial treatment did not give a consolidating effect to the material. Overall, compared to the currently employed urea hydrolysis process, the formate-based MICP by M. parvus offers a more environmentally friendly approach for the biotechnological application to protect concrete. PMID:26284061

  18. Biogenic concrete protection driven by the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP.

    PubMed

    Ganendra, Giovanni; Wang, Jianyun; Ramos, Jose A; Derluyn, Hannelore; Rahier, Hubert; Cnudde, Veerle; Ho, Adrian; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Microbiologically Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) from the formate oxidation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP as an alternative process for concrete protection was investigated. MICP was induced on Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC), the model material, by immersing the material in 10(9) M. parvus cells mL(-1) containing 5 g L(-1) of calcium formate. A 2 days immersion of the material gave the maximum weight increase of the specimens (38 ± 19 mg) and this was likely due to the deposition of calcium carbonate, biomass, and unconverted calcium formate. The solid deposition mainly occurred in the micropores of the specimen, close to the outer surface. A significantly lower water absorption was observed in the bacterially treated specimens compared to the non-treated ones (up to 2.92 ± 0.91 kg m(-2)) and this could be attributed to the solid deposition. However, the sonication test demonstrated that the bacterial treatment did not give a consolidating effect to the material. Overall, compared to the currently employed urea hydrolysis process, the formate-based MICP by M. parvus offers a more environmentally friendly approach for the biotechnological application to protect concrete.

  19. Parameter Calculation Technique for the Waste Treatment Facilities Using Naturally-Aerated Blocks in the Bog Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmed-Ogly, K. V.; Savichev, O. G.; Tokarenko, O. G.; Pasechnik, E. Yu; Reshetko, M. V.; Nalivajko, N. G.; Vlasova, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    Technique for the domestic wastewater treatment in the small residential areas and oil and gas facilities of the natural and man-made systems including a settling tank for mechanical treatment and a biological pond with peat substrate and bog vegetation for biological treatment has been substantiated. Technique for parameters calculation of the similar natural and man-made systems has been developed. It was proven that effective treatment of wastewater can be performed in Siberia all year round.

  20. Combination of methoprene and controlled aeration to manage insects in stored wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The insect growth regulator methoprene, in the commercial formulation Diacon II®, was applied to wheat stored in small bins either alone or in combination with controlled aeration of the bins to lower grain temperature for insect pest management of stored wheat. Grain temperatures and monitored and ...

  1. Effect of the aerated structure on selected properties of freeze-dried hydrocolloid gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciurzyńska, Agnieszka; Lenart, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The ability to create diverse structures and studies on the effect of the aerated structure on selected properties with the use of freeze-dried gels may provide knowledge about the properties of dried foods. Such gels can be a basis for obtaining innovative food products. For the gel preparation, 3 types of hydrocolloids were used: low-methoxyl pectin, a mixture of xanthan gum and locust-bean gum, and a mixture of xanthan gum and guar gum. Gels were aerated for 3 and 7 min, frozen at a temperature of -45°C 2 h-1, and freeze-dried at a temperature of 30°C. For the samples obtained, structure, porosity, shrinkage, rehydration, and colour were investigated. It was shown that the type of the hydrocolloid and aeration time influence the structure of freeze-dried gels, which determines such properties of samples as porosity, shrinkage, density, rehydration, and colour. The bigger pores of low-methoxyl pectin gels undergo rehydration in the highest degree. The delicate and aerated structure of gels with the mixture of xanthan gum and locust-bean gum was damaged during freeze-drying and shrinkage exhibited the highest value. Small pores of samples with the mixture of xanthan gum and guar gum were responsible for the lower rehydration properties, but the highest porosity value contributed to the highest lightness value.

  2. Gas transfer rates from airlifts used for concurrent aeration, carbon dioxide stripping, and recirculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airlifts simplify recirculating aquaculture systems and can potentially reduce capital costs and minimize maintenance issues. Airlifts have the ability to move and aerate water as well as degass the water of any carbon dioxide. This study evaluated the oxygen transfer and carbon dioxide removal abil...

  3. Improvement of anaerobic digester performance by wastewater recirculation through an aerated membrane.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine wastewater from an anaerobic digester was recirculated through a silicone hose located in an external aeration chamber to determine its effect on wastewater malodorants and biogas composition. The silicone hose acted as a semipermeable membrane for the passage of small molecules. In the first...

  4. Use of a web-based model for aeration management in stored rough rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A web-based model was used to simulate the impact of aeration on population growth of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), and the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.), in stored rough rice at Beaumont, TX, USA. Simulations were run for each of 10 years with 1 August as the start date, ...

  5. Epstein-Plesset theory based measurements of concentration of nitrogen gases dissolved in aerated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Masashi; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    Microbubble aeration is used to dissolved gases into water and is an important technique in agriculture and industry. We can measure concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) in aerated water by commercial DO meters. However, there do not exist commercially available techniques to measure concentration to dissolved nitrogen (DN). In the present study, we propose the method to measure DN in aerated water with the aid of Epstein-Plesset-type analysis. Gas-supersaturated tap water is produced by applying aeration with micro-sized air bubbles and is then stored in a glass container open to the atmosphere. Diffusion-driven growth of bubbles nucleated at the container surface is recorded with a video camera. The bubble growth rate is compare to the extended Epstein-Plesset theory that models mass transfer of both DO and DN into the surface-attached bubbles base on the diffusion equation. Given the DO measurements, we can obtain the DN level by fitting in the comparison.

  6. Processes to improve energy efficiency during pumping and aeration of recirculating water in circular tank systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional gas transfer technologies for aquaculture systems occupy a large amount of space, require considerable capital investment, and can contribute to high electricity demand. In addition, diffused aeration in a circular tank can interfere with the hydrodynamics of water rotation and the spee...

  7. Integral parameters for characterizing water, energy, and aeration properties of soilless plant growth media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamindu Deepagoda, T. K. K.; Chen Lopez, Jose Choc; Møldrup, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Tuller, Markus

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade there has been a significant shift in global agricultural practice. Because the rapid increase of human population poses unprecedented challenges to production of an adequate and economically feasible food supply for undernourished populations, soilless greenhouse production systems are regaining increased worldwide attention. The optimal control of water availability and aeration is an essential prerequisite to successfully operate plant growth systems with soilless substrates such as aggregated foamed glass, perlite, rockwool, coconut coir, or mixtures thereof. While there are considerable empirical and theoretical efforts devoted to characterize water retention and aeration substrate properties, a holistic, physically-based approach considering water retention and aeration concurrently is lacking. In this study, the previously developed concept of integral water storage and energy was expanded to dual-porosity substrates and an analog integral oxygen diffusivity parameter was introduced to simultaneously characterize aeration properties of four common soilless greenhouse growth media. Integral parameters were derived for greenhouse crops in general, as well as for tomatoes. The integral approach provided important insights for irrigation management and for potential optimization of substrate properties. Furthermore, an observed relationship between the integral parameters for water availability and oxygen diffusivity can be potentially applied for the design of advanced irrigation and management strategies to ensure stress-free growth conditions, while conserving water resources.

  8. Evaluation of cost-effective aeration technology solutions to address total trihalomethane (TTHM) compliance

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate cost-effective aeration technology solutions to address TTHM compliance at a water treatment plant clearwell. The project team worked closely with EPA Region 6 and the EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) to identify a...

  9. EVALUATING THE COSTS OF PACKED-TOWER AERATION AND GAC FOR CONTROLLING SELECTED ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article focuses on a preliminary cost analysis that compares liquid-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment with packed-tower aeration (PTA) treatment, with and without air emissions control. The sensitivity of cost to design and operating variables is also discussed...

  10. Ciliatological characterization of a biological reactor that eliminates nitrogen with intermitent aeration.

    PubMed

    Luna-Pabello, V M; Plisson-Saune, S; Paul, E; Durán de Bazúa, C

    1996-01-01

    Ciliates present in an activated sludge biological reactor used for removal of nitrogen compounds with intermitent aeration were determined. The reactor had a working volume of 30 liters, a hydraulic residence time of 20 hours, and a cell retention time of 15 days. Operating temperature was 15 degrees C, and it was fed with domestic sewage. Aeration was given in pulses, one hour aeration and one hour without aeration, feeding sodium acetate to favour denitrification processes. Elimination efficiency was 95% of the dissolved organic matter. During the pseudostable operating phase, 16 species of ciliates (Phylum Ciliophora) were found. They were distributed as follows: 13 Genera; 12 Families; 7 Orders; 6 Subclasses; 5 Classes, and 3 Subphyla. From them, 9 are free swimmers and 7 are pedunculates. The Subphylum with higher diversity of species was the Ciliophora. The Oligohymenophorea Class was the best represented, corresponding to the Peritricha Subclass the highest number of species. Almost all the ciliates found have been reported as common inhabitants of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants with high removal efficiencies. They are catalogued as saprobe ciliates, within a and b masosaprobe levels. The presence of this ciliate community agrees with the carbon and nitrogen compounds removal efficiencies. Consequently, there exists the possibility of evaluating the operational efficiency of an aerobic/anoxic reactor using direct ciliates observations.

  11. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: LOW TEMPERATURE THERMAL AERATION (LTTA®) SYSTEM - CANONIE ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Low Temperature Thermal Aeration (LTTA®) process was developed by Canonie Environmental Services, Inc. (Canonie), as a treatment system that desorbs organic contaminants from soils by heating the soils up to 800 °F. The main components of the LTTA process include the follow...

  12. Evaluation of ammonia emissions from manure incorporated with different soil aerator configurations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incorporation of swine manure with tillage effectively reduces ammonia emissions and conserves crop available N but is not compatible with no-till and many other conservation tillage programs. Rolling-tine aerators potentially provide a means to enhance manure infiltration with limited disruptio...

  13. Effect of micro-aeration on anaerobic digestion of primary sludge under septic tank conditions.

    PubMed

    Diak, James; Örmeci, Banu; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2013-04-01

    Micro-aeration, which refers to the addition of very small amounts of air, is a simple technology that can potentially be incorporated in septic tanks to improve the digestion performance. The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the effects of micro-aeration on anaerobic digestion of primary sludge under septic tank conditions. 1.6 L batch reactor experiments were carried out in duplicate using raw primary sludge, with 4.1 % total solids, and diluted primary sludge, with 2.1 % total solids. Reactors were operated for 5 weeks at room temperature to simulate septic tank conditions. Micro-aeration rate of 0.00156 vvm effectively solubilised chemical oxygen demand (COD) and improved the subsequent degradation of COD. Micro-aeration also increased the generation of ammonia and soluble proteins, but did not improve the reduction in total and volatile solids, or the reduction in carbohydrates. Experiments using diluted sludge samples showed similar trends as the experiments with raw sludge, which suggest that initial solids concentration did not have a significant effect on the degradation of primary sludge under septic tank conditions.

  14. Optimization of micro-aeration intensity in acidogenic reactor of a two-phase anaerobic digester treating food waste

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Suyun; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W.C.

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Effect of micro-aeration on acidogenesis and hydrolysis of food waste was investigated. • Micro-aeration at 258 L-air/kg TS/d increased the VFAs production 3-fold. • High aeration leads to loss of substrate through microbial biomass and respiration. • Optimum aeration increased methane recovery while high aeration intensity reduced methane yield. - Abstract: Micro-aeration is known to promote the activities of hydrolytic exo-enzymes and used as a strategy to improve the hydrolysis of particulate substrate. The effect of different micro-aeration rates, 0, 129, 258, and 387 L-air/kg TS/d (denoted as LBR-AN, LBR-6h, LBR-3h and LBR-2h, respectively) on the solubilization of food waste was evaluated at 35 °C in four leach bed reactors (LBR) coupled with methanogenic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Results indicate that the intensity of micro-aeration influenced the hydrolysis and methane yield. Adequate micro-aeration intensity in LBR-3h and LBR-2h significantly enhanced the carbohydrate and protein hydrolysis by 21–27% and 38–64% respectively. Due to the accelerated acidogenesis, more than 3-fold of acetic acid and butyric acid were produced in LBR-3h as compared to the anaerobic treatment LBR-AN resulting in the maximum methane yield of 0.27 L CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added} in the UASB. The performance of LBR-6h with inadequate aeration was similar to that of LBR-AN with a comparable hydrolysis degree. Nevertheless, higher aeration intensity in LBR-2h was also unfavorable for methane yield due to significant biomass generation and CO{sub 2} respiration of up to 18.5% and 32.8% of the total soluble hydrolysate, respectively. To conclude, appropriate micro-aeration rate can promote the hydrolysis of solid organic waste and methane yield without undesirable carbon loss and an aeration intensity of 258 L-air/kg TS/d is recommended for acidogenic LBR treating food waste.

  15. Neuroendocrine disruption and health effects in Elliptio complanata mussels exposed to aeration lagoons for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Blaise, C; André, C; Gagnon, C; Salazar, M

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine neuroendocrine-disrupting effects of two domestic wastewater aeration lagoons on freshwater mussels. Mussels were caged and placed in two final aeration lagoons for treating domestic wastewaters for 60 days, at a site 1km downstream of the dispersion plume on the eastern shores of the Richelieu River; the western shore served as the reference site. The mussels were analysed for gonad activity, oxidative metabolism of xenobiotics, stress biomarkers and neuroendocrine status (monoamine and arachidonic acid metabolism). The domestic wastewaters produced many different effects at all levels examined. The gonado-somatic index and vitellogenin-like proteins were significantly induced in both aeration lagoons and gonad pyrimidine synthesis (aspartate transcarbamylase activity) was significantly reduced, indicating that vitellogenin-like proteins were produced while DNA synthesis in gametes remained constant. Biomarkers of oxidative metabolism revealed that global heme oxidase (HO), glutathione S-transferase and xanthine (caffeine) oxydoreductase (XOR) activities were significantly induced in at least one of the aeration lagoons, but not downstream of the dispersion plume. The activities of 7-ethoxyresorufin (cytochrome P4501A1), dibenzoylfluorescein (cytochrome P450 3A4 and 3A5) and benzoyloxyresorurufin (cytochrome P450 3A4 and 2B6) dealkylases were readily induced by substances sharing structural similarities with coplanar polyaromatic hydrocarbons and hydroxylated or aminated aromatic or cyclic hydrocarbon compounds such as pharmaceuticals or steroids in the domestic wastewaters. Biomarkers of toxic stress revealed that exposure to aeration lagoons led to increased production of metallothioneins, lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks, with decreased heme oxygenase activity. LPO was significantly correlated with XOR, HO and cytochrome P4501A1 activities. Neuroendocrine effects included significant increases in dopamine and

  16. Allocation of supplementary aeration stations in the Chicago waterway system for dissolved oxygen improvement.

    PubMed

    Alp, Emre; Melching, Charles S

    2011-06-01

    The Chicago Waterway System (CWS), used mainly for commercial and recreational navigation and for urban drainage, is a 122.8 km branching network of navigable waterways controlled by hydraulic structures. The CWS receives pollutant loads from 3 of the largest wastewater treatment plants in the world, nearly 240 gravity Combined Sewer Overflows (CSO), 3 CSO pumping stations, direct diversions from Lake Michigan, and eleven tributary streams or drainage areas. Even though treatment plant effluent concentrations meet the applicable standards and most reaches of the CWS meet the applicable water quality standards, Dissolved Oxygen (DO) standards are not met in the CWS during some periods. A Use Attainability Analysis was initiated to evaluate what water quality standards can be achieved in the CWS. The UAA team identified several DO improvement alternatives including new supplementary aeration stations. Because of the dynamic nature of the CWS, the DUFLOW model that is capable of simulating hydraulics and water quality processes under unsteady-flow conditions was used to evaluate the effectiveness of new supplementary aeration stations. This paper details the use of the DUFLOW model to size and locate supplementary aeration stations. In order to determine the size and location of supplemental aeration stations, 90% compliance with a 5 mg/l DO standard was used as a planning target. The simulations showed that a total of four new supplementary aeration stations with oxygen supply capacities ranging from 30 to 80 g/s would be sufficient to meet the proposed target DO concentration for the North Branch and South Branch of the Chicago River. There are several aeration technologies, two of which are already being used in the CWS, available and the UAA team determined that the total capital costs of the alternatives range from $35.5 to $89.9 million with annual operations and maintenance costs ranging from $554,000 to $2.14 million. Supplemental aeration stations have been

  17. Combination of Methoprene and Controlled Aeration to Manage Insects in Stored Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Samuel S.; Arthur, Frank H.; VanGundy, Douglas; Phillips, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A commercial formulation of the insect growth regulator methoprene was applied to wheat stored in small bins either alone or in combination with controlled aeration of the bins, to lower grain temperature for insect pest management of stored wheat. Grain temperatures were monitored and modified by a computer-controlled thermocouple system that also activated the aeration system at programmed set-points to move cool ambient air through the grain mass to lower grain temperature. Results from sampling insect populations in experimental storage bins along with laboratory mortality bioassays of insects placed on wheat taken from the bins over the course of the storage period showed that methoprene was very effective in controlling infestation by the externally-feeding stored grain insects Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), the Indian meal moth Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), the red flour beetle, Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens), the rusty grain beetle, and also for the internal-feeding pest Rhyzopertha dominica( Fauvel), the lesser grain borer. Methoprene did not give good control of the internal-feeding pest Sitophilus oryzae (L.), the rice weevil. Aeration alone was somewhat effective in suppressing insect population development, while methoprene alone or when combined with aeration greatly enhanced insect control. Commercial grain grading for industry quality standards at the end of the storage period confirmed the impact of insect suppression on maintaining high quality of the stored wheat. This field experiment shows that methoprene combined with aeration to cool grain can be effective for pest management of stored wheat in the southern plains of the United States of America. PMID:27322331

  18. Spatiotemporal Aeration and Lung Injury Patterns Are Influenced by the First Inflation Strategy at Birth.

    PubMed

    Tingay, David G; Rajapaksa, Anushi; Zonneveld, C Elroy; Black, Don; Perkins, Elizabeth J; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Lavizzari, Anna; Frerichs, Inéz; Zahra, Valerie A; Davis, Peter G

    2016-02-01

    Ineffective aeration during the first inflations at birth creates regional aeration and ventilation defects, initiating injurious pathways. This study aimed to compare a sustained first inflation at birth or dynamic end-expiratory supported recruitment during tidal inflations against ventilation without intentional recruitment on gas exchange, lung mechanics, spatiotemporal regional aeration and tidal ventilation, and regional lung injury in preterm lambs. Lambs (127 ± 2 d gestation), instrumented at birth, were ventilated for 60 minutes from birth with either lung-protective positive pressure ventilation (control) or as per control after either an initial 30 seconds of 40 cm H2O sustained inflation (SI) or an initial stepwise end-expiratory pressure recruitment maneuver during tidal inflations (duration 180 s; open lung ventilation [OLV]). At study completion, molecular markers of lung injury were analyzed. The initial use of an OLV maneuver, but not SI, at birth resulted in improved lung compliance, oxygenation, end-expiratory lung volume, and reduced ventilatory needs compared with control, persisting throughout the study. These changes were due to more uniform inter- and intrasubject gravity-dependent spatiotemporal patterns of aeration (measured using electrical impedance tomography). Spatial distribution of tidal ventilation was more stable after either recruitment maneuver. All strategies caused regional lung injury patterns that mirrored associated regional volume states. Irrespective of strategy, spatiotemporal volume loss was consistently associated with up-regulation of early growth response-1 expression. Our results show that mechanical and molecular consequences of lung aeration at birth are not simply related to rapidity of fluid clearance; they are also related to spatiotemporal pressure-volume interactions within the lung during inflation and deflation.

  19. Combination of Methoprene and Controlled Aeration to Manage Insects in Stored Wheat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Samuel S; Arthur, Frank H; VanGundy, Douglas; Phillips, Thomas W

    2016-06-17

    A commercial formulation of the insect growth regulator methoprene was applied to wheat stored in small bins either alone or in combination with controlled aeration of the bins, to lower grain temperature for insect pest management of stored wheat. Grain temperatures were monitored and modified by a computer-controlled thermocouple system that also activated the aeration system at programmed set-points to move cool ambient air through the grain mass to lower grain temperature. Results from sampling insect populations in experimental storage bins along with laboratory mortality bioassays of insects placed on wheat taken from the bins over the course of the storage period showed that methoprene was very effective in controlling infestation by the externally-feeding stored grain insects Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), the Indian meal moth Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), the red flour beetle, Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens), the rusty grain beetle, and also for the internal-feeding pest Rhyzopertha dominica( Fauvel), the lesser grain borer. Methoprene did not give good control of the internal-feeding pest Sitophilus oryzae (L.), the rice weevil. Aeration alone was somewhat effective in suppressing insect population development, while methoprene alone or when combined with aeration greatly enhanced insect control. Commercial grain grading for industry quality standards at the end of the storage period confirmed the impact of insect suppression on maintaining high quality of the stored wheat. This field experiment shows that methoprene combined with aeration to cool grain can be effective for pest management of stored wheat in the southern plains of the United States of America.

  20. Permeability predictions for sand-clogged Portland cement pervious concrete pavement systems.

    PubMed

    Haselbach, Liv M; Valavala, Srinivas; Montes, Felipe

    2006-10-01

    Pervious concrete is an alternative paving surface that can be used to reduce the nonpoint source pollution effects of stormwater runoff from paved surfaces such as roadways and parking lots by allowing some of the rainfall to permeate into the ground below. This infiltration rate may be adversely affected by clogging of the system, particularly clogging or covering by sand in coastal areas. A theoretical relation was developed between the effective permeability of a sand-clogged pervious concrete block, the permeability of sand, and the porosity of the unclogged block. Permeabilities were then measured for Portland cement pervious concrete systems fully covered with extra fine sand in a flume using simulated rainfalls. The experimental results correlated well with the theoretical calculated permeability of the pervious concrete system for pervious concrete systems fully covered on the surface with sand. Two different slopes (2% and 10%) were used. Rainfall rates were simulated for the combination of direct rainfall (passive runoff) and for additional stormwater runoff from adjacent areas (active runoff). A typical pervious concrete block will allow water to pass through at flow rates greater than 0.2 cm/s and a typical extra fine sand will have a permeability of approximately 0.02 cm/s. The limit of the system with complete sand coverage resulted in an effective system permeability of approximately 0.004 cm/s which is similar to the rainfall intensity of a 30 min duration, 100-year frequency event in the southeastern United States. The results obtained are important in designing and evaluating pervious concrete as a paving surface within watershed management systems for controlling the quantity of runoff.

  1. Performance evaluation of micro-aerobic hydrolysis of mixed sludge: Optimum aeration and effect on its biochemical methane potential.

    PubMed

    Montalvo, Silvio; Ojeda, Felipe; Huiliñir, César; Guerrero, Lorna; Borja, Rafael; Castillo, Alejandra

    2016-12-05

    This study evaluated the performance of a micro-aerobic hydrolysis of mixed sludge and its influence as a pretreatment of this waste for its subsequent anaerobic digestion. Three experimental series were carried out to evaluate the optimum micro-aeration levels in the range from 0.1 to 0.5 air volume/min.reactor volume (vvm) and operation times within the range of 24-60 h. The maximum methane yield [35 mL CH4/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) added] was obtained for an aeration level of 0.35 vvm. This methane yield value increased 114% with respect to that obtained with the non-aerated sludge. In the micro-aeration process carried out at an aeration level of 0.35 vvm, increases in soluble proteins and total sugars concentrations of 185% and 192% with respect to their initial values were found, respectively, after 48 h of aeration. At the above micro-aerobic conditions, soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODS) augmented 150%, whereas VSS content decreased until 40% of their initial respective values. Higher COD increases and VSS decreases were found at 60 h of micro-aeration, but the above parameters did not vary significantly with respect to the values found at 48 h.

  2. Influence of aeration modes on leachate characteristic of landfills that adopt the aerobic-anaerobic landfill method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanfu; Shimaoka, Takayuki; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Komiya, Teppei; Chai, Xiaoli; Hao, Yongxia

    2014-01-01

    As far as the optimal design, operation, and field application of the Aerobic-Anaerobic Landfill Method (AALM) are concerned, it is very important to understand how aeration modes (different combinations of aeration depth and air injection rate) affect the biodegradation of organic carbon and the transformation of nitrogen in landfill solid waste. Pilot-scale lysimeter experiments were carried out under different aeration modes to obtain detailed information regarding the influence of aeration modes on leachate characteristics. Results from these lysimeter experiments revealed that aeration at the bottom layer was the most effective for decomposition of organic carbon when compared with aeration at the surface or middle layers. Moreover, the air injection rate led to different nitrogen transformation patterns, unlike the lesser influence it has on organic carbon decomposition. Effective simultaneous nitrification and denitrification were observed for the aeration mode with a higher air injection rate (=1.0 L/min). On the other hand, the phenomenon of sequenced nitrification and denitrification could be observed when a low air injection rate (=0.5L/min.) was employed. Finally, it is concluded that, for AALM, air injection with a higher air injection rate at the deepest layer near the leachate collection pipe tends to accelerate the stabilization of landfill waste as defined in terms of the enhancement of denitrification as well as organic carbon decomposition.

  3. Teaching Mathematics to Young Children through the Use of Concrete and Virtual Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Angelo, Frank; Iliev, Nevin

    2012-01-01

    The use of manipulatives is an essential key to teaching mathematics to young children. Throughout history, different types of manipulatives have been used to aid in comprehension of mathematical concepts including quipu, abaci and pattern blocks. Today, concrete and virtual manipulatives are the tools that early childhood teachers are using in…

  4. Giant Atomic and Molecular Models and Other Lecture Demonstration Devices Designed for Concrete Operational Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1983-01-01

    Describes the design, construction, and use of oversize lecture-demonstration atomic/molecular models. These models appeal to both concrete and formal operational students. Also describes construction and use of an "spdf" sandwich board and an experiment using attribute blocks. (JN)

  5. 27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, A SHORT DISTANCE WEST OF D STREET ABOUT ONE-QUARTER MILE SOUTH OF 9TH AVENUE (SECTION 26). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  6. Oxygen demand for the stabilization of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in passively aerated bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kasinski, Slawomir Wojnowska-Baryla, Irena

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • The use of an passively aerated reactor enables effective stabilization of OFMSW. • Convective air flow does not inhibit the aerobic stabilization of waste. • The use of an passively aerated reactor reduces the heat loss due to convection. • The volume of supplied air exceeds 1.7–2.88 times the microorganisms demand. - Abstract: Conventional aerobic waste treatment technologies require the use of aeration devices that actively transport air through the stabilized waste mass, which greatly increases operating costs. In addition, improperly operated active aeration systems, may have the adverse effect of cooling the stabilized biomass. Because active aeration can be a limiting factor for the stabilization process, passive aeration can be equally effective and less expensive. Unfortunately, there are few reports documenting the use of passive aeration systems in municipal waste stabilization. There have been doubts raised as to whether a passive aeration system provides enough oxygen to the organic matter mineralization processes. In this paper, the effectiveness of aeration during aerobic stabilization of four different organic fractions of municipal waste in a reactor with an integrated passive ventilation system and leachate recirculation was analyzed. For the study, four fractions separated by a rotary screen were chosen. Despite the high temperatures in the reactor, the air flow rate was below 0.016 m{sup 3}/h. Using Darcy’s equation, theoretical values of the air flow rate were estimated, depending on the intensity of microbial metabolism and the amount of oxygen required for the oxidation of organic compounds. Calculations showed that the volume of supplied air exceeded the microorganisms demand for oxidation and endogenous activity by 1.7–2.88-fold.

  7. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... 314. This combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, most pain relievers used for surgical procedures block activity in ...

  8. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yixin

    2014-06-26

    The feasibility of using carbon dioxide as feedstock in precast concrete production is studied. Carbon dioxide reacts with calcium compounds in concrete, producing solid calcium carbonates in binding matrix. Two typical precast products are examined for their capacity to store carbon dioxide during the production. They are concrete blocks and fiber-cement panels. The two products are currently mass produced and cured by steam. Carbon dioxide can be used to replace steam in curing process to accelerate early strength, improve the long-term durability and reduce energy and emission. For a reaction within a 24-hour process window, the theoretical maximum possible carbon uptake in concrete is found to be 29% based on cement mass in the product. To reach the maximum uptake, a special process is developed to promote the reaction efficiency to 60-80% in 4-hour carbon dioxide curing and improve the resistance to freeze-thaw cycling and sulfate ion attack. The process is also optimized to meet the project target of $10/tCO2 in carbon utilization. By the use of self-concentrating absorption technology, high purity CO2 can be produced at a price below $40/t. With low cost CO2 capture and utilization technologies, it is feasible to establish a network for carbon capture and utilization at the vicinity of carbon sources. If all block produces and panel producers in United States could adopt carbon dioxide process in their production in place of steam, carbon utilization in these two markets alone could consume more than 2 Mt CO2/year. This capture and utilization process can be extended to more precast products and will continue for years to come.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Smart aggregates: multi-functional sensors for concrete structures—a tutorial and a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Gu, Haichang; Mo, Yi-Lung

    2008-06-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' recent pioneering research work in piezoceramic-based smart aggregates and their innovative applications in concrete civil structures. The basic operating principle of smart aggregates is first introduced. The proposed smart aggregate is formed by embedding a waterproof piezoelectric patch with lead wires into a small concrete block. The proposed smart aggregates are multi-functional and can perform three major tasks: early-age concrete strength monitoring, impact detection and structural health monitoring. The proposed smart aggregates are embedded into the desired location before the casting of the concrete structure. The concrete strength development is monitored by observing the high frequency harmonic wave response of the smart aggregate. Impact on the concrete structure is detected by observing the open-circuit voltage of the piezoceramic patch in the smart aggregate. For structural health monitoring purposes, a smart aggregate-based active sensing system is designed for the concrete structure. Wavelet packet analysis is used as a signal-processing tool to analyze the sensor signal. A damage index based on the wavelet packet analysis is used to determine the structural health status. To better describe the time-history and location information of damage, two types of damage index matrices are proposed: a sensor-history damage index matrix and an actuator-sensor damage index matrix. To demonstrate the multi-functionality of the proposed smart aggregates, different types of concrete structures have been used as test objects, including concrete bridge bent-caps, concrete cylinders and a concrete frame. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness and the multi-functionality of the proposed smart aggregates. The multi-functional smart aggregates have the potential to be applied to the comprehensive monitoring of concrete structures from their earliest stages and throughout their lifetime.

  10. Blocked Tear Duct

    MedlinePlus

    Blocked tear duct Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff When you have a blocked tear duct, your tears can't drain normally, leaving you ... in the tear drainage system. A blocked tear duct is common in newborns. The condition usually gets ...

  11. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    PubMed Central

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB. PMID:27366387

  12. Dynamic Increase Factors for Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Strain Rate Effects on Fracture, S. Mindess and S.P. Shah, editors, December 1985, pp. 1-13. 35. Weerheijm, J., Reinhardt, H.W., “Modelling of...Out of Anchored Reinforcing Bars,” Transactions of the Japan Concrete Institute, Vol. 15, 1994, pp. 459-466. 50. Bentur, A. S., S. Mindess and N. P...Society Symposia Proceedings Vol. 64 (S. Mindess and S. P. Shah, eds.), Pittsburgh, 1986, pp. 225-234. 51. Banthia, N. P., “Impact Resistance of Concrete

  13. Assessing the concreteness of relational representation.

    PubMed

    Rein, Jonathan R; Markman, Arthur B

    2010-11-01

    Research has shown that people's ability to transfer abstract relational knowledge across situations can be heavily influenced by the concrete objects that fill relational roles. This article provides evidence that the concreteness of the relations themselves also affects performance. In 3 experiments, participants viewed simple relational patterns of visual objects and then identified these same patterns under a variety of physical transformations. Results show that people have difficulty generalizing to novel concrete forms of abstract relations, even when objects are unchanged. This suggests that stimuli are initially represented as concrete relations by default. In the 2nd and 3rd experiments, the number of distinct concrete relations in the training set was increased to promote more abstract representation. Transfer improved for novel concrete relations but not for other transformations such as object substitution. Results indicate that instead of automatically learning abstract relations, people's relational representations preserve all properties that appear consistently in the learning environment, including concrete objects and concrete relations.

  14. The Space Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Ciba-Geigy Corporation's "Space Block," technically known as TDT-177-51 Ren Shape epoxy model block, is a two-foot by two-foot by five- inch plastic block from which master models of the Space Shuttle protective tiles are cut by NC machines. Space Block is made of epoxy resin with low viscosity and slow curing time, enabling the large block to cure uniformly without cracking. Rockwell International uses master models of Shuttle tiles to check accuracy of NC machines accurately by comparing model dimensions with specifications. New epoxy resins are attracting broad interest as a replacement for traditional materials used in modeling auto, aerospace or other parts.

  15. Ammonia-based intermittent aeration control optimized for efficient nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Bunce, Ryder; Miller, Mark W; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the development of an intermittently aerated pilot-scale process (V = 0.45 m(3) ) operated for optimized efficient nitrogen removal in terms of volume, supplemental carbon and alkalinity requirements. The intermittent aeration pattern was controlled using a strategy based on effluent ammonia concentration set-points. The unique feature of the ammonia-based aeration control was that a fixed dissolved oxygen (DO) set-point was used and the length of the aerobic and anoxic time (anoxic time ≥25% of total cycle time) were changed based on the effluent ammonia concentration. Unlike continuously aerated ammonia-based aeration control strategies, this approach offered control over the aerobic solids retention time (SRT) to deal with fluctuating ammonia loading without solely relying on changes to the total SRT. This approach allowed the system to be operated at a total SRT with a small safety factor. The benefits of operating at an aggressive SRT were reduced hydraulic retention time (HRT) for nitrogen removal. As a result of such an operation, nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) out-selection was also obtained (ammonia oxidizing bacteria [AOB] maximum activity: 400 ± 79 mgN/L/d, NOB maximum activity: 257 ± 133 mgN/L/d, P < 0.001) expanding opportunities for short-cut nitrogen removal. The pilot demonstrated a total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal rate of 95 ± 30 mgN/L/d at an influent chemical oxygen demand: ammonia (COD/NH4 (+) -N) ratio of 10.2 ± 2.2 at 25°C within the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 h and within a total SRT of 5-10 days. The TIN removal efficiency up to 91% was observed during the study, while effluent TIN was 9.6 ± 4.4 mgN/L. Therefore, this pilot-scale study demonstrates that application of the proposed on-line aeration control is capable of relatively high nitrogen removal without supplemental carbon and alkalinity addition at a low HRT.

  16. Comparison of aeration and spinosad for suppressing insects in stored wheat.

    PubMed

    Flinn, P W; Subramanyam, Bh; Arthur, F H

    2004-08-01

    Field studies were conducted from July 2002 to January 2003 for evaluating the effects of controlled aeration and a commercial biological insecticide, spinosad, in suppressing insect populations in stored wheat. Six cylindrical steel bins were filled with newly harvested (2002 crop year) hard red winter wheat on 9 and 10 July 2002. Each bin contained 30.7 metric tons (1,100 bu) of wheat. Wheat in two bins was left untreated (control), whereas wheat in two bins was treated with spinosad, and in another two bins was subjected to aeration by using aeration controllers. Spinosad was applied to wheat at the time of bin filling to obtain a rate of 1 mg ([AI])/kg. Aeration controllers were set to run the fans when ambient air temperature fell below 23.9, 18.3, and 7.2 degrees C for the first, second, and third cooling cycles, respectively. We added 400 adults each of the rusty grain beetle, Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens); lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (F.); and red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), to the grain at monthly intervals between July and October 2002. Insect density in the bins was estimated monthly by taking 3-kg grain samples from 21 locations within each bin by using a pneumatic grain sampler. No live T. castaneum or C. ferrugineus and very low densities of R. dominica (<0.008 adults per kilogram) were found in wheat treated with spinosad during the 6-mo sampling period. Density of C. ferrugineus and T. castaneum in aerated bins did not exceed two adults per kilogram (the Federal Grain Inspection Service standard for infested wheat), whereas R. dominica increased to 12 adults per kilogram in November 2002, which subsequently decreased to three adults per kilogram in January 2003. In the untreated (control) bins, R. dominica density increased faster than that of C. ferrugineus or T. castaneum. Density of R. dominica peaked at 58 adults per kilogram in October 2002 and decreased subsequently, whereas T. castaneum density was 10 adults

  17. Assessing Workability Complaints in Mass Concrete Construction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    up primarily of rigid pipes. It appears that poorly maintained vibrators are frequently proposed for use in consolidating mass concrete . Use of such... vibrators can give the false im- pression of unworkable concrete and result in poorly consolidated concrete . Only vibrators in good operating...units is presented on page vi. 5 Chapt~er 2 Survey Results The survey also indicated that mass concrete is frequently vibrated improp- erly. Improper

  18. Bonded Concrete Overlays: Construction and Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    report provides a review and summary of surface preparation of the existing slab, joint and crack treatment, bonding methods, concrete overlay mixtures...34Bonded, Thin-Lift Portland Cement Concrete Re- surfacing," Report on Project HRlgl, Clayton County and Iowa Highway Research Board, September 1977...34Resurfacing and Patching Concrete Pavement with Bonded Concrete ," Proceedings, Highway Research Board, Vol. 35, 1956. 8. Gillette, R. W.,"A 10-Year Report

  19. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  20. Molecular Survey of Concrete Biofilm Microbial Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although several studies have shown that bacteria can deteriorate concrete structures, there is very little information on the composition of concrete microbial communities. To this end, we studied different microbial communities associated with concrete biofilms using 16S rRNA g...

  1. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT IN AGED CONCRETE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of radon generation and transport in Florida concretes sampled from 12- to 45-year-old residential slabs. It also compares measurements from old concrete samples to previous measurements on newly poured Florida residential concretes....

  2. Lightweight concrete with enhanced neutron shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2016-09-13

    A lightweight concrete containing polyethylene terephthalate in an amount of 20% by total volume. The concrete is enriched with hydrogen and is therefore highly effective at thermalizing neutrons. The concrete can be used independently or as a component of an advanced neutron radiation shielding system.

  3. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  4. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  5. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  6. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  7. 9 CFR 91.26 - Concrete flooring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Concrete flooring. 91.26 Section 91.26... LIVESTOCK FOR EXPORTATION Inspection of Vessels and Accommodations § 91.26 Concrete flooring. (a) Pens aboard an ocean vessel shall have a 3 inch concrete pavement, proportioned and mixed to give 2000...

  8. 11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/15, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. 13. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/18, Rev. D. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. D, no change; Date: 18 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. 10. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/14, Rev. B. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. B; Date: 21 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. 12. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/16, Rev. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 26 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 4. "TEST STAND NO. 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PLAN AND ELEVATION." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL PLAN AND ELEVATION." Specifications No. OC11-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/12 REV. E. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. E; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. 9. "TEST STANDS NOS. 11, 13, & 15; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STANDS NOS. 1-1, 1-3, & 1-5; CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. ENG 04-35350-10; Drawing No. 60-09-04; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/13. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04353 Eng. 177, no change; Date: 17 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Sectional analysis of reinforced concrete members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentz, Evan C.

    2000-10-01

    Four easy to use programs have been written that allow for state of the art sectional analysis of reinforced concrete blocks, plates, beams, columns and shells. Unlike most sectional analysis programs, these programs include the effects of shear on behaviour. They are based on the assumption that plane sections remain plane, that there is no transverse clamping stress, and that the biaxial behaviour can be modelled well by the Modified Compression Field Theory (MCFT). Each of these assumptions is shown to be reasonable. The programs are freely available on the World Wide Web at the listed addresses: http://www.ecf.utoronto.ca/ ˜bentz/m2k.htm Membrane-2000 for plates http://www.ecf.utoronto.ca/ ˜bentz/r2k.htm Response-2000 for beams and columns http://www.ecf.utoronto.ca/ ˜bentz/t2k.htm Triax-2000 for 3D blocks http://www.ecf.utoronto.ca/ ˜bentz/s2k.htm Shell-2000: shells with out-of-plane forces This thesis describes the MCFT in detail as implemented in the programs as well as explaining new constitutive relations employed for the behaviour of concrete in tension. The strongest feature of the new programs is the employment of the longitudinal stiffness method, developed for this thesis, which calculates the shear stress profile for a beam or shell much faster and with more numerical stability than the previous state of the art. The programs are verified against a set of experiments as well as against two new shear experiments performed for this thesis. They indicate the programs are good at predicting the behaviour of the elements. Response-2000 is compared to a database of 534 beams and shown to predict shear strengths with an average experimental over predicted shear strength ratio of 1.05 and with a coefficient of variation of 12%. This compares favourably to the ACI code prediction ratios that have an average of 1.20 and a coefficient of variation of 32%. It is suggested that the programs in this thesis represent a good first step in allowing rational

  15. Two-level multivariable control system of dissolved oxygen tracking and aeration system for activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The problem of tracking dissolved oxygen is one of the most complex and fundamental issues related to biological processes. The dissolved oxygen level in aerobic tanks has a significant influence on the behavior and activity of microorganisms. Aerated tanks are supplied with air from an aeration system (blowers, pipes, throttling valves, and diffusers). It is a complex, dynamic system governed by nonlinear hybrid dynamics. Control of the aeration system is also difficult in terms of control of the dissolved oxygen. In this article, a two-level multivariable control system for tracking dissolved oxygen and controlling an aeration system is designed. A nonlinear model predictive control algorithm was applied to design controllers for each level. This overall hierarchical control system was validated by simulation based on real data records provided by a water resource recovery facility located in Kartuzy, Northern Poland. The effect of control system parameters and disturbances was also investigated.

  16. Effects of aeration rate on degradation process of oil palm empty fruit bunch with kinetic-dynamic modeling.

    PubMed

    Talib, Ahmad Tarmezee; Mokhtar, Mohd Noriznan; Baharuddin, Azhari Samsu; Sulaiman, Alawi

    2014-10-01

    The effect of different aeration rates on the organic matter (OM) degradation during the active phase of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB)-rabbit manure co-composting process under constant forced-aeration system has been studied. Four different aeration rates, 0.13 L min(-1) kg(DM)(-1),0.26 L min(-1) kg(DM)(-1),0.49 L min(-1) kg(DM)(-1) and 0.74 L min(-1) kg(DM)(-1) were applied. 0.26 L min(-1) kg(DM)(-1) provided enough oxygen level (10%) for the rest of composting period, showing 40.5% of OM reduction that is better than other aeration rates. A dynamic mathematical model describing OM degradation, based on the ratio between OM content and initial OM content with correction functions of moisture content, free air space, oxygen and temperature has been proposed.

  17. Nitrogen removal in wood chip combined substrate baffled subsurface-flow constructed wetlands: impact of matrix arrangement and intermittent aeration.

    PubMed

    Li, Huai; Chi, Zifang; Yan, Baixing; Cheng, Long; Li, Jianzheng

    2017-02-01

    In this study, two lab-scale baffled subsurface-flow constructed wetlands (BSFCWs), including gravel-wood chips-slag and gravel-slag-wood chips, were operated at different intermittent aeration to evaluate the effect of artificial aeration and slow-released carbon source on the treatment efficiency of high-strength nitrogen wastewater. Results indicated that gravel-slag-wood chips extended aerobic/anaerobic alternating environment to gravel and slag zones and maintained anaerobic condition in the subsequent wood chip section. The order of gravel-slag-wood chip was more beneficial to pollutant removal. Sufficient carbon source supply resulted from wood-chip-framework substrate simultaneously obtained high removals of COD (97%), NH4(+)-N (95%), and TN (94%) in BSFCWs at 2 h aeration per day. The results suggest that intermittent aeration combined with wood chips could achieve high nitrogen removal in BSFCWs.

  18. Effects of soil aeration, legume residue, and soil texture on transformations of macro- and micronutrients in soils. [Vicia villosa

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, D.T.; Doran, J.W. ); Aulakh, M.S. )

    1992-02-01

    Soil aeration is an important factor controlling microbial activity, nutrient availability, and plant root growth. The authors investigated the effect of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) addition to well aerated (60% water-filled pore space (WFPS)) and poorly aerated (90% WFPS) soils of varying texture on transformations of C, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, Mn, Fe, and Cu for a 30-d period. The results of this study imply that incorporation of easily decomposable residue may supply substantial amounts of nutrients to growing plants. Where soils remain wet for > 10 d, residues may create intensive reducing conditions and a several fold increase in available Fe, Mn, Cu, and P. Conversely, DTPA extractable Fe, Mn, and Cu can vary greatly within a few weeks depending on soil aeration status, residue management, time of sampling, and soil texture and may lead to erroneous indices of nutrient availability to plants.

  19. Concrete Finisher Program. Apprenticeship Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Apprenticeship and Industry Training.

    This document presents information about the apprenticeship training program of Alberta, Canada, in general and the concrete finishing program in particular. The first part of the document discusses the following items: Alberta's apprenticeship and industry training system; the apprenticeship and industry training committee structure; local…

  20. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1985-02-19

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers is a liquid system.

  1. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep; Pullockaran, Jose D.; Knox, Lerry

    1997-01-01

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising hydrng a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO.sub.3 of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring.

  2. Optimization of Energy Consumption and Mass Transfer Parameters in a Surface Aeration Vessel.

    PubMed

    Mohammadpour, A; AkhavanBehabadi, M A; Ebrahimzadeh, M; Raisee, M; MajdiNasab, A R; Nosrati, M; Mousavi, S M

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports tests on a lab-scale surface aeration vessel was equipped with a Rushton turbine to examine its performance in terms of standard aeration efficiency (SAE), mixing time, and void fraction characteristics. These characteristics were investigated by tests using variations of rotor speed, impeller immersion depth, and water level. Results showed that variation of impeller immersion depth had a greater effect on the SAE compared to variation of water level. Moreover, the SAE increased with rotor speeds up to about 150 to 200 rpm and then decreased. In addition, void fraction improved by impeller immersion depth and rotor speed enhancement; however, mixing time and power number were reduced as rotor speed increased. According to the response surface methodology statistical optimizations, optimum values for rotor speed, impeller immersion depth, and water level were 168.90 rpm, 25 mm, and 30 cm, respectively, to achieve the maximum value of SAE.

  3. Design of passively aerated compost piles: Vertical air velocities between the pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, N.J.; Cherry, R.S.

    1996-09-01

    Passively aerated compost piles are built on a base of porous materials, such as straw or wood chips, in which perforated air supply pipes are distributed. The piles are not turned during composting, nor is forced-aeration equipment used, which significantly reduces the operating and capital expenses associated with these piles. Currently, pile configurations and materials are worked out by trial and error. Fundamentally based design procedures are difficult to develop because the natural convection air flow rate is not explicitly known, but rather is closely coupled with the pile temperature. This paper develops a mathematical model to analytically determine the maximum upward air flow velocity over an air supply pipe and the drop in vertical velocity away from the pipe. This model has one dimensionless number, dependent on the pile and base properties, which fully characterizes the velocity profile between the pipes. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Improvement of ammonia removal in activated sludge process with feedforward-feedback aeration controllers.

    PubMed

    Vrecko, Darko; Hvala, Nadja; Stare, Aljaz; Burica, Olga; Strazar, Marjeta; Levstek, Meta; Cerar, Peter; Podbevsek, Sebastjan

    2006-01-01

    In the paper three linear aeration controllers that can be easily implemented are presented and evaluated on the activated sludge process pilot plant. Controllers differ according to the information that is used about the process, which can be oxygen in the last aerobic reactor, ammonia in the last aerobic reactor and ammonia in the influent. The aeration controllers that are addressed are: oxygen cascade PI controller, ammonia cascade PI controller and ammonia feedforward-cascade PI controller. Experiments show that, in comparison with the oxygen cascade PI controller, the ammonia cascade PI controller allows better control of effluent ammonia and airflow savings of around 23%, while the ammonia feedforward-cascade PI controller gives the best reduction of ammonia peaks and can save up to 45% of the airflow.

  5. Nonlinear control of an activated sludge aeration process: use of fuzzy techniques for tuning PID controllers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, M A; Seco, A; Ferrer, J; Penya-roja, J M; Valverde, J L

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, several tuning algorithms, specifically ITAE, IMC and Cohen and Coon, were applied in order to tune an activated sludge aeration PID controller. Performance results of these controllers were compared by simulation with those obtained by using a nonlinear fuzzy PID controller. In order to design this controller, a trial and error procedure was used to determine, as a function of error at current time and at a previous time, sets of parameters (including controller gain, integral time and derivative time) which achieve satisfactory response of a PID controller actuating over the aeration process. Once these sets of data were obtained, neural networks were used to obtain fuzzy membership functions and fuzzy rules of the fuzzy PID controller.

  6. Process design and dynamics of a series of continuously fed aerated tank reactors treating dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, Anni; Alakukku, Laura; Aura, Erkki

    2013-09-01

    A 6-month trial was carried out to study operational conditions and process dynamics in a system of six continuously fed aerated tank bioreactors grouped by serial connection. Feedback was with NH3-stripped solution after biological treatment, with the purpose of lowering the NH3 content of the feedback solution in order to improve the process. The fate of carbon and nutrients during treatment were determined, as well as the ammonia stripping performance of the biological treatment. The results of the study confirmed the dynamic nature of the serial system and indicated its resistance to process disturbances. The feedback of slurry resulted in a dilution effect and significantly reduced the carbon and nutrients concentrations in the first tank, increasing the treatment efficiency. Overall, after mechanical separation, low intensity aeration treatment and ammonia stripping, up to 61%, 67%, 79% and 83% average reductions of TS, Ntot, NH4(+)-N and Ptot, respectively, were reached.

  7. Optimization of micro-aeration intensity in acidogenic reactor of a two-phase anaerobic digester treating food waste.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suyun; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2014-02-01

    Micro-aeration is known to promote the activities of hydrolytic exo-enzymes and used as a strategy to improve the hydrolysis of particulate substrate. The effect of different micro-aeration rates, 0, 129, 258, and 387 L-air/kg TS/d (denoted as LBR-AN, LBR-6h, LBR-3h and LBR-2h, respectively) on the solubilization of food waste was evaluated at 35°C in four leach bed reactors (LBR) coupled with methanogenic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Results indicate that the intensity of micro-aeration influenced the hydrolysis and methane yield. Adequate micro-aeration intensity in LBR-3h and LBR-2h significantly enhanced the carbohydrate and protein hydrolysis by 21-27% and 38-64% respectively. Due to the accelerated acidogenesis, more than 3-fold of acetic acid and butyric acid were produced in LBR-3h as compared to the anaerobic treatment LBR-AN resulting in the maximum methane yield of 0.27 L CH4/g VS(added) in the UASB. The performance of LBR-6h with inadequate aeration was similar to that of LBR-AN with a comparable hydrolysis degree. Nevertheless, higher aeration intensity in LBR-2h was also unfavorable for methane yield due to significant biomass generation and CO2 respiration of up to 18.5% and 32.8% of the total soluble hydrolysate, respectively. To conclude, appropriate micro-aeration rate can promote the hydrolysis of solid organic waste and methane yield without undesirable carbon loss and an aeration intensity of 258 L-air/kg TS/d is recommended for acidogenic LBR treating food waste.

  8. Sludge reduction by direct addition of chlorine dioxide into a sequencing batch reactor under operational mode of repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Liu, Weiyi; Li, Yuanmei; Xiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of direct addition of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) into a repeatedly alternating aeration/non-aeration sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on its sludge reduction and process performance was investigated. The experimental results showed that the sludge reduction efficiency was 32.9% and the observed growth yield (Yobs) of SBR was 0.11 kg VSS (volatile suspended solids) /kg COD (chemical oxygen demand) for 80 days' operation at the optimum ClO2 dosage of 2.0 mg/g TSS (total suspended solids). It was speculated that cell lysis and cryptic growth, uncoupled metabolism and endogenous metabolism were jointly responsible for the sludge reduction in this study. COD, NH3-N, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) in the effluent increased on average 29.47, 4.44, 1.97 and 0.05 mg/L, respectively. However, the effluent quality still satisfied the first-class B discharge standards for municipal wastewater treatment plants in China. In that case, the sludge maintained fine viability with the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) being 14.47 mg O2/(g VSS·h) and demonstrated good settleability with the sludge volume index (SVI) being 116 mL/g. The extra cost of sludge reduction at the optimum ClO2 dosage was estimated to be 2.24 CNY (or 0.36 dollar)/kg dry sludge.

  9. Understanding the scabbling of concrete using microwave energy

    SciTech Connect

    Buttress, A.J.; Jones, D.A.; Dodds, C.; Dimitrakis, G.; Campbell, C.J.; Dawson, A.; Kingman, S.W.

    2015-09-15

    Concrete blocks supplied by the UK Sellafield nuclear site were treated with microwave energy using a 15 kW system operating at 2.45 GHz. The effect of aggregate type (Whinstone, Gravel and Limestone); standoff distance; and effect of surface coating were studied to determine their influence on the systems performance in terms of mass and area removal rates and evaluate the controllability of the process. All blocks were scabbled successfully, with mass and area removal rates averaging 11.3 g s{sup −} {sup 1} and 3 cm s{sup −} {sup 1} respectively on treating large areas to a depth of 25 mm. The use of a Kevlar barrier between the block and applicator was found to significantly reduce the generation of dust as only 1.6% of the scabbled mass was in the < 106 μm — that generally considered to be airborne. Importantly Brazilian disc testing of the scabbled block showed that the process did not adversely affect structural properties of the test blocks after treatment.

  10. Solar-energy mobile water aerators are efficient for restoring eutrophic water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Xu, Z. X.

    2017-01-01

    Surface water eutrophication has become a worldwide social issue. large amounts of secondhand energy, high capital investment are required, and most ecosystem disturbances will arise in the conventional eutrophication restoration measures. However, mobile solar-energy water aerator has the better oxygen transfer rate, hydrodynamic condition and can be used in the large waterbody for its cruising character. Second, the device is low carbon and sustainable for the solar photovoltaic system applications. So the device can be widely used in the eutrophication restoration.

  11. Influence of free air space on microbial kinetics in passively aerated compost.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shouhai; Clark, O Grant; Leonard, Jerry J

    2009-01-01

    The influence of free air space (FAS) on passively aerated composting has been reported, but the quantitative relationship between FAS and the microbial kinetics in passively aerated compost has not been investigated. This relationship was studied by composting dairy manure and straw in an enclosed, passively aerated, cylindrical vessel. Based on this experimental system, conceptual and numerical models were developed in which the compost bed was considered to consist of layered elements, each being physically and chemically homogeneous. The microbial activity in each layer was represented in order to predict oxygen and substrate consumption and the release of water and heat. Convective transport of air, moisture, and heat through the layers was represented. Microbial growth and substrate consumption rates were described using modified first-order kinetics for each of the mesophilic and thermophilic temperature regimes. The values of the microbial kinetic parameters were adjusted for each layer based on an innovative, non-linear, statistical analysis of temperature histories recorded at different layers in the compost bed during three treatments (i.e., FAS values of 0.45, 0.52, and 0.65). Microbial kinetic rate constants were found to follow a sigmoid relationship with FAS, with correlation coefficients (R(2)) of 0.97 for the mesophilic stage and 0.96 for the thermophilic stage. Temperature histories and airflow measurements from a fourth treatment (FAS value of 0.57) were used as an independent check of the model's performance. Simulation results indicate that the model could predict the general trend of temperature development. A plot of the residuals shows that the model is biased, however, possibly because many parameters in the model were not measured directly but instead were estimated from literature. The result from this study demonstrates a new method for describing the relationship between microbial kinetics (k(max)) and substrate FAS, which could be used

  12. Potential of OUR and OTR measurements for identification of activated sludge removal processes in aerated basins.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, A; Libra, J A; Sahlmann, C; Handschag, J; Wiesmann, U; Gnirss, R

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop a process control scheme to reduce energy costs for aeration in activated sludge systems with biological P removal, pre-denitrification and nitrification stages, the spatial distribution of carbon oxidation and nitrification was evaluated over a long full-scale plug flow aeration basin using an externally measured specific oxygen uptake rate (sOUR) and in basin measurement of the actual specific oxygen transfer rate (sOTR) with off-gas testing as well as with the calculated oxygen demand from NH4-N concentrations (sOTR(N)). Using a simple static model, a gas phase balance on oxygen and carbon dioxide, sOTR(N) values were also calculated from off-gas testing. Comparison of sOTR(N) to sOTR and sOUR for carbon oxidation (sOUR(C)) to nitrification (sOUR(N)) at different loading conditions allowed the oxidation processes to be followed over the three zones of the aeration basin. As expected, the distribution depended on the dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in the basin. However, the major change was in the C-oxidation rate and not the nitrification rate. At a low DO, and when NH4-N was present in the zone, the amount of oxygen transferred for nitrification was nearly the same, but the overall sOTR was lower. The externally measured sOUR was only useful when it was differentiated into sOUR(N) and sOUR(C). sOUR(N) could be used to predict the nitrification rate in the basin. With further refinement, the gas phase balance model has potential to be used to monitor the degree of nitrification over the basin length. This can be integrated into a control scheme to reduce aeration costs by adjusting the DO setpoint according to loading conditions in the

  13. Field trial of a new aeration system for enhancing biodegradation in a biopile.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Cunningham, C J; Pas, Valerie; Philp, J C; Barry, D A; Anderson, P

    2004-01-01

    The influence of a new aeration system on the biopile performance was investigated. The purpose was to increase biodegradation efficiency by optimising airflow through the pile. During a 1-month field trial, the performance of a new system using two perforated vertical pipes with wind-driven turbines was compared with that of a standard pile configuration with two horizontal perforated pipes. Both piles were composed of a similar mix of diesel-contaminated soils, woodchips, compost and NPK fertiliser. Hydrocarbons were recovered using solvent extraction, and determined both gravimetrically and by gas chromatography. Total heterotrophs, pH and moisture content were also assessed. Air pressure measurements were made to compare the efficiency of suction in the pipes. Results at the end of the experiment showed that there was no significant difference between the two piles in the total amount of hydrocarbon biodegradation. The normalised degradation rate was, however, considerably higher in the new system than in the standard one, suggesting that the vertical venting method may have improved the efficiency of the biological reactions in the pile. The pressure measurements showed a significant improvement in the suction produced by the new aeration system. However, many factors other than the airflow (oxygen supply) may influence and limit the biodegradation rates, including moisture content, age of contaminants and the climatic conditions. Additional experiments and modelling need to be carried out to explore further the new aeration method and to develop criteria and guidelines for engineering design of optimal aeration schemes in order to achieve maximum biodegradation in biopiles.

  14. Environmental Aspects of Artificial Aeration and Oxygenation of Reservoirs: A Review of Theory, Techniques, and Experiences.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    RIVER RESERVOIR 1828 MONROE RESERVOIR 4220 BELTZVILLE LAKE 1909 RATHBUN RESERVOIR 4228 STILLWATER LAKE 1910 RED ROCK RESERVOIR 4505 LAKE HARTWELL 2002...of Engineers. 1973. ALLATOONA LAKE , DESTRATIFICATION EQUIPMENT TEST REPORT. U.S. Army Engineer District, Savannah, Georgia . 64 pp. This report...usually elevates dissolved oxygen content of the lake by bringing anoxic bot- tom waters to the lake surface where aeration occurs through contact with the

  15. Increase in pulmonary blood flow at birth: role of oxygen and lung aeration.

    PubMed

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; te Pas, Arjan B; Fouras, Andreas; Lewis, Robert A; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Hooper, Stuart B

    2016-03-01

    Lung aeration stimulates the increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) at birth, but the spatial relationships between PBF and lung aeration and the role of increased oxygenation remain unclear. Using simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography, we have investigated the separate roles of lung aeration and increased oxygenation in PBF changes at birth using near-term (30 days of gestation) rabbit kits (n = 18). Rabbits were imaged before ventilation, then the right lung was ventilated with 100% nitrogen (N2), air or 100% O2 (oxygen), before all kits were switched to ventilation in air, followed by ventilation of both lungs using air. Unilateral ventilation of the right lung with 100% N2 significantly increased heart rate (from 69.4 ± 4.9 to 93.0 ± 15.0 bpm), the diameters of both left and right pulmonary axial arteries, number of visible vessels in both left and right lungs, relative PBF index in both pulmonary arteries, and reduced bolus transit time for both left and right axial arteries (from 1.34 ± 0.39 and 1.81 ± 0.43 s to 0.52 ± 0.17 and 0.89 ± 0.21 s in the left and right axial arteries, respectively). Similar changes were observed with 100% oxygen, but increases in visible vessel number and vessel diameter of the axial arteries were greater in the ventilated right lung during unilateral ventilation. These findings confirm that PBF increase at birth is not spatially related to lung aeration and that the increase in PBF to unventilated regions is unrelated to oxygenation, although oxygen can potentiate this increase.

  16. Turbine Aeration Design Software for Mitigating Adverse Environmental Impacts Resulting From Conventional Hydropower Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliver, John S.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional hydropower turbine aeration test-bed for computational routines and software tools for improving environmental mitigation technologies for conventional hydropower systems. In achieving this goal, we have partnered with Alstom, a global leader in energy technology development and United States power generation, with additional funding from the Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment (IREE) and the College of Science and Engineering (CSE) at the UMN

  17. A Trade Study of Two Membrane-Aerated Biological Water Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allada, Ram; Lange, Kevin; Vega. Leticia; Roberts, Michael S.; Jackson, Andrew; Anderson, Molly; Pickering, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Biologically based systems are under evaluation as primary water processors for next generation life support systems due to their low power requirements and their inherent regenerative nature. This paper will summarize the results of two recent studies involving membrane aerated biological water processors and present results of a trade study comparing the two systems with regards to waste stream composition, nutrient loading and system design. Results of optimal configurations will be presented.

  18. A field study on phytoremediation of dredged sediment contaminated by heavy metals and nutrients: the impacts of sediment aeration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Yang, Lihua; Zhong, Fei; Cheng, Shuiping

    2014-12-01

    Compared to traditional chemical or physical treatments, phytoremediation has proved to be a cost-effective and environmentally sound alternative for remediation of contaminated dredged sediment. A field study was conducted in a sediment disposal site predominantly colonized by Typha angustifolia under different sediment moisture conditions to estimate the phytoremediation effects of dredged sediment. The moisture content was 37.30 % and 48.27 % in aerated and waterlogged sediment, respectively. Total nitrogen (TN) content was higher in the waterlogged sediment than in the aerated sediment. The total Cd contents were lower in aerated sediment, which was mainly resulted from the lower exchangeable fraction of Cd. The bioaccumulation of P, Cu and Pb in T. angustifolia was promoted by waterlogging, and the belowground tissue concentrations and accumulation factors (AFs) of Cu were higher than that of other metals, which can be explained by that Cu is an essential micronutrient for plants. Consistent with many previous studies, T. angustifolia showed higher metal levels in roots than in above-ground tissues at both the sediment conditions. Due to the improved biomass produced in the aerated sediment, the removals of nutrients and the metals by plant harvest were higher from aerated sediment than from waterlogged sediment. It was indicated that maintaining the dredged sediment aerated can avoid release risk and plant uptake of metals, while the opposite management option can promote phytoextraction of these contaminants.

  19. Effect of intermittent aeration strategies on treatment performance and microbial community of an IFAS reactor treating municipal waste water.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bhatia, Akansha; Kazmi, Absar Ahmad

    2017-01-31

    This study investigated the effect of various intermittent aeration (IA) cycles on organics and nutrient removal, and microbial communities in an integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor treating municipal waste water. Average effluent biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids, total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) values were noted as 20, 50, 30, 12 and 1.5 mgL(-1), respectively, in continuous aeration mode. A total of four operational conditions (run 1, continuous aeration; run 2, 150/30 min aeration on/off time; run 3, 120/60 min aeration on/off time and run 4, 90/60 min aeration on/off time) were investigated in IFAS reactor assessment. Among the all examined IA cycles, IA phase 2 gave the maximum COD and BOD removals with values recorded as 97% and 93.8%, respectively. With respect to nutrient removal (TN and TP), IA phase 1 was found to be optimum. Pathogen removal efficiency of present system was recorded as 90-95% during the three phases. With regard to settling characteristics, pilot showed poor settling during IA schedules, which was also evidenced by high sludge volume index values. Overall, IA could be used as a feasible way to improve the overall performance of IFAS system.

  20. Influence of aeration on volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) and NH3 emissions during aerobic composting of kitchen waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Li, Guoxue; Gu, Jun; Wang, Guiqin; Li, Yangyang; Zhang, Difang

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the influence of aeration on volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) and ammonia (NH3) emissions during kitchen waste composting. Aerobic composting of kitchen waste and cornstalks was conducted at a ratio of 85:15 (wet weight basis) in 60L reactors for 30days. The gas emissions were analyzed with force aeration at rates of 0.1 (A1), 0.2 (A2) and 0.3 (A3) L (kgDMmin)(-1), respectively. Results showed that VSCs emission at the low aeration rate (A1) was more significant than that at other two rates (i.e., A2 and A3 treatment), where no considerable emission difference was observed. On the other hand, NH3 emission reduced as the aeration rate decreased. It is noteworthy that the aeration rate did not significantly affect the compost quality. These results suggest that the aeration rate of 0.2L (kgDMmin)(-1) may be applied to control VSCs and NH3 emissions during kitchen waste composting.

  1. Characterisation of microbial communities in relation to physical-chemical parameters during in situ aeration of waste material.

    PubMed

    Mellendorf, Maren; Huber-Humer, Marion; Gamperling, Oliver; Huber, Pia; Gerzabek, Martin H; Watzinger, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    This study investigates changes in waste microbial community composition and biomass during in situ aeration in laboratory-scale columns over 32 weeks. Microbial profiles were assessed in solid and leachate samples in relation to physical-chemical parameters using phospholipid ester linked fatty acid (PLFA) and phospholipid ether lipid (PLEL) analysis and parameters such as pH, EC, TC, TOC, TN, NO(3)(-), NH(4)(+), COD and the biochemical parameter BOD(5). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the individual PLFAs and PLELs indicated a change in community composition and biomass over the operation period, which could be differentiated in the three phases (i) anaerobic, (ii) aeration start and (iii) extended aeration. PCA revealed that aeration and pH values were the most influential parameters on microbial dynamics. There was a marked decrease of ubiquitous microorganisms, some Gram negative bacterial groups and methanogenic archaea, but a consecutive increase of Gram positive microbial groups along with a rapid reduction of organics after aeration start. Those in situ aeration effects on microbial community composition and C conversion were stable throughout the laboratory set-up of 32 weeks.

  2. Effect of gradual-increasing aeration mode in an aerobic tank on nutrients' removal and functional microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang-Guo; Guo, Xiaoma; She, Zonglian; Gao, Mengchun; Guo, Liang

    2016-12-30

    Different aeration rates and modes in an aerobic tank of an anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic (A(2)O) process were investigated to reveal their influence on nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency. Meanwhile, Illumina high-throughput sequencing of partial 16S rRNA gene of bacteria was conducted to monitor the abundance and composition of microbial communities. The results showed that higher aeration rate led to better nutrients' removal efficiency. The gradual-increasing aeration mode along the wastewater stream enhanced the contaminants' removal and the system achieved chemical oxygen demand, [Formula: see text]-N, total nitrogen (TN) removal rates of 72%, 96% and 51%, respectively. However, the gradual-decreasing or uniform aeration modes resulted in inefficient removal of TN, especially the ammonia due to low DO in the end parts of A(2)O. Microbial community analysis indicated that denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating bacteria Acinetobacter spp. were the most dominant groups under the gradual-increasing aeration mode in all tanks of the A(2)O bioreactor. Moreover, the members of genera Clostridium, Thauera and Dechloromonas also largely existed in the system. The gradual-increasing aeration mode and cooperation of different groups of bacteria made the system stable and high-performance.

  3. Microbiologically induced deterioration of concrete - A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shiping; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sanchez-Silva, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically induced deterioration (MID) causes corrosion of concrete by producing acids (including organic and inorganic acids) that degrade concrete components and thus compromise the integrity of sewer pipelines and other structures, creating significant problems worldwide. Understanding of the fundamental corrosion process and the causal agents will help us develop an appropriate strategy to minimize the costs in repairs. This review presents how microorganisms induce the deterioration of concrete, including the organisms involved and their colonization and succession on concrete, the microbial deterioration mechanism, the approaches of studying MID and safeguards against concrete biodeterioration. In addition, the uninvestigated research area of MID is also proposed. PMID:24688488

  4. Use of floating balls for reducing bacterial aerosol emissions from aeration in wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hsueh Fen; Kuo, Yu Mei; Chien, Chih Ching; Chen, Chih Chieh

    2010-03-15

    The microorganism emissions from aeration in the wastewater treatment process may adversely affect air quality and human health. To control the liquid-to-air transport of microorganisms, commercially available balls were used and their control efficiencies were evaluated by a lab-scale aeration system. Escherichia coli as the test agent were aerosolized by the aeration system and size-fractionated E. coli-containing aerosol samples were collected by using an Andersen six-stage impactor with eosin methylene blue agar for subsequent culturing and enumeration of colonies. Aerosol samples were obtained without any control measure and with balls of four diameters (1.9, 2.9, 3.4 and 4.8 cm) in one, three and five layers covering the bubbling liquid surface. Experimental results showed that the control efficiencies of balls on bacterial aerosols varied from over 50% to nearly 100% under various control settings and substantially increased as the ball size decreased and the number of applied layers increased.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of membrane filtration process adapted for water treatment of aerated sewage lagoons.

    PubMed

    Cano, Grégory; Mouahid, Adil; Carretier, Emilie; Guasp, Pascal; Dhaler, Didier; Castelas, Bernard; Moulin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to apply the membrane bioreactor technology in an oxidation ditch in submerged conditions. This new wastewater filtration process will benefit rural areas (<5,000 population equivalent) subject to chronic water shortages by reusing this water for irrigation of green areas. For this purpose, the membranes developed without support are immersed in an aeration well and work in suction mode. The development of the membrane without support and more precisely the performance of spacers are approached by computational fluid dynamics in order to provide the best compromise between pressure drop/flow velocity and permeate flux. The numerical results on the layout and the membrane modules' geometry in the aeration well indicate that the optimal configuration is to install the membranes horizontally on three levels. Membranes should be connected to each other to a manifold providing a total membrane area of 18 m². Loss rate compared to the theoretical throughput is relatively low (less than 3%). Preliminary data obtained by modeling the lagoon provide access to its hydrodynamics, revealing that recirculation zones can be optimized by making changes in the operating conditions. The experimental validation of these results and taking into account the aeration in the numerical models are underway.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Flows in an Oxidation Ditch Driven by a New Surface Aerator.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weidong; Li, Kun; Wang, Gan; Wang, Yingzhe

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we present a newly designed inverse umbrella surface aerator, and tested its performance in driving flow of an oxidation ditch. Results show that it has a better performance in driving the oxidation ditch than the original one with higher average velocity and more uniform flow field. We also present a computational fluid dynamics model for predicting the flow field in an oxidation ditch driven by a surface aerator. The improved momentum source term approach to simulate the flow field of the oxidation ditch driven by an inverse umbrella surface aerator was developed and validated through experiments. Four kinds of turbulent models were investigated with the approach, including the standard k-ɛ model, RNG k-ɛ model, realizable k-ɛ model, and Reynolds stress model, and the predicted data were compared with those calculated with the multiple rotating reference frame approach (MRF) and sliding mesh approach (SM). Results of the momentum source term approach are in good agreement with the experimental data, and its prediction accuracy is better than MRF, close to SM. It is also found that the momentum source term approach has lower computational expenses, is simpler to preprocess, and is easier to use.

  7. Relationship between respiratory quotient, nitrification, and nitrous oxide emissions in a forced aerated composting process

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutsui, Hirofumi; Fujiwara, Taku; Inoue, Daisuke; Ito, Ryusei; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • RQ can be an indicator of N{sub 2}O emission in forced aerated composting process. • Emission of N{sub 2}O with nitrification was observed with RQ decrease. • Mass balances demonstrated the RQ decrease was caused by nitrification. • Conversion ratio of oxidized ammonia and total N to N{sub 2}O were ∼2.7%. - Abstract: We assessed the relationship between respiratory quotient (RQ) and nitrification and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emission in forced aerated composting using lab-scale reactors. Relatively high RQ values from degradation of readily degradable organics initially occurred. RQ then stabilized at slightly lower values, then decreased. Continuous emission of N{sub 2}O was observed during the RQ decrease. Correlation between nitrification and N{sub 2}O emission shows that the latter was triggered by nitrification. Mass balances demonstrated that the O{sub 2} consumption of nitrification (∼24.8 mmol) was slightly higher than that of CO{sub 2} emission (∼20.0 mmol), indicating that the RQ decrease was caused by the occurrence of nitrification. Results indicate that RQ is a useful index, which not only reflects the bioavailability of organics but also predicts the occurrence of nitrification and N{sub 2}O emission in forced aerated composting.

  8. Application of Oxygen-Enriched Aeration in the Production of Bacitracin by Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Flickinger, M. C.; Perlman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The physiological effects of controlling the dissolved oxygen tension at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.05 atm by the use of oxygen-enriched aeration were investigated during growth and bacitracin production by Bacillus licheniformis ATCC 10716. Up to a 2.35-fold increase in the final antibiotic yield and a 4-fold increase in the rate of bacitracin synthesis were observed in response to O2-enriched aeration. The increase in antibiotic production was accompanied by increased respiratory activity and an increase in the specific productivity of the culture from 1.3 to 3.6 g of antibiotic per g of cell mass produced. Oxygen enrichment of the aeration decreased medium carbohydrate uptake and the maximum specific growth rate of B. licheniformis from 0.6 h−1 to as low as 0.15 h−1, depending upon the level of enrichment and the conditions of oxygen transfer rate (impeller speed). The response of this culture to O2 enrichment suggests that this method of controlling the dissolved oxygen tension for antibiotic-producing cultures may simulate conditions that would occur if the carbon source were fed slowly, as is often employed to optimize antibiotic production. Analysis of the biologically active bacitracins produced by B. licheniformis ATCC 10716 suggested that the ratio of biologically active peptides was not changed by O2 enrichment, nor were any new biologically active compounds formed. Images PMID:34361

  9. Screening-level risk assessment of Coxiella burnetii (Q fever) transmission via aeration of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Sales-Ortells, Helena; Medema, Gertjan

    2012-04-03

    A screening-level risk assessment of Q fever transmission through drinking water produced from groundwater in the vicinity of infected goat barnyards that employed aeration of the water was performed. Quantitative data from scientific literature were collected and a Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment approach was followed. An exposure model was developed to calculate the dose to which consumers of aerated groundwater are exposed through aerosols inhalation during showering. The exposure assessment and hazard characterization were integrated in a screening-level risk characterization using a dose-response model for inhalation to determine the risk of Q fever through tap water. A nominal range sensitivity analysis was performed. The estimated risk of disease was lower than 10(-4) per person per year (pppy), hence the risk of transmission of C. burnetii through inhalation of drinking water aerosols is very low. The sensitivity analysis shows that the most uncertain parameters are the aeration process, the transport of C. burnetii in bioaerosols via the air, the aerosolization of C. burnetii in the shower, and the air filtration efficiency. The risk was compared to direct airborne exposure of persons in the vicinity of infected goat farms; the relative risk of exposure through inhalation of drinking water aerosols was 0.002%.

  10. Thermophilic aeration of cattle slurry with whey and/or jam wastes.

    PubMed

    Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi; Kiuru, Tapio; Ruuskanen, Juhani; Korhonen, Kari; Koivunen, Jari; Ruokojärvi, Arja

    2005-01-01

    Thermophilic aeration of cattle slurry and food industrial by-products was studied with the aim to improve hygienic qualities of the slurry so that it could be used as a safe fertiliser for berries to be eaten raw. We also wanted to study if the process would be energetically favourable in an arctic climate. Cattle slurry alone or with whey and/or jam waste was treated. The tests were done in a well heat-insulated reactor with a 10 m(3) volume. Temperature increases up to over 70 degrees C could be recorded in 19 days even though some processes were carried out in winter time when the ambient air temperature was less than 0 degrees C. The heat energy formed was higher than the electrical energy needed to carry out the aeration. The hygienic qualities of the aerated product were good with only minor nitrogen losses. The end product could be useful as a fertiliser and soil improving compound to increase the organic matter content of agricultural soil. Cattle slurry alone was well suited as the raw material if attaining a high temperature was the main goal. A part of slurry could be replaced with food-industrial side products. Whey waste suited better for co-composting than jam waste but the mixture of whey, jam waste, and slurry was optimal for composting.

  11. Improving industrial full-scale production of baker's yeast by optimizing aeration control.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Carlos A; Rayo, Julia; Giralda, José M

    2008-01-01

    This work analyzes the control of optimum dissolved oxygen of an industrial fed-batch procedure in which baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is grown under aerobic conditions. Sugar oxidative metabolism was controlled by monitoring aeration, molasses flows, and yeast concentration in the propagator along the later stage of the propagation, and keeping pH and temperature under controlled conditions. A large number of fed-batch growth experiments were performed in the tank for a period of 16 h, for each of the 3 manufactured commercial products. For optimization and control of cultivations, the growth and metabolite formation were quantified through measurement of specific growth and ethanol concentration. Data were adjusted to a model of multiple lineal regression, and correlations representing dissolved oxygen as a function of aeration, molasses, yeast concentration in the broth, temperature, and pH were obtained. The actual influence of each variable was consistent with the mathematical model, further justified by significant levels of each variable, and optimum aeration profile during the yeast propagation.

  12. Multiple electron transfer systems in oxygen reducing biocathodes revealed by different conditions of aeration/agitation.

    PubMed

    Rimboud, Mickaël; Bergel, Alain; Erable, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen reducing biocathodes were formed at -0.2V/SCE (+0.04V/SHE) from compost leachate. Depending on whether aeration was implemented or not, two different redox systems responsible for the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction were evidenced. System I was observed at low potential (-0.03V/SHE) on cyclic voltammetries (CVs). It appeared during the early formation of the biocathode (few hours) and resisted the hydrodynamic conditions induced by the aeration. System II was observed at higher potential on CV (+0.46V/SHE); it required a longer lag time (up to 10days) and quiescent conditions to produce an electrochemical signal. The hydrodynamic effects produced by the forced aeration led to its extinction. From their different behaviors and examples in the literature, system I was identified as being a membrane-bound cytochrome-related molecule, while system II was identified as a soluble redox mediator excreted by the biofilm. This study highlighted the importance of controlling the local hydrodynamics to design efficient oxygen reducing biocathodes able to operate at high potential.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation in process reactors during aeration tank settling.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M D; Ingildsen, P; Rasmussen, M R; Laursen, J

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. This paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet and outlet causing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in the process tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plant during aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been suggested and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics modelling. The most promising design changes have been found and reported.

  14. Estimation of Concrete's Porosity by Ultrasounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benouis, A.; Grini, A.

    Durability of concrete depends strongly on porosity; this conditions the intensity of the interactions of the concrete with the aggressive agents. The pores inside the concrete facilitate the process of damage, which is generally initiated on the surface. The most used measurement is undoubtedly the measurement of porosity accessible to water. The porosimetry by intrusion with mercury constitutes a tool for investigation of the mesoporosity. The relationship between concrete mixtures, porosity and ultrasonic velocity of concrete samples measured by ultrasonic NDT is investigated. This experimental study is interested in the relations between the ultrasonic velocity measured by transducers of 7.5 mm and 49.5 mm diameter and with 54 kHz frequency. Concrete specimens (160 mm diameter and 320 mm height) are fabricated with concrete of seven different mixtures (various W/C and S/S + G ratios), which gave porosities varying between 7% and 16%. Ultrasonic velocities in concrete were measured in longitudinal direction. Finally the results showed the influence of ratio W/C, where the porosity of the concretes of a ratio W/C _0,5 have correctly estimated by ultrasonic velocity. The integration of the concretes of a lower ratio, in this relation, caused a great dispersion. Porosity estimation of concretes with a ratio W/C lower than 0,5 became specific to each ratio.

  15. Diffusion of Radionuclides in Concrete and Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2012-04-25

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The objective of our study was to measure the diffusivity of Re, Tc and I in concrete containment and the surrounding vadose zone soil. Effects of carbonation, presence of metallic iron, and fracturing of concrete and the varying moisture contents in soil on the diffusivities of Tc and I were evaluated.

  16. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.

  17. The use of the chrysotile cement waste as the secondary aggregate for the concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, V.; Pligina, A.; Rozovskaya, T.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research on the effective concrete with secondary chrysotile cement aggregate. One of the important problems of modern science of construction materials is the use of secondary resources for the production of construction materials, and a considerable part of them are the chrysotile cement waste and scrapped chrysotile cement products. The aim of presented research is the development of effective concrete for the production of foundation wall blocks with the use of crushed chrysotile cement products as a secondary aggregate. The main characteristics of the secondary chrysotile cement aggregate have been determined. The concrete with different compositions and with different content of secondary chrysotile cement rubble has been studied. The dependences of the strength and the specific strength of concrete with a constant W/C ratio and constant binder consumption on the consumption of the secondary aggregate have been obtained. It is stated that the introduction of secondary chrysotile cement aggregate does not significantly effect the water resistance and frost resistance of the concrete. It is shown that the variation of the fractions of secondary aggregates and the binder makes it possible to obtain the effective concrete with a wide range of strength values.

  18. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  19. New NDE technologies for evaluating reinforced concrete masonry

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A.M.; Haskins, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    Researchers at the Waterways' Experiment Station (WES) have demonstrated that two new nondestructive evaluation technologies show promise in making a more accurate diagnosis of the structural condition of concrete masonry walls than prior technologies. Traditionally, sounding with a hammer has been used to determine the presence and quality of the grout fill around the reinforcing bars in concrete masonry units (CMU's). First, WES has developed a new grout detection system, which senses the reverberating energy in the CMU's with a microphone. This energy is introduced into the CMU by using a pistol to fire a metal BB against the face of the block. A microphone and spectrum analyzer replaces the function of the human ear to distinguish different pitches of sound through sounding. Since a technician is more likely to get consistent results with the new system, it is not as subjective as sounding. Next, WES has evaluated the new digital steel detectors. A reinforced concrete masonry structure can contain many combinations of steel: vertical bars, horizontal bars, size of bar, number of bars, splices, etc. Digital steel detectors with microprocessors have the potential to provide much more information than traditional analog types.

  20. Root aeration improves growth and nitrogen accumulation in rice seedlings under low nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingwen; Liang, Jing; Xu, Zhihui; Fan, Xiaorong; Zhou, Quansuo; Shen, Qirong; Xu, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In wetland soils, changes in oxygen (O2) level in the rhizosphere are believed to influence the behaviour of nutrients and their usage by plants. However, the effect of aeration on nitrogen (N) acquisition under different N supply conditions remains largely unknown. In this study, the rice cultivars Yangdao 6 (YD6, with higher root aerenchyma abundance) and Nongken 57 (NK57, with lower root aerenchyma abundance) were used to evaluate the effects of aeration on rice growth and N accumulation. Our results showed that the number of adventitious roots and the root surface area increased significantly, and ethylene production and aerenchyma formation decreased in both cultivars after external aeration (EA). Five N treatments, including no N (−N), 0.125 mM NH4NO3 (LN), 1.25 mM Ca(NO3)2 (NO3-N), 1.25 mM (NH4)2SO4 (NH4-N) and 1.25 mM NH4NO3 (N/N), were applied to YD6 and NK57 for 2 days under internal aeration or EA conditions. External aeration increased the root biomass in both cultivars and the shoot biomass in NK57 by 18–50 %. The total N concentrations in roots of YD6 grown under −N and LN and of NK57 grown under NO3-N were increased by EA. Expression of OsPAD4, one of four putative genes regulating aerenchyma formation, showed a similar pattern alongside changes in the ethylene level in the EA-treated rice irrespective of the N treatments. Furthermore, expression of the high-affinity nitrate transporter gene OsNRT2.1 was increased by EA under −N, LN and NO3-N conditions. Our data provide evidence of an interaction between O2 and the supply of N in ethylene production, aerenchyma formation and N nutrition through modification of the expression of OsPAD4 and OsNRT2.1. PMID:26578743

  1. Multiphasic finite element modeling of concrete hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Buffo-Lacarriere, L.; Sellier, A. . E-mail: alain.sellier@insa-toulouse.fr; Escadeillas, G.; Turatsinze, A.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents a model predicting the development of hydration and its consequences on temperature and water content. As it considers the effects of climatic conditions, the proposed model is a promising tool to evaluate the temperature, hydric and hydration fields of structures in situ. The hydration model predicts the hydration evolution of several main species (not only clinker but also mineral additions like fly ash or silica fume for instance). For each component, the modeling considers hydration development and chemical interaction between reactions. It also takes into account temperature and water content effects on reaction kinetics through thermal and hydric activation. Hydration development in turn modifies the thermal and hydric states of material. The result is a numerical model coupling hydration, and the thermal and hydric states of cement-based material. The model was tested on a 27 m{sup 3} concrete block in situ equipped with temperature sensors situated in the core and close to the face exposed to solar radiation.

  2. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  3. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  4. Laser ablation studies of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Savina, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, Y.; Reed, C.; Pellin, M.

    1999-10-20

    Laser ablation was studied as a means of removing radioactive contaminants from the surface and near-surface regions of concrete. The authors present the results of ablation tests on cement and concrete samples using a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fiber optic beam delivery. The laser-surface interaction was studied using cement and high density concrete as targets. Ablation efficiency and material removal rates were determined as functions of irradiance and pulse overlap. Doped samples were also ablated to determine the efficiency with which surface contaminants were removed and captured in the effluent. The results show that the cement phase of the material melts and vaporizes, but the aggregate portion (sand and rock) fragments. The effluent consists of both micron-size aerosol particles and chunks of fragmented aggregate material. Laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the surface during ablation. Analysis of the effluent showed that contaminants such as cesium and strontium were strongly segregated into different regions of the particle size distribution of the aerosol.

  5. Coupling of bio-PRB and enclosed in-well aeration system for remediation of nitrobenzene and aniline in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Ding, Feng; Wang, Liu; Liu, Peng; Yu, Xiaolong; Ye, Kang

    2016-05-01

    A laboratory-scale bio-permeable reactive barrier (bio-PRB) was constructed and combined with enclosed in-well aeration system to treat nitrobenzene (NB) and aniline (AN) in groundwater. Batch-style experiments were first conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of NB and AN degradation, using suspension (free cells) of degrading consortium and immobilized consortium by a mixture of perlite and peat. The NB and AN were completely degraded in <3 days using immobilized consortium, while 3-5 days were required using free cells. The O2 supply efficiency of an enclosed in-well aeration system was assessed in a box filled with perlite and peat. Dissolved O2 (DO) concentrations increased to 8-12 mg L(-1) in 12 h for sampling ports within 12 cm of the aeration well. A diffusion coefficient as 33.5 cm(2) s(-1) was obtained. The DO concentration was >4 mg L(-1) when the aeration system was applied into the bio-PRB system. The NB and AN were effectively removed when the aeration system was functional in the bio-PRB. The removal efficiency decreased when the aeration system malfunctioned for 20 days, thus indicating that DO was an important factor for the degradation of NB and AN. The regain of NB and AN removal after the malfunction indicates the robustness of degradation consortium. No original organics and new formed by-products were observed in the effluent. The results indicate that NB and AN in groundwater can be completely mineralized in a bio-PRB equipped with enclosed in-well aeration system and filled with perlite and peat attached with degrading consortium.

  6. Does Concrete Self-Decontaminate VX

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    DOES CONCRETE SELF-DECONTAMINATE VX? George W. Wagner, Richard J. O’Connor, and Lawrence R. Procell U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical ...this method avoids the problem of tenuous extraction procedures. In a recently published paper, Groenewold et al.2 examined the fate of dilute VX...concrete employed by Groenewold et al.,2 the current study examines VX droplets on the order of several µL to determine the behavior of VX on concrete in

  7. Phase 2 microwave concrete decontamination results

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.; Foster, D. Jr.; Wilson, C.T.; Schaich, C.R.

    1995-04-01

    The authors report on the results of the second phase of a four-phase program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop a system to decontaminate concrete using microwave energy. The microwave energy is directed at the concrete surface through the use of an optimized wave guide antenna, or applicator, and this energy rapidly heats the free water present in the interstitial spaces of the concrete matrix. The resulting steam pressure causes the surface to burst in much the same way popcorn pops in a home microwave oven. Each steam explosion removes several square centimeters of concrete surface that are collected by a highly integrated wave guide and vacuum system. The authors call this process the microwave concrete decontamination, or MCD, process. In the first phase of the program the principle of microwaves concrete removal concrete surfaces was demonstrated. In these experiments, concrete slabs were placed on a translator and moved beneath a stationary microwave system. The second phase demonstrated the ability to mobilize the technology to remove the surfaces from concrete floors. Area and volume concrete removal rates of 10.4 cm{sup 2}/s and 4.9 cm{sup 3}/S, respectively, at 18 GHz were demonstrated. These rates are more than double those obtained in Phase 1 of the program. Deeper contamination can be removed by using a longer residence time under the applicator to create multiple explosions in the same area or by taking multiple passes over previously removed areas. Both techniques have been successfully demonstrated. Small test sections of painted and oil-soaked concrete have also been removed in a single pass. Concrete with embedded metal anchors on the surface has also been removed, although with some increased variability of removal depth. Microwave leakage should not pose any operational hazard to personnel, since the observed leakage was much less than the regulatory standard.

  8. Radiation shielding concrete made of Basalt aggregates.

    PubMed

    Alhajali, S; Yousef, S; Kanbour, M; Naoum, B

    2013-04-01

    In spite of the fact that Basalt is a widespread type of rock, there is very little available information on using it as aggregates for concrete radiation shielding. This paper investigates the possibility of using Basalt for the aforementioned purpose. The results have shown that Basalt could be used successfully for preparing radiation shielding concrete, but some attention should be paid to the choice of the suitable types of Basalt and for the neutron activation problem that could arise in the concrete shield.

  9. Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    ER D C/ G SL T R- 07 -2 3 Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete Erin M. Williams, Stephen A. Akers, and Paul A. Reed...07-23 August 2007 Laboratory Characterization of Gray Masonry Concrete Erin M. Williams, Stephen A. Akers, and Paul A. Reed Geotechnical and...constitutive property behavior of a gray masonry concrete . A total of 38 mechanical property tests were successfully completed: two hydrostatic

  10. Polypropylene Fibers in Portland Cement Concrete Pavements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Bibliography on Fiber- Reinforced Cement and Concrete," Miscellaneous Paper C-76-6, with supplements 1, 2, 3, and 4 ( 1977 , 1979, 1980, and 1982), US Army... Mindess , S., Bentur, A., Yan, C., and Vondran, G., "Impact Resistance of Concrete Containing Both Conventional Steel Reinforcement and Fibrillated...Roads, Streets, Walks, and Open Storage Areas," TM 5-822-6/AFM 88-7, Chap. 7, Washington, DC, 1977 . 18. __ , "Concrete Floor Slabs on Grade Subjected

  11. Toward an understanding of the effects of agitation and aeration on growth and laccases production by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Gómez-Cruz, Cristina; Galindo, Enrique; Serrano-Carreón, Leobardo

    2014-05-10

    Mycelial growth and laccase production by Pleurotus ostreatus CP50 cultured in a 10-L mechanically agitated bioreactor were assessed through a 2(3) factorial experimental design. The main effects and interactions of three factors (agitation, aeration and copper induction) over five responses (μ, αLacc, βLacc, maximal volumetric laccase activity and maximal biomass concentration) were analyzed. P. ostreatus growth was significantly improved when culturing was conducted with high agitation (5.9kW/m(3)s) and aeration flow (0.5vvm) rates. Under the experimental conditions evaluated, no evidence of hydrodynamic stress affecting fungal growth was observed. However, the high agitation and aeration conditions were detrimental for the growth-associated laccase production constant (αLacc), leading to a very complex optimization of the process. The maximal laccase volumetric activity (1.2 and 3.8U/ml for non-induced and copper-induced cultures, respectively) was observed when the culturing was performed at a low agitation rate (0.9kW/m(3)s) and a high aeration flow rate (0.5vvm). Laccase proteolysis may explain the complex interactions observed between agitation and aeration and the effects of these factors on the laccase volumetric activity observed in the cultures.

  12. Impact of aeration disturbances on endogenous phosphorus fractions and their algae growth potential from malodorous river sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin; He, Yan; Wang, Jianhua; Qiao, Zhaochao; Wang, Yi; Li, Zhihong; Huang, Minsheng

    2017-03-01

    The present work assessed the impact of aeration disturbances on sediment-bound phosphorus fractions and their algae growth potential from a typical malodorous river. Phosphorus was sequentially extracted by a modified version of Hedley fractionation method. It was found that the mean contents of TP was 1476.1 ± 60.3 mg/kg, consisting mainly of dilute HCl-extractable P (52.6%) and NaOH-P (19.2%). The algae growth potential tests demonstrated that algae growth had varied P-level requirements for different P speciation and NaOH-P promoted algae growth remarkably and its promoting effect was positively related to its concentration. Additionally, intermittent overlying water aeration modes were recommended, and run 1 (7.0 mg/L, 12 h) was deemed as the optimized aerated mode in terms of its relatively low ecological risk and high P retention. It was noted that NaOH-P was most affected by aeration disturbance and exhibited marked increase with the elevated dissolved oxygen (DO) level whether for intermittent overlying water or sediment aeration. This research helps to gain improved understanding of the ecological risk on sediment P, and NaOH-P is recognized as one ecologically important P fraction in the sediments considering its relatively high proportion and bioavailability.

  13. A novel methodology to quantify nitrous oxide emissions from full-scale wastewater treatment systems with surface aerators.

    PubMed

    Ye, Liu; Ni, Bing-Jie; Law, Yingyu; Byers, Craig; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from open-surface wastewater treatment systems with surface aerators is difficult as emissions from the surface aerator zone cannot be easily captured by floating hoods. In this study, we propose and demonstrate a novel methodology to estimate N2O emissions from such systems through determination of the N2O transfer coefficient (kLa) induced by surface aerators based on oxygen balance for the entire system. The methodology is demonstrated through its application to a full-scale open oxidation ditch wastewater treatment plant with surface aerators. The estimated kLa profile based on a month-long measurement campaign for oxygen balance, intensive monitoring of dissolved N2O profiles along the oxidation ditch over a period of four days, together with mathematical modelling, enabled to determine the N2O emission factor from this treatment plant (0.52 ± 0.16%). Majority of the N2O emission was found to occur in the surface aerator zone, which would be missed if the gas hood method was applied alone.

  14. The effect of aeration and recirculation on a sand-based hybrid constructed wetland treating low-strength domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zapater-Pereyra, M; Kyomukama, E; Namakula, V; van Bruggen, J J A; Lens, P N L

    2016-08-01

    The Duplex-constructed wetland (CW) is a hybrid system composed of a vertical flow (VF) CW on top of a horizontal flow filter (HFF). Each compartment is designed to play a different role: aerobic treatment in the VF CW due to intermittent feeding and anoxic treatment in the HFF due to saturated conditions. Three Duplex-CWs were used in this study: Control, Aerated and Recirculating. The role of each compartment was tested for pollutant removal and micro-invertebrate abundance. In all systems, the VF CW removed mainly organic matter, solids and NH4(+)-N. Pathogens were removed in both compartments. Likewise, total nitrogen removal occurred in both compartments, only the Recirculating HFF was not able to denitrify the nitrogen due to the slightly more oxic conditions as compared to the other systems. All systems met discharge guidelines for organic matter, but only the Control and Aerated systems met those for total nitrogen. At the applied loading rates, the pollutant removal was not significantly enhanced by the use of aeration and recirculation. Therefore, operation as in the Control system, without aeration or recirculation, is recommended for the tested Duplex-CWs. If artificial aeration will be used in CWs, the support material should be carefully selected to allow a proper air distribution.

  15. Internal aeration of paddy field rice (Oryza sativa) during complete submergence---importance of light and floodwater O2.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Anders; Colmer, Timothy D; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Pedersen, Ole

    2013-03-01

    Flash floods can submerge paddy field rice (Oryza sativa), with adverse effects on internal aeration, sugar status and survival. Here, we investigated the in situ aeration of roots of rice during complete submergence, and elucidated how underwater photosynthesis and floodwater pO(2) influence root aeration in anoxic soil. In the field, root pO(2) was measured using microelectrodes during 2 d of complete submergence. Leaf gas films that formed on the superhydrophobic leaves were left intact, or experimentally removed, to elucidate their effect on internal aeration. In darkness, root pO(2) declined to very low concentrations (0.24 kPa) and was strongly correlated with floodwater pO(2). In light, root pO(2) was high (14 kPa) and primarily a function of the incident light determining the rates of underwater net photosynthesis. Plants with intact leaf gas films maintained higher underwater net photosynthesis relative to plants without gas films when the submerged shoots were in light. During complete submergence, internal aeration of rice in the field relies on underwater photosynthesis during the day and entry of O(2) from the floodwater during the night. Leaf gas films enhance photosynthesis during submergence leading to improved O(2) production and sugar status, and therefore contribute to the submergence tolerance of rice.

  16. Nitrogen and carbon removal from synthetic wastewater in a vertical structured-bed reactor under intermittent aeration.

    PubMed

    Moura, Rafael B; Damianovic, Márcia H R Z; Foresti, Eugenio

    2012-05-15

    The removal of nitrogen and organic matter using a single reactor has been a common focus of investigation, and reactors operated in batch mode and under intermittent aeration have attracted special attention. This study aimed to evaluate the application of a new reactor configuration consisting of a fixed-bed reactor that was operated under conditions of continuous feeding and intermittent aeration. The reactor was built using acrylic, with a working volume of 6.1L. The fixed bed used for biomass support was composed of polyurethane foam cylinders vertically oriented inside the reaction zone. The reactor was operated under intermittent aeration (2h aerated and 1h non-aerated) and a recirculation ratio Q(r)/Q=5. Three different operating conditions (Phase I, Phase II, and Phase III) corresponding to hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 12h, 8h, and 10h, respectively, were tested. In Phase I, the system achieved total nitrogen (TN) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of 82% and 89%, respectively. At HRTs of 8 h and 10 h, the reactor was unstable with respect to TN removal, and the average resultant removal efficiencies were 49% and 45%, respectively. However, COD removal efficiencies remained high with mean values of 85% and 88% for Phases II and III, respectively. Based on these results, it can be concluded that this new reactor configuration constitutes an alternative method for effective removal of organic matter and nitrogen from wastewater.

  17. Effects of Aeration of Sawdust Cultivation Bags on Hyphal Growth of Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa-Yong; Ham, Eun-Ju; Yoo, Young-Jin; Kim, Eui-Sung; Shim, Kyu-Kwang; Kim, Myung-Kon; Koo, Chang-Duck

    2012-09-01

    The effects of aeration through lid filters on the hyphal growth of Lentinula edodes (oak mushroom) in sawdust cultivation bags were investigated. The aeration treatment levels were traditional 27 mm hole cotton plugs, cotton balls and combinations of seven hole sizes × two hole positions (up and under) in the lids covering plastic bags containing 1.4 kg sawdust medium at 63% moisture that had been autoclaved for one hour and inoculated with sawdust spawn of L. edodes strain 921. Aeration treatment effects were measured based on the CO(2) concentration at the 15th wk, as well as the hyphal growth rate and degree of weight loss of bags every 14 days for 15 wk. In bags with traditional cotton plugs, the CO(2) concentration was 3.8 ± 1.3%, daily mean hyphal growth was 2.3 ± 0.6 mm and daily mean weight loss was 0.84 ± 0.26 g. In the bags with 15 mm diameter holes, the CO(2) concentration was 6.0 ± 1.6%, daily hyphal growth was 2.8 ± 0.2 mm and daily weight loss was 0.86 ± 0.4 g. The bags with 15 mm holes had a higher CO(2) concentration and lower water loss than bags with other hole sizes, but the hyphal growth was not significantly different from that of other bags. The weight loss of bags increased proportionally relative to the lid hole sizes. Taken together, these results indicate that traditional cotton plugs are economically efficient, but 15 mm hole lids are the most efficient at maintaining hyphal growth and controlling water loss while allowing CO(2) emissions.

  18. Membrane-aerated biofilm reactor for the treatment of acetonitrile wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Tinggang; Liu, Junxin; Bai, Renbi; Wong, F S

    2008-03-15

    A membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR) was studied for the treatment of wastewater containing acetonitrile, a typical organonitrile compound. The MABR used hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes as the diffusers for bubbleless aeration as well as the carriers for biofilm growth. The objectives were to prevent the stripping-loss of acetonitrile during aeration and to achieve acetonitrile biodegradation plus nitrogen removal simultaneously in a single biolfilm on the membranes. In the MABR, oxygen and substrates were supplied to the biofilm from opposite sides, in contrast to those from the same side in conventional biofilm bioreactors. Operational factors, including surface loading rate and upflow fluid velocity in the bioreactor, on the effect of acetonitrile biodegradation performance were examined. The profiles of dissolved oxygen concentration and microbial activities and populations in the biofilm were investigated. Experimental results showed that, with the adapted microorganisms, removal of acetonitrile at approximately 98.6 and 83.3%, in terms of total organic carbon and total nitrogen, were achieved at a surface loading rate (in terms of membrane surface) of up to 11.29 g acetonitrile/ m2 x d with an upflow fluid velocity of 12 cm/s and a hydraulic retention time of 30 h. The biofilm on the membranes developed an average thickness of about 1.6 mm in the steady state and consisted of oxic/anoxic/anaerobic zones that provided different functions for acetonitrile degradation, nitrification, and denitrification. The acetonitrile-degrading bacteria in the MABR appeared to secrete more extracellular polymeric substances that enhanced the attachment and development of the biofilm on the membranes. The study demonstrated the potential of using the MABR for the treatment of organonitrile wastewater.

  19. Vinyl acetate degradation by Brevibacillus agri isolated from a slightly aerated methanogenic reactor.

    PubMed

    Lara-Mayorga, I; Durán-Hinojosa, U; Arana-Cuenca, A; Monroy-Hermosillo, O; Ramírez-Vives, F

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, the authors showed that a slight aeration of a methanogenic reactor treating wastewater from the manufacture of polymeric resins could improve its performance, by increasing or allowing the removal of some of its contaminants, including vinyl acetate (VA). This paper reports the isolation under aerobic conditions of a VA-biodegrading axenic culture (strain C1) retrieved from the sludge of a slightly aerated methanogenic reactor at 1 mg L(-1) d(-1) of dissolved oxygen (DO). The axenic culture obtained was phenotypically (morphology, biochemical properties, VA consumption kinetics) and phylogenetically characterized. It formed white colonies with a branched and flat morphology on solid medium. The cell morphology of the isolate was bacillus with round endings and flagellate. The cells could form chains and were stained Gram-negative. The isolate required simple nutritional elements and had a growth rate of 0.024 h(-1). The phylogenetical analysis showed that the aerobic bacterium was identified as Brevibacillus agri, with 99.3% similarity. The VA consumption kinetics in the methanogenic sludge were: volumetric consumption rate (rVA) of 1.74 +/- 0.2 mg L(-1) h(-1), maximum specific consumption rate (qVAmax) of 3.98 mg g(-1) volatile suspended solids (VSS) h(-1) and affinity constant (Ks) of 457.1 mg L(-1). The same parameters in the axenic culture were 1.69 +/- 0.04 mg L(-1) (h-1), 4.09 mg g(-1) dry weight h(-1) and 421.9 mg L(-1), respectively. These results show evidence that the aerobic isolated bacterium, identified as Brevibacillus agri, carried out the VA hydrolysis in the slightly aerated methanogenic sludge, which is the limiting step in the degradation of this compound.

  20. Influence of Aeration and of Pantothenate on Growth Yields of Zymomonas mobilis

    PubMed Central

    Belaïch, Jean-Pierre; Senez, Jacques C.

    1965-01-01

    Belaïch, Jean-Pierre (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille, France), and Jacques C. Senez. Influence of aeration and of pantothenate on growth yields of Zymomonas mobilis. J. Bacteriol. 89:1195–1200. 1965.—The growth yields and rates of Zymomonas mobilis were measured in aerobic and anaerobic cultures on glucose medium containing yeast extract, amino acids, or ammonium chloride as the nitrogen source. In the absence of yeast extract, pantothenate was required. The growth yield and rate of the cultures in synthetic (amino acids) or minimal (NH4Cl) medium supplemented with pantothenate corresponded only to about one-half the “normal” values obtained in the presence of yeast extract, suggesting a situation of energetically uncoupled growth. Attempts to restore normal growth by the addition of various compounds were unsuccessful. Aeration of the cultures resulted in a partial oxidation of ethyl alcohol to acetate, but did not modify the growth yield nor the division time. Both aerobic and anaerobic cells, however, contained cytochrome c and a cytochrome oxidase of the a2 type, which was completely inhibited by 10−4m cyanide. In anaerobically grown cells, an additional cytochrome of the b type was present. The absence of a Pasteur effect suggests that the transfer of electrons by the respiratory chain of Z. mobilis may not be coupled with oxidative phosphorylation. Aeration had no effect on the catalase content of the cells. As shown by C14-glucose incorporation, 2 to 3% of the glucose metabolized was assimilated by the cells in both synthetic and rich complex medium. No intracellular glycogen nor poly-β-hydroxybutyrate was accumulated when growth was limited by nitrogen or by phosphate in the presence of excess glucose. PMID:14292985

  1. Liquid and atmospheric ammonia concentrations from a dairy lagoon during an aeration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumburg, Brian; Neger, Manjit; Mount, George H.; Yonge, David; Filipy, Jenny; Swain, John; Kincaid, Ron; Johnson, Kristen

    Ammonia emissions from agriculture are an environmental and human health concern, and there is increasing pressure to reduce emissions. Animal agriculture is the largest global source of ammonia emissions and on a per cow basis dairy operations are the largest emitters. The storage and disposal of the dairy waste is one area where emissions can be reduced, aerobic biological treatment of wastewater being a common and effective way of reducing ammonia emissions. An aeration experiment in a dairy lagoon with two commercial aerators was performed for 1 month. Liquid concentrations of ammonia, total nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate were monitored before, during and after the experiment and atmospheric ammonia was measured downwind of the lagoon using a short-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument with 1 ppbv sensitivity. No changes in either liquid or atmospheric ammonia concentrations were detected throughout the experiment, and neither dissolved oxygen, nitrite nor nitrate could be detected in the lagoon at any time. The average ammonia concentration at 10 sampling sites in the lagoon at a depth of 0.15 m was 650 mg l -1 and at 0.90 m it was 700 mg l -1 NH 3-N. The average atmospheric ammonia concentration 50 m downwind was about 300 ppbv. The 0.90 m depth total nitrogen concentrations and total and volatile solids concentrations decreased during the experiment due to some mixing of the lagoon but the 0.15 m depth concentrations did not decrease indicating that the aerators were not strong enough to mix the sludge off the bottom into the whole water column.

  2. Economic analysis of recycling contaminated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen, A.; Ayers, K.W.; Boren, J.K.; Parker, F.L.

    1997-02-01

    Decontamination and Decommissioning activities in the DOE complex generate large volumes of radioactively contaminated and uncontaminated concrete. Currently, this concrete is usually decontaminated, the contaminated waste is disposed of in a LLW facility and the decontaminated concrete is placed in C&D landfills. A number of alternatives to this practice are available including recycling of the concrete. Cost estimates for six alternatives were developed using a spreadsheet model. The results of this analysis show that recycling alternatives are at least as economical as current practice.

  3. Experimental needs of high temperature concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, J.C.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The needs of experimental data on concrete structures under high temperature, ranging up to about 370/sup 0/C for operating reactor conditions and to about 900/sup 0/C and beyond for hypothetical accident conditions, are described. This information is required to supplement analytical methods which are being implemented into the finite element code TEMP-STRESS to treat reinforced concrete structures. Recommended research ranges from material properties of reinforced/prestressed concrete, direct testing of analytical models used in the computer codes, to investigations of certain aspects of concrete behavior, the phenomenology of which is not well understood. 10 refs.

  4. Seismic behavior of lightweight concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbat, B. G.; Daniel, J. I.; Weinmann, T. L.; Hanson, N. W.

    1982-09-01

    Sixteen full-scale, column-beam assemblies, which represented a portion of a frame subjected to simulated seismic loading, were tested. Controlled test parameters included concrete type, column size, amount of main column steel, size and spacing of column confining hoops, and magnitude of column axial load. The columns were subjected to constant axial load and slow moment reversals at increasing inelastic deformations. Test data showed that properly designed lightweight concrete columns maintained ductility and strength when subjected to large inelastic deformations from load reversals. Confinement requirements for normal weight concrete columns were shown to be applicable to lightweight concrete columns up to thirty percent of the design strength.

  5. Pentek concrete scabbling system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek concrete scabbling system consists of the MOOSE{reg_sign} scabbler, the SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-I and SQUIRREL{reg_sign}-III scabblers, and VAC-PAC. The scabblers are designed to scarify concrete floors and slabs using cross section, tungsten carbide tipped bits. The bits are designed to remove concrete in 3/8 inch increments. The bits are either 9-tooth or demolition type. The scabblers are used with a vacuum system designed to collect and filter the concrete dust and contamination that is removed from the surface. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

  6. Proceedings of the concrete decontamination workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Halter, J.M.; Sullivan, R.G.; Currier, A.J.

    1980-05-28

    Fourteen papers were presented. These papers describe concrete surface removal methods and equipment, as well as experiences in decontaminating and removing both power and experimental nuclear reactors.

  7. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... is less serious than Mobitz type II. The animation below shows how your heart's electrical system works. ... block. Click the "start" button to play the animation. Written and spoken explanations are provided with each ...

  8. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  9. What Causes Heart Block?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of congenital heart block occurs in babies whose mothers have autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. People who have these diseases make proteins called antibodies that attack and damage the body's tissues or ...

  10. Blocked tear duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby may have an eye infection called conjunctivitis . ... increase the chance of other infections, such as conjunctivitis. ... be prevented. Proper treatment of nasal infections and conjunctivitis may reduce the risk of having a blocked ...

  11. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  12. Mid-Career Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    Considers typical reactions of midcareer employees to blocked opportunity; reasons for correcting these attitudes; ways of motivating these employees; methods of rekindling midcareer employees' interest in their jobs; encouraging competition; job switching; self-development programs; and supervisory attitudes. (CT)

  13. Block copolymer battery separator

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  14. Predicting oxygen transfer of fine bubble diffused aeration systems--model issued from dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Gillot, S; Capela-Marsal, S; Roustan, M; Héduit, A

    2005-04-01

    The standard oxygenation performances of fine bubble diffused aeration systems in clean water, measured in 12 cylindrical tanks (water depth from 2.4 to 6.1m), were analysed using dimensional analysis. A relationship was established to estimate the scale-up factor for oxygen transfer, the transfer number (N(T)) The transfer number, which is written as a function of the oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a(20)), the gas superficial velocity (U(G)), the kinematic viscosity of water (nu) and the acceleration due to gravity (g), has the same physical meaning as the specific oxygen transfer efficiency. N(T) only depends on the geometry of the tank/aeration system [the total surface of the perforated membrane (S(p)), the surface of the tank (S) or its diameter (D), the total surface of the zones covered by the diffusers ("aerated area", S(a)) and the submergence of the diffusers (h)]. This analysis allowed to better describe the mass transfer in cylindrical tanks. Within the range of the parameters considered, the oxygen transfer coefficient (k(L)a(20)) is an increasing linear function of the air flow rate. For a given air flow rate and a given tank surface area, k(L)a(20) decreases with the water depth (submergence of the diffusers). For a given water depth, k(L)a(20) increases with the number of diffusers, and, for an equal number of diffusers, with the total area of the zones covered by the diffusers. The latter result evidences the superiority of the total floor coverage over an arrangement whereby the diffusers are placed on separate grids. The specific standard oxygen transfer efficiency is independent of the air flow rate and the water depth, the drop in the k(L)a(20) being offset by the increase of the saturation concentration. For a given tank area, the impact of the total surface of the perforated membrane (S(p)) and of the aerated area (S(a)) is the same as on the oxygen transfer coefficient.

  15. Fate of microconstituents in biosolids composted in an aerated silage bag.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Nuria; Andrade, Natasha A; Deng, Di; Torrents, Alba; Rice, Clifford P; McConnell, Laura L; Ramirez, Mark; Millner, Patricia D

    2014-01-01

    Although most composting studies report pathogen concentrations, little is known about the fate of Endocrine Disruptor Chemicals (EDCs) during composting. In this study, a positively aerated polyethylene bag composting system was filled with a mixture of woodchips and limed biosolids from a large Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) to study the removal efficiency of two different groups of EDCs. Two antibacterial compounds, Triclocarban (TCC) and Triclosan (TCS), and a TCS byproduct, Methyltriclosan (MeTCS), as well as seven congeners of flame retardants known as PBDEs (Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers) were studied during two phases of composting: 1) a thermophilic phase, in which positive mechanical aeration, pushing air into and through the materials matrix, was conducted for 2 months; and 2) a curing and stabilization phase in which no mechanical aeration was provided and the bag was opened to ambient passive aeration to simulate storage conditions for seven months. Our results showed that while TCC concentrations remained constant, TCS degradation took place during both phases. The degradation of TCS was corroborated by the formation of MeTCS in both phases. The TCS concentrations decreased from 18409 ± 1,877 to 11955 ± 288 ng g(-1) dry wt. during the thermophilic phase and declined from 11,955 ± 288 to 7,244 ± 909. ng g(-1) dry wt. by the end of the curing phase. Thus, slightly greater TCS transformation occurred during the second than during the first (35.1 vs. 39.4%). MeTCS concentrations increased from 189.3 ± 8.6 to 364.6 ± 72.5 ng g(-1) dry wt. during the first phase and reached 589.0 ± 94.9 ng g(-1) dry wt. at the end of the second phase. PBDEs concentrations were below quantification limits for all but two of the congeners analyzed (BDE-47 and BDE-99). PBDE concentrations were measured at the end of the first phase only and were comparable to initial concentrations.

  16. View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and southwest guard tower, looking from cell block eight roof - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from cell block two into the "Death Row" exercise yard - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  19. A physical model for measuring thermally-induced block displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakun-Mazor, Dagan; Feldhiem, Aviran; Keissar, Yuval; Hatzor, Yossef H.

    2016-04-01

    A new model for thermally-induced block displacement in discontinuous rock slopes has been recently suggested. The model consists of a discrete block that is separated from the rock mass by a tension crack and rests on an inclined plane. The tension crack is filled with a wedge block or rock fragments. Irreversible block sliding is assumed to develop in response to climatic thermal fluctuations and consequent contraction and expansion of the sliding block material. While a tentative analytical solution for this model is already available, we are exploring here the possibility of obtaining such a permanent, thermally-induced, rock block displacement, under fully controlled conditions at the laboratory, and the sensitivity of the mechanism to geometry, mechanical properties, and temperature fluctuations. A large scale concrete physical model (50x150x60 cm^3) is being examined in a Climate-Controlled Room (CCR). The CCR permits accurate control of ambient temperature from 5 to 45 Celsius degrees. The permanent plastic displacement is being measured using four displacement transducers and a high resolution (29M pixel) visual range camera. A series of thermocouples measure the heating front inside the sliding block, hence thermal diffusivity is evaluated from the measured thermal gradient and heat flow. In order to select the appropriate concrete mixture, the mechanical and thermo-physical properties of concrete samples are determined in the lab. Friction angle and shear stiffness of the sliding interface are determined utilizing a hydraulic, servo-controlled direct shear apparatus. Uniaxial compression tests are performed to determine the uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus and Poison's ratio of the intact block material using a stiff triaxial load frame. Thermal conductivity and linear thermal expansion coefficient are determined experimentally using a self-constructed measuring system. Due to the fact that this experiment is still in progress, preliminary

  20. High temperature polymer concrete compositions

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Reams, Walter

    1985-01-01

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system. A preferred formulation emphasizing the major necessary components is as follows: ______________________________________ Component A: Silica sand 60-77 wt. % Silica flour 5-10 wt. % Portland cement 15-25 wt. % Acrylamide 1-5 wt. % Component B: Styrene 50-60 wt. % Trimethylolpropane 35-40 wt. % trimethacrylate ______________________________________ and necessary initiators, accelerators, and surfactants.

  1. Annotated Bibliography: Polymers in Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    example, the untreated cements let water through the 2 -ton pressure after 7 days aging, while cement containing 33 wt. percent resin No. 89 ( prepared ...100 parts were mixed with 300 parts local zone 2 concreting (14 0 mesh and 45 parts 40 percent II latex ( prepared by aq. emulsion poly - merization...condition for polymer-modified mortars using special super high early strength cement is the combined air and water cure such as 2 -day-20*C-moist, 5-day-20°C

  2. Spall Damage of Concrete Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    likely also strain-rate sensitive . Fiber-reinforced concrete has been extensively studied. Various types of fiber material, including nylon, glass, and...60/40) 0.95 AMATOL (50/50) 0.97 ANFO (9416 Am Nil Fuel oil) 0.82 1-100 Composition A-3 1.09 1.07 5-50 Composition B 1.11 0.98 5-50 Composition C-4 1.37...defines the boundary between threshold spall and medium spall and deflections less than 4.17 percent of the free span. The heavy damage curve defines

  3. Detection of active corrosion in reinforced and prestressed concrete: overview of NIST TIP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Nunez, M. A.; Nanni, A.; Matta, F.; Ziehl, P.

    2011-04-01

    The US transportation infrastructure has been receiving intensive public and private attention in recent years. The Federal Highway Administration estimates that 42 percent of the nearly 600,000 bridges in the Unites States are in need of structural or functional rehabilitation1. Corrosion of reinforcement steel is the main durability issue for reinforced and prestressed concrete structures, especially in coastal areas and in regions where de-icing salts are regularly used. Acoustic Emission (AE) has proved to be a promising method for detecting corrosion in steel reinforced and prestressed concrete members. This type of non-destructive test method primarily measures the magnitude of energy released within a material when physically strained. The expansive ferrous byproducts resulting from corrosion induce pressure at the steel-concrete interface, producing longitudinal and radial microcracks that can be detected by AE sensors. In the experimental study presented herein, concrete block specimens with embedded steel reinforcing bars and strands were tested under accelerated corrosion to relate the AE activity with the onset and propagation stages of corrosion. AE data along with half cell potential measurements and galvanic current were recorded to examine the deterioration process. Finally, the steel strands and bars were removed from the specimens, cleaned and weighed. The results were compared vis-à-vis Faraday's law to correlate AE measurements with degree of corrosion in each block.

  4. CONCRETE REFLECTED ARRAYS OF U(93.2) METAL

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie Gorham; John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Virginia Dean; Davis Reed

    2010-09-01

    During the period from 1963 – 1973, experiments involving highly enriched uranium units were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility to determine various critical configurations of three-dimensional arrays. The experiments formed a four-part series, and were reported by several different experimenters; the results of interest for this evaluation are those reported for the fourth experimentation, Critical Three-Dimensional Arrays of Neutron Interacting Units: Part IV, published and performed by D.W.Magnuson (Ref 1). Information is also available in the logbook . This set of experiments utilized subcritical metal units on a split table apparatus to determine critical configurations for 2×2×2 arrangements of highly enriched uranium reflected by concrete. Magnuson manipulated the configuration of several uranium cylinders and blocks within a concrete reflector. The different permutations utilized uranium cylinders of two different heights in various positions in the three dimensional array; certain cases also placed thin uranium blocks on top of the cylinders. The thickness of the surrounding concrete, as well as the inner dimensions of the concrete reflector was also varied in certain cases. The variations resulted in fourteen different experimental permutations or configurations. All fourteen configurations were judged to be unacceptable for use as criticality safety benchmarks. All experiments were initially evaluated; however only three configurations were evaluated in detail. Configurations 2, 4, 6 and 12 were not evaluated in detail because they are subcritical and configurations 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10 were also were not evaluated in detail because they were supercritical by more than beta effective (~0.007), or prompt critical. The experiments evaluated in detail for this benchmark were configurations 1, 3, and 11. The experimental report also contains the information for HEU-MET-FAST-056. Closely related work has been

  5. Study of chloride ion migration in reinforced concrete under cathodic protection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orlova, N.V.; Westall, J.C.; Rehani, M.; Koretsky, M.D.

    1999-09-01

    The migration of chloride ions in concrete with steel reinforcement was investigated. Mortar blocks (15 cm x 15 cm x 17 cm) of various composition (water to cement ratio, chloride ion content) were cast with an iron mesh cathode imbedded along one face and a thermally sprayed zinc anode applied to the opposite face. Current densities of 0.033 and 0.066 A (sq m) were applied to the blocks over a period of one year at constant temperature and humidity. The zinc face was covered with a pond of saturated calcium hydroxide to prevent polarization of the zinc-concrete interface. Over the course of polarization, potential vs. time curves were recorded and samples of mortar were extracted for determination of chloride concentration.

  6. Application of concrete in marine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, A.; Nygaard, C.

    1997-07-01

    The use of concrete in marine environment has gained tremendous popularity in the past decade and is continued to be a very popular material for marine industry in the world today. It has a very diversified use from large offshore platforms and floating structures in the North Sea, Canada and South America to offshore loading terminals and junction platforms in shallow waters in the marshes of southern Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico. Also, precast concrete sections are extensively used all over the world in the construction of marine structures. Because of their large variety of shapes and sizes, they can be tailored to fit multiple applications in marine environment. The added quality control in the fabrication yard and the ease of installation by lifting makes them a very attractive option. The use of precast concrete sections is gaining a lot of popularity in South America. A lot of fabrication yards are manufacturing these sections locally. There are hundreds of offshore concrete platforms utilizing these sections in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. The paper discusses the use of concrete for offshore structures including floaters. It describes some general concepts and advantages to be gained by the use of concrete (precast and cast-in-place) in marine environment. It also discusses some general design considerations required for the use of different types of precast concrete sections that can be utilized for oil and gas platforms and loading terminals. Lastly the paper describes some typical examples of concrete platforms built out of concrete piles, precast concrete girders and beam sections and concrete decking.

  7. 36. VAL, DETAIL OF TYPICAL INTERIOR OF CONCRETE 'A' FRAME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VAL, DETAIL OF TYPICAL INTERIOR OF CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING PAINTED CONCRETE WALLS, CONCRETE STAIRS AND INTERIOR WOOD DOOR. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. MODELNG RADON ENTRY INTO FLORIDA HOUSES WITH CONCRETE SLABS AND CONCRETE-BLOCK STEM WALLS, FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses results of modeling radon entry into a typical Florida house whose interior is slightly depressurized. he model predicts that the total radon entry rate is relatively low unless the soil or backfill permeability or radium content is high. ost of the factors c...

  9. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Knox, L.

    1997-04-29

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising mixing a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO{sub 3} of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring. 2 figs.

  10. Testing of plain and fibrous concrete single cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel models

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    Two single-cavity prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) models were fabricated and tested to failure to demonstrate the structural response and ultimate pressure capacity of models cast from high-strength concretes. Concretes with design compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa (10,000 psi) were developed for this investigation. One model was cast from plain concrete and failed in shear at the head region. The second model was cast from fiber reinforced concrete and failed by rupturing the circumferential prestressing at the sidewall of the structure. The tests also demonstrated the capabilities of the liner system to maintain a leak-tight pressure boundary. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  11. MTR WING, TRA604. PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS AND DIMENSIONS. TYPES A, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MTR WING, TRA-604. PRECAST CONCRETE PANELS AND DIMENSIONS. TYPES A, B, C, D, E, AND F; AND HOW THEY ARE CONNECTED. TYPES C AND D ARE ON WEST SIDE WHERE GLASS BLOCKS SURROUND ENTRY DOOR. BLAW-KNOX 3150-804-20, SHEET #1, 11/1950. INL INDEX NO. 531-0604-62-098-100644, REV. 0. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. GHG emissions during the high-rate production of compost using standard and advanced aeration strategies.

    PubMed

    Puyuelo, B; Gea, T; Sánchez, A

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we have evaluated different strategies for the optimization of the aeration during the active thermophilic stage of the composting process of source-selected Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (or biowaste) using reactors at bench scale (50L). These strategies include: typical cyclic aeration, oxygen feedback controller and a new self-developed controller based on the on-line maximization of the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) during the process. Results highlight differences found in the emission of most representative greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted from composting (methane and nitrous oxide) as well as in gases typically related to composting odor problems (ammonia as typical example). Specifically, the cyclic controller presents emissions that can double that of OUR controller, whereas oxygen feedback controller shows a better performance with respect to the cyclic controller. A new parameter, the respiration index efficiency, is presented to quantitatively evaluate the GHG emissions and, in consequence, the main negative environmental impact of the composting process. Other aspects such as the stability of the compost produced and the consumption of resources are also evaluated for each controller.

  13. Treatment of landfill leachate-impacted groundwater using cascade aeration and constructed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Loer, J.; O`Flanagan, B.; Fellows, W.

    1995-12-31

    At an unlined municipal solid waste landfill, heavy metal and toxic organic compounds present in leachate have impacted groundwater, necessitating extraction and treatment of the contaminated groundwater. A remedial design relying on a natural systems engineering approach will take advantage of existing contours (gravity flow) and surroundings (wetlands), and will limit energy inputs and eliminate chemical inputs. Impacted groundwater will be extracted, and aerated via a cascade constructed of polypropylene sheets fabricated into {open_quotes}step{close_quotes} sections and set into a side slope of the landfill. Volatilization of organics and oxidation of iron and heavy metals to insoluble compounds will occur during cascading and will continue within a sedimentation basin where settling of iron precipitates will induce co-settling of heavy metal precipitates. Following the sedimentation basin, a constructed wetland containing both aerobic zones and anaerobic zones will provide additional treatment of remaining solids and heavy metals, before surface discharge. Use of a natural systems approach significantly reduces operating costs compared to a mechanical-aeration, chemical-precipitation system, and is more aesthetically pleasing and suited to the remote locale. The system is under construction and seasonal operation will begin in spring 1996.

  14. Growth and final product formation by Bifidobacterium infantis in aerated fermentations.

    PubMed

    González, R; Blancas, A; Santillana, R; Azaola, A; Wacher, C

    2004-10-01

    Fermentation conditions were developed to allow Bifidobacterium infantis to grow in the presence of air. Batch fermentations in TPYG medium, starting from anoxic conditions followed by the application of low airflow rates [0.02-0.1 air volume, per liquid media volume, per minute (vvm)], were analyzed for growth, oxygen uptake, and product formation by the bacterium. Under all aerated fermentations, B. infantis showed high aerotolerance, with a maximum oxygen-specific consumption rate of 0.34 mmol oxygen per gram dry cell weight per hour in the presence of 0.06 vvm. Similar growth yields were obtained under oxic and anoxic conditions (0.11-0.13 and 0.11 g dry cell weight per mmol glucose, respectively). Oxygen also influenced metabolite formation since lactate production and its molar relation to acetate increased and formate decreased with aeration rate. Under anoxic conditions, a maximum concentration of 8.1 mM lactate and an acetate/lactate ratio of 3.5:1 were obtained, while under oxic conditions the lactate concentration increased more than two-fold and the acetate/lactate molar ratio decreased to 1.5:1. The possibility of balancing acetate/lactate molar ratios for organoleptic purposes as well as for obtaining good growth under microaerated conditions was demonstrated.

  15. Microfaunal indicators, Ciliophora phylogeny and protozoan population shifts in an intermittently aerated and fed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ntougias, Spyridon; Tanasidis, Spartakos; Melidis, Paraschos

    2011-02-28

    Microfauna community structure was examined in the mixed liquor of a bench-scale bioreactor equipped with an intermittent aeration and feeding system. The reactor was operated under an intermittent aeration of 25 min in every 1 h and varying feeding conditions (0.264, 0.403 and 0.773 kg BOD(5)/m(3) d). A total of 14 protozoan and metazoan taxa were identified by microscopic examination. Sessile ciliates, followed by crawling ciliates, were the major protozoan groups under 0.403 kg BOD(5)/m(3) d organic loading conditions, while sessile ciliate population was remarkably increased under an organic loading of 0.773 kg BOD(5)/m(3) d. Principal Component Analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient tests were performed in order to reveal relationships between microfauna community and operational parameters. Ciliophora specific-18S rRNA gene clone library was constructed to identify ciliate diversity under 0.773 kg BOD(5)/m(3) d organic loading conditions. Ciliophora diversity consisted of members of Aspidiscidae, Epistylidae, Opisthonectidae and Vorticellidae, with the majority of the clones being associated with the species Vorticella fusca. At least one novel phylogenetic linkage among Ciliophora was identified. Comparisons made after molecular characterization and microscopic examination of Ciliophora community showed that the estimation of broad ciliate groups is useful for ecological considerations and evaluation of the operational conditions in wastewater treatment plants.

  16. Crustacean zooplankton in aerated wastewater treatment lagoons as a potential feedstock for biofuel.

    PubMed

    Kring, Stefanie A; Xia, Xiaoyan; Powers, Susan E; Twiss, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Zooplankton biomass productivity was estimated for two 64,000 m3 (1.7 ha) facultative aerated wastewater treatment lagoons to evaluate potential biodiesel production from zooplankton biomass. Lagoons were monitored bi-weekly during summer 2010. Lipid accumulated by crustacean zooplankton was considered the most efficient means by which to collect lipid produced by phytoplankton owing to the greater ease in the collection of these organisms (>0.153mm) compared with unicellular algae (size <0.06 mm). In terms of biomass, the cladoceran Daphnia and the copepod Cyclops were the dominant zooplankton in these hypereutrophic lagoons, while unicellular chlorophytes dominated the phytoplankton community. Secondary productivity of these lagoons (250 g of dry weight m(-2) yr(-1)) is comparable to the secondary productivity of other sewage lagoons. The potential biodiesel production for one lagoon was estimated to be 0.04 +/- 0.02 L m(-2) yr(-1), which results in a total of 1120 +/- 560 L from two lagoons. This study showed that there are organisms present in wastewater lagoons, besides algae, that can serve as a biofuel feedstock. Additionally, this research expands the current knowledge of facultative aerated wastewater lagoon ecology and waste stream-derived biofuel. Future research should include complete life cycle and economic analyses to determine if harvesting zooplankton from wastewater lagoons is a sustainable endeavour.

  17. Removal of human enteric viruses and indicator microorganisms from domestic wastewater by aerated lagoons.

    PubMed

    Locas, Annie; Martinez, Veronica; Payment, Pierre

    2010-02-01

    Aerated lagoons offer a low-cost and simple approach to treating domestic wastewater in small municipalities. The objective of the current study was to evaluate, for each cell in the lagoons, the removal of indicator microorganisms and human enteric viruses under warm (summer) and cold (early spring) conditions. The two sites are located in southwest Quebec, Canada. Samples were assayed for thermotolerant coliforms, enterococci, Clostridium perfringens, somatic and male-specific coliphages, and culturable human enteric viruses (HEV). The results show higher removal under warm ambient conditions for all microorganisms. Thermotolerant coliforms and enterococci were removed to a greater extent than C. perfringens and HEV. HEV removal was only observed in warm ambient conditions. The removal of coliphages was different from the observed removal of HEV. The use of coliphages as surrogates for HEV has been proposed, but this does not seem appropriate for aerated lagoons, as the removal of coliphages overestimates the removal of HEV. Given the low observed removal of HEV during this study, the effluents remain a significant source of pathogens that can affect drinking water treatment plants drawing their raw water from receiving streams. Ultraviolet disinfection of treated wastewater effluent is a possible solution.

  18. Aerobic and two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion with pure oxygen and air aeration.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Gregor D; Ros, Milenko

    2008-01-01

    The degradability of excess activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant was studied. The objective was establishing the degree of degradation using either air or pure oxygen at different temperatures. Sludge treated with pure oxygen was degraded at temperatures from 22 degrees C to 50 degrees C while samples treated with air were degraded between 32 degrees C and 65 degrees C. Using air, sludge is efficiently degraded at 37 degrees C and at 50-55 degrees C. With oxygen, sludge was most effectively degraded at 38 degrees C or at 25-30 degrees C. Two-stage anaerobic-aerobic processes were studied. The first anaerobic stage was always operated for 5 days HRT, and the second stage involved aeration with pure oxygen and an HRT between 5 and 10 days. Under these conditions, there is 53.5% VSS removal and 55.4% COD degradation at 15 days HRT - 5 days anaerobic, 10 days aerobic. Sludge digested with pure oxygen at 25 degrees C in a batch reactor converted 48% of sludge total Kjeldahl nitrogen to nitrate. Addition of an aerobic stage with pure oxygen aeration to the anaerobic digestion enhances ammonium nitrogen removal. In a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic sludge digestion process within 8 days HRT of the aerobic stage, the removal of ammonium nitrogen was 85%.

  19. Seasonal influence of environmental variables and artificial aeration on Escherichia coli in small urban lakes.

    PubMed

    Durham, Bart W; Porter, Lucy; Webb, Allie; Thomas, Joshua

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated patterns of Escherichia coli in urban lakes in Lubbock, Texas. Specific objectives were to (1) document seasonal patterns in abundance of E. coli over a 3-year period, (2) identify environmental factors, including effects of migratory geese and artificial aeration devices that may influence E. coli abundance, and (3) determine if E. coli abundance over time was similar for individual lakes. Water samples were collected monthly for 36 months from six lakes, three of which contained artificial aeration devices (fountains). Regression models were constructed to determine which environmental variables most influence E. coli abundance in summer and winter seasons. Escherichia coli is present in the lakes of Lubbock, Texas year-round and typically exceeds established bacterial thresholds for recreational waters. Models most frequently contained pH and dissolved oxygen as predictor variables and explained from 17.4% to 92.4% of total variation in E. coli. Lakes with fountains had a higher oxygen concentration during summer and contained consistently less E. coli. We conclude that solar irradiation in synergy with pH and dissolved oxygen is the primary control mechanism for E. coli in study lakes, and that fountains help control abundance of fecal bacteria within these systems.

  20. Effects of toxicity, aeration, and reductant supply on trichloroethylene transformation by a mixed methanotrophic culture

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Cohen, L. ); McCarty, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The trichloroethylene (TCE) transformation rate and capacity of a mixed methanotrophic culture at room temperature were measured to determine the effects of time without methane (resting), use of an alternative energy source (formate), aeration, and toxicity of TCE and its transformation products. The initial specific TCE transformation rate of resting cells was 0.6 mg of TCE per mg of cells per day, and they had a finite TCE transformation capacity of 0.036 mg of TCE per mg of cells. Formate addition resulted in increased initial specific TCE transformation rates (2.1 mg/mg of cells per day) and elevated transformation capacity (0.073 mg of TCE per mg of cells). Significant declines in methane conversion rates following exposure to TCE were observed for both resting and formate-fed cells, suggesting toxic effects caused by TCE or its transformation products. TCE transformation and methane consumption rates of resting cells decreased with time much more rapidly when cells were shaken and aerated than when they remained dormant, suggesting that the transformation ability of methanotrophs is best preserved by storage under anoxic conditions.

  1. Large eddy simulation of dilute bubbly turbulent flows for aerating hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajit, Mohammad; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    We have proposed a formulation for the large eddy simulation of dilute bubbly flows by converting the governing equations to a more loosely-coupled form. This formulation provides an efficient numerical procedure for two-way coupling of bubbly flows at low gas holdups. Subgrid-scale turbulence modeling is based on the dynamic procedure of Germano for the liquid phase and the Jakobson approach for the gas phase. Wall-modeling is implemented using the method of Cabot & Moin. Our approach is employed to simulate flow over aerating hydrofoils at different angles of attack. A structured body-fitted C-grid is employed for domain discretization. Validation of our computational code, for C-grids, is carried out by simulating single-phase flows over a NACA0012 airfoil (20° AOA) with laminar flow and an E387 airfoil (6° AOA) with turbulent flow. Comparisons with available computational and experimental data in terms of time averaged drag coefficient, lift coefficient, separation bubble length, and reattachment point proves the validity of our computational code. The aerating hydrofoil simulation utilizes a NACA0015 hydrofoil, for which experiments were carried out at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. Comparisons between computational and experimental datasets show promising results. This work is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy and the Hydro Reasearch Foundation.

  2. Delayed ultraviolet light-induced cessation of respiration by inadequate aeration of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Joshi, J G; Swenson, P A; Schenley, R L

    1977-02-01

    Inadequately aerated Escherichia coli B/r cultures did not shut their respiration off 60 min after ultraviolet light (52 M/m2 at 254 nm) as they did when well supplied with oxygen. Since cessation of respiaration is associated with cell death, the result suggested that oxygen toxicity by superoxide radicals generated by cell metabolism might be responsible for cell death. The specific activity of superoxide dismutase, which scavenges O2- radicals, increased twofold after 90 min of adequate aeration, but the specific activity of catalase remained constant. Respiration and viability of irradiated cells were affected not at all by the presence of superoxide dismutase and only slightly by the presence of catalase. Metal ions such as Mn2+ and Fe2+ inducers of superoxide dismutase, had no effect on respiration and viability. When irradiated cells were incubated under N2 for 90 min, the respiration, growth, and viability time-course responses were the same as for the cells not exposed to anareobiosis. We conclude that superoxide anions generated at the time of irradiation play no part in cessation delays the ultraviolet light-induced synthesis of proteins responsible for the irreversible cessation of respiration.

  3. Functioning of microbial complexes in aerated layers of a highmoor peat bog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchenko, A. V.; Bogdanova, O. Yu.; Stepanov, A. L.; Polyanskaya, L. M.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.

    2010-09-01

    Monitoring was carried out using the luminescent-microscopic method of the abundance parameters of different groups of microorganisms in a monolith and in the mixed layers of a highmoor peat bog (oligotrophic residual-eutrophic peat soil) in a year-long model experiment. The increase of the aeration as a result of mixing of the layers enhanced the activity of the soil fungi. This was attested to by the following changes: the increase of the fungal mycelium length by 6 times and of the fungal biomass by 4 times and the double decrease of the fraction of spores in the fungal complex. The response of the fungal complex to mixing was different in the different layers of the peat bog. The maximal effect was observed in the T1 layer and the minimal one in the T2 layer. The emission of CO2 in the mixed samples was 1.5-2 times higher than that from the undisturbed peat samples. In contrast with the fungi, the bacteria and actinomycetes were not affected by the aeration of the highmoor layers.

  4. Effect of auxotrophies on yeast performance in aerated fed-batch reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, Carmine; Paciello, Lucia; Alteriis, Elisabetta de; Brambilla, Luca; Parascandola, Palma

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper contributes to fill the gap existing between the basic and applied research. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mathematical model sheds light on the physiology of auxotrophic yeast strains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast behavior in fed-batch is influenced by biological and environmental determinants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process optimization would make possible the production of heterologous proteins which are not yet on the market. -- Abstract: A systematic investigation on the effects of auxotrophies on the performance of yeast in aerated fed-batch reactor was carried out. Six isogenic strains from the CEN.PK family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one prototroph and five auxotrophs, were grown in aerated fed-batch reactor using the same operative conditions and a proper nutritional supplementation. The performance of the strains, in terms of final biomass decreased with increasing the number of auxotrophies. Auxotrophy for leucine exerted a profound negative effect on the performance of the strains. Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells of the strain carrying four auxotrophies and its significant viability loss, were indicative of an oxidative stress response induced by exposure of cells to the environmental conditions. The mathematical model was fundamental to highlight how the carbon flux, depending on the number and type of auxotrophies, was diverted towards the production of increasingly large quantities of energy for maintenance.

  5. Mild loss of lung aeration augments stretch in healthy lung regions.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Maurizio; Xin, Yi; Hamedani, Hooman; Clapp, Justin; Kadlecek, Stephen; Meeder, Natalie; Zeng, Johnathan; Profka, Harrilla; Kavanagh, Brian P; Rizi, Rahim R

    2016-02-15

    Inspiratory stretch by mechanical ventilation worsens lung injury. However, it is not clear whether and how the ventilator damages lungs in the absence of preexisting injury. We hypothesized that subtle loss of lung aeration during general anesthesia regionally augments ventilation and distension of ventilated air spaces. In eight supine anesthetized and intubated rats, hyperpolarized gas MRI was performed after a recruitment maneuver following 1 h of volume-controlled ventilation with zero positive end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP), FiO2 0.5, and tidal volume 10 ml/kg, and after a second recruitment maneuver. Regional fractional ventilation (FV), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of (3)He (a measurement of ventilated peripheral air space dimensions), and gas volume were measured in lung quadrants of ventral and dorsal regions of the lungs. In six additional rats, computed tomography (CT) images were obtained at each time point. Ventilation with ZEEP decreased total lung gas volume and increased both FV and ADC in all studied regions. Increases in FV were more evident in the dorsal slices. In each lung quadrant, higher ADC was predicted by lower gas volume and by increased mean values (and heterogeneity) of FV distribution. CT scans documented 10% loss of whole-lung aeration and increased density in the dorsal lung, but no macroscopic atelectasis. Loss of pulmonary gas at ZEEP increased fractional ventilation and inspiratory dimensions of ventilated peripheral air spaces. Such regional changes could help explain a propensity for mechanical ventilation to contribute to lung injury in previously uninjured lungs.

  6. Biological iron oxidation by Gallionella spp. in drinking water production under fully aerated conditions.

    PubMed

    de Vet, W W J M; Dinkla, I J T; Rietveld, L C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-11-01

    Iron oxidation under neutral conditions (pH 6.5-8) may be a homo- or heterogeneous chemically- or a biologically-mediated process. The chemical oxidation is supposed to outpace the biological process under slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7-8). The iron oxidation kinetics and growth of Gallionella spp. - obligatory chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers - were assessed in natural, organic carbon-containing water, in continuous lab-scale reactors and full-scale groundwater trickling filters in the Netherlands. From Gallionella cell numbers determined by qPCR, balances were made for all systems. The homogeneous chemical iron oxidation occurred in accordance with the literature, but was retarded by a low water temperature (13 °C). The contribution of the heterogeneous chemical oxidation was, despite the presence of freshly formed iron oxyhydroxides, much lower than in previous studies in ultrapure water. This could be caused by the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on the iron oxide surfaces. In the oxygen-saturated natural water with a pH ranging from 6.5 to 7.7, Gallionella spp. grew uninhibited and biological iron oxidation was an important, and probably the dominant, process. Gallionella growth was not even inhibited in a full-scale filter after plate aeration. From this we conclude that Gallionella spp. can grow under neutral pH and fully aerated conditions when the chemical iron oxidation is retarded by low water temperature and inhibition of the autocatalytic iron oxidation.

  7. Analysis of up-flow aerated biological activated carbon filter technology in drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoming; Liu, Jincui; Li, Shaowen; Biney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Problems have been found in the traditional post-positioned down-flow biological activated carbon filter (DBACF), such as microorganism leakage and low biodegradability. A pilot test was carried out to place a BACF between the sediment tank and the sand filter; a new technology of dual media up-flow aerated biological activated carbon filter (UBACF) was developed. Results showed that in terms of the new process, the up-flow mode was better than the down-flow. Compared with the DBACF, the problem of microorganism leakage could be well resolved with the UBACF process by adding disinfectant before the sand filtration, and a similar adsorption effect could be obtained. For the tested raw water, the COD(Mn) and NH3-N removal rate was 54.6% and 85.0%, respectively, similar to the waterworks with the DBACF process. The UBACF greatly enhanced oxygen supply capability and mass transfer rate via aeration, and the NH3-N removal ability was significantly improved from 1.5 mg/L to more than 3 mg/L. Influent to the UBACF with higher turbidity could be coped with through the primary filtration of the ceramisite layer combined with fluid-bed technology, which gave the carbon bed a low-turbidity environment of less than 1.0 NTU. The backwashing parameters and carbon abrasion rate of the two processes were almost the same.

  8. Effective microbes for simultaneous bio-oxidation of ammonia and manganese in biological aerated filter system.

    PubMed

    Abu Hasan, Hassimi; Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh; Kofli, Noorhisham Tan; Kamarudin, Siti Kartom

    2012-11-01

    This study determined the most effective microbes acting as ammonia-oxidising (AOB) and manganese-oxidising bacteria (MnOB) for the simultaneous removal of ammonia (NH(4)(+)-N) and manganese (Mn(2+)) from water. Two conditions of mixed culture of bacteria: an acclimatised mixed culture (mixed culture: MC) in a 5-L bioreactor and biofilm attached on a plastic medium (stages of mixed culture: SMC) in a biological aerated filter were isolated and identified using Biolog MicroSystem and 16S rRNA sequencing. A screening test for determining the most effective microbe in the removal of NH(4)(+)-N and Mn(2+) was initially performed using SMC and MC, respectively, and found that Bacillus cereus was the most effective microbe for the removal of NH(4)(+)-N and Mn(2+). Moreover, the simultaneous NH(4)(+)-N and Mn(2+) removal (above 95% removal for both NH(4)(+)-N and Mn(2+)) was achieved using a biological aerated filter under various operating conditions. Thus, the strain could act as an effective microbe of AOB and a MnOB for the simultaneous removal of NH(4)(+)-N and Mn(2+).

  9. Effect of micro-aeration and inoculum type on the biodegradation of lignocellulosic substrate.

    PubMed

    Tsapekos, P; Kougias, P G; Vasileiou, S A; Lyberatos, G; Angelidaki, I

    2017-02-01

    The effect of various micro-aeration strategies on the anaerobic digestion (AD) of wheat straw was thoroughly examined using a mixture of inocula, containing compost and well digested sludge from biogas plant. The aim was to determine the most efficient oxygen load, pulse repetition and treatment duration, resulting in the highest methane production. The oxygen load had the largest impact on the biodegradability of straw, among the examined variables. More specifically, a micro-aeration intensity of 10mLO2/gVS was identified as the critical threshold above which the AD performance was more susceptible to instability. The highest enhancement in biogas production was achieved by injecting 5mLO2/gVS for a consecutive 3-day treatment period, presenting a 7.2% increase compared to the untreated wheat straw. Nevertheless, the results from optimisation case study indicated a higher increase of 9% by injecting 7.3mLO2/gVS, distributed in 2 pulses during a slightly shorter treatment period (i.e. 47h).

  10. Bioreactor aeration conditions modulate growth and antigen expression during Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae cultivation.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Adilson José; de Baptista-Neto, Alvaro; do Carmo Cilento, Maria; de Campos Giordano, Roberto; Zangirolami, Teresa Cristina

    2008-05-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, the causative agent of swine erysipelas, was cultivated in a 5-L stirred and aerated bioreactor under different dissolved oxygen tensions (0%, 5%, and 30% of saturation) for evaluation of the influence of oxygen on cell growth as well as on the production of the main antigenic component of the vaccine against erysipelas, a 64-69 kDa protein (SpaA). The microorganism presented different growth profiles for different aeration conditions. However, at the end of the batch cultivations, similar cell concentrations were obtained under the studied conditions. In order to maximize biomass titers and antigen production, the microorganism was cultivated in fed-batch operation mode under aerobic conditions. Under this condition, there was a fivefold increase in biomass production in comparison to the results attained in batch cultivations. To follow up antigen expression, samples collected during batch cultivations were concentrated and treated with choline for antigen extraction. Antigen expression was then assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by murine immunization tests. It was observed a direct influence of oxygen availability upon antigen expression, which is favored in the presence of oxygen. Analysis of the samples collected throughout the fed-batch process also revealed that antigen production is growth associated.

  11. Biotransformation of citronellol by the basidiomycete Cystoderma carcharias in an aerated-membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Onken, J; Berger, R G

    1999-02-01

    The basidiomycete Cystoderma carcharias transformed citronellol into 3,7-dimethyl-1,6,7-octanetriol as the main product. 3,7-Dimethyl-6,7-epoxy-1-octanol was identified as important intermediary product of the biotransformation, and the allylic diols 2,6-dimethyl-2-octene-1,8-diol, 3,7-dimethyl-5-octene-1,7-diol and 3,7-dimethyl-7-octene-1,6-diol were found to be minor products. Microbial formation of rose oxide, a flavour-impact component, was observed for the first time. The formation of the main products was inhibited by 70% after addition of 0.1 mmol l-1 cytochrome monooxygenase inhibitors. Formation of 3,7-dimethyl-1,6,7-octanetriol was effective in a bioreactor with aeration over a coil of a hydrophobic microporous polypropene capillary membrane. Production rates of up to 150 mg l-1 day-1 were reached and led to a product concentration of 866 mg l-1 (conversion rate: 52%). The total loss of the added volatile substrate via the exhaust air was 4.5% when this aeration method was used.

  12. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.

    2012-09-24

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. Data collected throughout the course of this work will be used to quantify the efficacy of concrete wasteforms, similar to those used in the disposal of LLW and MLLW, for the immobilization of key radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium, and iodine). Data collected will also be used to quantify the physical and chemical properties of the concrete affecting radionuclide retention.

  13. Investigation of modified asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimich, Vita

    2016-01-01

    Currently the problem of improving the asphalt quality is very urgent. It is used primarily as topcoats exposed to the greatest relative to the other layers of the road, dynamic load - impact and shear. The number of cars on the road, the speed of their movement, as well as the traffic intensity increase day by day. We have to upgrade motor roads, which entails a huge cost. World experience shows that the issue is urgent not only in Russia, but also in many countries in Europe, USA and Asia. Thus, the subject of research is the resistance of asphalt concrete to water and its influence on the strength of the material at different temperatures, and resistance of pavement to deformation. It is appropriate to search for new modifiers for asphaltic binder and mineral additives for asphalt mix to form in complex the skeleton of the future asphalt concrete, resistant to atmospheric condensation, soil characteristics of the road construction area, as well as the growing road transport load. The important task of the work is searching special modifying additives for bitumen binder and asphalt mixture as a whole, which will improve the quality of highways, increasing the period between repairs. The methods described in the normative-technical documentation were used for the research. The conducted research allowed reducing the frequency of road maintenance for 7 years, increasing it from 17 to 25 years.

  14. Methodology, data collection, and data analysis for determination of water-mixing patterns induced by aerators and mixers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Gary P.; Hornewer, N.J.; Robertson, D.M.; Olson, D.T.; Gioja, Josh

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed data to describe mixing patterns induced by aerators and mixers to aid in the calibration and verification of a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. During September 1995, three-dimensional water-velocity profiles were collected during the operation of fine-bubble and coarse-bubble aerators in a test tank at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station. Three-dimensional water velocity, water-temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, and specific conductivity profiles were collected during operation of a coarse-bubble aerator in a reservoir in Schaumburg, Illinois, during summer 1996 and summer 1997, during strongly stratified and weakly stratified conditions. The effects of a submersible mixer alone and in combination with coarse-bubble aerators and a surface mixer alone also were investigated during summer 1997. The mixing patterns induced by the operation of aerators, submersible mixers, and surface mixers were described and compared with mixing patterns predicted by model simulations. Bubble-plume characteristics during tests in strongly stratified and weakly stratified conditions in the reservoir were documented and compared with characteristics simulated by different models. Lemckert and Imberger?s model simulates an entrainment rate similar to the rate measured during a test in the reservoir under strongly stratified conditions, whereas Schladow?s one-dimensional model appears to underestimate the total entrainment rate by about 50 percent. Schladow?s model was accurate during weak stratification but underestimated the radius of the plume during strong stratification. For 5 days during daylight hours, water temperature profiles were collected continuously during the operation of four aerators. Water temperatures in the reservoir were significantly affected by the operation of the aeration system. These changes were compared to simulations from a one-dimensional Dynamic Lake Model (DLM

  15. Construction Cluster Volume IV: [Concrete Work].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Justice, Harrisburg. Bureau of Correction.

    The document is the fourth of a series, to be integrated with a G.E.D. program, containing instructional materials for the construction cluster. The volume focuses on concrete work and consists of 20 instructional units which require a month of study. The units include: (1) uses of concrete and occupational information; (2) soils, drainage, and…

  16. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT THROUGH CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an examination of radon generation and transport through Florida residential concretes for their contribution to indoor radon concentrations. Radium concentrations in the 11 concretes tested were all <2.5 pCi/g and radon emanation coefficients were all...

  17. Assessing the Concreteness of Relational Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rein, Jonathan R.; Markman, Arthur B.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that people's ability to transfer abstract relational knowledge across situations can be heavily influenced by the concrete objects that fill relational roles. This article provides evidence that the concreteness of the relations themselves also affects performance. In 3 experiments, participants viewed simple relational…

  18. "Concreteness Fading" Promotes Transfer of Mathematical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Nicole M.; Fyfe, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that educators should avoid concrete instantiations when the goal is to promote transfer. However, concrete instantiations may benefit transfer in the long run, particularly if they are "faded" into more abstract instantiations. Undergraduates were randomly assigned to learn a mathematical concept in one of three…

  19. An Endochronic Plasticity Theory for Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-20

    Strain Curves for Concrete Under Multiaxial Load His- tories," CEAE Department, Univ. of Colo., Boulder. 18. Stankowski, T., and K. H. Gerstle (1983...T. (1983), "Concrete Under Multiaxial Load Histories," M. S. Thesis, CEAE Department, University of Colorado, Boulder. 31. Valanis, K. C., and C. F

  20. Properties and uses of concrete, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene

    1992-01-01

    Concretes that can now be formed have properties which may make them valuable for lunar or space construction. These properties include high compressive strength, good flexural strength (when reinforced), and favorable responses to temperature extremes (even increased strength at low temperatures). These and other properties of concrete are discussed.