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Sample records for aerated shewanella oneidensis

  1. Aerated Shewanella oneidensis in Continuously-fed Bioelectrochemical Systems for Power and Hydrogen Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of aeration of Shewanella oneidensis on potentiostatic current production, iron(III) reduction, hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, and electric power generation in a microbial fuel cell. The potentiostatic performance of aerated S. oneidensis was considerab...

  2. Aerated Shewanella oneidensis in continuously fed bioelectrochemical systems for power and hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-04-01

    We studied the effects of aeration of Shewanella oneidensis on potentiostatic current production, hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, and electric power generation in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The potentiostatic performance of aerated S. oneidensis was considerably enhanced to a maximum current density of 0.45 A/m(2) or 80.3 A/m(3) (mean: 0.34 A/m(2), 57.2 A/m(3)) compared to anaerobically grown cultures. Biocatalyzed hydrogen production rates with aerated S. oneidensis were studied within the applied potential range of 0.3-0.9 V and were highest at 0.9 V with 0.3 m(3) H(2)/m(3) day, which has been reported for mixed cultures, but is approximately 10 times higher than reported for an anaerobic culture of S. oneidensis. Aerated MFC experiments produced a maximum power density of 3.56 W/m(3) at a 200-Omega external resistor. The main reasons for enhanced electrochemical performance are higher levels of active biomass and more efficient substrate utilization under aerobic conditions. Coulombic efficiencies, however, were greatly reduced due to losses of reducing equivalents to aerobic respiration in the anode chamber. The next challenge will be to optimize the aeration rate of the bacterial culture to balance between maximization of bacterial activation and minimization of aerobic respiration in the culture.

  3. Electroanalysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Shumyantseva, V V; Shebanova, A S; Chalenko, Ya M; Voeikova, T A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V; Debabov, V G

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical parameters of bacterial cells Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were investigated. For registration of the direct electron transfer between S. oneidensis MR-1 and electrode, bacterial cells were pretreated with didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), a synthetic membrane-like substance of polycationic nature that exhibits membrane-loosening properties. Such pretreatment of S. oneidensis MR-1 allowed increasing the efficiency of extracellular electron transfer by the proteobacterium due to better availability of electroactive proteins for registration of electron transfer processes. The electroanalysis of bacterial cells S. oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic conditions allows registering redox-active proteins and biomolecules in the range of potentials of-0.40,-0.16, and-0 V, which corresponds to flavohemoproteins, quinone derivatives, and c-type cytochromes of the external membrane of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells.

  4. Efficiencies of Bio-electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen from Lactate Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was grown in a chemostatic, continuously-fed bioelectrochemical cell under slightly aerated conditions. The start-up phase was controlled potentiostatically (0.4 V vs. SHE). When a stable performance was achieved, the reactor was switched to bio-electrocatalytic producti...

  5. Reconstruction of Gene Networks of Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin Koo; Gao, Haichun; Arkin, Adam; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    It is of great interest to study the iron response of the -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis since it possesses a high content of iron and is capable of utilizing iron for anaerobic respiration. We report here that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. To gain more insights into the bacterial response to iron, temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, resulting in identification of iron-responsive biological pathways in a gene co-expression network. Iron acquisition systems, including genes unique to S. oneidensis, were rapidly and strongly induced by iron depletion, and repressed by iron repletion. Some were required for iron depletion, as exemplified by the mutational analysis of the putative siderophore biosynthesis protein SO3032. Unexpectedly, a number of genes related to anaerobic energy metabolism were repressed by iron depletion and induced by repletion, which might be due to the iron storage potential of their protein products. Other iron-responsive biological pathways include protein degradation, aerobic energy metabolism and protein synthesis. Furthermore, sequence motifs enriched in gene clusters as well as their corresponding DNA-binding proteins (Fur, CRP and RpoH) were identified, resulting in a regulatory network of iron response in S. oneidensis. Together, this work provides an overview of iron response and reveals novel features in S. oneidensis, including Shewanella-specific iron acquisition systems, and suggests the intimate relationship between anaerobic energy metabolism and iron response.

  6. Polyphasic taxonomy of the genus Shewanella and description of Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Moser, D. P.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Lies, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.; MacGregor, B. J.; Ringelberg, D. B.; White, D. C.; Nishijima, M.; Sano, H.; Burghardt, J.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA-DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  7. Isobutanol production from an engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Min; Park, Hyojung; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun-Suk; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Sang, Byoung-In; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is one of the most well-known metal-reducing bacteria and it has been extensively studied for microbial fuel cell and bioremediation aspects. In this study, we have examined S. oneidensis MR-1 as an isobutanol-producing host by assessing three key factors such as isobutanol synthetic genes, carbon sources, and electron supply systems. Heterologous Ehrlich pathway genes, kivD encoding ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and adh encoding alcohol dehydrogenase, were constructed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Among the composition of carbon sources examined, 2% of N-acetylglucosamine, 1.5% of pyruvate and 2% of lactate were found to be the most optimal nutrients and resulted in 10.3 mg/L of isobutanol production with 48 h of microaerobic incubation. Finally, the effects of metal ions (electron acceptor) and direct electron transfer systems on isobutanol production were investigated, and Fe(2+) ions increased the isobutanol production up to 35%. Interestingly, deletion of mtrA and mtrB, genes responsible for membrane transport systems, did not have significant impact on isobutanol production. Finally, we applied engineered S. oneidensis to a bioelectrical reactor system to investigate the effect of a direct electron supply system on isobutanol production, and it resulted in an increased growth and isobutanol production (up to 19.3 mg/L). This report showed the feasibility of S. oneidensis MR-1 as a genetic host to produce valuable biochemicals and combine an electron-supplying system with biotechnological applications.

  8. Isobutanol production from an engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Min; Park, Hyojung; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun-Suk; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Sang, Byoung-In; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is one of the most well-known metal-reducing bacteria and it has been extensively studied for microbial fuel cell and bioremediation aspects. In this study, we have examined S. oneidensis MR-1 as an isobutanol-producing host by assessing three key factors such as isobutanol synthetic genes, carbon sources, and electron supply systems. Heterologous Ehrlich pathway genes, kivD encoding ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and adh encoding alcohol dehydrogenase, were constructed in S. oneidensis MR-1. Among the composition of carbon sources examined, 2% of N-acetylglucosamine, 1.5% of pyruvate and 2% of lactate were found to be the most optimal nutrients and resulted in 10.3 mg/L of isobutanol production with 48 h of microaerobic incubation. Finally, the effects of metal ions (electron acceptor) and direct electron transfer systems on isobutanol production were investigated, and Fe(2+) ions increased the isobutanol production up to 35%. Interestingly, deletion of mtrA and mtrB, genes responsible for membrane transport systems, did not have significant impact on isobutanol production. Finally, we applied engineered S. oneidensis to a bioelectrical reactor system to investigate the effect of a direct electron supply system on isobutanol production, and it resulted in an increased growth and isobutanol production (up to 19.3 mg/L). This report showed the feasibility of S. oneidensis MR-1 as a genetic host to produce valuable biochemicals and combine an electron-supplying system with biotechnological applications. PMID:26280214

  9. Flavin Electron Shuttles Dominate Extracellular Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Kotloski, Nicholas J.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is widely studied for its ability to respire a diverse array of soluble and insoluble electron acceptors. The ability to breathe insoluble substrates is defined as extracellular electron transfer and can occur via direct contact or by electron shuttling in S. oneidensis. To determine the contribution of flavin electron shuttles in extracellular electron transfer, a transposon mutagenesis screen was performed with S. oneidensis to identify mutants unable to secrete flavins. A multidrug and toxin efflux transporter encoded by SO_0702 was identified and renamed bfe (bacterial flavin adenine dinucleotide [FAD] exporter) based on phenotypic characterization. Deletion of bfe resulted in a severe decrease in extracellular flavins, while overexpression of bfe increased the concentration of extracellular flavins. Strains lacking bfe had no defect in reduction of soluble Fe(III), but these strains were deficient in the rate of insoluble Fe(III) oxide reduction, which was alleviated by the addition of exogenous flavins. To test a different insoluble electron acceptor, graphite electrode bioreactors were set up to measure current produced by wild-type S. oneidensis and the Δbfe mutant. With the same concentration of supplemented flavins, the two strains produced similar amounts of current. However, when exogenous flavins were not supplemented to bioreactors, bfe mutant strains produced significantly less current than the wild type. We have demonstrated that flavin electron shuttling accounts for ~75% of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble substrates by S. oneidensis and have identified the first FAD transporter in bacteria. PMID:23322638

  10. Impacts of Nitrate and Nitrite on Physiology of Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Fu, Huihui; Wang, Jixuan; Sun, Linlin; Jiang, Yaoming; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis exhibits a remarkable versatility in anaerobic respiration, which largely relies on its diverse respiratory pathways. Some of these are expressed in response to the existence of their corresponding electron acceptors (EAs) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about respiration and the impact of non-oxygen EAs on the physiology of the microorganism when oxygen is present. Here we undertook a study to elucidate the basis for nitrate and nitrite inhibition of growth under aerobic conditions. We discovered that nitrate in the form of NaNO3 exerts its inhibitory effects as a precursor to nitrite at low concentrations and as an osmotic-stress provider (Na+) at high concentrations. In contrast, nitrite is extremely toxic, with 25 mM abolishing growth completely. We subsequently found that oxygen represses utilization of all EAs but nitrate. To order to utilize EAs with less positive redox potential, such as nitrite and fumarate, S. oneidensis must enter the stationary phase, when oxygen respiration becomes unfavorable. In addition, we demonstrated that during aerobic respiration the cytochrome bd oxidase confers S. oneidensis resistance to nitrite, which likely functions via nitric oxide (NO). PMID:23626841

  11. Biotransformation and biomethylation of arsenic by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wu, Mingyin; Lu, Gan; Si, Youbin

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to toxic arsenic was investigated by measuring the growth of the bacteria in the presence of As(III) and As(V) in different growth media. The bacteria were shown to biotransform arsenic through the partial methylation of inorganic arsenic into methylated metabolites. This biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by S. oneidensis MR-1 was affected by the methyl donor, the composition of the medium, and the presence of Fe(III). The relative content of methylated arsenic in the medium containing S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl donor was greater than that in the medium containing methylcobalamin. The biotransformation process driven by Fe-reducing bacteria, and occurred in combination with microbially mediated As-Fe reduction in the presence of Fe(III). The results demonstrate that S. oneidensis MR-1 methylates inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenic compounds. This process has potential applications in the bioremediation of environmental arsenic, and the results provide new insights into the control of in situ arsenic pollution.

  12. Biotransformation and biomethylation of arsenic by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wu, Mingyin; Lu, Gan; Si, Youbin

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to toxic arsenic was investigated by measuring the growth of the bacteria in the presence of As(III) and As(V) in different growth media. The bacteria were shown to biotransform arsenic through the partial methylation of inorganic arsenic into methylated metabolites. This biotransformation of inorganic arsenic by S. oneidensis MR-1 was affected by the methyl donor, the composition of the medium, and the presence of Fe(III). The relative content of methylated arsenic in the medium containing S-adenosyl methionine as the methyl donor was greater than that in the medium containing methylcobalamin. The biotransformation process driven by Fe-reducing bacteria, and occurred in combination with microbially mediated As-Fe reduction in the presence of Fe(III). The results demonstrate that S. oneidensis MR-1 methylates inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenic compounds. This process has potential applications in the bioremediation of environmental arsenic, and the results provide new insights into the control of in situ arsenic pollution. PMID:26692509

  13. Low-Temperature Growth of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Randa; Popa, Radu; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Giometti, Carol S.; Tollaksen, Sandra; Mosher, Jennifer J.; Findlay, Robert H.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2005-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a mesophilic bacterium with a maximum growth temperature of ≈35°C but the ability to grow over a wide range of temperatures, including temperatures near zero. At room temperature (≈22°C) MR-1 grows with a doubling time of about 40 min, but when moved from 22°C to 3°C, MR-1 cells display a very long lag phase of more than 100 h followed by very slow growth, with a doubling time of ≈67 h. In comparison to cells grown at 22°C, the cold-grown cells formed long, motile filaments, showed many spheroplast-like structures, produced an array of proteins not seen at higher temperature, and synthesized a different pattern of cellular lipids. Frequent pilus-like structures were observed during the transition from 3 to 22°C. PMID:15691935

  14. Validating Annotations for Uncharacterized Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Brenton; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Higdon, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Proteins of unknown function are a barrier to our understanding of molecular biology. Assigning function to these “uncharacterized” proteins is imperative, but challenging. The usual approach is similarity searches using annotation databases, which are useful for predicting function. However, since the performance of these databases on uncharacterized proteins is basically unknown, the accuracy of their predictions is suspect, making annotation difficult. To address this challenge, we developed a benchmark annotation dataset of 30 proteins in Shewanella oneidensis. The proteins in the dataset were originally uncharacterized after the initial annotation of the S. oneidensis proteome in 2002. In the intervening 5 years, the accumulation of new experimental evidence has enabled specific functions to be predicted. We utilized this benchmark dataset to evaluate several commonly utilized annotation databases. According to our criteria, six annotation databases accurately predicted functions for at least 60% of proteins in our dataset. Two of these six even had a “conditional accuracy” of 90%. Conditional accuracy is another evaluation metric we developed which excludes results from databases where no function was predicted. Also, 27 of the 30 proteins' functions were correctly predicted by at least one database. These represent one of the first performance evaluations of annotation databases on uncharacterized proteins. Our evaluation indicates that these databases readily incorporate new information and are accurate in predicting functions for uncharacterized proteins, provided that experimental function evidence exists. PMID:18687039

  15. Oxygen-dependent autoaggregation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Hill, Eric A.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2008-07-01

    In aerobic chemostat cultures maintained at 50% dissolved O2 tension (123.5 µM dissolved O2), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 rapidly aggregated upon addition of 0.68 mM CaCl2 and retained this multi-cellular phenotype at high dilution rates. Confocal microscopy analysis of the extracellular matrix material contributing to the stability of the aggregate structures revealed the presence of extracellular DNA, protein, and glycoconjugates. Upon onset of O2-limited growth (dissolved O2 below detection) however, the Ca2+-supplemented chemostat cultures of strain MR-1 rapidly disaggregated and grew as motile dispersed cells. Global transcriptome analysis comparing aerobic aggregated to O2-limited unaggregated cells identified genes encoding cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface adhesion factors whose transcription increased upon exposure to increased O2 concentrations. The aerobic aggregated cells also revealed increased expression of putative anaerobic electron transfer and homologs of metal reduction genes, including mtrD (SO1782), mtrE (SO1781), and mtrF (SO1780). Our data indicate that mechanisms involved in autoaggregation of MR-1 are dependent on the function of pilD gene which encodes a putative prepilin peptidase. Mutants of S. oneidensis strain MR-1 deficient in PilD and associated pathways, including type IV and Msh pili biogenesis, displayed a moderate increase in sensitivity to H2O2. Taken together, our evidence indicates that aggregate formation in S. oneidensis MR-1 may serve as an alternative or an addition to biochemical detoxification to reduce the oxidative stress associated with production of reactive oxygen species during aerobic metabolism while facilitating the development of hypoxic conditions within the aggregate interior.

  16. Hydrogen Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Meshulam-Simon, Galit; Behrens, Sebastian; Choo, Alexander D.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative sediment microorganism which uses diverse compounds, such as oxygen and fumarate, as well as insoluble Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as electron acceptors. The electron donor spectrum is more limited and includes metabolic end products of primary fermenting bacteria, such as lactate, formate, and hydrogen. While the utilization of hydrogen as an electron donor has been described previously, we report here the formation of hydrogen from pyruvate under anaerobic, stationary-phase conditions in the absence of an external electron acceptor. Genes for the two S. oneidensis MR-1 hydrogenases, hydA, encoding a periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase, and hyaB, encoding a periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase, were found to be expressed only under anaerobic conditions during early exponential growth and into stationary-phase growth. Analyses of ΔhydA, ΔhyaB, and ΔhydA ΔhyaB in-frame-deletion mutants indicated that HydA functions primarily as a hydrogen-forming hydrogenase while HyaB has a bifunctional role and represents the dominant hydrogenase activity under the experimental conditions tested. Based on results from physiological and genetic experiments, we propose that hydrogen is formed from pyruvate by multiple parallel pathways, one pathway involving formate as an intermediate, pyruvate-formate lyase, and formate-hydrogen lyase, comprised of HydA hydrogenase and formate dehydrogenase, and a formate-independent pathway involving pyruvate dehydrogenase. A reverse electron transport chain is potentially involved in a formate-hydrogen lyase-independent pathway. While pyruvate does not support a fermentative mode of growth in this microorganism, pyruvate, in the absence of an electron acceptor, increased cell viability in anaerobic, stationary-phase cultures, suggesting a role in the survival of S. oneidensis MR-1 under stationary-phase conditions. PMID:17189435

  17. Survival of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 to GPa pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Daniel, Isabelle; Eakins, Daniel; Meersman, Filip; McMillian, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Most life on Earth is thought to occupy near-surface environments under relatively mild conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salinity etc. That view is changing following discovery of extremophile organisms that prefer environments based on high or low T, extreme chemistries, or very high pressures. Over the past three decades, geomicrobiologists have discovered an extensive subsurface biosphere, that may account for between 1/10 to 1/3 of Earth's living biomass. We subjected samples of Shewanella oneidensis to several pressure cycles to examine its survival to static high pressures to above 1.5 GPa. Shewanella forms part of a genus that contains several piezophile species like S. violacea and S. benthica. We have obtained growth curves for populations recovered from high P conditions and cultured in the laboratory, before being subjected to even higher pressures. We have also carried out dynamic shock experiments using a specially designed cell to maintain high-P, low-T conditions during shock-recovery experiments and observe colony formation among the survivors. Colony counts, shape and growth curves allow us to compare the static vs dynamic pressure resistance of wild type vs pressure-adapted strains. Leverhulme

  18. Polyphasic Taxonomy of the GenusShewanellaand Description ofShewanellaoneidensis sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, K.

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA--DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  19. Induction of Rapid Detachment in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Thormann, Kai M.; Saville, Renée M.; Shukla, Soni; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2005-01-01

    Active detachment of cells from microbial biofilms is a critical yet poorly understood step in biofilm development. We discovered that detachment of cells from biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can be induced by arresting the medium flow in a hydrodynamic biofilm system. Induction of detachment was rapid, and substantial biofilm dispersal started as soon as 5 min after the stop of flow. We developed a confocal laser scanning microscopy-based assay to quantify detachment. The extent of biomass loss was found to be dependent on the time interval of flow stop and on the thickness of the biofilm. Up to 80% of the biomass of 16-h-old biofilms could be induced to detach. High-resolution microscopy studies revealed that detachment was associated with an overall loosening of the biofilm structure and a release of individual cells or small cell clusters. Swimming motility was not required for detachment. Although the loosening of cells from the biofilm structure was observed evenly throughout thin biofilms, the most pronounced detachment in thicker biofilms occurred in regions exposed to the flow of medium, suggesting a metabolic control of detachability. Deconvolution of the factors associated with the stop of medium flow revealed that a sudden decrease in oxygen tension is the predominant trigger for initiating detachment of individual cells. In contrast, carbon limitation did not trigger any substantial detachment, suggesting a physiological link between oxygen sensing or metabolism and detachment. In-frame deletions were introduced into genes encoding the known and putative global transcriptional regulators ArcA, CRP, and EtrA (FNR), which respond to changes in oxygen tension in S. oneidensis MR-1. Biofilms of null mutants in arcA and crp were severely impacted in the stop-of-flow-induced detachment response, suggesting a role for these genes in regulation of detachment. In contrast, an ΔetrA mutant displayed a variable detachment phenotype. From this genetic

  20. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, William D.; McDonough, J.; Senko, John M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kelly, Shelly D.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2008-10-15

    The reduction of uranium(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was studied to examine the effects of bioreduction kinetics and background electrolyte on the physical properties and reactivity to re-oxidation of the biogenic uraninite, UO2(s). Bioreduction experiments were conducted with uranyl acetate as the electron acceptor and sodium lactate as the electron donor under resting cell conditions in a 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, and in a PIPES-buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW). MR-1 was cultured in batch mode in a defined minimal medium with a specified air-to-medium volume ratio such that electron acceptor (O2) limiting conditions were reached just when cells were harvested for subsequent experiments. The rate of U(VI) bioreduction was manipulated by varying the cell density and the incubation temperature (1.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 20 _C or 2.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 37 _C) to generate U(IV) solids at ‘‘fast” and ‘‘slow” rates in the two different buffers. The presence of Ca in PBAGW buffer altered U(VI) speciation and solubility, and significantly decreased U(VI) bioreduction kinetics. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to measure uraninite particle size distributions produced under the four different conditions. The most common primary particle size was 2.9–3.0 nm regardless of U(VI) bioreduction rate or background electrolyte. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was also used to estimate uraninite particle size and was consistent with TEM results. The reactivity of the biogenic uraninite products with dissolved oxygen was tested, and neither U(VI) bioreduction rate nor background electrolyte had any statistical effect on oxidation rates. With MR-1, uraninite particle size was not controlled by the bioreduction rate of U(VI) or the background electrolyte. These results for MR-1, where U(VI) bioreduction rate had no discernible effect on uraninite particle size or oxidation rate, contrast with our recent research with

  1. The Electrogenic Bacterium Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 and its Mutants with Increased Reducing Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeikova, T. A.; Emelyanova, L. K.; Novikova, L. M.; Mordkovich, N. N.; Shakulov, R. S.; Debabov, V. G.

    2013-02-01

    Mutants of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 resistant to fosfomycin, a toxic analogue of phosphoenolpyruvate, were obtained. The mutants exhibited an increased reducing activity and a higher rate of lactate utilization. A correlation was shown between the rates of metabolism of oxidized substrates and the rate of reduction of methylene blue, a mediator of electron transport. The mutants of S.oneidensis MR-1 will be used in microbial fuel cells (MFC) to enhance energy production from organic compounds. The strain S. oneidensis MR-1 and its mutants with an increased electron production will be used as a good source of bioelectricity in MFC in the experiments on the International Space Station.

  2. Current Production and Metal Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Wild Type and Mutants.

    SciTech Connect

    Bretschger, Orianna; Obraztsova, Anna; Sturm, Carter A.; Chang, In Seop; Gorby, Yuri A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Barua, Soumitra; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong; Beliaev, Alex S.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Saffarini, Daad; Mansfeld, Florian; Kim, Byung Hong; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2007-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a Gram negative facultative anaerobe capable of utilizing a broad range of electron acceptors, including several solid substrates. S. oneidensis MR-1 can reduce Mn(IV) and Fe(III) oxides, and can produce current in microbial fuel cells. The mechanisms that are employed by S. oneidensis MR-1 to execute these processes have not yet been fully elucidated. Several different S. oneidensis MR-1 deletion mutants were generated and tested for current production and metal-oxide reduction. The results showed that a few key cytochromes play a role in all of the processes but that their degree of participation in each process is very different. Overall, these data suggest a very complex picture of electron transfer to solid and soluble substrates by S. oneidensis MR-1.

  3. Identification of diverse carbon utilization pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 via expression profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Michael E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Juhn, Frank S.; Serres, Margrethe H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gardner, Timothy S.

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and validated the first high-density expression array for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, consisting of 105 oligonucleotide probes differentially targeted to genes and intergenic regions of its genome. Beyond its use for global gene expression profiling, this microarray represents a platform for the identification of small non-coding RNAs, improved operon inference, and CHIP-chip studies.

  4. Recombinant engineering of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella oneidensis is known to respire with extracellular solid metal oxides (i.e., iron, manganese, uranium) as a terminal electron acceptor. It has become the focus of intensive research not only due to its important bioremediation features, but also as a potential organism for biological elec...

  5. Pressure effects on the chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases of the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the atmospheric pressure-adapted Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, Yuki; Nagae, Takayuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Imai, Takeo; Kato, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    The chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzymes were constructed from the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the shallow water Shewanella oneidensis genes. The properties of the enzymatic activities under pressure conditions indicated that the central region, which contained the active center and the dimer forming domains, was shown to be the most important region for pressure tolerance in the deep-sea enzyme.

  6. Formate Metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis Generates Proton Motive Force and Prevents Growth without an Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Aunica L.; Brutinel, Evan D.; Joo, Heena; Maysonet, Rebecca; VanDrisse, Chelsey M.; Kotloski, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that thrives in redox-stratified environments due to its ability to utilize a wide array of terminal electron acceptors. Conversely, the electron donors utilized by S. oneidensis are more limited and include products of primary fermentation such as lactate, pyruvate, formate, and hydrogen. Lactate, pyruvate, and hydrogen metabolisms in S. oneidensis have been described previously, but little is known about the role of formate oxidation in the ecophysiology of these bacteria. Formate is produced by S. oneidensis through pyruvate formate lyase during anaerobic growth on carbon sources that enter metabolism at or above the level of pyruvate, and the genome contains three gene clusters predicted to encode three complete formate dehydrogenase complexes. To determine the contribution of each complex to formate metabolism, strains lacking one, two, or all three annotated formate dehydrogenase gene clusters were generated and examined for growth rates and yields on a variety of carbon sources. Here, we report that formate oxidation contributes to both the growth rate and yield of S. oneidensis through the generation of proton motive force. Exogenous formate also greatly accelerated growth on N-acetylglucosamine, a carbon source normally utilized very slowly by S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions. Surprisingly, deletion of all three formate dehydrogenase gene clusters enabled growth of S. oneidensis using pyruvate in the absence of a terminal electron acceptor, a mode of growth never before observed in these bacteria. Our results demonstrate that formate oxidation is a fundamental strategy under anaerobic conditions for energy conservation in S. oneidensis. IMPORTANCE Shewanella species have garnered interest in biotechnology applications for their ability to respire extracellular terminal electron acceptors, such as insoluble iron oxides and electrodes. While much effort has gone into studying the

  7. Robustness of flux distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under environmental stress and genetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Martin, H. G.; Keasling, J.; Tang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The environmental important bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, has the significantly different growth rates under normal growth (doubling time=3hrs) in the minimal lactate medium, salt stress (doubling time > 6 hrs), and enhanced growth with amino acids supplementation (doubling time <1.5hrs). 13C based metabolic flux analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 indicates that the relative central metabolism maintains stable under all growth conditions. Furthermore, screen of MR-1 transposon mutants using high throughput 13C isotopomer analysis method also indicates the robustness of central metabolism under genetic perturbations. These observations reveal a rigid physiology in the level of flux distribution in MR-1, in contrast to the significant change of transcriptomes and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. This study provides evidence that microbial metabolism maintains metabolic stability under various environmental conditions, rather than being geared towards growth rate maximization.

  8. Identification of 42 possible cytochrome C genes in the Shewanella oneidensis genome and characterization of six soluble cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Terry E; Tsapin, Alexandre I; Vandenberghe, Isabel; de Smet, Lina; Frishman, Dmitrij; Nealson, Kenneth H; Cusanovich, Michael A; van Beeumen, Jozef J

    2004-01-01

    Through pattern matching of the cytochrome c heme-binding site (CXXCH) against the genome sequence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, we identified 42 possible cytochrome c genes (27 of which should be soluble) out of a total of 4758. However, we found only six soluble cytochromes c in extracts of S. oneidensis grown under several different conditions: (1) a small tetraheme cytochrome c, (2) a tetraheme flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase, (3) a diheme cytochrome c4, (4) a monoheme cytochrome c5, (5) a monoheme cytochrome c', and (6) a diheme bacterial cytochrome c peroxidase. These cytochromes were identified either through N-terminal or complete amino acid sequence determination combined with mass spectroscopy. All six cytochromes were about 10-fold more abundant when cells were grown at low than at high aeration, whereas the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase was specifically induced by anaerobic growth on fumarate. When adjusted for the different heme content, the monoheme cytochrome c5 is as abundant as are the small tetraheme cytochrome and the tetraheme fumarate reductase. Published results on regulation of cytochromes from DNA microarrays and 2D-PAGE differ somewhat from our results, emphasizing the importance of multifaceted analyses in proteomics.

  9. Systematic screening of carbon-based anode materials for microbial fuel cells with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Kipf, Elena; Koch, Julia; Geiger, Bettina; Erben, Johannes; Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2013-10-01

    We present a systematic screening of carbon-based anode materials for microbial fuel cells with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Under anoxic conditions nanoporous activated carbon cloth is a superior anode material in terms of current density normalized to the projected anode area and anode volume (24.0±0.3 μA cm(-2) and 482±7 μA cm(-3) at -0.2 vs. SCE, respectively). The good performance can be attributed to the high specific surface area of the material, which is available for mediated electron transfer through self-secreted flavins. Under aerated conditions no influence of the specific surface area is observed, which we attribute to a shift from primary indirect electron transfer by mediators to direct electron transfer via adherent cells. Furthermore, we show that an aerated initial growth phase enhances the current density under subsequent anoxic conditions fivefold when compared to a similar experiment that was conducted under permanently anoxic conditions.

  10. Extracellular respiration of dimethyl sulfoxide by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Vali, Hojatollah; Lies, Douglas P; Newman, Dianne K

    2006-03-21

    Shewanella species are renowned for their respiratory versatility, including their ability to respire poorly soluble substrates by using enzymatic machinery that is localized to the outside of the cell. The ability to engage in "extracellular respiration" to date has focused primarily on respiration of minerals. Here, we identify two gene clusters in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that each contain homologs of genes required for metal reduction and genes that are predicted to encode dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase subunits. Molecular and genetic analyses of these clusters indicate that one (SO1427-SO1432) is required for anaerobic respiration of DMSO. We show that DMSO respiration is an extracellular respiratory process through the analysis of mutants defective in type II secretion, which is required for transporting proteins to the outer membrane in Shewanella. Moreover, immunogold labeling of DMSO reductase subunits reveals that they reside on the outer leaflet of the outer membrane under anaerobic conditions. The extracellular localization of the DMSO reductase in S. oneidensis suggests these organisms may perceive DMSO in the environment as an insoluble compound.

  11. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Learman, Deric R.; Yi, Haakrho; Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Stanton L.; Geesey, Gill G.; Stevens, Ann M.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2009-01-05

    The role of LuxS in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been examined by transcriptomic profiling, biochemical, and physiological experiments. The results indicate that a mutation in luxS alters biofilm development, not by altering quorum-sensing abilities but by disrupting the activated methyl cycle (AMC). The S. oneidensis wild type can produce a luminescence response in the AI-2 reporter strain Vibrio harveyi MM32. This luminescence response is abolished upon the deletion of luxS. The deletion of luxS also alters biofilm formations in static and flowthrough conditions. Genetic complementation restores the mutant biofilm defect, but the addition of synthetic AI-2 has no effect. These results suggest that AI-2 is not used as a quorum-sensing signal to regulate biofilm development in S. oneidensis. Growth on various sulfur sources was examined because of the involvement of LuxS in the AMC. A mutation in luxS produced a reduced ability to grow with methionine as the sole sulfur source. Methionine is a key metabolite used in the AMC to produce a methyl source in the cell and to recycle homocysteine. These data suggest that LuxS is important to metabolizing methionine and the AMC in S. oneidensis.

  12. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. It is unclear in the g-proteobacterium S. oneidensis whether TCA is also regulated by Fur and RyhB. Results: In the present study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. Consistently, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and experimentally demonstrated the gene expression. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. Conclusions: These cumulative results delineate an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other g-proteobacteria. This work represents a step forward for understanding the unique regulation in S. oneidensis.

  13. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention.

  14. Electron acceptor dependence of electron shuttle secretion and extracellular electron transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Bing-Bing; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Dao-Bo; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an extensively studied dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a great potential for bioremediation and electricity generation. It secretes flavins as electron shuttles which play an important role in extracellular electron transfer. However, the influence of various environmental factors on the secretion of flavins is largely unknown. Here, the effects of electron acceptors, including fumarate, ferrihydrite, Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), nitrate and trimethylamine oxide (TMAO), on the secretion of flavins were investigated. The level of riboflavin and riboflavin-5'-phosphate (FMN) secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 varied considerably with different electron acceptors. While nitrate and ferrihydrite suppressed the secretion of flavins in relative to fumarate, Fe(III)-NTA and TMAO promoted such a secretion and greatly enhanced ferrihydrite reduction and electricity generation. This work clearly demonstrates that electron acceptors could considerably affect the secretion of flavins and consequent microbial EET. Such impacts of electron acceptors in the environment deserve more attention. PMID:23558182

  15. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils.

  16. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  17. Genomic reconstruction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 metabolism reveals previously uncharacterized machinery for lactate utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Yang, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Osterman, Andrei L.; Dervyn, Etienne; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Collart, Frank R.; Scott, J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2009-02-24

    The ability to utilize lactate as a sole source of carbon and energy is one of the key metabolic signatures of Shewanellae, a diverse group of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria commonly found in aquatic and sedimentary environments. Nonetheless, homology searches failed to recognize orthologs of previously described bacterial D- or L-lactate oxidizing enzymes (Escherichia coli genes dld and lldD) in any of the 13 analyzed genomes of Shewanella spp. Using comparative genomic techniques, we identified a conserved chromosomal gene cluster in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (locus tag: SO1522-SO1518) containing lactate permease and candidate genes for both D- and L-lactate dehydrogenase enzymes. The predicted D-LDH gene (dldD, SO1521) is a distant homolog of FAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase from yeast, whereas the predicted L-LDH is encoded by three genes with previously unknown functions (lldEGF, SO1520-19-18). Through a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques, we experimentally confirmed the predicted physiological role of these novel genes in S. oneidensis MR-1 and carried out successful functional validation studies in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We conclusively showed that dldD and lldEFG encode fully functional D-and L-LDH enzymes, which catalyze the oxidation of the respective lactate stereoisomers to pyruvate. Notably, the S. oneidensis MR-1 LldEFG enzyme is the first described example of a multi-subunit lactate oxidase. Comparative analysis of >400 bacterial species revealed the presence of LldEFG and Dld in a broad range of diverse species accentuating the potential importance of these previously unknown proteins in microbial metabolism.

  18. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III) Reduction in Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA), an integral outer-membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB), and an outer-membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC). Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer-membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three) and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III) citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC/mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations) are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA/MtrE/OmcA is able to reduce iron(III) citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications toward the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production. PMID:22363330

  19. Dosage-Dependent Proteome Response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Acute Chromate Challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Chourey, Karuna; Shah, Manesh B; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2007-01-01

    Proteome alterations in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in response to different acute dose challenges (0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM) of the toxic metal chromate [Cr(VI)] were characterized with multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS on a linear trapping quadrupole MS. A total of 2,406 functionally diverse proteins were identified, with a subset demonstrating dosage-dependent up- and down-regulated expression, such as proteins involved in detoxification and iron binding and transport.

  20. AMT Tag Approach to Proteomic Characterization of Deinococcus Radiodurans and Shewanella Oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Hixson, Kim K.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Tolic, Nikola; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-09-01

    Biology is transitioning from a largely qualitative, mostly descriptive science to a quantitative and ultimately predictive science. Advances in high throughput DNA sequencing have made increasing numbers of genome sequences available and enabled a “systems” level analysis of complex biological organisms. The ability to quantitatively measure the array of proteins, also termed the proteome, in prokaryotic cells and communities of cells is key to understanding microbial systems. This chapter focuses on the utility of the AMT tag mass spectrometric approach used to characterize the proteomes of two microbes, Deinococcus radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

  1. The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  2. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-07-01

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well-studied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  3. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 -a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  4. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c-type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lianming; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha B.; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, David E.; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-06-24

    Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c-type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr -1, 36 in-frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c-type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c-type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the wellstudied c-type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr -1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c-type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis.

  5. Impacts of Shewanella oneidensis c‐type cytochromes on aerobic and anaerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haichun; Barua, Soumitra; Liang, Yili; Wu, Lin; Dong, Yangyang; Reed, Samantha; Chen, Jingrong; Culley, Dave; Kennedy, David; Yang, Yunfeng; He, Zhili; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, James K.; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Summary Shewanella are renowned for their ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors (EA) for respiration, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c‐type cytochromes. To investigate the involvement of c‐type cytochrome proteins in aerobic and anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis Mr ‐1, 36 in‐frame deletion mutants, among possible 41 predicted, c‐type cytochrome genes were obtained. The potential involvement of each individual c‐type cytochrome in the reduction of a variety of EAs was assessed individually as well as in competition experiments. While results on the well‐studied c‐type cytochromes CymA(SO4591) and MtrC(SO1778) were consistent with previous findings, collective observations were very interesting: the responses of S. oneidensis Mr ‐1 to low and highly toxic metals appeared to be significantly different; CcoO, CcoP and PetC, proteins involved in aerobic respiration in various organisms, played critical roles in both aerobic and anaerobic respiration with highly toxic metals as EA. In addition, these studies also suggested that an uncharacterized c‐type cytochrome (SO4047) may be important to both aerobiosis and anaerobiosis. PMID:21255343

  6. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  7. Programming the quorum sensing-based AND gate in Shewanella oneidensis for logic gated-microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yidan; Yang, Yun; Katz, Evgeny; Song, Hao

    2015-03-11

    An AND logic gate based on a synthetic quorum-sensing (QS) module was constructed in a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mtrA knockout mutant. The presence of two input signals activated the expression of a periplasmic decaheme cytochrome MtrA to regenerate the extracellular electron transfer conduit, enabling the construction of AND-gated microbial fuel cells.

  8. Exploring the Roles of DNA Methylation in the Metal-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Bendall, Matthew L.; Luong, Khai; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Blow, Matthew; Korlach, Jonas; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We performed whole-genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and other cellular processes. Single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, including three novel targets for type I restriction/modification enzymes. The sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found that S. oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of differentially expressed genes under these conditions, suggesting that DNA methylation is not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicates that DNA methylation may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication. PMID:23995632

  9. Global profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: expression of hypothetical genes and improved functional annotations.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Picone, Alex F; Galperin, Michael Y; Romine, Margaret F; Higdon, Roger; Makarova, Kira S; Kolker, Natali; Anderson, Gordon A; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Auberry, Kenneth J; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Beliaev, Alex S; Edlefsen, Paul; Elias, Dwayne A; Gorby, Yuri A; Holzman, Ted; Klappenbach, Joel A; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Land, Miriam L; Lipton, Mary S; McCue, Lee-Ann; Monroe, Matthew; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Purvine, Samuel; Serres, Margrethe H; Tsapin, Sasha; Zakrajsek, Brian A; Zhu, Wenhong; Zhou, Jizhong; Larimer, Frank W; Lawrence, Charles E; Riley, Monica; Collart, Frank R; Yates, John R; Smith, Richard D; Giometti, Carol S; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M

    2005-02-01

    The gamma-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a metabolically versatile organism that can reduce a wide range of organic compounds, metal ions, and radionuclides. Similar to most other sequenced organisms, approximately 40% of the predicted ORFs in the S. oneidensis genome were annotated as uncharacterized "hypothetical" genes. We implemented an integrative approach by using experimental and computational analyses to provide more detailed insight into gene function. Global expression profiles were determined for cells after UV irradiation and under aerobic and suboxic growth conditions. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses confidently identified 538 hypothetical genes as expressed in S. oneidensis cells both as mRNAs and proteins (33% of all predicted hypothetical proteins). Publicly available analysis tools and databases and the expression data were applied to improve the annotation of these genes. The annotation results were scored by using a seven-category schema that ranked both confidence and precision of the functional assignment. We were able to identify homologs for nearly all of these hypothetical proteins (97%), but could confidently assign exact biochemical functions for only 16 proteins (category 1; 3%). Altogether, computational and experimental evidence provided functional assignments or insights for 240 more genes (categories 2-5; 45%). These functional annotations advance our understanding of genes involved in vital cellular processes, including energy conversion, ion transport, secondary metabolism, and signal transduction. We propose that this integrative approach offers a valuable means to undertake the enormous challenge of characterizing the rapidly growing number of hypothetical proteins with each newly sequenced genome. PMID:15684069

  10. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O'Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  11. The role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer surface structures in extracellular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhenni, Rachida; Vora, Gary J.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Shirodkar, Sheetal; Brockman, K. L.; Ray, Ricky; Wu, Peter; Johnson, Brandy J.; Biddle, E. M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Little, Brenda; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Saffarini, Daad

    2010-04-20

    Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobe that uses more than 14 different terminal electron acceptors for respiration. These include metal oxides and hydroxyoxides, and toxic metals such as uranium and chromium. Mutants deficient in metal reduction were isolated using the mariner transposon derivative, minihimar RB1. These included mutants with transposon insertions in the prepilin peptidase and type II secretion system genes. All mutants were deficient in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and exhibited slow growth when DMSO was used as the electron acceptor. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains one prepilin peptidase gene, pilD. A similar prepilin peptidase that may function in the processing of type II secretion prepilins was not found. Single and multiple chromosomal deletions of four putative type IV pilin genes did not affect Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. These results indicate that PilD in S. oneidensis is responsible for processing both type IV and type II secretion prepilin proteins. Type IV pili do not appear to be required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  12. Exploring the roles of DNA methylation in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bendall, Matthew L.; Luong, Khai; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Blow, Matthew; Korlach, Jonas; Deutschbauer, Adam; Malmstrom, Rex

    2013-08-30

    We performed whole genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella 17 oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and 18 other cellular processes. Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing 19 revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the 20 genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, 21 including three novel targets for Type I restriction/modification enzymes. The 22 sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via 23 SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found S. 24 oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed 25 different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially 26 methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of 27 differentially expressed genes in these conditions, suggesting DNA methylation is 28 not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment 29 of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicate DNA methylation 30 may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia 31 coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many 32 Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may 33 also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication.

  13. Crp-dependent cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huihui; Chen, Haijiang; Wang, Jixuan; Zhou, Guangqi; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2013-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is able to respire on a variety of organic and inorganic substrates, including nitrate and nitrite. Conversion of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonium is catalysed by periplasmic nitrate and nitrite reductases (NAP and NRF) respectively. Global regulator Crp (cyclic AMP receptor protein) is essential for growth of S. oneidensis on both nitrate and nitrite. In this study, we discovered that crp mutants are not only severely deficient in nitrate or nitrite respiration, but are also hypersensitive to nitrite. This hypersusceptibility phenotype is independent of nitrite respiration. Using random transposon mutagenesis, we obtained 73 Δcrp suppressor strains resistant to nitrite. Transposon insertion sites in 24 suppressor strains were exclusively mapped in the region upstream of the cyd operon encoding a cytochrome bd oxidase, resulting in expression of the operon now driven by a Crp-independent promoter. Further investigation indicated that the promoter in suppressor strains comes from the transposon. Mutational analysis of the cydB gene (encoding the essential subunit II of the bd oxidase) confirmed that the cytochrome bd oxidase confers nitrite resistance to S. oneidensis.

  14. A Crp-Dependent Two-Component System Regulates Nitrate and Nitrite Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yangyang; Wang, Jixuan; Fu, Huihui; Zhou, Guangqi; Shi, Miaomiao; Gao, Haichun

    2012-01-01

    We have previously illustrated the nitrate/nitrite respiratory pathway of Shewanella oneidensis, which is renowned for its remarkable versatility in respiration. Here we investigated the systems regulating the pathway with a reliable approach which enables characterization of mutants impaired in nitrate/nitrite respiration by guaranteeing biomass. The S. oneidensis genome encodes an Escherichia coli NarQ/NarX homolog SO3981 and two E. coli NarP/NarL homologs SO1860 and SO3982. Results of physiological characterization and mutational analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis possesses a single two-component system (TCS) for regulation of nitrate/nitrite respiration, consisting of the sensor kinase SO3981(NarQ) and the response regulator SO3982(NarP). The TCS directly controls the transcription of nap and nrfA (genes encoding nitrate and nitrite reductases, respectively) but regulates the former less tightly than the latter. Additionally, phosphorylation at residue 57 of SO3982 is essential for its DNA-binding capacity. At the global control level, Crp is found to regulate expression of narQP as well as nap and nrfA. In contrast to NarP-NarQ, Crp is more essential for nap rather than nrfA. PMID:23240049

  15. Global profiling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Expression of hypothetical genes and improved functional annotations

    SciTech Connect

    Picone, Alex F.; Galperin, Michael Y.; Romine, Margaret; Higdon, Roger; Makarova, Kira S.; Kolker, Natali; Anderson, Gordon A; Qiu, Xiaoyun; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Beliaev, Alexander S; Edlefsen, Paul; Elias, Dwayne A.; Gorby, Dr. Yuri A.; Holzman, Ted; Klappenbach, Joel; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Land, Miriam L; Lipton, Mary S.; McCue, Lee Ann; Monroe, Matthew; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Purvine, Samuel; Serres, Margrethe H.; Tsapin, Sasha; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Zhu, Wenguang; Zhou, Jizhong; Larimer, Frank W; Lawrence, Charles E.; Riley, Monica; Collart, Frank; YatesIII, John R.; Smith, Richard D.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, James K; Tiedje, James M.

    2005-01-01

    The gamma-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a metabolically versatile organism that can reduce a wide range of organic compounds, metal ions, and radionuclides. Similar to most other sequenced organisms, approximate to40% of the predicted ORFs in the S. oneidensis genome were annotated as uncharacterized "hypothetical" genes. We implemented an integrative approach by using experimental and computational analyses to provide more detailed insight into gene function. Global expression profiles were determined for cells after UV irradiation and under aerobic and suboxic growth conditions. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses confidently identified 538 hypothetical genes as expressed in S. oneidensis cells both as mRNAs and proteins (33% of all predicted hypothetical proteins). Publicly available analysis tools and databases and the expression data were applied to improve the annotation of these genes. The annotation results were scored by using a seven-category schema that ranked both confidence and precision of the functional assignment. We were able to identify homologs for nearly all of these hypothetical proteins (97%), but could confidently assign exact biochemical functions for only 16 proteins (category 1; 3%). Altogether, computational and experimental evidence provided functional assignments or insights for 240 more genes (categories 2-5; 45%). These functional annotations advance our understanding of genes involved in vital cellular processes, including energy conversion, ion transport, secondary metabolism, and signal transduction. We propose that this integrative approach offers a valuable means to undertake the enormous challenge of characterizing the rapidly growing number of hypothetical proteins with each newly sequenced genome.

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Early Surface-Associated Growth of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Gödeke, Julia; Binnenkade, Lucas; Thormann, Kai M.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation starts with single cells attaching to a surface, however, little is known about the initial attachment steps and the adaptation to the surface-associated life style. Here, we describe a hydrodynamic system that allows easy harvest of cells at very early biofilm stages. Using the metal ion-reducing gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model organism, we analyzed the transcriptional changes occurring during surface-associated growth between 15 and 60 minutes after attachment. 230 genes were significantly upregulated and 333 were downregulated by a factor of ≥2. Main functional categories of the corresponding gene products comprise metabolism, uptake and transport, regulation, and hypothetical proteins. Among the genes highly upregulated those implicated in iron uptake are highly overrepresented, strongly indicating that S. oneidensis MR-1 has a high demand for iron during surface attachment and initial biofilm stages. Subsequent microscopic analysis of biofilm formation under hydrodynamic conditions revealed that addition of Fe(II) significantly stimulated biofilm formation of S. oneidensis MR-1 while planktonic growth was not affected. Our approach to harvest cells for transcriptional analysis of early biofilm stages is expected to be easily adapted to other bacterial species. PMID:22860070

  17. A Ferrous Iron Exporter Mediates Iron Resistance in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brittany D; Brutinel, Evan D; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium frequently found in aquatic sediments. In the absence of oxygen, S. oneidensis can respire extracellular, insoluble oxidized metals, such as iron (hydr)oxides, making it intimately involved in environmental metal and nutrient cycling. The reduction of ferric iron (Fe(3+)) results in the production of ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) ions, which remain soluble under certain conditions and are toxic to cells at higher concentrations. We have identified an inner membrane protein in S. oneidensis, encoded by the gene SO_4475 and here called FeoE, which is important for survival during anaerobic iron respiration. FeoE, a member of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) protein family, functions to export excess Fe(2+) from the MR-1 cytoplasm. Mutants lacking feoE exhibit an increased sensitivity to Fe(2+). The export function of FeoE is specific for Fe(2+), as an feoE mutant is equally sensitive to other metal ions known to be substrates of other CDF proteins (Cd(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), or Zn(2+)). The substrate specificity of FeoE differs from that of FieF, the Escherichia coli homolog of FeoE, which has been reported to be a Cd(2+)/Zn(2+) or Fe(2+)/Zn(2+) exporter. A complemented feoE mutant has an increased growth rate in the presence of excess Fe(2+) compared to that of the ΔfeoE mutant complemented with fieF. It is possible that FeoE has evolved to become an efficient and specific Fe(2+) exporter in response to the high levels of iron often present in the types of environmental niches in which Shewanella species can be found.

  18. The roles of CymA in support of the respiratory flexibility of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marritt, Sophie; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella species are isolated from the oxic/anoxic regions of seawater and aquatic sediments where redox conditions fluctuate in time and space. Colonization of these environments is by virtue of flexible respiratory chains, many of which are notable for the ability to reduce extracellular substrates including the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) contained in oxide and phyllosilicate minerals. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 serves as a model organism to consider the biochemical basis of this flexibility. In the present paper, we summarize the various systems that serve to branch the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 in order that electrons from quinol oxidation can be delivered the various terminal electron acceptors able to support aerobic and anaerobic growth. This serves to highlight several unanswered questions relating to the regulation of respiratory electron transport in Shewanella and the central role(s) of the tetrahaem-containing quinol dehydrogenase CymA in that process.

  19. Probing regulon of ArcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by integrated genomic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin Koo; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    The Arc two-component system is a global regulator controlling many genes involved in aerobic/anaerobic respiration and fermentative metabolism in Escherichia coli. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains a gene encoding a putative ArcA homolog with {approx} 81% amino acid sequence identity to the E. coli ArcA protein but not a full-length arcB gene. To understand the role of ArcA in S. oneidensis, an arcA deletion strain was constructed and subjected to both physiological characterization and microarray analysis. Compared to the wild-type MR-1, the mutant exhibited impaired aerobic growth and a defect in utilizing DMSO in the absence of O{sub 2}. Microarray analyses on cells grown aerobically and anaerobically on fumarate revealed that expression of 1009 genes was significantly affected (p < 0.05) by the mutation. In contrast to E. coli ArcA, the protein appears to be dispensable in regulation of the TCA cycle in S. oneidensis. To further determine genes regulated by the Arc system, an ArcA recognition weight matrix from DNA-binding data and bioinformatics analysis was generated and used to produce an ArcA sequence affinity map. By combining both techniques, we identified an ArcA regulon of at least 50 operons, of which only 6 were found to be directly controlled by ArcA in E. coli. These results indicate that the Arc system in S. oneidensis differs from that in E. coli substantially in terms of its physiological function and regulon while their binding motif are strikingly similar.

  20. Phenotypic Characterisation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to X-Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley R.; Correa, Elon; Xu, Yun; AlMasoud, Najla; Pimblott, Simon M.; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis have the potential to influence the post-closure evolution of a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes and to affect the solubility of some radionuclides. Furthermore, their potential to reduce both Fe(III) and radionuclides can be harnessed for the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated land. As some such sites are likely to have significant radiation fluxes, there is a need to characterise the impact of radiation stress on such microorganisms. There have, however, been few global cell analyses on the impact of ionizing radiation on subsurface bacteria, so here we address the metabolic response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to acute doses of X-radiation. UV/Vis spectroscopy and CFU counts showed that although X-radiation decreased initial viability and extended the lag phase of batch cultures, final biomass yields remained unchanged. FT-IR spectroscopy of whole cells indicated an increase in lipid associated vibrations and decreases in vibrations tentatively assigned to nucleic acids, phosphate, saccharides and amines. MALDI-TOF-MS detected an increase in total protein expression in cultures exposed to 12 Gy. At 95 Gy, a decrease in total protein levels was generally observed, although an increase in a putative cold shock protein was observed, which may be related to the radiation stress response of this organism. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to these FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS spectral data suggested that an irradiated phenotype developed throughout subsequent generations. This study suggests that significant alteration to the metabolism of S. oneidensis MR-1 is incurred as a result of X-irradiation and that dose dependent changes to specific biomolecules characterise this response. Irradiated S. oneidensis also displayed enhanced levels of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction, though the mechanism underpinning this phenomenon is unclear. PMID

  1. Phenotypic Characterisation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to X-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashley R; Correa, Elon; Xu, Yun; AlMasoud, Najla; Pimblott, Simon M; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis have the potential to influence the post-closure evolution of a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes and to affect the solubility of some radionuclides. Furthermore, their potential to reduce both Fe(III) and radionuclides can be harnessed for the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated land. As some such sites are likely to have significant radiation fluxes, there is a need to characterise the impact of radiation stress on such microorganisms. There have, however, been few global cell analyses on the impact of ionizing radiation on subsurface bacteria, so here we address the metabolic response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to acute doses of X-radiation. UV/Vis spectroscopy and CFU counts showed that although X-radiation decreased initial viability and extended the lag phase of batch cultures, final biomass yields remained unchanged. FT-IR spectroscopy of whole cells indicated an increase in lipid associated vibrations and decreases in vibrations tentatively assigned to nucleic acids, phosphate, saccharides and amines. MALDI-TOF-MS detected an increase in total protein expression in cultures exposed to 12 Gy. At 95 Gy, a decrease in total protein levels was generally observed, although an increase in a putative cold shock protein was observed, which may be related to the radiation stress response of this organism. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to these FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS spectral data suggested that an irradiated phenotype developed throughout subsequent generations. This study suggests that significant alteration to the metabolism of S. oneidensis MR-1 is incurred as a result of X-irradiation and that dose dependent changes to specific biomolecules characterise this response. Irradiated S. oneidensis also displayed enhanced levels of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction, though the mechanism underpinning this phenomenon is unclear.

  2. Phenotypic Characterisation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to X-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ashley R; Correa, Elon; Xu, Yun; AlMasoud, Najla; Pimblott, Simon M; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Biogeochemical processes mediated by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella oneidensis have the potential to influence the post-closure evolution of a geological disposal facility for radioactive wastes and to affect the solubility of some radionuclides. Furthermore, their potential to reduce both Fe(III) and radionuclides can be harnessed for the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated land. As some such sites are likely to have significant radiation fluxes, there is a need to characterise the impact of radiation stress on such microorganisms. There have, however, been few global cell analyses on the impact of ionizing radiation on subsurface bacteria, so here we address the metabolic response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to acute doses of X-radiation. UV/Vis spectroscopy and CFU counts showed that although X-radiation decreased initial viability and extended the lag phase of batch cultures, final biomass yields remained unchanged. FT-IR spectroscopy of whole cells indicated an increase in lipid associated vibrations and decreases in vibrations tentatively assigned to nucleic acids, phosphate, saccharides and amines. MALDI-TOF-MS detected an increase in total protein expression in cultures exposed to 12 Gy. At 95 Gy, a decrease in total protein levels was generally observed, although an increase in a putative cold shock protein was observed, which may be related to the radiation stress response of this organism. Multivariate statistical analyses applied to these FT-IR and MALDI-TOF-MS spectral data suggested that an irradiated phenotype developed throughout subsequent generations. This study suggests that significant alteration to the metabolism of S. oneidensis MR-1 is incurred as a result of X-irradiation and that dose dependent changes to specific biomolecules characterise this response. Irradiated S. oneidensis also displayed enhanced levels of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide reduction, though the mechanism underpinning this phenomenon is unclear. PMID

  3. Molecular Underpinnings of Nitrite Effect on CymA-Dependent Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Miao; Fu, Huihui; Yin, Jianhua; Yuan, Jie; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella exhibit a remarkable versatility of respiration, with a diverse array of electron acceptors (EAs). In environments where these bacteria thrive, multiple EAs are usually present. However, we know little about strategies by which these EAs and their interaction affect ecophysiology of Shewanella. In this study, we demonstrate in the model strain, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, that nitrite, not through nitric oxide to which it may convert, inhibits respiration of fumarate, and probably many other EAs whose reduction depends on quinol dehydrogenase CymA. This is achieved via the repression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, a second messenger required for activation of cAMP-receptor protein (Crp) which plays a primary role in regulation of respiration. If nitrite is not promptly removed, intracellular cAMP levels drop, and this impairs Crp activity. As a result, the production of nitrite reductase NrfA, CymA, and fumarate reductase FccA is substantially reduced. In contrast, nitrite can be simultaneously respired with trimethylamine N-oxide, resulting in enhanced biomass. PMID:27493647

  4. Transcriptional analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with an electrode compared to Fe(III)citrate or oxygen as terminal electron acceptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Shewanella oneidensis is a target of extensive research efforts in the fields of bioelectrochemical systems and bioremediation because of its versatile metabolic capabilities, especially in regards to the respiration with extracellular electron acceptors. Here, we took a global approach ...

  5. An essential role for UshA in processing of extracellular flavin electron shuttles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Covington, Elizabeth D; Gelbmann, Christopher B; Kotloski, Nicholas J; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-10-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis can reduce a number of insoluble extracellular metals. Direct adsorption of cells to the metal surface is not necessary, and it has been shown that S. oneidensis releases low concentrations flavins, including riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), into the surrounding medium to act as extracellular electron shuttles. However, the mechanism of flavin release by Shewanella remains unknown. We have conducted a transposon mutagenesis screen to identify mutants deficient in extracellular flavin accumulation. Mutations in ushA, encoding a predicted 5'-nucleotidase, resulted in accumulation of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) in culture supernatants, with a corresponding decrease in FMN and riboflavin. Cellular extracts of S. oneidensis convert FAD to FMN, whereas extracts of ushA mutants do not, and fractionation experiments show that UshA activity is periplasmic. We hypothesize that S. oneidensis secretes FAD into the periplasmic space, where it is hydrolysed by UshA to FMN and adenosine monophosphate (AMP). FMN diffuses through outer membrane porins where it accelerates extracellular electron transfer, and AMP is dephosphorylated by UshA and reassimilated by the cell. We predict that transport of FAD into the periplasm also satisfies the cofactor requirement of the unusual periplasmic fumarate reductase found in Shewanella.

  6. Identification of Mobile Elements and Pseudogenes in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Margaret F.; Carlson, Timothy; Norbeck, Angela D.; McCue, Lee Ann; Lipton, Mary S.

    2008-05-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is the first of 22 different Shewanella spp. whose genomes have been or are being sequenced and thus serves as the model organism for studying the functional repertoire of the Shewanella genus. The original MR-1 genome annotation revealed a large number of transposase genes and pseudogenes, indicating that many of the genome’s functions may be decaying. Comparative analyses of the sequenced Shewanella strains suggest that 209 genes in MR-1 have in-frame stop codons, frameshifts, or interruptions and/or are truncated and that 65 of the original pseudogene predictions were erroneous. Among the decaying functions are that of one of three chemotaxis clusters, type I pilus production, starch utilization, and nitrite respiration. Many of the mutations could be attributed to members of 41 different types of insertion sequence (IS) elements and three types of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements identified here for the first time. The high copy numbers of individual mobile elements (up to 71) are expected to promote large-scale genome recombination events, as evidenced by the displacement of the algA promoter. The ability of MR-1 to acquire foreign genes via reactions catalyzed by both the integron integrase and the ISSod25-encoded integrases is suggested by the presence of attC sites and genes whose sequences are characteristic of other species downstream of each site. This large number of mobile elements and multiple potential sites for integrasemediated acquisition of foreign DNA indicate that the MR-1 genome is exceptionally dynamic, with many functions and regulatory control points in the process of decay or reinvention.

  7. Mutants Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Effective in Generating Bioelectricity in Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeikova, T. A.; Emelyanova, L. K.; Novikova, L. M.; Shakulov, R. S.; Sidoruk, K. V.; Smirnov, I. A.; Ilyin, V. K.; Soldatov, P. E.; Tyurin-Kuz'min, A. Y.; Smolenskaya, T. S.; Debabov, V. G.

    2013-02-01

    The capability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants FRS1 and FRB1, characterized by a high reducing activity, to generate electricity was measured in microbial fuel cells (MFC) of different types. The reducing activity of these mutants was previously identified with respect to the rate of discoloration (reduction) of methylene blueё, a dye that served as an electron transfer mediator. The present study demonstrated that the rate of MB discoloration was in direct correlation with the level of voltage in MFC of the above strains. In case when the mutants were used, the parameter in MFC proved to be 30-40% greater than in the case of the parent strain. In the course of this investigation MFC characteristics were identified, optimal electrode materials and ion-selective membranes selected, and MFC laboratory mockups manufactured.

  8. Shewregdb: Database and visualization environment for experimental and predicted regulatory information in Shewanella oneidensis mr-1

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Mustafa; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Leuze, Mike; Kora, Guruprasad; Romine, Margaret F.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2009-10-15

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an important model organism for environmental research as it has an exceptional metabolic and respiratory versatility regulated by a complex regulatory network. We have developed a database to collect experimental and computational data relating to regulation of gene and protein expression and a visualization environment that enables integration of these data types. The regulatory information in the database was collected from the published literature and different Internet resources. It includes predictions of DNA regulator binding sites, sigma factor binding sites, transcription units, operons, promoters, and RNA regulators including non-coding RNAs, riboswitches, and different types of terminators. A visualization environment based on GBrowser was developed for accessing the collected information and for its overlaying with experimental data (experimental results from studies employing microarrays, proteomics, and/or gene mutagenesis) and other genome annotations.

  9. An arsenic-specific biosensor with genetically engineered Shewanella oneidensis in a bioelectrochemical system.

    PubMed

    Webster, Dylan P; TerAvest, Michaela A; Doud, Devin F R; Chakravorty, Arun; Holmes, Eric C; Radens, Caleb M; Sureka, Swati; Gralnick, Jeffrey A; Angenent, Largus T

    2014-12-15

    Genetically engineered microbial biosensors have yet to realize commercial success in environmental applications due, in part, to difficulties associated with transducing and transmitting traditional bioluminescent information. Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) output a direct electric signal that can be incorporated into devices for remote environmental monitoring. Here, we describe a BES-based biosensor with genetically encoded specificity for a toxic metal. By placing an essential component of the metal reduction (Mtr) pathway of Shewanella oneidensis under the control of an arsenic-sensitive promoter, we have genetically engineered a strain that produces increased current in response to arsenic when inoculated into a BES. Our BES-based biosensor has a detection limit of ~40 μM arsenite with a linear range up to 100 μM arsenite. Because our transcriptional circuit relies on the activation of a single promoter, similar sensing systems may be developed to detect other analytes by the swap of a single genetic part.

  10. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorby, Yuri A.; Yanina, Svetlana; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Moyles, Dianne; Dohnalkova, Alice; Beveridge, Terry J.; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Kim, Kyung Shik; Culley, David E.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Hill, Eric A.; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A.; Kennedy, David W.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Logan, Bruce; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pilus-like appendages called bacterial nanowires in direct response to electron-acceptor limitation. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA, and those that lacked a functional Type II secretion pathway displayed nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants were also deficient in their ability to reduce hydrous ferric oxide and in their ability to generate current in a microbial fuel cell. Nanowires produced by the oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and the thermophilic, fermentative bacterium Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum reveal that electrically conductive appendages are not exclusive to dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and may, in fact, represent a common bacterial strategy for efficient electron transfer and energy distribution. PMID:16849424

  11. Expression of a tetraheme protein, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F cytochrome c(3), in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozawa, K.; Tsapin, A. I.; Nealson, K. H.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Akutsu, H.

    2000-01-01

    Cytochrome c(3) from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was successfully expressed in the facultative aerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic, microaerophilic, and aerobic conditions, with yields of 0.3 to 0.5 mg of cytochrome/g of cells. A derivative of the broad-host-range plasmid pRK415 containing the cytochrome c(3) gene from D. vulgaris Miyazaki F was used for transformation of S. oneidensis MR-1, resulting in the production of protein product that was indistinguishable from that produced by D. vulgaris Miyazaki F, except for the presence of one extra alanine residue at the N terminus.

  12. Transcriptome analysis reveals response regulator SO2426-mediated gene expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under chromate challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Wei, Wei; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2008-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits diverse metal ion-reducing capabilities and thus is of potential utility as a bioremediation agent. Knowledge of the molecular components and regulatory mechanisms dictating cellular responses to heavy metal stress, however, remains incomplete. In a previous work, the S. oneidensis so2426 gene, annotated as a DNA-binding response regulator, was demonstrated to be specifically responsive at both the transcript and protein levels to acute chromate [Cr(VI)] challenge. To delineate the cellular function of SO2426 and its contribution to metal stress response, we integrated genetic and physiological approaches with a genome-wide screen for target gene candidates comprising the SO2426 regulon.

  13. Selenite reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is mediated by fumarate reductase in periplasm

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao-Bo; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Na; Yang, Zong-Chuang; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In situ reduction of selenite to elemental selenium (Se(0)), by microorganisms in sediments and soils is an important process and greatly affects the environmental distribution and the biological effects of selenium. However, the mechanism behind such a biological process remains unrevealed yet. Here we use Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a widely-distributed dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium with a powerful and diverse respiration capability, to evaluate the involvement of anaerobic respiration system in the microbial selenite reduction. With mutants analysis, we identify fumarate reductase FccA as the terminal reductase of selenite in periplasm. Moreover, we find that such a reduction is dependent on central respiration c-type cytochrome CymA. In contrast, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the Mtr electron transfer pathway do not work as selenite reductases. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized role of anaerobic respiration reductases of S. oneidensis MR-1 in selenite reduction and geochemical cycles of selenium in sediments and soils. PMID:24435070

  14. Aggrandizing power output from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 microbial fuel cells using calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Petersen, Emily R; Gross, Benjamin J; Soto, Carissa M; Ringeisen, Bradley R; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Biffinger, Justin C

    2012-01-15

    There are several interconnected metabolic pathways in bacteria essential for the conversion of carbon electron sources directly into electrical currents using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). This study establishes a direct exogenous method to increase power output from a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 containing MFC by adding calcium chloride to the culture medium. The current output from each CaCl(2) concentration tested revealed that the addition of CaCl(2) to 1400 μM increased the current density by >80% (0.95-1.76 μA/cm(2)) using sodium lactate as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, polarization curves showed that the maximum power output could be increased from 157 to 330 μW with the addition of 2080 μM CaCl(2). Since the conductivity of the culture medium did not change after the addition of CaCl(2) (confirmed by EIS and bulk conductivity measurements), this increase in power was primarily biological and not based on ionic effects. Thus, controlling the concentration of CaCl(2) is a pathway to increase the efficiency and performance of S. oneidensis MR-1 MFCs.

  15. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea B.; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-26

    It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. In this study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of the γ-proteobacterium S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. In addition, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and demonstrated its expression experimentally. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. This work delineates an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other γ-proteobacteria.

  16. Physiological and Transcriptomic Analyses to Characterize the Function of Fur and Iron Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P; Luo, Feng; Wu, Liyou; Parsons, Andrea; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Maintaining iron homeostasis is a key metabolic challenge for most organisms. In many bacterial species, regulation of iron homeostasis is carried out by the global transcriptional regulator Fur. Physiological examination showed that Shewanella oneidensis harboring a fur deletion mutation had deficiencies in both growth and acid tolerance response. However, the fur mutant better tolerated iron-limited environments than the wild-type strain MR-1. Transcriptomic studies comparing the fur mutant and MR-1 confirmed previous findings that iron acquisition systems were highly induced by Fur inactivation. In addition, the temporal gene expression profiling of the fur mutant in response to iron depletion and repletion suggested that a number of genes involved in energy transport were iron-responsive but Fur-independent. Further identification of Fur-independent genes was obtained by generating a gene co-expression network from temporal gene expression profiles. A group of genes is involved in heat shock and has an rpoH-binding site at their promoters, and genes related to anaerobic energy transport has a highly conserved Crp binding site at the promoters. Together, this work provides useful information for the characterization of the function of Fur and the iron response in S. oneidensis.

  17. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  18. Biofabrication of discrete spherical gold nanoparticles using the metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Wang, Wei; Broich, Michael L; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystallites have garnered substantial interest due to their varying applications including catalysis. Consequently important aspects related to control of shape/size and syntheses through economical and non-hazardous means are desirable. Highly efficient bioreduction based natural fabrication approaches that utilize microbes and or -plant extracts are poised to meet these needs. Here we show that the gamma- proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, can reduce tetrachloro aurate (III) ions, producing discrete extracellular spherical gold nanocrystallites. The particles were homogeneous with multiple size distributions and produced under ambient conditions at high yield, 88% of theoretical maximum. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres in the size range of 2-50 nm, with an average of 12 5 nm. The nanoparticles were hydrophilic, biocompatible, and resisted aggregation even after several months. The particles are likely capped by a detachable protein/peptide coat. UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectra and transmission electron microscopy measurements confirmed the formation as well the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity of these gold nanoparticles was assessed using Gram-negative (E. coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria. Toxicity assessments divulged that the particles were neither toxic nor inhibitory to any of these bacteria.

  19. Dual stator dynamics in the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 flagellar motor.

    PubMed

    Paulick, Anja; Delalez, Nicolas J; Brenzinger, Susanne; Steel, Bradley C; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P; Thormann, Kai M

    2015-06-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an intricate nanomachine which converts ion gradients into rotational movement. Torque is created by ion-dependent stator complexes which surround the rotor in a ring. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 expresses two distinct types of stator units: the Na(+)-dependent PomA4 B2 and the H(+)-dependent MotA4 B2. Here, we have explored the stator unit dynamics in the MR-1 flagellar system by using mCherry-labeled PomAB and MotAB units. We observed a total of between 7 and 11 stator units in each flagellar motor. Both types of stator units exchanged between motors and a pool of stator complexes in the membrane, and the exchange rate of MotAB, but not of PomAB, units was dependent on the environmental Na(+)-levels. In 200 mM Na(+), the numbers of PomAB and MotAB units in wild-type motors was determined to be about 7:2 (PomAB:MotAB), shifting to about 6:5 without Na(+). Significantly, the average swimming speed of MR-1 cells at low Na(+) conditions was increased in the presence of MotAB. These data strongly indicate that the S. oneidensis flagellar motors simultaneously use H(+) and Na(+) driven stators in a configuration governed by MotAB incorporation efficiency in response to environmental Na(+) levels.

  20. Immobilization of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in diffusive gradients in thin films for determining metal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Baker, Paul W; Högstrand, Christer; Lead, Jamie; Pickup, Roger W; Zhang, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Assessing metal bioavailability in soil is important in modeling the effects of metal toxicity on the surrounding ecosystem. Current methods based on diffusive gradient thin films (DGTs) and Gel-Integrated Microelectrode are limited in their availability and sensitivity. To address this, Shewanella oneidensis, an anaerobic iron reducing bacterium, was incorporated into a thin layer of agarose to replace the polyacrylamide gel that is normally present in DGT to form biologically mobilizing DGT (BMDGT). Viability analysis revealed that 16-35% of the cells remained viable within the BMDGTs depending on the culturing conditions over a 20 h period with/without metals. Deployment of BMDGTs in standardized metal solutions showed significant differences to cell-free BMDGTs when cells grown in Luria Broth (LB) were incorporated into BMDGTs and deployed under anaerobic conditions. Deployment of these BMDGTs in hematite revealed no significant differences between BMDGTs and BMDGTs containing heat killed cells. Whether heat killed cells retain the ability to affect bioavailability is uncertain. This is the first study to investigate how a microorganism that was incorporated into a DGT device such as the metal reducing bacteria, S. oneidensis, may affect the mobility of metals.

  1. Transcriptome Profiling of Shewanella oneidensis Gene Expressionfollowing Exposure to Acidic and Alkaline pH

    SciTech Connect

    Leaphart, Adam B.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Huang, Katherine; Alm,Eric; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Arkin, Adam P.; Brown, Steven D.; Wu, Liyou; Yan,Tingfen; Liu, Xueduan; Wickham, Gene S.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2007-04-02

    The molecular response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 tovariations in extracellular pH was investigated based on genomewide geneexpression profiling. Microarray analysis revealed that cells elicitedboth general and specific transcriptome responses when challenged withenvironmental acid (pH 4) or base (pH 10) conditions over a 60-minperiod. Global responses included the differential expression of genesfunctionally linked to amino acid metabolism, transcriptional regulationand signal transduction, transport, cell membrane structure, andoxidative stress protection. Response to acid stress included theelevated expression of genes encoding glycogen biosynthetic enzymes,phosphate transporters, and the RNA polymerase sigma-38 factor (rpoS),whereas the molecular response to alkaline pH was characterized byupregulation of nhaA and nhaR, which are predicted to encode an Na+/H+antiporter and transcriptional activator, respectively, as well assulfate transport and sulfur metabolism genes. Collectively, theseresults suggest that S. oneidensis modulates multiple transporters, cellenvelope components, and pathways of amino acid consumption and centralintermediary metabolism as part of its transcriptome response to changingexternal pH conditions.

  2. The Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Fluxome under Various OxygenConditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Hwang, Judy S.; Wemmer, David E.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-17

    The central metabolic fluxes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1were examined under carbon-limited (aerobic) and oxygen-limited(micro-aerobic) chemostat conditions using 13C labeled lactate as thesole carbon source. The carbon labeling patterns of key amino acids inbiomass were probed using both GC-MS and 13C-NMR. Based on the genomeannotation, a metabolic pathway model was constructed to quantify thecentral metabolic flux distributions. The model showed that thetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major carbon metabolism route underboth conditions. The Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways weremainly utilized for biomass synthesis (flux below 5 percent of thelactate uptake rate). The anapleurotic reactions (pyruvate to malate andoxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate) and the glyoxylate shunt wereactive. Under carbon-limited conditions, a substantial amount of carbonwas oxidized via the highly reversible serine metabolic pathway. Fluxesthrough the TCA cycle were less whereas acetate production was more underoxygen limitation than under carbon limitation. Although fluxdistributions under aerobic, micro-aerobic, and shake-flask cultureconditions were dramatically different, the relative flux ratios of thecentral metabolic reactions did not vary significantly. Hence, S.oneidensis metabolism appears to be quite robust to environmentalchanges. Our study also demonstrates the merit of coupling GC-MS with 13CNMR for metabolic flux analysis to reduce the use of 13C labeledsubstrates and to obtain more accurate flux values.

  3. Snapshot of iron response in Shewanella oneidensis by gene network reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P.; Luo, Feng; Xiong, Wenlu; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Arkin, Adam P.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-10-09

    Background: Iron homeostasis of Shewanella oneidensis, a gamma-proteobacterium possessing high iron content, is regulated by a global transcription factor Fur. However, knowledge is incomplete about other biological pathways that respond to changes in iron concentration, as well as details of the responses. In this work, we integrate physiological, transcriptomics and genetic approaches to delineate the iron response of S. oneidensis. Results: We show that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. Temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, and a gene co-expression network was reconstructed. Modules of iron acquisition systems, anaerobic energy metabolism and protein degradation were the most noteworthy in the gene network. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that genes in each of the modules might be regulated by DNA-binding proteins Fur, CRP and RpoH, respectively. Closer inspection of these modules revealed a transcriptional regulator (SO2426) involved in iron acquisition and ten transcriptional factors involved in anaerobic energy metabolism. Selected genes in the network were analyzed by genetic studies. Disruption of genes encoding a putative alcaligin biosynthesis protein (SO3032) and a gene previously implicated in protein degradation (SO2017) led to severe growth deficiency under iron depletion conditions. Disruption of a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) caused deficiency in both anaerobic iron reduction and growth with thiosulfate or TMAO as an electronic acceptor, suggesting that SO1415 is required for specific branches of anaerobic energy metabolism pathways. Conclusions: Using a reconstructed gene network, we identified major biological pathways that were differentially expressed during iron depletion and repletion. Genetic studies not only demonstrated the importance of iron acquisition and protein degradation for iron depletion, but also characterized a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) with a

  4. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N

    2015-01-01

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  5. Multi-heme Cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Structures, functions and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2014-11-05

    Multi-heme cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometers. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-heme cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-heme cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward there are opportunities to engage multi-heme cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-heme cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-heme cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  6. Graphene oxide as nanogold carrier for ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of Shewanella oneidensis with silver enhancement strategy.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Yuan, Yong

    2014-02-15

    The genus Shewanella is ubiquitous in environment and has been extensively studied for their applications in bioremediation. A novel immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of Shewanella oneidensis was presented based on graphene oxide (GO) as nanogold carrier with silver enhancement strategy. The enhanced sensitivity was achieved by employing conjugate-featuring gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and antibodies (Ab) assembled on bovine serum albumin (BSA)-modified GO (Ab/AuNPs/BSA/GO). After a sandwich-type antigen-antibody reaction, Ab/AuNPs/BSA/GO conjugate binding on the target analyte produced an enhanced immune-recognition response by the reduction of silver ion in the present of hydroquinone. The deposited silver metal was dissolved with nitric acid and subsequently quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry. The high AuNPs loading capacity of GO and the obvious signal amplification by gold-catalyzed silver deposition offer an excellent detection method with a wide range of linear relationship between 7.0 × 10(1) and 7.0 × 10(7)cfu/mL. Furthermore, the immunoassay developed in this work exhibited high sensitivity, acceptable stability and reproducibility. This simple and sensitive assay method has promising application in various fields for rapid detection of bacteria, protein and DNA.

  7. Outer membrane-associated serine protease involved in adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) oxides.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Ginn, Brian R; Bates, David J; Dublin, Steven N; Taylor, Jeanette V; Apkarian, Robert P; Amaro-Garcia, Samary; Neal, Andrew L; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a variety of anaerobic electron acceptors, including insoluble Fe(III) oxides. S. oneidensis employs a number of novel strategies for respiration of insoluble Fe(III) oxides, including localization of respiratory proteins to the cell outer membrane (OM). The molecular mechanism by which S. oneidensis adheres to and respires Fe(III) oxides, however, remains poorly understood. In the present study, whole cell fractionation and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques were combined to identify a serine protease (SO3800) associated with the S. oneidensis OM. SO3800 contained predicted structural motifs similar to cell surface-associated serine proteases that function as bacterial adhesins in other gram-negative bacteria. The gene encoding SO3800 was deleted from the S. oneidensis genome, and the resulting mutant strain (DeltaSO3800) was tested for its ability to adhere to and respire Fe(III) oxides. DeltaSO3800 was severely impaired in its ability to adhere to Fe(III) oxides, yet retained wild-type Fe(III) respiratory capability. Laser Doppler velocimetry and cryoetch high-resolution SEM experiments indicated that DeltaSO3800 displayed a lower cell surface charge and higher amount of surface-associated exopolysaccharides. Results of this study indicate that S. oneidensis may respire insoluble Fe(III) oxides at a distance, negating the requirement for attachment prior to electron transfer.

  8. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Tomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC, and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to MtrA either directly or indirectly through other periplasmic proteins. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). In addition to Fe(III) oxides, Mtr pathway is also involved in reduction of

  9. Enhanced performance of hexavalent chromium reducing cathodes in the presence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and lactate.

    PubMed

    Xafenias, Nikolaos; Zhang, Yue; Banks, Charles J

    2013-05-01

    Biocathodes for the reduction of the highly toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) were investigated using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1) as a biocatalyst and performance was assessed in terms of current production and Cr(VI) reduction. Potentiostatically controlled experiments (-500 mV vs Ag/AgCl) showed that a mediatorless MR-1 biocathode started up under aerated conditions in the presence of lactate, received 5.5 and 1.7 times more electrons for Cr(VI) reduction over a 4 h operating period than controls without lactate and with lactate but without MR-1, respectively. Cr(VI) reduction was also enhanced, with a decrease in concentration over the 4 h operating period of 9 mg/L Cr(VI), compared to only 1 and 3 mg/L, respectively, in the controls. Riboflavin, an electron shuttle mediator naturally produced by MR-1, was also found to have a positive impact in potentiostatically controlled cathodes. Additionally, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with MR-1 and lactate present in both anode and cathode produced a maximum current density of 32.5 mA/m(2) (1000 Ω external load) after receiving a 10 mg/L Cr(VI) addition in the cathode, and cathodic efficiency increased steadily over an 8 day operation period with successive Cr(VI) additions. In conclusion, effective and continuous Cr(VI) reduction with associated current production were achieved when MR-1 and lactate were both present in the biocathodes. PMID:23517384

  10. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  11. Decolorization and detoxification of a sulfonated triphenylmethane dye aniline blue by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongmin; Xiao, Xiang; Xu, Cancan; Cao, Danming; Du, Daolin

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the extracellular decolorization of aniline blue, a sulfonated triphenylmethane dye, by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was confirmed. S. oneidensis MR-1 showed a high capacity for decolorizing aniline blue even at a concentration of up to 1,000 mg/l under anaerobic conditions. Maximum decolorization efficiency appeared at pH 7.0 and 30 °C. Lactate was a better candidate of electron donor for the decolorization of aniline blue. The addition of nitrate, hydrous ferric oxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide all could cause a significant decline of decolorization efficiency. The Mtr respiratory pathway was found to be involved into the decolorization of aniline blue by S. oneidensis MR-1. The toxicity evaluation through phytotoxicity and genotoxicity showed that S. oneidensis MR-1 could decrease the toxicity of aniline blue during the decolorization process. Thus, this work may facilitate a better understanding on the degradation mechanisms of the triphenylmethane dyes by Shewanella and is beneficial to their application in bioremediation.

  12. Comparison of uranium(VI) removal by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in flow and batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Sani, Rajesh K; Peyton, Brent M; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2008-06-01

    To better understand the interactions among metal contaminants, nutrients, and microorganisms in subsurface fracture-flow systems, biofilms of pure culture of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were grown in six fracture-flow reactors (FFRs) of different geometries. The spatial and temporal distribution of uranium and bacteria were examined using a tracer dye (brilliant blue FCF) and microscopy. The results showed that plugging by bacterial cells was dependent on the geometry of the reactor and that biofilms grown in FFRs had a limited U(VI)-reduction capacity. To quantify the U(VI)-reduction capacity of biofilms, batch experiments for U(VI) reduction were performed with repetitive U(VI) additions. U(VI)-reduction rates of stationary phase cultures decreased after each U(VI) addition. After the fourth U(VI) addition, stationary phase cultures treated with U(VI) with and without spent medium yielded gray and black precipitates, respectively. These gray and black U precipitates were analyzed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Data for randomly selected areas of black precipitates showed that reduced U particles (3-6 nm) were crystalline, whereas gray precipitates were a mixture of crystalline and amorphous solids. Results obtained in this study, including a dramatic limitation of S. oneidensis MR-1 and its biofilms to reduce U(VI) and plugging of FFRs, suggest that alternative organisms should be targeted for stimulation for metal immobilization in subsurface fracture-flow systems. PMID:18468655

  13. Monodispersed biocompatible silver sulfide nanoparticles: Facile extracellular biosynthesis using the gamma-proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Moon, Ji Won; Meyer III, Harry M; Hensley, Dale K; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Pelletier, Dale A

    2011-01-01

    Interest in engineered metal and semiconductor nanocrystallites continues to grow due to their unique size- and shape-dependent optoelectronic, physicochemical and biological properties. Therefore identifying novel non-hazardous nanoparticle synthesis routes that address hydrophilicity, size and shape control and production costs has become a priority. In the present article we report for the first time on the efficient generation of extracellular silver sulfide (Ag{sub 2}S) nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. The particles are reasonably monodispersed and homogeneously shaped. They are produced under ambient temperatures and pressures at high yield, 85% theoretical maximum. UV-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed the formation, optical and surface properties, purity and crystallinity of the synthesized particles. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres with a mean diameter of 9 {+-} 3.5 nm, and are capped by a detachable protein/peptide surface coat. Toxicity assessments of these biogenic Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles on Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) bacterial systems, as well as eukaryotic cell lines including mouse lung epithelial (C 10) and macrophage (RAW-264.7) cells, showed that the particles were non-inhibitory and non-cytotoxic to any of these systems. Our results provide a facile, eco-friendly and economical route for the fabrication of technologically important semiconducting Ag{sub 2}S nanoparticles. These particles are dispersible and biocompatible, thus providing excellent potential for use in optical imaging, electronic devices and solar cell applications.

  14. Integrative analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data of Shewanella oneidensis: missing value imputation using temporal datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-García, Wandaliz; Brown, Steven D; Johnson, Roger; Zhang, Weiwen; Runger, George; Meldrum, Deirdre

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in recent years, proteomic datasets currently available still suffer large number of missing values. Integrative analyses based upon incomplete proteomic and transcriptomic da-tasets could seriously bias the biological interpretation. In this study, we applied a non-linear data-driven stochastic gradient boosted trees (GBT) model to impute missing proteomic values for proteins experi-mentally undetected, using a temporal transcriptomic and proteomic dataset of Shewanella oneidensis. In this dataset, genes expression was measured after the cells were exposed to 1 mM potassium chromate for 5-, 30-, 60-, and 90-min, while protein abundance was measured only for 45- and 90-min samples. With the goal of elucidating the relationship between temporal gene expression and protein abundance data, and then using it to impute missing proteomic values for samples of 45-min (which does not have cognate transcriptomic data) and 90-min, we initially used nonlinear Smoothing Splines Curve Fitting (SSCF) to identify temporal relationships among transcriptomic data at different time points and then imputed missing gene expression measurements for the sample at 45-min. After the imputation was validated by biological constrains (i.e. operons), we used a data-driven Gradient Boosted Trees (GBT) model to uncover possible non-linear relationships between temporal transcriptomic and proteomic data, and to impute protein abundance for the proteins experimentally undetected in the 45- and 90-min sam-ples, based on relevant predictors such as temporal mRNA gene expression data, cellular roles, molecular weight, sequence length, protein length, guanine-cytosine (GC) content and triple codon counts. The imputed protein values were validated using biological constraints such as operon, regulon and pathway information. Finally, we demonstrated that such missing value imputation improved characterization of the temporal response of S. oneidensis to chromate.

  15. Global Transcriptome Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Exposed to Different Terminal Electron Acceptors†

    PubMed Central

    Beliaev, A. S.; Klingeman, D. M.; Klappenbach, J. A.; Wu, L.; Romine, M. F.; Tiedje, J. M.; Nealson, K. H.; Fredrickson, J. K.; Zhou, J.

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the complex structure of the energy-generating networks in the dissimilatory metal reducer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, global mRNA patterns were examined in cells exposed to a wide range of metal and non-metal electron acceptors. Gene expression patterns were similar irrespective of which metal ion was used as electron acceptor, with 60% of the differentially expressed genes showing similar induction or repression relative to fumarate-respiring conditions. Several groups of genes exhibited elevated expression levels in the presence of metals, including those encoding putative multidrug efflux transporters, detoxification proteins, extracytoplasmic sigma factors and PAS-domain regulators. Only one of the 42 predicted c-type cytochromes in MR-1, SO3300, displayed significantly elevated transcript levels across all metal-reducing conditions. Genes encoding decaheme cytochromes MtrC and MtrA that were previously linked to the reduction of different forms of Fe(III) and Mn(IV), exhibited only slight decreases in relative mRNA abundances under metal-reducing conditions. In contrast, specific transcriptome responses were displayed to individual non-metal electron acceptors resulting in the identification of unique groups of nitrate-, thiosulfate- and TMAO-induced genes including previously uncharacterized multi-cytochrome gene clusters. Collectively, the gene expression results reflect the fundamental differences between metal and non-metal respiratory pathways of S. oneidensis MR-1, where the coordinate induction of detoxification and stress response genes play a key role in adaptation of this organism under metal-reducing conditions. Moreover, the relative paucity and/or the constitutive nature of genes involved in electron transfer to metals is likely due to the low-specificity and the opportunistic nature of the metal-reducing electron transport pathways. PMID:16199584

  16. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Characterization of the Fur Modulon in the Metal-Reducing Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiu-Feng; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; McCue, Lee Ann; Stanek, Dawn; Connelly, Heather; Hauser, Loren J.; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tingfen; Leaphart, Adam; Hettich, Robert L.; Zhou, Jizhong; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of the complete genome sequence for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has permitted a comprehensive characterization of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) modulon in this dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. We have employed targeted gene mutagenesis, DNA microarrays, proteomic analysis using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and computational motif discovery tools to define the S. oneidensis Fur regulon. Using this integrated approach, we identified nine probable operons (containing 24 genes) and 15 individual open reading frames (ORFs), either with unknown functions or encoding products annotated as transport or binding proteins, that are predicted to be direct targets of Fur-mediated repression. This study suggested, for the first time, possible roles for four operons and eight ORFs with unknown functions in iron metabolism or iron transport-related functions. Proteomic analysis clearly identified a number of transporters, binding proteins, and receptors related to iron uptake that were up-regulated in response to a fur deletion and verified the expression of nine genes originally annotated as pseudogenes. Comparison of the transcriptome and proteome data revealed strong correlation for genes shown to be undergoing large changes at the transcript level. A number of genes encoding components of the electron transport system were also differentially expressed in a fur deletion mutant. The gene omcA (SO1779), which encodes a decaheme cytochrome c, exhibited significant decreases in both mRNA and protein abundance in the fur mutant and possessed a strong candidate Fur-binding site in its upstream region, thus suggesting that omcA may be a direct target of Fur activation. PMID:15576789

  17. Growth Inhibition and Stimulation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by Surfactants and Calcium Polysulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Kathryn L.; Tilton, Fred A.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Ergas, Sarina J.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miracle, Ann L.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2012-06-14

    Foam delivery technology (FDT) uses surfactant based foam to immobilize subsurface contaminants in situ. Where traditional approaches are impractical, FDT has the potential to overcome many of the technical challenges facing the remediation of contaminated deep vadose zone environments. However, little is known about the effects these reactive chemicals may have on microorganisms inhabiting the contaminated subsurface. In addition, there are currently no standard assays to assess microbial responses to subsurface remedial treatments while these agents are under development. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid laboratory assay to assess the potential growth inhibition and/or stimulation of microorganisms following exposure to candidate FDT components. Calcium polysulfide (CPS) and several surfactants (i.e. sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and NINOL40-CO) have diverse chemistries and are candidate components of FDT. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultures were exposed to a range of concentrations of these chemicals to determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and the growth and viability potential of these components. Concentrations of SDS higher than 700 {micro}M were toxic to S. oneidensis MR-1 growth over the course of four days of exposure. The relative acute toxicity order for these compounds was SDS>>CPS>>NINOL40-CO>SLES-CAPB. Dose dependent growth decreases (20 to 100 mM) were observed in the CAPB and SLES treated cultures and both CPS and NINOL 40-CO were toxic at all concentrations tested (1.45 to 7.25 mM CPS). Both SLES (20 to 100 mM) and SDS at lower concentrations (20 to 500 {micro}M) were stimulatory to S. oneidensis MR-1 indicating a capacity to be used as a carbon source. These studies also identified potentially key component characteristics, such as precipitate formation and oxygen availability, which may prove valuable in assessing the response of subsurface

  18. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies. PMID:25411412

  19. Synthetic and Evolutionary Construction of a Chlorate-Reducing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Iain C.; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Carlson, Hans K.; Iavarone, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite evidence for the prevalence of horizontal gene transfer of respiratory genes, little is known about how pathways functionally integrate within new hosts. One example of a mobile respiratory metabolism is bacterial chlorate reduction, which is frequently encoded on composite transposons. This implies that the essential components of the metabolism are encoded on these mobile elements. To test this, we heterologously expressed genes for chlorate reduction from Shewanella algae ACDC in the non-chlorate-reducing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The construct that ultimately endowed robust growth on chlorate included cld, a cytochrome c gene, clrABDC, and two genes of unknown function. Although strain MR-1 was unable to grow on chlorate after initial insertion of these genes into the chromosome, 11 derived strains capable of chlorate respiration were obtained through adaptive evolution. Genome resequencing indicated that all of the evolved chlorate-reducing strains replicated a large genomic region containing chlorate reduction genes. Contraction in copy number and loss of the ability to reduce chlorate were also observed, indicating that this phenomenon was extremely dynamic. Although most strains contained more than six copies of the replicated region, a single strain with less duplication also grew rapidly. This strain contained three additional mutations that we hypothesized compensated for the low copy number. We remade the mutations combinatorially in the unevolved strain and determined that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) upstream of cld enabled growth on chlorate and was epistatic to a second base pair change in the NarP binding sequence between narQP and nrfA that enhanced growth. PMID:25991681

  20. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N

    2015-01-01

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies. PMID:25411412

  1. Trace Element Speciation and Distribution Study at Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilm/Mineral/Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelabert, A.; Wang, Y.; Gescher, J.; Ha, J.; Cordova, C. D.; Singer, D. M.; Spormann, A. M.; Trainor, T. P.; Eng, P. J.; Brown, G. E.

    2006-12-01

    Fe- and Al-(oxyhydr)oxides are among the most reactive mineral surfaces contacted by surface and ground waters, and thus they constitute important sorbents for heavy metal and metalloid ions. As microbial biofilms may be present as coatings on these minerals, they are likely to induce major changes in surface charges and sorption capacities for metal(loid) ions compared to biofilm-free mineral surfaces. In addition, the micro- environments in biofilms can be quite different from those in bulk solutions, which can enhance (or inhibit) metal adsorption on mineral surfaces and produce biominerals that are not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics based on the bulk solution values. In order to provide a more quantitative understanding of these effects, we have carried out a study of the interaction of Zn(II), Pb(II), and As(V) with Shewanella oneidensis (wild type, EPS-deficient mutant, and ppx- and ppk-deficient mutants) grown on highly polished and oriented single crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0001). This gram-negative bacterium commonly found in soil and sediments can use a wide range of electron donors and terminal electron acceptors including Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides under anaerobic conditions. In-situ ATR-FTIR analyses and potentiometric titrations of S. oneidensis biofilm collected from a glass bead-filled column inoculated with S. oneidensis were conducted in order to determine the nature of functional groups present on the bacterial surfaces, to quantify the site densities and protonation constants for these groups, and to determine the electrostatic parameters for S. oneidensis surfaces. GI-XAFS analyses performed on BL 11-2 at SSRL, together with macroscopic metal adsorption experiments as a function of pH (2 to 6.5), metal concentration (10-3 to 10-7 M), and ionic strength (10-1 to 10-3 M), were used to determine ion speciation and local coordination environments in the biofilm and to develop a surface complexation model describing

  2. Distinct Roles of Major Peptidoglycan Recycling Enzymes in β-Lactamase Production in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Mao, Yinting; Ju, Lili; Jin, Miao; Sun, Yiyang; Jin, Shouguang

    2014-01-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics were the earliest discovered and are the most widely used group of antibiotics that work by inactivating penicillin-binding proteins to inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis. As one of the most efficient defense strategies, many bacteria produce β-lactam-degrading enzymes, β-lactamases, whose biochemical functions and regulation have been extensively studied. A signal transduction pathway for β-lactamase induction by β-lactam antibiotics, consisting of the major peptidoglycan recycling enzymes and the LysR-type transcriptional regulator, AmpR, has been recently unveiled in some bacteria. Because inactivation of some of these proteins, especially the permease AmpG and the β-hexosaminidase NagZ, results in substantially elevated susceptibility to the antibiotics, these have been recognized as potential therapeutic targets. Here, we show a contrasting scenario in Shewanella oneidensis, in which the homologue of AmpR is absent. Loss of AmpG or NagZ enhances β-lactam resistance drastically, whereas other identified major peptidoglycan recycling enzymes are dispensable. Moreover, our data indicate that there exists a parallel signal transduction pathway for β-lactamase induction, which is independent of either AmpG or NagZ. PMID:25136029

  3. Validation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Small Proteins by AMT Tag-based Proteome Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Romine, Margaret F.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Fang, Ruihua; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-09-01

    Using stringent criteria for protein identification by accurate mass and time (AMT) tag mass spectrometric methodology, we detected 36 proteins <101 amino acids in length, including 10 that were annotated as hypothetical proteins, in 172 global tryptic digests of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 proteins analyzed. Peptides that map to the conserved, but functionally uncharacterized proteins SO4134 and SO2787, were the most frequently detected small proteins in these samples, while hypotheticals SO2669 and SO2063, conserved hypotheticals SO0335 and SO2176, and the SlyX protein (SO1063) were observed at frequencies similar to small expected abundant ribosomal proteins and translation initiation factor IF-1 and consequently, likely to encode important cellular functions. In addition, 30 proteins including three of the small proteins that map to genes predicted to encode frameshifts, point mutations, or recoding signals were detected. Of these 30 genes, peptides that map to positions beyond internal stop codons were detected in 13 genes (SO0101, SO0419, SO0590, SO0738, SO1113, SO1211, SO3079, SO3130, SO3240, SO4231, SO4328, SO4422, and SO4657). While expression of the full-length formate dehydrogenase encoded by SO0101 can be explained by incorporation of selenocysteine at the internal stop codon, the mechanism of translating downstream sequences in the remaining genes remains unknown.

  4. Electron tunneling properties of outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes from Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Wigginton, Nicholas S; Rosso, Kevin M; Lower, Brian H; Shi, Liang; Hochella, Michael F

    2007-02-01

    In this report, we describe the characterization of two outer-membrane decaheme cytochromes OmcA and MtrC purified from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and tunneling spectroscopy (TS). OmcA and MtrC were solubilized with a common detergent and irreversibly bound to Au (111) substrates as self-assembled cytochrome films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) verified that OmcA and MtrC were covalently bound to the Au surface via thiol bonds to cysteine residues. Initial STM images show that a layer of detergent covers and protects the cytochrome films. Temporary application of high bias voltage causes the detergent film to reorganize around the tip, opening a window for direct STM imaging of the cytochrome layer underneath. The STM apparent sizes of both OmcA and MtrC are 58 nanometers in diameter consistent with expectations from their molecular masses. Current-voltage TS over individual cytochromes showed that OmcA and MtrC have different abilities to mediate the tunneling current, reflecting differences in their electronic structures. The data suggest that the two cytochromes could have different roles in the electron transport chain during metal reduction.

  5. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7–1.1 Å−1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6–9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures. PMID:26738409

  6. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range.

    PubMed

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 10(8) cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 10(2) CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  7. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7-1.1 Å-1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6-9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures.

  8. Investigating different mechanisms for biogenic selenite transformations: Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, C.I.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Law, N.; Charnock, J.M.; Coker, V.S.; Fellowes, J.W.; Oremland, R.S.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica, use different mechanisms to transform toxic, bioavailable sodium selenite to less toxic, non-mobile elemental selenium and then to selenide in anaerobic environments, offering the potential for in situ and ex situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, industrial effluents, and agricultural drainage waters. The products of these reductive transformations depend on both the organism involved and the reduction conditions employed, in terms of electron donor and exogenous extracellular redox mediator. The intermediary phase involves the precipitation of elemental selenium nanospheres and the potential role of proteins in the formation of these structures is discussed. The bionanomineral phases produced during these transformations, including both elemental selenium nanospheres and metal selenide nanoparticles, have catalytic, semiconducting and light-emitting properties, which may have unique applications in the realm of nanophotonics. This research offers the potential to combine remediation of contaminants with the development of environmentally friendly manufacturing pathways for novel bionanominerals. ?? 2009 Taylor & Francis.

  9. Laboratory investigation of high pressure survival in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into the gigapascal pressure range

    PubMed Central

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Kardzhaliyska, Liya; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 at up to 1500 MPa was investigated by laboratory studies involving exposure to high pressure followed by evaluation of survivors as the number (N) of colony forming units (CFU) that could be cultured following recovery to ambient conditions. Exposing the wild type (WT) bacteria to 250 MPa resulted in only a minor (0.7 log N units) drop in survival compared with the initial concentration of 108 cells/ml. Raising the pressure to above 500 MPa caused a large reduction in the number of viable cells observed following recovery to ambient pressure. Additional pressure increase caused a further decrease in survivability, with approximately 102 CFU/ml recorded following exposure to 1000 MPa (1 GPa) and 1.5 GPa. Pressurizing samples from colonies resuscitated from survivors that had been previously exposed to high pressure resulted in substantially greater survivor counts. Experiments were carried out to examine potential interactions between pressure and temperature variables in determining bacterial survival. One generation of survivors previously exposed to 1 GPa was compared with WT samples to investigate survival between 37 and 8°C. The results did not reveal any coupling between acquired high pressure resistance and temperature effects on growth. PMID:25452750

  10. Cell growth and protein expression of Shewanella oneidensis in biofilms and hydrogel-entrapped cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingdan; Ng, Chun Kiat; Cohen, Yehuda; Cao, Bin

    2014-05-01

    The performance of biofilm-based bioprocesses is difficult to predict and control because of the intrinsic heterogeneous and dynamic properties of microbial biofilms. Biofilm mimics, such as microbial cells entrapped in polymeric scaffolds that are permeable for nutrients, have been proposed to replace real biofilms to achieve long-term robust performance in engineering applications. However, the physiological differences between cells that are physically entrapped in a synthetic polymeric matrix and biofilm cells that are encased in a self-produced polymeric matrix remain unknown. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism and alginate hydrogel as a model synthetic matrix, we compared the cell growth and protein expression in entrapped cultures and biofilms. The hydrogel-entrapped cultures were found to exhibit a growth rate comparable with biofilms. There was no substantial difference in cell viability, surface charge, as well as hydrophobicity between the cells grown in alginate hydrogel and those grown in biofilms. However, the gel-entrapped cultures were found to be physiologically different from biofilms. The gel-entrapped cultures had a higher demand for metabolic energy. The siderophore-mediated iron uptake was repressed in the gel-entrapped cells. The presence of the hydrogel matrix decreased the expression of proteins involved in biofilm formation, while inducing the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA) in the gel-entrapped cultures. These results advance the fundamental understanding of the physiology of hydrogel-entrapped cells, which can lead to more efficient biofilm mimic-based applications.

  11. Structure of Biogenic Uraninite Produced By Shewanella Oneidensis Strain MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, E.J.; Veeramani, H.; Sharp, J.O.; Suvorova, E.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Mehta, A.; Stahlman, J.; Webb, S.M.; Clark, D.L.; Conradson, S.D.; Ilton, E.S.; Bargar, J.R.

    2009-05-27

    The stability of biogenic uraninite with respect to oxidation is seminal to the success of in situ bioreduction strategies for remediation of subsurface U(VI) contamination. The properties and hence stability of uraninite are dependent on its size, structure, and composition. In this study, the local-, intermediate-, and long-range molecular-scale structure of nanoscale uraninite produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 was investigated using EXAFS, SR-based powder diffraction and TEM. The uraninite products were found to be structurally homologous with stoichiometric UO{sub 2} under all conditions considered. Significantly, there was no evidence for lattice strain of the biogenic uraninite nanoparticles. The fresh nanoparticles were found to exhibit a well-ordered interior core of diameter ca. 1.3 nm and an outer region of thickness ca {approx}0.6 nm in which the structure is locally distorted. The lack of nanoparticle strain and structural homology with stoichiometric UO{sub 2} suggests that established thermodynamic parameters for the latter material are an appropriate starting point to model the behavior of nanobiogenic uraninite. The detailed structural analysis in this study provides an essential foundation for subsequent investigations of environmental samples.

  12. The Influence of Cultivation Methods on Shewanella oneidensis Physiology and Proteome Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Kennedy, David W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Giometti, Carol S.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Gorby, Yuri A.

    2008-04-01

    High-throughput analyses that are central to microbial systems biology and ecophysiology research benefit from highly homogeneous and physiologically well-defined cell cultures. While attention has focused on the technical variation associated with high-throughput technologies, biological variation introduced as a function of cell cultivation methods has been overlooked. This study evaluated the impact of cultivation methods, controlled batch or continuous culture in bioreactors versus shake flasks, on the reproducibility of global proteome measurements in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Variability in dissolved oxygen concentration and consumption rate, metabolite profiles, and proteome was greater in shake flask than controlled batch or chemostat cultures. Proteins indicative of suboxic and anaerobic growth (e.g., fumarate reductase and decaheme c-type cytochromes) were more abundant in cells from shake flasks compared to bioreactor cultures, a finding consistent with data demonstrating that “aerobic” flask cultures were O2 deficient due to poor mass transfer kinetics. The work described herein establishes the necessity of controlled cultivation for ensuring highly reproducible and homogenous microbial cultures. By decreasing cell to cell metabolic variability, higher quality samples will allow for the interpretive accuracy necessary for drawing conclusions relevant to microbial systems biology research.

  13. Addressing Shewanella oneidensis cytochromome : a first step towards high-throughput expression of cytochromes c.

    SciTech Connect

    Londer, Y. Y.; Giuliani, S.; Peppler, T.; Collart, F.; Biosciences Division

    2008-11-01

    Integrated studies that address proteins structure and function in the new era of systems biology and genomics often require the application of high-throughput approaches for parallel production of many different purified proteins from the same organism. Cytochromes c-electron transfer proteins carrying one or more hemes covalently bound to the polypeptide chain--are essential in most organisms. However, they are one of the most recalcitrant classes of proteins with respect to heterologous expression because post-translational incorporation of hemes is required for proper folding and stability. We have addressed this challenge by designing two families of vectors (total of 6 vectors) suitable for ligation-independent cloning and developing a pipeline for expression and solubility analysis of cytochromes c. This system has been validated by expression analysis of thirty genes from Shewanella oneidensis coding for cytochromes c or cytochromes c-type domains predicted to have 1-4 hemes. Out of 30 targets, 26 (87%) were obtained in soluble form in one or more vectors. This work establishes a methodology for high-throughput expression of this class of proteins and provides a clone resource for the microbiological and functional genomics research communities.

  14. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G.; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V.; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth’s deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7–1.1 Å‑1 corresponding to real space dimensions of 6–9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures.

  15. Reduction of jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and secondary mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingjie, Ouyang; Xiancai, Lu; Huan, Liu; Juan, Li; Tingting, Zhu; Xiangyu, Zhu; Jianjun, Lu; Rucheng, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Jarosite is a common mineral in a variety of environments formed by the oxidation of iron sulfide normally accompanying with the generation of acid mine drainage (AMD) in mining areas or acid rock drainages (ARD) in many localities. Decomposition of jarosite by dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) influences the mobility of many heavy metals generally accommodated in natural jarosite. This study examined the anaerobic reduction of synthesized jarosite by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a typical facultative bacteria. The release of ferrous and ferric ion, as well as sulfate and potassium, in the inoculated experimental group lasting 80 days is much higher than that in abiotic control groups. The detection of bicarbonate and acetate in experimental solution further confirms the mechanism of microbial reduction of jarosite, in which lactate acts as the electron donor. The produced ferrous iron stimulates the subsequent secondary mineralization, leading to precipitation and transformation of various iron-containing minerals. Green rust and goethite are the intermediate minerals of the microbial reduction process under anoxic conditions, and the end products include magnetite and siderite. In aerobic environments, goethite, magnetite and siderite were also detected, but the contents were relatively lower. While in abiotic experiments, only goethite has been detected as a product. Thus, the microbial reduction and subsequent mineral transformation can remarkably influence the geochemical cycling of iron and sulfur in supergene environments, as well as the mobility of heavy metals commonly accommodated in jarosite.

  16. Direct electrochemistry of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase: evidence of interactions across the dimeric interface.

    PubMed

    Judd, Evan T; Youngblut, Matthew; Pacheco, A Andrew; Elliott, Sean J

    2012-12-21

    Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (soNrfA), a dimeric enzyme that houses five c-type hemes per protomer, conducts the six-electron reduction of nitrite and the two-electron reduction of hydroxylamine. Protein film voltammetry (PFV) has been used to study the cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Escherichia coli (ecNrfA) previously, revealing catalytic reduction of both nitrite and hydroxylamine substrates by ecNrfA adsorbed to a graphite electrode that is characterized by "boosts" and attenuations in activity depending on the applied potential. Here, we use PFV to investigate the catalytic properties of soNrfA during both nitrite and hydroxylamine turnover and compare those properties to the properties of ecNrfA. Distinct differences in both the electrochemical and kinetic characteristics of soNrfA are observed; e.g., all detected electron transfer steps are one-electron in nature, contrary to what has been observed in ecNrfA [Angove, H. C., Cole, J. A., Richardson, D. J., and Butt, J. N. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 23374-23381]. Additionally, we find evidence of substrate inhibition during nitrite turnover and negative cooperativity during hydroxylamine turnover, neither of which has previously been observed in any cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Collectively, these data provide evidence that during catalysis, potential pathways of communication exist between the individual soNrfA monomers comprising the native homodimer.

  17. Endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide and its regulation in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Genfu; Li, Ning; Mao, Yinting; Zhou, Guangqi; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions across all domains of life. In this study, mechanisms of endogenous H2S generation in Shewanella oneidensis were investigated. As a research model with highly diverse anaerobic respiratory pathways, the microorganism is able to produce H2S by respiring on a variety of sulfur-containing compounds with SirACD and PsrABC enzymatic complexes, as well as through cysteine degradation with three enzymes, MdeA, SO_1095, and SseA. We showed that the SirACD and PsrABC complexes, which are predominantly, if not exclusively, responsible for H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species, do not interplay with each other. Strikingly, a screen for regulators controlling endogenous H2S generation by transposon mutagenesis identified global regulator Crp to be essential to all H2S-generating processes. In contrast, Fnr and Arc, two other global regulators that have a role in respiration, are dispensable in regulating H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species. Interestingly, Arc is involved in the H2S generation through cysteine degradation by repressing expression of the mdeA gene. We further showed that expression of the sirA and psrABC operons is subjected to direct regulation of Crp, but the mechanisms underlying the requirement of Crp for H2S generation through cysteine degradation remain elusive. PMID:25972854

  18. Water Dynamics in Shewanella oneidensis at Ambient and High Pressure using Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Fabrizia; Hazael, Rachael; Simeoni, Giovanna G; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Moulin, Martine; Haertlein, Michael; Trevor Forsyth, V; Seydel, Tilo; Daniel, Isabelle; Meersman, Filip; McMillan, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) is an ideal technique for studying water transport and relaxation dynamics at pico- to nanosecond timescales and at length scales relevant to cellular dimensions. Studies of high pressure dynamic effects in live organisms are needed to understand Earth's deep biosphere and biotechnology applications. Here we applied QENS to study water transport in Shewanella oneidensis at ambient (0.1 MPa) and high (200 MPa) pressure using H/D isotopic contrast experiments for normal and perdeuterated bacteria and buffer solutions to distinguish intracellular and transmembrane processes. The results indicate that intracellular water dynamics are comparable with bulk diffusion rates in aqueous fluids at ambient conditions but a significant reduction occurs in high pressure mobility. We interpret this as due to enhanced interactions with macromolecules in the nanoconfined environment. Overall diffusion rates across the cell envelope also occur at similar rates but unexpected narrowing of the QENS signal appears between momentum transfer values Q = 0.7-1.1 Å(-1) corresponding to real space dimensions of 6-9 Å. The relaxation time increase can be explained by correlated dynamics of molecules passing through Aquaporin water transport complexes located within the inner or outer membrane structures. PMID:26738409

  19. Real-Time Gene Expression Profiling of Live Shewanella Oneidensis Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

    2009-03-30

    The overall objective of this proposal is to make real-time observations of gene expression in live Shewanella oneidensis cells with high sensitivity and high throughput. Gene expression, a central process to all life, is stochastic because most genes often exist in one or two copies per cell. Although the central dogma of molecular biology has been proven beyond doubt, due to insufficient sensitivity, stochastic protein production has not been visualized in real time in an individual cell at the single-molecule level. We report the first direct observation of single protein molecules as they are generated, one at a time in a single live E. coli cell, yielding quantitative information about gene expression [Science 2006; 311: 1600-1603]. We demonstrated a general strategy for live-cell single-molecule measurements: detection by localization. It is difficult to detect single fluorescence protein molecules inside cytoplasm - their fluorescence is spread by fast diffusion to the entire cell and overwhelmed by the strong autofluorescence. We achieved single-molecule sensitivity by immobilizing the fluorescence protein on the cell membrane, where the diffusion is much slowed. We learned that under the repressed condition protein molecules are produced in bursts, with each burst originating from a stochastically-transcribed single messenger RNA molecule, and that protein copy numbers in the bursts follow a geometric distribution. We also simultaneously published a paper reporting a different method using β-glactosidase as a reporter [Nature 440, 358 (2006)]. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, inaccessible by previous proteomic techniques. Both papers allowed quantification of protein expression with unprecedented sensitivity and received overwhelming acclaim from the scientific community. The Nature paper has been identified as one of the most-cited papers in the past year [http://esi-topics.com/]. We have also an analytical framework describing the

  20. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-02-15

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III) oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons in the periplasm to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can

  1. ArcS, the cognate sensor kinase in an atypical Arc system of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Lassak, Jürgen; Henche, Anna-Lena; Binnenkade, Lucas; Thormann, Kai M

    2010-05-01

    The availability of oxygen is a major environmental factor for many microbes, in particular for bacteria such as Shewanella species, which thrive in redox-stratified environments. One of the best-studied systems involved in mediating the response to changes in environmental oxygen levels is the Arc two-component system of Escherichia coli, consisting of the sensor kinase ArcB and the cognate response regulator ArcA. An ArcA ortholog was previously identified in Shewanella, and as in Escherichia coli, Shewanella ArcA is involved in regulating the response to shifts in oxygen levels. Here, we identified the hybrid sensor kinase SO_0577, now designated ArcS, as the previously elusive cognate sensor kinase of the Arc system in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Phenotypic mutant characterization, transcriptomic analysis, protein-protein interaction, and phosphotransfer studies revealed that the Shewanella Arc system consists of the sensor kinase ArcS, the single phosphotransfer domain protein HptA, and the response regulator ArcA. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that HptA might be a relict of ArcB. Conversely, ArcS is substantially different with respect to overall sequence homologies and domain organizations. Thus, we speculate that ArcS might have adopted the role of ArcB after a loss of the original sensor kinase, perhaps as a consequence of regulatory adaptation to a redox-stratified environment.

  2. Fnr (EtrA) acts as a fine-tuning regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Garza, Claribel; Murray, Alison E.; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; McCue, Lee Ann; Romine, Margaret F.; Loffler, F. E.; Tiedje, James M.

    2011-03-30

    EtrA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model organism for study of adaptation to varied redox niches, shares 73.6% and 50.8% amino acid sequence identity with the oxygen-sensing regulators Fnr in E. coli and Anr in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively; however, its regulatory role of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella spp. is not well understood. The expression of the nap genes, nrfA, cymA and hcp was significantly reduced in etrA deletion mutant EtrA7-1; however, limited anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction occurred, suggesting that multiple regulators control nitrate reduction in this strain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fumarate reductase gene expression was down regulated at least 2-fold and the EtrA7-1 mutant grew poorly with fumarate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), suggesting both respiratory pathways are under EtrA control. Transcript analysis further suggested a role of EtrA in prophage activation and down regulation of genes implicated in aerobic metabolism. In contrast to previous studies that attributed a minor regulatory role to EtrA in Shewanella spp., this study demonstrates that EtrA acts as a global transcriptional regulator and confers physiological advantages to strain MR-1 under certain growth conditions. In conjunction with other regulators, EtrA fine-tunes the expression of genes involved in anaerobic metabolism in S. oneidensis strain MR-1.

  3. Iron reduction in the DAMO/Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 coculture system and the fate of Fe(II).

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Li, Shan-Wei; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation processes play important roles in the global iron and carbon cycle, respectively. This study explored the ferrihydrite reduction process with methane as a carbon source in a coculture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microbes enriched in laboratory and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and then characterized the reduced products. Ferrihydrite reduction was also studied in the DAMO and Shewanella systems alone. The ferrihydrite was reduced slightly (<13.3%) in the separate systems, but greatly (42.0-88.3%) in the coculture system. Isotope experiment of (13)CH4 addition revealed that DAMO microbes coupled to S. oneidensis MR-1 in a ferric iron reduction process with (13)CH4 consumption and (13)CO2 production. Compared with ferrihydrite, the reduced products showed increased crystallinity (from amorphous state to crystallinity 77.1%) and magnetism (from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic). The produced ferrous iron was formed into minerals primarily composed of siderite with a small amount vivianite and magnetite. A portion of products covered the cell surface and hindered further reactions. The results presented herein widen the current understanding of iron metabolism and mineralization in the ocean, and show that the coculture systems of DAMO microbes and Shewanella have the potential to be globally important to iron reduction and methane oxidation.

  4. Redox and pH Microenvironments within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms Reveal an Electron Transfer Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to quantify the variations in redox potential and pH in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms respiring on electrodes. We grew S. oneidensis MR-1 on a graphite electrode, which was used to accept electrons for microbial respiration. We modified well-known redox and pH microelectrodes with a built-in reference electrode so that they could operate near polarized surfaces and quantified the redox potential and pH profiles in these biofilms. In addition, we used a ferri-/ferrocyanide redox system in which electrons were only transferred by mediated electron transfer to explain the observed redox potential profiles in biofilms. We found that regardless of the polarization potential of the biofilm electrode, the redox potential decreased toward the bottom of the biofilm. In a fully redox-mediated control system (ferri-/ferrocyanide redox system), the redox potential increased toward the bottom when the electrode was the electron acceptor. The opposite behavior of redox profiles in biofilms and the redox-controlled system is explained by S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms not being redox-controlled when they respire on electrodes. The lack of a significant variation in pH implies that there is no proton transfer limitation in S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and that redox potential profiles are not caused by pH. PMID:21648431

  5. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  6. Identification and characterization of a HEPN-MNT family type II toxin-antitoxin in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Fei; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2015-11-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are prevalent in bacteria and archaea. However, related studies in the ecologically and bioelectrochemically important strain Shewanella oneidensis are limited. Here, we show that SO_3166, a member of the higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide-binding (HEPN) superfamily, strongly inhibited cell growth in S. oneidensis and Escherichia coli. SO_3165, a putative minimal nucleotidyltransferase (MNT), neutralized the toxicity of SO_3166. Gene SO_3165 lies upstream of SO_3166, and they are co-transcribed. Moreover, the SO_3165 and SO_3166 proteins interact with each other directly in vivo, and antitoxin SO_3165 bound to the promoter of the TA operon and repressed its activity. Finally, the conserved Rx4-6H domain in HEPN family was identified in SO_3166. Mutating either the R or H abolished SO_3166 toxicity, confirming that Rx4-6H domain is critical for SO_3166 activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SO_3166 and SO_3165 in S. oneidensis form a typical type II TA pair. This TA pair plays a critical role in regulating bacterial functions because its disruption led to impaired cell motility in S. oneidensis. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that HEPN-MNT can function as a TA system, thereby providing important insights into the understanding of the function and regulation of HEPNs and MNTs in prokaryotes.

  7. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M.; Monty, Chelsea N.

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms. PMID:26824529

  8. Identification and characterization of a HEPN-MNT family type II toxin–antitoxin in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianyun; Guo, Yunxue; Zeng, Zhenshun; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Fei; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2015-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are prevalent in bacteria and archaea. However, related studies in the ecologically and bioelectrochemically important strain Shewanella oneidensis are limited. Here, we show that SO_3166, a member of the higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide-binding (HEPN) superfamily, strongly inhibited cell growth in S. oneidensis and Escherichia coli. SO_3165, a putative minimal nucleotidyltransferase (MNT), neutralized the toxicity of SO_3166. Gene SO_3165 lies upstream of SO_3166, and they are co-transcribed. Moreover, the SO_3165 and SO_3166 proteins interact with each other directly in vivo, and antitoxin SO_3165 bound to the promoter of the TA operon and repressed its activity. Finally, the conserved Rx4-6H domain in HEPN family was identified in SO_3166. Mutating either the R or H abolished SO_3166 toxicity, confirming that Rx4-6H domain is critical for SO_3166 activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that SO_3166 and SO_3165 in S. oneidensis form a typical type II TA pair. This TA pair plays a critical role in regulating bacterial functions because its disruption led to impaired cell motility in S. oneidensis. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that HEPN-MNT can function as a TA system, thereby providing important insights into the understanding of the function and regulation of HEPNs and MNTs in prokaryotes. PMID:26112399

  9. The Role of 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase in Enhancement of Solid-Phase Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Turick, Charles E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Zakrajsek, Brian A.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Poppy, Tara E.; Maloney, Andrea; Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT - While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane associated c-type cytochromes and electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of the tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. We determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione ([2-(2- chloro- 4- methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA, which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates at which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E°') of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on our findings, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in S. oneidensis MR-1.

  10. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M; Monty, Chelsea N

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms.

  11. Unraveling the Mechanism for the Viability Deficiency of Shewanella oneidensis oxyR Null Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miaomiao; Wan, Fen; Mao, Yinting

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative stresses triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage various cellular components are unavoidable for virtually all living organisms. In defense, microorganisms have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense, respond to, and battle against ROS. Shewanella oneidensis, an important research model for applied and environmental microbes, employs OxyR to mediate the response to H2O2 by derepressing the production of the major H2O2 scavenger KatB as a major means toward these goals. Surprisingly, despite enhanced H2O2 degradation, the oxyR mutant carries a viability deficiency phenotype (plating defect), which can be suppressed by the addition of exogenous iron species. Experiments showed that the defect was not due to iron starvation. Rather, multiple lines of evidence suggested that H2O2 generated abiotically in lysogeny broth (LB) is responsible for the defect by quickly killing mutant cells. We then showed that the iron species suppressed the plating defect by two distinct mechanisms, either as an H2O2 scavenger without involving living cells or as an environmental cue to stimulate an OxyR-independent response to help cells cope with oxidative stress. Based on the suppression of the plating defect by overproduction of H2O2 scavengers in vivo, we propose that cellular components that are vulnerable to H2O2 and responsible for the defect may reside outside the cytoplasm. IMPORTANCE In bacteria, OxyR is the major regulator controlling the cellular response to H2O2. The loss of OxyR results in reduced viability in many species, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We showed in S. oneidensis that this defect was due to H2O2 generated abiotically in LB. We then showed that this defect could be corrected by the addition of Fe2+ or catalase to the LB or increased intracellular production of catalase. Further analyses revealed that Fe2+ was able not only to decompose H2O2 directly but also to stimulate the activity of OxyR-independent H2O2

  12. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both

  13. A Matter of Timing: Contrasting Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide on Oxidative Stress Response in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Genfu; Wan, Fen; Fu, Huihui; Li, Ning

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), well known for its toxic properties, has recently become a research focus in bacteria, in part because it has been found to prevent oxidative stress caused by treatment with some antibiotics. H2S has the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus preventing oxidative stress, but it is also toxic, leading to conflicting reports of its effects in different organisms. Here, with Shewanella oneidensis as a model, we report that the effects of H2S on the response to oxidative stress are time dependent. When added simultaneously with H2O2, H2S promoted H2O2 toxicity by inactivating catalase, KatB, a heme-containing enzyme involved in H2O2 degradation. Such an inhibitory effect may apply to other heme-containing proteins, such as cytochrome cbb3 oxidase. When H2O2 was supplied 20 min or later after the addition of H2S, the oxidative-stress-responding regulator OxyR was activated, resulting in increased resistance to H2O2. The activation of OxyR was likely triggered by the influx of iron, a response to lowered intracellular iron due to the iron-sequestering property of H2S. Given that Shewanella bacteria thrive in redox-stratified environments that have abundant sulfur and iron species, our results imply that H2S is more important for bacterial survival in such environmental niches than previously believed. IMPORTANCE Previous studies have demonstrated that H2S is either detrimental or beneficial to bacterial cells. While it can act as a growth-inhibiting molecule by damaging DNA and denaturing proteins, it helps cells to combat oxidative stress. Here we report that H2S indeed has these contrasting biological functions and that its effects are time dependent. Immediately after H2S treatment, there is growth inhibition due to damage of heme-containing proteins, at least to catalase and cytochrome c oxidase. In contrast, when added a certain time later, H2S confers an enhanced ability to combat oxidative stress by activating the

  14. Carbon Nanotubes-Mediated Reduction of Hematite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, K.; Xu, S.; Wang, L.; Yang, Y.; Patel, A.

    2015-12-01

    The worldwide carbon nanotubes (CNTs) industry is rapidly expanding with production capacity exceeding several thousand tons per year. After the service lives, CNTs will be ultimately released into the environment with their concentrations in soils increasing by 0.4-147 ng/kg/year and the consequent environmental impacts have received more and more attentions. Effects of CNTs on the redox reactions of Fe have not been studied, although the CNT-bound quinone functional groups can potentially act as an electron shuttle. In this study, we investigated the impact of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the reduction of hematite by metal-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results showed that the presence of MWCNT with concentration ranging from 0.05 to 1 g/L inhibited the reduction of hematite (Fe2O3) by up to 35%, likely due to the toxicity effects of MWCNTs. However, the microbially-reduced MWCNTs (0.1 g/L) stimulated the reduction of Fe(III) by 3.6 times, indicating the potential role of MWCNTs as an electron shuttle. These results suggest MWCNTs play a dual role in regulating the microbial reduction of hematite through both toxicity effects and electron shuttle. We plan to further explore the mechanism for the impact of MWCNTs on the redox reactions of iron by studying the influences of carboxyl functionalized MWCNTs, analyzing the impact of MWCNTs on bacterial growth and characterizing the quinone functional groups in MWCNTs. Potential results will provide a novel perception for the impact of CNTs on the biogeochemical cycles of iron.The worldwide carbon nanotubes (CNTs) industry is rapidly expanding with production capacity exceeding several thousand tons per year. After the service lives, CNTs will be ultimately released into the environment with their concentrations in soils increasing by 0.4-147 ng/kg/year and the consequent environmental impacts have received more and more attentions. Effects of CNTs on the redox reactions of Fe have not

  15. Investigations of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Majors, Paul D.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-07-01

    Biofilms are known to possess spatially and temporally varying metabolite concentration profiles at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. This results in varying growth environments within that may ultimately drive species diversity, determine biofilm structure and also the spatial arrangement of the community members. Using noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopic imaging/spectroscopy and confocal imaging, we investigated anaerobic reduction kinetics, structural variation, and the stratification of metabolism within live biofilms of the facultative anaerobic dissimilatory metal-reducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Biofilms were pregrown using a defined minimal media in a homebuilt constant depth film fermenter and subsequently transferred to an in-magnet sample chamber under laminar flow for NMR measurements. The sample was subjected to various, rapidly switched substrate/ anaerobic electron acceptor combinations (fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and nitrate electron acceptors). Localized NMR spectroscopy was used to non-invasively monitored the spectra of hydrogen-containing metabolites at high temporal resolution (4.5 min) under oxygen-limited conditions. Anaerobic reduction was immediately observed upon switching feed solutions indicate that no gene induction (transcriptional response) was needed for MR-1 to switch between fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate electron acceptors. In parallel experiments, confocal microscopy was used with constitutively expressed fluorescent reporters to independently investigate structural changes in response to the availability of electron acceptor and also the outcome of metabolic competition under oxygen-limited conditions. A clearer understanding of the metabolic diversity and plasticity of the biofilm mode of growth as well as how this possibly translates to the environmental fitness is made possible through the use of non-invasive and non-destructive techniques such as described here.

  16. Surface-Enhanced Raman Imaging of Intracellular Bioreduction of Chromate in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Sandeep P.; Henne, Kristene L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This proposed research aims to use novel nanoparticle sensors and spectroscopic tools constituting surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and Fluorescence Lifetime imaging (FLIM) to study intracellular chemical activities within single bioremediating microorganism. The grand challenge is to develop a mechanistic understanding of chromate reduction and localization by the remediating bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by chemical and lifetime imaging. MR-1 has attracted wide interest from the research community because of its potential in reducing multiple chemical and metallic electron acceptors. While several biomolecular approaches to decode microbial reduction mechanisms exist, there is a considerable gap in the availability of sensor platforms to advance research from population-based studies to the single cell level. This study is one of the first attempts to incorporate SERS imaging to address this gap. First, we demonstrate that chromate-decorated nanoparticles can be taken up by cells using TEM and Fluorescence Lifetime imaging to confirm the internalization of gold nanoprobes. Second, we demonstrate the utility of a Raman chemical imaging platform to monitor chromate reduction and localization within single cells. Distinctive differences in Raman signatures of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) enabled their spatial identification within single cells from the Raman images. A comprehensive evaluation of toxicity and cellular interference experiments conducted revealed the inert nature of these probes and that they are non-toxic. Our results strongly suggest the existence of internal reductive machinery and that reduction occurs at specific sites within cells instead of at disperse reductive sites throughout the cell as previously reported. While chromate-decorated gold nanosensors used in this study provide an improved means for the tracking of specific chromate interactions within the cell and on the cell surface, we expect our single cell imaging tools to be

  17. c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Simonson, Cody J.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-08-08

    Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC, previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild type MR-1. Similar to the wild type, the mutants accumulated UO2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an exopolymeric substance (EPS). In wild type cells, this UO2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties, contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA. This is the first study to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  18. Direct electrochemistry of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase: evidence for interactions across the dimeric interface

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Evan T.; Youngblut, Matthew; Pacheco, A. Andrew; Elliott, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (soNrfA), a dimeric enzyme that houses five c-type hemes per protomer, carries out the six-electron reduction of nitrite and the two-electron reduction of hydroxylamine. Protein film voltammetry (PFV) has been used to study the cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Escherichia coli (ecNrfA) previously, revealing catalytic reduction of both nitrite and hydroxylamine substrates by ecNrfA adsorbed to a graphite electrode that is characterized by ‘boosts’ and attenuations in activity depending on the applied potential. Here, we use PFV to investigate the catalytic properties of soNrfA during both nitrite and hydroxylamine turnover and compare those properties to ecNrfA. Distinct differences in both the electrochemical and kinetic characteristics of soNrfA are observed, e.g., all detected electron transfer steps are one-electron in nature, contrary to what has been observed in ecNrfA (Angove, H. C., Cole, J. A., Richardson, D. J., and Butt, J. N. (2002) Protein film voltammetry reveals distinctive fingerprints of nitrite and hydroxylamine reduction by a cytochrome C nitrite reductase, J Biol Chem 277, 23374-23381). Additionally, we find evidence of substrate inhibition during nitrite turnover and negative cooperativity during hydroxylamine turnover, neither of which have previously been observed in any cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Collectively these data provide evidence that during catalysis, potential pathways of communication exist between the individual soNrfA monomers comprising the native homodimer. PMID:23210513

  19. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  20. The tetraheme cytochrome CymA is required for anaerobic respiration with dimethyl sulfoxide and nitrite in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Schwalb, Carsten; Chapman, Stephen K; Reid, Graeme A

    2003-08-12

    The tetraheme c-type cytochrome, CymA, from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has previously been shown to be required for respiration with Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate [Myers, C. R., and Myers, J. M. (1997) J. Bacteriol. 179, 1143-1152]. It is located in the cytoplasmic membrane where the bulk of the protein is exposed to the periplasm, enabling it to transfer electrons to a series of redox partners. We have expressed and purified a soluble derivative of CymA (CymA(sol)) that lacks the N-terminal membrane anchor. We show here, by direct measurements of electron transfer between the purified proteins, that CymA(sol) efficiently reduces S. oneidensis fumarate reductase. This indicates that no further proteins are required for electron transfer between the quinone pool and fumarate if we assume direct reduction of CymA by quinols. By expressing CymA(sol) in a mutant lacking CymA, we have shown that this soluble form of the protein can complement the defect in fumarate respiration. We also demonstrate that CymA is essential for growth with DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) and for reduction of nitrite, implicating CymA in at least five different electron transfer pathways in Shewanella.

  1. Conduction-band edge dependence of carbon-coated hematite stimulated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shungui; Tang, Jiahuan; Yuan, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria-based bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) are promising technologies used for alternative energy generation, wastewater treatment, and environmental monitoring. However, their practical application is limited by the bioelectrode performance, mainly resulting from low extracellular electron transfer (EET) efficiency. In this study, a carbon-coated hematite (C/Hematite) electrode was successfully obtained by a green and solvent-free route, that is, heat treatment in an oxygen-rich environment using solid ferrocene as the precursor. The as-prepared C/Hematite electrode was evaluated as a high-performance electrode material in a Shewanella oneidensis-inoculated BES. The maximum biocurrent density of the Shewanella-attached C/Hematite electrode reached 0.22 ± 0.01 mA cm(-2), which is nearly 6-times higher than that of a bare carbon cloth (CC) electrode (0.036 ± 0.005 mA cm(-2)). Electrochemical measurements revealed that the enhanced conductivity and better energy matching between the outer membrane c-type cytochromes of S. oneidensis and the electrode contributed to the improved EET efficiency. The results of this study demonstrated that the semiconductive properties of iron oxides play important roles for the involved bacterial extracellular respiration activities.

  2. Oxygen Tension and Riboflavin Gradients Cooperatively Regulate the Migration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Revealed by a Hydrogel-Based Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beum Jun; Chu, Injun; Jusuf, Sebastian; Kuo, Tiffany; TerAvest, Michaela A.; Angenent, Largus T.; Wu, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a model bacterial strain for studies of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). It has two extracellular electron transfer pathways: (1) shuttling electrons via an excreted mediator riboflavin; and (2) direct contact between the c-type cytochromes at the cell membrane and the electrode. Despite the extensive use of S. oneidensis in BESs such as microbial fuel cells and biosensors, many basic microbiology questions about S. oneidensis in the context of BES remain unanswered. Here, we present studies of motility and chemotaxis of S. oneidensis under well controlled concentration gradients of two electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized form of riboflavin (flavin+), using a newly developed microfluidic platform. Experimental results demonstrate that either oxygen or flavin+ is a chemoattractant to S. oneidensis. The chemotactic tendency of S. oneidensis in a flavin+ concentration gradient is significantly enhanced in an anaerobic in contrast to an aerobic condition. Furthermore, either a low oxygen tension or a high flavin+ concentration considerably enhances the speed of S. oneidensis. This work presents a robust microfluidic platform for generating oxygen and/or flavin+ gradients in an aqueous environment, and demonstrates that two important electron acceptors, oxygen and oxidized riboflavin, cooperatively regulate S. oneidensis migration patterns. The microfluidic tools presented as well as the knowledge gained in this work can be used to guide the future design of BESs for efficient electron production. PMID:27703448

  3. A biochemical approach to study the role of the terminal oxidases in aerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    The genome of the facultative anaerobic γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes for three terminal oxidases: a bd-type quinol oxidase and two heme-copper oxidases, a A-type cytochrome c oxidase and a cbb 3-type oxidase. In this study, we used a biochemical approach and directly measured oxidase activities coupled to mass-spectrometry analysis to investigate the physiological role of the three terminal oxidases under aerobic and microaerobic conditions. Our data revealed that the cbb 3-type oxidase is the major terminal oxidase under aerobic conditions while both cbb 3-type and bd-type oxidases are involved in respiration at low-O2 tensions. On the contrary, the low O2-affinity A-type cytochrome c oxidase was not detected in our experimental conditions even under aerobic conditions and would therefore not be required for aerobic respiration in S. oneidensis MR-1. In addition, the deduced amino acid sequence suggests that the A-type cytochrome c oxidase is a ccaa 3-type oxidase since an uncommon extra-C terminal domain contains two c-type heme binding motifs. The particularity of the aerobic respiratory pathway and the physiological implication of the presence of a ccaa 3-type oxidase in S. oneidensis MR-1 are discussed.

  4. Disruption of Putrescine Biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis Enhances Biofilm Cohesiveness and Performance in Cr(VI) Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Peng, Ni; Du, Yonghua; Ji, Lianghui

    2014-01-01

    Although biofilm-based bioprocesses have been increasingly used in various applications, the long-term robust and efficient biofilm performance remains one of the main bottlenecks. In this study, we demonstrated that biofilm cohesiveness and performance of Shewanella oneidensis can be enhanced through disrupting putrescine biosynthesis. Through random transposon mutagenesis library screening, one hyperadherent mutant strain, CP2-1-S1, exhibiting an enhanced capability in biofilm formation, was obtained. Comparative analysis of the performance of biofilms formed by S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type (WT) and CP2-1-S1 in removing dichromate (Cr2O72−), i.e., Cr(VI), from the aqueous phase showed that, compared with the WT biofilms, CP2-1-S1 biofilms displayed a substantially lower rate of cell detachment upon exposure to Cr(VI), suggesting a higher cohesiveness of the mutant biofilms. In addition, the amount of Cr(III) immobilized by CP2-1-S1 biofilms was much larger, indicating an enhanced performance in Cr(VI) bioremediation. We further showed that speF, a putrescine biosynthesis gene, was disrupted in CP2-1-S1 and that the biofilm phenotypes could be restored by both genetic and chemical complementations. Our results also demonstrated an important role of putrescine in mediating matrix disassembly in S. oneidensis biofilms. PMID:24362428

  5. Anaerobic Central Metabolic Pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Reinterpreted in the Light of Isotopic Metabolite Labeling▿

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-01-01

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic or oxygen-limited conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes, in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine to form serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate and glycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine its use of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, we grew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source, with either trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor. Analysis of cellular metabolites indicated that a large percentage (>70%) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate or pyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other key metabolites indicate that under anaerobic conditions, although glyoxylate synthesized from the isocitrate lyase reaction can be converted to glycine, a complete serine-isocitrate pathway is not present and serine/glycine is, in fact, oxidized via a highly reversible degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significant activity in the anapleurotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase) reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observed to be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of a complete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under certain anaerobic conditions, e.g., TMAO-reducing conditions. PMID:17114268

  6. Constraint-Based Model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Metabolism: A Tool for Data Analysis and Hypothesis Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Eric A.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; De Ingeniis, Jessica; Zhang, Xiaolin; Osterman, Andrei; Scott, James H.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Konopka, Allan E.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2010-01-01

    Shewanellae are gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in chemically (i.e., redox) stratified environments. Occupying such niches requires the ability to rapidly acclimate to changes in electron donor/acceptor type and availability; hence, the ability to compete and thrive in such environments must ultimately be reflected in the organization and utilization of electron transfer networks, as well as central and peripheral carbon metabolism. To understand how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 utilizes its resources, the metabolic network was reconstructed. The resulting network consists of 774 reactions, 783 genes, and 634 unique metabolites and contains biosynthesis pathways for all cell constituents. Using constraint-based modeling, we investigated aerobic growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 on numerous carbon sources. To achieve this, we (i) used experimental data to formulate a biomass equation and estimate cellular ATP requirements, (ii) developed an approach to identify cycles (such as futile cycles and circulations), (iii) classified how reaction usage affects cellular growth, (iv) predicted cellular biomass yields on different carbon sources and compared model predictions to experimental measurements, and (v) used experimental results to refine metabolic fluxes for growth on lactate. The results revealed that aerobic lactate-grown cells of S. oneidensis MR-1 used less efficient enzymes to couple electron transport to proton motive force generation, and possibly operated at least one futile cycle involving malic enzymes. Several examples are provided whereby model predictions were validated by experimental data, in particular the role of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system in the metabolism of one-carbon units, and growth on different sources of carbon and energy. This work illustrates how integration of computational and experimental efforts facilitates the understanding of microbial metabolism at a systems

  7. Constraint-Based Model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Metabolism: a Tool for Data Analysis and Hypothesis Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Hill, Eric A.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; De Ingeniis, Jessica; Zhang, Xiaolin; Osterman, Andrei; Scott, James H.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2010-06-24

    Shewanellae are gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in chemically (i.e., redox) stratified environments. Occupying such niches requires the ability to rapidly acclimate to changes in electron donor/acceptor type and availability; hence, the ability to compete and thrive in such environments must ultimately be reflected in the organization and flexibility of the electron transfer networks as well as central and peripheral carbon metabolism pathways. To understand the factors contributing to the ecophysiological success of Shewanellae, the metabolic network of S. oneidensis MR-1 was reconstructed. The resulting network consists of 774 reactions, 783 genes, and 634 unique metabolites and contains biosynthesis pathways for all cell constituents. Using constraint-based modeling, we investigated aerobic growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 on numerous carbon sources. To achieve this, we (i) used experimental data to formulate a biomass equation and estimate cellular ATP requirements, (ii) developed an approach to identify futile cycles, (iii) classified how reaction usage affects cellular growth, (iv) predicted cellular biomass yields on different carbon sources and compared model predictions to experimental measurements, and (v) used experimental results to refine metabolic fluxes for growth on lactate. The results revealed that aerobic lactate-grown cells of S. oneidensis MR-1 used less efficient enzymes to couple electron transport to proton motive force generation, and possibly operated at least one futile cycle involving malic enzymes. Several examples are provided whereby model predictions were validated by experimental data, in particular the role of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system in the metabolism of one-carbon units, and growth on different sources of carbon and energy. This work illustrates how integration of computational and experimental efforts facilitates the understanding of microbial metabolism

  8. Substrate-level phosphorylation is the primary source of energy conservation during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kristopher A; Flynn, Jeffrey M; Naranjo, Belén; Shikhare, Indraneel D; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    It is well established that respiratory organisms use proton motive force to produce ATP via F-type ATP synthase aerobically and that this process may reverse during anaerobiosis to produce proton motive force. Here, we show that Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, a nonfermentative, facultative anaerobe known to respire exogenous electron acceptors, generates ATP primarily from substrate-level phosphorylation under anaerobic conditions. Mutant strains lacking ackA (SO2915) and pta (SO2916), genes required for acetate production and a significant portion of substrate-level ATP produced anaerobically, were tested for growth. These mutant strains were unable to grow anaerobically with lactate and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with substrate-level phosphorylation yielding a significant amount of ATP. Mutant strains lacking ackA and pta were also shown to grow slowly using N-acetylglucosamine as the carbon source and fumarate as the electron acceptor, consistent with some ATP generation deriving from the Entner-Doudoroff pathway with this substrate. A deletion strain lacking the sole F-type ATP synthase (SO4746 to SO4754) demonstrated enhanced growth on N-acetylglucosamine and a minor defect with lactate under anaerobic conditions. ATP synthase mutants grown anaerobically on lactate while expressing proteorhodopsin, a light-dependent proton pump, exhibited restored growth when exposed to light, consistent with a proton-pumping role for ATP synthase under anaerobic conditions. Although S. oneidensis requires external electron acceptors to balance redox reactions and is not fermentative, we find that substrate-level phosphorylation is its primary anaerobic energy conservation strategy. Phenotypic characterization of an ackA deletion in Shewanella sp. strain MR-4 and genomic analysis of other sequenced strains suggest that this strategy is a common feature of Shewanella.

  9. Laue crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase from a high-yield expression system

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew

    2012-09-11

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, are reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein 'small tetraheme c' replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated approximately 20 mg crude ccNiR per liter of culture, compared with 0.5-1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for Escherichia coli ccNiR, and is stable for over 2 weeks in pH 7 solution at 4 C. UV/vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified five independent one-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the five reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed among the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good-quality crystals, with which the 2.59-{angstrom}-resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein).

  10. Surface display of roGFP for monitoring redox status of extracellular microenvironments in Shewanella oneidensis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Mukherjee, Manisha; Cheng, Hsin-I; Zhang, Yingdan; Ji, Lianghui; Cao, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Biofilms are the most ubiquitous and resilient form of microbial life on earth. One most important feature of a biofilm is the presence of a self-produced matrix, which creates highly heterogeneous and dynamic microenvironments within biofilms. Redox status in biofilm microenvironments plays a critical role in biofilm development and function. However, there is a lack of non-intrusive tools to quantify extracellular redox status of microenvironments within a biofilm matrix. In this study, using Shewanella oneidensis as a model organism, we demonstrated a novel approach to monitor extracellular redox status in biofilm microenvironments. Specifically, we displayed a redox sensitive fluorescence protein roGFP onto the cell surface of S. oneidensis by fusing it to the C-terminus of BpfA, a large surface protein, and used the surface displayed roGFP as a sensor to quantify the extracellular redox status in the matrix of S. oneidensis biofilms. The fusion of roGFP into BpfA has no negative impacts on cell growth and biofilm formation. Upon exposure to oxidizing agents such as H2 O2 , Ag(+) , and SeO3 (2-) , S. oneidensis BpfA-roGFP cells exhibited a characteristic fluorescence of roGFP. Proteinase treatment assay and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy confirmed the surface localization of BpfA-roGFP. We further used the surface displayed roGFP monitored the extracellular redox status in the matrix at different depths of a biofilm exposed to H2 O2 . This study provides a novel approach to non-invasively monitor extracellular redox status in microenvironments within biofilms, which can be used to understand redox responses of biofilms to environmental perturbations.

  11. Laue Crystal Structure of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase from a High-yield Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, is reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein “Small Tetra-heme c” replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated ~20 mg crude ccNiR/L culture, compared with 0.5–1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for E. coli ccNiR, and is stable for over two weeks in pH 7 solution at 4° C. UV/Vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified 5 independent 1-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the 5 reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed amongst the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good quality crystals, with which the 2.59 Å resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein). PMID:22382353

  12. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebush,S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  13. Purification and Characterization of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Herve; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-08-02

    The γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that was implicated in both H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned into a protein expression vector. The resulting plasmid was transformed into a MR-1 mutant deficient in H2 formation. Expression of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant’s ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for wild type. Following expression, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase was purified to near homogeneity. The purified MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase could couple H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII) and methyl viologen directly. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated Tc(VII) but not methyl viologen reductions. Under the conditions tested, Tc(VII) reduction was complete in Tris buffer but not in HEPES buffer. The reduced Tc(IV) was soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc(IV) precipitates formed in HEPES buffer were packed with crystallites. Although X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements confirmed that the reduction products found in both buffers were Tc(IV), extended X-ray adsorption fine-structure measurements revealed that these products were very different. While the product in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2•nH2O. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase is a bidirectional enzyme that catalyzes both H2 formation and oxidation as well as Tc(VII) reduction directly by coupling H2 oxidation.

  14. Purification and Characterization of the [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that has been implicated in H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase coupled H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O4− and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O4− but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O4− used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O4− was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2·nH2O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O4− reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O4− reduction directly by coupling to H2 oxidation. PMID:21724888

  15. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants selected for their inability to produce soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes are unable to respire Fe(III) as anaerobic electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Jones, Morris E; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J; Taillefert, Martial

    2010-04-01

    Recent voltammetric analyses indicate that Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 produces soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes during anaerobic respiration of sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. Results of the present study expand the range of Shewanella species capable of producing soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes to include Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Soluble organic-Fe(III) was produced by S. oneidensis cultures incubated anaerobically with Fe(III) oxides, or with Fe(III) oxides and the alternate electron acceptor fumarate, but not in the presence of O(2), nitrate or trimethylamine-N-oxide. Chemical mutagenesis procedures were combined with a novel MicroElectrode Screening Array (MESA) to identify four (designated Sol) mutants with impaired ability to produce soluble organic-Fe(III) during anaerobic respiration of Fe(III) oxides. Two of the Sol mutants were deficient in anaerobic growth on both soluble Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III) oxide, yet retained the ability to grow on a suite of seven alternate electron acceptors. The rates of soluble organic-Fe(III) production were proportional to the rates of iron reduction by the S. oneidensis wild-type and Sol mutant strains, and all four Sol mutants retained wild-type siderophore production capability. Results of this study indicate that the production of soluble organic-Fe(III) may be an important intermediate step in the anaerobic respiration of both soluble and sparingly soluble forms of Fe(III) by S. oneidensis.

  16. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem ‘modules’ similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV–visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  17. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas A; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S; Fredrickson, Jim K; Zachara, John M; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David J

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem 'modules' similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV-visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  18. Roles of 3,3′,4′,5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide in regulating extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Yu, Sheng-Song; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Li, Wen-Wei; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) is critically involved in many pollutant conversion processes in both natural environment and engineered bioelectrochemical systems (BES), but typically with limited efficiency and poor controllability. In this study, we discover an important role of uncouplers in affecting the microbial energy metabolism and EET. Dose of lower-concentration 3,3′,4′,5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS) in the anolyte promoted the current generation and substrate degradation of an MFC inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, higher TCS dosage caused obvious microbial inhibition. Our results suggest a previously unknown role of uncouplers in regulating the microbial EET. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of such processes are investigated. This work broadens our view about the EET behaviors of microorganisms in real water environment where uncouplers are usually present, and suggests a possible new approach to regulate microbial EET in BES. PMID:25612888

  19. Roles of 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide in regulating extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Peng; Yu, Sheng-Song; Zhang, Hai-Ling; Li, Wen-Wei; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-23

    Microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) is critically involved in many pollutant conversion processes in both natural environment and engineered bioelectrochemical systems (BES), but typically with limited efficiency and poor controllability. In this study, we discover an important role of uncouplers in affecting the microbial energy metabolism and EET. Dose of lower-concentration 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS) in the anolyte promoted the current generation and substrate degradation of an MFC inoculated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, higher TCS dosage caused obvious microbial inhibition. Our results suggest a previously unknown role of uncouplers in regulating the microbial EET. In addition, the underlying mechanisms of such processes are investigated. This work broadens our view about the EET behaviors of microorganisms in real water environment where uncouplers are usually present, and suggests a possible new approach to regulate microbial EET in BES.

  20. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    PubMed

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  1. Use of SWATH mass spectrometry for quantitative proteomic investigation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms grown on graphite cloth electrodes.

    PubMed

    Grobbler, Christy; Virdis, Bernardino; Nouwens, Amanda; Harnisch, Falk; Rabaey, Korneel; Bond, Philip L

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative proteomics from low biomass, biofilm samples is not well documented. In this study we show successful use of SWATH-MS for quantitative proteomic analysis of a microbial electrochemically active biofilm. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was grown on carbon cloth electrodes under continuous anodic electrochemical polarizations in a bioelectrochemical system (BES). Using lactate as the electron donor, anodes serving as terminal microbial electron acceptors were operated at three different electrode potentials (+0.71 V, +0.21 V & -0.19 V vs. SHE) and the development of catalytic activity was monitored by measuring the current traces over time. Once maximum current was reached (usually within 21-29 h) the electrochemical systems were shut off and biofilm proteins were extracted from the electrodes for proteomic assessment. SWATH-MS analysis identified 704 proteins, and quantitative comparison was made of those associated with tricarboxcylic acid (TCA) cycle. Metabolic differences detected between the biofilms suggested a branching of the S. oneidensis TCA cycle when grown at the different electrode potentials. In addition, the higher abundance of enzymes involved in the TCA cycle at higher potential indicates an increase in metabolic activity, which is expected given the assumed higher energy gains. This study demonstrates high numbers of identifications on BES biofilm samples can be achieved in comparison to what is currently reported. This is most likely due to the minimal preparation steps required for SWATH-MS.

  2. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components

    PubMed Central

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E.; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, John H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic–abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution. PMID:25143589

  3. Effects of the anaerobic respiration of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shenghua; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (VI) is considered to be one of the most widely dispersed and problematic environmental contaminants, due in large part to its high solubility and great mobility in natural aquatic systems. We previously reported that under anaerobic conditions, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown in medium containing uranyl acetate rapidly accumulated long, extracellular, ultrafine U(VI) nanofibers composed of polycrystalline chains of discrete meta-schoepite (UO(3)·2H2O) nanocrystallites. Wild-type MR-1 finally transformed the uranium (VI) nanofibers to uranium (IV) nanoparticles via further reduction. In order to investigate the influence of the respiratory chain in the uranium transformation process, a series of mutant strains lacking a periplasmic cytochrome MtrA, outer membrane (OM) cytochrome MtrC and OmcA, a tetraheme cytochrome CymA anchored to the cytoplasmic membrane, and a trans-OM protein MtrB, were tested in this study. Although all the mutants produced U(VI) nanofibers like the wild type, the transformation rates from U(VI) nanofibers to U(IV) nanoparticles varied; in particular, the mutant with deletion in tetraheme cytochrome CymA stably maintained the uranium (VI) nanofibers, suggesting that the respiratory chain of S. oneidensis MR-1 is probably involved in the stability of extracellular U(VI) nanofibers, which might be easily treated via the physical processes of filtration or flocculation for the remediation of uranium contamination in sediments and aquifers, as well as the recovery of uranium in manufacturing processes.

  4. Shewanella oneidensis FabB: A β-ketoacyl-ACP Synthase That Works with C16:1-ACP

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qixia; Li, Meng; Fu, Huihui; Meng, Qiu; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    It is established that Escherichia coli β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (KAS) I (encoded by EcfabB) is the primary, if not exclusive, factor for elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP (C10:1-ACP) but not effective with C16:1- or longer-chain-ACPs. To test the extent to which these features apply to KAS I proteins in other species, in this study, we examined the physiological role of FabB in Shewanella oneidensis, an excellent model for researching type II fatty acid synthetic (FAS) system and its regulation. We showed that the loss of either FabA (the enzyme that introduces double bond) or FabB, in the absence of DesA which desaturizes C16 and C18 to generate respective C16:1 and C18:1, leads to a UFA auxotroph. However, fatty acid profiles of membrane phospholipid of the fabA and fabB mutants are significantly different, suggesting that FabB participates in steps beyond elongation of C10:1-ACP. Further analyses demonstrated that S. oneidensis FabB differs from EcFabB in that (i) it is not the only enzyme capable of catalyzing elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP produced by FabA, (ii) it plays a critical role in elongation of C16:1- and longer-chain-ACPs, and (iii) its overproduction is detrimental. PMID:27014246

  5. Pyruvate and lactate metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under fermentation, oxygen limitation, and fumarate respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Geydebrekht, Oleg V; Hill, Eric A; Reed, Jennifer L; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of a wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed the lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor-limited growth on lactate with O(2), lactate with fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensable for growth, the respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under conditions of O(2) limitation but was required for anaerobic growth, likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as an electron donor and an electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by a recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by the generation of proton motive force.

  6. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  7. The effect of metal loading on Cd adsorption onto Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cell envelopes: The role of sulfhydryl sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiang; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2015-10-01

    The adsorption and desorption of Cd onto Shewanella oneidensis bacterial cells with and without blocking of sulfhydryl sites was measured in order to determine the effect of metal loading and to understand the role of sulfhydryl sites in the adsorption reactions. The observed adsorption/desorption behaviors display strong dependence on metal loading. Under a high loading of 40 μmol Cd/g bacterial cells, blocking the sulfhydryl sites within the cell envelope by exposure of the biomass to monobromo(trimethylammonio)bimane bromide (qBBr) does not significantly affect the extent of Cd adsorption, and we observed fully reversible adsorption under this condition. In contrast, under a low metal loading of 1.3 μmol Cd/g bacterial cells, the extent of Cd adsorption onto sulfhydryl-blocked S. oneidensis cells was significantly lower than that onto untreated cells, and only approximately 50-60% of the adsorbed Cd desorbed from the cells upon acidification. In conjunction with previous EXAFS results, our findings demonstrate that Cd adsorption onto S. oneidensis under low metal loading conditions is dominated by sulfhydryl binding, and thus is controlled by a distinct adsorption mechanism from the non-sulfhydryl site binding which controls Cd adsorption under high metal loading conditions. We use the data to develop a surface complexation model that constrains the values of the stability constants for individual Cd-sulfhydryl and Cd-non-sulfhydryl bacterial complexes, and we use this approach to account for the Cd adsorption behavior as a function of both pH and metal loading. This approach is crucial in order to predict metal adsorption onto bacteria under environmentally relevant metal loading conditions where sulfhydryl binding sites can dominate the adsorption reaction.

  8. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  9. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-30

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe growing by coupling organic matter oxidation to reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of these bacteria under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2 and fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation, which does not sustain growth but allows cells to survive for prolonged period. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of all ATP needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute much to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, and TCA cycle did not contribute significantly to substrate oxidation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation, however was important for anaerobic growth probably supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. Unexpectedly, obtained results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination between substrate-level phosphorylation and a respiratory process, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). Based on involved enzymes localization we hypothesize that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  10. Two residues predominantly dictate functional difference in motility between Shewanella oneidensis flagellins FlaA and FlaB.

    PubMed

    Sun, Linlin; Dong, Yangyang; Shi, Miaomiao; Jin, Miao; Zhou, Qing; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Gao, Haichun

    2014-05-23

    Nearly half of flagellated microorganisms possess a multiple-flagellin system. Although a functional filament can be formed from one of multiple flagellins alone in many bacteria, it is more common that one flagellin is the major constituent and others contribute. Underlying mechanisms proposed for such scenarios cover flagellin regulation of various levels, including transcription, translation, post-translational modification, secretion, and filament assembly. In Shewanella oneidensis, the flagellar filament is composed of FlaA and FlaB flagellins; the latter is the major one in terms of motility. In this study, we showed that regulation of all levels except for filament assembly is indistinguishable between these two flagellins. Further analyses revealed that two amino acid residues predominantly dictated functional difference with respect to motility. Given that Shewanella prefer a solid surface-associated life style, of which filaments consisting of either FlaA or FlaB are equally supportive, we envision that roles of flagella in surface adhesion and formation of bacterial communities are particularly important for their survival and proliferation in these specific niches.

  11. Antibacterial activity of graphene-modified anode on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Deng, Feng; Hu, Yongyou; Sun, Jian; Yang, Yonggang

    2015-09-01

    To clearly illustrate the antibacterial activity of graphene on anodic exoelectrogen, the growth of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm on graphene-modified anodes (GMAs) and bare graphite anodes (BGs) were compared. The GMAs with different amounts of graphene were obtained by the cyclic voltammetric electrodeposition of 5, 20 and 40 potential cycles (5-G, 20-G and 40-G). Confocal scanning laser microscopy and cyclic voltammetry results demonstrated that graphene exhibited an obvious antibacterial effect for initial Shewanella MR biofilm growth. After 5 h of inoculation, 40-G, 20-G and 5-G had 6.3, 8.8 and 13.9% lower levels of biofilm viability, respectively, compared to BG, and all three exhibited approximately 70% lower electrochemical activity compared to BG. However, 18 h later, the biofilm on the GMAs exhibited much higher viability than that of the BG, and the electrochemical activity increased to a similar level. This study revealed the dual effect of graphene, including the antibacterial activity on biofilms and the enhancement of bacterial attachment and electron transfer.

  12. Two Residues Predominantly Dictate Functional Difference in Motility between Shewanella oneidensis Flagellins FlaA and FlaB*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linlin; Dong, Yangyang; Shi, Miaomiao; Jin, Miao; Zhou, Qing; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Gao, Haichun

    2014-01-01

    Nearly half of flagellated microorganisms possess a multiple-flagellin system. Although a functional filament can be formed from one of multiple flagellins alone in many bacteria, it is more common that one flagellin is the major constituent and others contribute. Underlying mechanisms proposed for such scenarios cover flagellin regulation of various levels, including transcription, translation, post-translational modification, secretion, and filament assembly. In Shewanella oneidensis, the flagellar filament is composed of FlaA and FlaB flagellins; the latter is the major one in terms of motility. In this study, we showed that regulation of all levels except for filament assembly is indistinguishable between these two flagellins. Further analyses revealed that two amino acid residues predominantly dictated functional difference with respect to motility. Given that Shewanella prefer a solid surface-associated life style, of which filaments consisting of either FlaA or FlaB are equally supportive, we envision that roles of flagella in surface adhesion and formation of bacterial communities are particularly important for their survival and proliferation in these specific niches. PMID:24733391

  13. Comparative Genomics and Experimental Characterization of N-Acetylglucosamine Utilization Pathway of Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chen; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Laikova, Olga N.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Zagnitko, Olga P.; Romine, Margaret F.; Obraztova, Anna; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Osterman, Andrei

    2006-10-06

    Members of the genus Shewanella are widespread in aquatic and sedimentary environments and are, in general, noted both for their respiratory versatility and for their limited repertoire of substrates that they can utilize as electron donors. This study expands the range of carbon substrates utilized by Shewanella spp., unambiguously identifies several genes involved in chitin metabolism, and describes a novel variant of the classical three-step biochemical conversion of GlcNAc to fructose-6-phosphate first described in Escherichia coli.

  14. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Boily, Jean F.; Lower, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Antibody-recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells during anaerobic growth, when Fe(III) served as the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface with hematite, while MtrC was more uniformly displayed on the bacterium’s exterior cell surface. Both cytochromes were also found associated with extracellular material.

  15. Protection from oxidative stress relies mainly on derepression of OxyR-dependent KatB and Dps in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaoming; Dong, Yangyang; Luo, Qixia; Li, Ning; Wu, Genfu; Gao, Haichun

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella thrives in redox-stratified environments where accumulation of H2O2 becomes inevitable because of the chemical oxidation of reduced metals, sulfur species, or organic molecules. As a research model, the representative species Shewanella oneidensis has been extensively studied for its response to various stresses. However, little progress has been made toward an understanding of the physiological and genetic responses of this bacterium to oxidative stress, which is critically relevant to its application as a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. In this study, we systematically investigated the mechanism underlying the response to H2O2 at cellular, genomic, and molecular levels. Using transcriptional profiling, we found that S. oneidensis is hypersensitive to H2O2 in comparison with Escherichia coli, and well-conserved defense genes such as ahpCF, katB, katG, and dps appear to form the first line of defense, whereas iron-sulfur-protecting proteins may not play a significant role. Subsequent identification and characterization of an analogue of the E. coli oxyR gene revealed that S. oneidensis OxyR is the master regulator that mediates the bacterial response to H2O2-induced oxidative stress by directly repressing or activating the defense genes. The sensitivity of S. oneidensis to H2O2 is likely attributable to the lack of an inducible manganese import mechanism during stress. To cope with stress, major strategies that S. oneidensis adopts include rapid removal of the oxidant and restriction of intracellular iron concentrations, both of which are achieved predominantly by derepression of the katB and dps genes.

  16. Protection from Oxidative Stress Relies Mainly on Derepression of OxyR-Dependent KatB and Dps in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yaoming; Dong, Yangyang; Luo, Qixia; Li, Ning; Wu, Genfu

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella thrives in redox-stratified environments where accumulation of H2O2 becomes inevitable because of the chemical oxidation of reduced metals, sulfur species, or organic molecules. As a research model, the representative species Shewanella oneidensis has been extensively studied for its response to various stresses. However, little progress has been made toward an understanding of the physiological and genetic responses of this bacterium to oxidative stress, which is critically relevant to its application as a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. In this study, we systematically investigated the mechanism underlying the response to H2O2 at cellular, genomic, and molecular levels. Using transcriptional profiling, we found that S. oneidensis is hypersensitive to H2O2 in comparison with Escherichia coli, and well-conserved defense genes such as ahpCF, katB, katG, and dps appear to form the first line of defense, whereas iron-sulfur-protecting proteins may not play a significant role. Subsequent identification and characterization of an analogue of the E. coli oxyR gene revealed that S. oneidensis OxyR is the master regulator that mediates the bacterial response to H2O2-induced oxidative stress by directly repressing or activating the defense genes. The sensitivity of S. oneidensis to H2O2 is likely attributable to the lack of an inducible manganese import mechanism during stress. To cope with stress, major strategies that S. oneidensis adopts include rapid removal of the oxidant and restriction of intracellular iron concentrations, both of which are achieved predominantly by derepression of the katB and dps genes. PMID:24214945

  17. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essential for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.

  18. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor-dependent periplasmic glutathione peroxidase is involved in oxidative stress response of Shewanella oneidensis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, Jingcheng; Wei, Hehong; Tian, Chunyuan; Damron, Fredrick; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacteria use alternative sigma factors (σs) to regulate condition-specific gene expression for survival and Shewanella harbors multiple ECF (extracytoplasmic function) σ genes and cognate anti-sigma factor genes. Here we comparatively analyzed two of the rpoE-like operons in the strain MR-1: rpoE-rseA-rseB-rseC and rpoE2-chrR. Results: RpoE was important for bacterial growth at low and high temperatures, in the minimal medium, and high salinity. The degP/htrA orthologue, required for growth of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at high temperature, is absent in Shewanella, while the degQ gene is RpoE-regulated and is required for bacterial growth at high temperature. RpoE2 was essentialmore » for the optimal growth in oxidative stress conditions because the rpoE2 mutant was sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. The operon encoding a ferrochelatase paralogue (HemH2) and a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase (PgpD) was identified as RpoE2-dependent. PgpD exhibited higher activities and played a more important role in the oxidative stress responses than the cytoplasmic glutathione peroxidase CgpD under tested conditions. The rpoE2-chrR operon and the identified regulon genes, including pgpD and hemH2, are coincidently absent in several psychrophilic and/or deep-sea Shewanella strains. Conclusion: In S. oneidensis MR-1, the RpoE-dependent degQ gene is required for optimal growth under high temperature. The rpoE2 and RpoE2-dependent pgpD gene encoding a periplasmic glutathione peroxidase are involved in oxidative stress responses. But rpoE2 is not required for bacterial growth at low temperature and it even affected bacterial growth under salt stress, indicating that there is a tradeoff between the salt resistance and RpoE2-mediated oxidative stress responses.« less

  19. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  20. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  1. Mapping the iron binding site(s) on the small tetraheme cytochrome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yufeng; Paquete, Catarina M; Louro, Ricardo O; Ross, Daniel E; Labelle, Edward; Bond, Daniel R; Tien, Ming

    2011-07-19

    In the model microbe Shewanella oneidensis, multi-heme proteins are utilized for respiratory metabolism where metals serve as the terminal electron acceptor. Among those is the periplasm-localized small tetraheme cytochrome (STC). STC has been extensively characterized structurally and electrochemically to which electron flow in and out of the protein has been modeled. However, until the present work, no kinetic studies have been performed to probe the route of electron flow or to determine the iron-binding site on STC. Using iron chelated by EDTA, NTA, or citrate, we have used chemical modification, site-directed mutagenesis along with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and stopped-flow measurements to identify the iron binding site of STC. Chemical modifications of STC revealed that carboxyl groups on STC are involved in binding of EDTA-Fe(3+). Scanning mutagenesis was performed on Asp and Glu to probe the putative iron-binding site on STC. Two STC mutants (D21N; D80N) showed ∼70% decrease in observed electron transfer rate constant with EDTA-Fe(3+) from transient-state kinetic measurements. The impaired reactivity of STC (D80N/D21N) with EDTA-Fe(3+) was further confirmed by a significant decrease (>10-fold) in iron binding affinity.

  2. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kasai, Takuya; Hirose, Atsumi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer (EET) pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the EET processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extracellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological basis for MFCs. PMID:26136738

  3. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Thormann, Kai M.; Duttler, Stefanie; Saville, Renee; Hyodo, Mamoru; Shukla, Soni; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2006-04-01

    Stability and resilience against environmental perturbations are critical properties of medical and environmental biofilms and pose important targets for their control. Biofilm stability is determined by two mutually exclusive processes: attachment of cells to and detachment from the biofilm matrix. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally versatile, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) mineral -reducing microorganism, we identified mxdABCD as a new set of genes essential for formation of a three-dimensional biofilm. Molecular analysis revealed that mxdA encodes a cyclic bis(3',5')guanylic acid (cyclic di-GMP)-forming enzyme with an unusual GGDEF motif, i.e., NVDEF, which is essential for its function. mxdB encodes a putative membrane-associated glycosyl transferase. Both genes are essential for matrix attachment. The attachment-deficient phenotype of a Delta mxdA mutant was rescued by ectopic expression of VCA0956, encoding another diguanylate cyclase. Interestingly, a rapid cellular detachment from the biofilm occurred upon induction of yhjH, a gene encoding an enzyme that has been shown to have phosphodiesterase activity. In this way, it was possible to bypass the previously identified sudden depletion of molecular oxygen as an environmental trigger to induce biofilm dissolution. We propose a model for c-di-GMP as a key intracellular regulator for controlling biofilm stability by shifting the state of a biofilm cell between attachment and detachment in a concentration-dependent manner.

  4. Fate of Fe and Cd upon microbial reduction of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenchen; Yi, Xiaoyun; Dang, Zhi; Yu, Hui; Zeng, Tao; Wei, Chaohai; Feng, Chunhua

    2016-02-01

    Polyferric sulphate has been widely used for emergent control on incidental release of heavy metals such as Cd to surface water, causing precipitation of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs to the sediment. To date, little is known about whether the dissolution of the flocs in the presence of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) can occur and how the dissolution influences the fate of Fe and Cd in the sediment. Here, we demonstrated that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, as representative DIRB, has the ability to reduce the flocs, resulting in the release of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) to the solution. Batch experiment results showed that the concentrations of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+)reached the maximum values at 48 h and then decreased over the remaining incubation time. The characterizations on the solid phase by the scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technologies revealed the formation of iron minerals such as goethite and magnetite as a consequence of microbial Fe(III) reduction. The newly formed iron minerals played a significant role in re-immobilizing Cd by sorption. These results imply that microbial reduction of polyferric flocs is an important contributor to the transport and transformation of metals in the sediment-water interface.

  5. Positive regulation of the Shewanella oneidensis OmpS38, a major porin facilitating anaerobic respiration, by Crp and Fur.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Ju, Lili; Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2015-09-18

    Major porins are among the most abundant proteins embedded in the outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria, playing crucial roles in maintenance of membrane structural integrity and OM permeability. Although many OM proteins (especially c-type cytochromes) in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for respiratory versatility, have been extensively studied, physiological significance of major porins remains largely unexplored. In this study, we show that OmpS38 and OmpA are two major porins, neither of which is responsive to changes in osmolarity or contributes to the intrinsic resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. However, OmpS38 but not OmpA is largely involved in respiration of non-oxygen electron acceptors. We then provide evidence that expression of ompS38 is transcribed from two promoters, the major of which is favored under anaerobic conditions while the other appears constitutive. The major promoter is under the direct control of Crp, the master regulator dictating respiration. As a result, the increase in the level of OmpS38 correlates with an elevated activity in Crp under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the activity of the major promoter is also affected by Fur, presumably indirectly, the transcription factor for iron-dependent gene expression.

  6. Impact of ArcA loss in Shewanella oneidensis revealed by comparative proteomics under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jie; Wei, Buyun; Lipton, Mary S.; Gao, Haichun

    2012-06-01

    Shewanella inhabit a wide variety of niches in nature and can utilize a broad spectrum of electron acceptors under anaerobic conditions. How they modulate their gene expression to adapt is poorly understood. ArcA, homologue of a global regulator controlling hundreds of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in E. coli, was shown to be important in aerobiosis/anaerobiosis of S. oneidensis as well. Loss of ArcA, in addition to altering transcription of many genes, resulted in impaired growth under aerobic condition, which was not observed in E. coli. To further characterize the impact of ArcA loss on gene expression on the level of proteome under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomic approach was employed. Results show that ArcA loss led to globally altered gene expression, generally consistent with that observed with transcripts. Comparison of transcriptomic and proteomic data permitted identification of 17 high-confidence ArcA targets. Moreover, our data indicate that ArcA is required for regulation of cytochrome c proteins, and the menaquinone level may play a role in regulating ArcA as in E. coli. Proteomic-data-guided growth assay revealed that the aerobic growth defect of ArcA mutant is presumably due to impaired peptide utilization.

  7. Regulation of nitrite resistance of the cytochrome cbb3 oxidase by cytochrome c ScyA in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianhua; Jin, Miao; Zhang, Haiyan; Ju, Lili; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2015-02-01

    Cytochrome c proteins, as enzymes to exchange electrons with substrates or as pure electron carriers to shuttle electrons, play vital roles in bacterial respiration and photosynthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for the respiratory diversity, at least 42 c-type cytochromes are predicted to be encoded in the genome and are regarded to be the foundation of its highly branched electron transport pathways. However, only a small number of c-type cytochromes have been extensively studied. In this study, we identify soluble cytochrome c ScyA as an important factor influencing the nitrite resistance of a strain devoid of the bd oxidase by utilizing a newly developed transposon mutagenesis vector, which enables overexpression of the gene(s) downstream of the insertion site. We show that when in overabundance ScyA facilitates growth against nitrite inhibition by enhancing nitrite resistance of the cbb3 oxidase. Based on the data presented in this study, we suggest two possible mechanisms underlying the observed effect of ScyA: (1) ScyA increases electron flow to the cbb3 oxidase; (2) ScyA promotes nitrite resistance of the cbb3 oxidase, possibly by direct interaction.

  8. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  9. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  10. Ferrous Phosphate Surface Precipitates Resulting from the Reduction of Intragrain 6-line Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3) and phosphate (P) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. In the intragrain ferrihydrite suspensions, 200-300 µmol L-1 dissolved Fe(III) was released during the initial stages of incubation; no Fe(III)aq was detected in the free ferrihydrite suspensions. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Distinctive surface precipitates of Fe(II) phosphates with spherical morphology were observed on porous silica when P was present. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and fragments of extracellular materials at the end of incubation.

  11. Investigation into FlhFG reveals distinct features of FlhF in regulating flagellum polarity in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Tong; Shi, Miaomiao; Ju, Lili; Gao, Haichun

    2015-10-01

    Rod-shaped bacterial cells are polarized, with many organelles confined to a polar cellular site. In polar flagellates, FlhF and FlhG, a multiple-domain (B-N-G) GTPase and a MinD-like ATPase respectively, function as a cognate pair to regulate flagellar localization and number as revealed in Vibrio and Pseudomonas species. In this study, we show that FlhFG of Shewanella oneidensis (SoFlhFG), a monotrichous γ-proteobacterium renowned for respiratory diversity, also play an important role in the flagellar polar placement and number control. Despite this, SoFlhFG exhibit distinct features that are not observed in the characterized counterparts. Most strikingly, the G domain of SoFlhF determines the polar placement, contrasting the N domain of the Vibrio cholerae FlhF. The SoFlhF N domain in fact counteracts the function of the G domain with respect to the terminal targeting in the absence of the B domain. We further show that GTPase activity of SoFlhF is essential for motility but not positioning. Overall, our results suggest that mechanisms underlying the polar placement of organelles appear to be diverse, even for evolutionally relatively conserved flagellum.

  12. Bound Flavin-Cytochrome Model of Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis: Analysis by Free Energy Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gongyi; Pachter, Ruth

    2016-06-30

    Flavins are known to enhance extracellular electron transfer (EET) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacteria, which reduce electron acceptors through outer-membrane (OM) cytochromes c. Free-shuttle and bound-redox cofactor mechanisms were proposed to explain this enhancement, but recent electrochemical reports favor a flavin-bound model, proposing two one-electron reductions of flavin, namely, oxidized (Ox) to semiquinone (Sq) and semiquinone to hydroquinone (Hq), at anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. In this work, to provide a mechanistic understanding of riboflavin (RF) binding at the multiheme OM cytochrome OmcA, we explored binding configurations at hemes 2, 5, 7, and 10. Subsequently, on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, binding free energies and redox potential shifts upon RF binding for the Ox/Sq and Sq/Hq reductions were analyzed. Our results demonstrated an upshift in the Ox/Sq and a downshift in the Sq/Hq redox potentials, consistent with a bound RF-OmcA model. Furthermore, binding free energy MD simulations indicated an RF binding preference at heme 7. MD simulations of the OmcA-MtrC complex interfacing at hemes 5 revealed a small interprotein redox potential difference with an electron transfer rate of 10(7)-10(8)/s. PMID:27266856

  13. Involvement of cytochrome c CymA in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Nancy N; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Hawari, Jalal

    2012-02-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a cyclic nitramine explosive commonly used for military applications that is responsible for severe soil and groundwater contamination. In this study, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was shown to efficiently degrade RDX anaerobically (3.5 µmol·h(-1)·(g protein)(-1)) via two initial routes: (1) sequential N-NO(2) reductions to the corresponding nitroso (N-NO) derivatives (94% of initial RDX degradation) and (2) denitration followed by ring cleavage. To identify genes involved in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX, a library of ~2500 mutants of MR-1 was constructed by random transposon mutagenesis and screened for mutants with a reduced ability to degrade RDX compared with the wild type. An RDX-defective mutant (C9) was isolated that had the transposon inserted in the c-type cytochrome gene cymA. C9 transformed RDX at ~10% of the wild-type rate, with degradation occurring mostly via early ring cleavage caused by initial denitration leading to the formation of methylenedinitramine, 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal, formaldehyde, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Genetic complementation of mutant C9 restored the wild-type phenotype, providing evidence that electron transport components have a role in the anaerobic reduction of RDX by MR-1.

  14. Estimating the dual-enzyme kinetic parameters for Cr (VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 from soil column experiments.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Akram; Alam, Mahbub; Yonge, David R

    2005-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) contamination of soil and groundwater is considered a major environmental concern. Bioreduction of Cr (VI) to trivalent chromium (Cr (III)) can be considered an effective technology in remediating Cr (VI) contaminated sites. Among the Cr (VI) reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1) is relatively effective. Reduction of Cr (VI) by MR-1 is defined by the dual-enzyme kinetic model. The feasibility of bioreduction of Cr (VI) is usually evaluated by performing batch experiments which may not accurately represent the subsurface environment. The objective of this paper is to present a rational approach to determine the dual-enzyme reaction kinetics of Cr (VI) reduction by MR-1 from continuous flow soil column experiments which more accurately simulate the subsurface environment. Kinetic parameters obtained from soil column data were found to be much smaller than that obtained from batch data. The stable enzyme induced reaction rate was found to be 127th and the average deactivating enzyme induced reaction rate was 117th of the corresponding values obtained from batch reactor data as reported in literature.

  15. Cu-doped TiO(2) nanoparticles enhance survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under ultraviolet light (UV) exposure.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Sahu, Manoranjan; Biswas, Pratim; Tang, Yinjie J

    2011-10-01

    It has been shown that photocatalytic TiO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as an efficient anti-microbial agent under UV light due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal-reducing bacterium highly susceptible to UV radiation. Interestingly, we found that the presence of Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs in the cultural medium dramatically increased the survival rates (based on colony-forming unit) of strain MR-1 by over 10,000-fold (incubation without shaking) and ~200 fold (incubation with shaking) after a 2-h exposure to UV light. Gene expression results (via qPCR measurement) indicated that the DNA repair gene recA in MR-1 was significantly induced by UV exposure (indicating cellular damage under UV stress), but the influence of NPs on recA expression was not statistically evident. Plausible explanations to NP attenuation of UV stresses are: 1. TiO(2) based NPs are capable of scattering and absorbing UV light and thus create a shading effect to protect MR-1 from UV radiation; 2. more importantly, Cu-doped TiO(2) NPs can co-agglomerate with MR-1 to form large flocs that improves cells' survival against the environmental stresses. This study improves our understanding of NP ecological impacts under natural solar radiation and provides useful insights to application of photocatalytic-NPs for bacterial disinfection. PMID:21855961

  16. Reduced expression of cytochrome oxidases largely explains cAMP inhibition of aerobic growth in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianhua; Meng, Qiu; Fu, Huihui; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial growth under aerobic conditions by elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), first revealed more than 50 years ago, was attributed to accumulation of toxic methylglyoxal (MG). Here, we report a Crp-dependent mechanism rather than MG accumulation that accounts for the phenotype in Shewanella oneidensis, an emerging research model for the bacterial physiology. We show that a similar phenotype can be obtained by removing CpdA, a cAMP phosphodiesterase that appears more effective than its Escherichia coli counterpart. Although production of heme c and cytochromes c is correlated well with cAMP levels, neither is sufficient for the retarded growth. Quantities of overall cytochromes c increased substantially in the presence of elevated cAMP, a phenomenon resembling cells respiring on non-oxygen electron acceptors. In contrast, transcription of Crp-dependent genes encoding both cytochromes bd and cbb3 oxidases is substantially repressed under the same condition. Overall, our results suggest that cAMP of elevated levels drives cells into a low-energetic status, under which aerobic respiration is inhibited. PMID:27076065

  17. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Le Laz, Sébastien; kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  18. Expression of terminal oxidases under nutrient-starved conditions in Shewanella oneidensis: detection of the A-type cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Bauzan, Marielle; Lignon, Sabrina; Rousset, Marc; Brugna, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella species are facultative anaerobic bacteria that colonize redox-stratified habitats where O2 and nutrient concentrations fluctuate. The model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses genes coding for three terminal oxidases that can perform O2 respiration: a bd-type quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidases of the cbb3-type and the A-type. Whereas the bd- and cbb3-type oxidases are routinely detected, evidence for the expression of the A-type enzyme has so far been lacking. Here, we investigated the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of these terminal oxidases under different O2 tensions. Our results reveal that the bd-type oxidase plays a significant role under nutrient starvation in aerobic conditions. The expression of the cbb3-type oxidase is also modulated by the nutrient composition of the medium and increases especially under iron-deficiency in exponentially growing cells. Most importantly, under conditions of carbon depletion, high O2 and stationary-growth, we report for the first time the expression of the A-type oxidase in S. oneidensis, indicating that this terminal oxidase is not functionally lost. The physiological role of the A-type oxidase in energy conservation and in the adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is discussed. PMID:26815910

  19. Identification of a small tetraheme cytochrome c and a flavocytochrome c as two of the principal soluble cytochromes c in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Vandenberghe, I.; Nealson, K. H.; Scott, J. H.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Harada, E.; Kaizu, T.; Akutsu, H.; Leys, D.; Van Beeumen, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Two abundant, low-redox-potential cytochromes c were purified from the facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 grown anaerobically with fumarate. The small cytochrome was completely sequenced, and the genes coding for both proteins were cloned and sequenced. The small cytochrome c contains 91 residues and four heme binding sites. It is most similar to the cytochromes c from Shewanella frigidimarina (formerly Shewanella putrefaciens) NCIMB400 and the unclassified bacterial strain H1R (64 and 55% identity, respectively). The amount of the small tetraheme cytochrome is regulated by anaerobiosis, but not by fumarate. The larger of the two low-potential cytochromes contains tetraheme and flavin domains and is regulated by anaerobiosis and by fumarate and thus most nearly corresponds to the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase previously characterized from S. frigidimarina to which it is 59% identical. However, the genetic context of the cytochrome genes is not the same for the two Shewanella species, and they are not located in multicistronic operons. The small cytochrome c and the cytochrome domain of the flavocytochrome c are also homologous, showing 34% identity. Structural comparison shows that the Shewanella tetraheme cytochromes are not related to the Desulfovibrio cytochromes c(3) but define a new folding motif for small multiheme cytochromes c.

  20. H₂-dependent azoreduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: involvement of secreted flavins and both [Ni-Fe] and [Fe-Fe] hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Le Laz, Sébastien; Kpebe, Arlette; Lorquin, Jean; Brugna, Myriam; Rousset, Marc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the hydrogen (H2)-dependent discoloration of azo dye amaranth by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Experiments with hydrogenase-deficient strains demonstrated that periplasmic [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (HyaB) and periplasmic [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase (HydA) are both respiratory hydrogenases of dissimilatory azoreduction in S. oneidensis MR-1. These findings suggest that HyaB and HydA can function as uptake hydrogenases that couple the oxidation of H2 to the reduction of amaranth to sustain cellular growth. This constitutes to our knowledge the first report of the involvement of [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase in a bacterial azoreduction process. Assays with respiratory inhibitors indicated that a menaquinone pool and different cytochromes were involved in the azoreduction process. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that flavin mononucleotide and riboflavin were secreted in culture supernatant by S. oneidensis MR-1 under H2-dependent conditions with concentration of 1.4 and 2.4 μmol g protein(-1), respectively. These endogenous flavins were shown to significantly accelerate the reduction of amaranth at micromolar concentrations acting as electron shuttles between the cell surface and the extracellular azo dye. This work may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms of azoreduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 and may have practical applications for microbiological treatments of dye-polluted industrial effluents.

  1. Metabolite-enabled mutualistic interaction between Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli in a co-culture using an electrode as electron acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Victor Bochuan; Sivakumar, Krishnakumar; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Qichun; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Cao, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions in planktonic microbial communities have been extensively studied. However, our understanding on mutualistic communities consisting of co-existing planktonic cells and biofilms is limited. Here, we report a planktonic cells-biofilm mutualistic system established by the fermentative bacterium Escherichia coli and the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis in a bioelectrochemical device, where planktonic cells in the anode media interact with the biofilms on the electrode. Our results show that the transfer of formate is the key mechanism in this mutualistic system. More importantly, we demonstrate that the relative distribution of E. coli and S. oneidensis in the liquid media and biofilm is likely driven by their metabolic functions towards an optimum communal metabolism in the bioelectrochemical device. RNA sequencing-based transcriptomic analyses of the interacting organisms in the mutualistic system potentially reveal differential expression of genes involved in extracellular electron transfer pathways in both species in the planktonic cultures and biofilms. PMID:26061569

  2. Final Summary of "Interdisciplinary Study of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1's Metabolism & Metal Reduction"

    SciTech Connect

    Kolker, Eugene

    2007-06-26

    Our project focused primarily on analysis of different types of data produced by global high-throughput technologies, data integration of gene annotation, and gene and protein expression information, as well as on getting a better functional annotation of Shewanella genes. Specifically, four of our numerous major activities and achievements include the development of: statistical models for identification and expression proteomics, superior to currently available approaches (including our own earlier ones); approaches to improve gene annotations on the whole-organism scale; standards for annotation, transcriptomics and proteomics approaches; and generalized approaches for data integration of gene annotation, gene and protein expression information.

  3. The X-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA reveals new insight at the microbe-mineral interface

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus; Baiden, Nanakow; Johs, Alexander; Tomanicek, Stephen J.; Liang, Liyuan; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Gates, Andrew J.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2014-05-21

    The x-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA, an extracellular decaheme cytochrome involved in mineral reduction, was solved to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The four OmcA molecules in the asymmetric unit were arranged so the distance between heme-5 on adjacent OmcA monomers was less than 1 nm, indicative of a transient OmcA dimer capable of intermolecular electron transfer. A previously identified hematite binding motif was identified near heme 10, forming a hydroxylated surface that would bring a heme-10 electron egress site to ~ 1 nm of mineral surface.

  4. The X-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA reveals new insight at the microbe-mineral interface.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Marcus J; Baiden, Nanakow A; Johs, Alexander; Tomanicek, Stephen J; Liang, Liyuan; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K; Zachara, John M; Gates, Andrew J; Butt, Julea N; Richardson, David J; Clarke, Thomas A

    2014-05-21

    The X-ray crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis OmcA, an extracellular decaheme cytochrome involved in mineral reduction, was solved to a resolution of 2.7 Å. The four OmcA molecules in the asymmetric unit are arranged so the minimum distance between heme 5 on adjacent OmcA monomers is 9 Å, indicative of a transient OmcA dimer capable of intermolecular electron transfer. A previously identified hematite binding motif was identified near heme 10, forming a hydroxylated surface that would bring a heme 10 electron egress site to ∼10 Å of a mineral surface.

  5. ShewRegDB: a Visualization Environment for Integration of Experimental and In Silico Derived Regulatory Information in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Mustafa H; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Leuze, Michael Rex; Kora, Guruprasad H; Romine, Margaret; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an important model organism for environmental research as it has an exceptional metabolic and respiratory versatility regulated by a complex regulatory network. We have developed a database to collect experimental and computational data relating to regulation of gene and protein expression, and, a visualization environment that enables integration of these data types. The regulatory information in the database includes predictions of DNA regulator binding sites, sigma factor binding sites, transcription units, operons, promoters, and RNA regulators including non-coding RNAs, riboswitches, and different types of terminators.

  6. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mónica N; Neto, Sónia E; Alves, Alexandra S; Fonseca, Bruno M; Carrêlo, Afonso; Pacheco, Isabel; Paquete, Catarina M; Soares, Cláudio M; Louro, Ricardo O

    2015-01-01

    The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1) relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC) emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR), but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR). In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA), the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB-OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC.

  7. Ferrous phosphate surface precipitates resulting from the reduction of intragrain 6-line ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Peretyazhko, Tetyana; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arey, Bruce W.; McKinley, James P.; Wang, Chong M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Xia, Yuanxian

    2010-07-01

    The reductive biotransformation of 6-line ferrihydrite located within porous silica (intragrain ferrihydrite) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was investigated and compared to the behavior of 6-line ferrihydrite in suspension (free ferrihydrite). The effect of buffer type (PIPES and NaHCO3), phosphate (P), and an electron shuttle (AQDS) on the extent of reduction and formation of Fe(II) secondary phases was investigated under anoxic conditions. Electron microscopy and micro X-ray diffraction were applied to evaluate the morphology and mineralogy of the biogenic precipitates and to study the distribution of microorganisms on the surface of porous silica after bioreduction. Kinetic reduction experiments with free and intragrain ferrihydrite revealed contrasting behaviour with respect to the buffer and presence of P. The overall amount of intragrain ferrihydrite reduction was less than that of free ferrihydrite [at 5 mmol L-1 Fe(III)T]. Reductive mineralization was not observed in the intragrain ferrihydrite incubations without P, and all biogenic Fe(II) concentrated in the aqueous phase. Irrespective of buffer and AQDS addition, rosettes of Fe(II) phosphate of approximate 20-30 μm size were observed on porous silica when P was present. The rosettes grew not only on the silica surface but also within it, forming a coherent spherical structure. These precipitates were well colonized by microorganisms and contained extracellular materials at the end of incubation. Microbial extracellular polymeric substances may have adsorbed Fe(II) promoting Fe(II) phosphate nucleation with subsequent crystal growth proceeding in different directions from a common center.

  8. Iron Triggers λSo Prophage Induction and Release of Extracellular DNA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Binnenkade, Lucas; Teichmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Prophages are ubiquitous elements within bacterial chromosomes and affect host physiology and ecology in multiple ways. We have previously demonstrated that phage-induced lysis is required for extracellular DNA (eDNA) release and normal biofilm formation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Here, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms of prophage λSo spatiotemporal induction in biofilms. To this end, we used a functional fluorescence fusion to monitor λSo activation in various mutant backgrounds and in response to different physiological conditions. λSo induction occurred mainly in a subpopulation of filamentous cells in a strictly RecA-dependent manner, implicating oxidative stress-induced DNA damage as the major trigger. Accordingly, mutants affected in the oxidative stress response (ΔoxyR) or iron homeostasis (Δfur) displayed drastically increased levels of phage induction and abnormal biofilm formation, while planktonic cells were not or only marginally affected. To further investigate the role of oxidative stress, we performed a mutant screen and identified two independent amino acid substitutions in OxyR (T104N and L197P) that suppress induction of λSo by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, λSo induction was not suppressed in biofilms formed by both mutants, suggesting a minor role of intracellular H2O2 in this process. In contrast, addition of iron to biofilms strongly enhanced λSo induction and eDNA release, while both processes were significantly suppressed at low iron levels, strongly indicating that iron is the limiting factor. We conclude that uptake of iron during biofilm formation triggers λSo-mediated lysis of a subpopulation of cells, likely by an increase in iron-mediated DNA damage sensed by RecA. PMID:24951794

  9. Hydrogenase- and Outer Membrane c-Type Cytochrome-Facilitated Reduction of Technetium(VII) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Reed, Samantha B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Simonson, Cody J.; Liu, Chongxuan; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-01-15

    Pertechnetate, 99Tc(VII)O4-, is a highly mobile radionuclide contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy sites that can be enzymatically reduced by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble Tc(IV)O2(s). In other microorganisms, Tc(VII)O4- reduction is generally considered to be catalyzed by hydrogenase. Here, we provide evidence that although the NiFe hydrogenase of MR-1 was involved in the H2-driven reduction of Tc(VII)O4- (presumably through a direct coupling of H2 oxidation and Tc(VII) reduction), the deletion of both hydrogenase genes did not completely eliminate the ability of MR-1 to reduce Tc(VII). With lactate as the electron donor, mutants lacking the outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA or the proteins required for the maturation of c-type cytochromes were defective in reducing Tc(VII) to nanoparticulate TcO2·nH2O(s) relative to MR-1 or a NiFe hydrogenase mutant. In addition, reduced MtrC and OmcA were oxidized by Tc(VII)O4-, confirming the capacity for direct electron transfer from these OMCs to TcO4-. c-Type cytochrome-catalyzed Tc(VII) reduction could be a potentially important mechanism in environments where organic electron donor concentrations are sufficient to allow this reaction to dominate.

  10. Functional expression of Carassius auratus cytochrome P4501A in a novel Shewanella oneidensis expression system and application for the degradation of benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ziwei; Lu, Ming; Shon, Kwang-Jae; Park, Jang-Su

    2014-06-10

    Cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) in fish has attracted an increasing interest because of its important roles in the metabolic activation of certain xenobiotics such as aromatic hydrocarbons. CYPs are reported to be expressed in yeast, insect cells and Escherichia coli, but are critical for high-level expression. Besides, this study found that the purification of recombinant goldfish CYP1A would result in a loss of enzyme activity. Because large quantities of functional CYP1A are required, it is necessary to find a suitable host with high-level expression. In the present study, a novel expression system using Shewanella oneidensis was established successfully for the production of goldfish CYP1A. A signal peptide in the expression vector leads to the high-level expression in the periplasmic space of Shewanella. The recombinant CYP1A in Shewanella reached up to 1μmol per liter of culture, and showed the typical P450 hemoprotein spectra. An ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase assay revealed the amount of functional proteins in Shewanella to be almost ten times more than those in other expression systems. Furthermore, the CYP1A-mediated degradation of benzo[a]pyrene was also observed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. These results indicate the possible application of periplasmic fractions to obtain sufficient quantities of functional CYP1A for further studies.

  11. Evaluation of the effects of various culture condition on Cr (VI)reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a novel high-throughputmini-bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Laidlaw, David; Gani, Kishen; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-16

    The growth and Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensisMR-1 was examined using a mini-bioreactor system that independentlymonitors and controls pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature for each ofits 24, 10-mL reactors. Independent monitoring and control of eachreactor in the cassette allows the exploration of a matrix ofenvironmental conditions known to influence S. oneidensis chromiumreduction. S. oneidensis MR-1 grew in minimal medium without amino acidor vitamin supplementation under aerobic conditions but required serineand glycine supplementation under anaerobic conditions. Growth wasinhibited by dissolved oxygen concentrations>80 percent. Lactatetransformation to acetate was enhanced by low concentration of dissolvedoxygen during the logarithmic growth phase. Between 11 and 35oC, thegrowth rate obeyed the Arrhenius reaction rate-temperature relationship,with a maximum growth rate occurring at 35oC. S. oneidensis MR-1 was ableto grow over a wide range of pH (6-9). At neutral pH and temperaturesranging from 30-35oC, S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced 100 mu M Cr(VI) toCr(III) within 20 minutes in the exponential growth phase, and the growthrate was not affected by the addition of chromate; it reduced chromateeven faster at temperatures between 35 and 39oC. At low temperatures(<25oC), acidic (pH<6.5), or alkaline (pH>8.5) conditions, 100mu M Cr(VI) strongly inhibited growth and chromate reduction. Themini-bioreactor system enabled the rapid determination of theseparameters reproducibly and easily by performing very few experiments.Besides its use for examining parameters of interest to environmentalremediation, the device will also allow one to quickly assess parametersfor optimal production of recombinant proteins or secondarymetabolites

  12. Role of outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell production, accumulation and detachment during respiration on hematite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to contribute to iron cycling over the long term by respiring on crystalline iron oxides such as hematite when poorly crystalline phases are depleted. The ability of outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC of MR-1 to bind to an...

  13. Silver nanocrystallites: biofabrication using Shewanella oneidensis, and an evaluation of their comparative toxicity on gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Anil K; Pelletier, Dale A; Wang, Wei; Moon, Ji-Won; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P; Joy, David C; Phelps, Tommy J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-07-01

    Microorganisms have long been known to develop resistance to metal ions either by sequestering metals inside the cell or by effluxing them into the extracellular media. Here we report the biosynthesis of extracellular silver-based single nanocrystallites of well-defined composition and homogeneous morphology utilizing the gamma-proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, upon incubation with aqueous silver nitrate solution. Further characterization of these particles revealed that the crystals consist of small, reasonably monodispersed spheres in the 2-11 nm size range (average of 4 +/- 1.5 nm). The bactericidal effect of these nanoparticles (biogenic-Ag) is compared to chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (colloidal-Ag and oleate capped silver nanoparticles, oleate-Ag) and assessed using Gram-negative (E. coli and S. oneidensis) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria. Relative toxicity was based on the diameter of inhibition zone in disk diffusion tests, minimum inhibitory concentrations, live/dead assays, and atomic force microscopy. From a toxicity perspective, strain-dependent inhibition depended on the synthesis procedure and the surface coat. Biogenic-Ag was found to be of higher toxicity compared to colloidal-Ag for all three strains tested, whereas E. coli and S. oneidensis were found to be more resistant to either of these nanoparticles than B. subtilis. In contrast, oleate-Ag was not toxic to any of the bacteria. These findings have implications for the potential uses of Ag nanomaterials and for their fate in biological and environmental systems.

  14. Anaerobic central metabolic pathways in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1interpreted in the light of isotopic metabolite labeling, enzymeactivities and genome annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Meadows, Adam L.; Kirby, James; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-06-27

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  15. Shewanella oneidensis in a lactate-fed pure-culture and a glucose-fed co-culture with Lactococcus lactis with an electrode as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam A; Bar, Haim Y; Beg, Qasim K; Segrè, Daniel; Booth, James; Cotta, Michael A; Angenent, Largus T

    2011-02-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) employing mixed microbial communities as biocatalysts are gaining importance as potential renewable energy, bioremediation, or biosensing devices. While we are beginning to understand how individual microbial species interact with an electrode as electron donor, little is known about the interactions between different microbial species in a community: sugar fermenting bacteria can interact with current producing microbes in a fashion that is either neutral, positively enhancing, or even negatively affecting. Here, we compare the bioelectrochemical performance of Shewanella oneidensis in a pure-culture and in a co-culture with the homolactic acid fermenter Lactococcus lactis at conditions that are pertinent to conventional BES operation. While S. oneidensis alone can only use lactate as electron donor for current production, the co-culture is able to convert glucose into current with a comparable coulombic efficiency of ∼17%. With (electro)-chemical analysis and transcription profiling, we found that the BES performance and S. oneidensis physiology were not significantly different whether grown as a pure- or co-culture. Thus, the microbes worked together in a purely substrate based (neutral) relationship. These co-culture experiments represent an important step in understanding microbial interactions in BES communities with the goal to design complex microbial communities, which specifically convert target substrates into electricity. PMID:21036604

  16. Transcription factors FabR and FadR regulate both aerobic and anaerobic pathways for unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qixia; Shi, Miaomiao; Ren, Yedan; Gao, Haichun

    2014-01-01

    As genes for type II fatty acid synthesis are essential to the growth of Escherichia coli, its sole (anaerobic) pathway has significant potential as a target for novel antibacterial drug, and has been extensively studied. Despite this, we still know surprisingly little about fatty acid synthesis in bacteria because this anaerobic pathway in fact is not widely distributed. In this study, we show a novel model of unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) synthesis in Shewanella, emerging human pathogens in addition to well-known metal reducers. We identify both anaerobic and aerobic UFA biosynthesis pathways in the representative species, S. oneidensis. Uniquely, the bacterium also contains two regulators FabR and FadR, whose counterparts in other bacteria control the anaerobic pathway. However, we show that in S. oneidensis these two regulators are involved in regulation of both pathways, in either direct or indirect manner. Overall, our results indicate that the UFA biosynthesis and its regulation are far more complex than previously expected, and S. oneidensis serves as a good research model for further work. PMID:25566241

  17. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Steven D. Brown; Robert L. Hettich; Nathan VerBerkmoes; Jizhong Zhou

    2004-03-17

    The mediation of metal reduction by microorganisms has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives; however, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE field sites. Chromium(VI), for example, is one of several risk-driving contaminants at DOE sites and has been targeted by the DOE for bioremediation research. The bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can potentially be used to immobilize chromium, a toxic and mutagenic metal, by reducing soluble Cr(VI) to the insoluble and less bioavailable form of Cr(III), thus facilitating its removal from contained-storage and natural sites. The overall goal of this study is to integrate targeted biochemical and proteomic analyses with genome-wide gene expression profiling to examine the molecular basis and regulation of chromium(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Towards this goal, we will (1) isolate and identify the terminal chromium(VI) reductase and the gene(s) encoding this activity using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques; (2) verify the function of the gene(s) encoding the terminal Cr(VI) reductase and compare whole transcriptome data with whole proteome data in order to understand the regulation of chromium reduction; and (3) investigate the molecular stress response and adaptation of S. oneidensis to toxic levels of soluble Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. This research will provide important information on the functional components and regulatory mechanisms of microbial metal reduction, which should prove valuable in developing effective assessment strategies for in situ bioremediation and genetically engineering desired bacteria for enhanced bioremediation.

  18. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, A. S.; Thompson, D. K.; Khare, T.; Lim, H.; Brandt, C. C.; Li, G.; Murray, A. E.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Giometti, C. S.; Yates, J., III; Nealson, K. H.; Tiedje, J. M.; Zhou, J.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Scripps Research Inst.; Michigan State Univ.; The Inst. for Genomic Research; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; California Inst. of Tech.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c{sub 552}, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data.

  19. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Beliaev, Alex S; Thompson, Dorothea K; Khare, Tripti; Lim, Hanjo; Brandt, Craig C; Li, Guangshan; Murray, Alison E; Heidelberg, John F; Giometti, Carol S; Yates, John; Nealson, Kenneth H; Tiedje, James M; Zhoui, Jizhong

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c552, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data. PMID:11881834

  20. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin K; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-12-28

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  1. Physiological roles of ArcA, Crp, and EtrA and their interactive control on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Chen, Jingrong; Liang, Yili; Chen, Haijiang; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, genes encoding the global regulators ArcA, Crp, and EtrA have been identified. All these proteins deviate from their counterparts in E. coli significantly in terms of functionality and regulon. It is worth investigating the involvement and relationship of these global regulators in aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis. In this study, the impact of the transcriptional factors ArcA, Crp, and EtrA on aerobic and anaerobic respiration in S. oneidensis were assessed. While all these proteins appeared to be functional in vivo, the importance of individual proteins in these two major biological processes differed. The ArcA transcriptional factor was critical in aerobic respiration while the Crp protein was indispensible in anaerobic respiration. Using a newly developed reporter system, it was found that expression of arcA and etrA was not influenced by growth conditions but transcription of crp was induced by removal of oxygen. An analysis of the impact of each protein on transcription of the others revealed that Crp expression was independent of the other factors whereas ArcA repressed both etrA and its own transcription while EtrA also repressed arcA transcription. Transcriptional levels of arcA in the wild type, crp, and etrA strains under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions were further validated by quantitative immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against ArcA. This extensive survey demonstrated that all these three global regulators are functional in S. oneidensis. In addition, the reporter system constructed in this study will facilitate in vivo transcriptional analysis of targeted promoters.

  2. Transcriptional Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with an Electrode Compared to Fe(III)Citrate or Oxygen as Terminal Electron Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Miriam A.; Bar, Haim Y.; Beg, Qasim K.; Segrè, Daniel; Booth, James; Cotta, Michael A.; Angenent, Largus T.

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a target of extensive research in the fields of bioelectrochemical systems and bioremediation because of its versatile metabolic capabilities, especially with regard to respiration with extracellular electron acceptors. The physiological activity of S. oneidensis to respire at electrodes is of great interest, but the growth conditions in thin-layer biofilms make physiological analyses experimentally challenging. Here, we took a global approach to evaluate physiological activity with an electrode as terminal electron acceptor for the generation of electric current. We performed expression analysis with DNA microarrays to compare the overall gene expression with an electrode to that with soluble iron(III) or oxygen as the electron acceptor and applied new hierarchical model-based statistics for the differential expression analysis. We confirmed the differential expression of many genes that have previously been reported to be involved in electrode respiration, such as the entire mtr operon. We also formulate hypotheses on other possible gene involvements in electrode respiration, for example, a role of ScyA in inter-protein electron transfer and a regulatory role of the cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase under anaerobic conditions. Further, we hypothesize that electrode respiration imposes a significant stress on S. oneidensis, resulting in higher energetic costs for electrode respiration than for soluble iron(III) respiration, which fosters a higher metabolic turnover to cover energy needs. Our hypotheses now require experimental verification, but this expression analysis provides a fundamental platform for further studies into the molecular mechanisms of S. oneidensis electron transfer and the physiologically special situation of growth on a poised-potential surface. PMID:22319591

  3. Rapid precipitation of amorphous silica in experimental systems with nontronite (NAu-1) and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoko; O'Reilly, S. E.

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer-size (<50 nm) precipitates of amorphous silica globules were observed in laboratory systems containing nontronite NAu-1, Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, and lean aqueous media. Their formation was attributed to the release of polysilicic acids at the expense of dissolving NAu-1, and subsequent polymerization and stabilization mediated by biomolecules. Rapid (<24 h) silica globule formation was confirmed in the immediate vicinity of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances in all experimental systems that contained bacteria, whether the bacteria were respiring dissolved O 2 or Fe(III) originating from NAu-1, and whether the bacteria were viable or heat-killed. Silica globules were not observed in bacteria- and biomolecule-free systems. Thermodynamic calculations using disilicic acid, rather than monomeric silica, as the primary aqueous silica species suggest that the systems may have been supersaturated with respect to amorphous silica even though they appeared to be undersaturated if all aqueous silica was assumed to be monomeric H 4SiO 4. The predominant aqueous silica species in the experimental systems was likely polysilicic acids because aqueous silica was continuously supplied from the concurrent dissolution of aluminosilicate. Further polymerization and globule formation may have been driven by the presence of polyamines, a group of biologically produced compounds that are known to drive amorphous silica precipitation in diatom frustules. Globules were likely to be positively charged in our systems due to chemisorption of organic polycations onto silica surfaces that would have been otherwise negatively charged. We propose the following steps for the formation of nanometer-size silica globules in our experimental systems: (i) continuous supply of polysilicic acids due to NAu-1 dissolution; (ii) polysilicic acid polymerization to form <50 nm silica globules and subsequent stabilization mediated by microbially produced polyamines

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, S.J.; Johs, A.; Sawhney, M.S.; Shi, L.; Liang, L.

    2012-05-24

    The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 {angstrom}, = 90, {beta} = 97.8, {gamma} = 90{sup o}. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 {angstrom}.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanicek, S. J.; Johs, Alexander; Sawhney, M. S.; Shi, Liang; Liang, L.

    2012-01-01

    The outer membrane cytochrome OmcA functions as a terminal metal reductase in the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The ten-heme centers shuttle electrons from the transmembrane donor complex to extracellular electron acceptors. Here, the crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of OmcA are reported. Crystals of OmcA were grown by the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using PEG 20 000 as a precipitant. The OmcA crystals belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 93.0, b = 246.0, c = 136.6 A ° , * = 90, * = 97.8, * = 90*. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 3.25 A ° .

  6. Effects of Bio-Au Nanoparticles on Electrochemical Activity of Shewanella oneidensis Wild Type and ΔomcA/mtrC Mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-11-01

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming AuIII into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to AuIII but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of AuIII, but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells.

  7. Effects of bio-Au nanoparticles on electrochemical activity of Shewanella oneidensis wild type and ΔomcA/mtrC mutant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-11-22

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming Au(III) into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to Au(III) but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of Au(III), but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells.

  8. The Origin of 8-Amino-3,8-dideoxy-d-manno-octulosonic Acid (Kdo8N) in the Lipopolysaccharide of Shewanella oneidensis*

    PubMed Central

    Gattis, Samuel G.; Chung, Hak Suk; Trent, M. Stephen; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) is an essential component of the outer monolayer of nearly all Gram-negative bacteria. LPS is composed of a hydrophobic anchor, known as lipid A, an inner core oligosaccharide, and a repeating O-antigen polysaccharide. In nearly all species, the first sugar bridging the hydrophobic lipid A and the polysaccharide domain is 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo), and thus it is critically important for LPS biosynthesis. Modifications to lipid A have been shown to be important for resistance to antimicrobial peptides as well as modulating recognition by the mammalian innate immune system. Therefore, lipid A derivatives have been used for development of vaccine strains and vaccine adjuvants. One derivative that has yet to be studied is 8-amino-3,8-dideoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo8N), which is found exclusively in marine bacteria of the genus Shewanella. Using bioinformatics, a candidate gene cluster for Kdo8N biosynthesis was identified in Shewanella oneidensis. Expression of these genes recombinantly in Escherichia coli resulted in lipid A containing Kdo8N, and in vitro assays confirmed their proposed enzymatic function. Both the in vivo and in vitro data were consistent with direct conversion of Kdo to Kdo8N prior to its incorporation into the Kdo8N-lipid A domain of LPS by a metal-dependent oxidase followed by a glutamate-dependent aminotransferase. To our knowledge, this oxidase is the first enzyme shown to oxidize an alcohol using a metal and molecular oxygen, not NAD(P)+. Creation of an S. oneidensis in-frame deletion strain showed increased sensitivity to the cationic antimicrobial peptide polymyxin as well as bile salts, suggesting a role in outer membrane integrity. PMID:23413030

  9. The conjugated oligoelectrolyte DSSN+ enables exceptional coulombic efficiency via direct electron transfer for anode-respiring Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Kirchhofer, Nathan D; Chen, Xiaofen; Marsili, Enrico; Sumner, James J; Dahlquist, Frederick W; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2014-10-14

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was cultivated on lactate with poised graphite electrode acceptors (E = +0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl) in order to explore the basis for sustained increases in anodic current output following the addition of the lipid-intercalating conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE), 4,4'-bis(4'-(N,N-bis(6''-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl)amino)-styryl)stilbene tetraiodide (DSSN+). Microbial cultures, which were spiked with DSSN+, exhibit a ∼2.2-fold increase in charge collected, a ∼3.1-fold increase in electrode colonization by S. oneidensis, and a ∼1.7-fold increase in coulombic efficiency from 51 ± 10% to an exceptional 84 ± 7% without obvious toxicity effects. Direct microbial biofilm voltammetry reveals that DSSN+ rapidly and sustainably increases cytochrome-based direct electron transfer and subsequently increases flavin-based mediated electron transfer. Control experiments indicate that DSSN+ does not contribute to the current in the absence of bacteria. PMID:25171764

  10. Mapping the Subcellular Proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using Sarkosyl-based fractionation and LC-MS/MS protein identification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Roslyn N.; Romine, Margaret F.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2010-07-19

    A simple and effective subcellular proteomic method for fractionation and analysis of gram-negative bacterial cytoplasm, periplasm, inner, and outer membranes was applied to Shewanella oneidensis to gain insight into its subcellular architecture. A combination of differential centrifugation, Sarkosyl solubilization, and osmotic lysis was used to prepare subcellular fractions. Global differences in protein fractions were observed by SDS PAGE and heme staining, and tryptic peptides were analyzed using high-resolution LC-MS/MS. Compared to crude cell lysates, the fractionation method achieved a significant enrichment (average ~2-fold) in proteins predicted to be localized to each subcellular fraction. Compared to other detergent, organic solvent, and density-based methods previously reported, Sarkosyl most effectively facilitated separation of the inner and outer membranes and was amenable to mass spectrometry, making this procedure ideal for probing the subcellular proteome of gram-negative bacteria via LC-MS/MS. With 40% of the observable proteome represented, this study has provided extensive information on both subcellular architecture and relative abundance of proteins in S. oneidensis and provides a foundation for future work on subcellular organization and protein-membrane interactions in other gram-negative bacteria.

  11. 13C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; H. Nealson, Kenneth; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and 13C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the 13C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that 13C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms. PMID:26868848

  12. ¹³C Pathway Analysis for the Role of Formate in Electricity Generation by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Using Lactate in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuai; Guo, Weihua; Nealson, Kenneth H; Feng, Xueyang; He, Zhen

    2016-02-12

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising technology for direct electricity generation from organics by microorganisms. The type of electron donors fed into MFCs affects the electrical performance, and mechanistic understanding of such effects is important to optimize the MFC performance. In this study, we used a model organism in MFCs, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and (13)C pathway analysis to investigate the role of formate in electricity generation and the related microbial metabolism. Our results indicated a synergistic effect of formate and lactate on electricity generation, and extra formate addition on the original lactate resulted in more electrical output than using formate or lactate as a sole electron donor. Based on the (13)C tracer analysis, we discovered decoupled cell growth and electricity generation in S. oneidensis MR-1 during co-utilization of lactate and formate (i.e., while the lactate was mainly metabolized to support the cell growth, the formate was oxidized to release electrons for higher electricity generation). To our best knowledge, this is the first time that (13)C tracer analysis was applied to study microbial metabolism in MFCs and it was demonstrated to be a valuable tool to understand the metabolic pathways affected by electron donors in the selected electrochemically-active microorganisms.

  13. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium (VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Hettich, Robert L.

    2006-10-30

    Although microbial metal reduction has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform, detoxify, or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE-relevant environments. The major goal of this work is to elucidate the molecular components comprising the chromium(VI) response pathway, with an emphasis on components involved in Cr(VI) detoxification and the enzyme complex catalyzing the terminal step in Cr(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We have identified and characterized (in the case of DNA-binding response regulator [SO2426] and a putative azoreductase [SO3585]) the genes and gene products involved in the molecular response of MR-1 to chromium(VI) stress using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and recently developed proteomic technology, in particular liquid chromatographymass spectrometry (LC-MS), in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques. The proteome datasets were integrated with information from whole-genome expression arrays for S. oneidensis MR-1 (as illustrated in Figure 1). The genes and their encoded products identified in this study are of value in understanding metal reduction and bacterial resistance to metal toxicity and in developing effective metal immobilization strategies.

  14. Specific Bonds between an Iron Oxide Surface and Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Brian H.; Shi, Liang; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Droubay, Timothy C.; Mccready, David E.; Lower, Steven

    2007-07-31

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is purported to express outer membrane cytochromes (e.g., MtrC and OmcA) that transfer electrons directly to Fe(III) in a mineral during anaerobic respiration.  A prerequisite for this type of reaction would be the formation of a stable bond between a cytochrome and an iron oxide surface.  Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to detect whether a specific bond forms between a hematite (Fe2O3) thin film, created with oxygen plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and recombinant MtrC or OmcA molecules coupled to gold substrates.  Force spectra displayed a unique force signature indicative of a specific bond between each cytochrome and the hematite surface.  The strength of the OmcA-hematite bond was approximately twice as strong as the MtrC-hematite bond, but direct binding to hematite was twice as favorable for MtrC.  Reversible folding/unfolding reactions were observed for mechanically denatured MtrC molecules bound to hematite.  The force measurements for the hematite-cytochrome pairs were compared to spectra collected between an iron oxide and S. oneidensis under anaerobic conditions.  There is a strong correlation between the whole cell and pure protein force spectra suggesting that the unique binding attributes of each cytochrome complement one another and allow both MtrC and OmcA to play a prominent role in the transfer of electrons to Fe(III) in minerals.  Finally, by comparing the magnitude of binding force for the whole cell vs. pure protein data, we were able to estimate that a single bacterium of S. oneidensis (2 x 0.5 μm) expresses ~104 cytochromes on its outer surface. 

  15. Systematic Assessment of the Benefits and Caveats in Mining Microbial Post-Translational Modifications from Shotgun Proteomic Data; Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromate Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2008-01-01

    Microbes are known to regulate both gene expression and protein activity through the use of post-translational modifications (PTMs). Common PTMs involved in cellular signaling and gene control include methylations, acetylations, and phosphorylations; whereas oxidations have been implicated as an indicator for stress. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative bacterium that demonstrates both respiratory versatility and the ability to sense and adapt to diverse environmental conditions. The dataset used in this study consisted of tandem mass spectra derived from mid-log phase aerobic cultures of S. oneidensis shocked either with or without 1 mM chromate [Cr(VI)]. In this study, three algorithms (DBDigger, Sequest, and InsPecT) were evaluated for their ability to scrutinize shotgun proteomic data for evidence of PTMs. The use of conservative scoring filters for peptides or proteins versus creating a sub-database first from a non-modification search was evaluated with DBDigger. The use of higher scoring filters for peptide identifications was found to result in optimal identifications of PTM peptides with a 2% false discovery rate (FDR) for the total dataset using the DBDigger algorithm. However, the FDR climbs to about 50% when considering PTM peptides only. Sequest was evaluated as a method for confirming PTM peptides putatively identified using DBDigger; however, there was a low identification rate (~25%) for the searched spectra. InsPecT was found to have a lower FDR (~9%) than DBDigger for PTM peptides. Comparisons between InsPecT and DBDigger were made with respect to both the FDR and PTM peptide identifications. As a demonstration of this approach, a number of S. oneidensis chemotaxis proteins as well as low-abundance signal transduction proteins were identified as being post-translationally modified in response to chromate challenge.

  16. Identifying the role of cytochromes upon the attachment, growth and detachment of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on hematite during dissimilatory iron reduction under natural- flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A. C.; Geesey, G. G.

    2006-12-01

    Current understanding of bacterial respiration by dissimilatory iron (Fe) reduction is based primarily on studies of closed systems using soluble Fe(III). However, natural environments likely to support Fe reduction are typically open systems and contain Fe(III) primarily in the form of crystalline (hydr)oxides. Mechanisms by which electrons are transported between bacteria and mineral terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) under open system conditions are still poorly understood. However, a number of cytochromes have been identified as potentially playing a critical role in the electron transport system of some Fe reducing bacteria. Experiments were performed using (i) omcA, (ii) mtrC, or (iii) omcA and mtrC cytochrome deficient mutants of the Fe-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, in transparent-window flow- reactors containing hematite as the only TEA. These were operated under defined hydrodynamic and anaerobic conditions. Cells expressed green fluorescent protein (gfp), allowing real time measurement of cells at the mineral surface by epifluorescence microscopy. Cytochromes which play a critical role in the anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis by Fe reduction under open system natural-flow conditions could then be identified. Differences in the accumulation, maximum density, detachment and total production of surface-associated cells growing on hematite surfaces were apparent between the mutants, and between the mutants and the wild-type. Mutants deficient in cytochromes grew to a lower max density by up to 2 orders of magnitude than the wild-type, and exhibited no reduced Fe in the reactor effluent or at the surface of the hematite at the conclusion of the experiment, as revealed by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Therefore omcA and / or mtrC cytochromes appear critical for electron shuttling and anaerobic growth of S. Oneidensis on hematite under natural-flow conditions.

  17. Evidence-Based Annotation of Gene Function in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Using Genome-Wide Fitness Profiling across 121 Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Shao, Wenjun; Baumohl, Jason K.; Xu, Zhuchen; Nguyen, Michelle; Tamse, Raquel; Davis, Ronald W.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2011-01-01

    Most genes in bacteria are experimentally uncharacterized and cannot be annotated with a specific function. Given the great diversity of bacteria and the ease of genome sequencing, high-throughput approaches to identify gene function experimentally are needed. Here, we use pools of tagged transposon mutants in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to probe the mutant fitness of 3,355 genes in 121 diverse conditions including different growth substrates, alternative electron acceptors, stresses, and motility. We find that 2,350 genes have a pattern of fitness that is significantly different from random and 1,230 of these genes (37% of our total assayed genes) have enough signal to show strong biological correlations. We find that genes in all functional categories have phenotypes, including hundreds of hypotheticals, and that potentially redundant genes (over 50% amino acid identity to another gene in the genome) are also likely to have distinct phenotypes. Using fitness patterns, we were able to propose specific molecular functions for 40 genes or operons that lacked specific annotations or had incomplete annotations. In one example, we demonstrate that the previously hypothetical gene SO_3749 encodes a functional acetylornithine deacetylase, thus filling a missing step in S. oneidensis metabolism. Additionally, we demonstrate that the orphan histidine kinase SO_2742 and orphan response regulator SO_2648 form a signal transduction pathway that activates expression of acetyl-CoA synthase and is required for S. oneidensis to grow on acetate as a carbon source. Lastly, we demonstrate that gene expression and mutant fitness are poorly correlated and that mutant fitness generates more confident predictions of gene function than does gene expression. The approach described here can be applied generally to create large-scale gene-phenotype maps for evidence-based annotation of gene function in prokaryotes. PMID:22125499

  18. Characterization of Shewanella oneidensis MtrC: a cell-surface decaheme cytochrome involved in respiratory electron transport to extracellular electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hartshorne, Robert S.; Jepson, Brian N.; Clarke, Thomas A.; Field, Sarah J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David

    2007-09-04

    Abstract MtrC is a decaheme c-type cytochrome associated with the outer cell membrane of Fe(III)-respiring species of the Shewanella genus. It is proposed to play a role in anaerobic respiration by mediating electron transfer to extracellular mineral oxides that can serve as terminal electron acceptors. The present work presents the first spectropotentiometric and voltammetric characterization of MtrC, using protein purified from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Potentiometric titrations, monitored by UV–vis absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, reveal that the hemes within MtrC titrate over a broad potential range spanning between approximately +100 and approximately *500 mV (vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). Across this potential window the UV– vis absorption spectra are characteristic of low-spin c-type hemes and the EPR spectra reveal broad, complex features that suggest the presence of magnetically spin-coupled lowspin c-hemes. Non-catalytic protein film voltammetry of MtrC demonstrates reversible electrochemistry over a potential window similar to that disclosed spectroscopically. The voltammetry also allows definition of kinetic properties of MtrC in direct electron exchange with a solid electrode surface and during reduction of a model Fe(III) substrate. Taken together, the data provide quantitative information on the potential domain in which MtrC can operate.

  19. The surface properties of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 and S. oneidensis MR-1: the effect of pH and terminal electron acceptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the surface characteristics of two strains of Shewanella sp., S. oneidensis MR-1 and S. putrefaciens 200, that were grown under aerobic conditions as well as under anaerobic conditions with trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) as the electron acceptor. The investigation focused on the experimental determination of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) under a range of pH and ionic strength, as well as by subsequent modeling in which Shewanella cells were considered to be soft particles with water- and ion-permeable outermost layers. Results The soft layer of p200 is significantly more highly charged (i.e., more negative) than that of MR-1. The effect of electron acceptor on the soft particle characteristics of Shewanella sp. is complex. The fixed charge density, which is a measure of the deionized and deprotonated functional groups in the soft layer polymers, is slightly greater (i.e., more negative) for aerobically grown p200 than for p200 grown with TMAO. On the other hand, the fixed charge density of aerobically grown MR1 is slightly less than that of p200 grown with TMAO. The effect of pH on the soft particle characteristics is also complex, and does not exhibit a clear pH-dependent trend. Conclusions The Shewanella surface characteristics were attributed to the nature of the outermost soft layer, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in case of p200 and lypopolysaccharides (LPS) in case of MR1 which generally lacks EPS. The growth conditions (i.e., aerobic vs. anaerobic TMAO) have an influence on the soft layer characteristics of Shewanella sp. cells. Meanwhile, the clear pH dependency of the mechanical and morphological characteristics of EPS and LPS layers, observed in previous studies through atomic force microscopy, adhesion tests and spectroscopies, cannot be corroborated by the electrohydrodynamics-based soft particle characteristics which does not exhibited a clear pH dependency in this study. While the electrohydrodynamics-based soft

  20. Targeted Protein Degradation of Outer Membrane Decaheme Cytochrome MtrC Metal Reductase in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Measured Using Biarsenical Probe CrAsH-EDT2

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yijia; Chen, Baowei; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-10-14

    Development of efficient microbial biofuel cells requires an ability to exploit interfacial electron transfer reactions to external electron acceptors, such as metal oxides; such reactions occur in the facultative anaerobic gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 through the catalytic activity of the outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochrome MtrC. Central to the utility of this pathway to synthetic biology is an understanding of cellular mechanisms that maintain optimal MtrC function, cellular localization, and renewal by degradation and resynthesis. In order to monitor trafficking to the outer membrane, and the environmental sensitivity of MtrC, we have engineered a tetracysteine tag (i.e., CCPGCC) at its C-terminus that permits labeling by the cell impermeable biarsenical fluorophore, carboxy-FlAsH (CrAsH) of MtrC at the surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells. In comparison, the cell permeable reagent FlAsH permits labeling of the entire population of MtrC, including proteolytic fragments resulting from incorrect maturation. We demonstrate specific labeling by CrAsH of engineered MtrC which is dependent on the presence of a functional type-2 secretion system (T2S), as evidenced by T2S system gspD or gspG deletion mutants which are incapable of CrAsH labeling. Under these latter conditions, MtrC undergoes proteolytic degradation to form a large 35-38 kDa fragment; this degradation product is also resolved during normal turnover of the CrAsH-labeled MtrC protein. No MtrC protein is released into the medium during turnover, suggesting the presence of cellular turnover systems involving MtrC reuptake and degradation. The mature MtrC localized on the outer membrane is a long-lived protein, with a turnover rate of 0.043 hr-1 that is insensitive to O2 concentration. Maturation of MtrC is relatively inefficient, with substantial rates of turnover of the immature protein prior to export to the outer membrane (i.e., 0.028 hr-1) that are consistent

  1. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Uses Overlapping Pathways for Iron Reduction at a Distance and by Direct Contact under Conditions Relevant for Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lies, Douglas P.; Hernandez, Maria E.; Kappler, Andreas; Mielke, Randall E.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a new method to measure iron reduction at a distance based on depositing Fe(III) (hydr)oxide within nanoporous glass beads. In this “Fe-bead” system, Shewanella oneidensis reduces at least 86.5% of the iron in the absence of direct contact. Biofilm formation accompanies Fe-bead reduction and is observable both macro- and microscopically. Fe-bead reduction is catalyzed by live cells adapted to anaerobic conditions, and maximal reduction rates require sustained protein synthesis. The amount of reactive ferric iron in the Fe-bead system is available in excess such that the rate of Fe-bead reduction is directly proportional to cell density; i.e., it is diffusion limited. Addition of either lysates prepared from anaerobic cells or exogenous electron shuttles stimulates Fe-bead reduction by S. oneidensis, but iron chelators or additional Fe(II) do not. Neither dissolved Fe(III) nor electron shuttling activity was detected in culture supernatants, implying that the mediator is retained within the biofilm matrix. Strains with mutations in omcB or mtrB show about 50% of the wild-type levels of reduction, while a cymA mutant shows less than 20% of the wild-type levels of reduction and a menF mutant shows insignificant reduction. The Fe-bead reduction defect of the menF mutant can be restored by addition of menaquinone, but menaquinone itself cannot stimulate Fe-bead reduction. Because the menF gene encodes the first committed step of menaquinone biosynthesis, no intermediates of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway are used as diffusible mediators by this organism to promote iron reduction at a distance. CymA and menaquinone are required for both direct and indirect mineral reduction, whereas MtrB and OmcB contribute to but are not absolutely required for iron reduction at a distance. PMID:16085832

  2. Comparative proteomics reveal the impact of OmcA/MtrC deletion on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in response to hexavalent chromium exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Chen, Juan; Hu, Wen-Jun; Liu, Ji-Yun; Zheng, Hai-Lei; Zhao, Feng

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a priority pollutant causing serious environmental issues. Microbial reduction provides an alternative strategy for Cr(VI) remediation. The dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, was employed to study Cr(VI) reduction and toxicity in this work. To understand the effect of membrane cytochromes on Cr(VI) response, a comparative protein profile analysis from S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant of deleting OmcA and MtrC (△omcA/mtrC) was conducted using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) technology. The 2-DE patterns were compared, and the proteins with abundant changes of up to twofold in the Cr(VI) treatment were detected. Using mass spectrometry, 38 and 45 differentially abundant proteins were identified in the wild type and the mutant, respectively. Among them, 25 proteins were shared by the two strains. The biological functions of these identified proteins were analyzed. Results showed that Cr(VI) exposure decreased the abundance of proteins involved in transcription, translation, pyruvate metabolism, energy production, and function of cellular membrane in both strains. There were also significant differences in protein expressions between the two strains under Cr(VI) treatment. Our results suggest that OmcA/MtrC deletion might result in the Cr(VI) toxicity to outer membrane and decrease assimilation of lactate, vitamin B12, and cystine. When carbohydrate metabolism was inhibited by Cr(VI), leucine and sulfur metabolism may act as the important compensatory mechanisms in the mutant. Furthermore, the mutant may regulate electron transfer in the inner membrane and periplasm to compensate for the deletion of OmcA and MtrC in Cr(VI) reduction.

  3. Anaerobic respiration of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 requires psrA, a homolog of the phsA gene of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium LT2.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2009-08-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a facultatively anaerobic gammaproteobacterium, respires a variety of anaerobic terminal electron acceptors, including the inorganic sulfur compounds sulfite (SO3(2-)), thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)), tetrathionate (S4O6(2-)), and elemental sulfur (S(0)). The molecular mechanism of anaerobic respiration of inorganic sulfur compounds by S. oneidensis, however, is poorly understood. In the present study, we identified a three-gene cluster in the S. oneidensis genome whose translated products displayed 59 to 73% amino acid similarity to the products of phsABC, a gene cluster required for S(0) and S2O3(2-) respiration by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2. Homologs of phsA (annotated as psrA) were identified in the genomes of Shewanella strains that reduce S(0) and S2O3(2-) yet were missing from the genomes of Shewanella strains unable to reduce these electron acceptors. A new suicide vector was constructed and used to generate a markerless, in-frame deletion of psrA, the gene encoding the putative thiosulfate reductase. The psrA deletion mutant (PSRA1) retained expression of downstream genes psrB and psrC but was unable to respire S(0) or S2O3(2-) as the terminal electron acceptor. Based on these results, we postulate that PsrA functions as the main subunit of the S. oneidensis S2O3(2-) terminal reductase whose end products (sulfide [HS-] or SO3(2-)) participate in an intraspecies sulfur cycle that drives S(0) respiration.

  4. Electrochemical selection and characterization of a high current-generating Shewanella oneidensis mutant with altered cell-surface morphology and biofilm-related gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits extracellular electron transfer (EET) activity that is influenced by various cellular components, including outer-membrane cytochromes, cell-surface polysaccharides (CPS), and regulatory proteins. Here, a random transposon-insertion mutant library of S. oneidensis MR-1 was screened after extended cultivation in electrochemical cells (ECs) with a working electrode poised at +0.2 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) to isolate mutants that adapted to electrode-respiring conditions and identify as-yet-unknown EET-related factors. Results Several mutants isolated from the enrichment culture exhibited rough morphology and extraordinarily large colonies on agar plates compared to wild-type MR-1. One of the isolated mutants, designated strain EC-2, produced 90% higher electric current than wild-type MR-1 in ECs and was found to have a transposon inserted in the SO_1860 (uvrY) gene, which encodes a DNA-binding response regulator of the BarA/UvrY two-component regulatory system. However, an in-frame deletion mutant of SO_1860 (∆SO_1860) did not exhibit a similar level of current generation as that of EC-2, suggesting that the enhanced current-generating capability of EC-2 was not simply due to the disruption of SO_1860. In both EC-2 and ∆SO_1860, the transcription of genes related to CPS synthesis was decreased compared to wild-type MR-1, suggesting that CPS negatively affects current generation. In addition, transcriptome analyses revealed that a number of genes, including those involved in biofilm formation, were differentially expressed in EC-2 compared to those in ∆SO_1860. Conclusions The present results indicate that the altered expression of the genes related to CPS biosynthesis and biofilm formation is associated with the distinct morphotype and high current-generating capability of strain EC-2, suggesting an important role of these genes in determining the EET activity of S. oneidensis. PMID:25028134

  5. Kinetic Characterization of OmcA and MtrC, Terminal Reductases Involved in Respiratory Electron Transfer for Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Daniel E.; Brantley, Susan L.; Tien, Ming

    2009-01-01

    We have used scaling kinetics and the concept of kinetic competence to elucidate the role of hemeproteins OmcA and MtrC in iron reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Second-order rate constants for OmcA and MtrC were determined by single-turnover experiments. For soluble iron species, a stopped-flow apparatus was used, and for the less reactive iron oxide goethite, a conventional spectrophotometer was used to measure rates. Steady-state experiments were performed to obtain molecular rate constants by quantifying the OmcA and MtrC contents of membrane fractions and whole cells by Western blot analysis. For reduction of soluble iron, rates determined from transient-state experiments were able to account for rates obtained from steady-state experiments. However, this was not true with goethite; rate constants determined from transient-state experiments were 100 to 1,000 times slower than those calculated from steady-state experiments with membrane fractions and whole cells. In contrast, addition of flavins to the goethite experiments resulted in rates that were consistent with both transient- and steady-state experiments. Kinetic simulations of steady-state results with kinetic constants obtained from transient-state experiments supported flavin involvement. Therefore, we show for the first time that OmcA and MtrC are kinetically competent to account for catalysis of soluble iron reduction in whole Shewanella cells but are not responsible for electron transfer via direct contact alone with insoluble iron-containing minerals. This work supports the hypothesis that electron shuttles are important participants in the reduction of solid Fe phases by this organism. PMID:19542342

  6. Comparative c-type cytochrome expression analysis in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C grown with soluble and insoluble oxidised metal electron acceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Silke; Liu, Xiaoxin; Chourey, Karuna; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Wagner, Darlene D; Pffifner, Susan; Loeffler, Frank E

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C encode 40 and 69 putative c-type cytochrome genes, respectively. Deletion mutant and biochemical studies have assigned specific functions to a few c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to oxidised metals in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Although promising, the genetic approach is limited to gene deletions that produce a distinct phenotype, and organism for which a genetic system is available. To more comprehensively investigate and compare c-type cytochrome expression in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C, proteomic measurements were used to characterise lysates of cells grown with soluble Fe(III) (as ferric citrate) and insoluble Mn(IV) (as MnO2) as electron acceptors. Strain MR-1 expressed 19 and 20, and strain 2CP-C expressed 27 and 25 c-type cytochromes when grown with Fe(III) and Mn(IV), respectively. The majority of c-type cytochromes (77% for strain MR-1 and 63% for strain 2CP-C) were expressed under both growth conditions; however, the analysis also revealed unique c-type cytochromes that were specifically expressed in cells grown with soluble Fe(III) or insoluble Mn(IV). Proteomic characterisation proved to be a promising approach for determining the c-type cytochrome complement expressed under different growth conditions, and will help elucidating the specific functions of more c-type cytochromes that are the basis for Shewanella and Anaeromyxobacter respiratory versatility.

  7. Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) does not disproportionate hydroxylamine to ammonia and nitrite, despite a strongly favorable driving force.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew; Pauly, Daniel J; Stein, Natalia; Walters, Daniel; Conrad, John A; Moran, Graham R; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) from Shewanella oneidensis, which catalyzes the six-electron reduction of nitrite to ammonia in vivo, was shown to oxidize hydroxylamine in the presence of large quantities of this substrate, yielding nitrite as the sole free nitrogenous product. UV-visible stopped-flow and rapid-freeze-quench electron paramagnetic resonance data, along with product analysis, showed that the equilibrium between hydroxylamine and nitrite is fairly rapidly established in the presence of high initial concentrations of hydroxylamine, despite said equilibrium lying far to the left. By contrast, reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia did not occur, even though disproportionation of hydroxylamine to yield both nitrite and ammonia is strongly thermodynamically favored. This suggests a kinetic barrier to the ccNiR-catalyzed reduction of hydroxylamine to ammonia. A mechanism for hydroxylamine reduction is proposed in which the hydroxide group is first protonated and released as water, leaving what is formally an NH2(+) moiety bound at the heme active site. This species could be a metastable intermediate or a transition state but in either case would exist only if it were stabilized by the donation of electrons from the ccNiR heme pool into the empty nitrogen p orbital. In this scenario, ccNiR does not catalyze disproportionation because the electron-donating hydroxylamine does not poise the enzyme at a sufficiently low potential to stabilize the putative dehydrated hydroxylamine; presumably, a stronger reductant is required for this.

  8. Involvement and specificity of Shewanella oneidensis outer membrane cytochromes in the reduction of soluble and solid-phase terminal electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Bücking, Clemens; Popp, Felix; Kerzenmacher, Sven; Gescher, Johannes

    2010-05-01

    The formation of outer membrane (OM) cytochromes seems to be a key step in the evolution of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria. They are believed to be the endpoints of an extended respiratory chain to the surface of the cell that establishes the connection to insoluble electron acceptors such as iron or manganese oxides. The gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains the genetic information for five putative OM cytochromes. In this study, the role and specificity of these proteins were investigated. All experiments were conducted using a markerless deletion mutant in all five OM cytochromes that was complemented via the expression of single, plasmid-encoded genes. MtrC and MtrF were shown to be potent reductases of chelated ferric iron, birnessite, and a carbon anode in a microbial fuel cell. OmcA-producing cells were unable to catalyze iron and electrode reduction, although the protein was correctly produced and oriented. However, OmcA production resulted in a higher birnessite reduction rate compared with the mutant. The presence of the decaheme cytochrome SO_2931 as well as the diheme cytochrome SO_1659 did not rescue the phenotype of the deletion mutant.

  9. In Vivo Identification of the Outer Membrane Protein OmcA-MtrC Interaction Network in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells Using Novel Hydrophobic Chemical Cross-Linkers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haizhen; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske, Gerhard R.; Zakharova, Natalia L.; Yang, Li; Zheng, Chunxiang; Wolff, Meagan A.; Tolic, Nikola; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-04-01

    Outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA (SO1779) and MtrC (SO1778) are the integral components of electron transfer used by Shewanella oneidensis for anaerobic respiration of metal (hydr)oxides. Here the OmcA-MtrC interaction was identified in vivo using a novel hydrophobic chemical cross-linker (MRN) combined with immunoprecipitation techniques. In addition, identification of other OM proteins from the cross-linked complexes allows first visualization of the OmcA-MtrC interaction network. Further experiments on omcA and mtrC mutant cells showed OmcA plays a central role in the network interaction. For comparison, two commercial cross-linkers were also used in parallel and both resulted in fewer OM protein identifications, indicating the superior properties of MRN for identification of membrane protein interactions. Finally, comparison experiments of in vivo cross-linking and cell lysate cross-linking resulted in significantly different protein interaction data, demonstrating the importance of in vivo cross-linking for study of protein-protein interactions in cells.

  10. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Robert Hettich

    2007-02-06

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Chromate is a serious anthropogenic pollutant found in subsurface sediment and groundwater environments due to its widespread use in defense and industrial applications. Effective bioremediation of chromate-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work was focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Our work utilized temporal transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses to characterize the dynamic molecular response of MR-1 to an acute chromate shock (up to 90 min) as well as to a 24-h, low-dose exposure. In addition, we have examined the transcriptome of MR-1 cells actively engaged in chromate reduction. These studies implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1.

  11. Uranium reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a function of NaHCO3 concentration: surface complexation control of reduction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Ling; Fein, Jeremy B

    2014-04-01

    It is crucial to determine the controls on the kinetics of U(VI) bioreduction in order to understand and model the fate and mobility of U in groundwater systems and also to enhance the effectiveness of U bioremediation strategies. In this study, we measured the rate of U(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 as function of NaHCO3 concentration. The experiments demonstrate that increasing concentrations of NaHCO3 in the system lead to slower U(VI) reduction kinetics. The NaHCO3 concentration also strongly affects the speciation of U(VI) on the bacterial cell envelope. We used a thermodynamic surface complexation modeling approach to determine the speciation and concentration of U(VI) adsorbed onto the bacteria as a function of the NaHCO3 concentration in the experimental systems. We observed a strong positive correlation between the measured U(VI) reduction rates and the calculated total concentration of U(VI) surface complexes formed on the bacterial cell envelope. This positive correlation indicates that the speciation and concentration of U(VI) adsorbed on the bacterial cell envelope control the kinetics of U(VI) bioreduction under the experimental conditions. The results of this study serve as a basis for developing speciation-based kinetic rate laws for enzymatic reduction of U(VI) by bacteria. PMID:24576101

  12. Viability and metal reduction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under CO2 stress: implications for ecological effects of CO2 leakage from geologic CO2 sequestration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bing; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Zhipeng; Hu, Yandi; Tang, Yinjie J; Jun, Young-Shin

    2010-12-01

    To study potential ecological impacts of CO(2) leakage to shallow groundwater and soil/sediments from geologic CO(2) sequestration (GCS) sites, this work investigated the viability and metal reduction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under CO(2) stress. While MR-1 could grow under high-pressure nitrogen gas (500 psi), the mix of 1% CO(2) with N(2) at total pressures of 15 or 150 psi significantly suppressed the growth of MR-1, compared to the N(2) control. When CO(2) partial pressures were over 15 psi, the growth of MR-1 stopped. The reduced bacterial viability was consistent with the pH decrease and cellular membrane damage under high pressure CO(2). After exposure to 150 psi CO(2) for 5 h, no viable cells survived, the cellular contents were released, and microscopy images confirmed significant cell structure deformation. However, after a relatively short exposure (25 min) to 150 psi CO(2), MR-1 could fully recover their growth within 24 h after the stress was removed, and the reduction of MnO(2) by MR-1 was observed right after the stress was removed. Furthermore, MR-1 survived better if the cells were aggregated rather than suspended, or if pH buffering minerals, such as calcite, were present. To predict the cell viability under different CO(2) pressures and exposure times, a two-parameter mathematical model was developed.

  13. Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tiedje, James M.

    2005-06-01

    Anaerobic Nitrate Reduction. Nitrate is an extensive co-contaminant at some DOE sites making metal and radionuclide reduction problematic. Hence, we sought to better understand the nitrate reduction pathway and its control in S. oneidensis MR-1. It is not known whether the nitrate reduction is by denitrification or dissimilatory nitrate reduction into ammonium (DNRA). By both physiological and genetic evidence, we proved that DNRA is the nitrate reduction pathway in this organism. Using the complete genome sequence of S. oneidensis MR-1, we identified a gene encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase based on its 72% sequence identity with the napA gene in E. coli. Anaerobic growth of MR-1 on nitrate was abolished in a site directed napA mutant, indicating that NapA is the only nitrate reductase present. The anaerobic expression of napA and nrfA, a homolog of the cytochrome b552 nitrite reductase in E. coli, increased with increasing nitrate concentration until a plateau was reached at 3 mM KNO3. This indicates that these genes are not repressed by increasing concentrations of nitrate. The reduction of nitrate can generate intermediates that can be toxic to the microorganism. To determine the genetic response of MR-1 to high concentrations of nitrate, DNA microarrays were used to obtain a complete gene expression profile of MR-1 at low (1 mM) versus high (40 mM) nitrate concentrations. Genes encoding transporters and efflux pumps were up-regulated, perhaps as a mechanism to export toxic compounds. In addition, the gene expression profile of MR-1, grown anaerobically with nitrate as the only electron acceptor, suggested that this dissimilatory pathway contributes to N assimilation. Hence the nitrate reduction pathway could serve a dual purpose. The role of EtrA, a homolog of Fnr (global anaerobic regulator in E. coli) was examined using an etrA deletion mutant we constructed, S. oneidensis EtrA7-1.

  14. Generation and Validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Clone Set for Protein Expression and Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohu; Petrosino, Joseph; Hemphill, Lisa; Wan, Xiufeng; Leaphart, Adam B.; Weinstock, George M.; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive gene collection for S. oneidensis was constructed using the lambda recombinase (Gateway) cloning system. A total of 3584 individual ORFs (85%) have been successfully cloned into the entry plasmids. To validate the use of the clone set, three sets of ORFs were examined within three different destination vectors constructed in this study. Success rates for heterologous protein expression of S. oneidensis His- or His/GST- tagged proteins in E. coli were approximately 70%. The ArcA and NarP transcription factor proteins were tested in an in vitro binding assay to demonstrate that functional proteins can be successfully produced using the clone set. Further functional validation of the clone set was obtained from phage display experiments in which a phage encoding thioredoxin was successfully isolated from a pool of 80 different clones after three rounds of biopanning using immobilized anti-thioredoxin antibody as a target. This clone set complements existing genomic (e.g., whole-genome microarray) and other proteomic tools (e.g., mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis), and facilitates a wide variety of integrated studies, including protein expression, purification, and functional analyses of proteins both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:18714347

  15. Reduction of Nitrate in Shewanella oneidensis depends on atypical NAP and NRF systems with NapB as a preferred electron transport protein from CymA to NapA

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin; Barua, Soumitra; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-04-23

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  16. Chromate/Nitrite Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1: Evidence for Multiple Cr(VI) Reduction Mechanisms Dependent on Physiological Growth Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William Arnold; Viamajala, S.; Peyton, Brent Michael; Petersen, J. N.

    2002-06-01

    Inhibition of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] reduction due to nitrate and nitrite was observed during tests with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (previously named Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 and henceforth referred to as MR-1). Initial Cr(VI) reduction rates were measured at various nitrite concentrations, and a mixed inhibition kinetic model was used to determine the kinetic parameters-maximum Cr(VI) reduction rate and inhibition constant [V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI))]. Values of V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI)) obtained with MR-1 cultures grown under denitrifying conditions were observed to be significantly different from the values obtained when the cultures were grown with fumarate as the terminal electron acceptor. It was also observed that a single V(max,Cr(VI)) and K(i,Cr(VI)) did not adequately describe the inhibition kinetics of either nitrate-grown or fumarate-grown cultures. The inhibition patterns indicate that Cr(VI) reduction in MR-1 is likely not limited to a single pathway, but occurs via different mechanisms some of which are dependent on growth conditions. Inhibition of nitrite reduction due to the presence of Cr(VI) was also studied, and the kinetic parameters V(max,NO2) and K(i,NO2) were determined. It was observed that these coefficients also differed significantly between MR-1 grown under denitrifying conditions and fumarate reducing conditions. The inhibition studies suggest the involvement of nitrite reductase in Cr(VI) reduction. Because nitrite reduction is part of the anaerobic respiration process, inhibition due to Cr(VI) might be a result of interaction with the components of the anaerobic respiration pathway such as nitrite reductase. Also, differences in the degree of inhibition of nitrite reduction activity by chromate at different growth conditions suggest that the toxicity mechanism of Cr(VI) might also be dependent on the conditions of growth. Cr(VI) reduction has been shown to occur via different pathways, but to our knowledge, multiple

  17. Direct Involvement of Type II Secretion System in Extracellular Translocation of Shewanella Oneidensis Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Deng, Shuang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mottaz, Heather M.; Hill, Eric A.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-08-01

    Outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are extracellular lipoproteins important for dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides during anaerobic respiration. To investigate the roles of type II secretion system (T2S) in translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane, we measured the effects of deleting two T2S genes, gspD and gspG, on the secretion of MtrC and OmcA when cells were grown under anaerobic conditions. Deletion of gspD or gspG resulted in slightly yellowish supernatants, different from the pink supernatant of wild type (wt). Comparative proteomic analyses revealed that, although MtrC, OmcA and NrfA, a periplasmic nitrite reductase, were present the supernatants of wt and ΔgspD mutant, their peptides counts were much lower in ΔgspD than in wt. Subsequent analyses with heme-staining and Western blot not only confirmed that deletion of gspD or gspG reduced the abundances of MtrC and OmcA in the supernatants, but also revealed that the deletions consequently increased their abundances inside the cells. Complementation of ΔgspG mutant with functional GspG could reverse the effects of deleting gspG on the colors of the supernatants and the abundances of MtrC and OmcA. In contrast, Western results showed that the abundance of NrfA was reduced in the supernatant and the cells of ΔgspD mutant, suggesting that reduced NrfA in the periplasm, where MtrC and OmcA were accumulated, contributed to its reduction in the supernatant. Thus, our results demonstrate at the first time that T2S facilitates translocation of MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane.

  18. Correlations between the Electronic Properties of Shewanella oneidensis Cytochrome c Nitrite Reductase (ccNiR) and Its Structure: Effects of Heme Oxidation State and Active Site Ligation.

    PubMed

    Stein, Natalia; Love, Daniel; Judd, Evan T; Elliott, Sean J; Bennett, Brian; Pacheco, A Andrew

    2015-06-23

    The electrochemical properties of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR), a homodimer that contains five hemes per protomer, were investigated by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectropotentiometries. Global analysis of the UV-vis spectropotentiometric results yielded highly reproducible values for the heme midpoint potentials. These midpoint potential values were then assigned to specific hemes in each protomer (as defined in previous X-ray diffraction studies) by comparing the EPR and UV-vis spectropotentiometric results, taking advantage of the high sensitivity of EPR spectra to the structural microenvironment of paramagnetic centers. Addition of the strong-field ligand cyanide led to a 70 mV positive shift of the active site's midpoint potential, as the cyanide bound to the initially five-coordinate high-spin heme and triggered a high-spin to low-spin transition. With cyanide present, three of the remaining hemes gave rise to distinctive and readily assignable EPR spectral changes upon reduction, while a fourth was EPR-silent. At high applied potentials, interpretation of the EPR spectra in the absence of cyanide was complicated by a magnetic interaction that appears to involve three of five hemes in each protomer. At lower applied potentials, the spectra recorded in the presence and absence of cyanide were similar, which aided global assignment of the signals. The midpoint potential of the EPR-silent heme could be assigned by default, but the assignment was also confirmed by UV-vis spectropotentiometric analysis of the H268M mutant of ccNiR, in which one of the EPR-silent heme's histidine axial ligands was replaced with a methionine.

  19. Role of Outer-Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the Biomineralization of Ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, Catherine L.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Kennedy, David W.; Saffarini, Daad; Arey, Bruce W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Moore, Dean A.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Moyles, Dianne M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer membrane cytochrome genes mtrC, omcA, or both, were characterized for the ability to reduce metal oxides using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemicalr techniques. The results indicate that neither MtrC nor OmcA are essential for the reduction of soluble, complexed Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-NTA; however, at least one of these outer membrane cytochromes is required for the reduction of Fe(III)- and Mn(III/IV)- oxides. In vitro analysis of purified, recombinant protein demonstrated that both cytochromes transfer electrons directly to metal-oxides; however, MtrC transfers electrons at a faster rate than OmcA. Immunolocalization of MtrC and OmcA reveal that both cytochromes are surface-exposed on the cell outer-membrane and co-localize with insoluble iron precipitates when respiring ferrihydrite or cultured aerobically with Fe(III)-citrate. Additionally, during prolonged incubation, wild-type cells promoted biotransformation of ferrihydrite to vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H2O] while the double cytochrome mutant was unable to form any secondary mineral phases. Collectively, our results support a role for direct electron transfer from OMCs to metal oxides by establishing their in vitro electron transfer activities, confirming the requirement of either MtrC or OmcA for in vivo reductive biomineralization of ferrihydrite, and localizing the cytochromes to the cell exterior where they can directly contact mineral substrates.

  20. Role of outer-membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in the biomineralization of ferrihydrite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Reardon, C L; Dohnalkova, A C; Nachimuthu, P; Kennedy, D W; Saffarini, D A; Arey, B W; Shi, L; Wang, Z; Moore, D; McLean, J S; Moyles, D; Marshall, M J; Zachara, J M; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to improve the understanding of electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-mineral interface, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mutants with in-frame deletions of outer-membrane cytochromes (OMCs), MtrC and OmcA, were characterized for the ability to reduce ferrihydrite (FH) using a suite of microscopic, spectroscopic, and biochemical techniques. Analysis of purified recombinant proteins demonstrated that both cytochromes undergo rapid electron exchange with FH in vitro with MtrC displaying faster transfer rates than OmcA. Immunomicroscopy with cytochrome-specific antibodies revealed that MtrC co-localizes with iron solids on the cell surface while OmcA exhibits a more diffuse distribution over the cell surface. After 3-day incubation of MR-1 with FH, pronounced reductive transformation mineral products were visible by electron microscopy. Upon further incubation, the predominant phases identified were ferrous phosphates including vivianite [Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)x8H(2)O] and a switzerite-like phase [Mn(3),Fe(3)(PO(4))(2)x7H(2)O] that were heavily colonized by MR-1 cells with surface-exposed outer-membrane cytochromes. In the absence of both MtrC and OmcA, the cells ability to reduce FH was significantly hindered and no mineral transformation products were detected. Collectively, these results highlight the importance of the outer-membrane cytochromes in the reductive transformation of FH and support a role for direct electron transfer from the OMCs at the cell surface to the mineral.

  1. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

    2011-09-30

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (ΔSO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ΔSO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 μM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

  2. Silver nanocrystallites: Facile biofabrication using Shewanella oneidensis, and an evaluation of their comparative toxicity on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Wang, Wei; Pelletier, Dale A; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms have long been known to develop resistance to metal ions either by sequestering metals inside the cell or by effluxing them into the extracellular media. Here we report the biosynthesis of extracellular silver based single nanocrystallites of well-defined composition and homogeneous morphology utilizing the -proteobacterium, Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, upon incubation with an aqueous solution of silver nitrate. Further characterization of these particles revealed that the crystals consist of small, reasonably monodispersed spheres in the size range 2 11 nm (with an average of 4 1.5 nm). The bactericidal effect of these biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (biogenic-Ag) are compared to similar chemically synthesized nanoparticles (colloidal silver [colloidal-Ag] and oleate capped silver [oleate-Ag]). The determination of the bactericidal effect of these different silver nanoparticles was assessed using both Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (B. subtilis) bacteria and based on the diameter of the inhibition zone in disc diffusion tests, minimum inhibitory concentrations, Live/Dead staining assays, and atomic force microscopy. From a toxicity perspective, a clear synthesis procedure, and a surface coat- and strain-dependent inhibition were observed for silver nanoparticles. Biogenic-Ag was found to be of higher toxicity when compared to colloidal-Ag for both E. coli and B. subtilis. E. coli was found to be more resistant to either of these nanoparticles than B. subtilis. In contrast, Oleate-Ag was not toxic to either of the bacteria. These findings have important implications for the potential uses of Ag nanomaterials and for their fate in biological and environmental systems.

  3. Effects of Incubation Conditions on Cr(VI) Reduction by c-type Cytochromes in Intact Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rui; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Wu, Yundang; Wang, Ying; Chen, Dandan

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) of metal-reducing bacteria play a key role in microbial metal reduction processes. However, the in situ redox status of OM c-Cyts during microbial metal reduction processes remain poorly understood. In this study, diffuse-transmission UV/Vis spectroscopy is used to investigate the in situ spectral reaction of Cr(VI) reduction by c-Cyts in intact Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells under different incubation conditions. The reduced c-Cyts decreased transiently at the beginning and then recovered gradually over time. The Cr(VI) reduction rates decreased with increasing initial Cr(VI) concentrations, and Cr(III) was identified as a reduced product. The presence of Cr(III) substantially inhibited Cr(VI) reduction and the recovery of reduced c-Cyts, indicating that Cr(III) might inhibit cell growth. Cr(VI) reduction rates increased with increasing cell density. The highest Cr(VI) reduction rate and fastest recovery of c-Cyts were obtained at pH 7.0 and 30°C, with sodium lactate serving as an electron donor. The presence of O2 strongly inhibited Cr(VI) reduction, suggesting that O2 might compete with Cr(VI) as an electron acceptor in cells. This study provides a case of directly examining in vivo reaction properties of an outer-membrane enzyme during microbial metal reduction processes under non-invasive physiological conditions. PMID:27242759

  4. Particle size effect and the mechanism of hematite reduction by the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2016-11-01

    The cycling of iron at the Earth's near surface is profoundly influenced by dissimilatory metal reducing microorganisms, and many studies have focused on unraveling electron transfer mechanisms between these bacteria and Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. However, these efforts have been complicated by the fact that these minerals often occur in the micro- to nanosize regime, and in relevant natural environments as well as in the laboratory are subject to aggregation. The nature of the physical interface between the cellular envelope, the outer-membrane cytochromes responsible for facilitating the interfacial electron transfer step, and these complex mineral particulates is thus difficult to probe. Previous studies using whole cells have reported reduction rates that do not correlate with particle size. In the present study we isolate the interaction between the decaheme outer-membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis and nanoparticulate hematite, examining the reduction rate as a function of particle size and reaction products through detailed characterization of the electron balance and the structure and valence of iron at particle surfaces. By comparison with abiotic reduction via the smaller molecule ascorbic acid, we show that the reduction rate is systematically controlled by the sterically accessible interfacial contact area between OmcA and hematite in particle aggregates; rates increase once pore throat sizes in aggregates become as large as OmcA. Simultaneous measure of OmcA oxidation against Fe(II) release shows a ratio of 1:10, consistent with a cascade OmcA oxidation mechanism heme by heme. X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal incipient magnetite on the reacted surfaces of the hematite nanoparticles after reaction. The collective findings establish the importance of accessibility of physical contact between the terminal reductases and iron oxide surfaces, and through apparent consistency of observations help reconcile behavior reported at the larger

  5. High-and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis.

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Boyanov, M.; Bunker, B. A.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fein, J. B.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Notre Dame

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with pK{sub a} values of 3.3 {+-} 0.2, 4.8 {+-} 0.2, 6.7 {+-} 0.4, and 9.4 {+-} 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -5}, 1.3({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -4}, 5.9({+-}3.3) x 10{sup -5}, and 1.1({+-}0.6) x 10{sup -4} moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low

  6. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  7. PBP1a/LpoA but not PBP1b/LpoB are involved in regulation of the major β-lactamase gene blaA in Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jianhua; Sun, Yiyang; Mao, Yinting; Jin, Miao; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    β-Lactamase production is one of the most important strategies for Gram-negative bacteria to combat β-lactam antibiotics. Studies of the regulation of β-lactamase expression have largely been focused on the class C β-lactamase AmpC, whose induction by β-lactams requires LysR-type regulator AmpR and permease AmpG-dependent peptidoglycan recycling intermediates. In Shewanella, which is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and is a reservoir for antibiotic resistance, production of the class D β-lactamase BlaA confers bacteria with natural resistance to many β-lactams. Expression of the blaA gene in the genus representative Shewanella oneidensis is distinct from the AmpC paradigm because of the lack of an AmpR homologue and the presence of an additional AmpG-independent regulatory pathway. In this study, using transposon mutagenesis, we identify proteins that are involved in blaA regulation. Inactivation of mrcA and lpoA, which encode penicillin binding protein 1a (PBP1a) and its lipoprotein cofactor, LpoA, respectively, drastically enhances blaA expression in the absence of β-lactams. Although PBP1b and its cognate, LpoB, also exist in S. oneidensis, their roles in blaA induction are dispensable. We further show that the mrcA-mediated blaA expression is independent of AmpG.

  8. Structures of KdnB and KdnA from Shewanella oneidensis: Key Enzymes in the Formation of 8-Amino-3,8-Dideoxy-d-Manno-Octulosonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zachman-Brockmeyer, Trevor R; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2016-08-16

    8-Amino-3,8-dideoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo8N) is a unique amino sugar that has thus far only been observed on the lipopolysaccharides of marine bacteria belonging to the genus Shewanella. Although its biological function is still unclear, it is thought that the sugar is important for the integrity of the bacterial cell outer membrane. A three-gene cluster required for the biosynthesis of Kdo8N was first identified in Shewanella oneidensis. Here we describe the three-dimensional structures of two of the enzymes required for Kdo8N biosynthesis in S. oneidensis, namely, KdnB and KdnA. The structure of KdnB was solved to 1.85-Å resolution, and its overall three-dimensional architecture places it into the Group III alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. A previous study suggested that KdnB did not require NAD(P) for activity. Strikingly, although the protein was crystallized in the absence of any cofactors, the electron density map clearly revealed the presence of a tightly bound NAD(H). In addition, a bound metal was observed, which was shown via X-ray fluorescence to be a zinc ion. Unlike other members of the Group III alcohol dehydrogenases, the dinucleotide cofactor in KdnB is tightly bound and cannot be removed without leading to protein precipitation. With respect to KdnA, it is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate or (PLP)-dependent aminotransferase. For this analysis, the structure of KdnA, trapped in the presence of the external aldimine with PLP and glutamate, was determined to 2.15-Å resolution. The model of KdnA represents the first structure of a sugar aminotransferase that functions on an 8-oxo sugar. Taken together the results reported herein provide new molecular insight into the biosynthesis of Kdo8N.

  9. Isolation of a High-Affinity Functional Protein Complex between OmcA and MtrC: Two Outer Membrane Decaheme c-type Cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Chen, Baowei; Wang, Zheming; Elias, Dwayne A.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Gorby, Yuri A.; Ni, Shuisong; Lower, Brian H.; Kennedy, David W.; Wunschel, David S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium that is capable of using insoluble oxidized metals, such as manganese [Mn(III, IV)] and iron [Fe(III)] oxides and oxyhydroxides, as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The ability of S. oneidensis MR-1 to reduce oxidized Mn and/or Fe has previously been linked to OmcA and MtrC: two decaheme c-type cytochromes that are localized to the outer membrane. To investigate how the electron transport proteins OmcA and MtrC are organized, we expressed and purified recombinant OmcA and MtrC from wild type S. oneidensis MR-1 as well as a mutant that lacked OmcA and MtrC (ΔomcA/mtrC). After purification to the nearly electrophoretic homogeneity from the ΔomcA/mtrC mutant, the recombinant OmcA and MtrC exhibited the characteristics of c-type cytochromes, and each of their polypeptides was confirmed to contain 10 hemes. When purified from wild type cells, endogenous MtrC or OmcA was always co-purified with recombinant OmcA or MtrC, respectively. Fluorescence polarization experiment showed that recombinant OmcA bound to the FlAsH-labeled MtrC with a dissociation constant of 7 ×10-7 M. The purified recombinant OmcA or MtrC alone displayed intrinsic ferric reductase activity with NADH used as an electron donor. Ferric reductase specific activity increased by 35 to 41% when nearly equimolar concentrations of OmcA and MtrC were assayed relative to the two proteins assayed independently. These results demonstrate that OmcA and MtrC directly interact with each other to form a stable complex with high ferric reductase activity.

  10. Kinetics of Reduction of Fe(III) Complexes by Outer Membrane Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zheming; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Xuelin; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Dupuis, Michel; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Shi, Liang

    2008-09-12

    Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 possesses up to 42 c-type cytochromes with heme content varying between 1 to as many as 37. Among them, the outer-membrane cytochromes, particularly MtrC and OmcA, are suspected to function as terminal reductases and are responsible for its enzymatic catalysis capability. So far, the mechanisms of metal reduction by these outer-membrane cytochromes are unknown. In this work, we report the study of reduction kinetics of a series of Fe(III) complexes with citrate, NTA and EDTA by abiotically reduced MtrC and OmcA using a stopped-flow technique in combination with theoretical computation methods within the framework of the electron transfer theory of Marcus and speciation calculations based on the current thermodynamic database. Stopped-flow kinetic data showed that the reaction was very fast and appeared to proceed in two stages, a fast stage that completes in much less than a second and a slower stage afterwards. For a given complex, the reaction is faster by reduction with MtrC than OmcA, while for a given protein, the reaction completes in the decreasing order of Fe-EDTA > Fe-NTA > Fe-citrate. All the stopped-flow kinetic curves could be modeled by two parallel second-order bimolecular redox reactions with second-order rate constants ranging from 0.872 µM-1s-1 for the fast reaction between MtrC with Fe-EDTA complex to 0.012 µM-1s-1 for the slow reaction between OmcA and Fe-citrate complex. Speciation calculations indicated that at both metal:ligand ratios, 1:1.5 and 1:10, a single dominant ferric complex was responsible for the observed reaction for each ligand and, therefore, the observed dual-reaction pathways was attributed to the differences in the reduction behavior among various heme groups within each protein. The results of redox potential calculations with known thermodynamic data show only small differences on the scale of a few millivolts among the three complexes, suggested that

  11. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces I: Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning and speciation at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Gescher, Johannes; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Eng, Peter J.; Bargar, John R.; Farges, Francois; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are often present as coatings on metal-oxide surfaces in natural and industrial environments and may induce significant changes in the partitioning behavior and speciation of aqueous metal ions, which in turn can impact their transport and fate. In this study, long-period X-ray standing wave-fluorescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy was used to measure under in situ conditions the partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between multilayer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms and highly polished, oriented single-crystal surfaces of α-Al2O3 and α-Fe2O3 as a function of metal-ion concentration and time at pH 6.0. We show that after 3-h exposure time, Pb(II) binds preferentially to the α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces at low Pb concentration ([Pb] = 10-7 M) and then increasingly partitions into the biofilm coatings at higher concentrations (10-6 to 10-4 M). In contrast, Zn(II) partitions preferentially into the biofilm coating for both surfaces at all Zn concentrations studied (10-7 to 10-4 M). In comparison, the α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) surface has a low affinity for both Pb(II) and Zn(II), and the biofilm coatings are the dominant sink for both ions. These findings suggest that in the presence of S. oneidensis biofilm coatings, α-Al2O3 (0 0 0 1) is the least reactive surface for Pb(II) and Zn(II) compared to α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1). They also show that Zn(II) has a lower affinity than Pb(II) for reactive sites on α-Al2O3 (1-102) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) at [Me(II)] of 10-7 M; at 10-5 M, the bulk of the metal ions partition into the biofilm coatings. At longer exposure times (20-24 h), both Pb(II) and Zn(II) increasingly partition to the metal-oxide surfaces at [Me(II)] = 10-5 M and pH 6.0, indicating possible reaction/diffusion-controlled sorption processes. Pb LIII-edge and Zn K-edge grazing-incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-EXAFS) measurements suggest that both Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions may be

  12. Contributions of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase to H2 production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as revealed by isotope ratio analysis of evolved H(2).

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Hill, Eric A; Moran, James J; Bartholomew, Rachel A; Yang, Hui; Hegg, Eric L

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes both a [NiFe]- and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase. While the output of these proteins has been characterized in mutant strains expressing only one of the enzymes, the contribution of each to H2 synthesis in the wild-type organism is not clear. Here, we use stable isotope analysis of H2 in the culture headspace, along with transcription data and measurements of the concentrations of gases in the headspace, to characterize H2 production in the wild-type strain. After most of the O2 in the headspace had been consumed, H2 was produced and then consumed by the bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Once the cultures were completely anaerobic, a new burst of H2 synthesis catalyzed by both enzymes took place. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that at this point in the culture cycle, a pool of electrons is shunted toward both hydrogenases in the wild-type organisms, but that in the absence of one of the hydrogenases, the flux is redirected to the available enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first use of natural-abundance stable isotope analysis of a metabolic product to elucidate substrate flux through two alternative enzymes in the same cellular system.

  13. Contributions of the [NiFe]- and [FeFe]-hydrogenase to H2 production in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as revealed by isotope ratio analysis of evolved H2

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Hill, Eric A.; Moran, James J.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Hui, Yang; Hegg, Eric L.

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 encodes both a [NiFe]- and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase. While the output of these proteins has been characterized in mutant strains expressing only one of the enzymes, the contribution of each to H2 synthesis in the wild-type organism is not clear. Here we use stable isotope analysis of H2 in the culture headspace, along with transcription data and measurements of the concentrations of gases in the headspace, to characterize H2 production in the wild-type strain. After most of the O2 in the headspace had been consumed, H2 was produced and then consumed by the bidirectional [NiFe]-hydrogenase. Once the cultures were completely anaerobic, a new burst of H2 synthesis catalyzed by both enzymes took place. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that at this point in the culture cycle, a pool of electrons is shunted toward both hydrogenases in the wild-type organism, but that in the absence of one of the hydrogenases, the flux is redirected to the available enzyme. To our knowledge, this is the first use of stable isotope analysis of a metabolic product to elucidate substrate flux through two alternative enzymes in the same cellular system.

  14. High-syn conformation of uridine and asymmetry of the hexameric molecule revealed in the high-resolution structures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uridine phosphorylase in the free form and in complex with uridine.

    PubMed

    Safonova, Tatyana N; Mikhailov, Sergey N; Veiko, Vladimir P; Mordkovich, Nadezhda N; Manuvera, Valentin A; Alekseev, Cyril S; Kovalchuk, Mikhail V; Popov, Vladimir O; Polyakov, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP; EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine-salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. Expression of UP from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SoUP) was performed in Escherichia coli. The high-resolution X-ray structure of SoUP was solved in the free form and in complex with uridine. A crystal of SoUP in the free form was grown under microgravity and diffracted to ultrahigh resolution. Both forms of SoUP contained sulfate instead of phosphate in the active site owing to the presence of ammonium sulfate in the crystallization solution. The latter can be considered as a good mimic of phosphate. In the complex, uridine adopts a high-syn conformation with a nearly planar ribose ring and is present only in one subunit of the hexamer. A comparison of the structures of SoUP in the free form and in complex with the natural substrate uridine showed that the subunits of the hexamer are not identical, with the active sites having either an open or a closed conformation. In the monomers with the closed conformation, the active sites in which uridine is absent contain a glycerol molecule mimicking the ribose moiety of uridine.

  15. Concerted action of two subunits of the functional dimer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uridine phosphorylase derived from a comparison of the C212S mutant and the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed

    Safonova, T N; Mordkovich, N N; Veiko, V P; Okorokova, N A; Manuvera, V A; Dorovatovskii, P V; Popov, V O; Polyakov, K M

    2016-02-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP; EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine-salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. The structure of the C212S mutant of uridine phosphorylase from the facultatively aerobic Gram-negative γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SoUP) was determined at 1.68 Å resolution. A comparison of the structures of the mutant and the wild-type enzyme showed that one dimer in the mutant hexamer differs from all other dimers in the mutant and wild-type SoUP (both in the free form and in complex with uridine). The key difference is the `maximum open' state of one of the subunits comprising this dimer, which has not been observed previously for uridine phosphorylases. Some conformational features of the SoUP dimer that provide access of the substrate into the active site are revealed. The binding of the substrate was shown to require the concerted action of two subunits of the dimer. The changes in the three-dimensional structure induced by the C212S mutation account for the lower affinity of the mutant for inorganic phosphate, while the affinity for uridine remains unchanged.

  16. Effect of biofilm coatings at metal-oxide/water interfaces II: Competitive sorption between Pb(II) and Zn(II) at Shewanella oneidensis/metal-oxide/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingge; Gélabert, Alexandre; Michel, F. Marc; Choi, Yongseong; Eng, Peter J.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2016-09-01

    Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilm-coated single-crystal α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) and α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) surfaces was investigated using long-period X-ray standing wave-florescence yield (LP-XSW-FY) spectroscopy. In situ partitioning of aqueous Pb(II) and Zn(II) between the biofilms and underlying metal-oxide substrates was probed following exposure of these complex interfaces to equi-molar Pb and Zn solutions (0.01 M NaNO3 as background electrolyte, pH = 6.0, and 3-h equilibration time). At higher Pb and Zn concentrations (⩾10-5 M), more than 99% of these ions partitioned into the biofilms at S. oneidensis/α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2)/water interfaces, which is consistent with the partitioning behavior of both Pb(II) or Zn(II) in single-metal-ion experiments. Thus, no apparent competitive effects were found in this system at these relatively high metal-ion concentrations. However, at lower equi-molar concentrations (⩽10-6 M), Pb(II) and Zn(II) partitioning in the same system changed significantly compared to the single-metal-ion systems. The presence of Zn(II) decreased Pb(II) partitioning onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) substantially (∼52% to ∼13% at 10-7 M, and ∼23% to ∼5% at 10-6 M), whereas the presence of Pb(II) caused more Zn(II) to partition onto α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces (∼15% to ∼28% at 10-7 M, and ∼1% to ∼7% at 10-6 M). The higher observed partitioning of Zn(II) (∼28%) at the α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces compared to Pb(II) (∼13%) in the mixed-metal-ion systems at the lowest concentration (10-7 M) suggests that Zn(II) is slightly favored over Pb(II) for sorption sites on α-Al2O3 (1 -1 0 2) surfaces under our experimental conditions. Competitive sorption of Pb(II) and Zn(II) at S. oneidensis/α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1)/water interfaces at equi-molar metal-ion concentrations of ⩽10-6 M showed that the presence of Pb(II) ions decreased Zn(II) partitioning onto α-Fe2O3 (0 0 0 1) significantly (∼45% to <1% at 10

  17. Towards environmental systems biology of Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, Alexander S; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Saffarini, Daad; Serres, Margrethe H.; Zhulin, Igor B; Tiedje, James M

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Shewanella are known for their versatile electron-accepting capacities, which allow them to couple the decomposition of organic matter to the reduction of the various terminal electron acceptors that they encounter in their stratified environments. Owing to their diverse metabolic capabilities, shewanellae are important for carbon cycling and have considerable potential for the remediation of contaminated environments and use in microbial fuel cells. Systems-level analysis of the model species Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and other members of this genus has provided new insights into the signal-transduction proteins, regulators, and metabolic and respiratory subsystems that govern the remarkable versatility of the shewanellae.

  18. Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2012-07-01

    Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

  19. Deciphering the aggregation mechanism of bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis MR1) in the presence of polyethyleneimine: Effects of the exopolymeric superstructure and polymer molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Krapf, Marie-Eve M; Lartiges, Bruno; Merlin, Christophe; Francius, Grégory; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation tests between bacteria and Polyethyleneimine (PEI) of low (600g/mol) and high (750,000g/mol) molecular weight were performed in order to address the physico-chemical mechanisms underlying the interactions between cationic polymer and bacterial membranes. The selected strain, Schewanella oneidensis MR-1, produces a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of various lengths depending on the growth conditions. Optical density, bioaggregate size, electrophoretic mobility measurements, TEM and AFM observations, and cell lysis tests (crystal violet release), were collected to describe the PEI-mediated aggregation of LPS-O-antigen-free and LPS-O-antigen-decorated bacteria. The results show that PEI of low molecular weight (600g/mol) fails to aggregate bacteria, whereas PEIs of higher molecular weight (60,000 and 750,000g/mol) lead to flocculation at low polymer concentrations. In addition, the LPS-O antigen bacterial superstructure is shown to act as a protective barrier, thus delaying the harmful effects of the cationic polymer. Despite this protection, the interaction of bacterial membranes with increasing concentrations of PEI leads to a series of deleterious processes including biosurface modification (peeling, membrane permeabilization and/or lysis), aggregation of bacterial cells, and complexation of PEI with both released biosurface fragments and cytoplasmic residues issued from lysis. PMID:26774052

  20. Deciphering the aggregation mechanism of bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis MR1) in the presence of polyethyleneimine: Effects of the exopolymeric superstructure and polymer molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Krapf, Marie-Eve M; Lartiges, Bruno; Merlin, Christophe; Francius, Grégory; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Duval, Jérôme F L

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation tests between bacteria and Polyethyleneimine (PEI) of low (600g/mol) and high (750,000g/mol) molecular weight were performed in order to address the physico-chemical mechanisms underlying the interactions between cationic polymer and bacterial membranes. The selected strain, Schewanella oneidensis MR-1, produces a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of various lengths depending on the growth conditions. Optical density, bioaggregate size, electrophoretic mobility measurements, TEM and AFM observations, and cell lysis tests (crystal violet release), were collected to describe the PEI-mediated aggregation of LPS-O-antigen-free and LPS-O-antigen-decorated bacteria. The results show that PEI of low molecular weight (600g/mol) fails to aggregate bacteria, whereas PEIs of higher molecular weight (60,000 and 750,000g/mol) lead to flocculation at low polymer concentrations. In addition, the LPS-O antigen bacterial superstructure is shown to act as a protective barrier, thus delaying the harmful effects of the cationic polymer. Despite this protection, the interaction of bacterial membranes with increasing concentrations of PEI leads to a series of deleterious processes including biosurface modification (peeling, membrane permeabilization and/or lysis), aggregation of bacterial cells, and complexation of PEI with both released biosurface fragments and cytoplasmic residues issued from lysis.

  1. Global Molecular Characterization of the Chromate Stress Response in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Identification of a Putative DNA-Binding Response Regulator and Azoreductase Involved in Cr(VI) Detoxification

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Thompson, Melissa R.; Brown, Steven D.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Hettich, Robert L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Effective bioremediation of Cr-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work is focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Previous transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1. Here we describe a detailed functional analysis of SO2426 and SO3585 in order to begin to understand the role of these proteins in the cellular response to chromate. The protein products encoded by genes so2426 and so3585 were expressed and detected only in chromate-shocked samples as determined by multidimensional high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Both genes were also highly induced (>46-fold) in MR-1 cells actively reducing chromate based on whole-genome microarray analysis. We have created in-frame deletions of the so2426 and so3585 loci in the MR-1 chromosome and have characterized the phenotype of the resulting mutants in the presence of varying concentrations of Cr, Cu, Co, Sr, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under aerobic respiratory conditions. Growth studies indicated that the so2426 deletion mutant was more sensitive to heavy metals compared to the WT reference, and chromate reduction by the so2426 mutant was impaired significantly. The growth response of the mutant to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was similar to that of MR-1. To gain insight into the regulon of this response regulator, MR-1 microarrays were used to

  2. Towards Environmental Systems Biology of Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Auchutung, Jennifer M.; Driscoll, Michael E.; Gardner, Timothy S.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Rodionov, Dmitry; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Saffarini, Daad; Serres, Margrethe H.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Zhulin, Igor B.; Tiedje, James M.

    2008-07-07

    Abstract: Shewanella are known for versatility in their electron accepting capacities, which allow them to couple decomposition of organic matter to reduction of the variety of terminal electron acceptors encountered in the stratified environments they inhabit. Due to their diverse metabolic capabilities, shewanellae play important roles in carbon cycling and have considerable potential for remediation of contaminated environments and use in microbial fuel cells. Systems-level analysis of the model species, S. oneidensis MR-1, and other members of this genus have provided significant insights into the signal transduction proteins, regulators, and metabolic and respiratory subsystems governing the remarkable versatility of the shewanellae.

  3. Structure of 2C-Methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate Synthase from Shewanella oneidensis at 1.6 angstrom: Identification of Farnesyl pyrophosphate Trapped in a Hydrophobic Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Shuisong; Robinson, Howard; Marsing, Gregory C.; Bussiere, Dirksen E.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2004-11-01

    definitive analysis of the identity and mode of binding of the bound molecule. Kishida et al. (2003) reported that no cavity existed in a 1.6Å structure of the SO3437 homolog from Thermus thermophilus, presumably due to tighter packing of the protein from the thermophilic organism. Steinbacher et al. (2002) make no description of a hydrophobic cavity in a lower resolution (2.5-3.2Å) of the Escherichia coli protein. Here, we report a high-resolution (1.6Å) structure of MECDP synthase from Shewanella oneidensis in the absence of substrate in the active site. We provide unambiguous data that confirms the presence of Zn2+ in one of the metal binding sites and observe what appears to be farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) bound in the hydrophobic cavity along the non-crystallographic three-fold symmetry axis of the homotrimer. The high-resolution structure clarifies the mode of binding of the pyrophosphate of FPP in the arginine cluster that caps the hydrophobic cavity.

  4. Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    Serres, Margrethe H.

    2009-05-15

    The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse set of nutrients and to have a large set of genes dedicated to regulation and to sensing of the environment. The sequencing of the S. oneidensis MR-1 genome facilitated experimental and bioinformatics analyses by a group of collaborating researchers, the Shewanella Federation. Through the joint effort and with support from Department of Energy S. oneidensis MR-1 has become a model organism of study. Our work has been a functional analysis of S. oneidensis MR-1, both by itself and as part of a comparative study. We have improved the annotation of gene products, assigned metabolic functions, and analyzed protein families present in S. oneidensis MR-1. The data has been applied to analysis of experimental data (i.e. gene expression, proteome) generated for S. oneidensis MR-1. Further, this work has formed the basis for a comparative study of over 20 members of the Shewanella genus. The species and strains selected for genome sequencing represented an evolutionary gradient of DNA relatedness, ranging from close to intermediate, and to distant. The organisms selected have also adapted to a variety of ecological niches. Through our work we have been able to detect and interpret genome similarities and differences between members of the genus. We have in this way contributed to the

  5. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  6. Biogenic formation of As-S nanotubes by diverse Shewanella strains

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Myung, Nosang V.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2009-11-01

    Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 was previously shown to produce novel, photoactive, As-S nanotubes via the reduction of As(V) and S2O3 2* under anaerobic conditions. To determine if this ability was unique to this bacterium, 10 different Shewanella strains, including Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, Shewanella alga BrY, Shewanella amazonensis SB2B, Shewanella denitrificans OS217, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, S. putrefaciens IR-1, S. putrefaciens SP200, and S. putrefaciens W3-6-1, were examined for production of As-S nanotubes under standardized conditions. Of the 10 strains examined, three formed As-S nanotubes like those of strain HN-41. While Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 and S.putrefaciens CN-32 rapidly formed As-S precipitates in 7 days, strains S. alga BrY and S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced As(V) at a much lower rate and formed yellow As-S after 30 days. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy analyses showed that the morphological and chemical properties of As-S formed by strains S. putrefaciens CN-32, S. alga BrY, and S. oneidensis MR-1 were similar to those previously determined for Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 As-S nanotubes. These studies indicated that the formation of As-S nanotubes is widespread among Shewanella strains and is closely related to bacterial growth and the reduction rate of As(V) and thiosulfate.

  7. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response ofshewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Sarah; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Wu, Liyou; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam P.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2004-04-30

    Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities. However, the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of S. oneidensis to survive and adapt to various environmentally relevant stresses is poorly understood. To define this organism's molecular response to elevated growth temperatures, temporal gene expression profiles were examined in cells subjected to heat stress using whole-genome DNA microarrays for S. oneidensis MR-1. Approximately 15 percent (711) of the predicted S. oneidensis genes represented on the microarray were significantly up- or down-regulated (P < 0.05) over a 25-min period following shift to the heat shock temperature (42 C). As expected, the majority of S. oneidensis genes exhibiting homology to known chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were highly and transiently induced. In addition, a number of predicted genes encoding enzymes in glycolys is and the pentose cycle, [NiFe] dehydrogenase, serine proteases, transcriptional regulators (MerR, LysR, and TetR families), histidine kinases, and hypothetical proteins were induced in response to heat stress. Genes encoding membrane proteins were differentially expressed, suggesting that cells possibly alter their membrane composition or structure in response to variations in growth temperature. A substantial number of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins displayed down-regulated co-expression patterns in response to heat stress, as did genes encoding prophage and flagellar proteins. Finally, based on computational comparative analysis of the upstream promoter regions of S.oneidensis heat-inducible genes, a putative regulatory motif, showing high conservation to the Escherichia coli sigma 32-binding consensus sequence, was identified.

  8. Comparisons of Shewanella strains based on genome annotations, modeling and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Wai Kit; Vu, Trang; Lovendahl, Klaus N.; Llull, Jenna; Serres, Margaret; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella is a genus of facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria that have highly adaptable metabolism which allows them to thrive in diverse environments. This quality makes them attractive target bacteria for research in bioremediation and microbial fuel cell applications. Constraint-based modeling is a useful tool for helping researchers gain insights into the metabolic capabilities of these bacteria. However, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is the only strain with a genome-scale metabolic model constructed out of the 22 sequenced Shewanella strains.

  9. Enhanced Shewanella biofilm promotes bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Yu, Yang-Yang; Deng, Xiao-Peng; Ng, Chun Kiat; Cao, Bin; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Song, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Electroactive biofilms play essential roles in determining the power output of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To engineer the electroactive biofilm formation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model exoelectrogen, we herein heterologously overexpressed a c-di-GMP biosynthesis gene ydeH in S. oneidensis MR-1, constructing a mutant strain in which the expression of ydeH is under the control of IPTG-inducible promoter, and a strain in which ydeH is under the control of a constitutive promoter. Such engineered Shewanella strains had significantly enhanced biofilm formation and bioelectricity generation. The MFCs inoculated with these engineered strains accomplished a maximum power density of 167.6 ± 3.6 mW/m(2) , which was ∼ 2.8 times of that achieved by the wild-type MR-1 (61.0 ± 1.9 mW/m(2) ). In addition, the engineered strains in the bioelectrochemical system at poised potential of 0.2 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) generated a stable current density of 1100 mA/m(2) , ∼ 3.4 times of that by wild-type MR-1 (320 mA/m(2) ). PMID:25899863

  10. Enhanced Shewanella biofilm promotes bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Yu, Yang-Yang; Deng, Xiao-Peng; Ng, Chun Kiat; Cao, Bin; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Song, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Electroactive biofilms play essential roles in determining the power output of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To engineer the electroactive biofilm formation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model exoelectrogen, we herein heterologously overexpressed a c-di-GMP biosynthesis gene ydeH in S. oneidensis MR-1, constructing a mutant strain in which the expression of ydeH is under the control of IPTG-inducible promoter, and a strain in which ydeH is under the control of a constitutive promoter. Such engineered Shewanella strains had significantly enhanced biofilm formation and bioelectricity generation. The MFCs inoculated with these engineered strains accomplished a maximum power density of 167.6 ± 3.6 mW/m(2) , which was ∼ 2.8 times of that achieved by the wild-type MR-1 (61.0 ± 1.9 mW/m(2) ). In addition, the engineered strains in the bioelectrochemical system at poised potential of 0.2 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) generated a stable current density of 1100 mA/m(2) , ∼ 3.4 times of that by wild-type MR-1 (320 mA/m(2) ).

  11. Piezo-adapted 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase of the obligate piezophile Shewanella benthica DB21MT-2 isolated from the 11,000-m depth of the Mariana Trench.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Ryota; Sato, Takako; Tamegai, Hideyuki; Kato, Chiaki

    2009-11-01

    3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH)-encoding leuB genes were obtained from the obligate piezophile Shewanella benthica DB21MT-2 and non-piezophile Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the proteins were purified using His-tag. The estimated kinetic parameters of these enzymes indicated that IPMDH of S. benthica DB21MT-2 is more tolerant of high pressure than that of S. oneidensis MR-1. Thus such an adaptation is one of the mechanisms bacteria utilize for survival at high pressures. PMID:19897891

  12. Metabolically engineered glucose-utilizing Shewanella strains under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Donggeon; Lee, Sae Bom; Kim, Sohyun; Min, Byoungnam; Choi, In-Geol; Chang, In Seop

    2014-02-01

    Comparative genome analysis of Shewanella strains predicted that the strains metabolize preferably two- and three-carbon carbohydrates as carbon/electron source because many Shewanella genomes are deficient of the key enzymes in glycolysis (e.g., glucokinase). In addition, all Shewanella genomes are known to have only one set of genes associated with the phosphotransferase system required to uptake sugars. To engineer Shewanella strains that can utilize five- and six-carbon carbohydrates, we constructed glucose-utilizing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by introducing the glucose facilitator (glf; ZMO0366) and glucokinase (glk; ZMO0369) genes of Zymomonas mobilis. The engineered MR-1 strain was able to grow on glucose as a sole carbon/electron source under anaerobic conditions. The glucose affinity (Ks) and glucokinase activity in the engineered MR-1 strain were 299.46 mM and 0.259 ± 0.034 U/g proteins. The engineered strain was successfully applied to a microbial fuel cell system and exhibited current generation using glucose as the electron source.

  13. A lipid membrane intercalating conjugated oligoelectrolyte enables electrode driven succinate production in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, AW; Garner, LE; Nevin, KP; Woodard, TL; Franks, AE; Lovley, DR; Sumner, JJ; Sund, CJ; Bazan, GC

    2013-06-01

    An amphiphilic conjugated oligoelectrolyte (COE) that spontaneously intercalates into lipid membranes enables Shewanella oneidensis to use a graphite electrode as the sole electron donor for succinate production. Current consumed in a poised electrochemical system by Shewanella with micromolar concentrations of COE correlates well with the succinate produced via fumarate reduction as determined by HPLC analysis. Confocal microscopy confirms incorporation of the COE into the microbes on the electrode surface. This work presents a unique strategy to induce favorable bio-electronic interactions for the production of reduced microbial metabolites.

  14. The Shewanella Federation: Functional Genomic Investigations of Dissimilatory Metal-Reducing Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2009-01-30

    Generation and validation of a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 clone set for protein expression and phage display. An ORF clone set for S. oneidensis was created using the lambda recombinase system. ORFs within entry vectors in this system can be readily transferred into multiple destination vectors, making the clone set a useful resource for research groups studying this microorganism. To establish that the S. oneidensis clone set could be used for protein expression and functional studies, three sets of ORFs were examined for expression of His-tag proteins, expression of His/GST-tag proteins, or for effective display on phage. A total of 21 out of 30 (70%) predicted two-component transcriptional regulators from S. oneidensis were successfully expressed in the His-tag format. The use of the S. oneidensis clone set for functional studies was tested using a phage display system. The method involves the fusion of peptides or proteins to a coat protein of a bacteriophage. This results in display of the fused protein on the exterior of the phage, while the DNA encoding the fusion resides within the virion. The physical linkage between the displayed protein and the DNA encoding it allows screening of vast numbers of proteins for ligand-binding properties. With this technology, a phage clone encoding thioredoxin TrxA was isolated from a sub-library consisting of 80 clones. It is evident that the S. oneidensis clone set can be used for expression of functional S. oneidensis proteins in E. coli using the appropriate destination vectors. Characterization of ArcA. In Escherichia coli, metabolic transitions between aerobic and anaerobic growth states occur when cells enter an oxygen-limited condition. Many of these metabolic transitions are controlled at the transcriptional level by the activities of the global regulatory proteins ArcA (aerobic respiration control) and Fnr (fumarate nitrate regulator). A homolog of ArcA (81% amino acid sequence identity) was identified in S

  15. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments. PMID:26632613

  16. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments.

  17. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei L. Osterman, Ph.D.

    2012-12-17

    Integration of bioinformatics and experimental techniques was applied to mapping and characterization of the key components (pathways, enzymes, transporters, regulators) of the core metabolic machinery in Shewanella oneidensis and related species with main focus was on metabolic and regulatory pathways involved in utilization of various carbon and energy sources. Among the main accomplishments reflected in ten joint publications with other participants of Shewanella Federation are: (i) A systems-level reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization pathways in the genus of Shewanella (19 species). This analysis yielded reconstruction of 18 sugar utilization pathways including 10 novel pathway variants and prediction of > 60 novel protein families of enzymes, transporters and regulators involved in these pathways. Selected functional predictions were verified by focused biochemical and genetic experiments. Observed growth phenotypes were consistent with bioinformatic predictions providing strong validation of the technology and (ii) Global genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Of those, 45 regulons were inferred directly from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in other species. Selected regulatory predictions were experimentally tested. Integration of this analysis with microarray data revealed overall consistency and provided additional layer of interactions between regulons. All the results were captured in the new database RegPrecise, which is a joint development with the LBNL team. A more detailed analysis of the individual subsystems, pathways and regulons in Shewanella spp included bioinfiormatics-based prediction and experimental characterization of: (i) N-Acetylglucosamine catabolic pathway; (ii)Lactate utilization machinery; (iii) Novel Nrt

  18. Shewanella knowledgebase: integration of the experimental data and computational predictions suggests a biological role for transcription of intergenic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V; Romine, Margaret; Schmoyer, Denise D; Kora, Guruprasad H; Syed, Mustafa H; Leuze, Michael Rex; Serres, Margrethe H.; Park, Byung; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2010-01-01

    Shewanellae are facultative gamma-proteobacteria whose remarkable respiratory versatility has resulted in interest in their utility for bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides and for energy generation in microbial fuel cells. Extensive experimental efforts over the last several years and the availability of 21 sequenced Shewanella genomes made it possible to collect and integrate a wealth of information on the genus into one public resource providing new avenues for making biological discoveries and for developing a system level understanding of the cellular processes. The Shewanella knowledgebase was established in 2005 to provide a framework for integrated genome-based studies on Shewanella ecophysiology. The present version of the knowledgebase provides access to a diverse set of experimental and genomic data along with tools for curation of genome annotations and visualization and integration of genomic data with experimental data. As a demonstration of the utility of this resource, we examined a single microarray data set from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 for new insights into regulatory processes. The integrated analysis of the data predicted a new type of bacterial transcriptional regulation involving co-transcription of the intergenic region with the downstream gene and suggested a biological role for co-transcription that likely prevents the binding of a regulator of the upstream gene to the regulator binding site located in the intergenic region. Database URL: http://shewanella-knowledgebase.org:8080/Shewanella/ or http://spruce.ornl.gov:8080/Shewanella/

  19. Shewanella frigidimarina microbial fuel cells and the influence of divalent cations on current output.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Petersen, Emily R; Leary, Dagmar H; Nadeau, Lloyd J; Soto, Carissa M; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Johnson, Glenn R; Vora, Gary J; Biffinger, Justin C

    2013-02-15

    The genes involved in the proposed pathway for Shewanella extracellular electron transfer (EET) are highly conserved. While extensive studies involving EET from a fresh water Shewanella microbe (S. oneidensis MR-1) to soluble and insoluble electron acceptors have been published, only a few reports have examined EET from marine strains of Shewanella. Thus, Shewanella frigidimarina (an isolate from Antarctic Sea ice) was used within miniature microbial fuel cells (mini-MFC) to evaluate potential power output. During the course of this study several distinct differences were observed between S. oneidensis MR-1 and S. frigidimarina under comparable conditions. The maximum power density with S. frigidimarina was observed when the anolyte was half-strength marine broth (1/2 MB) (0.28 μW/cm(2)) compared to Luria-Bertani (LB) (0.07 μW/cm(2)) or a defined growth minimal medium (MM) (0.02 μW/cm(2)). The systematic modification of S. frigidimarina cultured in 1/2 MB and LB with divalent cations shows that a maximum current output can be generated independent of internal ionic ohmic losses and the presence of external mediators.

  20. The genus Shewanella: from the briny depths below to human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Janda, J Michael; Abbott, Sharon L

    2014-11-01

    The genus Shewanella is currently composed of more than 50 species that inhabit a range of marine environs and ecosystems. Several members of this genus, including S. oneidensis, have been identified that could potentially play key roles in environmental processes such as bioremediation of toxic elements and heavy metals and serving as microbial fuel cells. In contrast to this beneficial role, shewanellae are increasingly being implicated as human pathogens in persons exposed through occupational or recreational activities to marine niches containing shewanellae. Documented illnesses linked to Shewanella include skin and soft tissue infections, bacteremia, and otitis media. At present, it is unclear exactly how many Shewanella species are truly bona fide human pathogens. Recent advances in the taxonomy and phylogenetic relatedness of members of this genus, however, support the concept that most human infections are caused by a single species, S. algae. Some phylogenetic data further suggest that some current members of the genus are not true Shewanella species sensu stricto. The current review summarizes our present knowledge of the distribution, epidemiology, disease spectrum, and identification of microbial species focusing on a clinical perspective.

  1. Stress Responses of Shewanella

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jianhua; Gao, Haichun

    2011-01-01

    The shewanellae are ubiquitous in aquatic and sedimentary systems that are chemically stratified on a permanent or seasonal basis. In addition to their ability to utilize a diverse array of terminal electron acceptors, the microorganisms have evolved both common and unique responding mechanisms to cope with various stresses. This paper focuses on the response and adaptive mechanism of the shewanellae, largely based on transcriptional data. PMID:21912550

  2. Integrated genome-based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Segre Daniel; Beg Qasim

    2012-02-14

    This project was a component of the Shewanella Federation and, as such, contributed to the overall goal of applying the genomic tools to better understand eco-physiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of Shewanella genus. Our role at Boston University was to perform bioreactor and high throughput gene expression microarrays, and combine dynamic flux balance modeling with experimentally obtained transcriptional and gene expression datasets from different growth conditions. In the first part of project, we designed the S. oneidensis microarray probes for Affymetrix Inc. (based in California), then we identified the pathways of carbon utilization in the metal-reducing marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, using our newly designed high-density oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarray on Shewanella cells grown with various carbon sources. Next, using a combination of experimental and computational approaches, we built algorithm and methods to integrate the transcriptional and metabolic regulatory networks of S. oneidensis. Specifically, we combined mRNA microarray and metabolite measurements with statistical inference and dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA) to study the transcriptional response of S. oneidensis MR-1 as it passes through exponential, stationary, and transition phases. By measuring time-dependent mRNA expression levels during batch growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 under two radically different nutrient compositions (minimal lactate and nutritionally rich LB medium), we obtain detailed snapshots of the regulatory strategies used by this bacterium to cope with gradually changing nutrient availability. In addition to traditional clustering, which provides a first indication of major regulatory trends and transcription factors activities, we developed and implemented a new computational approach for Dynamic Detection of Transcriptional Triggers (D2T2). This new method allows us to infer a putative topology of transcriptional dependencies

  3. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Echophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Margrethe H. Serres

    2012-06-29

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a motile, facultative {gamma}-Proteobacterium with remarkable respiratory versatility; it can utilize a range of organic and inorganic compounds as terminal electronacceptors for anaerobic metabolism. The ability to effectively reduce nitrate, S0, polyvalent metals andradionuclides has established MR-1 as an important model dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism for genome-based investigations of biogeochemical transformation of metals and radionuclides that are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites nationwide. Metal-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella also have a highly developed capacity for extracellular transfer of respiratory electrons to solid phase Fe and Mn oxides as well as directly to anode surfaces in microbial fuel cells. More broadly, Shewanellae are recognized free-living microorganisms and members of microbial communities involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the cycling of elements in aquatic and sedimentary systems. To function and compete in environments that are subject to spatial and temporal environmental change, Shewanella must be able to sense and respond to such changes and therefore require relatively robust sensing and regulation systems. The overall goal of this project is to apply the tools of genomics, leveraging the availability of genome sequence for 18 additional strains of Shewanella, to better understand the ecophysiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of this important genus. To understand these systems we propose to use genome-based approaches to investigate Shewanella as a system of integrated networks; first describing key cellular subsystems - those involved in signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism - then building towards understanding the function of whole cells and, eventually, cells within populations. As a general approach, this project will employ complimentary "top-down" - bioinformatics-based genome functional predictions, high

  4. Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms: Characterization by Infrared Spectroscopy and Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bin; Shi, Liang; Brown, Roslyn N.; Xiong, Yijia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-04-01

    This study characterizes the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to provide insight into potential interactions of EPS with redox-active metals and radionuclides. Both bound and loosely associated EPS were extracted from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms prepared using a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HfMBR). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids, membrane lipids, and fatty acids in both bound and loosely associated EPS. Using a global proteomic approach, a total of 58 extracellular and outer membrane proteins were identified in the EPS. These included homologues of multiple S. oneidensis MR-1 proteins that potentially contribute to key physiological biofilm processes, such as biofilm-promoting protein BpfA, surface-associated serine protease, nucleotidases (CpdB and UshA), an extracellular lipase, and oligopeptidases (PtrB and a M13 family oligopeptidase lipoprotein). In addition, 20 redox proteins were found in extracted EPS. Among the detected redox proteins were the homologues of two S. oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes, MtrC and OmcA, which have been implicated in extracellular electron transfer. Given their detection in the EPS of Shewanella sp. HRCR 1 biofilms, c-type cytochromes may contribute to the possible redox activity of the biofilm matrix and play important roles in extracellular electron transfer reactions.

  5. Differential arsenic mobilization from As-bearing ferrihydrite by iron-respiring Shewanella strains with different arsenic-reducing activities.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Donghun; Kanaly, Robert A; Kim, Min-Gyu; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic immobilization and release in the environment is significantly influenced by bacterial oxidation and reduction of arsenic and arsenic-bearing minerals. In this study, we tested three iron-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella sp. HN-41, and Shewanella putrefaciens 200, which have diverse arsenate-reducing activities with regard to reduction of an As-bearing ferrihydrite slurry. In the cultures of S. oneidensis MR-1 and Shewanella sp. HN-41, which are not capable of respiratory reduction of As(V) to As(III), arsenic was maintained predominantly in its pentavalent form, existing in particulate poorly crystalline As-bearing ferrihydrite and formed small quantities of a stable ferrous arsenate [Fe3(AsO4)2] precipitate. However, in the culture of the As(V) reducer, S. putrefaciens 200, As(V) was reduced to As(III) and a small fraction of As-bearing ferrihydrite was transformed into ribbon-shaped siderite that subsequently re-released arsenic into the liquid phase. Our results indicated that release of arsenic and formation of diverse secondary nanoscale Fe-As minerals are specifically closely related to the arsenic-reducing abilities of different bacteria. Therefore, bacterial arsenic reduction appears to significantly influence As mobilization in soils, minerals, and other Fe-rich environments.

  6. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  7. Identification and analysis of a highly conserved chemotaxis gene cluster in Shewanella species.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Ward, M.

    2007-08-01

    A conserved cluster of chemotaxis genes was identified from the genome sequences of fifteen Shewanella species. An in-frame deletion of the cheA-3 gene, which is located in this cluster, was created in S. oneidensis MR-1 and the gene shown to be essential for chemotactic responses to anaerobic electron acceptors. The CheA-3 protein showed strong similarity to Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 and P. aeruginosa CheA-1, two proteins that are also essential for chemotaxis. The genes encoding these proteins were shown to be located in chemotaxis gene clusters closely related to the cheA-3-containing cluster in Shewanella species. The results of this study suggest that a combination of gene neighborhood and homology analyses may be used to predict which cheA genes are essential for chemotaxis in groups of closely related microorganisms.

  8. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    This project had as its goals the understanding of the ecophysiology of the genus Shewanella using various genomics approaches. As opposed to other programs involving Shewanella, this one branched out into the various areas in which Shewanella cells are active, and included both basic and applied studies. All of the work was, to some extent, related to the ability of the bacteria to accomplish electron exchange between the cell and solid state electron acceptors and/or electron donors, a process we call Extracellular Electron Transport, or EET. The major accomplishments related to several different areas: Basic Science Studies: 1. Genetics and genomics of nitrate reduction, resulting in elucidation of atypical nitrate reduction systems in Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1)[2]. 2. Influence of bacterial strain and growth conditions on iron reduction, showing that rates of reduction, extents of reduction, and the formation of secondary minerals were different for different strains of Shewanella [3,4,9]. 3. Comparative genomics as a tool for comparing metabolic capacities of different Shewanella strains, and for predicting growth and metabolism [6,10,15]. In these studies, collaboration with ORNL, PNNL, and 4. Basic studies of electron transport in strain MR-1, both to poised electrodes, and via conductive nanowires [12,13]. This included the first accurate measurements of electrical energy generation by a single cell during electrode growth [12], and the demonstration of electrical conductivity along the length of bacterial nanowires [13]. 5. Impact of surface charge and electron flow on cell movement, cell attachment, cell growth, and biofilm formation [7.18]. The demonstration that interaction with solid state electron acceptors resulted in increased motility [7] led to the description of a phenomenon called electrokinesis. The importance of this for biofilm formation and for electron flow was hypothesized by Nealson & Finkel [18], and is now under study in several

  9. The Roles of Outer Membrane Cytochromes of Shewanella and Geobacter in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Richardson, David; Wang, Zheming; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2009-08-01

    As key components of the electron transfer (ET) pathways used for dissimilatory reduction of solid iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(IV)] (hydr)oxides, outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and OmcE and OmcS of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediate ET reactions extracellularly. Cell surface-exposed MtrC and OmcA can transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. S. oneidensis MR-1 cells also secrete flavins that can facilitate ET to the oxides. The secreted flavins are thought to serve either as chelators that form soluble Fe(III)/Mn(IV)-flavin complexes or as electron shuttles that ferry the electrons from cell-associated ET proteins to the metal oxides. Cell-surface localization may also permit MtrC and OmcA to transfer electrons extracellularly to either flavin-chelated Fe(III)/Mn(IV) or oxidized flavins. OmcE and OmcS are proposed to be located on the Geobacter cell surface where they are believed to function as the intermediates to relay electrons to type IV pili, which are then hypothesized to transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. Thus, cell surface-localization positions these outer membrane cytochromes to transfer electrons to Fe(III)/Mn(IV) oxides external to the bacterial cells either directly, indirectly, or both, demonstrating a common strategy shared by Shewanella and Geobacter for extracellular reduction of the oxides.

  10. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2007-07-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobactersulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane quinone/quinol pool through the periplasm to the outer membrane. The type II secretion system of S. oneidensis MR-1 has been implicated in the reduction of metal (hydr)oxides, most likely by translocating decahaem c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane to the surface of bacterial cells where they form a protein complex. The extracellular MtrC and OmcA can directly reduce solid metal (hydr)oxides. Likewise, outer membrane multihaem c-Cyts OmcE and OmcS of G. sulfurreducens are suggested to transfer electrons from outer membrane to type IV pili that are hypothesized to relay the electrons to solid metal (hydr)oxides. Thus, multihaem c-Cyts play critical roles in S. oneidensis MR-1-and G. sulfurreducens-mediated dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides by facilitating ET across the bacterial cell envelope.

  11. USING AERATION FOR CORROSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aeration is a useful drinking water treatment process. Aeration has been used to remove hydrogen sulfide, methane, radon, iron, manganese, and volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) from drinking water. Aeration is also effective in removing carbon dioxide which directly impacts ...

  12. Roles of UndA and MtrC of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 in iron reduction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The completion of genome sequencing in a number of Shewanella species, which are most renowned for their metal reduction capacity, offers a basis for comparative studies. Previous work in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has indicated that some genes within a cluster (mtrBAC-omcA-mtrFED) were involved in iron reduction. To explore new features of iron reduction pathways, we experimentally analyzed Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 since its gene cluster is considerably different from that of MR-1 in that the gene cluster encodes only four ORFs. Results Among the gene cluster, two genes (mtrC and undA) were shown to encode c-type cytochromes. The ΔmtrC deletion mutant revealed significant deficiencies in reducing metals of Fe2O3, α-FeO(OH), β-FeO(OH), ferric citrate, Mn(IV) and Co(III), but not organic compounds. In contrast, no deficiency of metal reduction was observed in the ΔundA deletion mutant. Nonetheless, undA deletion resulted in progressively slower iron reduction in the absence of mtrC and fitness loss under the iron-using condition, which was indicative of a functional role of UndA in iron reduction. Conclusions These results provide physiological and biochemical evidences that UndA and MtrC of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 are involved in iron reduction. PMID:24274142

  13. Utilization of DNA as a Sole Source of Phosphorus, Carbon, and Energy by Shewanella spp.: Ecological and Physiological Implications for Dissimilatory Metal Reduction▿

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Ammons, Christine; Culley, David E.; Li, Shu-Mei W.; McLean, Jeff S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    The solubility of orthophosphate (PO43−) in iron-rich sediments can be exceedingly low, limiting the bioavailability of this essential nutrient to microbial populations that catalyze critical biogeochemical reactions. Here we demonstrate that dissolved extracellular DNA can serve as a sole source of phosphorus, as well as carbon and energy, for metal-reducing bacteria of the genus Shewanella. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and Shewanella sp. strain W3-18-1 all grew with DNA but displayed different growth rates. W3-18-1 exhibited the highest growth rate with DNA. While strain W3-18-1 displayed Ca2+-independent DNA utilization, both CN32 and MR-1 required millimolar concentrations of Ca2+ for growth with DNA. For S. oneidensis MR-1, the utilization of DNA as a sole source of phosphorus is linked to the activities of extracellular phosphatase(s) and a Ca2+-dependent nuclease(s), which are regulated by phosphorus availability. Mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular proteome of MR-1 identified one putative endonuclease (SO1844), a predicted UshA (bifunctional UDP-sugar hydrolase/5′ nucleotidase), a predicted PhoX (calcium-activated alkaline phosphatase), and a predicted CpdB (bifunctional 2′,3′ cyclic nucleotide 2′ phosphodiesterase/3′ nucleotidase), all of which could play important roles in the extracellular degradation of DNA under phosphorus-limiting conditions. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the ability to use exogenous DNA as the sole source of phosphorus is widespread among the shewanellae, and perhaps among all prokaryotes, and may be especially important for nutrient cycling in metal-reducing environments. PMID:18156329

  14. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schkolnik, Gal; Schmidt, Matthias; Mazza, Marco G; Harnisch, Falk; Musat, Niculina

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp), thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM) investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats.

  15. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schkolnik, Gal; Schmidt, Matthias; Mazza, Marco G.; Harnisch, Falk; Musat, Niculina

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp), thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM) investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats. PMID:26709923

  16. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Spormann, Alfred

    2011-07-12

    We have constructed in-frame deletions of 7 of the 10 PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We are currently in the process of characterizing the deletion mutants under a wide range of growth conditions. In addition to characterizing growth, we will also examine the biofilm formation of the deletion mutants. In addition to the genetic analyses of the mutants, we are also interested in comparing the activities of the various PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins. Proteins containing PAS, GGDEF and EAL amino acid sequence motifs may play an important role in regulating c-di-GMP signaling in response to environmental conditions. A genetic and biochemical analysis into the roles of these proteins is underway. PDE activity was observed for several PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins. One of these proteins, SO0427, also demonstrates possible DGC activity in vitro. Currently, we are studying the growth, motility and biofilm formation characteristics of deletion mutants, as well as the activity of the purified proteins.

  17. The influence of cultivation methods on Shewanella oneidensis physiology and proteome expression

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.; Kennedy, David W.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Giometti, Carol S.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Hill, Eric A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput analyses that are central to microbial systems biology and ecophysiology research benefit from highly homogeneous and physiologically well-defined cell cultures. While attention has focused on the technical variation associated with high-throughput technologies, biological variation introduced as a function of cell cultivation methods has been largely overlooked. This study evaluated the impact of cultivation methods, controlled batch or continuous culture in bioreactors versus shake flasks, on the reproducibility of global proteome measurements in Shewanellaoneidensis MR-1. Variability in dissolved oxygen concentration and consumption rate, metabolite profiles, and proteome was greater in shake flask than controlled batch or chemostat cultures. Proteins indicative of suboxic and anaerobic growth (e.g., fumarate reductase and decaheme c-type cytochromes) were more abundant in cells from shake flasks compared to bioreactor cultures, a finding consistent with data demonstrating that “aerobic” flask cultures were O2 deficient due to poor mass transfer kinetics. The work described herein establishes the necessity of controlled cultivation for ensuring highly reproducible and homogenous microbial cultures. By decreasing cell to cell variability, higher quality samples will allow for the interpretive accuracy necessary for drawing conclusions relevant to microbial systems biology research. PMID:18030449

  18. Utilization of DNA as a Sole Source of Phosphorus, Carbon, and Energy by Shewanella spp.: Ecological and Physiological Implications for Dissimilatory Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Ammons, Christine G.; Culley, David E.; Li, Shu-Mei; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2008-02-15

    As a constituent of dissolved organic matter, DNA may be consumed by microorganisms inhabiting various freshwater and marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that dissolved extracellular DNA can serve as a sole source of carbon, energy, nitrogen, and phosphorus for microorganisms residing in the upper layer of Columbia River (WA, USA) water column as well as a sole source of phosphorus for the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens and for Bacillus subtilis ATCC 49760. Our results suggest that DNA assimilation by S. oneidensis is linked to the activity of Ca2+-dependent nuclease(s) and extracellular phosphatase(s). The ability to use DNA as the sole source of phosphorus may be of particular ecological advantage for microorganisms living under Fe(III)-reducing conditions where bioavailability of inorganic phosphate may be limited by the formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2•8H20].

  19. Monodispersed biocompatible Ag2S nanoparticles: Facile extracellular bio-fabrication using the gamma-proteobacterium, S. oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, Anil K; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Wang, Wei; Moon, Ji Won; Gu, Baohua; Meyer III, Harry M; Hensley, Dale K; Retterer, Scott T; Allison, David P; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Pelletier, Dale A

    2011-01-01

    Interest in engineered metal and semiconductor nanocrystallites continues to grow due to their unique size and or shape dependent optoelectronic, physicochemical and biological properties. Therefore identifying novel non-hazardous nanoparticle synthesis routes that address hydrophilicity, size and shape control and production costs have become a priority. In the present illustration we report for the first time the efficient generation of extracellular Ag2S nanoparticles by the metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis. The particles are nearly monodispersed with homogeneous shape distributions and are produced under ambient temperatures and pressures at high yield, 85 % theoretical maximum. UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements confirmed the formation, optical properties, purity, and crystallinity of the as-synthesized particles. Further characterization revealed that the particles consist of spheres in the size range of 1-22 nm, with an average size of 9 3 nm and are capped by a detachable protein/peptide surface coat. Toxicity assessments of these silver sulfide nanoparticles on Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis bacterial systems as well as eukaryotic; mouse lung epithelial (C 10) and macrophage (RAW-264.7) cells showed that the particles were non-inhibitory or non-cytotoxic to both these systems. Our results provide a facile, eco-friendly and economical route for the fabrication of technologically important semiconducting Ag2S nanoparticles which are dispersible and biocompatible; thus providing excellent potential for their uses in optical imaging and electronic devices, and solar cell applications.

  20. Biochemical and pathogenic properties of Shewanella alga and Shewanella putrefaciens.

    PubMed

    Khashe, S; Janda, J M

    1998-03-01

    We characterized 49 strains of Shewanella spp. from clinical (n = 31) and nonhuman (n = 18) sources. Most Shewanella alga organisms (Gilardi biovar 2; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] biotype 2) originated from clinical material (92%), failed to produce acid from carbohydrates other than D-ribose, and were biochemically and enzymatically fairly homogeneous. In contrast, Shewanella putrefaciens organisms (Gilardi biovars 1 and 3; CDC biotype 1) were more often associated with nonhuman sources (70%), were able to utilize a number of sugars (sucrose, L-arabinose, and maltose), and were found to exhibit wider variations in biochemical characteristics; three biotypes within S. putrefaciens were detected. Notable differences between the two species in enzymatic activity, determined with the API-ZYM system (bioMérieux, Hazelwood, Mo.), and cellular fatty acid profiles, determined by the MIDI system (Microbial ID Inc., Newark, Del.), were also detected. Pathogenicity studies of mice indicate that S. alga appears to be the more virulent species, possibly due to the production of a hemolytic substance.

  1. Towards Electrosynthesis in Shewanella: Energetics of Reversing the Mtr Pathway for Reductive Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Daniel E.; Flynn, Jeffrey M.; Baron, Daniel B.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems rely on microorganisms to link complex oxidation/reduction reactions to electrodes. For example, in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, an electron transfer conduit consisting of cytochromes and structural proteins, known as the Mtr respiratory pathway, catalyzes electron flow from cytoplasmic oxidative reactions to electrodes. Reversing this electron flow to drive microbial reductive metabolism offers a possible route for electrosynthesis of high value fuels and chemicals. We examined electron flow from electrodes into Shewanella to determine the feasibility of this process, the molecular components of reductive electron flow, and what driving forces were required. Addition of fumarate to a film of S. oneidensis adhering to a graphite electrode poised at −0.36 V versus standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) immediately led to electron uptake, while a mutant lacking the periplasmic fumarate reductase FccA was unable to utilize electrodes for fumarate reduction. Deletion of the gene encoding the outer membrane cytochrome-anchoring protein MtrB eliminated 88% of fumarate reduction. A mutant lacking the periplasmic cytochrome MtrA demonstrated more severe defects. Surprisingly, disruption of menC, which prevents menaquinone biosynthesis, eliminated 85% of electron flux. Deletion of the gene encoding the quinone-linked cytochrome CymA had a similar negative effect, which showed that electrons primarily flowed from outer membrane cytochromes into the quinone pool, and back to periplasmic FccA. Soluble redox mediators only partially restored electron transfer in mutants, suggesting that soluble shuttles could not replace periplasmic protein-protein interactions. This work demonstrates that the Mtr pathway can power reductive reactions, shows this conduit is functionally reversible, and provides new evidence for distinct CymA:MtrA and CymA:FccA respiratory units. PMID:21311751

  2. Catfish production using intensive aeration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the last 3 years, researchers at UAPB and NWAC have been monitoring and verifying production yields in intensively aerated catfish ponds with aeration rates greater than 6 hp/acre. We now have three years of data on commercial catfish production in intensively aerated ponds. With stocking densi...

  3. Relationship between surface chemistry, biofilm structure, and electron transfer in Shewanella anodes.

    PubMed

    Artyushkova, Kateryna; Cornejo, Jose A; Ista, Linnea K; Babanova, Sofia; Santoro, Carlo; Atanassov, Plamen; Schuler, Andrew J

    2015-03-05

    A better understanding of how anode surface properties affect growth, development, and activity of electrogenic biofilms has great potential to improve the performance of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells. The aim of this paper was to determine how anodes with specific exposed functional groups (-N(CH3)3 (+), -COOH, -OH, and -CH3), created using ω-substituted alkanethiolates self-assembled monolayers attached to gold, affect the surface properties and functional performance of electrogenic Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 biofilms. A combination of spectroscopic, microscopic, and electrochemical techniques was used to evaluate how electrode surface chemistry influences morphological, chemical, and functional properties of S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilms, in an effort to develop improved electrode materials and structures. Positively charged, highly functionalized, hydrophilic surfaces were beneficial for growth of uniform biofilms with the smallest cluster sizes and intercluster diffusion distances, and yielding the most efficient electron transfer. The authors derived these parameters based on 3D morphological features of biofilms that were directly linked to functional properties of the biofilm during growth and that, during polarization, were directly connected to the efficiency of electron transfer to the anode. Our results indicate that substratum chemistry affects not only primary attachment, but subsequent biofilm development and bacterial physiology.

  4. The marine bacteria Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB400 upregulates the type VI secretion system during early biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Linares, Denis; Jean, Natacha; Van Overtvelt, Perrine; Ouidir, Tassadit; Hardouin, Julie; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2016-02-01

    Shewanella sp. are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, extensively studied for their electron transfer ability. Shewanella frigidimarina has been detected and isolated from marine environments, and in particular, from biofilms. However, its ability to adhere to surfaces and form a biofilm is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the ability to adhere and to form a biofilm of S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 is significantly higher than that of Shewanella oneidensis in our conditions. We also show that this strain forms a biofilm in artificial seawater, whereas in Luria-Bertani, this capacity is reduced. To identify proteins involved in early biofilm formation, a proteomic analysis of sessile versus planktonic membrane-enriched fractions allowed the identification of several components of the same type VI secretion system gene cluster: putative Hcp1 and ImpB proteins as well as a forkhead-associated domain-containing protein. The upregulation of Hcp1 a marker of active translocation has been confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our data demonstrated the presence of a single and complete type VI secretion system in S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 genome, upregulated in sessile compared with planktonic conditions. The fact that three proteins including the secreted protein Hcp1 have been identified may suggest that this type VI secretion system is functional. PMID:26617163

  5. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    TIEDJE, JAMES M; KONSTANTINIDIS, KOSTAS; WORDEN, MARK

    2014-01-08

    The aim of the work reported is to study Shewanella population genomics, and to understand the evolution, ecophysiology, and speciation of Shewanella. The tasks supporting this aim are: to study genetic and ecophysiological bases defining the core and diversification of Shewanella species; to determine gene content patterns along redox gradients; and to Investigate the evolutionary processes, patterns and mechanisms of Shewanella.

  6. Integrated genome based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Saffarini, Daad A

    2013-03-07

    Progress is reported in these areas: Regulation of anaerobic respiration by cAMP receptor protein and role of adenylate cyclases; Identification of an octaheme c cytochrome as the terminal sulfite reductase in S. oneidensis MR-1; Identification and analysis of components of the electron transport chains that lead to reduction of thiosulfate, tetrathionate, and elemental sulfur in MR-1; Involvement of pili and flagella in metal reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1; and work suggesting that HemN1 is the major enzyme that is involved in heme biosynthesis under anaerobic conditions.

  7. Shewanella dokdonensis sp. nov., isolated from seawater.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hye-Ri; Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2012-07-01

    A novel bacterial strain, designated UDC329(T), was isolated from a sample of seawater collected at Dong-do, on the coast of Dokdo Island, in the East Sea of the Republic of Korea. The Gram-staining-negative, motile, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore-forming rods of the strain developed into dark orange-yellow colonies. The strain grew optimally between 25 and 30 °C, with 1% (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7. It grew in the absence of NaCl, but not with NaCl at >7% (w/v). The predominant menaquinone was MK-7, the predominant ubiquinones were Q-7 and Q-8, and the major fatty acids were iso-C(15:0) (33.52%) and C(17:1)ω8c (11.73%). The genomic DNA G+C content of strain UDC329(T) was 50.2 mol%. In phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, strain UDC329(T) was grouped with members of the genus Shewanella and appeared most closely related to Shewanella fodinae JC15(T) (97.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), Shewanella indica KJW27(T) (95.0%), Shewanella algae ATCC 51192(T) (94.8%), Shewanella haliotis DW01(T) (94.5%) and Shewanella chilikensis JC5(T) (93.9%). The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain UDC329(T) and S. fodinae JC15(T) was, however, only 27.4%. On the basis of phenotypic, genotypic and DNA-DNA relatedness data, strain UDC329(T) represents a novel species in the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella dokdonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is UDC329(T) (=KCTC 22898(T)=DSM 23626(T)).

  8. Binding of Shewanella FadR to the fabA fatty acid biosynthetic gene: implications for contraction of the fad regulon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Zheng, Beiwen; Gao, Rongsui; Feng, Youjun

    2015-09-01

    The Escherichia coli fadR protein product, a paradigm/prototypical FadR regulator, positively regulates fabA and fabB, the two critical genes for unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis. However the scenario in the other Ɣ-proteobacteria, such as Shewanella with the marine origin, is unusual in that Rodionov and coworkers predicted that only fabA (not fabB) has a binding site for FadR protein. It raised the possibility of fad regulon contraction. Here we report that this is the case. Sequence alignment of the FadR homologs revealed that the N-terminal DNA-binding domain exhibited remarkable similarity, whereas the ligand-accepting motif at C-terminus is relatively-less conserved. The FadR homologue of S. oneidensis (referred to FadR_she) was over-expressed and purified to homogeneity. Integrative evidence obtained by FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) and chemical cross-linking analyses elucidated that FadR_she protein can dimerize in solution, whose identity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. In vitro data from electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that FadR_she is almost functionally-exchangeable/equivalent to E. coli FadR (FadR_ec) in the ability of binding the E. coli fabA (and fabB) promoters. In an agreement with that of E. coli fabA, S. oneidensis fabA promoter bound both FadR_she and FadR_ec, and was disassociated specifically with the FadR regulatory protein upon the addition of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. To monitor in vivo effect exerted by FadR on Shewanella fabA expression, the native promoter of S. oneidensis fabA was fused to a LacZ reporter gene to engineer a chromosome fabA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in E. coli. As anticipated, the removal of fadR gene gave about 2-fold decrement of Shewanella fabA expression by β-gal activity, which is almost identical to the inhibitory level by the addition of oleate. Therefore, we concluded that fabA is contracted to be the only one member of fad regulon in the context of fatty acid

  9. Identification of genes regulated by changing salinity in the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella sp. WP3 using RNA arbitrarily primed PCR.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengkang; Xiao, Xiang; Li, Jinyuan; Luo, Jinxian; Wang, Fengping

    2006-04-01

    The differential gene transcription of a deep-sea bacterium Shewanella sp. WP3 in response to changing salinity was analyzed by RNA fingerprinting using arbitrarily primed PCR (RAP-PCR). Ninety primer sets were used to scan two different RNA pools derived from cultures of 1% and 7% NaCl concentrations. Forty-three putative differential-expressed fragments were identified, cloned, and sequenced. Six out of the 43 fragments were confirmed to be truly differentially transcribed in terms of changing salinity. The deduced amino acid sequences of the six gene fragments showed highest identities (66-96%) with ribosomal protein L24, ATP binding protein, and chaperon protein HscA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (Y6, Y9, and Y29); isocitrate lyase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Y15); peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase of Shewanella sp. SIB1 (Y21), glutamine synthetase of Shewanella violacea (Y25), respectively. Four genes (Y6, Y15, Y21, and Y25) were up regulated in 7% NaCl, while the other two (Y9 and Y29) contained more abundant transcripts in 1% NaCl. The data suggested that strategies involved in controlling protein synthesis, protein folding and/or trafficking, glutamate concentration, fatty acid metabolism, and substance transporting were used for salt adaptation in Shewanella sp. WP3. The expression patterns of the six genes in response to transient stress shocks including salt shock (3% NaCl shift to 12%), cold shock (15 degrees C shift to 0 degrees C), and high-hydrostatic pressure shock (0.1 MPa shift to 50 MPa) were further examined. Y29 encoding the putative HscA chaperon protein was indicated to be involved in adaptation of all the stresses tested. PMID:16133656

  10. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2014-04-08

    As a part of the Shewanella Federation project, we have used integrated genomic, proteomic and computational technologies to study various aspects of energy metabolism of two Shewanella strains from a systems-level perspective.

  11. Shewanella-Related Bacteremia and Fournier's Gangrene: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tommy Hing-cheung; Cheng, Naomi Hua-yin; Ho, Roy Tsz-chung; Chan, Helen Shuk-ying; Lam, Kwok-wai; Xavier, Jimenez; Wu, Tak-chiu

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens have been implicated for causing serious infections in humans, including disseminated infection. We report the possible first case of Shewanella-related Fournier's gangrene and bacteremia caused in a 65-year-old Chinese male with nephrotic syndrome. He was successfully managed by surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy.

  12. pSW2, a Novel Low-Temperature-Inducible Gene Expression Vector Based on a Filamentous Phage of the Deep-Sea Bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Wei; Jian, Hua-Hua; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2015-08-15

    A low-temperature-inducible protein expression vector (pSW2) based on a filamentous phage (SW1) of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. This vector replicated stably in Escherichia coli and Shewanella species, and its copy number increased at low temperatures. The pSW2 vector can be utilized as a complementation plasmid in WP3, and it can also be used for the production of complex cytochromes with multiple heme groups, which has the potential for application for metal ion recovery or bioremediation. Promoters of low-temperature-inducible genes in WP3 were fused into the vector to construct a series of vectors for enhancing protein expression at low temperature. The maximum green fluorescent protein intensity was obtained when the promoter for the hfq gene was used. The WP3/pSW2 system can efficiently produce a patatin-like protein (PLP) from a metagenomic library that tends to form inclusion bodies in E. coli. The yields of PLP in the soluble fraction were 8.3 mg/liter and 4.7 mg/liter of culture at 4°C and 20°C, respectively. Moreover, the pSW2 vector can be broadly utilized in other Shewanella species, such as S. oneidensis and S. psychrophila.

  13. pSW2, a Novel Low-Temperature-Inducible Gene Expression Vector Based on a Filamentous Phage of the Deep-Sea Bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin-Wei; Jian, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    A low-temperature-inducible protein expression vector (pSW2) based on a filamentous phage (SW1) of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. This vector replicated stably in Escherichia coli and Shewanella species, and its copy number increased at low temperatures. The pSW2 vector can be utilized as a complementation plasmid in WP3, and it can also be used for the production of complex cytochromes with multiple heme groups, which has the potential for application for metal ion recovery or bioremediation. Promoters of low-temperature-inducible genes in WP3 were fused into the vector to construct a series of vectors for enhancing protein expression at low temperature. The maximum green fluorescent protein intensity was obtained when the promoter for the hfq gene was used. The WP3/pSW2 system can efficiently produce a patatin-like protein (PLP) from a metagenomic library that tends to form inclusion bodies in E. coli. The yields of PLP in the soluble fraction were 8.3 mg/liter and 4.7 mg/liter of culture at 4°C and 20°C, respectively. Moreover, the pSW2 vector can be broadly utilized in other Shewanella species, such as S. oneidensis and S. psychrophila. PMID:26048946

  14. Aeration equipment for small depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluše, Jan; Pochylý, František

    2015-05-01

    Deficit of air in water causes complications with cyanobacteria mainly in the summer months. Cyanobacteria is a bacteria that produces poison called cyanotoxin. When the concentration of cyanobacteria increases, the phenomena "algal bloom" appears, which is very toxic and may kill all the organisms. This article describes new equipment for aeration of water in dams, ponds and reservoirs with small depth. This equipment is mobile and it is able to work without any human factor because its control is provided by a GPS module. The main part of this equipment consists of a floating pump which pumps water from the surface. Another important part of this equipment is an aerator where water and air are blended. Final aeration process runs in the nozzles which provide movement of all this equipment and aeration of the water. Simulations of the flow are solved by multiphase flow with diffusion in open source program called OpenFOAM. Results will be verified by an experiment.

  15. A functional description of CymA, an electron-transfer hub supporting anaerobic respiratory flexibility in Shewanella.

    PubMed

    Marritt, Sophie J; Lowe, Thomas G; Bye, Jordan; McMillan, Duncan G G; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim; Zachara, John; Richardson, David J; Cheesman, Myles R; Jeuken, Lars J C; Butt, Julea N

    2012-06-15

    CymA (tetrahaem cytochrome c) is a member of the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases. Essential for the anaerobic respiratory flexibility of shewanellae, CymA transfers electrons from menaquinol to various dedicated systems for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors including fumarate and insoluble minerals of Fe(III). Spectroscopic characterization of CymA from Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 identifies three low-spin His/His co-ordinated c-haems and a single high-spin c-haem with His/H(2)O co-ordination lying adjacent to the quinol-binding site. At pH 7, binding of the menaquinol analogue, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, does not alter the mid-point potentials of the high-spin (approximately -240 mV) and low-spin (approximately -110, -190 and -265 mV) haems that appear biased to transfer electrons from the high- to low-spin centres following quinol oxidation. CymA is reduced with menadiol (E(m) = -80 mV) in the presence of NADH (E(m) = -320 mV) and an NADH-menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) oxidoreductase, but not by menadiol alone. In cytoplasmic membranes reduction of CymA may then require the thermodynamic driving force from NADH, formate or H2 oxidation as the redox poise of the menaquinol pool in isolation is insufficient. Spectroscopic studies suggest that CymA requires a non-haem co-factor for quinol oxidation and that the reduced enzyme forms a 1:1 complex with its redox partner Fcc3 (flavocytochrome c3 fumarate reductase). The implications for CymA supporting the respiratory flexibility of shewanellae are discussed.

  16. A Functional Description of CymA, an Electron Transfer Hub Supporting Anaerobic Respiratory Flexibility in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Marritt, Sophie; Lowe, Thomas G.; Bye, Jordan; McMillan, Duncan G.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Richardson, David J.; Cheesman, Myles R.; Jeuken, Lars J.; Butt, Julea N.

    2012-06-15

    CymA is a member of the NapC/NirT family of quinol dehydrogenases. Essential for the anaerobic respiratory flexibility of shewanellae, CymA transfers electrons from menaquinol to various dedicated systems for the reduction of terminal electron acceptors including fumarate and insoluble minerals of Fe(III). Spectroscopic characterization of CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 identifies three low-spin His/His coordinated c-hemes and a single high-spin c-heme with His/H{sub 2}O coordination lying adjacent to the quinol binding site. At pH 7, binding of the menaquinol analogue, 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide, does not alter the mid-point potentials of the high-spin (ca. {approx}240 mV) and low-spin (ca. {approx}110, {approx}190 and {approx}265 mV) hemes that appear biased to transfer electrons from the high- to low-spin centres following quinol oxidation. CymA is reduced with menadiol (E{sub m} = {approx} 80 mV) in the presence of NADH (E{sub m} = {approx} 320 mV) and an NADH:menadione oxidoreductase, but not by menadiol alone. In cytoplasmic membranes reduction of CymA may then require the thermodynamic driving force from NADH, formate or H{sub 2} oxidation as the redox poise of the menaquinol pool in isolation is insufficient. Spectroscopic studies suggest that CymA requires a nonheme cofactor for quinol oxidation and that the reduced enzyme forms a 1:1 complex with its redox partner Fcc{sub 3}. The implications for CymA supporting the respiratory flexibility of shewanellae are discussed.

  17. Applying fine bubble aeration to small aeration tanks.

    PubMed

    Duchène, P; Cotteux, E; Capela, S

    2001-01-01

    Because the aeration system in an activated sludge plant typically represents a large part of the total energy requirements, designers and operators need accurate oxygen transfer information to make the aeration system as energy efficient as possible. This paper presents clean water tests performed at 38 wastewater treatment plants. The Specific Aeration Efficiency results (SAE, kgO2/kWh) are reported for: (1) large open channels (volume higher than 1000 m3), (2) small open channels, (3) total floor coverage cylindrical tanks, and (4) cylindrical tanks with a grid arrangement. Some practical guidelines can be drawn, some of them being: (1) high SAE can be achieved at small aeration tanks (< 1000 m3), applying cylindrical tanks with a total floor coverage arrangement of diffusers, volumetric blowers, and moderate air flow rates per diffuser area; (2) the high investment cost of this configuration can be justified with respect to a grid layout characterized by spiral liquid circulation which affects the oxygen transfer; (3) small open channels can meet sufficient SAE values but fail to meet in this range of tank volumes those of total floor coverage cylindrical tanks.

  18. Global Molecular and Morphological Effects of 24-Hour Chromium(VI)Exposure on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Chourey, Karuna; Thompson, Melissa R; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Brown, Steven D; Shah, Manesh B; Zhou, Jizhong; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Thompson, Dorothea K

    2006-01-01

    The biological impact of 24-h ("chronic") chromium(VI) [Cr(VI) or chromate] exposure on ShewanellaoneidensisMR-1 was assessed by analyzing cellular morphology as well as genome-wide differential gene and protein expression profiles. Cells challenged aerobically with an initial chromate concentration of 0.3 mM in complex growth medium were compared to untreated control cells grown in the absence of chromate. At the 24-h time point at which cells were harvested for transcriptome and proteome analyses, no residual Cr(VI) was detected in the culture supernatant, thus suggesting the complete uptake and/or reduction of this metal by cells. In contrast to the untreated control cells, Cr(VI)-exposed cells formed apparently aseptate, nonmotile filaments that tended to aggregate. Transcriptome profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic charac terization revealed that the principal molecular response to 24-h Cr(VI) exposure was the induction of prophage-related genes and their encoded products as well as a number of functionally undefined hypothetical genes that were located within the integrated phage regions of the MR-1 genome. In addition, genes with annotated functions in DNA metabolism, cell division, biosynthesis and degradation of the murein (pepti doglycan) sacculus, membrane response, and general environmental stress protection were upregulated, while genes encoding chemotaxis, motility, and transport/binding proteins were largely repressed under conditions of 24-h chromate treatment.

  19. Combined effect of loss of the caa3 oxidase and Crp regulation drives Shewanella to thrive in redox-stratified environments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangqi; Yin, Jianhua; Chen, Haijiang; Hua, Yijie; Sun, Linlin; Gao, Haichun

    2013-09-01

    Shewanella species are a group of facultative Gram-negative microorganisms with remarkable respiration abilities that allow the use of a diverse array of terminal electron acceptors (EA). Like most bacteria, S. oneidensis possesses multiple terminal oxidases, including two heme-copper oxidases (caa3- and cbb3-type) and a bd-type quinol oxidase. As aerobic respiration is energetically favored, mechanisms underlying the fact that these microorganisms thrive in redox-stratified environments remain vastly unexplored. In this work, we discovered that the cbb3-type oxidase is the predominant system for respiration of oxygen (O2), especially when O2 is abundant. Under microaerobic conditions, the bd-type quinol oxidase has a significant role in addition to the cbb3-type oxidase. In contrast, multiple lines of evidence suggest that under test conditions the caa3-type oxidase, an analog to the mitochondrial enzyme, has no physiological significance, likely because of its extremely low expression. In addition, expression of both cbb3- and bd-type oxidases is under direct control of Crp (cAMP receptor protein) but not the well-established redox regulator Fnr (fumarate nitrate regulator) of canonical systems typified in Escherichia coli. These data, collectively, suggest that adaptation of S. oneidensis to redox-stratified environments is likely due to functional loss of the caa3-type oxidase and switch of the regulatory system for respiration.

  20. Shewanella algae Peritonitis in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Malini; Goh, Bak Leong; Lim, Christopher; NorFadhlina, Zakaria; Fairol, Ibrahim

    Patients with peritonitis present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, and turbid peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluid. Shewanella algae peritonitis has not yet been reported in PD patients in the literature. We present the first 2 cases of Shewanella algae peritonitis in PD patients. Mupirocin cream is applied on the exit site as prophylactic antibiotic therapy. PMID:27659933

  1. Decolorization of textile azo dye and Congo red by an isolated strain of the dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Chen, Tingting; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Xia; Ni, Chao; Sun, Dongzhe

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis BC01 (SXM) was isolated from sediment collected off Xiamen, China and was identified based on the phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA sequences and the gyrB gene. This strain showed high activity in the decolorization of textile azo dyes, especially methyl orange, reactive red 198, and recalcitrant dye Congo red, decolorizing at rates of 96.2, 93.0, and 87.5%, respectively. SXM had the best performance for the specific decolorization rate (SDR) of azo dyes compared to Proteus hauseri ZMd44 and Aeromonas hydrophila NIU01 strains and had an SDR similar to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Congo red decolorization. Luria-Bertani medium was the optimal culture medium for SXM, as it reached a density of 4.69 g-DCW L(-1) at 16 h. A mediator (manganese) significantly enhanced the biodegradation and flocculation of Congo red. Further analysis with UV-VIS, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that Congo red was cleaved at the azo bond, producing 4,4'-diamino-1,1'-biphenyl and 1,2'-diamino naphthalene 4-sulfonic acid. Finally, SEM results revealed that nanowires exist between the bacteria, indicating that SXM degradation of the azo dyes was coupled with electron transfer through the nanowires. The purpose of this work is to explore the utilization of a novel, dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium in the treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  2. [Ethylene oxide residues and aeration time after use of modern heated aerators (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Star, E G

    1980-06-01

    The aeration time after ethylene oxide sterilization is rather long, particularly for PVC materials. It can be shortened enormously by heated aerators with continuous air exchange. We used different aeration methods and determined the ethylene oxide residues in endotracheal tubes, nasal and oro-pharyngeal airways, breathing tubes, parts of heart-lung-machines as well as gastroscope- and bronchoscope linings. The analyses were performed with a Hewlett-Packard gas chromatograph by the head space method. Intermittent vacuum with air irrigation was not as effective as continuous air exchange in heated aerators. The aeration time in these at 37 degrees C is longer than with 62 degrees C. After degassing in aerators with 62 degrees C the sterilized items can be used the next day already. Aerators blow the released ethylene oxide residues into the open air. The personnel is exposed to considerably smaller ethylene oxide concentrations because the long aeration time at room temperature in storage places is now eliminated.

  3. Aerated Lagoons. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This student manual contains the textual material for a unit which focuses on the structural and operationally unique features of aerated lagoons. Topic areas discussed include: (1) characteristics of completely mixed aerated lagoons; (2) facultative aerated lagoons; (3) aerated oxidation ponds; (4) effects of temperature on aerated lagoons; (5)…

  4. High performance aerated lagoon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, L.

    1999-08-01

    At a time when less money is available for wastewater treatment facilities and there is increased competition for the local tax dollar, regulatory agencies are enforcing stricter effluent limits on treatment discharges. A solution for both municipalities and industry is to use aerated lagoon systems designed to meet these limits. This monograph, prepared by a recognized expert in the field, provides methods for the rational design of a wide variety of high-performance aerated lagoon systems. Such systems range from those that can be depended upon to meet secondary treatment standards alone to those that, with the inclusion of intermittent sand filters or elements of sequenced biological reactor (SBR) technology, can also provide for nitrification and nutrient removal. Considerable emphasis is placed on the use of appropriate performance parameters, and an entire chapter is devoted to diagnosing performance failures. Contents include: principles of microbiological processes, control of algae, benthal stabilization, design for CBOD removal, design for nitrification and denitrification in suspended-growth systems, design for nitrification in attached-growth systems, phosphorus removal, diagnosing performance.

  5. A Re‐evaluation of Electron‐Transfer Mechanisms in Microbial Electrochemistry: Shewanella Releases Iron that Mediates Extracellular Electron Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Oram, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Exoelectrogenic bacteria can couple their metabolism to extracellular electron acceptors, including macroscopic electrodes, and this has applications in energy production, bioremediation and biosensing. Optimisation of these technologies relies on a detailed molecular understanding of extracellular electron‐transfer (EET) mechanisms, and Shewanella oneidensis MR‐1 (MR‐1) has become a model organism for such fundamental studies. Here, cyclic voltammetry was used to determine the relationship between the surface chemistry of electrodes (modified gold, ITO and carbon electrodes) and the EET mechanism. On ultra‐smooth gold electrodes modified with self‐assembled monolayers containing carboxylic‐acid‐terminated thiols, an EET pathway dominates with an oxidative catalytic onset at 0.1 V versus SHE. Addition of iron(II)chloride enhances the catalytic current, whereas the siderophore deferoxamine abolishes this signal, leading us to conclude that this pathway proceeds via an iron mediated electron transfer mechanism. The same EET pathway is observed at other electrodes, but the onset potential is dependent on the electrolyte composition and electrode surface chemistry. EET pathways with onset potentials above −0.1 V versus SHE have previously been ascribed to direct electron‐transfer (DET) mechanisms through the surface exposed decaheme cytochromes (MtrC/OmcA) of MR‐1. In light of the results reported here, we propose that the previously identified DET mechanism of MR‐1 needs to be re‐evaluated.

  6. Shewanella dysentery in a patient with underlying malignancy.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, S

    2014-12-01

    Shewanella spp is a facultatively anaerobic, motile, gramnegative bacillus and can be found throughout the world mainly in marine environments and soil. It is a rare pathogen in human and infection by it is usually associated with underlying severe morbidities. We report a case of a 69- years old woman who presented with Shewanella putrefaciens dysentery and who was subsequently found to have underlying malignancy.

  7. Shewanella fidelis sp. nov., isolated from sediments and sea water.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Elena P; Sawabe, Tomoo; Hayashi, Karin; Gorshkova, Nataliya M; Zhukova, Natalia V; Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Mikhailov, Valery V; Nicolau, Dan V; Christen, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Two marine bacterial strains, KMM 3582T and KMM 3589, isolated respectively from sediments of the South China Sea and sea water of the Sea of Japan, have been characterized. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence-based phylogenetic analysis placed the two strains in a separate branch of the gamma-Proteobacteria within the members of the genus Shewanella. KMM 3582T showed the highest similarity (97.1 and 97.4%, respectively) to Shewanella pealeana and Shewanella gelidimarina. The G + C contents of the DNAs of the two strains studied were 45.0 mol%. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between the two strains was 82%, indicating that they represent a single genospecies. These organisms were slightly pinkish, Gram-negative, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic, mesophilic (with temperature range from 4 to 30 degrees C), neutrophilic and haemolytic and were able to degrade alginate, gelatin and DNA. The novel organisms were susceptible to gentamicin, lincomycin, oleandomycin, streptomycin and polymyxin. The predominant fatty acids were characteristic for shewanellae: 13 : 0-i, 15 : 0-i, 16 : 0 and 16 : 1omega7. Eicosapentaenoic acid, 20 : 5omega3, was not detected. Phylogenetic evidence, together with phenotypic characteristics, showed that the two bacteria constitute a novel species of the genus Shewanella. The name Shewanella fidelis sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain KMM 3582T (=LMG 20551T =ATCC BAA-318T).

  8. Pyogenic Flexor Tenosynovitis Caused by Shewanella algae.

    PubMed

    Fluke, Erin C; Carayannopoulos, Nikoletta L; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2016-07-01

    Pyogenic flexor tenosynovitis is an orthopedic emergency most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci and occasionally, when associated with water exposure, Mycobacterium marinum. Shewanella algae, a gram-negative bacillus found in warm saltwater environments, has infrequently been reported to cause serious soft tissue infections and necrosis. In this case, S. algae caused complicated flexor tenosynovitis requiring open surgical irrigation and debridement. Flexor tenosynovitis caused by S. algae rapidly presented with all 4 Kanavel cardinal signs as well as subcutaneous purulence, ischemia, and necrosis, thus meeting the requirements for Pang et al group III classification of worst prognosis. Because of its rarity and virulence, S. algae should always be considered in cases of flexor tenosynovitis associated with traumatic water exposure to treat and minimize morbidity appropriately.

  9. DESIGN INFORMATION ON FINE PORE AERATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted over several years at municipal wastewater treatment plants employing line pore diffused aeration systems. These studies were designed to produce reliable information on the performance and operational requirements of fine pore devices under process ...

  10. ENHANCED BIODEGRADATION THROUGH IN-SITU AERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provided an overview of enhanced aerobic bioremediation using in-situ aeration or venting. The following topics were covered: (1) Basic discussion on biodegradation and respiration testing; (2) Basic discussion on volatilization, rate-limited mass transport, an...

  11. Oxygen transfer in circular surface aeration tanks.

    PubMed

    Rao, Achanta Ramakrishna; Patel, Ajey Kumar; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2009-06-01

    Surface aeration systems employed in activated sludge plants are the most energy-intensive units of the plants and typically account for a higher percentage of the treatment facility's total energy use. The geometry of the aeration tank imparts a major effect on the system efficiency. It is said that at optimal geometric conditions, systems exhibits the maximum efficiency. Thus the quantification of the optimal geometric conditions in surface aeration tanks is needed. Optimal geometric conditions are also needed to scale up the laboratory result to the field installation. In the present work, experimental studies have been carried out on baffled and unbaffled circular surface aeration tanks to ascertain the optimal geometric conditions. It is found that no optimal geometric conditions exist for the liquid/water depth in circular surface aeration tanks; however, for design purposes, a standard value has been assumed. Based on the optimal geometric conditions, a scale-up equation has been developed for the baffled circular surface aeration tanks.

  12. Reduction and partial degradation mechanisms of naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye amaranth by Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yiguo; Guo, Jun; Xu, Zhicheng; Mo, Cuiyun; Xu, Meiying; Sun, Guoping

    2007-06-01

    Reduction and biodegradation mechanisms of naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye amaranth using a newly isolated Shewanella decolorationis strain S12 were investigated. Under anaerobic conditions, amaranth was reduced by strain S12, and a stoichiometric amount of two reduction products RP-1 and RP-2 were generated. UV/visible spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that RP-1 and RP-2 were 1-aminenaphthylene -4-sulfonic acid and 1-aminenaphthylene-2-hydroxy-3, 6-disulfonic acid. The result strongly supports a mechanism of azo dye reduction by the process via the reductive cleavage of the azo bond to form corresponding aromatic amines. The result of HPLC analyses revealed that these aromatic amines were not able to be mineralized by strain S12 under anaerobic conditions. But after re-aeration of the decolorized culture, RP-2 was mineralized completely by this microorganism, but the consumption of RP-1 was not observed. Ames test showed that amaranth had mutagenic but no cytotoxic potential. The mutagenic potential was relieved after the anaerobic treatment with strain S12 as the mutagenic effect of the two reduction products from amaranth was not detected by Ames test. Thus, the ability of strain S12 to reduce and partially mineralize the naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye efficiently was demonstrated, which can potentially be used to biodegrade and detoxify wastewater containing azo dyes using an alternating anaerobic/aerobic treatment procedure.

  13. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  14. Identification and Characterization of UndA-HRCR-6, an Outer Membrane Endecaheme c-Type Cytochrome of Shewanella sp. Strain HRCR-6

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Wang, Zheming; Kennedy, David W.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-08-01

    The outer membrane decaheme c-type cytochromes (c-Cyt) MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1(MR-1) play critical roles in extracellular reduction of iron [Fe(III)] oxides and uranium [ U(VI)]. To identify and characterize the outer membrane c-Cyts found in the metal-reducing Shewanella strains isolated from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 7 HRCR isolates were tested for the presence of mtrC, omcA and undA1 (a gene encoding a putative 11-heme c-Cyt) homologues in their genomes. All 7 tested strains possessed an mtrC homologue, while 3 strains had an omcA homologue and the remaining 4 strains contained an undA1 homologue. The coding region of an undA1 homologue from HRCR isolate 6 was cloned and sequenced. Because it was 93% identical to the UndA of S. baltica OS223, the protein product encoded by this sequenced gene was named as UndA-HRCR6. In MR-1, UndA-HRCR6 (i) restored an MR-1 mutant’s ability to reduce solid phase ferrihydrite at 40% of that for MR-1 wild type, (ii) increased extracellular formation of UO2 associated with the outer membrane and extracellular polymeric substances in a U(VI) reduction assay and (iii) was secreted to the extracellular environment by bacterial type II secretion system. UndA-HRCR6 was purified from the membrane fraction following its overexpression in MR-1 cells. Purified UndA-HRCR6 possessed 11 heme-Fe and reduced ferric complexes. Collectively, these results show that UndA-HRCR6 is an outer membrane endecaheme c-Cyt and can serve an extracellular metal reductase with functions similar to that of MR-1 MtrC and OmcA.

  15. Shewanella seohaensis sp. nov., isolated from a tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Park, Sooyeon; Jung, Yong-Taek; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2012-06-01

    A Gram-negative, motile and rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated S7-3(T), was isolated from a tidal flat sediment at Saemankum on the western coast of Korea. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences showed that strain S7-3(T) belonged to the genus Shewanella, clustering with Shewanella decolorationis S12(T). Strain S7-3(T) exhibited 98.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity and 96.8 % gyrB sequence similarity to S. decolorationis S12(T), respectively. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values between strain S7-3(T) and other members of the genus Shewanella were in the range of 93.0-98.0 %. Strain S7-3(T) contained simultaneously both menaquinones (MK) and ubiquinones (Q); the predominant menaquinone was MK-7 and the predominant ubiquinones were Q-7 and Q-8. The fatty acid profiles of strain S7-3(T) and S. decolorationis JCM 21555(T) were similar; major components were C(17:1) ω8c, iso-C(15:0) and iso-C(15:0) 2-OH and/or C(16:1) ω7c. The DNA G+C content of strain S7-3(T) was 51.8 mol% and its mean DNA-DNA relatedness value with S. decolorationis JCM 21555(T) was 43 %. Differential phenotypic properties of strain S7-3(T), together with the phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, revealed that this strain is distinguishable from recognized Shewanella species. On the basis of the data presented, strain S7-3(T) is considered to represent a novel Shewanella species, for which the name Shewanella seohaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S7-3(T) (=KCTC 23556(T) = CCUG 60900(T)).

  16. Soil Aeration deficiencies in urban sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltecke, Katharina; Gaertig, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    Soil aeration deficiencies in urban sites Katharina Weltecke and Thorsten Gaertig On urban tree sites reduction of soil aeration by compaction or sealing is an important but frequently underestimated factor for tree growth. Up to 50% of the CO2 assimilated during the vegetation period is respired in the root space (Qi et al. 1994). An adequate supply of the soil with oxygen and a proper disposal of the exhaled carbon dioxide are essential for an undisturbed root respiration. If the soil surface is smeared, compacted or sealed, soil aeration is interrupted. Several references show that root activity and fine root growth are controlled by the carbon dioxide concentration in soil air (Qi et al.1994, Burton et al. 1997). Gaertig (2001) found that decreasing topsoil gas permeability leads to reduced fine root density and hence to injury in crown structure of oaks. In forest soils a critical CO2 concentration of more than 0.6 % indicates a bad aeration status (Gaertig 2001). The majority of urban tree sites are compacted or sealed. The reduction of soil aeration may lead to dysfunctions in the root space and consequently to stress during periods of drought, which has its visible affects in crown structure. It is reasonable to assume that disturbances in soil aeration lead to reduced tree vigour and roadworthiness, resulting in high maintenance costs. The assessment of soil aeration in urban sites is difficult. In natural ecosystems the measurement of gas diffusivity and the gas-chromatical analysis of CO2 in soil air are accepted procedures in analyzing the state of aeration (Schack-Kirchner et al. 2001, Gaertig 2001). It has been found that these methods can also be applied for analyzing urban sites. In particular CO2 concentration in the soil atmosphere can be considered as a rapidly assessable, relevant and integrating indicator of the aeration situation of urban soils. This study tested the working hypothesis that soil aeration deficiencies lead to a decrease of fine

  17. Landfill aeration worldwide: Concepts, indications and findings

    SciTech Connect

    Ritzkowski, M.; Stegmann, R.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different landfill aeration concepts and accordant application areas are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examples of full scale projects are provided for Europe, North-America and Asia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Major project findings are summarised, including prospects and limitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inconsistencies between laboratory and full scale results have been elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An explanatory approach in connection with the inconsistencies is provided. - Abstract: The creation of sustainable landfills is a fundamental goal in waste management worldwide. In this connection landfill aeration contributes towards an accelerated, controlled and sustainable conversion of conventional anaerobic landfills into a biological stabilized state associated with a minimised emission potential. The technology has been successfully applied to landfills in Europe, North America and Asia, following different strategies depending on the geographical region, the specific legislation and the available financial resources. Furthermore, methodologies for the incorporation of landfill aeration into the carbon trade mechanisms have been developed in recent years. This manuscript gives an overview on existing concepts for landfill aeration; their application ranges and specifications. For all of the described concepts examples from different countries worldwide are provided, including details regarding their potentials and limitations. Some of the most important findings from these aeration projects are summarised and future research needs have been identified. It becomes apparent that there is a great demand for a systematisation of the available results and implications in order to further develop and optimise this very promising technology. The IWWG (International Waste Working Group) Task Group 'Landfill Aeration' contributes towards the achievement of this goal.

  18. Acid mine water aeration and treatment system

    DOEpatents

    Ackman, Terry E.; Place, John M.

    1987-01-01

    An in-line system is provided for treating acid mine drainage which basically comprises the combination of a jet pump (or pumps) and a static mixer. The jet pump entrains air into the acid waste water using a Venturi effect so as to provide aeration of the waste water while further aeration is provided by the helical vanes of the static mixer. A neutralizing agent is injected into the suction chamber of the jet pump and the static mixer is formed by plural sections offset by 90 degrees.

  19. Surfactant effects on alpha-factors in aeration systems.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Diego; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2006-04-01

    Aeration in wastewater treatment processes accounts for the largest fraction of plant energy costs. Aeration systems function by shearing the surface (surface aerators) or releasing bubbles at the bottom of the tank (coarse- or fine-bubble aerators). Surfactant accumulation on gas-liquid interfaces reduces mass transfer rates, and this reduction in general is larger for fine-bubble aerators. This study evaluates mass transfer effects on the characterization and specification of aeration systems in clean and process water conditions. Tests at different interfacial turbulence regimes show higher gas transfer depression for lower turbulence regimes. Contamination effects can be offset at the expense of operating efficiency, which is characteristic of surface aerators and coarse-bubble diffusers. Results describe the variability of alpha-factors measured at small scale, due to uncontrolled energy density. Results are also reported in dimensionless empirical correlations describing mass transfer as a function of physiochemical and geometrical characteristics of the aeration process. PMID:16549087

  20. Studies of iron-uptake mechanisms in two bacterial species of the shewanella genus adapted to middle-range (Shewanella putrefaciens) or antarctic (Shewanella gelidimarina) temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pakchung, Amalie A H; Soe, Cho Z; Codd, Rachel

    2008-10-01

    Iron(III)-uptake mechanisms in bacteria indigenous to the Antarctic, which is the most Fe-deficient continent on Earth, have not been extensively studied. The cold-adapted, Antarctic bacterium, Shewanella gelidimarina, does not produce detectable levels of the siderophore, putrebactin, in the supernatant of Fe(III)-deprived cultures. This is distinct from the putrebactin-producing bacterium from the same genus, Shewanella putrefaciens, which is adapted to middle-range temperatures. The production of putrebactin by S. putrefaciens is optimal, when the pH value of the medium is 7.0. According to the strong positive response from whole cells in the Chrome Azurol S (CAS) agar diffusion assay, Shewanella gelidimarina appears to produce cell-associated siderophores. In the RP-HPLC trace of an Fe(III)-loaded extract from the cell-associated components of S. gelidimarina cultured in media with [Fe(III)] ca. 0 microM, a peak appears at [MeCN] ca. 77%, which decreases in intensity in a parallel experiment in which [Fe(III)] ca. 5 microM, and is barely detectable in Fe(III)-replete media ([Fe(III)] ca. 20 microM). The Fe(III)-dependence of this peak suggests that the attendant species, which is significantly more hydrophobic than putrebactin (RP-HPLC elution: [MeCN] ca. 14%), is associated with Fe(III)-management in S. gelidimarina. This study highlights the diversity in Fe(III)-uptake mechanisms in Shewanella species adapted to different environmental and thermal niches. PMID:18972501

  1. Evaluation of oxygen transfer parameters of fine-bubble aeration system in plug flow aeration tank of wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaohong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Shi, Hanchang; Song, Yanqing

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge of the oxygen mass transfer of aerators under operational conditions in a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is meaningful for the optimization of WWTP, however, scarce to best of our knowledge. Through analyzing a plug flow aeration tank in the Lucun WWTP, in Wuxi, China, the oxygenation capacity of fine-bubble aerators under process conditions have been measured in-situ using the off-gas method and the non-steady-state method. The off-gas method demonstrated that the aerators in different corridors in the aeration tank of WWTP ha d significantly different oxygen transferperformance; furthermore, the aerators in the samecorridor shared almost equal oxygen transfer performance over the course of a day. Results measured by the two methods showed that the oxygen transfer performance of fine-bubble aerators in the aeration tank decreased dramatically compared with that in the clean water. The loss of oxygen transfer coefficient was over 50% under low-aeration conditions (aeration amount < 0.67 Nm3/hr). However, as the aeration amount reached 0.96 Nm3/hr, the discrepancy of oxygen transfer between the process condition and clean water was negligible. The analysis also indicated that the non-steady-state and off-gas methods resulted in comparable estimates of oxygen transfer parameters for the aerators under process conditions.

  2. Permanent draft genome of acetaldehyde degradation bacterium, Shewanella sp. YQH10.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Shang, Xiexie; Zeng, Runying

    2015-02-01

    Shewanella sp. YQH10 isolated from mangrove sediment, was a novel species of Shewanella, which has the ability to degrade acetaldehyde. Here, we present an annotated draft genome sequence of Shewanella sp. YQH10, which contains 4,215,794 bp with a G + C content of 48.1%. This information regarding the genetic basis of this bacterium can greatly advance our understanding of the physiology of this species.

  3. Recovery of Elemental Palladium by Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasaka, S.; Xia, X.; Sawada, K.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Ohnuki, T.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial reduction of metals plays an important role in environmental behavior and provides a technique for the recovery of metals from industrial wastewater. Recently, demand for platinum group metals (PGMs) increases by their catalytic properties. The extreme rarity of PGMs have led to a growing interest in their recovery. Palladium, one of PGMs, has different oxidation states of Pd(II) and Pd(0). The oxidized form of Pd(II) is soluble, while the reduced form of Pd(0) is insoluble. In this study, microbial reduction of palladium by Fe(III)- reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaceins was conducted. This bacterium is known to be capable of reducing metals, such as Mn(IV), U(VI), or Tc(VII) with organic C or H2 as an electron donor. In order to investigate the potential of S. putrefaciens to reduce Pd(II) in solution, resting cells or heat-killed cells were suspended under anaerobic conditions with lactate or H2 as an electron donor. The cells of S. putrefaciens (NBRC3908) were grown in aerobic medium, harvested by centrifugation, and then washed with 25 mmol/dm3 HEPES and 100 mmol/dm3 NaCl (HEPES-NaCl) solution (pH 7.0). The heat-killed cells were autoclaved for 20 min at 121 degrees C. The cell suspension (21.5 mg in dry weight) was resuspended in the HEPES-NaCl solution which contained 1.0 mmol/dm3 Na2PdCl4 (Wako Pure chemical Industries, Ltd). The suspensions were bubbled with N2 for 15 min before 10 mmol/dm3 lactate or 4.8 v/v% H2 was added. The suspensions were then incubated at 30 degrees C. Redox potential (Eh) and pH of the solutions were measured in an inert glove box with Ar gas. Concentration of Pd(II) was measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). Deposited Pd and cells were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Approximately 86% of Pd(II) of the initial concentration was removed from solution by the resting cells within 24 h when

  4. CFD model of an aerating hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D.; Sabourin, M.; Beaulieu, S.; Papillon, B.; Ellis, C.

    2014-03-01

    Improving water quality in the tailrace below hydroelectric dams has become a priority in many river systems. In warm climates, water drawn by the turbine from deep in a reservoir can be deficient in dissolved oxygen (DO), a critical element in maintaining a healthy aquatic ecosystem. Many different solutions have been proposed in order to increase the DO levels in turbine discharge, including: turbine aeration systems (adding air to the water through either the turbine hub, the periphery or through distributed aeration in the runner blades); bubble diffusers in the reservoir or in the tailrace; aerating weirs downstream of the dams; and surface water pumps in the reservoir near the dam. There is a significant potential to increase the effectiveness of these solutions by improving the way that oxygen is introduced into the water; better distributions of bubbles will result in better oxygen transfer. In the present study, a two-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics model has been formulated using a commercial code to study the distribution of air downstream of a simple aerating hydrofoil. The two-phase model uses the Eulerian-Eulerian approach. Appropriate relations are used to model the interphase forces, including the Grace drag force model, the Favre averaged drag force and the Sato enhanced eddy viscosity. The model is validated using experimental results obtained in the water tunnel at the University of Minnesota's Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory. Results are obtained for water velocities between 5 and 10 m/s, air flow rates between 0.5 and 1.5 sL/min and for angles of attack between 0° and -8°. The results of this study show that the CFD model provides a good qualitative comparison to the experimental results by well predicting the wake location at the different flow rates and angles of attack used.

  5. Neonatal sepsis caused by Shewanella algae: A case report.

    PubMed

    Charles, Marie Victor Pravin; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan; Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of mortality among neonates, especially in developing countries. Most cases of neonatal sepsis are attributed to Escherichia coli and other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Shewanella algae (S. algae) is a gram-negative saprophytic bacillus, commonly associated with the marine environment, which has been isolated from humans. Early onset neonatal sepsis caused by S. algae is uncommon. We report a case of S. algae blood stream infection in a newborn with early onset neonatal sepsis.

  6. Single-Molecule Methods for the Large-Scale Characterization of Expression Levels and Protein-Protein Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2008-10-01

    This project has demonstrated a new approach to localize binding sites of proteins regulating gene expression (also known as transcription factors) on the genome of bacteria. Knowledge of the precise binding site(s) of a specific transcription factor helps determining its role in the cell cycle and by extension provides further understanding of the mechanisms at play in the organism. The approach entails labeling transcription factors (or any other DNA-binding protein of interest) with quantum dots, a new class of very bright fluorescent probes, which allow detection of individual molecules with a simple microscope. Detection is then followed with very accurate localization of the probe (with nanometer resolution) with respect to specific parts of the DNA or other proteins bound to the DNA. We have confirmed the precision of our measurement using another technique based on atomic force microscopy, which provides a nanometer-resolution topographic picture of a sample. Quantum dots and DNA are readily observable (and distinguishable) in the atomic force microscope, and can be simultaneously observed by fluorescence microscopy, allowing a direct comparison of the two methods. Precise nanometer-localization of protein binding sites using fluorescent quantum dots is thus a direct and visual method for physical mapping of transcription factor binding sites on whole genomes.

  7. Shewanella oneidensis in a lactate-fed pure-culture and a glucose-fed co-culture with Lactococcus lactis with an electrode as electron acceptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) employing mixed microbial communities as biocatalysts are gaining importance as potential renewable energy, bioremediation, or biosensing devices. While we are beginning to understand how individual microbial species interact with an electrode as electron donor, li...

  8. Effects of aeration method and aeration rate on greenhouse gas emissions during composting of pig feces in pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Li, Guoxue; Tang, Qiong; Ma, Xuguang; Wang, Gang; Schuchardt, Frank

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover ways to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and reduce energy consumption during the composting process. We assessed the effects of different aeration rates (0, 0.18, 0.36, and 0.54 L/(kg dry matter (dm)·min)) and methods (continuous and intermittent) on GHG emissions. Pig feces and corn stalks were mixed at a ratio of 7:1. The composting process lasted for 10 weeks, and the compost was turned approximately every 2 weeks. Results showed that both aeration rate and method significantly affected GHG emissions. Higher aeration rates increased NH3 and N2O losses, but reduced CH4 emissions. The exception is that the CH4 emission of the passive aeration treatment was lower than that of the low aeration rate treatment. Without forced aeration, the CH4 diffusion rates in the center of the piles were very low and part of the CH4 was oxidized in the surface layer. Intermittent aeration reduced NH3 and CH4 losses, but significantly increased N2O production during the maturing periods. Intermittent aeration increased the nitrification/denitrification alternation and thus enhanced the N2O production. Forced aeration treatments had higher GHG emission rates than the passive aeration treatment. Forced aeration accelerated the maturing process, but could not improve the quality of the end product. Compared with continuous aeration, intermittent aeration could increase the O2 supply efficiency and reduced the total GHG emission by 17.8%, and this reduction increased to 47.4% when composting was ended after 36 days. PMID:25968266

  9. Effects of aeration method and aeration rate on greenhouse gas emissions during composting of pig feces in pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Li, Guoxue; Tang, Qiong; Ma, Xuguang; Wang, Gang; Schuchardt, Frank

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to uncover ways to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and reduce energy consumption during the composting process. We assessed the effects of different aeration rates (0, 0.18, 0.36, and 0.54 L/(kg dry matter (dm)·min)) and methods (continuous and intermittent) on GHG emissions. Pig feces and corn stalks were mixed at a ratio of 7:1. The composting process lasted for 10 weeks, and the compost was turned approximately every 2 weeks. Results showed that both aeration rate and method significantly affected GHG emissions. Higher aeration rates increased NH3 and N2O losses, but reduced CH4 emissions. The exception is that the CH4 emission of the passive aeration treatment was lower than that of the low aeration rate treatment. Without forced aeration, the CH4 diffusion rates in the center of the piles were very low and part of the CH4 was oxidized in the surface layer. Intermittent aeration reduced NH3 and CH4 losses, but significantly increased N2O production during the maturing periods. Intermittent aeration increased the nitrification/denitrification alternation and thus enhanced the N2O production. Forced aeration treatments had higher GHG emission rates than the passive aeration treatment. Forced aeration accelerated the maturing process, but could not improve the quality of the end product. Compared with continuous aeration, intermittent aeration could increase the O2 supply efficiency and reduced the total GHG emission by 17.8%, and this reduction increased to 47.4% when composting was ended after 36 days.

  10. Tracer studies on an aerated lagoon.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Alistair; Shilton, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The city of Palmerston North, New Zealand, has two aerated lagoons as its secondary treatment facility. Interest about treatment efficiency led to an investigation into the hydraulics in the second lagoon to determine if further optimisation was viable. A tracer study using rhodamine WT was undertaken to ascertain the stimulus response output. Samples were also taken at 24 points within the lagoon to determine the tracer concentration profile throughout the lagoon. The mean residence time was determined to be 39.9 h compared with a theoretical residence time of 55.4 h. Peak concentration of the tracer at the outlet occurred at 0.44 of the mean residence time. The results of the tracer study pointed to 28% of volume being dead space. A subsequent sludge survey indicated that 26% of the design volume of the lagoon was filled with sludge. While the curved geometry of the lagoon did not appear to impact the hydraulics the fact that the first aerator is confined in a relatively smaller area will have locally boosted the mixing energy input in this inlet zone. From interpretation of the tracer response and the tracer distribution profiles it appears that the aerators are mixing the influent into the bulk flow effectively in the front end of the lagoon and that there was no evidence of any substantive short-circuiting path of concentrated tracer around to the outlet. The tracer distribution profiles gave direct insight as to how the tracer was being transported within the pond and should be used more often when conducting tracer studies. Comparison with the literature indicated that the lagoon's hydraulic efficiency was on par with a baffled pond system and it would be expected that addition of several baffles to the lagoon would provide minimal further improvement. PMID:22277219

  11. Municipal sludge characteristic changes under different aerating condition in a deep-shaft aeration system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jiaqing; Wang, Xiaochang C; Shu, Wei; He, Teng; Liu, Yanzheng

    2016-01-01

    A pilot-scale municipal sewage sludge deep-shaft aeration system was implemented in Lanzhou, Gansu Province of China. The reactor depth was 60 m with a diameter of 1.0 m and the sludge to be treated came from a wastewater plant in Lanzhou. In order to obtain the optimum operation conditions, analysis was conducted on the transformations of the volatile suspended solids (VSS), temperature, pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and pathogens in the deep-shaft reactor under different aeration conditions. Attention was paid to how operating conditions affected the removal efficiency of the VSS and the reaction temperature. As a result, higher volatile solids removal was gained at higher temperature, and the temperature could reach 50.8°C for a complete inactivation of bacteria in the first reaction zone when the deep-shaft aeration system was run for about 18 days. The sludge aeration rate was observed as 1.5 to 1.8 L/(h·L sludge) which enabled the volatile solids removal rate to reach 40.1%. The degradation of VSS occurred under a micro-oxygen environment, and the lowest ORP was found to be -256 mV in the digestive process. Not only aerobic bacteria but also anaerobic and facultative bacteria performed their functions in the reactor.

  12. Municipal sludge characteristic changes under different aerating condition in a deep-shaft aeration system.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jiaqing; Wang, Xiaochang C; Shu, Wei; He, Teng; Liu, Yanzheng

    2016-01-01

    A pilot-scale municipal sewage sludge deep-shaft aeration system was implemented in Lanzhou, Gansu Province of China. The reactor depth was 60 m with a diameter of 1.0 m and the sludge to be treated came from a wastewater plant in Lanzhou. In order to obtain the optimum operation conditions, analysis was conducted on the transformations of the volatile suspended solids (VSS), temperature, pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and pathogens in the deep-shaft reactor under different aeration conditions. Attention was paid to how operating conditions affected the removal efficiency of the VSS and the reaction temperature. As a result, higher volatile solids removal was gained at higher temperature, and the temperature could reach 50.8°C for a complete inactivation of bacteria in the first reaction zone when the deep-shaft aeration system was run for about 18 days. The sludge aeration rate was observed as 1.5 to 1.8 L/(h·L sludge) which enabled the volatile solids removal rate to reach 40.1%. The degradation of VSS occurred under a micro-oxygen environment, and the lowest ORP was found to be -256 mV in the digestive process. Not only aerobic bacteria but also anaerobic and facultative bacteria performed their functions in the reactor. PMID:27054720

  13. Aeration control of thermophilic aerobic digestion using fluorescence monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kee; Oh, Byung-Keun

    2009-01-01

    The thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) process is recognized as an effective method for rapid waste activated sludge (WAS) degradation and the deactivation of pathogenic microorganisms. Yet, high energy costs due to heating and aeration have limited the commercialization of economical TAD processes. Previous research on autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) has already reduced the heating cost. However, only a few studies have focused on reducing the aeration cost. Therefore, this study applied a two-step aeration control strategy to a fill-and-draw mode semicontinuous TAD process. The NADH-dependent fluorescence was monitored throughout the TAD experiment, and the aeration rate shifted according to the fluorescence intensity. As a result, the simple two-step aeration control operation achieved a 20.3% reduction in the total aeration, while maintaining an effective and stable operation. It is also expected that more savings can be achieved with a further reduction of the lower aeration rate or multisegmentation of the aeration rate. PMID:19190414

  14. Enhancement of ultrasonic disintegration of sewage sludge by aeration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming; Cheng, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Sonication is an effective way for sludge disintegration, which can significantly improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion to reduce and recycle use of sludge. But high energy consumption limits the wide application of sonication. In order to improve ultrasonic sludge disintegration efficiency and reduce energy consumption, aeration was introduced. Results showed that sludge disintegration efficiency was improved significantly by combining aeration with ultrasound. The aeration flow rate, gas bubble size, ultrasonic density and aeration timing had impacts on sludge disintegration efficiency. Aeration that used in later stage of ultrasonic irradiation with low aeration flow rate, small gas bubbles significantly improved ultrasonic disintegration sludge efficiency. At the optimal conditions of 0.4 W/mL ultrasonic irradiation density, 30 mL/min of aeration flow rate, 5 min of aeration in later stage and small gas bubbles, ultrasonic sludge disintegration efficiency was increased by 45% and one third of ultrasonic energy was saved. This approach will greatly benefit the application of ultrasonic sludge disintegration and strongly promote the treatment and recycle of wastewater sludge. PMID:27090707

  15. OXIDATION OF AS(III) BY AERATION AND STORAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study of the effects of aeration and storage on the oxidation of arsenic(III) was undertaken at three utilities in the US to establish the engineering significance of aeration as a potential pre-treatment method for arsenic removal. The results of this study clearly establish t...

  16. Enhancement of ultrasonic disintegration of sewage sludge by aeration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming; Cheng, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Sonication is an effective way for sludge disintegration, which can significantly improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion to reduce and recycle use of sludge. But high energy consumption limits the wide application of sonication. In order to improve ultrasonic sludge disintegration efficiency and reduce energy consumption, aeration was introduced. Results showed that sludge disintegration efficiency was improved significantly by combining aeration with ultrasound. The aeration flow rate, gas bubble size, ultrasonic density and aeration timing had impacts on sludge disintegration efficiency. Aeration that used in later stage of ultrasonic irradiation with low aeration flow rate, small gas bubbles significantly improved ultrasonic disintegration sludge efficiency. At the optimal conditions of 0.4 W/mL ultrasonic irradiation density, 30 mL/min of aeration flow rate, 5 min of aeration in later stage and small gas bubbles, ultrasonic sludge disintegration efficiency was increased by 45% and one third of ultrasonic energy was saved. This approach will greatly benefit the application of ultrasonic sludge disintegration and strongly promote the treatment and recycle of wastewater sludge.

  17. FOULING OF FINE PORE DIFFUSED AERATORS: AN INTER- PLANT COMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been increasing interest in fine pore aeration systems, along with concerned about diffuser fouling and the subsequent loss of aeration efficiency. The objective of this study was to assess the relative fouling tendency of fine bubble diffusers t nine activated sludge ...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... sterilization. The device may include a heater to warm the circulating air. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... required to remove residual ethylene oxide (ETO) from wrapped medical devices that have undergone...

  20. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... required to remove residual ethylene oxide (ETO) from wrapped medical devices that have undergone...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6100 Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. (a) Identification. An ethyene oxide gas... required to remove residual ethylene oxide (ETO) from wrapped medical devices that have undergone...

  2. Recirculation-aeration: Bibliography for aquaculture. Bibliographies and literature of agriculture (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Perschbacher, P.W.; Powell, R.V.; Freeman, D.W.; Lorio, W.J.; Hanfman, D.T.

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography includes literature citations through 1992 related to water recirculation and aeration in aquaculture. The focus is on filtration, aeration, and circulation techniques in various aquaculture situations.

  3. The ars detoxification system is advantageous but not required for As(V) respiration by the genetically tractable Shewanella species strain ANA-3.

    PubMed

    Saltikov, Chad W; Cifuentes, Ana; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Newman, Dianne K

    2003-05-01

    Arsenate [As(V); HAsO(4)(2-)] respiration by bacteria is poorly understood at the molecular level largely due to a paucity of genetically tractable organisms with this metabolic capability. We report here the isolation of a new As(V)-respiring strain (ANA-3) that is phylogenetically related to members of the genus Shewanella and that also provides a useful model system with which to explore the molecular basis of As(V) respiration. This gram-negative strain stoichiometrically couples the oxidation of lactate to acetate with the reduction of As(V) to arsenite [As(III); HAsO(2)]. The generation time and lactate molar growth yield (Y(lactate)) are 2.8 h and 10.0 g of cells mol of lactate(-1), respectively, when it is grown anaerobically on lactate and As(V). ANA-3 uses a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors, including oxygen, soluble ferric iron, oxides of iron and manganese, nitrate, fumarate, the humic acid functional analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate, and thiosulfate. ANA-3 also reduces As(V) to As(III) in the presence of oxygen and resists high concentrations of As(III) (up to 10 mM) when grown under either aerobic or anaerobic conditions. ANA-3 possesses an ars operon (arsDABC) that allows it to resist high levels of As(III); this operon also confers resistance to the As-sensitive strains Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Escherichia coli AW3110. When the gene encoding the As(III) efflux pump, arsB, is inactivated in ANA-3 by a polar mutation that also eliminates the expression of arsC, which encodes an As(V) reductase, the resulting As(III)-sensitive strain still respires As(V); however, the generation time and the Y(lactate) value are two- and threefold lower, respectively, than those of the wild type. These results suggest that ArsB and ArsC may be useful for As(V)-respiring bacteria in environments where As concentrations are high, but that neither is required for respiration.

  4. Enhanced biotransformation of nitrobenzene by the synergies of Shewanella species and mediator-functionalized polyurethane foam.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Hong; Zhou, Yan; Song, Yang; Liu, Guangfei; Feng, Yujie

    2013-05-15

    The performance and mechanism of anaerobic treatment of nitrobenzene using the combination of Shewanella species and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate-modified polyurethane foam (Shewanella/AQS-PUF) were investigated. The results showed that Shewanella/AQS-PUF significantly accelerated nitrobenzene bio-reduction (95.6%) and aniline formation (94.3%) with nitrobenzene removal rate up to 0.13 mM h(-1). Moreover, there were synergistic effects between Shewanella species and AQS-PUF on promoting nitrobenzene biotransformation with 5-fold increase in first-order rate constant compared to that without AQS-PUF. During this process, AQS-PUF could induce Shewanella species to secrete more flavins (0.335 μM) as redox mediator for nitrobenzene bio-reduction. Meanwhile, it was also found that the bound EPS of Shewanella species could act as biocatalyst for nitrobenzene reduction and the addition of flavins enhanced its catalytic activity. This indicated that the EPS of Shewanella species was not only involved in direct bio-reduction of nitrobenzene, but also interacted with secreted flavins to mediate nitrobenzene bio-reduction.

  5. Shewanella gelidii sp. nov., isolated from the red algae Gelidium amansii, and emended description of Shewanella waksmanii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chen, Hongli; Liu, Zhenhua; Ming, Hong; Zhou, Chenyan; Zhu, Xinshu; Zhang, Peng; Jing, Changqin; Feng, Huigen

    2016-08-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, straight or slightly curved rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, facultatively anaerobic bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated RZB5-4T, was isolated from a sample of the red algae Gelidium amansii collected from the coastal region of Rizhao, PR China (119.625° E 35.517° N). The organism grew optimally between 24 and 28 °C, at pH 7.0 and in the presence of 2-3 % (w/v) NaCl. The strain required seawater or artificial seawater for growth, and NaCl alone did not support growth. Strain RZB5-4T contained C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0 as the dominant fatty acids. The respiratory quinones detected in strain RZB5-4T were ubiquinone 7, ubiquinone 8, menaquinone 7 and methylmenaquinone 7. The polar lipids of strain RZB5-4T comprised phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, one unidentified glycolipid, one unidentified phospholipid and one unknown lipid. The DNA G+C content of strain RZB5-4T was 47 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and gyrase B (gyrB) gene sequences showed that strain RZB5-4T belonged to the genus Shewanella, clustering with Shewanella waksmanii ATCC BAA-643T. Strain RZB5-4T exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity value (96.6 %) and the highest gyrB gene sequence similarity value (80.7 %), respectively, to S. waksmanii ATCC BAA-643T. On the basis of polyphasic analyses, strain RZB5-4T represents a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella gelidii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is RZB5-4T (=JCM 30804T=KCTC 42663T=MCCC 1K00697T). PMID:27064664

  6. Investigation of the Electron Transport Chain to and the Catalytic Activity of the Diheme Cytochrome c Peroxidase CcpA of Shewanella oneidensis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Björn; Seidel, Julian; Sturm, Gunnar; Einsle, Oliver; Gescher, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial diheme c-type cytochrome peroxidases (BCCPs) catalyze the periplasmic reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water. The gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis produces the peroxidase CcpA under a number of anaerobic conditions, including dissimilatory iron-reducing conditions. We wanted to understand the function of this protein in the organism and its putative connection to the electron transport chain to ferric iron. CcpA was isolated and tested for peroxidase activity, and its structural conformation was analyzed by X-ray crystallography. CcpA exhibited in vitro peroxidase activity and had a structure typical of diheme peroxidases. It was produced in almost equal amounts under anaerobic and microaerophilic conditions. With 50 mM ferric citrate and 50 μM oxygen in the growth medium, CcpA expression results in a strong selective advantage for the cell, which was detected in competitive growth experiments with wild-type and ΔccpA mutant cells that lack the entire ccpA gene due to a markerless deletion. We were unable to reduce CcpA directly with CymA, MtrA, or FccA, which are known key players in the chain of electron transport to ferric iron and fumarate but identified the small monoheme ScyA as a mediator of electron transport between CymA and BCCP. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed description of a complete chain of electron transport to a periplasmic c-type cytochrome peroxidase. This study furthermore reports the possibility of establishing a specific electron transport chain using c-type cytochromes. PMID:21742904

  7. Decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Azeem; Arshad, Muhammad; Crowley, David E

    2008-07-01

    Wastewaters from textile processing and dye-stuff manufacture industries contain substantial amounts of salts in addition to azo dye residues. To examine salinity effects on dye-degrading bacteria, a study was carried out with four azo dyes in the presence of varying concentrations of NaCl (0-100 g l(-1)) with a previously isolated bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens strain AS96. Under static, low oxygen conditions, the bacterium decolorized 100 mg dye l(-1) at salt concentrations up to 60 g NaCl l(-1). There was an inverse relationship between the velocity of the decolorization reaction and salt concentration over the range between 5 and 60 g NaCl l(-1) and at dye concentrations between 100 and 500 mg l(-1). The addition of either glucose (C source) or NH(4)NO(3) (N source) to the medium strongly inhibited the decolorization process, while yeast extract (4 g l(-1)) and Ca(H(2)PO(4))(2).H(2)O (1 g l(-1)) both enhanced decolorization rates. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated the presence of 1-amino-2-naphthol, sulfanilic acid and nitroaniline as the major metabolic products of the azo dyes, which could be further degraded by a shift to aerobic conditions. These findings show that Shewanella could be effective for the treatment of dye-containing industrial effluents containing high concentrations of salt.

  8. Genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization pathways in the Shewanella genus

    SciTech Connect

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Yang, Chen; Li, Xiaoqing; Rodionova, Irina A.; Wang, Yanbing; Obraztsova, Anna; Zagnitko, Olga P.; Overbeek, Ross; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Samantha B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Osterman, Andrei L.

    2010-09-13

    To address a practically and fundamentally important challenge of reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization machinery in any microorganism directly from its genomic sequence, we have established a subsystems-based comparative approach and applied it to 19 genomes from the Shewanella genus. The key stages of our approach include: (i) a homology-based identification of gene candidates using a genomic compilation of ~500 known components of sugar catabolic pathways; (ii) functional assignment of orthologs and prediction of alternative genes and pathway variants based on genomic (operons, regulons) and functional (subsystems, pathways) context analysis; (iii) validation of bioinformatic predictions by a combination of biochemical, genetic and physiological experiments. The obtained genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization includes ~170 protein families (mostly metabolic enzymes, transporters and transcriptional regulators) spanning 17 distinct pathways with a mosaic distribution across Shewanella species providing insights into their ecophysiology and adaptive evolution. The reconstructed catabolic pathways are significantly enriched by nonorthologous gene replacements and alternative biochemical routes. Phenotypic assays revealed a remarkable consistency between predicted and observed phenotype, an ability to utilize an individual sugar as a sole source of carbon and energy, over the entire matrix of tested strains and sugars. In addition to improving our knowledge of genomics, functional organization and evolution of the sugar catabolome, this study confirmed the efficiency of the established approach, which is scalable and applicable to other groups of microorganisms.

  9. Effect of aeration rate on composting of penicillin mycelial dreg.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Shihua; Wen, Qinxue; Zheng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Pilot scale experiments with forced aeration were conducted to estimate effects of aeration rates on the performance of composting penicillin mycelial dreg using sewage sludge as inoculation. Three aeration rates of 0.15, 0.50 and 0.90L/(min·kg) organic matter (OM) were examined. The principal physicochemical parameters were monitored during the 32day composting period. Results showed that the higher aeration rate of 0.90L/(min·kg) did not corresponded to a longer thermophilic duration and higher rates of OM degradation; but the lower aeration rate of 0.15L/(min·kg) did induce an accumulation of NH4(+)-N contents due to the inhibition of nitrification. On the other hand, aeration rate has little effect on degradation of penicillin. The results show that the longest phase of thermophilic temperatures≥55°C, the maximum NO3(-)-N content and seed germination, and the minimum C/N ratio were obtained with 0.50L/(min·kg) OM. Therefore, aeration rates of 0.50L/(min·kg) OM can be recommended for composting penicillin mycelial dreg.

  10. Effect of aeration rate on composting of penicillin mycelial dreg.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Shihua; Wen, Qinxue; Zheng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Pilot scale experiments with forced aeration were conducted to estimate effects of aeration rates on the performance of composting penicillin mycelial dreg using sewage sludge as inoculation. Three aeration rates of 0.15, 0.50 and 0.90L/(min·kg) organic matter (OM) were examined. The principal physicochemical parameters were monitored during the 32day composting period. Results showed that the higher aeration rate of 0.90L/(min·kg) did not corresponded to a longer thermophilic duration and higher rates of OM degradation; but the lower aeration rate of 0.15L/(min·kg) did induce an accumulation of NH4(+)-N contents due to the inhibition of nitrification. On the other hand, aeration rate has little effect on degradation of penicillin. The results show that the longest phase of thermophilic temperatures≥55°C, the maximum NO3(-)-N content and seed germination, and the minimum C/N ratio were obtained with 0.50L/(min·kg) OM. Therefore, aeration rates of 0.50L/(min·kg) OM can be recommended for composting penicillin mycelial dreg. PMID:26574101

  11. SHEWANELLA AND PHOTOBACTERIUM IN OYSTERS AND SEAWATER FROM THE DELAWARE BAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella algae, S. putrefaciens, and Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae are indigenous marine bacteria and human pathogens causing cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, abscesses, septicemia, and death. Infections are rare and are most often associated with the immunocompromized host. A study ...

  12. Anaerobic Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens: Analysis of the electron transport chain

    SciTech Connect

    Daad Saffarini

    2004-01-20

    The goals of the project were to isolate mutants that are deficient in metal reduction, identify components of the electron transport chain that are involved in this process, and purify some of these proteins for biochemical analyses. In the 3-year period since the start of the project, we have accomplished many of these goals. We have isolated several new S. oneidensis mutants that are deficient in metal reduction, and have initiated the development of vectors for the overexpression of cytochromes and other proteins in S. oneidensis. We have also overexpressed CymA, one of the c cytochromes that are involved in metal reduction.

  13. INVESTIGATIONS INTO BIOFOULING PHENOMENA IN FINE PORE AERATION DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbiologically-based procedures were used to describe biofouling phenomena on fine pore aeration devices and to determine whether biofilm characteristics could be related to diffuser process performance parameters. Fine pore diffusers were obtained from five municipal wastewa...

  14. Molecular characterization of Shewanella and Aeromonas isolates associated with spoilage of Common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Beaz-Hidalgo, Roxana; Agüeria, Daniela; Latif-Eugenín, Fadua; Yeannes, Maria I; Figueras, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Storage in ice is a common way of preserving commercial fish species but some microorganisms can still contaminate and participate in the spoilage of the product; therefore, identification of potential harmful microbes is important. Thirteen colonies were isolated from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) that had been stored in ice, whose phenotypic identification revealed that they belonged to the genera Aeromonas (n = 5) and Shewanella (n = 8). Molecular genotyping with ERIC-PCR showed clonality only among two of the five Aeromonas isolates and for two groups (n = 3; n = 2) of the eight Shewanella isolates. Sequencing the rpoD gene showed that four Aeromonas isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas salmonicida and one to A. sobria. Of the eight Shewanella, seven isolates cluster with Shewanella putrefaciens and one with Shewanella profunda in the 16S rRNA phylogenetic tree. However, analysis of the gyrB gene showed that these eight isolates could constitute a new species closely related to S. baltica. The Shewanella and A. salmonicida isolates produce off-odours and reduce trimethylamine oxide, indicating that they might contribute to the spoilage of the fish. PMID:25790506

  15. Molecular characterization of Shewanella and Aeromonas isolates associated with spoilage of Common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Beaz-Hidalgo, Roxana; Agüeria, Daniela; Latif-Eugenín, Fadua; Yeannes, Maria I; Figueras, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Storage in ice is a common way of preserving commercial fish species but some microorganisms can still contaminate and participate in the spoilage of the product; therefore, identification of potential harmful microbes is important. Thirteen colonies were isolated from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) that had been stored in ice, whose phenotypic identification revealed that they belonged to the genera Aeromonas (n = 5) and Shewanella (n = 8). Molecular genotyping with ERIC-PCR showed clonality only among two of the five Aeromonas isolates and for two groups (n = 3; n = 2) of the eight Shewanella isolates. Sequencing the rpoD gene showed that four Aeromonas isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas salmonicida and one to A. sobria. Of the eight Shewanella, seven isolates cluster with Shewanella putrefaciens and one with Shewanella profunda in the 16S rRNA phylogenetic tree. However, analysis of the gyrB gene showed that these eight isolates could constitute a new species closely related to S. baltica. The Shewanella and A. salmonicida isolates produce off-odours and reduce trimethylamine oxide, indicating that they might contribute to the spoilage of the fish.

  16. [Anaerobic humus respiration by Shewanella cinica D14T].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-cheng; Hong, Yi-guo; Luo, Wei; Chen, Xing-juan; Sun, Guo-ping; Xu, Mei-ying; Guo, Jun; Cen, Ying-hua

    2006-12-01

    Experimental results suggested Shewanella cinica D14T is capable of humus respiration utilizing various organic acids and some important environmental pollutants (e.g., toluene. etc) as electron donors and AQS or AQDS as a sole terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic condition. The dissimilatory reduction of 1mmol/L AQDS can couple to the production of enough ATP to support cell growth about 60 generations; The oxidization of electron donors was coupled to the reduction of humus, as reduced humus increased corresponding with increasing of electron donor; The typical inhibitors such as Cu2+ which inhibited Fe-S center, Stigmatellin which was methyl-naphthoquinone model, Dicumarol which inhibited oxidized methyl-naphthoquinone transform to reduced one, Metyrapone which was specific inhibitor for P450 enzyme blocked the humus respiration seriously. These were powerful evidences for humus-respiration by D14.

  17. Thermal stability of cytochrome c' from mesophilic Shewanella amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yuki; Fujii, Sotaro; Kuribayashi, Taka-aki; Masanari, Misa; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome c' (SACP) from mesophilic Shewanella amazonensis, growing optimally at 37 °C, was thermally more stable than cytochrome c' (AVCP) from mesophilic Allochromatium vinosum, growing optimally at 25 °C. In contrast, SACP was less stable than cytochrome c' (PHCP) from thermophilic Hydrogenophilus thermoluteolus, growing optimally at 52 °C. Although only 28% of the SACP amino acid sequence was identical to those of AVCP and PHCP, the latter two being 55% identical, the overall main chain structures of the three cytochromes c' were similar, and SACP exhibited thermal stability intermediate between those of AVCP and PHCP. For these three proteins, the higher the stability is, the lesser the number of Gly residues in the putative α-helical regions is. Cytochromes c' including the present three are suitable for examining the protein stabilization mechanisms, because they are structurally similar and available from environments with a wide range of temperatures.

  18. [Improvement of River Water Quality by Aeration: WASP Model Study].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-bo; Wang, Hong-xiu; Liu, Cui; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Shuang

    2015-04-01

    Aeration is one of the main technical methods to remediate polluted rivers, and mathematical models are the main ways to predict and assess the environmental pollution. WASP model was used to study the effect of aeration on improving the water quality of a small river over a time span. The preliminary results showed that the simulation values were consistent with practical monitoring data, which could be useful for the management and control of polluted water. Furthermore, simulations under different aeration conditions suggested that aeration technology could significantly lower the levels of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia-nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) of river water, thus improving the water quality. With the improvement of dissolved oxygen (DO), the water quality could be further improved. However, the increase in the removal rate of pollutants would slow down. Also, there were remarkable differences among various months throughout the whole year, and aeration from May to September had better results. Considering economic costs and environmental benefits, river aeration with a 4 mg x L(1) DO standard in summer was determined as the best condition.

  19. Generating CO(2)-credits through landfill in situ aeration.

    PubMed

    Ritzkowski, M; Stegmann, R

    2010-04-01

    Landfills are some of the major anthropogenic sources of methane emissions worldwide. The installation and operation of gas extraction systems for many landfills in Europe and the US, often including technical installations for energy recovery, significantly reduced these emissions during the last decades. Residual landfill gas, however, is still continuously produced after the energy recovery became economically unattractive, thus resulting in ongoing methane emissions for many years. By landfill in situ aeration these methane emissions can be widely avoided both, during the aeration process as well as in the subsequent aftercare period. Based on model calculations and online monitoring data the amount of avoided CO(2-eq). can be determined. For an in situ aerated landfill in northern Germany, acting as a case study, 83-95% (depending on the kind and quality of top cover) of the greenhouse gas emission potential could be reduced under strictly controlled conditions. Recently the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has approved a new methodology on the "Avoidance of landfill gas emissions by in situ aeration of landfills" (UNFCCC, 2009). Based on this methodology landfill aeration projects might be considered for generation of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) in the course of CDM projects. This paper contributes towards an evaluation of the potential of landfill aeration for methane emissions reduction.

  20. Enhancement of Nitrogen Removal in an Intermittent Aeration Membrane Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaojuan; Wisniewski, Christelle; Li, Xudong; Zhou, Qi

    2010-11-01

    An intermittent aerated membrane bioreactor was applied in laboratory scale to treat synthetic household wastewater. The system organic load and nitrogen load were 0.34 kgCODṡm-3ṡd-1 and 0.06 kgTNṡm-3ṡd-1, respectively. The hydraulic residence time was equal to 12 h and very long sludge residence times were imposed. Intermittent aeration, with anoxic-aerobic cycle of 30/60 minutes, was employed in the system. The results showed that 100% SS and >90% COD could be removed. The average removal efficiency of NH4-N and TN was 99.7% and 80%, respectively. A linear relationship between the fouling rate and the MLSS, MLVSS concentration was founded. The denitrification seemed to be the rate-limiting step for nitrogen removal. To enhance denitrification, the following strategies could be considered: 1) to select suitable aeration/non-aeration cycle, 2) to control the aeration intensity, 3) to feed the system at the beginning of non-aeration period, 4) to maintain high MLSS concentration.

  1. Shewanella marisflavi sp. nov. and Shewanella aquimarina sp. nov., slightly halophilic organisms isolated from sea water of the Yellow Sea in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Kim, In-Gi; Oh, Tae-Kwang

    2004-11-01

    Two Gram-negative, motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped organisms, strains SW-117(T) and SW-120(T), were isolated from sea water of the Yellow Sea in Korea and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strains SW-117(T) and SW-120(T) simultaneously contained both menaquinones (MK) and ubiquinones (Q) as isoprenoid quinones; the predominant menaquinone was MK-7 and the predominant ubiquinones were Q-7 and Q-8. The major fatty acid detected in the two strains was iso-C(15 : 0). The DNA G+C content of strains SW-117(T) and SW-120(T) was 51 and 54 mol%, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strains SW-117(T) and SW-120(T) fall within the radiation of the cluster comprising Shewanella species. Strains SW-117(T) and SW-120(T) showed a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.4 % and a DNA-DNA relatedness level of 10.1 %. Strains SW-117(T) and SW-120(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity levels of 93.8-98.5 % and 92.4-97.0 %, respectively, to Shewanella species. Strain SW-117(T) exhibited DNA-DNA relatedness levels of 8.3-20.3 % to the type strains of six phylogenetically related Shewanella species. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and genetic data, strains SW-117(T) and SW-120(T) were classified in the genus Shewanella as two distinct novel species, for which the names Shewanella marisflavi sp. nov. (type strain, SW-117(T)=KCCM 41822(T)=JCM 12192(T)) and Shewanella aquimarina sp. nov. (type strain, SW-120(T)=KCCM 41821(T)=JCM 12193(T)) are proposed, respectively.

  2. A new step aeration approach towards the improvement of nitrogen removal in a full scale Carrousel oxidation ditch.

    PubMed

    Jin, Pengkang; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Xiaochang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Jin, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Two aeration modes, step aeration and point aeration, were used in a full-scale Carrousel oxidation ditch with microporous aeration. The nitrogen removal performance and mechanism were analyzed. With the same total aeration input, both aeration modes demonstrated good nitrification outcomes with the average efficiency in removing NH4(+)-N of more than 98%. However, the average removal efficiencies for total nitrogen were 89.3% and 77.6% under step aeration and point aeration, respectively. The results indicated that an extended aerobic zone followed the aeration zones could affect the proportion of anoxic and oxic zones. The step aeration with larger anoxic zones indicated better TN removal efficiency. More importantly, step aeration provided the suitable environment for both nitrifiers and denitrifiers. The diversity and relative abundance of denitrifying bacteria under the step aeration (1.55%) was higher than that under the point aeration (1.12%), which resulted in an overall higher TN removal efficiency.

  3. Characterization of Odorant Compounds from Mechanical Aerated Pile Composting and Static Aerated Pile Composting.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Priyanka; Lee, Joonhee; Choi, Hong-Lim

    2016-04-01

    We studied airborne contaminants (airborne particulates and odorous compounds) emitted from compost facilities in South Korea. There are primarily two different types of composting systems operating in Korean farms, namely mechanical aerated pile composting (MAPC) and aerated static pile composting (SAPC). In this study, we analyzed various particulate matters (PM10, PM7, PM2.5, PM1, and total suspended particles), volatile organic compounds and ammonia, and correlated these airborne contaminants with microclimatic parameters, i.e., temperature and relative humidity. Most of the analyzed airborne particulates (PM7, PM2.5, and PM1) were detected in high concentration at SAPC facilities compered to MAPC; however these differences were statistically non-significant. Similarly, most of the odorants did not vary significantly between MAPC and SAPC facilities, except for dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and skatole. DMS concentrations were significantly higher in MAPC facilities, whereas skatole concentrations were significantly higher in SAPC facilities. The microclimate variables also did not vary significantly between MAPC and SAPC facilities, and did not correlate significantly with most of the airborne particles and odorous compounds, suggesting that microclimate variables did not influence their emission from compost facilities. These findings provide insight into the airborne contaminants that are emitted from compost facilities and the two different types of composting agitation systems. PMID:26949962

  4. Characterization of Odorant Compounds from Mechanical Aerated Pile Composting and Static Aerated Pile Composting

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Priyanka; Lee, Joonhee; Choi, Hong-Lim

    2016-01-01

    We studied airborne contaminants (airborne particulates and odorous compounds) emitted from compost facilities in South Korea. There are primarily two different types of composting systems operating in Korean farms, namely mechanical aerated pile composting (MAPC) and aerated static pile composting (SAPC). In this study, we analyzed various particulate matters (PM10, PM7, PM2.5, PM1, and total suspended particles), volatile organic compounds and ammonia, and correlated these airborne contaminants with microclimatic parameters, i.e., temperature and relative humidity. Most of the analyzed airborne particulates (PM7, PM2.5, and PM1) were detected in high concentration at SAPC facilities compered to MAPC; however these differences were statistically non-significant. Similarly, most of the odorants did not vary significantly between MAPC and SAPC facilities, except for dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and skatole. DMS concentrations were significantly higher in MAPC facilities, whereas skatole concentrations were significantly higher in SAPC facilities. The microclimate variables also did not vary significantly between MAPC and SAPC facilities, and did not correlate significantly with most of the airborne particles and odorous compounds, suggesting that microclimate variables did not influence their emission from compost facilities. These findings provide insight into the airborne contaminants that are emitted from compost facilities and the two different types of composting agitation systems. PMID:26949962

  5. [Research of controlling condition for aeration stabilization pond dealing with sanitary waste of countryside].

    PubMed

    Li, Huai-Zheng; Yao, Shu-Jun; Xu, Zu-Xin; Chen, Wei-Bing

    2012-10-01

    According to research of some problems, such as the hydraulic detention time that aeration stabilization pond deals with sanitary waste of countryside, dissolved oxygen in pond during the process of aeration, the concentration distribution of sludge and different aeration periods affecting on the treatment efficiency, we can acquire good treatment efficiency and energy consumption of economy. The results indicate that under the aeration stabilization pond of this experiment, 4 d is the best hydraulic detention time with this aeration stabilization pond. Time of the discontinuous running aeration should be greater than 15 min. The concentration distribution of sludge can reach equilibrium at each point of aeration stabilization pond between 2 min and 10 min. The best aeration period of dislodging the pollutant is 0.5 h aeration/1.0 h cut-off.

  6. Seasonal variations and aeration effects on water quality improvements and physiological responses of Nymphaea tetragona Georgi.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Huang, Min-Sheng; Dai, Ling-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal variations and aeration effects on water quality improvements and the physiological responses of Nymphaea tetragona Georgi were investigated with mesocosm experiments. Plants were hydroponically cultivated in six purifying tanks (aerated, non-aerated) and the characteristics of the plants were measured. Water quality improvements in purifying tanks were evaluated by comparing to the control tanks. The results showed that continuous aeration affected the plant morphology and physiology. The lengths of the roots, petioles and leaf limbs in aeration conditions were shorter than in non-aeration conditions. Chlorophyll and soluble protein contents of the leaf limbs in aerated tanks decreased, while peroxidase and catalase activities of roots tissues increased. In spring and summer, effects of aeration on the plants were less than in autumn. Total nitrogen (TN) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) in aerated tanks were lower than in non-aerated tanks, while total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved phosphorus (DP) increased in spring and summer. In autumn, effects of aeration on the plants became more significant. TN, NH4(+)-N, TP and DP became higher in aerated tanks than in non-aerated tanks in autumn. This work provided evidences for regulating aeration techniques based on seasonal variations of the plant physiology in restoring polluted stagnant water.

  7. Seasonal variations and aeration effects on water quality improvements and physiological responses of Nymphaea tetragona Georgi.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Peng-Zhen; Huang, Min-Sheng; Dai, Ling-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal variations and aeration effects on water quality improvements and the physiological responses of Nymphaea tetragona Georgi were investigated with mesocosm experiments. Plants were hydroponically cultivated in six purifying tanks (aerated, non-aerated) and the characteristics of the plants were measured. Water quality improvements in purifying tanks were evaluated by comparing to the control tanks. The results showed that continuous aeration affected the plant morphology and physiology. The lengths of the roots, petioles and leaf limbs in aeration conditions were shorter than in non-aeration conditions. Chlorophyll and soluble protein contents of the leaf limbs in aerated tanks decreased, while peroxidase and catalase activities of roots tissues increased. In spring and summer, effects of aeration on the plants were less than in autumn. Total nitrogen (TN) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) in aerated tanks were lower than in non-aerated tanks, while total phosphorus (TP) and dissolved phosphorus (DP) increased in spring and summer. In autumn, effects of aeration on the plants became more significant. TN, NH4(+)-N, TP and DP became higher in aerated tanks than in non-aerated tanks in autumn. This work provided evidences for regulating aeration techniques based on seasonal variations of the plant physiology in restoring polluted stagnant water. PMID:23819294

  8. Skin and Soft Tissue Infections due to Shewanella algae – An Emerging Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Meera; Vinod, Vivek; Dinesh, R. Kavitha

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Shewanella spp. are emerging human pathogens, the predominant species being Shewanella algae. Shewanella skin and soft tissue infections are more commonly seen in immunocompromised patients with a pre-existing cutaneous ulcer and most often associated with exposure to marine environments. Aim: The study was conducted to investigate the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Shewanella skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) for a period of five years. Materials and Methods: All Gram-negative non-fermenting motile isolates which produced pigmented colonies and positive for oxidase and H2S were further identified with Vitek 2 system. Results: A total of 16 patients with SSTIs due to Shewanella species were identified during the period from 2010 to 2014. Majority of patients were urban, elderly and fisher men. Shewanella algae (n=12, 75%) was the predominant isolate. Skin or mucosal portal of entry was found in all patients and seawater contact was recorded in 56.25% of the patients. 81% of infections were polymicrobial, common concomitant pathogens being gut and marine flora. Peripheral vascular diseases were the predominant risk factors with comorbidities like diabetes, hypertension and hepatobiliary diseases. Third generation cephalosporins, meropenem and gentamicin were the most effective antibiotics while two of the isolates were multidrug resistant. 75% of the infected patients recovered completely and three patients died of complications. Conclusion: Shewanella algae should be considered as an emerging pathogen of SSTIs mainly in patients with chronic ulcers and at times be multidrug resistant. These infections have a good clinical outcome if prompt medical, surgical and supportive treatment is offered. PMID:25859455

  9. Differentiation of Shewanella putrefaciens and Shewanella alga on the basis of whole-cell protein profiles, ribotyping, phenotypic characterization, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, B F; Jørgensen, K; Christensen, H; Olsen, J E; Gram, L

    1997-01-01

    Seventy-six presumed Shewanella putrefaciens isolates from fish, oil drillings, and clinical specimens, the type strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (ATCC 8071), the type strain of Shewanella alga (IAM 14159), and the type strain of Shewanella hanedai (ATCC 33224) were compared by several typing methods. Numerical analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole-cell protein and ribotyping patterns showed that the strains were separated into two distinct clusters with 56% +/- 10% and 40% +/- 14% similarity for whole-cell protein profiling and ribotyping, respectively. One cluster consisted of 26 isolates with 52 to 55 mol% G + C and included 15 human isolates, mostly clinical specimens, 8 isolates from marine waters, and the type strain of S. alga. This homogeneous cluster of mesophilic, halotolerant strains was by all analyses identical to the recently defined species S. alga (U. Simidu et al., Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol, 40:331-336, 1990). Fifty-two typically psychrotolerant strains formed the other, more heterogeneous major cluster, with 43 to 47 mol% G + C. The type strain of S. putrefaciens was included in this group. The two groups were confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. It is concluded that the isolates must be considered two different species, S. alga and S. putrefaciens, and that most mesophilic isolates formerly identified as S. putrefaciens belong to S. alga. The ecological role and potential pathogenicity of S. alga can be evaluated only if the organism is correctly identified. PMID:9172338

  10. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations.

  11. Cardiopulmonary changes with aeration of the newborn lung.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Stuart Brian; Polglase, Graeme Roger; Roehr, Charles Christoph

    2015-06-01

    The newborn's transition from fetal to neonatal life includes aeration of the lungs, establishment of pulmonary gas exchange and changing the fetal circulation into the adult phenotype. This review summarizes the latest research findings, which show that lung aeration, airway liquid clearance and cardiovascular changes are directly interconnected at birth. The mechanisms of airway liquid clearance at birth are reviewed and the particular importance of the transpulmonary pressure gradient during lung aeration is discussed. Further, we summarize research findings which prove that lung aeration triggers the increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) at birth, and how the increase in PBF secures the preload for left ventricular output. Consequently, we review animal experiments which suggest that delaying umbilical cord clamping until breathing commences facilitates hemodynamic stability during transition. These data are reviewed with respect to the clinical applicability: As lung aeration is the key to successful transition to newborn life, providing adequate respiratory support at birth must be the primary objective of neonatal staff attending to the newborn infant. Clinical studies are needed to demonstrate whether the obvious benefits of delaying cord clamping until breathing commences hold true in human babies.

  12. Pure and aerated water entry of a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. H.; Causon, D. M.; Qian, L.; Mingham, C. G.; Mai, T.; Greaves, D.; Raby, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation of the entry of a rigid square flat plate into pure and aerated water. Attention is focused on the measurement and calculation of the slamming loads on the plate. The experimental study was carried out in the ocean basin at Plymouth University's COAST laboratory. The present numerical approach extends a two-dimensional hydro-code to compute three-dimensional hydrodynamic impact problems. The impact loads on the structure computed by the numerical model compare well with laboratory measurements. It is revealed that the impact loading consists of distinctive features including (1) shock loading with a high pressure peak, (2) fluid expansion loading associated with very low sub-atmospheric pressure close to the saturated vapour pressure, and (3) less severe secondary reloading with super-atmospheric pressure. It is also disclosed that aeration introduced into water can effectively reduce local pressures and total forces on the flat plate. The peak impact loading on the plate can be reduced by half or even more with 1.6% aeration in water. At the same time, the lifespan of shock loading is prolonged by aeration, and the variation of impulse is less sensitive to the change of aeration than the peak loading.

  13. Shewanella mangrovi sp. nov., an acetaldehyde-degrading bacterium isolated from mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Shang, Xie-Xie; Yi, Zhi-Wei; Gu, Li; Zeng, Run-Ying

    2015-08-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain YQH10T, which was isolated from mangrove sediment collected from Zhangzhou, China during the screening of acetaldehyde-degrading bacteria. Cells of strain YQH10T were Gram-stain-negative rods and pale brown-pigmented. Growth was observed at salinities from 0 to 11% and at temperatures from 4 to 42 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain YQH10T is affiliated to the genus Shewanella, showing the highest similarity with Shewanella haliotis DW01T (95.7%) and other species of the genus Shewanella (91.4-95.6 %). The principal fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 and C17 : 1ω8c. The major respiratory quinone was Q-8. The polar lipids comprised phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The genomic DNA had a G+C content of 48.3 mol%. Strain YQH10T can completely degrade 0.02% (w/v) acetaldehyde on 2216E at 28 °C within 48 h. Based on these phenotypic and genotypic data, strain YQH10T represents a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella mangrovi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YQH10T ( = MCCC 1A00830T = JCM 30121T). PMID:25957050

  14. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  15. Shewanella mangrovi sp. nov., an acetaldehyde-degrading bacterium isolated from mangrove sediment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Shang, Xie-Xie; Yi, Zhi-Wei; Gu, Li; Zeng, Run-Ying

    2015-08-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on strain YQH10T, which was isolated from mangrove sediment collected from Zhangzhou, China during the screening of acetaldehyde-degrading bacteria. Cells of strain YQH10T were Gram-stain-negative rods and pale brown-pigmented. Growth was observed at salinities from 0 to 11% and at temperatures from 4 to 42 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain YQH10T is affiliated to the genus Shewanella, showing the highest similarity with Shewanella haliotis DW01T (95.7%) and other species of the genus Shewanella (91.4-95.6 %). The principal fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 and C17 : 1ω8c. The major respiratory quinone was Q-8. The polar lipids comprised phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The genomic DNA had a G+C content of 48.3 mol%. Strain YQH10T can completely degrade 0.02% (w/v) acetaldehyde on 2216E at 28 °C within 48 h. Based on these phenotypic and genotypic data, strain YQH10T represents a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella mangrovi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YQH10T ( = MCCC 1A00830T = JCM 30121T).

  16. Shewanella loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial mats in the Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Obraztova, Anna; Stewart, Nathan; Popa, Radu; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Nealson, Kenneth; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-08-28

    A novel marine bacterial strain, PV-4T, isolated from a microbial mat located at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean, has been characterized. This micro-organism is orange in color, Gram-negative, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic and psychrotolerant (temperature range, 0-42 C). No growth was observed with nitrate, nitrite, DMSO or thiosulfate as the electron acceptor and lactate as the electron donor. The major fatty acid detected in strain PV-4T was iso-C15 : 0. Strain PV-4T had ubiquinones consisting mainly of Q-7 and Q-8, and possessed menaquinone MK-7. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 53.8 mol% and the genome size was about 4.5 Mbp. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed PV-4T within the genus Shewanella. PV-4T exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity levels of 99.6 and 97.5 %, respectively, with respect to the type strains of Shewanella aquimarina and Shewanella marisflavi. DNA from strain PV-4T showed low mean levels of relatedness to the DNAs of S. aquimarina (50.5%) and S. marisflavi (8.5%). On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics, the bacterium was classified in the genus Shewanella within a distinct novel species, for which the name Shewanella loihica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PV-4T (=ATCC BAA-1088T=DSM 17748T).

  17. Control of a mechanical aeration process via topological sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, M.; Hassine, M.; Masmoudi, M.

    2009-06-01

    The topological sensitivity analysis method gives the variation of a criterion with respect to the creation of a small hole in the domain. In this paper, we use this method to control the mechanical aeration process in eutrophic lakes. A simplified model based on incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is used, only considering the liquid phase, which is the dominant one. The injected air is taken into account through local boundary conditions for the velocity, on the injector holes. A 3D numerical simulation of the aeration effects is proposed using a mixed finite element method. In order to generate the best motion in the fluid for aeration purposes, the optimization of the injector location is considered. The main idea is to carry out topological sensitivity analysis with respect to the insertion of an injector. Finally, a topological optimization algorithm is proposed and some numerical results, showing the efficiency of our approach, are presented.

  18. Aspects concerning the quality of aeration for environmental friendly turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunea, F.; Houde, S.; Ciocan, G. D.; Oprina, G.; Baran, G.; Pincovschi, I.

    2010-08-01

    The hydro renewable energy provides a reliable power source; it does not pollute the air or land but affects the aquatic habitat due to low dissolved oxygen (DO) level in the water discharged from turbines. Hydro-turbines intake generally withdraws water from the bottom layer of the reservoirs with low DO level. In the different methods used for improving DO downstream the hydropower plants the volume of air is considered to be the main parameter of the injection. The energetic consumption is affected, in terms of loss of turbine efficiency due to air injection. The authors propose a study to show the importance of the quality of air injection, meaning bubble size, pressure loss on the aeration device etc. Different types of fine bubble aeration systems have been tested and compared. The capacity to predict the aeration by numerical simulation is analysed.

  19. Aeration for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailong; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2005-06-01

    This paper investigates the tidal effects on aeration conditions for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh. We extend the work of Ursino et al. (2004) by using a two-phase model for air and water flows in the marsh. Simulations have been conducted to examine directly the link between the airflow dynamics and the aeration condition in the marsh soil. The results show that the effects of entrapped air on water movement in the vadose zone are significant in certain circumstances. Single-phase models based on Richards' equation, which neglect such effects, may not be adequate for quantifying the aeration condition in tidal marsh. The optimal aeration condition, represented by the maximum of the integral magnitude of tidally advected air mass (TAAM) flux, is found to occur near the tidal creek for the four soil textures simulated. This may explain the observation that some salt marsh plant species grow better near tidal creeks than in the inner marsh areas. Our analyses, based on the two-phase model and predicted TAAM flux magnitude, provide further insight into the "positive feedback" mechanism proposed by Ursino et al. (2004). That is, pioneer plants may grow successfully near the creek where the root aeration condition is optimal. The roots of the pioneer plants can soften and loosen the rhizosphere soil, which increases the evapotranspiration rate, the soil porosity, and absolute permeability and weakens the capillary effects. These, in turn, improve further the root aeration conditions and may lead to colonization by plants less resistant to anaerobic conditions.

  20. Aeration for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailong; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2005-06-01

    This paper investigates the tidal effects on aeration conditions for plant root respiration in a tidal marsh. We extend the work of Ursino et al. (2004) by using a two-phase model for air and water flows in the marsh. Simulations have been conducted to examine directly the link between the airflow dynamics and the aeration condition in the marsh soil. The results show that the effects of entrapped air on water movement in the vadose zone are significant in certain circumstances. Single-phase models based on Richards' equation, which neglect such effects, may not be adequate for quantifying the aeration condition in tidal marsh. The optimal aeration condition, represented by the maximum of the integral magnitude of tidally advected air mass (TAAM) flux, is found to occur near the tidal creek for the four soil textures simulated. This may explain the observation that some salt marsh plant species grow better near tidal creeks than in the inner marsh areas. Our analyses, based on the two-phase model and predicted TAAM flux magnitude, provide further insight into the ``positive feedback'' mechanism proposed by Ursino et al. (2004). That is, pioneer plants may grow successfully near the creek where the root aeration condition is optimal. The roots of the pioneer plants can soften and loosen the rhizosphere soil, which increases the evapotranspiration rate, the soil porosity, and absolute permeability and weakens the capillary effects. These, in turn, improve further the root aeration conditions and may lead to colonization by plants less resistant to anaerobic conditions.

  1. Physiology and enzymology involved in denitrification by Shewanella putrefaciens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, B.; Nealson, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to N2O was investigated in batch cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1, MR-4, and MR-7. All three strains reduced nitrate to nitrite to N2O, and this reduction was coupled to growth, whereas ammonium accumulation was very low (0 to 1 micromol liter-1). All S. putrefaciens isolates were also capable of reducing nitrate aerobically; under anaerobic conditions, nitrite levels were three- to sixfold higher than those found under oxic conditions. Nitrate reductase activities (31 to 60 micromol of nitrite min-1 mg of protein-1) detected in intact cells of S. putrefaciens were equal to or higher than those seen in Escherichia coli LE 392. Km values for nitrate reduction ranged from 12 mM for MR-1 to 1.3 mM for MR-4 with benzyl viologen as an artifical electron donor. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities in cell-free preparations were demonstrated in native gels by using reduced benzyl viologen. Detergent treatment of crude and membrane extracts suggested that the nitrate reductases of MR-1 and MR-4 are membrane bound. When the nitrate reductase in MR-1 was partially purified, three subunits (90, 70, and 55 kDa) were detected in denaturing gels. The nitrite reductase of MR-1 is also membrane bound and appeared as a 60-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after partial purification.

  2. Cytometric patterns reveal growth states of Shewanella putrefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Melzer, Susanne; Winter, Gudrun; Jäger, Kathrin; Hübschmann, Thomas; Hause, Gerd; Syrowatka, Frank; Harms, Hauke; Tárnok, Attila; Müller, Susann

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial growth is often difficult to estimate beyond classical cultivation approaches. Low cell numbers, particles or coloured and dense media may disturb reliable growth assessment. Further difficulties appear when cells are attached to surfaces and detachment is incomplete. Therefore, flow cytometry was tested and used for analysis of bacterial growth on the single-cell level. Shewanella putrefaciens was cultivated as a model organism in planktonic or biofilm culture. Materials of smooth and rough surfaces were used for biofilm cultivation. Both aerobic and anaerobic as well as feast and famine conditions were applied. Visualization of growth was also done using Environmental Scanning and Phase Contrast Microscopy. Bioinformatic tools were applied for data interpretation. Cytometric proliferation patterns based on distributions of DNA contents per cell corresponded distinctly to the various lifestyles, electron acceptors and substrates tested. Therefore, cell cycling profiles of S. putrefaciens were found to mirror growth conditions. The cytometric patterns were consistently detectable with exception of some biofilm types whose resolution remained challenging. Corresponding heat maps proved to be useful for clear visualization of growth behaviour under all tested conditions. Therefore, flow cytometry in combination with bioinformatic tools proved to be powerful means to determine various growth states of S. putrefaciens, even in constrained environments. The approach is universal and will also be applicable for other bacterial species. PMID:25185955

  3. Fault detection and isolation of sensors in aeration control systems.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Bengt; Zambrano, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of fault detection (FD) and isolation in the aeration system of an activated sludge process. For this study, the dissolved oxygen in each aerated zone is assumed to be controlled automatically. As the basis for an FD method we use the ratio of air flow rates into different zones. The method is evaluated in two scenarios: using the Benchmark Simulation Model no. 1 (BSM1) by Monte Carlo simulations and using data from a wastewater treatment plant. The FD method shows good results for a correct and early FD and isolation.

  4. Retrofitting activated sludge systems to intermittent aeration for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Hanhan, O; Artan, N; Orhon, D

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides the basis and the conceptual approach of applying process kinetics and modelling to the design of alternating activated sludge systems for retrofitting existing activated sludge plants to intermittent aeration for nitrogen removal. It shows the significant role of the two specific parameters, namely, the aerated fraction and the cycle time ratio on process performance through model simulations and proposes a way to incorporate them into a design procedure using process stoichiometry and mass balance. It illustrates the effect of these parameters, together with the sludge age, in establishing the balance between the denitrification potential and the available nitrogen created in the anoxic/aerobic sequences of system operation.

  5. Retrofitting activated sludge systems to intermittent aeration for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Hanhan, O; Artan, N; Orhon, D

    2002-01-01

    The paper provides the basis and the conceptual approach of applying process kinetics and modelling to the design of alternating activated sludge systems for retrofitting existing activated sludge plants to intermittent aeration for nitrogen removal. It shows the significant role of the two specific parameters, namely, the aerated fraction and the cycle time ratio on process performance through model simulations and proposes a way to incorporate them into a design procedure using process stoichiometry and mass balance. It illustrates the effect of these parameters, together with the sludge age, in establishing the balance between the denitrification potential and the available nitrogen created in the anoxic/aerobic sequences of system operation. PMID:12420968

  6. The status of the species Shewanella irciniae Lee et al. 2006. Request for an opinion.

    PubMed

    Rameshkumar, N

    2015-08-01

    During a taxonomic study in describing a novel species of the genus Shewanella from a mangrove ecosystem, it was found that the type strain Shewanella irciniae was not available from the Japan Collection of Microorganisms (JCM) and the type strain received from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) culture collection and from the author who described this species were found to be members of the genus Brevibacillus based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Therefore, this species cannot be included in any further scientific studies. It is therefore proposed that the Judicial Commission of the International Committee of Systematics of Prokaryotes place the name Shewanella irciniae on the list of rejected names, if a suitable replacement for the type strain is not found or a neotype strain is not proposed within two years following the publication of this Request for an Opinion. PMID:26296347

  7. Biofuel from Bacteria and Sunlight: Shewanella as an Ideal Platform for Producing Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Minnesota is developing clean-burning, liquid hydrocarbon fuels from bacteria. The University is finding ways to continuously harvest hydrocarbons from a type of bacteria called Shewanella by using a photosynthetic organism to constantly feed Shewanella the sugar it needs for energy and hydrocarbon production. The two organisms live and work together as a system. Using Shewanella to produce hydrocarbon fuels offers several advantages over traditional biofuel production methods. First, it eliminates many of the time-consuming and costly steps involved in growing plants and harvesting biomass. Second, hydrocarbon biofuels resemble current petroleum-based fuels and would therefore require few changes to the existing fuel refining and distribution infrastructure in the U.S.

  8. The status of the species Shewanella irciniae Lee et al. 2006. Request for an opinion.

    PubMed

    Rameshkumar, N

    2015-08-01

    During a taxonomic study in describing a novel species of the genus Shewanella from a mangrove ecosystem, it was found that the type strain Shewanella irciniae was not available from the Japan Collection of Microorganisms (JCM) and the type strain received from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) culture collection and from the author who described this species were found to be members of the genus Brevibacillus based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Therefore, this species cannot be included in any further scientific studies. It is therefore proposed that the Judicial Commission of the International Committee of Systematics of Prokaryotes place the name Shewanella irciniae on the list of rejected names, if a suitable replacement for the type strain is not found or a neotype strain is not proposed within two years following the publication of this Request for an Opinion.

  9. Shewanella upenei sp. nov., a lipolytic bacterium isolated from bensasi goatfish Upeneus bensasi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Kil; Kim, Young-Ok; Park, Sooyeon; Kang, So-Jung; Nam, Bo-Hye; Kim, Doo Nam; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2011-06-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, motile, non-spore-forming and rod-shaped bacterial strain, 20-23R(T), was isolated from intestine of bensasi goatfish, Upeneus bensasi, and its taxonomic position was investigated by using a polyphasic study. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain 20-23R(T) belonged to the genus Shewanella. Strain 20-23R(T) exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity values of 99.5, 99.2, and 97.5% to Shewanella algae ATCC 51192(T), Shewanella haliotis DW01(T), and Shewanella chilikensis JC5(T), respectively. Strain 20-23R(T) exhibited 93.1-96.0% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the other Shewanella species. It also exhibited 98.3-98.4% gyrB sequence similarity to the type strains of S. algae and S. haliotis. Strain 20-23R(T) contained simultaneously both menaquinones and ubiquinones; the predominant menaquinone was MK-7 and the predominant ubiquinones were Q-8 and Q-7. The fatty acid profiles of strain 20-23R(T), S. algae KCTC 22552(T) and S. haliotis KCTC 12896(T) were similar; major components were iso-C(15:0), C(16:0), C(16:1) ω7c and/or iso-C(15:0) 2-OH and C(17:1) ω8c. The DNA G+C content of strain 20-23R(T) was 53.9 mol%. Differential phenotypic properties and genetic distinctiveness of strain 20-23R(T), together with the phylogenetic distinctiveness, revealed that this strain is distinguishable from recognized Shewanella species. On the basis of the data presented, strain 20-23R(T) represents a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella upenei sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 20-23R(T) (=KCTC 22806(T) =CCUG 58400(T)).

  10. Effect of cyclic aeration on fouling in submerged membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; He, Chengda

    2012-07-01

    Due to the inefficiency of aeration measures in preventing fouling by soluble and colloidal particles. The effect of alternating high/low cyclic aeration mode on the membrane fouling in the submerged membrane bioreactor was studied by comparing to fouling in a constant aeration mode. Results indicated a higher overall fouling rate in the cyclic aeration mode than in the constant aeration. However, a higher percentage of reversible fouling was observed for the cyclic aeration mode. The membrane permeability can be more easily recovered from physical cleaning such as backwashing in the cyclic aeration mode. The activated sludge floc size distribution analysis revealed a floc destruction and re-flocculation processes caused by the alternating high/low aeration. The short high aeration period could prevent the destruction of strong strength bonds within activated sludge flocs. Therefore, less soluble and colloidal material was observed in the supernatant due to the preservation of the strong strength bonds. The weak strength bonds damaged in the high aeration period could be recovered in the re-flocculation process in the low aeration period. The floc destruction and re-flocculation processes were suggested to be the main reason for the low irreversible fouling in the cyclic aeration mode.

  11. Intermittent aeration to improve wastewater treatment efficiency in pilot-scale constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Uggetti, Enrica; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I; Trabi, Christophe L; Hawes, Patrick; Puigagut, Jaume; García, Joan

    2016-07-15

    Forced aeration of horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (HSSF CWs) is nowadays a recognized method to improve treatment efficiency, mainly in terms of ammonium removal. While numerous investigations have been reported testing constant aeration, scarce information can be found about the efficiency of intermittent aeration. This study aims at comparing continuous and intermittent aeration, establishing if there is an optimal regime that will increase treatment efficiency of HSSF CWs whilst minimizing the energy requirement. Full and intermittent aeration were tested in a pilot plant of three HSSF CWs (2.64m(2) each) fed with primary treated wastewater. One unit was fully aerated; one intermittently aerated (i.e. by setting a limit of 0.5mg/L dissolved oxygen within the bed) with the remaining unit not aerated as a control. Results indicated that intermittent aeration was the most successful operating method. Indeed, the coexistence of aerobic and anoxic conditions promoted by the intermittent aeration resulted in the highest COD (66%), ammonium (99%) and total nitrogen (79%) removals. On the other hand, continuous aeration promotes ammonium removal (99%), but resulted in nitrate concentrations in the effluent of up to 27mg/L. This study demonstrates the high potential of the intermittent aeration to increase wastewater treatment efficiency of CWs providing an extreme benefit in terms of the energy consumption.

  12. Dissolved Oxygen management in catfish ponds using electric paddlewheel aerators: new approaches with old technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The electric paddlewheel aerator has been the main aerator used in the U.S. catfish industry for the post forty years. While it has its limitations, it is perhaps the most efficient shallow-water aerator yet to be developed. Its shortcomings result not so much from poor design, as from poor usage. U...

  13. 5. AERATOR VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM. FLUSH VALVE AT RIGHT OPENS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. AERATOR VIEW FROM DOWNSTREAM. FLUSH VALVE AT RIGHT OPENS TO CLEAR THE SYSTEM ABOVE THE SILT AND DEBRIS AND TO STOP THE FLOW OF WATER INTO THE SYSTEM DOWN LINE. BOX FLUME CONTINUES DOWN LINE TO SEDIMENTATION CHAMBER. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  14. Renewable energy for the aeration of wastewater ponds.

    PubMed

    Hobus, I; Hegemann, W

    2003-01-01

    The application of a decentralised renewable energy supply for the aeration of wastewater ponds, and the influence of an unsteady oxygen supply on the specific conversion rate and biocoenose was investigated. With the discontinuous aeration the specific conversion rate is increased as compared to facultative ponds. The estimation of the microorganisms consortia was done with in situ hybridisation techniques. A significant shift in the bacteria population with the chosen specific probes for anaerobic, sulphate reducing and nitrifying bacteria could not be detected. Wastewater ponds have sufficient buffer volume to compensate for the fluctuating energy supply. But the efficiency of the energy supply of a photovoltaic plant decreases in shallow lakes (d < 1.5 m) corresponding to a high oxygen production of algae. For the layout of the individual components: photovoltaic and wind power plant, energy management, aeration system and wastewater pond, a simulation model was developed and tested. The application of renewable energy for the aeration of wastewater ponds is a useful alternative for the redevelopment of overloaded ponds as well as the construction of new wastewater ponds, especially in areas with an inadequate central electricity grid and a high availability of wind and solar energy.

  15. 21 CFR 880.6100 - Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylene oxide gas aerator cabinet. 880.6100 Section 880.6100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... with a ventilation system designed to circulate and exchange the air in the cabinet to shorten the...

  16. Non-autoclaved aerated concrete with mineral additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ina, L. V.; Rakov, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of joint grinding of Portland cement clinker, silica and carbonate components and mineral additives to specific surface of 280 - 300 m2/kg on the properties (strength, average density and thermal conductivity) of non-autoclaved aerated concrete, and the porosity of the hardened cement paste produced from Portland cement clinker with mineral additives. The joint grinding of the Portland cement clinker with silica and carbonate components and mineral additives reduces the energy consumption of non-autoclaved aerated concrete production. The efficiency of mineral additives (diopside, wollastonite) is due to the closeness the composition, the type of chemical bonds, physical and chemical characteristics (specific enthalpy of formation, specific entropy) to anhydrous clinker minerals and their hydration products. Considering the influence of these additions on hydration of clinker minerals and formation of hardened cement paste structure, dispersed wollastonite and diopside should be used as mineral additives. The hardness and, consequently, the elastic modulus of diopside are higher than that of hardened cement paste. As a result, there is a redistribution of stresses in the hardened cement paste interporous partitions and hardening, both the partitions and aerated concrete on the whole. The mineral additives introduction allowed to obtain the non-autoclaved aerated concrete with average density 580 kg/m3, compressive strength of 3.3 MPa and thermal conductivity of 0.131 W/(m.°C).

  17. Aerated Lagoons. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This unit (which consists of a single lesson) describes the structural and operationally unique features of aerated lagoons. In addition, special troubleshooting and maintenance problems are discussed. The instructor's guide for the unit includes: (1) an overview of the lesson; (2) lesson plan; (3) lecture outline (keyed to a set of slides used…

  18. 4. AERATOR AT 525, CONSTRUCTED 19371938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. AERATOR AT 525, CONSTRUCTED 1937-1938, VIEW FROM UPSTREAM (TRASH SCREEN REMOVED FOR CLARITY), WATER FROM INTAKE FLOWS THROUGH FLUME, THEN DAMS, AND SPILLS OVER STEPS TO MIX WITH OXYGEN, THUS REDUCING ACIDITY LEVELS. ACID INDUCES FASTER CORROSION OF PIPES AND SPOILS TASTE. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  19. Landfill aeration for emission control before and during landfill mining.

    PubMed

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello; Heerenklage, Joern; Pivato, Alberto; Ritzkowski, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The landfill of Modena, in northern Italy, is now crossed by the new high velocity railway line connecting Milan and Bologna. Waste was completely removed from a part of the landfill and a trench for the train line was built. With the aim of facilitating excavation and further disposal of the material extracted, suitable measures were defined. In order to prevent undesired emissions into the excavation area, the aerobic in situ stabilisation by means of the Airflow technology took place before and during the Landfill Mining. Specific project features involved the pneumatic leachate extraction from the aeration wells (to keep the leachate table low inside the landfill and increase the volume of waste available for air migration) and the controlled moisture addition into a limited zone, for a preliminary evaluation of the effects on process enhancement. Waste and leachate were periodically sampled in the landfill during the aeration before the excavation, for quality assessment over time; the evolution of biogas composition in the landfill body and in the extraction system for different plant set-ups during the project was monitored, with specific focus on uncontrolled migration into the excavation area. Waste biological stability significantly increased during the aeration (waste respiration index dropped to 33% of the initial value after six months). Leachate head decreased from 4 to 1.5m; leachate recirculation tests proved the beneficial effects of moisture addition on temperature control, without hampering waste aerobization. Proper management of the aeration plant enabled the minimization of uncontrolled biogas emissions into the excavation area.

  20. 6. AERATOR VIEWED UPSTREAM. DETAIL OF FLUSH VALVE AND VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. AERATOR VIEWED UPSTREAM. DETAIL OF FLUSH VALVE AND VIEW INTO BOX FLUME. NOTE WRENCH TO OPEN VALVE AND REMAINS OF OLD SHOVEL USED FOR MAINTENANCE. TRASH SCREEN MESH IS SEEN AT BOTTOM LEFT. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  1. The potential for aeration of MSW landfills to accelerate completion

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Charlotte; Gronow, Jan; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2008-07-01

    Landfilling is a popular waste disposal method, but, as it is practised currently, it is fundamentally unsustainable. The low short-term financial costs belie the potential long-term environmental costs, and traditional landfill sites require long-term management in order to mitigate any possible environmental damage. Old landfill sites might require aftercare for decades or even centuries, and in some cases remediation may be necessary. Biological stabilisation of a landfill is the key issue; completion criteria provide a yardstick by which the success of any new technology may be measured. In order for a site to achieve completion it must pose no risk to human health or the environment, meaning that attenuation of any emissions from the site must occur within the local environment without causing harm. Remediation of old landfill sites by aerating the waste has been undertaken in Germany, the United States, Italy and The Netherlands, with considerable success. At a pilot scale, aeration has also been used in newly emplaced waste to accelerate stabilisation. This paper reviews the use of aerobic landfill worldwide, and assesses the ways in which the use of aerobic landfill techniques can decrease the risks associated with current landfill practices, making landfill a more sustainable waste disposal option. It focuses on assessing ways to utilise aeration to enhance stabilisation. The results demonstrated that aeration of old landfill sites may be an efficient and cost-effective method of remediation and allow the date of completion to be brought forward by decades. Similarly, aeration of newly emplaced waste can be effective in enhancing degradation, assisting with completion and reducing environmental risks. However, further research is required to establish what procedure for adding air to a landfill would be most suitable for the UK and to investigate new risks that may arise, such as the possible emission of non-methane organic compounds.

  2. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bagge, D; Hjelm, M; Johansen, C; Huber, I; Gram, L

    2001-05-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25 degrees C and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 10(8) CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system (modified Robbins device) (reaching 10(2) CFU/cm(2)) than in a batch system (reaching 10(7) CFU/cm(2)), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were not dependent on the availability of carbohydrate (lactate or glucose) or on iron starvation. The number of S. putrefaciens bacteria on the surface was partly influenced by the presence of other bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) which reduced the numbers of S. putrefaciens bacteria in the biofilm. Numbers of bacteria on the surface must be quantified to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on adhesion and biofilm formation. We used a combination of fluorescence microscopy (4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and in situ hybridization, for mixed-culture studies), ultrasonic removal of bacteria from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces. PMID:11319118

  3. Redox-reactive membrane vesicles produced by Shewanella.

    PubMed

    Gorby, Y; McLean, J; Korenevsky, A; Rosso, K; El-Naggar, M Y; Beveridge, T J

    2008-06-01

    This manuscript is dedicated to our friend, mentor, and coauthor Dr Terry Beveridge, who devoted his scientific career to advancing fundamental aspects of microbial ultrastructure using innovative electron microscopic approaches. During his graduate studies with Professor Robert Murray, Terry provided some of the first glimpses and structural evaluations of the regular surface arrays (S-layers) of Gram-negative bacteria (Beveridge & Murray, 1974, 1975, 1976a). Beginning with his early electron microscopic assessments of metal binding by cell walls from Gram-positive bacteria (Beveridge & Murray, 1976b, 1980) and continuing with more than 30 years of pioneering research on microbe-mineral interactions (Hoyle & Beveridge, 1983, 1984; Ferris et al., 1986; Gorby et al., 1988; Beveridge, 1989; Mullen et al., 1989; Urrutia Mera et al., 1992; Mera & Beveridge, 1993; Brown et al., 1994; Konhauser et al., 1994; Beveridge et al., 1997; Newman et al., 1997; Lower et al., 2001; Glasauer et al., 2002; Baesman et al., 2007), Terry helped to shape the developing field of biogeochemistry. Terry and his associates are also widely regarded for their research defining the structure and function of outer membrane vesicles from Gram-negative bacteria that facilitate processes ranging from the delivery of pathogenic enzymes to the possible exchange of genetic information. The current report represents the confluence of two of Terry's thematic research streams by demonstrating that membrane vesicles produced by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria from the genus Shewanella catalyze the enzymatic transformation and precipitation of heavy metals and radionuclides. Under low-shear conditions, membrane vesicles are commonly tethered to intact cells by electrically conductive filaments known as bacterial nanowires. The functional role of membrane vesicles and associated nanowires is not known, but the potential for mineralized vesicles that morphologically resemble nanofossils to serve as

  4. [Effects of iron on azoreduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing-Juan; Xu, Mei-Ying; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The effects of soluble and insoluble Fe(III) on anaerobic azoreduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12 were examined in a series of experiments. Results showed that the effects of iron on anaerobic azoreduction depended on the solubility and concentration of the compounds. Azoreduction was inhibited by insoluble Fe(III) and 0.05-2 mmol/L Fe2 O3 all decelerated the azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth, but the increase in the concentrations of Fe2O3 did not cause an increasing inhibition. Soluble Fe(III) of which concentration less than 0.4 mmol/L enhanced azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth but there was no linear relationship between the concentration of soluble Fe(III) and azoreduction activity. Soluble Fe(III) of which concentration more than 1 mmol/L inhibited azoreduction activity of 0.2 mmol/L amaranth and an increasing concentration resulted in an increased inhibition. The inhibition was strengthened under the conditions of limited electron donor. On the other hand, soluble Fe(III) and Fe(II) could relieve the inhibition of azoreduction by dicumarol which blocked quinone cycle. It suggests that in addition to quinone cycle, there is a Fe(III) <--> Fe(II) cycle shuttling electrons in cytoplasmic and periplasmic environment. That is the reason why low concentration of soluble Fe(III) or Fe (II) can enhance azoreduction of S. decolorationis S12. It also indicates that insoluble Fe(III) and high concentration of soluble Fe(III) do compete with azo dye for electrons once it acts as electron acceptor. Thus, when iron and azo dye coexisted, iron could serve as an electron transfer agent or electron competitive inhibitor for anaerobic azoreduction under different conditions. High efficiency of azoreduction can be achieved through controlling the solubility and concentration of irons.

  5. Numerical simulation of aeration bubble growth in a plug-flow aeration tank used in wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Li, Y. P.

    2010-03-01

    The micro-scale hydrodynamics of bubbles growth by aeration is related to the oxygen transfer efficiency and the overall performance of the activated sludge wastewater treatment process. To gain a deeper insight on the micro-scale phenomena of dispersed bubble in this process, a three-dimensional direct simulation method is developed to study the effects of the liquid cross-flow on micro-scale behavior of bubble growth in a plug-flow aeration tank. The numerical simulations are performed using the level set method coupling with the governing equations of a single fluid with variable properties. The governing equations are solved using the finite-volume projection technique. The simulation results are compared with the experimental observations and theoretical relations. The simulated results show that water cross-flow in plug-flow type aeration tank has a strong impact on the bubble growth process. Compared to that generated under quiescent water conditions used in mixing type aeration tank, the bubble under water cross-flow conditions grows downstream along the tilted axis, and the bubble generation time tends to decrease noticeably and the bubble at detachment has significantly smaller size. The dynamic characteristics of the bubble growth through two orifices are also numerically studied. The effect of water cross-flow on the bubbling synchronicity is finally discussed.

  6. Effect of spray aeration on organics and nitrogen removal in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Wei; Song, Xin-Shan; Wang, Gang; Wang, Yu-Hui

    2014-12-01

    The objective of present study was to assess the simultaneous removal of organics and nitrogen by four lab-scale vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands (V-SFCWs). The emergent plants employed were Canna indica. Five-month experiments showed that the planted and aerated system largely reduced the COD by 95%, NH4 by 88% and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) by 83%. It outperformed the unplanted or simple aerated system and was much better than non-aerated system. The study provided a strong evidence to support widespread research and application of spray aeration as a low-cost and energy-efficient aeration technology in V-SFCWs. PMID:25259785

  7. Effect of spray aeration on organics and nitrogen removal in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Wei; Song, Xin-Shan; Wang, Gang; Wang, Yu-Hui

    2014-12-01

    The objective of present study was to assess the simultaneous removal of organics and nitrogen by four lab-scale vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands (V-SFCWs). The emergent plants employed were Canna indica. Five-month experiments showed that the planted and aerated system largely reduced the COD by 95%, NH4 by 88% and total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) by 83%. It outperformed the unplanted or simple aerated system and was much better than non-aerated system. The study provided a strong evidence to support widespread research and application of spray aeration as a low-cost and energy-efficient aeration technology in V-SFCWs.

  8. Piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the piezophilic Shewanella violacea DSS12 as compared with non-piezophilic Shewanella species.

    PubMed

    Tamegai, Hideyuki; Ota, Yuuya; Haga, Minami; Fujimori, Hiroki; Kato, Chiaki; Nogi, Yuichi; Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    The facultative piezophile Shewanella violacea DSS12 is known to alter its respiratory components under the influence of hydrostatic pressure during growth, suggesting that it has a respiratory system that functions in adaptation to high pressure. We investigated the pressure- and temperature-dependencies of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the membrane of S. violacea relative to non-piezophilic Shewanella species. We observed that the activity in the membrane of S. violacea was more resistant to high pressure than those of non-piezophilic Shewanella even though DSS12 was cultured under atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, the temperature dependency of this activity was almost the same for all of the tested strain regardless of optimal growth temperature. Both high pressure and low temperature are expected to lower protein flexibility, causing a decrease in enzyme activity, but the results of this study suggest that the mechanism maintaining enzyme activity under high hydrostatic pressure is different from that at low temperature. Additionally, the responses of the activity to the pressure- and temperature-changes were independent of membrane lipid composition. Therefore, the piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidases of S. violacea is perhaps dependent on the properties of the protein itself and not on the lipid composition of the membrane. Our observations suggest that S. violacea constitutively express piezotolerant respiratory terminal oxidases that serve adaptation to the deep-sea environment. PMID:21597190

  9. Piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the piezophilic Shewanella violacea DSS12 as compared with non-piezophilic Shewanella species.

    PubMed

    Tamegai, Hideyuki; Ota, Yuuya; Haga, Minami; Fujimori, Hiroki; Kato, Chiaki; Nogi, Yuichi; Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    The facultative piezophile Shewanella violacea DSS12 is known to alter its respiratory components under the influence of hydrostatic pressure during growth, suggesting that it has a respiratory system that functions in adaptation to high pressure. We investigated the pressure- and temperature-dependencies of the respiratory terminal oxidase activity of the membrane of S. violacea relative to non-piezophilic Shewanella species. We observed that the activity in the membrane of S. violacea was more resistant to high pressure than those of non-piezophilic Shewanella even though DSS12 was cultured under atmospheric pressure. On the other hand, the temperature dependency of this activity was almost the same for all of the tested strain regardless of optimal growth temperature. Both high pressure and low temperature are expected to lower protein flexibility, causing a decrease in enzyme activity, but the results of this study suggest that the mechanism maintaining enzyme activity under high hydrostatic pressure is different from that at low temperature. Additionally, the responses of the activity to the pressure- and temperature-changes were independent of membrane lipid composition. Therefore, the piezotolerance of the respiratory terminal oxidases of S. violacea is perhaps dependent on the properties of the protein itself and not on the lipid composition of the membrane. Our observations suggest that S. violacea constitutively express piezotolerant respiratory terminal oxidases that serve adaptation to the deep-sea environment.

  10. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at −150, −100 and −50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  11. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-05-10

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation.

  12. Redox potential driven aeration during very-high-gravity ethanol fermentation by using flocculating yeast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Hao, Xue-Mi; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation requires oxygen to maintain high biomass and cell viability, especially under very-high-gravity (VHG) condition. In this work, fermentation redox potential (ORP) was applied to drive the aeration process at low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels, which is infeasible to be regulated by a DO sensor. The performance and characteristics of flocculating yeast grown under 300 and 260 g glucose/L conditions were subjected to various aeration strategies including: no aeration; controlled aeration at -150, -100 and -50 mV levels; and constant aeration at 0.05 and 0.2 vvm. The results showed that anaerobic fermentation produced the least ethanol and had the highest residual glucose after 72 h of fermentation. Controlled aerations, depending on the real-time oxygen demand, led to higher cell viability than the no-aeration counterpart. Constant aeration triggered a quick biomass formation, and fast glucose utilization. However, over aeration at 0.2 vvm caused a reduction of final ethanol concentration. The controlled aeration driven by ORP under VHG conditions resulted in the best fermentation performance. Moreover, the controlled aeration could enhance yeast flocculating activity, promote an increase of flocs size, and accelerate yeast separation near the end of fermentation. PMID:27161047

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Shewanella sp. ECSMB14101, Isolated from the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Long; Guo, Xing-Pan; Ding, De-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella sp. ECSMB14101 was isolated from marine biofilms formed on the East China Sea. The draft genome sequence comprises 4,272,451 bp with a G+C content of 49.82%. Information on this draft genome will contribute to the understanding of bacterium-animal interactions. PMID:25593251

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Bacterium Shewanella benthica Strain KT99.

    PubMed

    Lauro, F M; Chastain, R A; Ferriera, S; Johnson, J; Yayanos, A A; Bartlett, D H

    2013-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the obligately piezophilic Shewanella benthica strain KT99 isolated from the abyssal South Pacific Ocean. Strain KT99 is the first piezophilic isolate from the Tonga-Kermadec trench, and its genome provides many clues on high-pressure adaptation and the evolution of deep-sea piezophilic bacteria. PMID:23723392

  15. Niche specific amino acid features within the core genes of the genus Shewanella.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rachana; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella species are found to dwell in various ecological niches. The widespread habitation where they live requires specific adaptations. Recent advances in genomic approaches, such as in sequencing technologies, generate huge amount of genomic data that lend support towards understanding the microbial evolution and diversity through comparative study. In this manuscript, we discuss a comparative analysis of core genes of phylogenetically related twelve members from the genus Shewanella. Phylogenetic analysis based on the core genes, differentiated two subgroups of the genus, one group comprises of species characterized as highpressure cold-adapted while the other group is characterized as mesophilic pressure-sensitive species. By analyzing the differences of amino acid composition of these two groups, we have identified the specific trend of amino acid usage that has been adopted by the psychro-peizo-tolerant Shewanella species. The functional categories have also been recognized which are responsible for rendering the particular amino acid compositional pattern in psychropeizophilic Shewanella species facilitating their niche adaptation. PMID:23144554

  16. Physiological and evolutionary studies of NAP systems in Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Fengping; Xu, Jun; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Xiao, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Most of the Shewanella species contain two periplasmic nitrate reductases (NAP-α and NAP-β), which is a unique feature of this genus. In the present study, the physiological function and evolutionary relationship of the two NAP systems were studied in the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3. Both of the WP3 nap gene clusters: nap-α (napD1A1B1C) and nap-β (napD2A2B2) were shown to be involved in nitrate respiration. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that NAP-β originated earlier than NAP-α. Tetraheme cytochromes NapC and CymA were found to be the major electron deliver proteins, and CymA also served as a sole electron transporter towards nitrite reductase. Interestingly, a ΔnapA2 mutant with the single functional NAP-α system showed better growth than the wild-type strain, when grown in nitrate medium, and it had a selective advantage to the wild-type strain. On the basis of these results, we proposed the evolution direction of nitrate respiration system in Shewanella: from a single NAP-β to NAP-β and NAP-α both, followed by the evolution to a single NAP-α. Moreover, the data presented here will be very useful for the designed engineering of Shewanella for more efficient respiring capabilities for environmental bioremediation. PMID:21124486

  17. Intestinal carriage of Shewanella xiamenensis simulating carriage of OXA-48-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alberto; Di Palo, Domenica Maria; Galano, Angelo; Becciani, Sabrina; Montagnani, Carlotta; Pecile, Patrizia; Galli, Luisa; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2015-05-01

    Positivity for bla(OXA-48)-like carbapenemase genes was revealed by molecular testing of a surveillance rectal swab from a patient who had previously been colonized and infected by an OXA-48-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Positivity was due to a coincidental carriage of Shewanella xiamenensis harboring a new bla(OXA-48)-like gene, while the K. pneumoniae was no longer present.

  18. Decolorization of azo dyes by marine Shewanella strains under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Meng, Xianming; Fu, Shiang Q; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Azo dye decolorization was studied with Shewanella strains under saline conditions. Growing cells of Shewanella algae and Shewanella marisflavi isolated from marine environments demonstrated better azo dye decolorization capacities than the other three strains from non-saline sources. Cell suspensions of S. algae and S. marisflavi could decolorize single or mixed azo dyes with different structures. Decolorization kinetics were described with Michaelis-Menton equation, which indicated better decolorization performance of S. algae over S. marisflavi. Lactate and formate were identified as efficient electron donors for amaranth decolorization by the two strains. S. algae and S. marisflavi could decolorize amaranth at up to 100 g L(-1) NaCl or Na2SO4. However, extremely low concentration of NaNO3 exerted strong inhibition on decolorization. Both strains could remove the color and COD of textile effluent during sequential anaerobic-aerobic incubation. Lower concentrations of NaCl (20-30 g L(-1)) stimulated the activities of azoreductase, laccase, and NADH-DCIP reductase. The decolorization intermediates were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Decolorization metabolites of amaranth were less toxic than original dye. These findings improved our knowledge of azo-dye-decolorizing Shewanella species and provided efficient candidates for the treatment of dye-polluted saline wastewaters.

  19. Biological characteristics and pathogenicity of a highly pathogenic Shewanella marisflavi infected sea cucumber (Apostichopus uaponicus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella marisflavi isolate AP629 was characterized as a novel pathogen of sea cucumber. The LD50 values (14 days) in sea cucumber and swordtail fish were 3.89 × 106 and 4.85 × 104 CFU g-1 body weight, respectively. Studies on S. marisflavi had been conducted, including morphology, physiological a...

  20. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  1. Characterization and application of monoclonal antibodies against Shewanella marisflavi, a novel pathogen of Apostichopus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shewanella marisflavi strain AP629 was certified as a novel pathogen of the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. In this study, four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (3C1, 3D9, 2F2, 2A8) against strain AP629 were developed by immunizing Balb/C mice. 3C1 and 3D9 recognized S. marisflavi only, showing no ...

  2. Shewanella putrefaciens in a fuel-in-water emulsion from the Prestige oil spill.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gil, J; Ramos-Sánchez, M C; Martín-Gil, F J

    2004-10-01

    Microorganisms that colonize the fuel-in-water emulsion from the Prestige spill have been compared with those from Exxon-Valdez. Both emulsions contained non-fermentative gram-negative rods but unlike Exxon-Valdez's, the Prestige's spill contained anaerobic bacteria and no fungi. Our main finding has been the identification of Shewanella putrefaciens , a bacterium promising for bioremediation. PMID:15539931

  3. Shewanella putrefaciens in a fuel-in-water emulsion from the Prestige oil spill.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gil, J; Ramos-Sánchez, M C; Martín-Gil, F J

    2004-10-01

    Microorganisms that colonize the fuel-in-water emulsion from the Prestige spill have been compared with those from Exxon-Valdez. Both emulsions contained non-fermentative gram-negative rods but unlike Exxon-Valdez's, the Prestige's spill contained anaerobic bacteria and no fungi. Our main finding has been the identification of Shewanella putrefaciens , a bacterium promising for bioremediation.

  4. Effective pine bark composting with the Dome Aeration Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Trois, Cristina . E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za; Polster, Andreas

    2007-07-01

    In South Africa garden refuse is primarily disposed of in domestic landfills. Due to the large quantities generated, any form of treatment would be beneficial for volume reduction, waste stabilization and resource recovery. Dome Aeration Technology (DAT) is an advanced process for aerobic biological degradation of garden refuse and general waste [Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999a. Advantages of dome aeration in mechanical-biological waste treatment. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Cagliari, 4-8 October 1999; Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999b. Mechanical-biological waste stabilization by the dome aeration method. Environment Protection Engineering 25 (3/99). Mollekopf, N., Brummack, J., Paar, S., Vorster, K., 2002. Use of the Dome Aeration Technology for biochemical stabilization of waste prior to landfilling. In: Proceedings of the Wastecon 2002, Waste Congress and Exhibition, Durban, South Africa.]. It is a non-reactor open windrow composting process, with the main advantage being that the input material needs no periodic turning. A rotting time of only 3-4 months indicates the high efficiency. Additionally, the low capital/operational costs, low energy inputs and limited plant requirements provide potential for use in aerobic refuse stabilization. The innovation in the DAT process is the passive aeration achieved by thermally driven advection through open windrows caused by temperature differences between the degrading material and the outside environment. This paper investigates the application of Dome Aeration Technology to pine bark composting as part of an integrated waste management strategy. A full-scale field experiment was performed at the Bisasar Road Landfill Site in Durban to assess the influence of climate, waste composition and operational conditions on the process. A test windrow was constructed and measurements of temperature and airflow through the material were taken. The process

  5. BIOVENTING - Groundwater Aeration by Discontinuous Oxygen Gas Pulse Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater aeration by discontinuous oxygen gas pulse injections appears to be a promising concept for enhanced natural attenuation of dissolved contaminants that are susceptible for oxygenase enzyme attacks. Oxygen amendments facilitate indigenous microbiota to catabolize groundwater pollutants, such as aromatics, that are considered to be recalcitrant in absence of dissolved oxygen. As a rule, natural attenuation of many pollutants under aerobic conditions is considerably faster than under anaerobic conditions. Thus, enhancing the dissolved oxygen level appears to be worthwhile. In situ aeration of groundwater has been accomplished by air sparging, H2O2-supply, or by utilization of oxygen release compounds. However, continuous aeration of previously anaerobic groundwater is not desirable for several reasons: (a) economic efforts too high, (b) pollutant dislocation towards surface (desired only in air sparging), (c) risk of aquifer clogging (gas clogging, oxidation of ferrous iron, formation of bioslimes). In contrast, discontinuous oxygen gas sparging provides only for periodical groundwater aeration which is followed by microaerobic and suboxic conditions. Microaerobic conditions can prevail spatially (e.g., at plume fringes or within biofilms) or temporarily (e.g., at discontinuous bioventing). They still allow adapted bacteria to transform environmental pollutants to less toxic compounds, e.g., aromatic ring cleavage after dioxygenasis attack. Ring cleavage products, on the other hand, may be degraded more easily by anaerobic consortia than the initial aromatic compounds, making oxygen depletion periods highly intriguing in regard to an initiation of natural attenuation processes at plume fringes. In our work we outline the effect of oxygen depletion conditions on biodegradation of monchlorobenzene (MCB) as they occur subsequently to temporary aeration periods. For microaerobic conditions, relative to the oxygen supply, a stoichiometric transformation of MCB

  6. Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov., a novel metal-reducing facultative anaerobe from Amazonian shelf muds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Aller, R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A new bacterial species belonging to the genus Shewanella is described on the basis of phenotypic characterization and sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA-encoding and gyrase B (gyrB) genes. This organism, isolated from shallow-water marine sediments derived from the Amazon River delta, is a Gram-negative, motile, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped eubacterium and has a G&C content of 51.7 mol%. Strain SB2BT is exceptionally active in the anaerobic reduction of iron, manganese and sulfur compounds. SB2BT grows optimally at 35 degrees C, with 1-3% NaCl and over a pH range of 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed a clear affiliation between strain SB2BT and members of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria. High similarity values were found with certain members of the genus Shewanella, especially with Shewanella putrefaciens, and this was supported by cellular fatty acid profiles and phenotypic characterization. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain SB2BT and its phylogenetically closest relatives revealed low similarity values (24.6-42.7%) which indicated species status for strain SB2BT. That SB2BT represents a distinct bacterial species within the genus Shewanella is also supported by gyrB sequence analysis. Considering the source of the isolate, the name Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov. is proposed and strain SB2BT (= ATCC 700329T) is designated as the type strain.

  7. Shewanella litorisediminis sp. nov., a gammaproteobacterium isolated from a tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Hwa; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2012-11-01

    A Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterial strain, designated SMK1-12(T), was isolated from a tidal flat sediment on the western coast of Korea. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences showed that strain SMK1-12(T) belonged to the genus Shewanella, clustering with the type strain of Shewanella amazonensis. Strain SMK1-12(T) exhibited the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity value (97.0 %) and the highest gyrB sequence similarity value (87.8 %) to S. amazonensis SB2B(T), respectively. Strain SMK1-12(T) contained simultaneously both menaquinones and ubiquinones; the predominant menaquinone was MK-7 and the predominant ubiquinones were Q-7 and Q-8. The major fatty acids (>10 % of the total fatty acids) detected in strain SMK1-12(T) were the MIDI system summed feature 3 (iso-C(15:0) 2-OH and/or C(16:1) ω7c), iso-C(15:0), C(17:1) ω8c and C(16:0). The DNA G+C content of strain SMK1-12(T) was 58.0 mol% and its mean DNA-DNA relatedness value with S. amazonensis ATCC 700329(T) was 15 ± 4.6 %. Differential phenotypic properties, together with the phylogenetic and genetic distinctiveness, revealed that strain SMK1-12(T) is distinguishable from recognized Shewanella species. On the basis of the data presented, strain SMK1-12(T) is considered to represent a novel Shewanella species, for which the name Shewanella litorisediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SMK1-12(T) (=KCTC 23961(T) = CCUG 62411(T)).

  8. Shewanella algicola sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from brown algae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Yoo, Han-Su; Lee, Dong-Heon; Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ju; Oh, Duck-Chul

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium motile by means of a single polar flagella, strain ST-6T, was isolated from a brown alga (Sargassum thunbergii) collected in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Strain ST-6T was psychrotolerant, growing at 4-30 °C (optimum 20 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences revealed that strain ST-6T belonged to a distinct lineage in the genus Shewanella. Strain ST-6T was related most closely to Shewanella basaltis J83T, S. gaetbuli TF-27T, S. arctica IT12T, S. vesiculosa M7T and S. aestuarii SC18T, showing 96-97 % and 85-70 % 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences similarities, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain ST-6T and the type strains of two species of the genus Shewanella were <22.6 %. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 %) were summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c and/ or iso-C15:0 2-OH), C16:0, iso-C13:0 and C17:1ω8c. The DNA G+C content of strain ST-6Twas 42.4 mol%, and the predominant isoprenoid quinones were menaquinone MK-7 and ubiquinones Q-7 and Q-8. On the basis of its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain ST-6T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella algicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ST-6T (= KCTC 23253T = JCM 31091T). PMID:26962005

  9. Landfill aeration for emission control before and during landfill mining.

    PubMed

    Raga, Roberto; Cossu, Raffaello; Heerenklage, Joern; Pivato, Alberto; Ritzkowski, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The landfill of Modena, in northern Italy, is now crossed by the new high velocity railway line connecting Milan and Bologna. Waste was completely removed from a part of the landfill and a trench for the train line was built. With the aim of facilitating excavation and further disposal of the material extracted, suitable measures were defined. In order to prevent undesired emissions into the excavation area, the aerobic in situ stabilisation by means of the Airflow technology took place before and during the Landfill Mining. Specific project features involved the pneumatic leachate extraction from the aeration wells (to keep the leachate table low inside the landfill and increase the volume of waste available for air migration) and the controlled moisture addition into a limited zone, for a preliminary evaluation of the effects on process enhancement. Waste and leachate were periodically sampled in the landfill during the aeration before the excavation, for quality assessment over time; the evolution of biogas composition in the landfill body and in the extraction system for different plant set-ups during the project was monitored, with specific focus on uncontrolled migration into the excavation area. Waste biological stability significantly increased during the aeration (waste respiration index dropped to 33% of the initial value after six months). Leachate head decreased from 4 to 1.5m; leachate recirculation tests proved the beneficial effects of moisture addition on temperature control, without hampering waste aerobization. Proper management of the aeration plant enabled the minimization of uncontrolled biogas emissions into the excavation area. PMID:26445364

  10. Human infection with Shewanella putrefaciens and S. algae: report of 16 cases in Martinique and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vignier, Nicolas; Barreau, Morgane; Olive, Claude; Baubion, Emilie; Théodose, Rafaelle; Hochedez, Patrick; Cabié, André

    2013-07-01

    Shewanella spp. are saprophytic bacteria that are part of the marine microflora in warm climates and are rarely pathogenic. However, Shewanella spp. infections are being increasingly reported, and there has been no comprehensive review of the literature describing these infections. This article reports 16 cases of Shewanella spp. infections in Martinique since 1997 and reviews another 239 cases reported in the literature since 1973. Patients experienced soft tissue infections, ear infection, or abdominal and biliary tract infections. A skin or mucosal portal of entry was found for 53% of the patients and exposure to the marine environment was reported for 44%; 79% of patients had an underlying condition. Bacteriema were frequent (28%). Most (87%) patients recovered, although ear infections can become chronic. Death occurred in 13% of the patients. Most Shewanella spp. isolates are susceptible to cefotaxime (95%), piperacillin and tazobactam (98%), gentamicin (99%), and ciprofloxacin (94%).

  11. Soil aeration status in a lowland wet grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, K. R.; Leeds-Harrison, P. B.; Lawson, C. S.; Gowing, D. J. G.

    2004-02-01

    The maintenance or development of plant community diversity in species-rich wet grasslands has been a focus of water management considerations in the UK for the past 20 years. Much attention has been given to the control of water levels in the ditch systems within these wet grassland systems. In this paper we report measurements of aeration status and water-table fluctuation made on a peat soil site at Tadham Moor in Somerset, UK, where water management has focused on the maintenance of wet conditions that often result in flooding in winter and wet soil conditions in the spring and summer. Measurement and modelling of the water-table fluctuation indicates the possibility of variability in the aeration of the root environment and anoxic conditions for much of the winter period and for part of the spring and summer. We have used water content and redox potential measurements to characterize the aeration status of the peat soil. We find that air-filled porosity is related to water-table depth in these situations. Redox potentials in the spring were generally found to be low, implying a reducing condition for nitrate and iron. A significant relationship (p < 0.01) between redox potential and water-table depth exists for data measured at 0.1 m depth, but no relationship could be found for data from 0.4 m depth.

  12. Optimum air-demand ratio for maximum aeration efficiency in high-head gated circular conduits.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Fahri; Tuna, M Cihat; Baylar, Ahmet; Ozturk, Mualla

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is an important component of water quality and its ability to sustain life. Water aeration is the process of introducing air into a body of water to increase its oxygen saturation. Water aeration can be accomplished in a variety of ways, for instance, closed-conduit aeration. High-speed flow in a closed conduit involves air-water mixture flow. The air flow results from the subatmospheric pressure downstream of the gate. The air entrained by the high-speed flow is supplied by the air vent. The air entrained into the flow in the form of a large number of bubbles accelerates oxygen transfer and hence also increases aeration efficiency. In the present work, the optimum air-demand ratio for maximum aeration efficiency in high-head gated circular conduits was studied experimentally. Results showed that aeration efficiency increased with the air-demand ratio to a certain point and then aeration efficiency did not change with a further increase of the air-demand ratio. Thus, there was an optimum value for the air-demand ratio, depending on the Froude number, which provides maximum aeration efficiency. Furthermore, a design formula for aeration efficiency was presented relating aeration efficiency to the air-demand ratio and Froude number. PMID:25225935

  13. Optimum air-demand ratio for maximum aeration efficiency in high-head gated circular conduits.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Fahri; Tuna, M Cihat; Baylar, Ahmet; Ozturk, Mualla

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is an important component of water quality and its ability to sustain life. Water aeration is the process of introducing air into a body of water to increase its oxygen saturation. Water aeration can be accomplished in a variety of ways, for instance, closed-conduit aeration. High-speed flow in a closed conduit involves air-water mixture flow. The air flow results from the subatmospheric pressure downstream of the gate. The air entrained by the high-speed flow is supplied by the air vent. The air entrained into the flow in the form of a large number of bubbles accelerates oxygen transfer and hence also increases aeration efficiency. In the present work, the optimum air-demand ratio for maximum aeration efficiency in high-head gated circular conduits was studied experimentally. Results showed that aeration efficiency increased with the air-demand ratio to a certain point and then aeration efficiency did not change with a further increase of the air-demand ratio. Thus, there was an optimum value for the air-demand ratio, depending on the Froude number, which provides maximum aeration efficiency. Furthermore, a design formula for aeration efficiency was presented relating aeration efficiency to the air-demand ratio and Froude number.

  14. In situ nitrogen removal from leachate by bioreactor landfill with limited aeration

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Liming; He Pinjing Li Guojian

    2008-07-01

    The feasibility of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in a bioreactor landfill with limited aeration was assessed. Three column reactors, simulating bioreactor landfill operations under anaerobic condition (as reference), intermittent forced aeration and enhanced natural aeration were hence established, where aerated columns passed through two phases, i.e., fresh landfill and well-decomposed landfill. The experimental results show that limited aeration decreased nitrogen loadings of leachate distinctly in the fresh landfill. In the well-decomposed landfill, the NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N of the input leachate could be nitrified completely in the aerated landfill columns. The nitrifying loadings of the column cross section reached 7.9 g N/m{sup 2} d and 16.9 g N/m{sup 2} d in the simulated landfill columns of intermittent forced aeration and enhanced natural aeration, respectively. The denitrification was influenced by oxygen distribution in the landfill column. Intermittent existence of oxygen in the landfill with the intermittent forced aeration was favorable to denitrify the NO{sub 2}{sup -}-N and NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N, indicated by the high denitrification efficiency (>99%) under the condition of BOD{sub 5}/TN of more than 5.4 in leachate; locally persistent existence of oxygen in the landfill with enhanced natural aeration could limit the denitrification, indicated by relatively low denitrification efficiency of about 75% even when the BOD{sub 5}/TN in leachate had an average of 7.1.

  15. Role and regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis in the response of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 to different temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Xiao, Xiang; Ou, Hong-Yu; Gai, Yingbao; Wang, Fengping

    2009-04-01

    Members of the genus Shewanella inhabit various environments; they are capable of synthesizing various types of low-melting-point fatty acids, including monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA) with and without eicosapentanoic acid (EPA). The genes involved in fatty acid synthesis in 15 whole-genome-sequenced Shewanella strains were identified and compared. A typical type II fatty acid synthesis pathway in Shewanella was constructed. A complete EPA synthesis gene cluster was found in all of the Shewanella genomes, although only a few of them were found to produce EPA. The roles and regulation of fatty acids synthesis in Shewanella were further elucidated in the Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 response to different temperatures and pressures. The EPA and BCFA contents of WP3 significantly increased when it was grown at low temperature and/or under high pressure. EPA, but not MUFA, was determined to be crucial for its growth at low temperature and high pressure. A gene cluster for a branched-chain amino acid ABC transporter (LIV-I) was found to be upregulated at low temperature. Combined approaches, including mutagenesis and an isotopic-tracer method, revealed that the LIV-I transporter played an important role in the regulation of BCFA synthesis in WP3. The LIV-I transporter was identified only in the cold-adapted Shewanella species and was assumed to supply an important strategy for Shewanella cold adaptation. This is the first time the molecular mechanism of BCFA regulation in bacteria has been elucidated. PMID:19201790

  16. Correlation between the optimal growth pressures of four Shewanella species and the stabilities of their cytochromes c 5.

    PubMed

    Masanari, Misa; Wakai, Satoshi; Ishida, Manabu; Kato, Chiaki; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2014-05-01

    Shewanella species live widely in deep-sea and shallow-water areas, and thus grow piezophilically and piezosensitively. Piezophilic and psychrophilic Shewanella benthica cytochrome c 5 (SB cytc 5) was the most stable against guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) and thermal denaturation, followed by less piezophilic but still psychrophilic Shewanella violacea cytochrome c 5 (SV cytc 5). These two were followed, as to stability level, by piezosensitive and mesophilic Shewanella amazonensis cytochrome c 5 (SA cytc 5), and piezosensitive and psychrophilic Shewanella livingstonensis cytochrome c 5 (SL cytc 5). The midpoint GdnHCl concentrations of SB cytc 5, SV cytc 5, SL cytc 5, and SA cytc 5 correlated with the optimal growth pressures of the species, the correlation coefficient value being 0.93. A similar trend was observed for thermal denaturation. Therefore, the stability of each cytochrome c 5 is related directly to its host's optimal growth pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Lys-37, Ala-41, and Leu-50 conserved in piezosensitive SL cytc 5 and SA cytc 5 are ancestors of the corresponding residues in piezophilic SB cytc 5 and SV cytc 5, Gln, Thr, and Lys, respectively, which might have been introduced during evolution on adaption to environmental pressure. The monomeric Shewanella cytochromes c 5 are suitable tools for examining protein stability with regard to the optimal growth pressures of the source species. PMID:24699850

  17. Correlation between the optimal growth pressures of four Shewanella species and the stabilities of their cytochromes c 5.

    PubMed

    Masanari, Misa; Wakai, Satoshi; Ishida, Manabu; Kato, Chiaki; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2014-05-01

    Shewanella species live widely in deep-sea and shallow-water areas, and thus grow piezophilically and piezosensitively. Piezophilic and psychrophilic Shewanella benthica cytochrome c 5 (SB cytc 5) was the most stable against guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) and thermal denaturation, followed by less piezophilic but still psychrophilic Shewanella violacea cytochrome c 5 (SV cytc 5). These two were followed, as to stability level, by piezosensitive and mesophilic Shewanella amazonensis cytochrome c 5 (SA cytc 5), and piezosensitive and psychrophilic Shewanella livingstonensis cytochrome c 5 (SL cytc 5). The midpoint GdnHCl concentrations of SB cytc 5, SV cytc 5, SL cytc 5, and SA cytc 5 correlated with the optimal growth pressures of the species, the correlation coefficient value being 0.93. A similar trend was observed for thermal denaturation. Therefore, the stability of each cytochrome c 5 is related directly to its host's optimal growth pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Lys-37, Ala-41, and Leu-50 conserved in piezosensitive SL cytc 5 and SA cytc 5 are ancestors of the corresponding residues in piezophilic SB cytc 5 and SV cytc 5, Gln, Thr, and Lys, respectively, which might have been introduced during evolution on adaption to environmental pressure. The monomeric Shewanella cytochromes c 5 are suitable tools for examining protein stability with regard to the optimal growth pressures of the source species.

  18. The effects of agitation and aeration on the production of gluconic acid by Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Dronawat, S.N.; Svihla, C.K.; Hanley, T.R.

    1995-12-31

    The effects of agitation and aeration in the production of gluconic acid by Aspergillus niger from a glucose medium were investigated. Experiments were conducted at aeration rates of 5.0 and 10.0 L/min. Four different agitation speeds were investigated for each aeration rate. Gluconic acid concentration and biomass concentration were analyzed, and the rate of consumption of substrate by A. niger was noted. The main purpose of this work was to find the optimal conditions of agitation and aeration for the growth of A. niger and production of gluconic acid in submerged culture in a batch fermentor at a bench-top scale. The oxygen-transfer rates at different agitation and aeration rates were calculated. The gluconic acid concentration and rate of growth of A. niger increased with increase in the agitation and aeration rates.

  19. Stratification structure of polysaccharides and proteins in activated sludge with different aeration in membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Yu, Haihuan; Zhang, Lanhe; Song, Lianfa

    2015-09-01

    The effect of distribution pattern of polysaccharides (PS) and proteins (PN) in activated sludge (AS) stratification with different aeration rates on membrane fouling and rejection efficiency were investigated. During high aeration, PN and PS concentrations increased in supernatant, the dominant fraction (84% of PN and 73% of PS) was small molecules (<1 kDa). Less slime and loose bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS), more tight bound EPS (TB-EPS) were observed compared with low aeration. The decrease in PN/PS ratio and Ca(2+) concentration within EPS deteriorated AS flocculation ability. At slow trans-membrane pressure (TMP) rise stage, fouling rate under high aeration was 41% lower than low aeration due to lower PN within EPS outer. Low PS rejection rate (about 23%) leaded to higher PS in effluent at this stage. High PS rejection rate (about 94%) at rapid TMP rise stage resulted in about 2.2-time higher fouling rate than that low aeration.

  20. Effect of Aeration and Circulation Treatment of Effluent on Wastewater Purification Functions of a Planted Canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Morio; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Hiratsuka, Akira

    Water purification characteristic evaluation was done for adding aeration and circulation to a canal planted with Carex dispalata, which is a Japanese native species whose height does not obstruct the view. Circulation improved the BOD removal efficiency, irrespective of the use of aeration. Aeration improved the BOD removal efficiency in the condition of circulation ON. The BOD removal rate without any circulation was 15g·m-2·d-1, which was the maximum, suggesting that it can be raised higher than 20g·m-2·d-1 through the use of aeration and circulation. The D-BOD removal effect is high. Therefore, removal of the organic pollution load by bacteria increased. The nitrogen removal efficiency did not increase because nitrification by aeration did not advance. Instead of energy-intensive aeration, it is necessary to consider the oxidative capacity of nitrification.