Science.gov

Sample records for aerial image contrast

  1. Aerial Image Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Robert E.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial images produce the best stereoscopic images of the viewed world. Despite the fact that every optic in existence produces an aerial image, few persons are aware of their existence and possible uses. Constant reference to the eye and other optical systems have produced a psychosis of design that only considers "focal planes" in the design and analysis of optical systems. All objects in the field of view of the optical device are imaged by the device as an aerial image. Use of aerial images in vision and visual display systems can provide a true stereoscopic representation of the viewed world. This paper discusses aerial image systems - their applications and designs and presents designs and design concepts that utilize aerial images to obtain superior visual displays, particularly with application to visual simulation.

  2. Aerial Photographs and Satellite Images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Photographs and other images of the Earth taken from the air and from space show a great deal about the planet's landforms, vegetation, and resources. Aerial and satellite images, known as remotely sensed images, permit accurate mapping of land cover and make landscape features understandable on regional, continental, and even global scales. Transient phenomena, such as seasonal vegetation vigor and contaminant discharges, can be studied by comparing images acquired at different times. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which began using aerial photographs for mapping in the 1930's, archives photographs from its mapping projects and from those of some other Federal agencies. In addition, many images from such space programs as Landsat, begun in 1972, are held by the USGS. Most satellite scenes can be obtained only in digital form for use in computer-based image processing and geographic information systems, but in some cases are also available as photographic products.

  3. Aerial Video Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    When Michael Henry wanted to start an aerial video service, he turned to Johnson Space Center for assistance. Two NASA engineers - one had designed and developed TV systems in Apollo, Skylab, Apollo- Soyuz and Space Shuttle programs - designed a wing-mounted fiberglass camera pod. Camera head and angles are adjustable, and the pod is shaped to reduce vibration. The controls are located so a solo pilot can operate the system. A microprocessor displays latitude, longitude, and bearing, and a GPS receiver provides position data for possible legal references. The service has been successfully utilized by railroads, oil companies, real estate companies, etc.

  4. Detection of linear features in aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Rui

    Over the past decades, considerable progress had been made to develop automatic image interpretation tools in remote sensing. However, there is still a gap between the results and the requirements for accuracy and robustness. Noisy aerial image interpretation, especially for low resolution images, is still difficult. In this thesis, we propose a fully automatic system for linear feature detection in aerial images. We present how the system works on the application of extraction and reconstruction of road and pipeline networks. The work in this thesis is divided by three parts: line detection, feature interpretation, and feature tracking. An improved Hough transform based on orientation information is introduced for the line detection. We explore the Markov random field model and Bayesian filtering for feature interpretation and tracking. Experimental results show that our proposed system is robust and effective to deal with low resolution aerial images.

  5. Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-11-13

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift {phi} directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient {nabla}{sub {phi}}, or the Laplacian {nabla}{sup 2}{phi}. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1

  6. System for interactive management of aerial imaging campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wypych, Tom; Kuester, Falko

    We present a system to enable real time management of interchangeable imaging platforms aboard commodity unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to improve interactivity during aerial imaging campaigns. We argue that this improvement in interactivity enables powerful immediate-mode inspection by the ground operator, and implements a more intuitive, flexible, and ultimately useful control interface to aerial imaging systems.

  7. Orientation Strategies for Aerial Oblique Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, A.; Moré, J.

    2012-07-01

    Oblique aerial images become more and more distributed to fill the gap between vertical aerial images and mobile mapping systems. Different systems are on the market. For some applications, like texture mapping, precise orientation data are required. One point is the stable interior orientation, which can be achieved by stable camera systems, the other a precise exterior orientation. A sufficient exterior orientation can be achieved by a large effort in direct sensor orientation, whereas minor errors in the angles have a larger effect than in vertical imagery. The more appropriate approach is by determine the precise orientation parameters by photogrammetric methods using an adapted aerial triangulation. Due to the different points of view towards the object the traditional aerotriangulation matching tools fail, as they produce a bunch of blunders and require a lot of manual work to achieve a sufficient solution. In this paper some approaches are discussed and results are presented for the most promising approaches. We describe a single step approach with an aerotriangulation using all available images; a two step approach with an aerotriangulation only of the vertical images plus a mathematical transformation of the oblique images using the oblique cameras excentricity; and finally the extended functional model for a bundle block adjustment considering the mechanical connection between vertical and oblique images. Beside accuracy also other aspects like efficiency and required manual work have to be considered.

  8. Aerial photographs and satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    Because photographs and images taken from the air or from space are acquired without direct contact with the ground, they are referred to as remotely sensed images. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has used remote sensing from the early years of the 20th century to support earth science studies and for mapping purposes.

  9. Investigating an Aerial Image First

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyrembeck, Edward P.; Elmer, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    Most introductory optics lab activities begin with students locating the real image formed by a converging lens. The method is simple and straightforward--students move a screen back and forth until the real image is in sharp focus on the screen. Students then draw a simple ray diagram to explain the observation using only two or three special…

  10. A registration strategy for long spatio-temporal aerial remote sensing image sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yutian; Yan, Dongmei; Li, Jianming; Wang, Gang

    2015-12-01

    A novel registration strategy for aerial image sequence is put forward to adapt to the long spatio-temporal span of the aerial remote sensing imaging. By setting keyframe, this strategy aligns all images in sequence to a unified datum with high registration sustainability and precision. The contrast experiment on different registration strategies is carried out based on SIFT feature matching of mid-infrared aerial sequences. The experiment results show that the proposed strategy performs well on long spatio-temporal sequences with different imaging resolutions and scenes.

  11. HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW WITH THE CEMETERY IN BACKGROUND. PHOTOGRAPH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW WITH THE CEMETERY IN BACKGROUND. PHOTOGRAPH 29 OCTOBER 1959. NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - Black Hills National Cemetery, 20901 Pleasant Valley Drive, Sturgis, Meade County, SD

  12. HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW WITH NEW EXPRESSWAY IN FOREGROUND. PHOTOGRAPH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW WITH NEW EXPRESSWAY IN FOREGROUND. PHOTOGRAPH 19 SEPTEMBER 1978. NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - Black Hills National Cemetery, 20901 Pleasant Valley Drive, Sturgis, Meade County, SD

  13. Multiscale image contrast amplification (MUSICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuylsteke, Pieter; Schoeters, Emile P.

    1994-05-01

    This article presents a novel approach to the problem of detail contrast enhancement, based on multiresolution representation of the original image. The image is decomposed into a weighted sum of smooth, localized, 2D basis functions at multiple scales. Each transform coefficient represents the amount of local detail at some specific scale and at a specific position in the image. Detail contrast is enhanced by non-linear amplification of the transform coefficients. An inverse transform is then applied to the modified coefficients. This yields a uniformly contrast- enhanced image without artefacts. The MUSICA-algorithm is being applied routinely to computed radiography images of chest, skull, spine, shoulder, pelvis, extremities, and abdomen examinations, with excellent acceptance. It is useful for a wide range of applications in the medical, graphical, and industrial area.

  14. Calculation and uses of the lithographic aerial image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagello, Donis G.; Smith, Daniel G.

    2012-09-01

    Beginning with the seminal Dill papers of 1975, the aerial image has been essential for understanding the process of microlithography. From the aerial image, we can predict the performance of a given lithographic process in terms of depth of focus, exposure latitude, etc. As lithographic technologies improved, reaching smaller and smaller printed features, the sophistication of aerial image calculations has had to increase from simple incoherent imaging theory, to partial coherence, polarization effects, thin film effects at the resist, thick mask effects, and so on. This tutorial provides an overview and semihistorical development of the aerial image calculation and then provides a review of some of the various ways in which the aerial image is typically used to estimate the performance of the lithographic process.

  15. Adapted polarization state contrast image.

    PubMed

    Richert, Michael; Orlik, Xavier; De Martino, Antonello

    2009-08-03

    We propose a general method to maximize the polarimetric contrast between an object and its background using a predetermined illumination polarization state. After a first estimation of the polarimetric properties of the scene by classical Mueller imaging, we evaluate the incident polarized field that induces scattered polarization states by the object and background, as opposite as possible on the Poincar e sphere. With a detection method optimized for a 2-channel imaging system, Monte Carlo simulations of low flux coherent imaging are performed with various objects and backgrounds having different properties of retardance, dichroism and depolarization. With respect to classical Mueller imaging, possibly associated to the polar decomposition, our results show a noticeable increase in the Bhattacharyya distance used as our contrast parameter.

  16. An algorithm for approximate rectification of digital aerial images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-resolution aerial photography is one of the most valuable tools available for managing extensive landscapes. With recent advances in digital camera technology, computer hardware, and software, aerial photography is easier to collect, store, and transfer than ever before. Images can be automa...

  17. Coastal Digital Surface Model on Low Contrast Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosu, A.-M.; Assenbaum, M.; De la Torre, Y.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.

    2015-08-01

    Coastal sandy environments are extremely dynamic and require regular monitoring that can easily be achieved by using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) including a drone and a photo camera. The acquired images have low contrast and homogeneous texture. Using these images and with very few, if any, ground control points (GCPs), it is difficult to obtain a digital surface model (DSM) by classical correlation and automatic interest points determination approach. A possible response to this problem is to work with enhanced, contrast filtered images. To achieve this, we use and tune the free open-source software MicMac.

  18. Direct Penguin Counting Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, C. U.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents an application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images to monitor penguin colony in Baton Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica. The area around Narębski Point located on the southeast coast of Barton Peninsula was designated as Antarctic Specially Protected Area No. 171 (ASPA 171), and Chinstrap and Gentoo penguins inhabit in this area. The UAV images were acquired in a part of ASPA 171 from four flights in a single day, Jan 18, 2014. About 360 images were mosaicked as an image of about 3 cm spatial resolution and then a subset including representative penguin rookeries was selected. The subset image was segmented based on gradient map of pixel values, and spectral and spatial attributes were assigned to each segment. The object based image analysis (OBIA) was conducted with consideration of spectral attributes including mean and minimum values of each segment and various shape attributes such as area, length, compactness and roundness to detect individual penguin. The segments indicating individual penguin were effectively detected on rookeries with high contrasts in the spectral and shape attributes. The importance of periodic and precise monitoring of penguins has been recognized because variations of their populations reflect environmental changes and disturbance from human activities. Utilization of very high resolution imaging method shown in this study can be applied to other penguin habitats in Antarctica, and the results will be able to support establishing effective environmental management plans.

  19. HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH 15 SEPTEMBER 1950. NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - San Francisco National Cemetery, 1 Lincoln Boulevard, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. High-contrast imaging testbed

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  1. Use of simulated neural networks of aerial image classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medina, Frances I.; Vasquez, Ramon

    1991-01-01

    The utility of one layer neural network in aerial image classification is examined. The network was trained with the delta rule. This method was shown to be useful as a classifier in aerial images with good resolution. It is fast, it is easy to implement, because it is distribution-free, nothing about statistical distribution of the data is needed, and it is very efficient as a boundary detector.

  2. A Comparison of Visual Statistics for the Image Enhancement of FORESITE Aerial Images with Those of Major Image Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2006-01-01

    Aerial images from the Follow-On Radar, Enhanced and Synthetic Vision Systems Integration Technology Evaluation (FORESITE) flight tests with the NASA Langley Research Center's research Boeing 757 were acquired during severe haze and haze/mixed clouds visibility conditions. These images were enhanced using the Visual Servo (VS) process that makes use of the Multiscale Retinex. The images were then quantified with visual quality metrics used internally with the VS. One of these metrics, the Visual Contrast Measure, has been computed for hundreds of FORESITE images, and for major classes of imaging--terrestrial (consumer), orbital Earth observations, orbital Mars surface imaging, NOAA aerial photographs, and underwater imaging. The metric quantifies both the degree of visual impairment of the original, un-enhanced images as well as the degree of visibility improvement achieved by the enhancement process. The large aggregate data exhibits trends relating to degree of atmospheric visibility attenuation, and its impact on limits of enhancement performance for the various image classes. Overall results support the idea that in most cases that do not involve extreme reduction in visibility, large gains in visual contrast are routinely achieved by VS processing. Additionally, for very poor visibility imaging, lesser, but still substantial, gains in visual contrast are also routinely achieved. Further, the data suggest that these visual quality metrics can be used as external standalone metrics for establishing performance parameters.

  3. Aerial imaging manages pipeline right-of-way programs

    SciTech Connect

    Jadkowski, M.A.; Convery, P.

    1996-02-01

    Pipeline companies that own and manage extensive rights-of-way corridors are facing ever-increasing regulatory pressures, operating issues and ongoing needs to remain competitive in today`s marketplace. The digital aerial rights-of-way monitoring system (DARMS) is a personal computer-based digital charge-coupled device (CCD) camera integrated with a high-capacity tape recorder. DARMS was developed through NASA by the Stennis Space Center for use in a Sewall aircraft. Sewall is responsible for its operational testing and developing the image products for pipeline monitoring. DARMS consists of a personal computer main control unit (MCU), a Kodak Megaplus 1.4-CCD camera head, a monochrome video monitor for in-flight operation, and an Exabyte 8500 8-millimeter tape recorder for image data storage. The system is designed to be operated in a small, unpressurized aircraft flown by a single pilot. The control program software provides a highly autonomous turnkey operation. After a mission has been flown, Exabyte tape is loaded onto a Sun workstation and the images are contrast-balanced and spatially enhanced using a mid-high filtering algorithm. Depending on client requirements, images also may be geo-referenced to a coordinate system or mosaicked together. The resulting image frames are indexed using their GPS location, delivered to the client and archived.

  4. Laser Image Contrast Enhancement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Robert L. (Inventor); Holmes, Richard R. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An optical image enhancement system provides improved image contrast in imaging of a target in high temperature surroundings such as a furnace. The optical system includes a source of vertically polarized light such as laser and a beam splitter for receiving the light and directing the light toward the target. A retardation plate is affixed to a target-facing surface of the beam splitter and a vertical polarizer is disposed along a common optical path with the beam splitter between the retardation plate and the target. A horizontal polarizer disposed in the common optical path, receives light passing through a surface of the beam splitter opposed to the target-facing surface. An image detector is disposed at one end of the optical path. A band pass filter having a band pass filter characteristic matching the frequency of the vertically polarized light source is disposed in the path between the horizontal polarizer and the image detector. The use of circular polarization, together with cross polarizers, enables the reflected light to be passed to the detector while blocking thermal radiation.

  5. Advanced Image Processing of Aerial Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glenn; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Aerial imagery of the Earth is an invaluable tool for the assessment of ground features, especially during times of disaster. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have developed techniques which have proven to be useful for such imagery. Aerial imagery from various sources, including Langley's Boeing 757 Aries aircraft, has been studied extensively. This paper discusses these studies and demonstrates that better-than-observer imagery can be obtained even when visibility is severely compromised. A real-time, multi-spectral experimental system will be described and numerous examples will be shown.

  6. Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems Testing: Evaluation of VIS SWIR MWIR and LWIR passive imagers.

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carlisle; Woo, Bryana Lynn

    2017-01-01

    This report contains analysis of unmanned aerial systems as imaged by visible, short-wave infrared, mid-wave infrared, and long-wave infrared passive devices. Testing was conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) during the week of August 15, 2016. Target images in all spectral bands are shown and contrast versus background is reported. Calculations are performed to determine estimated pixels-on-target for detection and assessment levels, and the number of pixels needed to cover a hemisphere for detection or assessment at defined distances. Background clutter challenges are qualitatively discussed for different spectral bands, and low contrast scenarios are highlighted for long-wave infrared imagers.

  7. Endoscopy imaging intelligent contrast improvement.

    PubMed

    Sheraizin, S; Sheraizin, V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a medical endoscopy video contrast improvement method that provides intelligent automatic adaptive contrast control. The method fundamentals are video data clustering and video data histogram modification. The video data clustering allows an effective use the low noise two channel contrast enhancement processing. The histogram analysis permitted to determine the video exposure type for simple and complicated contrast distribution. We determined the needed gamma value for automatic local area contrast improvement for the following exposure types: dark, normal, light, dark light, dark normal etc. The experimental results of medical endoscopy video processing allow defining the automatic gamma control range from 0.5 to 2.0.

  8. HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF THE CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF THE CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON 6 APRIL 1968. NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  9. A Low-Cost Imaging System for Aerial Applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available and versatile platform for airborne remote sensing. Although various airborne imaging systems are being used for research and commercial applications, most of these systems are either too expensive or too complex to be of practical use for aerial app...

  10. An improved dehazing algorithm of aerial high-definition image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wentao; Ji, Ming; Huang, Xiying; Wang, Chao; Yang, Yizhou; Li, Tao; Wang, Jiaoying; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    For unmanned aerial vehicle(UAV) images, the sensor can not get high quality images due to fog and haze weather. To solve this problem, An improved dehazing algorithm of aerial high-definition image is proposed. Based on the model of dark channel prior, the new algorithm firstly extracts the edges from crude estimated transmission map and expands the extracted edges. Then according to the expended edges, the algorithm sets a threshold value to divide the crude estimated transmission map into different areas and makes different guided filter on the different areas compute the optimized transmission map. The experimental results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithm is substantially the same as the one based on dark channel prior and guided filter. The average computation time of the new algorithm is around 40% of the one as well as the detection ability of UAV image is improved effectively in fog and haze weather.

  11. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  12. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  13. Aerial image databases for pipeline rights-of-way management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadkowski, Mark A.

    1996-03-01

    Pipeline companies that own and manage extensive rights-of-way corridors are faced with ever-increasing regulatory pressures, operating issues, and the need to remain competitive in today's marketplace. Automation has long been an answer to the problem of having to do more work with less people, and Automated Mapping/Facilities Management/Geographic Information Systems (AM/FM/GIS) solutions have been implemented at several pipeline companies. Until recently, the ability to cost-effectively acquire and incorporate up-to-date aerial imagery into these computerized systems has been out of the reach of most users. NASA's Earth Observations Commercial Applications Program (EOCAP) is providing a means by which pipeline companies can bridge this gap. The EOCAP project described in this paper includes a unique partnership with NASA and James W. Sewall Company to develop an aircraft-mounted digital camera system and a ground-based computer system to geometrically correct and efficiently store and handle the digital aerial images in an AM/FM/GIS environment. This paper provides a synopsis of the project, including details on (1) the need for aerial imagery, (2) NASA's interest and role in the project, (3) the design of a Digital Aerial Rights-of-Way Monitoring System, (4) image georeferencing strategies for pipeline applications, and (5) commercialization of the EOCAP technology through a prototype project at Algonquin Gas Transmission Company which operates major gas pipelines in New England, New York, and New Jersey.

  14. Accuracy of Measurements in Oblique Aerial Images for Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, W.

    2016-10-01

    Oblique aerial images have been a source of data for urban areas for several years. However, the accuracy of measurements in oblique images during this time has been limited to a single meter due to the use of direct -georeferencing technology and the underlying digital elevation model. Therefore, oblique images have been used mostly for visualization purposes. This situation changed in recent years as new methods, which allowed for a higher accuracy of exterior orientation, were developed. Current developments include the process of determining exterior orientation and the previous but still crucial process of tie point extraction. Progress in this area was shown in the ISPRS/EUROSDR Benchmark on Multi-Platform Photogrammetry and is also noticeable in the growing interest in the use of this kind of imagery. The higher level of accuracy in the orientation of oblique aerial images that has become possible in the last few years should result in a higher level of accuracy in the measurements of these types of images. The main goal of this research was to set and empirically verify the accuracy of measurements in oblique aerial images. The research focused on photogrammetric measurements composed of many images, which use a high overlap within an oblique dataset and different view angles. During the experiments, two series of images of urban areas were used. Both were captured using five DigiCam cameras in a Maltese cross configuration. The tilt angles of the oblique cameras were 45 degrees, and the position of the cameras during flight used a high grade GPS/INS navigation system. The orientation of the images was set using the Pix4D Mapper Pro software with both measurements of the in-flight camera position and the ground control points (measured with GPS RTK technology). To control the accuracy, check points were used (which were also measured with GPS RTK technology). As reference data for the whole study, an area of the city-based map was used. The archived results

  15. D City Transformations by Time Series of Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, A.

    2015-02-01

    Recent photogrammetric applications, based on dense image matching algorithms, allow to use not only images acquired by digital cameras, amateur or not, but also to recover the vast heritage of analogue photographs. This possibility opens up many possibilities in the use and enhancement of existing photos heritage. The research of the original figuration of old buildings, the virtual reconstruction of disappeared architectures and the study of urban development are some of the application areas that exploit the great cultural heritage of photography. Nevertheless there are some restrictions in the use of historical images for automatic reconstruction of buildings such as image quality, availability of camera parameters and ineffective geometry of image acquisition. These constrains are very hard to solve and it is difficult to discover good dataset in the case of terrestrial close range photogrammetry for the above reasons. Even the photographic archives of museums and superintendence, while retaining a wealth of documentation, have no dataset for a dense image matching approach. Compared to the vast collection of historical photos, the class of aerial photos meets both criteria stated above. In this paper historical aerial photographs are used with dense image matching algorithms to realize 3d models of a city in different years. The models can be used to study the urban development of the city and its changes through time. The application relates to the city centre of Verona, for which some time series of aerial photographs have been retrieved. The models obtained in this way allowed, right away, to observe the urban development of the city, the places of expansion and new urban areas. But a more interesting aspect emerged from the analytical comparison between models. The difference, as the Euclidean distance, between two models gives information about new buildings or demolitions. As considering accuracy it is necessary point out that the quality of final

  16. Phase contrast imaging of cochlear soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani Smith, Stephanie; Hwang, Margaret; Rau, Christoph; Fishman, Andrew J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2011-03-01

    A noninvasive technique to image soft tissue could expedite diagnosis and disease management in the auditory system. We propose inline phase contrast imaging with hard X-rays as a novel method that overcomes the limitations of conventional absorption radiography for imaging soft tissue. In this study, phase contrast imaging of mouse cochleae was performed at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source. The phase contrast tomographic reconstructions show soft tissue structures of the cochlea, including the inner pillar cells, the inner spiral sulcus, the tectorial membrane, the basilar membrane, and the Reissner's membrane. The results suggest that phase contrast X-ray imaging and tomographic techniques hold promise to noninvasively image cochlear structures at an unprecedented cellular level.

  17. Feature extraction with LIDAR data and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jianhua; Liu, Yanjing; Cheng, Penggen; Li, Xianhua; Zeng, Qihong; Xia, Jing

    2006-10-01

    Raw LIDAR data is a irregular spacing 3D point cloud including reflections from bare ground, buildings, vegetation and vehicles etc., and the first task of the data analyses of point cloud is feature extraction. However, the interpretability of LIDAR point cloud is often limited due to the fact that no object information is provided, and the complex earth topography and object morphology make it impossible for a single operator to classify all the point cloud precisely 100%. In this paper, a hierarchy method for feature extraction with LIDAR data and aerial images is discussed. The aerial images provide us information of objects figuration and spatial distribution, and hierarchic classification of features makes it easy to apply automatic filters progressively. And the experiment results show that, using this method, it was possible to detect more object information and get a better result of feature extraction than using automatic filters alone.

  18. Deep person re-identification in aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Arne; Schuchert, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    Person re-identification is the problem of matching multiple occurrences of a person in large amounts of image or video data. In this work we propose an approach specifically tailored to re-identify people across different camera views in aerial video recordings. New challenges that arise in aerial data include unusual and more varied view angles, a moving camera and potentially large changes in environment and other in uences between recordings (i.e. between flights). Our approach addresses these new challenges. Due to their recent successes, we apply deep learning to automatically learn features for person re-identification on a number of public datasets. We evaluate these features on aerial data and propose a method to automatically select suitable pretrained features without requiring person id labels on the aerial data. We further show that tailored data augmentation methods are well suited to better cope with the larger variety in view angles. Finally, we combine our model with a metric learning approach to allow for interactive improvement of re-identification results through user feedback. We evaluate the approach on our own video dataset which contains 12 persons recorded from a UAV.

  19. Atmospheric visibility estimation and image contrast calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermansson, Patrik; Edstam, Klas

    2016-10-01

    A method, referred to as contrast calibration, has been developed for transforming digital color photos of outdoor scenes from the atmospheric conditions, illumination and visibility, prevailing at the time of capturing the image to a corresponding image for other atmospheric conditions. A photo captured on a hazy day can, for instance, be converted to resemble a photo of the same scene for good visibility conditions. Converting digital color images to specified lightning and transmission conditions is useful for image based assessment of signature suppression solutions. The method uses "calibration objects" which are photographed at about the same time as the scene of interest. The calibration objects, which (indirectly) provide information on visibility and lightning conditions, consist of two flat boards, painted in different grayscale colors, and a commercial, neutral gray, reference card. Atmospheric extinction coefficient and sky intensity can be determined, in three wavelength bands, from image pixel values on the calibration objects and using this information the image can be converted to other atmospheric conditions. The image is transformed in contrast and color. For illustration, contrast calibration is applied to sample images of a scene acquired at different times. It is shown that contrast calibration of the images to the same reference values of extinction coefficient and sky intensity results in images that are more alike than the original images. It is also exemplified how images can be transformed to various other atmospheric weather conditions. Limitations of the method are discussed and possibilities for further development are suggested.

  20. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Säynäjoki, Raita; Packalén, Petteri; Maltamo, Matti; Vehmas, Mikko; Eerikäinen, Kalle

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L.) from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM) was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF) and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species. PMID:27873799

  1. a Fast Approach for Stitching of Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    The last few years have witnessed an increasing volume of aerial image data because of the extensive improvements of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). These newly developed UAVs have led to a wide variety of applications. A fast assessment of the achieved coverage and overlap of the acquired images of a UAV flight mission is of great help to save the time and cost of the further steps. A fast automatic stitching of the acquired images can help to visually assess the achieved coverage and overlap during the flight mission. This paper proposes an automatic image stitching approach that creates a single overview stitched image using the acquired images during a UAV flight mission along with a coverage image that represents the count of overlaps between the acquired images. The main challenge of such task is the huge number of images that are typically involved in such scenarios. A short flight mission with image acquisition frequency of one second can capture hundreds to thousands of images. The main focus of the proposed approach is to reduce the processing time of the image stitching procedure by exploiting the initial knowledge about the images positions provided by the navigation sensors. The proposed approach also avoids solving for all the transformation parameters of all the photos together to save the expected long computation time if all the parameters were considered simultaneously. After extracting the points of interest of all the involved images using Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm, the proposed approach uses the initial image's coordinates to build an incremental constrained Delaunay triangulation that represents the neighborhood of each image. This triangulation helps to match only the neighbor images and therefore reduces the time-consuming features matching step. The estimated relative orientation between the matched images is used to find a candidate seed image for the stitching process. The pre-estimated transformation

  2. Evaluation of Color Settings in Aerial Images with the Use of Eye-Tracking User Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirijovsky, J.; Popelka, S.

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of presented paper is to find the most realistic and preferred color settings for four different types of surfaces on the aerial images. This will be achieved through user study with the use of eye-movement recording. Aerial images taken by the unmanned aerial system were used as stimuli. From each image, squared crop area containing one of the studied types of surfaces (asphalt, concrete, water, soil, and grass) was selected. For each type of surface, the real value of reflectance was found with the use of precise spectroradiometer ASD HandHeld 2 which measures the reflectance. The device was used at the same time as aerial images were captured, so lighting conditions and state of vegetation were equal. The spectral resolution of the ASD device is better than 3.0 nm. For defining the RGB values of selected type of surface, the spectral reflectance values recorded by the device were merged into wider groups. Finally, we get three groups corresponding to RGB color system. Captured images were edited with the graphic editor Photoshop CS6. Contrast, clarity, and brightness were edited for all surface types on images. Finally, we get a set of 12 images of the same area with different color settings. These images were put into the grid and used as stimuli for the eye-tracking experiment. Eye-tracking is one of the methods of usability studies and it is considered as relatively objective. Eye-tracker SMI RED 250 with the sampling frequency 250 Hz was used in the study. As respondents, a group of 24 students of Geoinformatics and Geography was used. Their task was to select which image in the grid has the best color settings. The next task was to select which color settings they prefer. Respondents' answers were evaluated and the most realistic and most preferable color settings were found. The advantage of the eye-tracking evaluation was that also the process of the selection of the answers was analyzed. Areas of Interest were marked around each image in the

  3. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  4. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  5. Generating object proposals for improved object detection in aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Lars W.; Schuchert, Tobias; Beyerer, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    Screening of aerial images covering large areas is important for many applications such as surveillance, tracing or rescue tasks. To reduce the workload of image analysts, an automatic detection of candidate objects is required. In general, object detection is performed by applying classifiers or a cascade of classifiers within a sliding window algorithm. However, the huge number of windows to classify, especially in case of multiple object scales, makes these approaches computationally expensive. To overcome this challenge, we reduce the number of candidate windows by generating so called object proposals. Object proposals are a set of candidate regions in an image that are likely to contain an object. We apply the Selective Search approach that has been broadly used as proposals method for detectors like R-CNN or Fast R-CNN. Therefore, a set of small regions is generated by initial segmentation followed by hierarchical grouping of the initial regions to generate proposals at different scales. To reduce the computational costs of the original approach, which consists of 80 combinations of segmentation settings and grouping strategies, we only apply the most appropriate combination. Therefore, we analyze the impact of varying segmentation settings, different merging strategies, and various colour spaces by calculating the recall with regard to the number of object proposals and the intersection over union between generated proposals and ground truth annotations. As aerial images differ considerably from datasets that are typically used for exploring object proposals methods, in particular in object size and the image fraction occupied by an object, we further adapt the Selective Search algorithm to aerial images by replacing the random order of generated proposals by a weighted order based on the object proposal size and integrate a termination criterion for the merging strategies. Finally, the adapted approach is compared to the original Selective Search algorithm

  6. An automatic high precision registration method between large area aerial images and aerial light detection and ranging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Q.; Xie, D.; Sun, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The integration of digital aerial photogrammetry and Light Detetion And Ranging (LiDAR) is an inevitable trend in Surveying and Mapping field. We calculate the external orientation elements of images which identical with LiDAR coordinate to realize automatic high precision registration between aerial images and LiDAR data. There are two ways to calculate orientation elements. One is single image spatial resection using image matching 3D points that registered to LiDAR. The other one is Position and Orientation System (POS) data supported aerotriangulation. The high precision registration points are selected as Ground Control Points (GCPs) instead of measuring GCPs manually during aerotriangulation. The registration experiments indicate that the method which registering aerial images and LiDAR points has a great advantage in higher automation and precision compare with manual registration.

  7. Three-dimensional image contrast using biospeckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinho, Robson Pierangeli; Braga, Roberto A., Jr.

    2010-09-01

    The biospeckle laser (BSL) has been applied in many areas of knowledge and a variety of approaches has been presented to address the best results in biological and non-biological samples, in fast or slow activities, or else in defined flow of materials or in random activities. The methodologies accounted in the literature consider the apparatus used in the image assembling and the way the collected data is processed. The image processing steps presents in turn a variety of procedures with first or second order statistics analysis, and as well with different sizes of data collected. One way to access the biospeckle in defined flow, such as in capillary blood flow in alive animals, was the adoption of the image contrast technique which uses only one image from the illuminated sample. That approach presents some problems related to the resolution of the image, which is reduced during the image contrast processing. In order to help the visualization of the low resolution image formed by the contrast technique, this work presents the three-dimensional procedure as a reliable alternative to enhance the final image. The work based on a parallel processing, with the generation of a virtual map of amplitudes, and maintaining the quasi-online characteristic of the contrast technique. Therefore, it was possible to generate in the same display the observed material, the image contrast result and in addiction the three-dimensional image with adjustable options of rotation. The platform also offers to the user the possibility to access the 3D image offline.

  8. Large-Scale Aerial Image Categorization Using a Multitask Topological Codebook.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luming; Wang, Meng; Hong, Richang; Yin, Bao-Cai; Li, Xuelong

    2016-02-01

    Fast and accurately categorizing the millions of aerial images on Google Maps is a useful technique in pattern recognition. Existing methods cannot handle this task successfully due to two reasons: 1) the aerial images' topologies are the key feature to distinguish their categories, but they cannot be effectively encoded by a conventional visual codebook and 2) it is challenging to build a realtime image categorization system, as some geo-aware Apps update over 20 aerial images per second. To solve these problems, we propose an efficient aerial image categorization algorithm. It focuses on learning a discriminative topological codebook of aerial images under a multitask learning framework. The pipeline can be summarized as follows. We first construct a region adjacency graph (RAG) that describes the topology of each aerial image. Naturally, aerial image categorization can be formulated as RAG-to-RAG matching. According to graph theory, RAG-to-RAG matching is conducted by enumeratively comparing all their respective graphlets (i.e., small subgraphs). To alleviate the high time consumption, we propose to learn a codebook containing topologies jointly discriminative to multiple categories. The learned topological codebook guides the extraction of the discriminative graphlets. Finally, these graphlets are integrated into an AdaBoost model for predicting aerial image categories. Experimental results show that our approach is competitive to several existing recognition models. Furthermore, over 24 aerial images are processed per second, demonstrating that our approach is ready for real-world applications.

  9. Feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Voormolen, M M; Bouakaz, A; Krenning, B J; Lancée, C T; ten Cate, F J; de Jong, N

    2004-04-01

    Improved endocardial border delineation with the application of contrast agents should allow for less complex and faster tracing algorithms for left ventricular volume analysis. We developed a fast rotating phased array transducer for 3D imaging of the heart with harmonic capabilities making it suitable for contrast imaging. In this study the feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging is evaluated in vitro. A commercially available tissue mimicking flow phantom was used in combination with Sonovue. Backscatter power spectra from a tissue and contrast region of interest were calculated from recorded radio frequency data. The spectra and the extracted contrast to tissue ratio from these spectra were used to optimize the excitation frequency, the pulse length and the receive filter settings of the transducer. Frequencies ranging from 1.66 to 2.35 MHz and pulse lengths of 1.5, 2 and 2.5 cycles were explored. An increase of more than 15 dB in the contrast to tissue ratio was found around the second harmonic compared with the fundamental level at an optimal excitation frequency of 1.74 MHz and a pulse length of 2.5 cycles. Using the optimal settings for 3D harmonic contrast recordings volume measurements of a left ventricular shaped agar phantom were performed. Without contrast the extracted volume data resulted in a volume error of 1.5%, with contrast an accuracy of 3.8% was achieved. The results show the feasibility of accurate volume measurements from 3D harmonic contrast images. Further investigations will include the clinical evaluation of the presented technique for improved assessment of the heart.

  10. Algorithm for unmanned aerial vehicle aerial different-source image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Yujia; Liu, Jinghong; Yang, Mingyu; Wang, Xuan; Sun, Mingchao

    2016-12-01

    The fusion between visible and infrared images captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), both complementary to each other, can improve the reliability of target detection and recognition and other tasks. The images captured by UAV are featured by high dynamics and complex air-ground target background. Pixel-level matching should be conducted for the two different-source images, prior to their fusion. Therefore, an improved matching algorithm has been proposed that combines the improved Shi-Tomasi algorithm with the shape context (SC)-based algorithm. First, the Shi-Tomasi algorithm is employed to conduct feature-point detection in the scale space. The tangential direction of the edge contour where the feature-point lies is taken as its main direction, so as to guarantee the algorithm's rotational invariance. Then, this paper conducts the block description for the extracted feature-point within the n×n neighborhood of its edge contour to obtain its descriptors. Finally, a fast library for approximate nearest neighbors matching algorithm is adopted to match all the feature-points. And the experimental results show that, in the scene where the shape of the main target is clear, the algorithm can achieve better matching and registration results for infrared and visible images that have been transformed through rotation, translation, or zooming.

  11. Contrast sensitivity function and image discrimination.

    PubMed

    Peli, E

    2001-02-01

    A previous study tested the validity of simulations of the appearance of a natural image (from different observation distances) generated by using a visual model and contrast sensitivity functions of the individual observers [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 13, 1131 (1996)]. Deleting image spatial-frequency components that should be undetectable made the simulations indistinguishable from the original images at distances larger than the simulated distance. The simulated observation distance accurately predicted the distance at which the simulated image could be discriminated from the original image. Owing to the 1/f characteristic of natural images' spatial spectra, the individual contrast sensitivity functions (CSF's) used in the simulations of the previous study were actually tested only over a narrow range of retinal spatial frequencies. To test the CSF's over a wide range of frequencies, the same simulations and testing procedure were applied to five contrast versions of the images (10-300%). This provides a stronger test of the model, of the simulations, and specifically of the CSF's used. The relevant CSF for a discrimination task was found to be obtained by using 1-octave Gabor stimuli measured in a contrast detection task. The relevant CSF data had to be measured over a range of observation distances, owing to limitations of the displays.

  12. a New Paradigm for Matching - and Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, T.; Zhuo, X.; Reinartz, P.; Fraundorfer, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the performance of SIFT-based image matching regarding large differences in image scaling and rotation, as this is usually the case when trying to match images captured from UAVs and airplanes. This task represents an essential step for image registration and 3d-reconstruction applications. Various real world examples presented in this paper show that SIFT, as well as A-SIFT perform poorly or even fail in this matching scenario. Even if the scale difference in the images is known and eliminated beforehand, the matching performance suffers from too few feature point detections, ambiguous feature point orientations and rejection of many correct matches when applying the ratio-test afterwards. Therefore, a new feature matching method is provided that overcomes these problems and offers thousands of matches by a novel feature point detection strategy, applying a one-to-many matching scheme and substitute the ratio-test by adding geometric constraints to achieve geometric correct matches at repetitive image regions. This method is designed for matching almost nadir-directed images with low scene depth, as this is typical in UAV and aerial image matching scenarios. We tested the proposed method on different real world image pairs. While standard SIFT failed for most of the datasets, plenty of geometrical correct matches could be found using our approach. Comparing the estimated fundamental matrices and homographies with ground-truth solutions, mean errors of few pixels can be achieved.

  13. Error Estimation Techniques to Refine Overlapping Aerial Image Mosaic Processes via Detected Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, William Glenn

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I propose to demonstrate a means of error estimation preprocessing in the assembly of overlapping aerial image mosaics. The mosaic program automatically assembles several hundred aerial images from a data set by aligning them, via image registration using a pattern search method, onto a GIS grid. The method presented first locates…

  14. Land Use Classification from Vhr Aerial Images Using Invariant Colour Components and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movia, A.; Beinat, A.; Sandri, T.

    2016-06-01

    Very high resolution (VHR) aerial images can provide detailed analysis about landscape and environment; nowadays, thanks to the rapid growing airborne data acquisition technology an increasing number of high resolution datasets are freely available. In a VHR image the essential information is contained in the red-green-blue colour components (RGB) and in the texture, therefore a preliminary step in image analysis concerns the classification in order to detect pixels having similar characteristics and to group them in distinct classes. Common land use classification approaches use colour at a first stage, followed by texture analysis, particularly for the evaluation of landscape patterns. Unfortunately RGB-based classifications are significantly influenced by image setting, as contrast, saturation, and brightness, and by the presence of shadows in the scene. The classification methods analysed in this work aim to mitigate these effects. The procedures developed considered the use of invariant colour components, image resampling, and the evaluation of a RGB texture parameter for various increasing sizes of a structuring element. To identify the most efficient solution, the classification vectors obtained were then processed by a K-means unsupervised classifier using different metrics, and the results were compared with respect to corresponding user supervised classifications. The experiments performed and discussed in the paper let us evaluate the effective contribution of texture information, and compare the most suitable vector components and metrics for automatic classification of very high resolution RGB aerial images.

  15. Contrast optimization in broadband passive polarimetric imaging.

    PubMed

    Boffety, Matthieu; Hu, Haofeng; Goudail, François

    2014-12-01

    Polarimetric imaging is often performed using light with a narrow spectrum for the sake of polarization measurement accuracy. However, due to the use of narrowband filters, this reduces the amount of light entering the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. This may not be the best choice for target detection applications, where a high target contrast is required rather than polarimetric accuracy. We address contrast optimization for broadband passive polarimetric imaging. We show through simulation and experiments that polarimetric contrast can be significantly increased by broadening the spectrum of analyzed light. In addition, we show that the contrast can be optimized by taking into account the spectral dependence of the scene and of the polarization analysis devices.

  16. Contrast dispersion imaging for cancer localization.

    PubMed

    Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer growth is associated with angiogenic processes in many types of cancer. Several imaging strategies have therefore been developed that target angiogenesis as a marker for cancer localization. To this end, intravascular and extravascular tissue perfusion is typically assessed by dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) ultrasound (US) and MRI. All the proposed strategies, however, overlook important changes in the microvascular architecture that result from angiogenic processes. To overcome these limitations, we have recently introduced a new imaging strategy that analyzes the intravascular dispersion kinetics of contrast agents spreading through the microvasculature. Contrast dispersion is mainly determined by microvascular multi-path trajectories, reflecting the underlying microvascular architecture. This paper reviews the results obtained for prostate cancer localization by US and MRI dispersion imaging, also presenting the latest new developments and future perspectives.

  17. NASA High Contrast Imaging for Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Described is NASA's ongoing program for the detection and characterization of exosolar planets via high-contrast imaging. Some of the more promising proposed techniques under assessment may enable detection of life outside our solar system. In visible light terrestrial planets are approximately 10(exp -10) dimmer than the parent star. Issues such as diffraction, scatter, wavefront, amplitude and polarization all contribute to a reduction in contrast. An overview of the techniques will be discussed.

  18. High-contrast imaging with METIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Absil, Olivier; Agócs, Tibor; Pantin, Eric; Quanz, Sascha; Stuik, Remko; Snik, Frans; Brandl, Bernhard

    2016-08-01

    The Mid-infrared E-ELT Imager and Spectrograph (METIS) for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) consists of diffraction-limited imagers that cover 3 to 14 microns with medium resolution (R 5000) long slit spectroscopy, and an integral field spectrograph for high spectral resolution spectroscopy (R 100,000) over the L and M bands. One of the science cases that METIS addresses is the characterization of faint circumstellar material and exoplanet companions through imaging and spectroscopy. We present our approach for high contrast imaging with METIS, covering diffraction suppression with coronagraphs, the removal of slowly changing optical aberrations with focal plane wavefront sensing, interferometric imaging with sparse aperture masks, and observing strategies for both the imagers and IFU image slicers.

  19. Realization of an aerial 3D image that occludes the background scenery.

    PubMed

    Kakeya, Hideki; Ishizuka, Shuta; Sato, Yuya

    2014-10-06

    In this paper we describe an aerial 3D image that occludes far background scenery based on coarse integral volumetric imaging (CIVI) technology. There have been many volumetric display devices that present floating 3D images, most of which have not reproduced the visual occlusion. CIVI is a kind of multilayered integral imaging and realizes an aerial volumetric image with visual occlusion by combining multiview and volumetric display technologies. The conventional CIVI, however, cannot show a deep space, for the number of layered panels is limited because of the low transmittance of each panel. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel optical design to attain an aerial 3D image that occludes far background scenery. In the proposed system, a translucent display panel with 120 Hz refresh rate is located between the CIVI system and the aerial 3D image. The system modulates between the aerial image mode and the background image mode. In the aerial image mode, the elemental images are shown on the CIVI display and the inserted translucent display is uniformly translucent. In the background image mode, the black shadows of the elemental images in a white background are shown on the CIVI display and the background scenery is displayed on the inserted translucent panel. By alternation of these two modes at 120 Hz, an aerial 3D image that visually occludes the far background scenery is perceived by the viewer.

  20. Line matching based on planar homography for stereo aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanbiao; Zhao, Liang; Huang, Shoudong; Yan, Lei; Dissanayake, Gamini

    2015-06-01

    We propose an efficient line matching algorithm for a pair of calibrated aerial photogrammetric images, which makes use of sparse 3D points triangulated from 2D point feature correspondences to guide line matching based on planar homography. Two different strategies are applied in the proposed line matching algorithm for two different cases. When three or more points can be found coplanar with the line segment to be matched, the points are used to fit a plane and obtain an accurate planar homography. When one or two points can be found, the approximate terrain plane parallel to the line segment is utilized to compute an approximate planar homography. Six pairs of rural or urban aerial images are used to demonstrate the efficiency and validity of the proposed algorithm. Compared with line matching based on 2D point feature correspondences, the proposed method can increase the number of correctly matched line segments. In addition, compared with most line matching methods that do not use 2D point feature correspondences, the proposed method has better efficiency, although it obtains fewer matches. The C/C++ source code for the proposed algorithm is available at

  1. Precision Relative Positioning for Automated Aerial Refueling from a Stereo Imaging System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    PRECISION RELATIVE POSITIONING FOR AUTOMATED AERIAL REFUELING FROM A STEREO IMAGING SYSTEM THESIS Kyle P. Werner, 2Lt, USAF AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-048...Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-048 PRECISION RELATIVE POSITIONING FOR AUTOMATED AERIAL...RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-048 PRECISION RELATIVE POSITIONING FOR AUTOMATED AERIAL REFUELING FROM A STEREO IMAGING SYSTEM THESIS

  2. Local adaptive contrast enhancement for color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijk, Judith; den Hollander, Richard J. M.; Schavemaker, John G. M.; Schutte, Klamer

    2007-04-01

    A camera or display usually has a smaller dynamic range than the human eye. For this reason, objects that can be detected by the naked eye may not be visible in recorded images. Lighting is here an important factor; improper local lighting impairs visibility of details or even entire objects. When a human is observing a scene with different kinds of lighting, such as shadows, he will need to see details in both the dark and light parts of the scene. For grey value images such as IR imagery, algorithms have been developed in which the local contrast of the image is enhanced using local adaptive techniques. In this paper, we present how such algorithms can be adapted so that details in color images are enhanced while color information is retained. We propose to apply the contrast enhancement on color images by applying a grey value contrast enhancement algorithm to the luminance channel of the color signal. The color coordinates of the signal will remain the same. Care is taken that the saturation change is not too high. Gamut mapping is performed so that the output can be displayed on a monitor. The proposed technique can for instance be used by operators monitoring movements of people in order to detect suspicious behavior. To do this effectively, specific individuals should both be easy to recognize and track. This requires optimal local contrast, and is sometimes much helped by color when tracking a person with colored clothes. In such applications, enhanced local contrast in color images leads to more effective monitoring.

  3. Automated updating of road databases from aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltsavias, Emmanuel; Zhang, Chunsun

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a practical system for automated 3-D road network reconstruction from aerial images using knowledge-based image analysis. The system integrates processing of color image data and information from digital spatial databases, extracts and fuses multiple object cues, takes into account context information, employs existing knowledge, rules and models, and treats each road subclass accordingly. The key of the system is the use of knowledge as much as possible to increase success rate and reliability of the results, working in 2-D images and 3-D object space, and use of 2-D and 3-D interaction when needed. Another advantage of the developed system is that it can correctly and reliably handle problematic areas caused by shadows and occlusions. This work is part of a project to improve and update the 1:25,000 vector maps of Switzerland. The system was originally developed to processed stereo images. Recently, it has been modified to work also with single orthoimages. The system has been implemented as a stand-alone software package, and has been tested on a large number of images with different landscape. In this paper, various parts of the developed system are discussed, and the results of our system in the tests conducted independently by our project partner in Switzerland, and the test results with orthoimages in a test site in The Netherlands are presented together with the system performance evaluation.

  4. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema

    Erin Miller

    2016-07-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  5. Integration of aerial imaging and variable-rate technology for site-specific aerial herbicide application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As remote sensing and variable rate technology are becoming more available for aerial applicators, practical methodologies on effective integration of these technologies are needed for site-specific aerial applications of crop production and protection materials. The objectives of this study were to...

  6. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  7. Application of Digital Image Correlation Method to Improve the Accuracy of Aerial Photo Stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shih-Heng; Jhou, You-Liang; Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Hsiao, Han-Wei; Sung, Wen-Pei

    2016-04-01

    Satellite images and traditional aerial photos have been used in remote sensing for a long time. However, there are some problems with these images. For example, the resolution of satellite image is insufficient, the cost to obtain traditional images is relatively high and there is also human safety risk in traditional flight. These result in the application limitation of these images. In recent years, the control technology of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is rapidly developed. This makes unmanned aerial vehicle widely used in obtaining aerial photos. Compared to satellite images and traditional aerial photos, these aerial photos obtained using UAV have the advantages of higher resolution, low cost. Because there is no crew in UAV, it is still possible to take aerial photos using UAV under unstable weather conditions. Images have to be orthorectified and their distortion must be corrected at first. Then, with the help of image matching technique and control points, these images can be stitched or used to establish DEM of ground surface. These images or DEM data can be used to monitor the landslide or estimate the volume of landslide. For the image matching, we can use such as Harris corner method, SIFT or SURF to extract and match feature points. However, the accuracy of these methods for matching is about pixel or sub-pixel level. The accuracy of digital image correlation method (DIC) during image matching can reach about 0.01pixel. Therefore, this study applies digital image correlation method to match extracted feature points. Then the stitched images are observed to judge the improvement situation. This study takes the aerial photos of a reservoir area. These images are stitched under the situations with and without the help of DIC. The results show that the misplacement situation in the stitched image using DIC to match feature points has been significantly improved. This shows that the use of DIC to match feature points can actually improve the accuracy of

  8. Initial Efforts toward Mission-Representative Imaging Surveys from Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanich, Greg; Plice, Laura; Ippolito, Corey; Young, Larry A.; Lau, Benton; Lee, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Numerous researchers have proposed the use of robotic aerial explorers to perform scientific investigation of planetary bodies in our solar system. One of the essential tasks for any aerial explorer is to be able to perform scientifically valuable imaging surveys. The focus of this paper is to discuss the challenges implicit in, and recent observations related to, acquiring mission-representative imaging data from a small fixed-wing UAV, acting as a surrogate planetary aerial explorer. This question of successfully performing aerial explorer surveys is also tied to other topics of technical investigation, including the development of unique bio-inspired technologies.

  9. Research of aerial imaging spectrometer data acquisition technology based on USB 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junze; Wang, Yueming; He, Daogang; Yu, Yanan

    2016-11-01

    With the emergence of UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) platform for aerial imaging spectrometer, research of aerial imaging spectrometer DAS(data acquisition system) faces new challenges. Due to the limitation of platform and other factors, the aerial imaging spectrometer DAS requires small-light, low-cost and universal. Traditional aerial imaging spectrometer DAS system is expensive, bulky, non-universal and unsupported plug-and-play based on PCIe. So that has been unable to meet promotion and application of the aerial imaging spectrometer. In order to solve these problems, the new data acquisition scheme bases on USB3.0 interface.USB3.0 can provide guarantee of small-light, low-cost and universal relying on the forward-looking technology advantage. USB3.0 transmission theory is up to 5Gbps.And the GPIF programming interface achieves 3.2Gbps of the effective theoretical data bandwidth.USB3.0 can fully meet the needs of the aerial imaging spectrometer data transmission rate. The scheme uses the slave FIFO asynchronous data transmission mode between FPGA and USB3014 interface chip. Firstly system collects spectral data from TLK2711 of high-speed serial interface chip. Then FPGA receives data in DDR2 cache after ping-pong data processing. Finally USB3014 interface chip transmits data via automatic-dma approach and uploads to PC by USB3.0 cable. During the manufacture of aerial imaging spectrometer, the DAS can achieve image acquisition, transmission, storage and display. All functions can provide the necessary test detection for aerial imaging spectrometer. The test shows that system performs stable and no data lose. Average transmission speed and storage speed of writing SSD can stabilize at 1.28Gbps. Consequently ,this data acquisition system can meet application requirements for aerial imaging spectrometer.

  10. Semantic Segmentation of Aerial Images with AN Ensemble of Cnns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmanis, D.; Wegner, J. D.; Galliani, S.; Schindler, K.; Datcu, M.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a deep learning approach to semantic segmentation of very high resolution (aerial) images. Deep neural architectures hold the promise of end-to-end learning from raw images, making heuristic feature design obsolete. Over the last decade this idea has seen a revival, and in recent years deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have emerged as the method of choice for a range of image interpretation tasks like visual recognition and object detection. Still, standard CNNs do not lend themselves to per-pixel semantic segmentation, mainly because one of their fundamental principles is to gradually aggregate information over larger and larger image regions, making it hard to disentangle contributions from different pixels. Very recently two extensions of the CNN framework have made it possible to trace the semantic information back to a precise pixel position: deconvolutional network layers undo the spatial downsampling, and Fully Convolution Networks (FCNs) modify the fully connected classification layers of the network in such a way that the location of individual activations remains explicit. We design a FCN which takes as input intensity and range data and, with the help of aggressive deconvolution and recycling of early network layers, converts them into a pixelwise classification at full resolution. We discuss design choices and intricacies of such a network, and demonstrate that an ensemble of several networks achieves excellent results on challenging data such as the ISPRS semantic labeling benchmark, using only the raw data as input.

  11. Automatic Line Network Extraction from Aerial Imagery of Urban Areas through Knowledge Based Image Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    Automatic Line Network Extraction from Aerial Imangery of Urban Areas Sthrough KnowledghBased Image Analysis N 04 Final Technical ReportI December...Automatic Line Network Extraction from Aerial Imagery of Urban Areas through Knowledge Based Image Analysis Accesion For NTIS CRA&I DTIC TAB 0...paittern re’ognlition. blac’kboardl oriented symbollic processing, knowledge based image analysis , image understanding, aer’ial imsagery, urban area, 17

  12. Grab a coffee: your aerial images are already analyzed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Anthony; Rademacher, Thomas; Schulz, Kristian

    2015-07-01

    For over 2 decades the AIMTM platform has been utilized in mask shops as the standard for actinic review of photomask sites in order to perform defect disposition and repair review. Throughout this time the measurement throughput of the systems has been improved in order to keep pace with the requirements demanded by a manufacturing environment, however the analysis of the sites captured has seen little improvement and remained a manual process. This manual analysis of aerial images is time consuming, subject to error and unreliability and contributes to holding up turn-around time (TAT) and slowing process flow in a manufacturing environment. AutoAnalysis, the first application available for the FAVOR® platform, offers a solution to these problems by providing fully automated data transfer and analysis of AIMTM aerial images. The data is automatically output in a customizable format that can be tailored to your internal needs and the requests of your customers. Savings in terms of operator time arise from the automated analysis which no longer needs to be performed. Reliability is improved as human error is eliminated making sure the most defective region is always and consistently captured. Finally the TAT is shortened and process flow for the back end of the line improved as the analysis is fast and runs in parallel to the measurements. In this paper the concept and approach of AutoAnalysis will be presented as well as an update to the status of the project. A look at the benefits arising from the automation and the customizable approach of the solution will be shown.

  13. Intraoperative imaging using intravascular contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jeffrey R.; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Garland, Summer; Lemole, G. Michael; Romanowski, Marek

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents are becoming more frequently studied in medical imaging due to their advantageous characteristics, most notably the ability to capture near-infrared signal across the tissue and the safety of the technique. This produces a need for imaging technology that can be specific for both the NIR dye and medical application. Indocyanine green (ICG) is currently the primary NIR dye used in neurosurgery. Here we report on using the augmented microscope we described previously for image guidance in a rat glioma resection. Luc-C6 cells were implanted in a rat in the left-frontal lobe and grown for 22 days. Surgical resection was performed by a neurosurgeon using augmented microscopy guidance with ICG contrast. Videos and images were acquired to evaluate image quality and resection margins. ICG accumulated in the tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention from the compromised bloodbrain- barrier. The augmented microscope was capable of guiding the rat glioma resection and intraoperatively highlighted tumor tissue regions via ICG fluorescence under normal illumination of the surgical field.

  14. The TRENDS High-Contrast Imaging Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin

    2014-08-01

    We have established a multi-disciplinary program that combines precise Doppler measurements with high-contrast imaging. Using long-term RV accelerations (or 'trends'), we take a much-needed short-cut for identifying promising high-contrast imaging targets. The goal of this project is to directly detect and characterize the companions responsible for accelerating their host stars. By working at the interface of two powerful and complementary planet detection techniques, we are able to construct 3d-orbits, calculate dynamical masses, and explicitly calibrate theoretical atmospheric models for substellar objects in a regime where they currently break-down (low temperatures). Using a sample of non-detections, the TRENDS program also provides the ability to robustly determine the occurrence rate of giant planets from 0-20 AU through statistical inference.

  15. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures.

    PubMed

    Gammer, Christoph; Burak Ozdol, V; Liebscher, Christian H; Minor, Andrew M

    2015-08-01

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast.

  16. Coastline Extraction from Aerial Images Based on Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paravolidakis, V.; Moirogiorgou, K.; Ragia, L.; Zervakis, M.; Synolakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays coastline extraction and tracking of its changes become of high importance because of the climate change, global warming and rapid growth of human population. Coastal areas play a significant role for the economy of the entire region. In this paper we propose a new methodology for automatic extraction of the coastline using aerial images. A combination of a four step algorithm is used to extract the coastline in a robust and generalizable way. First, noise distortion is reduced in order to ameliorate the input data for the next processing steps. Then, the image is segmented into two regions, land and sea, through the application of a local threshold to create the binary image. The result is further processed by morphological operators with the aim that small objects are being eliminated and only the objects of interest are preserved. Finally, we perform edge detection and active contours fitting in order to extract and model the coastline. These algorithmic steps are illustrated through examples, which demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology.

  17. Nonlinear Estimation Approach to Real-Time Georegistration from Aerial Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Padgett, Curtis W.

    2012-01-01

    When taking aerial images, it is important to know locations of specific points of interest in an Earth-centered coordinate system (latitude, longitude, height). The correspondence between a pixel location in the image and its Earth coordinate is known as georegistration. There are two main technical challenges arising in the intended application. The first is that no known features are assumed to be available in any of the images. The second is that the intended applications are real time. Here, images are taken at regular intervals (i.e. once per second), and it is desired to make decisions in real time based on the geolocation of specific objects seen in the images as they arrive. This is in sharp contrast to most current methods for geolocation that operate "after-the-fact" by processing, on the ground, a database of stored images using computationally intensive methods. The solution is a nonlinear estimation algorithm that combines processed realtime camera images with vehicle position and attitude information ob tained from an onboard GPS receiver. This approach provides accurate georegistration estimates (latitude, longitude, height) of arbitrary features and/or points of interest seen in the camera images. This solves the georegistration problem at the modest cost of augmenting the camera information with a GPS receiver carried onboard the vehicle.

  18. Using aerial photography and image analysis to measure changes in giant reed populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted along the Rio Grande in southwest Texas to evaluate color-infrared aerial photography combined with supervised image analysis to quantify changes in giant reed (Arundo donax L.) populations over a 6-year period. Aerial photographs from 2002 and 2008 of the same seven study site...

  19. Automatic Line Network Extraction from Aerial Imagery of Urban Areas through Knowledge-Based Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-19

    approach for the analysis of aerial images. In this approach image analysis is performed ast three levels of abstraction, namely iconic or low-level... image analysis , symbolic or medium-level image analysis , and semantic or high-level image analysis . Domain dependent knowledge about prototypical urban

  20. Detection of object motion regions in aerial image pairs with a multilayer markovian model.

    PubMed

    Benedek, Csaba; Szirányi, Tamás; Kato, Zoltan; Zerubia, Josiane

    2009-10-01

    We propose a new Bayesian method for detecting the regions of object displacements in aerial image pairs. We use a robust but coarse 2-D image registration algorithm. Our main challenge is to eliminate the registration errors from the extracted change map. We introduce a three-layer Markov random field (L(3)MRF) model which integrates information from two different features, and ensures connected homogenous regions in the segmented images. Validation is given on real aerial photos.

  1. Angular Differential Imaging: a Powerful High-Contrast Imaging Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; Lafreniere, D; Doyon, R; Macintosh, B; Nadeau, D

    2005-11-07

    Angular differential imaging is a high-contrast imaging technique that reduces speckle noise from quasi-static optical aberrations and facilitates the detection of faint nearby companions. A sequence of images is acquired with an altitude/azimuth telescope, the instrument rotator being turned off. This keeps the instrument and telescope optics aligned, stabilizes the instrumental PSF and allows the field of view to rotate with respect to the instrument. For each image, a reference PSF obtained from other images of the sequence is subtracted. All residual images are then rotated to align the field and are median combined. Observed performances are reported for Gemini Altair/NIRI data. Inside the speckle dominated region of the PSF, it is shown that quasi-static PSF noise can be reduced by a factor {approx}5 for each image subtraction. The combination of all residuals then provides an additional gain of the order of the square root of the total number of images acquired. To our knowledge, this is the first time an acquisition strategy and reduction pipeline designed for speckle attenuation and high contrast imaging is demonstrated to significantly get better detection limits with longer integration times at all angular separations. A PSF noise attenuation of 100 was achieved from 2-hour long sequences of images of Vega, reaching a 5-sigma contrast of 20 magnitudes for separations greater than 7''. This technique can be used with currently available instruments to search for {approx} 1 M{sub Jup} exoplanets with orbits of radii between 50 and 300 AU around nearby young stars. The possibility of combining the technique with other high-contrast imaging methods is briefly discussed.

  2. Contrast optimization in broadband polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Lijo; Hu, Haofeng; Boffety, Matthieu; Goudail, François

    2016-05-01

    For the sake of polarimetric accuracy, polarization imaging systems based on liquid crystal modulators often work at one given wavelength due to the strong chromatic properties of the liquid crystal retarders. This often requires the use of narrowband filters which reduces the amount of light in the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. For applications where the main parameter of interest is the target/background discriminability rather than polarimetric accuracy, spectral filtering may not be the best option. In this work, we investigate the impact of broadening the spectrum of the light entering the system on the discriminability performance of passive and active polarimetric systems. Through simulations, we show that broadening the bandwidth of the illumination can increase the contrast between two regions, as the increase of light flux compensates for the loss of polarimetric precision. Moreover, we show that taking into account the chromatic characteristics of the components of the imaging system can further enhance the contrast. We validate these findings through experiments in passive and active configurations, and demonstrate that the illumination bandwidth can be seen as an additional parameter to optimize polarimetric imaging set-ups.

  3. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation.

  4. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Twellmann, Thorsten; Saalbach, Axel; Gerstung, Olaf; Leach, Martin O; Nattkemper, Tim W

    2004-01-01

    Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA) by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation. PMID:15494072

  5. Coronary magnetic resonance vein imaging: imaging contrast, sequence, and timing.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Reza; Han, Yuchi; Peters, Dana C; Herzka, Daniel A; Wylie, John V; Goddu, Beth; Kissinger, Kraig K; Yeon, Susan B; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Manning, Warren J

    2007-12-01

    Recently, there has been increased interest in imaging the coronary vein anatomy to guide interventional cardiovascular procedures such as cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), a device therapy for congestive heart failure (CHF). With CRT the lateral wall of the left ventricle is electrically paced using a transvenous coronary sinus lead or surgically placed epicardial lead. Proper transvenous lead placement is facilitated by the knowledge of the coronary vein anatomy. Cardiovascular MR (CMR) has the potential to image the coronary veins. In this study we propose and test CMR techniques and protocols for imaging the coronary venous anatomy. Three aspects of design of imaging sequence were studied: magnetization preparation schemes (T(2) preparation and magnetization transfer), imaging sequences (gradient-echo (GRE) and steady-state free precession (SSFP)), and imaging time during the cardiac cycle. Numerical and in vivo studies both in healthy and CHF subjects were performed to optimize and demonstrate the utility of CMR for coronary vein imaging. Magnetization transfer was superior to T(2) preparation for contrast enhancement. Both GRE and SSFP were viable imaging sequences, although GRE provided more robust results with better contrast. Imaging during the end-systolic quiescent period was preferable as it coincided with the maximum size of the coronary veins.

  6. Comparison of SLAR images and small-scale, low-sun aerial photographs.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, M. M.

    1971-01-01

    A comparison of side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) images and black and white aerial photos of similar scale and illumination of an area in the Mojave Desert of California shows that aerial photos yield far more information about geology than do SLAR images because of greater resolution, tonal range, and geometric fidelity, and easier use in stereo. Nevertheless, radar can differentiate some materials or surfaces that aerial photos cannot; thus, they should be considered as complementary, rather than competing tools in geologic investigations. The most significant advantage of SLAR, however, is its freedom from the stringent conditions of weather, date, and time that are required by small-scale aerial photos taken with a specified direction and angle of illumination. Indeed, in low latitudes, SLAR is the only way to obtain small-scale images with low illumination from certain directions; moreover, in areas of nearly continuous cloudiness, radar may be the only practical source of small-scale images.

  7. Study of Automatic Image Rectification and Registration of Scanned Historical Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. R.; Tseng, Y. H.

    2016-06-01

    Historical aerial photographs directly provide good evidences of past times. The Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences (RCHSS) of Taiwan Academia Sinica has collected and scanned numerous historical maps and aerial images of Taiwan and China. Some maps or images have been geo-referenced manually, but most of historical aerial images have not been registered since there are no GPS or IMU data for orientation assisting in the past. In our research, we developed an automatic process of matching historical aerial images by SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) for handling the great quantity of images by computer vision. SIFT is one of the most popular method of image feature extracting and matching. This algorithm extracts extreme values in scale space into invariant image features, which are robust to changing in rotation scale, noise, and illumination. We also use RANSAC (Random sample consensus) to remove outliers, and obtain good conjugated points between photographs. Finally, we manually add control points for registration through least square adjustment based on collinear equation. In the future, we can use image feature points of more photographs to build control image database. Every new image will be treated as query image. If feature points of query image match the features in database, it means that the query image probably is overlapped with control images.With the updating of database, more and more query image can be matched and aligned automatically. Other research about multi-time period environmental changes can be investigated with those geo-referenced temporal spatial data.

  8. Aberration measurement based on principal component analysis of aerial images of optimized marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guanyong; Wang, Xiangzhao; Li, Sikun; Yang, Jishuo; Xu, Dongbo

    2014-10-01

    We propose an aberration measurement technique based on principal component analysis of aerial images of optimized marks (AMAI-OM). Zernike aberrations are retrieved using a linear relationship between the aerial image and Zernike coefficients. The linear relationship is composed of the principal components (PCs) and regression matrix. A centering process is introduced to compensate position offsets of the measured aerial image. A new test mark is designed in order to improve the centering accuracy and theoretical accuracy of aberration measurement together. The new test marks are composed of three spaces with different widths, and their parameters are optimized by using an accuracy evaluation function. The offsets of the measured aerial image are compensated in the centering process and the adjusted PC coefficients are obtained. Then the Zernike coefficients are calculated according to these PC coefficients using a least square method. The simulations using the lithography simulators PROLITH and Dr.LiTHO validate the accuracy of our method. Compared with the previous aberration measurement technique based on principal component analysis of aerial image (AMAI-PCA), the measurement accuracy of Zernike aberrations under the real measurement condition of the aerial image is improved by about 50%.

  9. A featureless approach to 3D polyhedral building modeling from aerial images.

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach.

  10. A Featureless Approach to 3D Polyhedral Building Modeling from Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. PMID:22346575

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging: imaging techniques and contrast mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Howseman, A M; Bowtell, R W

    1999-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a widely used technique for generating images or maps of human brain activity. The applications of the technique are widespread in cognitive neuroscience and it is hoped they will eventually extend into clinical practice. The activation signal measured with fMRI is predicated on indirectly measuring changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin which arise from an increase in blood oxygenation in the vicinity of neuronal firing. The exact mechanisms of this blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast are highly complex. The signal measured is dependent on both the underlying physiological events and the imaging physics. BOLD contrast, although sensitive, is not a quantifiable measure of neuronal activity. A number of different imaging techniques and parameters can be used for fMRI, the choice of which depends on the particular requirements of each functional imaging experiment. The high-speed MRI technique, echo-planar imaging provides the basis for most fMRI experiments. The problems inherent to this method and the ways in which these may be overcome are particularly important in the move towards performing functional studies on higher field MRI systems. Future developments in techniques and hardware are also likely to enhance the measurement of brain activity using MRI. PMID:10466145

  12. Fluorescence lifetime contrast in small animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujan, V. Krishnan; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Sun, LuZhe; Herman, Brian A.

    2007-02-01

    Early detection of primary tumors is the key for effective therapeutic intervention and successful patient survival. Small animal models emulating human diseases are powerful tools for our comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of tumor formation and metastasis to distant sites. Our long-term goal is to develop a non-invasive, multiphoton-fluorescence lifetime imaging (MP-FLIM) modality that can precisely quantify these steps in animal tumor models at a very early stage. The specific hypothesis is that fluorescence lifetime can be employed as reliable contrast parameter for providing higher detection sensitivity as compared with conventional intensity-based tumor imaging approaches and therefore it is possible to detect smaller tumor volumes (early detection) than those achieved by other prevailing methods. We base this hypothesis on our recent observations that (1) fluorescence lifetime is "intrinsic" to the fluorophore and its measurement is not affected by concentration and/or spectral artifacts as in intensity-based methods, (2) multiphoton excitation can enable increased tissue penetrability and reduced phototoxicity and (3) MP-FLIM approach can discriminate background autofluorescence from the fluorescent proteins in thick tissues thereby achieving a ten-fold increase in signal-to-background ratio over the intensity-based approaches. We present our preliminary data to support this hypothesis in primary tumor detection in nu/nu athymic mouse models.

  13. Undetectable Changes in Image Resolution of Luminance-Contrast Gradients Affect Depth Perception.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Yoshiaki; Komine, Kazuteru; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Morita, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    A great number of studies have suggested a variety of ways to get depth information from two dimensional images such as binocular disparity, shape-from-shading, size gradient/foreshortening, aerial perspective, and so on. Are there any other new factors affecting depth perception? A recent psychophysical study has investigated the correlation between image resolution and depth sensation of Cylinder images (A rectangle contains gradual luminance-contrast changes.). It was reported that higher resolution images facilitate depth perception. However, it is still not clear whether or not the finding generalizes to other kinds of visual stimuli, because there are more appropriate visual stimuli for exploration of depth perception of luminance-contrast changes, such as Gabor patch. Here, we further examined the relationship between image resolution and depth perception by conducting a series of psychophysical experiments with not only Cylinders but also Gabor patches having smoother luminance-contrast gradients. As a result, higher resolution images produced stronger depth sensation with both images. This finding suggests that image resolution affects depth perception of simple luminance-contrast differences (Gabor patch) as well as shape-from-shading (Cylinder). In addition, this phenomenon was found even when the resolution difference was undetectable. This indicates the existence of consciously available and unavailable information in our visual system. These findings further support the view that image resolution is a cue for depth perception that was previously ignored. It partially explains the unparalleled viewing experience of novel high resolution displays.

  14. Line Matching Algorithm for Aerial Image Combining image and object space similarity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxue; Wang, Weixi; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Zhenyu; Zhu, Hong; Li, Miao; He, Biao; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new straight line matching method for aerial images is proposed in this paper. Compared to previous works, similarity constraints combining radiometric information in image and geometry attributes in object plane are employed in these methods. Firstly, initial candidate lines and the elevation values of lines projection plane are determined by corresponding points in neighborhoods of reference lines. Secondly, project reference line and candidate lines back forward onto the plane, and then similarity measure constraints are enforced to reduce the number of candidates and to determine the finial corresponding lines in a hierarchical way. Thirdly, "one-to-many" and "many-to-one" matching results are transformed into "one-to-one" by merging many lines into the new one, and the errors are eliminated simultaneously. Finally, endpoints of corresponding lines are detected by line expansion process combing with "image-object-image" mapping mode. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can be able to obtain reliable line matching results for aerial images.

  15. Critical Assessment of Object Segmentation in Aerial Image Using Geo-Hausdorff Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Y.; Wang, G.

    2016-06-01

    Aerial Image records the large-range earth objects with the ever-improving spatial and radiometric resolution. It becomes a powerful tool for earth observation, land-coverage survey, geographical census, etc., and helps delineating the boundary of different kinds of objects on the earth both manually and automatically. In light of the geo-spatial correspondence between the pixel locations of aerial image and the spatial coordinates of ground objects, there is an increasing need of super-pixel segmentation and high-accuracy positioning of objects in aerial image. Besides the commercial software package of eCognition and ENVI, many algorithms have also been developed in the literature to segment objects of aerial images. But how to evaluate the segmentation results remains a challenge, especially in the context of the geo-spatial correspondence. The Geo-Hausdorff Distance (GHD) is proposed to measure the geo-spatial distance between the results of various object segmentation that can be done with the manual ground truth or with the automatic algorithms.Based on the early-breaking and random-sampling design, the GHD calculates the geographical Hausdorff distance with nearly-linear complexity. Segmentation results of several state-of-the-art algorithms, including those of the commercial packages, are evaluated with a diverse set of aerial images. They have different signal-to-noise ratio around the object boundaries and are hard to trace correctly even for human operators. The GHD value is analyzed to comprehensively measure the suitability of different object segmentation methods for aerial images of different spatial resolution. By critically assessing the strengths and limitations of the existing algorithms, the paper provides valuable insight and guideline for extensive research in automating object detection and classification of aerial image in the nation-wide geographic census. It is also promising for the optimal design of operational specification of remote

  16. Acoustically modulated x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Theron J; Bailat, Claude J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2004-11-07

    We report the use of ultrasonic radiation pressure with phase contrast x-ray imaging to give an image proportional to the space derivative of a conventional phase contrast image in the direction of propagation of an ultrasonic beam. Intense ultrasound is used to exert forces on objects within a body giving displacements of the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Subtraction of images made with and without the ultrasound field gives an image that removes low spatial frequency features and highlights high frequency features. The method acts as an acoustic 'contrast agent' for phase contrast x-ray imaging, which in soft tissue acts to highlight small density changes.

  17. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  18. Gold nanorods: contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Gopal, R. Raja; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.

    2007-07-01

    Gold nanorods are seen as possible contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging since they have strong absorption peaks at near-infrared wavelengths. Also they are easy to conjugate with various proteins. If these particles can be conjugated with cancer affinity proteins then these particles can accumulate specifically at a tumor site. By detecting the presence of accumulation of gold nanorods inside the tissue the indirect detection of tumor can be realized. When these particles are irradiated with light pulses of appropriate temporal properties and energy the temperature around these particles can be high enough to induce apoptosis or necrosis in the surrounding cells. In order to use these particles at their full potential we must determine precisely their optical properties. We simulated the optical properties of gold nanorods synthesized by us using the DDSCAT code. The simulated spectra agree qualitatively with the spectra determined using spectrometry and also determined using photoacoustic spectroscopy. Further the values of molar extinction coefficient derived from the simulations were similar to the data measured experimentally by other groups. These results validated qualitatively the model used in the simulations. During simulations we found that the choice of the dielectric function used in simulations plays an important role in the results.

  19. Spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis for blood flow imaging with maximized speckle contrast.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Weihua; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Hongyan; Luo, Qingming

    2010-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging is a technique used for imaging blood flow without scanning. Though several studies have attempted to combine spatial and temporal statistics of laser speckle images for reducing image noise as well as preserving acceptable spatiotemporal resolution, the statistical accuracy of these spatiotemporal methods has not been thoroughly compared. Through numerical simulation and animal experiments, this study investigates the changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise of the speckle contrast images computed by these methods with various numbers of frames and spatial windows. The simulation results show that the maximum relative error of the mean speckle contrast computed by the spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis (STLASCA) method, in which the speckle contrast images are computed by analyzing the 3-D spatiotemporal speckle image cube, is approximately 5%, while it is higher than 13% for other methods. Changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise computed by these methods for animal experiment data are consistent with the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that STLASCA achieves more accurate speckle contrast, and suggest that STLASCA most effectively utilizes the number of pixels, thus achieving maximized speckle contrast, and thereby maximizing the variation of the laser speckle contrast image.

  20. Spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis for blood flow imaging with maximized speckle contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jianjun; Li, Pengcheng; Luo, Weihua; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Hongyan; Luo, Qingming

    2010-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging is a technique used for imaging blood flow without scanning. Though several studies have attempted to combine spatial and temporal statistics of laser speckle images for reducing image noise as well as preserving acceptable spatiotemporal resolution, the statistical accuracy of these spatiotemporal methods has not been thoroughly compared. Through numerical simulation and animal experiments, this study investigates the changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise of the speckle contrast images computed by these methods with various numbers of frames and spatial windows. The simulation results show that the maximum relative error of the mean speckle contrast computed by the spatiotemporal laser speckle contrast analysis (STLASCA) method, in which the speckle contrast images are computed by analyzing the 3-D spatiotemporal speckle image cube, is approximately 5%, while it is higher than 13% for other methods. Changes in the mean speckle contrast values and the relative noise computed by these methods for animal experiment data are consistent with the simulation results. Our results demonstrate that STLASCA achieves more accurate speckle contrast, and suggest that STLASCA most effectively utilizes the number of pixels, thus achieving maximized speckle contrast, and thereby maximizing the variation of the laser speckle contrast image.

  1. Aerial image simulation for partial coherent system with programming development in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Nazmul; Rahman, Md. Momtazur; Udoy, Ariful Banna

    2014-10-01

    Aerial image can be calculated by either Abbe's method or sum of coherent system decomposition (SOCS) method for partial coherent system. This paper introduces a programming with Matlab code that changes the analytical representation of Abbe's method to the matrix form, which has advantages for both Abbe's method and SOCS since matrix calculation is easier than double integration over object plane or pupil plane. First a singular matrix P is derived from a pupil function and effective light source in the spatial frequency domain. By applying Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to the matrix P, eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are obtained. The aerial image can then be computed by the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions without calculation of Transmission Cross Coefficient (TCC). The aerial final image is almost identical as an original cross mask and the intensity distribution on image plane shows that it is almost uniform across the linewidth of the mask.

  2. Design and realization of an image mosaic system on the CCD aerial camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai ying; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Hai bin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Shao jun

    2015-08-01

    It has long been difficulties in aerial photograph to stitch multi-route images into a panoramic image in real time for multi-route flight framing CCD camera with very large amount of data, and high accuracy requirements. An automatic aerial image mosaic system based on GPU development platform is described in this paper. Parallel computing of SIFT feature extraction and matching algorithm module is achieved by using CUDA technology for motion model parameter estimation on the platform, which makes it's possible to stitch multiple CCD images in real-time. Aerial tests proved that the mosaic system meets the user's requirements with 99% accuracy and 30 to 50 times' speed improvement of the normal mosaic system.

  3. [Automatic houses detection with color aerial images based on image segmentation].

    PubMed

    He, Pei-Pei; Wan, You-Chuan; Jiang, Peng-Rui; Gao, Xian-Jun; Qin, Jia-Xin

    2014-07-01

    In order to achieve housing automatic detection from high-resolution aerial imagery, the present paper utilized the color information and spectral characteristics of the roofing material, with the image segmentation theory, to study the housing automatic detection method. Firstly, This method proposed in this paper converts the RGB color space to HIS color space, uses the characteristics of each component of the HIS color space and the spectral characteristics of the roofing material for image segmentation to isolate red tiled roofs and gray cement roof areas, and gets the initial segmentation housing areas by using the marked watershed algorithm. Then, region growing is conducted in the hue component with the seed segment sample by calculating the average hue in the marked region. Finally through the elimination of small spots and rectangular fitting process to obtain a clear outline of the housing area. Compared with the traditional pixel-based region segmentation algorithm, the improved method proposed in this paper based on segment growing is in a one-dimensional color space to reduce the computation without human intervention, and can cater to the geometry information of the neighborhood pixels so that the speed and accuracy of the algorithm has been significantly improved. A case study was conducted to apply the method proposed in this paper to high resolution aerial images, and the experimental results demonstrate that this method has a high precision and rational robustness.

  4. High Density Aerial Image Matching: State-Of and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haala, N.; Cavegn, S.

    2016-06-01

    Ongoing innovations in matching algorithms are continuously improving the quality of geometric surface representations generated automatically from aerial images. This development motivated the launch of the joint ISPRS/EuroSDR project "Benchmark on High Density Aerial Image Matching", which aims on the evaluation of photogrammetric 3D data capture in view of the current developments in dense multi-view stereo-image matching. Originally, the test aimed on image based DSM computation from conventional aerial image flights for different landuse and image block configurations. The second phase then put an additional focus on high quality, high resolution 3D geometric data capture in complex urban areas. This includes both the extension of the test scenario to oblique aerial image flights as well as the generation of filtered point clouds as additional output of the respective multi-view reconstruction. The paper uses the preliminary outcomes of the benchmark to demonstrate the state-of-the-art in airborne image matching with a special focus of high quality geometric data capture in urban scenarios.

  5. A two-camera imaging system for pest detection and aerial application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation reports on the design and testing of an airborne two-camera imaging system for pest detection and aerial application assessment. The system consists of two digital cameras with 5616 x 3744 effective pixels. One camera captures normal color images with blue, green and red bands, whi...

  6. A low-cost dual-camera imaging system for aerial applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available remote sensing platform as low-cost and easy-to-use consumer-grade cameras are being increasingly used for aerial imaging. In this article, we report on a dual-camera imaging system we recently assembled that can capture RGB and near-infrared (NIR) i...

  7. Effects of Image Contrast on Functional MRI Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Castillo, Javier; Duthie, Kristen N.; Saad, Ziad S.; Chu, Carlton; Bandettini, Peter A.; Luh, Wen-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Lack of tissue contrast and existing inhomogeneous bias fields from multi-channel coils have the potential to degrade the output of registration algorithms; and consequently degrade group analysis and any attempt to accurately localize brain function. Non-invasive ways to improve tissue contrast in fMRI images include the use of low flip angles (FAs) well below the Ernst angle and longer repetition times (TR). Techniques to correct intensity inhomogeneity are also available in most mainstream fMRI data analysis packages; but are not used as part of the pre-processing pipeline in many studies. In this work, we use a combination of real data and simulations to show that simple-to-implement acquisition/pre-processing techniques can significantly improve the outcome of both functional-to-functional and anatomical-to-functional image registrations. We also emphasize the need of tissue contrast on EPI images to be able to appropriately evaluate the quality of the alignment. In particular, we show that the use of low FAs (e.g., θ≤40°), when physiological noise considerations permit such an approach, significantly improves accuracy, consistency and stability of registration for data acquired at relatively short TRs (TR≤2s). Moreover, we also show that the application of bias correction techniques significantly improves alignment both for array-coil data (known to contain high intensity inhomogeneity) as well as birdcage-coil data. Finally, improvements in alignment derived from the use of the first infinite-TR volumes (ITVs) as targets for registration are also demonstrated. For the purpose of quantitatively evaluating the different scenarios, two novel metrics were developed: Mean Voxel Distance (MVD) to evaluate registration consistency, and Deviation of Mean Voxel Distance (dMVD) to evaluate registration stability across successive alignment attempts. PMID:23128074

  8. Aerial image mosaics built using images with vegetation index pre-calculated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendo Candido, Leandro; de Castro Jorge, Lúcio André; Luppe, Maximiliam

    2016-10-01

    Precision agriculture (PA) has offered a multitude of benefits to farmers, such as cost reduction, accuracy and speed in decision making. Among the tools that work with PA, the aerial image mosaics have key role in accurate mapping of diseases and pests in crops. A mosaic is the combination of multiple images, creating a new image that covers the property or plots accurately. One of the important analysis for farmers is based on the properties of the reflectance in each range of the electromagnetic spectrum of vegetation. Performing mathematical combinations of the different spectral bands has a better understanding of the spectral response of the vegetation. These combinations are called vegetation index (VI) and are useful for the control of the biomass, water content in leaf, chlorophyll content and others. It is usually calculated VI after the construction of the mosaic, as well the farmer has an accurate analysis of its vegetation. However, building a mosaic of images, it has a high computational cost, taking hours to complete and then apply the VI and to have the first test results. In order to reduce the computational cost of this process, this work aims to present a mosaic of images constructed from images with the VI already pre-calculated providing faster analysis to the farmer, given the fact that applying VI on the image came a this reduction in density image and thus have the gain in computational cost to build the mosaic.

  9. Low-Altitude Coastal Aerial Photogrammetry for High-Resolution Seabed Imaging and Habitat Mapping of Shallow Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alevizos, E.

    2012-04-01

    This paper explores the application of Kite Aerial Photography at the coastal environment along with digital photogrammetry for seabed geomorphological mapping. This method takes advantage of sea-water clearance that allows the transmission of sunlight through the water column and backscatter of seabed reflection under certain conditions of sunlight, weather and sea state. We analyze the procedure of acquisition, processing and interpretation of kite aerial imagery from the sub-littoral zone up to 5 meters depth. Using a calibrated non-metric digital compact camera we managed to acquire several vertical aerial images from two coastal sites in the Attica Peninsula (Greece) covering an area of approximately 200x100 meters. Both sites express significant geomorphological variability and they have a relatively smooth slope profile. For the photogrammetric processing we acquired topographic and bathymetric survey simultaneously with Kite Aerial Photography using a portable GPS of sub-meter accuracy. In order to deal with bottom control measurements we developed Bottom Control Points which were placed on the seabed. These act like the Ground Control Points and they can be easily deployed in the marine environment. The processing included interior and exterior orientation as well as ortho-rectification of images. This produced final orthomosaics for each site at scales 1:500 - 1:1500 with a resolution of a few centimeters. Interpretation of the seabed was based on color and texture features of certain areas with explicit seabed reflectivity and was supported by underwater photographs for ground truthing. At the final stage of image analysis, we recognized the boundaries (contrasting reflectivity) between different bottom types and digitized them as 2D objects using GIS. Concluding, this project emphasizes on the advantages and physical restrictions of Kite Aerial Photography in mapping small-scale geomorphological features in coastal, estuarine and lagoonal environments

  10. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  11. The cleaning effects of mask aerial image after FIB repair in sub-80nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyemi; Jeong, Goomin; Jeong, Sookyeong; Kim, Sangchul; Han, Oscar

    2007-10-01

    The Aerial Image Measurement Tool (AIMS) can estimate the wafer printability without exposure to wafer by using scanner. Since measured aerial images are similar with wafer prints, using AIMS becomes normal for verifying issue points of a mask. Also because mask design rule continues to shrink, defects and CD uniformity are at issues as factors decreasing mask yield. Occurred defects on a mask are removed by existing mask repair techniques such as nanomachining, electron beam and focused ion beam. But damages and contaminants by chemical and physical action are found on the mask surface and contaminants above special size lead to defects on a wafer. So cleaning has been necessary after repair process and detergency has been important. Before AIMS measurement, cleaning is done to make same condition with shipped mask, which method brings repeated process - repair and cleaning - if aerial image was not usual. So cleaning effect after the FIB repair is tested by using the AIMS to find the optimized process minimizing the repeated process and to get similar scanner results. First, programmed defect mask that includes various defect size and type is manufactured on some kinds of patterns in DRAM device and sub-80nm tech. Next the defects on the programmed mask are repaired by FIB repair machine. And aerial images are compared after the chemical cleaning, non-chemical cleaning and without cleaning. Finally, approximate aerial images to scanner results are taken regardless of cleaning process. It means that residue originated from repair process doesn't affect aerial images and flexible process is possible between AIMS, repair and cleaning process. But as the effect of minute particles and contaminations will be increased if pattern size is much smaller, it needs to reconfirm the effect below the sub-60nm in DRAM device.

  12. Comparison of analysis techniques for aerial image metrology on advanced photomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seolchong; Woo, Sungha; Jang, Heeyeon; Lee, Youngmo; Kim, Sangpyo; Yang, Hyunjo; Schulz, Kristian; Garetto, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    The standard method for defect disposition and verification of repair success in the mask shop is through the utilization of the aerial imaging platform, AIMSTM. The CD (Critical Dimension) deviation of the defective or repaired region as well as the pattern shift can be calculated by comparing the measured aerial images of this region to that of a reference. Through this analysis it can be determined if the defect or repaired region will be printed on the wafer under the illumination conditions of the scanner. The analysis of the measured aerial images from the AIMSTM are commonly performed manually using the analysis software available on the system or with the help of an analysis software called RV (Repair Verification). Because the process is manual, it is not standardized and is subject to operator variations. This method of manual aerial image analysis is time consuming, dependent on the skill level of the operator and significantly contributes to the overall mask manufacturing process flow. AutoAnalysis (AA), the first application available for the FAVOR® platform, provides fully automated analysis of AIMSTM aerial images [1] and runs in parallel to the measurement of the aerial images. In this paper, we investigate the initial AutoAnalysis performance compared to the conventional method using RV and its application to a production environment. The evaluation is based on the defect CD of three pattern types: contact holes, dense line and spaces and peripheral structure. The defect analysis results for different patterns and illumination conditions will be correlated and challenges in transitioning to the new approach will be discussed.

  13. Building 3D aerial image in photoresist with reconstructed mask image acquired with optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. S.; Tang, Y. P.; Chu, F. S.; Huang, W. C.; Liu, R. G.; Gau, T. S.

    2012-03-01

    Calibration of mask images on wafer becomes more important as features shrink. Two major types of metrology have been commonly adopted. One is to measure the mask image with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to obtain the contours on mask and then simulate the wafer image with optical simulator. The other is to use an optical imaging tool Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMSTM) to emulate the image on wafer. However, the SEM method is indirect. It just gathers planar contours on a mask with no consideration of optical characteristics such as 3D topography structures. Hence, the image on wafer is not predicted precisely. Though the AIMSTM method can be used to directly measure the intensity at the near field of a mask but the image measured this way is not quite the same as that on the wafer due to reflections and refractions in the films on wafer. Here, a new approach is proposed to emulate the image on wafer more precisely. The behavior of plane waves with different oblique angles is well known inside and between planar film stacks. In an optical microscope imaging system, plane waves can be extracted from the pupil plane with a coherent point source of illumination. Once plane waves with a specific coherent illumination are analyzed, the partially coherent component of waves could be reconstructed with a proper transfer function, which includes lens aberration, polarization, reflection and refraction in films. It is a new method that we can transfer near light field of a mask into an image on wafer without the disadvantages of indirect SEM measurement such as neglecting effects of mask topography, reflections and refractions in the wafer film stacks. Furthermore, with this precise latent image, a separated resist model also becomes more achievable.

  14. Complex dark-field contrast in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    Without assuming that the sub-pixel microstructures of an object to be imaged distribute in space randomly, we investigate the influence of the object's microstructures on grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging. Our theoretical analysis and 3D computer simulation study based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory show that the existing dark-field contrast can be generalized into a complex dark-field contrast in a way such that its imaginary part quantifies the effect of the object's sub-pixel microstructures on the phase of intensity oscillations. A method based on the phase-attenuation duality that holds for soft tissues to be imaged at high x-ray energies is proposed to retrieve the imaginary part of the complex dark-field contrast for imaging. In comparison to the existing dark-field contrast, the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast exhibits significantly stronger selectivity on the shape of the object's sub-pixel microstructures. Thus the x-ray imaging corresponding to the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast can provide additional and complementary information to that corresponding to the attenuation contrast, phase contrast and the existing dark-field contrast.

  15. Spatial frequency, phase, and the contrast of natural images.

    PubMed

    Bex, Peter J; Makous, Walter

    2002-06-01

    We examined contrast sensitivity and suprathreshold apparent contrast with natural images. The spatial-frequency components within single octaves of the images were removed (notch filtered), their phases were randomized, or the polarity of the images was inverted. Of Michelson contrast, root-mean-square (RMS) contrast, and band-limited contrast, RMS contrast was the best index of detectability. Negative images had lower apparent contrast than their positives. Contrast detection thresholds showed spatial-frequency-dependent elevation following both notch filtering and phase randomization. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 0.5-2 cycles per degree (c/deg). Suprathreshold contrast matching functions also showed spatial-frequency-dependent contrast loss for both notch-filtered and phase-randomized images. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 1-3 c/deg. There was no detectable difference between the effects of phase randomization and notch filtering on contrast sensitivity. We argue that these observations are consistent with changes in the activity within spatial-frequency channels caused by the higher-order phase structure of natural images that is responsible for the presence of edges and specularities.

  16. Spatial frequency, phase, and the contrast of natural images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bex, Peter J.; Makous, Walter

    2002-06-01

    We examined contrast sensitivity and suprathreshold apparent contrast with natural images. The spatial-frequency components within single octaves of the images were removed (notch filtered), their phases were randomized, or the polarity of the images was inverted. Of Michelson contrast, root-mean-square (RMS) contrast, and band-limited contrast, RMS contrast was the best index of detectability. Negative images had lower apparent contrast than their positives. Contrast detection thresholds showed spatial-frequency-dependent elevation following both notch filtering and phase randomization. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 0.5-2 cycles per degree (c/deg). Suprathreshold contrast matching functions also showed spatial-frequency-dependent contrast loss for both notch-filtered and phase-randomized images. The peak of the spatial-frequency tuning function was approximately 1-3 c/deg. There was no detectable difference between the effects of phase randomization and notch filtering on contrast sensitivity. We argue that these observations are consistent with changes in the activity within spatial-frequency channels caused by the higher-order phase structure of natural images that is responsible for the presence of edges and specularities.

  17. High Resolution X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    murine liver. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray, ultrasound, phase contrast, imaging, elastography 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...of the veins in a mouse liver that was excised from an euthanized mouse, fixed in paraformaldehyde and subsequently dried. The vascular tree is...clearly visible in the x-ray image. Contrast agent injections into the portal vein of another mouse liver verified that the veins are imaged and not

  18. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  19. Imaging depth and multiple scattering in laser speckle contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mitchell A.; Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is a powerful and simple method for full field imaging of blood flow. However, the depth dependence and the degree of multiple scattering have not been thoroughly investigated. We employ three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of photon propagation combined with high resolution vascular anatomy to investigate these two issues. We found that 95% of the detected signal comes from the top 700 μm of tissue. Additionally, we observed that single-intravascular scattering is an accurate description of photon sampling dynamics, but that regions of interest (ROIs) in areas free of obvious surface vessels had fewer intravascular scattering events than ROI over resolved surface vessels. Furthermore, we observed that the local vascular anatomy can strongly affect the depth dependence of LSCI. We performed simulations over a wide range of intravascular and extravascular scattering properties to confirm the applicability of these results to LSCI imaging over a wide range of visible and near-infrared wavelengths. PMID:25089945

  20. Evaluation of microbubble contrast agents for dynamic imaging with x-ray phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Millard, T P; Endrizzi, M; Everdell, N; Rigon, L; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Stride, E; Olivo, A

    2015-07-29

    X-rays are commonly used as a means to image the inside of objects opaque to visible light, as their short wavelength allows penetration through matter and the formation of high spatial resolution images. This physical effect has found particular importance in medicine where x-ray based imaging is routinely used as a diagnostic tool. Increasingly, however, imaging modalities that provide functional as well as morphological information are required. In this study the potential to use x-ray phase based imaging as a functional modality through the use of microbubbles that can be targeted to specific biological processes is explored. We show that the concentration of a microbubble suspension can be monitored quantitatively whilst in flow using x-ray phase contrast imaging. This could provide the basis for a dynamic imaging technique that combines the tissue penetration, spatial resolution, and high contrast of x-ray phase based imaging with the functional information offered by targeted imaging modalities.

  1. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection.

  2. Advances in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents for Biomarker Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Pagel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents have provided new capabilities for biomarker detection through molecular imaging. MRI contrast agents based on the T2 exchange mechanism have more recently expanded the armamentarium of agents for molecular imaging. Compared with T1 and T2* agents, T2 exchange agents have a slower chemical exchange rate, which improves the ability to design these MRI contrast agents with greater specificity for detecting the intended biomarker. MRI contrast agents that are detected through chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) have even slower chemical exchange rates. Another emerging class of MRI contrast agents uses hyperpolarized 13C to detect the agent with outstanding sensitivity. These hyperpolarized 13C agents can be used to track metabolism and monitor characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. Together, these various MRI contrast agents provide excellent opportunities to develop molecular imaging for biomarker detection. PMID:27049630

  3. New imaging technology: measurement of myocardial perfusion by contrast echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging has long been a goal for the non-invasive echocardiographic assessment of the heart. However, many factors at play in perfusion imaging have made this goal elusive. Harmonic imaging and triggered imaging with newer contrast agents have made myocardial perfusion imaging potentially practical in the very near future. The application of indicator dilution theory to the coronary circulation and bubble contrast agents is fraught with complexities and sources of error. Therefore, quantification of myocardial perfusion by non-invasive echocardiographic imaging requires further investigation in order to make this technique clinically viable.

  4. Contrast-enhanced imaging of cerebral vasculature with laser speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, K.; Li, N.; Rege, A.; Jia, X.; All, A.; Thakor, N.

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution cerebral vasculature imaging has applications ranging from intraoperative procedures to basic neuroscience research. Laser speckle, with spatial contrast processing, has recently been used to map cerebral blood flow. We present an application of the technique using temporal contrast processing to image cerebral vascular structures with a field of view a few millimeters across and approximately 20 μm resolution through a thinned skull. We validate the images using fluorescent imaging and demonstrate a factor of 2-4 enhancement in contrast-to-noise ratios over reflectance imaging using white or spectrally filtered green light. The contrast enhancement enables the perception of approximately 10%-30% more vascular structures without the introduction of any contrast agent.

  5. Aerial-image enables diagrams and animation to be inserted in motion pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, S. J., Jr.; Tressel, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Aerial-image unit makes it possible to insert diagrams and animation into live motion pictures, and also lift an element from a confusing background by suppressing general details. The unit includes a combination of two separate lens systems, the camera-projector system and the field lens system.

  6. Application of high resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles for hydrology and range science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A common problem in many natural resource disciplines is the lack of high-enough spatial resolution images that can be used for monitoring and modeling purposes. Advances have been made in the utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in hydrology and rangeland science. By utilizing low fligh...

  7. Vehicle Detection of Aerial Image Using TV-L1 Texture Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Li, Y.; Huang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Vehicle detection from high-resolution aerial image facilitates the study of the public traveling behavior on a large scale. In the context of road, a simple and effective algorithm is proposed to extract the texture-salient vehicle among the pavement surface. Texturally speaking, the majority of pavement surface changes a little except for the neighborhood of vehicles and edges. Within a certain distance away from the given vector of the road network, the aerial image is decomposed into a smoothly-varying cartoon part and an oscillatory details of textural part. The variational model of Total Variation regularization term and L1 fidelity term (TV-L1) is adopted to obtain the salient texture of vehicles and the cartoon surface of pavement. To eliminate the noise of texture decomposition, regions of pavement surface are refined by seed growing and morphological operation. Based on the shape saliency analysis of the central objects in those regions, vehicles are detected as the objects of rectangular shape saliency. The proposed algorithm is tested with a diverse set of aerial images that are acquired at various resolution and scenarios around China. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can detect vehicles at the rate of 71.5% and the false alarm rate of 21.5%, and that the speed is 39.13 seconds for a 4656 x 3496 aerial image. It is promising for large-scale transportation management and planning.

  8. A low-cost single-camera imaging system for aerial applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available and versatile platform for airborne remote sensing. Although various airborne imaging systems are available, most of these systems are either too expensive or too complex to be of practical use for aerial applicators. The objective of this study was ...

  9. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  10. Quantitative analysis of contrast to noise ratio using a phase contrast x-ray imaging prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Kang, Minhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) of the x-ray images taken with the phase contrast imaging mode and compare them with the CNR of the images taken under the conventional mode. For each mode, three images were taken under three exposure conditions of 100 kVp (2.8mAs), 120 kVp (1.9mAs) and 140kVp (1.42mAs). A 1.61cm thick contrast detail phantom was used as an imaging object. For phase contrast, the source to image detector distance (SID) was 182.88 cm and the source to object (SOD) distance was 73.15 cm. The SOD was the same as SID in the conventional imaging mode. A computed radiography (CR) plate was used as a detector and the output CR images were converted to linear form in relation with the incident x-ray exposure. To calculate CNR, an image processing software was used to determine the mean pixel value and the standard deviation of the pixels in the region of interest (ROI) and in the nearby background around ROI. At any given exposure condition investigated in this study, the CNR values for the phase contrast images were better as compared to the corresponding conventional mode images. The superior image quality in terms of CNR is contributed by the phase-shifts resulted contrast, as well as the reduced scatters due to the air gap between the object and the detector.

  11. Color Contrast Metrics for Complex Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    viewer who is focused at infinity sees an image of the outside world with 4 the computer-generated imagery " watercolored " upon it. The reader has...raster is 2:1 positively interlaced and paints a complete image once every 1/30 s. The aspect ratio was adjusted to 1:1, yielding a (26 cm)2 -live...required approximately 5 s. Presentation of the HUDBACKs to subjects was synchronized with the monitor’s raster so that they were always painted

  12. Registering aerial video images using the projective constraint.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brian P; Goshtasby, A Ardeshir

    2010-03-01

    To separate object motion from camera motion in an aerial video, consecutive frames are registered at their planar background. Feature points are selected in consecutive frames and those that belong to the background are identified using the projective constraint. Corresponding background feature points are then used to register and align the frames. By aligning video frames at the background and knowing that objects move against the background, a means to detect and track moving objects is provided. Only scenes with planar background are considered in this study. Experimental results show improvement in registration accuracy when using the projective constraint to determine the registration parameters as opposed to finding the registration parameters without the projective constraint.

  13. Intra-field CDU map correlation between SEMs and aerial image characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Philipp, Peter; Litt, Lloyd C.; Meusemann, Stefan; Thaler, Thomas; Schulz, Kristian; Tschinkl, Martin; Ackmann, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Reticle critical dimension uniformity (CDU) is one of the major sources of wafer CD variations which include both inter-field variations and intra-field variations. Generally, wafer critical dimension (CD) measurement sample size interfield is much less than intra-field. Intra-field CDU correction requires time-consumption of metrology. In order to improve wafer intra-field CDU, several methods can be applied such as intra-field dose correction to improve wafer intra-field CDU. Corrections can be based on CD(SEM) or aerial image metrology data from the reticle. Reticle CDU and wafer CDU maps are based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) metrology, while reticle inspection intensity mapping (NuFLare 6000) and wafer level critical dimension (WLCD) utilize aerial images or optical techniques. Reticle inspecton tools such as those from KLA and NuFlare, offer the ability to collect optical measurement data to produce an optical CDU map. WLCD of Zeiss has the advantage of using the same illumination condition as the scanner to measure the aerial images or optical CD. In this study, the intra-field wafer CDU map correlation between SEMs and aerial images are characterized. The layout of metrology structures is very important for the correlation between wafer intra-field CDU, measured by SEM, and the CDU determined by aerial images. The selection of metrology structures effects on the correlation to SEM CD to wafer is also demonstrated. Both reticle CDU, intensity CDU and WLCD are candidates for intra-field wafer CDU characterization and the advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed.

  14. Aerial Vehicle Surveys of other Planetary Atmospheres and Surfaces: Imaging, Remote-sensing, and Autonomy Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Gregory; Ippolito, Corey; Alena, Rick

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the anticipated imaging and remote-sensing technology requirements for aerial vehicle survey missions to other planetary bodies in our Solar system that can support in-atmosphere flight. In the not too distant future such planetary aerial vehicle (a.k.a. aerial explorers) exploration missions will become feasible. Imaging and remote-sensing observations will be a key objective for these missions. Accordingly, it is imperative that optimal solutions in terms of imaging acquisition and real-time autonomous analysis of image data sets be developed for such vehicles.

  15. Semi-automatic detection of linear archaeological traces from orthorectified aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figorito, Benedetto; Tarantino, Eufemia

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-automatic approach for archaeological traces detection from aerial images. The method developed was based on the multiphase active contour model (ACM). The image was segmented into three competing regions to improve the visibility of buried remains showing in the image as crop marks (i.e. centuriations, agricultural allocations, ancient roads, etc.). An initial determination of relevant traces can be quickly carried out by the operator by sketching straight lines close to the traces. Subsequently, tuning parameters (i.e. eccentricity, orientation, minimum area and distance from input line) are used to remove non-target objects and parameterize the detected traces. The algorithm and graphical user interface for this method were developed in a MATLAB environment and tested on high resolution orthorectified aerial images. A qualitative analysis of the method was lastly performed by comparing the traces extracted with ancient traces verified by archaeologists.

  16. Registration of multitemporal aerial optical images using line features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenyang; Goshtasby, A. Ardeshir

    2016-07-01

    Registration of multitemporal images is generally considered difficult because scene changes can occur between the times the images are obtained. Since the changes are mostly radiometric in nature, features are needed that are insensitive to radiometric differences between the images. Lines are geometric features that represent straight edges of rigid man-made structures. Because such structures rarely change over time, lines represent stable geometric features that can be used to register multitemporal remote sensing images. An algorithm to establish correspondence between lines in two images of a planar scene is introduced and formulas to relate the parameters of a homography transformation to the parameters of corresponding lines in images are derived. Results of the proposed image registration on various multitemporal images are presented and discussed.

  17. Intravascular contrast agents suitable for magnetic resonance imaging. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Clanton, J.A.; Herzer, W.A.; Gibbs, S.J.; Price, A.C.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-10-01

    Two paramagnetic chelates, chromium EDTA and gadolinium DTPA, were evaluated as potential intravenous contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. After evaluating both agents in vitro, in vivo studies were conducted in dogs to document changes in renal appearance produced by contrast injection. Acute splenic and renal infarction were diagnosed with contrast-enhanced MR and confirmed by gamma camera imaging following administration of Tc-99m-labeled DMSA and sulfur colloid. The authors conclude that intravenous paramagnetic contrast agents presently offer the best mechanism for assessment of tissue function and changes in perfusion with MR.

  18. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Contrast and resolution in imaging with microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...water jet of carbon suspension and imaged using a microfocus x - ray source coupled in-line with a synchronously gated intensified optically coupled...

  19. Endoluminal contrast for abdomen and pelvis magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mohit K; Khatri, Gaurav; Bailey, April; Pinho, Daniella F; Costa, Daniel; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the abdomen and pelvis can be limited for assessment of different conditions when imaging inadequately distended hollow organs. Endoluminal contrast agents may provide improved anatomic definition and detection of subtle pathology in such scenarios. The available routes of administration for endoluminal contrast agents include oral, endorectal, endovaginal, intravesicular, and through non-physiologic accesses. Appropriate use of endoluminal contrast agents requires a thorough understanding of the clinical indications, available contrast agents, patient preparation, and interaction of the contrast agent with the desired MR imaging protocol. For example, biphasic oral enteric contrast agents are preferred in MR enterography as their signal properties on T1- and T2-weighted imaging allow for evaluation of both intraluminal and bowel wall pathology. In specific situations such as with MR enterography, MR defecography, and accurate local staging of certain pelvic tumors, the use of an endoluminal contrast agent is imperative in providing adequate diagnostic imaging. In other clinical scenarios, the use of an endoluminal contrast agent may serve as an indispensable problem-solving tool.

  20. First results for an image processing workflow for hyperspatial imagery acquired with a low-cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Very high-resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have great potential for use in rangeland monitoring and assessment, because the imagery fills the gap between ground-based observations and remotely sensed imagery from aerial or satellite sensors. However, because UAV imagery is ofte...

  1. Observation of coral reefs on Ishigaki Island, Japan, using Landsat TM images and aerial photographs

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Kayanne, Hajime

    1997-06-01

    Ishigaki Island is located at the southwestern end of Japanese Islands and famous for its fringing coral reefs. More than twenty LANDSAT TM images in twelve years and aerial photographs taken on 1977 and 1994 were used to survey two shallow reefs on this island, Shiraho and Kabira. Intensive field surveys were also conducted in 1995. All satellite images of Shiraho were geometrically corrected and overlaid to construct a multi-date satellite data set. The effects of solar elevation and tide on satellite imagery were studied with this data set. The comparison of aerial and satellite images indicated that significant changes occurred between 1977 and 1984 in Kabira: rapid formation in the western part and decrease in the eastern part of dark patches. The field surveys revealed that newly formed dark patches in the west contain young corals. These results suggest that remote sensing is useful for not only mapping but also monitoring of shallow coral reefs.

  2. Motility Contrast Imaging and Tissue Dynamics Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John

    Motion is the defining physiological characteristic of living matter. If we are interested in how things function, then the way they move is most informative. Motion provides an endogenous and functional suite of biomarkers that are sensitive to subtle changes that occur under applied pharmacological doses or cellular stresses. This chapter reviews the application of biodynamic imaging to measure cellular dynamics in three-dimensional tissue culture for drug screening applications. Nanoscale and microscale motions are detected through statistical fluctuations in dynamic speckle across an ensemble of cells within each resolution voxel. Tissue dynamics spectroscopy generates drug-response spectrograms that serve as phenotypic fingerprints of drug action and can differentiate responses from heterogeneous regions of tumor tissue.

  3. Application of machine learning for the evaluation of turfgrass plots using aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ke; Raheja, Amar; Bhandari, Subodh; Green, Robert L.

    2016-05-01

    Historically, investigation of turfgrass characteristics have been limited to visual ratings. Although relevant information may result from such evaluations, final inferences may be questionable because of the subjective nature in which the data is collected. Recent advances in computer vision techniques allow researchers to objectively measure turfgrass characteristics such as percent ground cover, turf color, and turf quality from the digital images. This paper focuses on developing a methodology for automated assessment of turfgrass quality from aerial images. Images of several turfgrass plots of varying quality were gathered using a camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. The quality of these plots were also evaluated based on visual ratings. The goal was to use the aerial images to generate quality evaluations on a regular basis for the optimization of water treatment. Aerial images are used to train a neural network so that appropriate features such as intensity, color, and texture of the turfgrass are extracted from these images. Neural network is a nonlinear classifier commonly used in machine learning. The output of the neural network trained model is the ratings of the grass, which is compared to the visual ratings. Currently, the quality and the color of turfgrass, measured as the greenness of the grass, are evaluated. The textures are calculated using the Gabor filter and co-occurrence matrix. Other classifiers such as support vector machines and simpler linear regression models such as Ridge regression and LARS regression are also used. The performance of each model is compared. The results show encouraging potential for using machine learning techniques for the evaluation of turfgrass quality and color.

  4. Image Dependent Relative Formation Navigation for Autonomous Aerial Refueling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    sensors that do not emit any electro- magnetic energy) to reduce the likelihood of detection when operating in unfriendly areas of interest. This would...modification and analysis of the images in other ways. By modifying the values of the pixels, images can be sharpened, smoothed, darken, lightened , and

  5. Molecular Optical Coherence Tomography Contrast Enhancement and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Applegate, Brian E.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Skala, Melissa C.; Kim, Jongsik; Boppart, Stephen A.

    Histochemistry began as early as the nineteenth century, with the development of synthetic dyes that provided spatially mapped chemical contrast in tissue [1]. Stains such as hematoxylin and eosin, which contrast cellular nuclei and cytoplasm, greatly aid in the interpretation of microscopy images. An analogous development is currently taking place in biomedical imaging, whereby techniques adapted for MRI, CT, and PET now provide in vivo molecular imaging over the entire human body, aiding in both fundamental research discovery and in clinical diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Because OCT offers a unique spatial scale that is intermediate between microscopy and whole-body biomedical imaging, molecular contrast OCT (MCOCT) also has great potential for providing new insight into in vivo molecular processes. The strength of MCOCT lies in its ability to isolate signals from a molecule or contrast agent from the tissue scattering background over large scan areas at depths greater than traditional microscopy techniques while maintaining high resolution.

  6. Contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Huang, Lin; Jiang, Max S; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-12-18

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and thermoacoustic imaging (TAI) are two emerging biomedical imaging techniques that both utilize ultrasonic signals as an information carrier. Unique advantages of PAI and TAI are their abilities to provide high resolution functional information such as hemoglobin and blood oxygenation and tissue dielectric properties relevant to physiology and pathology. These two methods, however, may have a limited detection depth and lack of endogenous contrast. An exogenous contrast agent is often needed to effectively resolve these problems. Such agents are able to greatly enhance the imaging contrast and potentially break through the imaging depth limit. Furthermore, a receptor-targeted contrast agent could trace the molecular and cellular biological processes in tissues. Thus, photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging can be outstanding tools for early diagnosis, precise lesion localization, and molecular typing of various diseases. The agents also could be used for therapy in conjugation with drugs or in photothermal therapy, where it functions as an enhancer for the integration of diagnosis and therapy. In this article, we present a detailed review about various exogenous contrast agents for photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging. In addition, challenges and future directions of photoacoustic and thermoacoustic molecular imaging in the field of translational medicine are also discussed.

  7. Usefulness of ultrasound contrast for image enhancement during stress echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Folkert J

    2002-10-01

    Although stress echocardiography has been established as a diagnostic technique for the detection and assessment of ischemia, there are still a number of limitations to the technique. These are related to suboptimal image quality with poor visualization of endocardial borders. Because assessment of wall motion is fundamental to the diagnostic value of stress echocardiography (both pharmacologic and exercise), endocardial border visualization is of utmost importance. Furthermore, interinstitutional observer agreement of 100% in highest image quality patients to a cumbersome 43% in low image quality patients is present. Therefore, improvements of image quality during stress are essential. One of the recent improvements is harmonic imaging, which improves visualization of endocardial borders at rest and during dobutamine stress. However, there is room for improvement. Since the introduction of ultrasound contrast agents, contrast has been increasingly used for better endocardial border visualization. Data from centers with a large number of stress echocardiography tests have shown that the addition of contrast agents decreases the number of more redundant diagnostic testing. Data obtained in our center in a subset of patients administered with SonoVue, a new generation contrast agent made of stabilized microbubbles containing sulfur hexafluoride, an inert gas, showed an improvement in the number of evaluable segments with fundamental and harmonic imaging and in the endocardial border detection during dobutamine stress echocardiography. Contrast also enables future quantitative analysis using acoustic quantification (AQ), and color kinesis. These studies should be carried out now that contrast has been approved for introduction to the market.

  8. Pyogenic liver abscess: contrast-enhanced MR imaging in rats.

    PubMed

    Weissleder, R; Saini, S; Stark, D D; Elizondo, G; Compton, C; Wittenberg, J; Ferrucci, J T

    1988-01-01

    MR imaging was used to evaluate experimentally induced pyogenic liver abscesses in an animal model. Rats were examined before and after IV administration of either gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), ferrite particles, or both contrast agents together. Pyogenic liver abscesses appeared hypointense on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Bolus administration of Gd-DTPA using a fast spin-echo sequence with repetition time of 250 msec and echo time of 20 msec (SE 250/20) showed transient selective enhancement of normal hepatic tissue and increased lesion conspicuity, quantitatively assessed by the contrast-to-noise ratio, which increased from -35.7 to -59.0. Delayed leakage of Gd-DTPA into the abscess center partially obscured small lesions at 30-60 min. Ferrite particles reduced the signal intensity of normal liver, and the abscess then appeared homogenously hyperintense. Applying the SE 500/32 sequence, the contrast-to-noise ratio increased from -1.2 to +74.0. Coordinated administration of both contrast agents showed a further increase in contrast to +94.0, with a hyperintense abscess rim surrounded by hypointense liver. Gd-DTPA increases abscess-liver contrast by rim enhancement of the abscess wall, and ferrite increases the abscess-liver contrast by selectively decreasing the signal intensity of surrounding normal liver. As a result of increased contrast-to-noise ratio, both contrast agents, alone or in combination, increase the conspicuity of hepatic abscesses.

  9. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  10. "Multimodal Contrast" from the Multivariate Analysis of Hyperspectral CARS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabarangao, Joel T.

    The typical contrast mechanism employed in multimodal CARS microscopy involves the use of other nonlinear imaging modalities such as two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to produce a molecule-specific pseudocolor image. In this work, I explore the use of unsupervised multivariate statistical analysis tools such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Vertex Component Analysis (VCA) to provide better contrast using the hyperspectral CARS data alone. Using simulated CARS images, I investigate the effects of the quadratic dependence of CARS signal on concentration on the pixel clustering and classification and I find that a normalization step is necessary to improve pixel color assignment. Using an atherosclerotic rabbit aorta test image, I show that the VCA algorithm provides pseudocolor contrast that is comparable to multimodal imaging, thus showing that much of the information gleaned from a multimodal approach can be sufficiently extracted from the CARS hyperspectral stack itself.

  11. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Paganin, David M.; Uesugi, Kentaro; Allison, Beth J.; Lewis, Robert A.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Pavlov, Konstantin M.

    2011-02-01

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  12. Detection and clustering of features in aerial images by neuron network-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozenilek, Vit

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the algorithm for detection and clustering of feature in aerial photographs based on artificial neural networks. The presented approach is not focused on the detection of specific topographic features, but on the combination of general features analysis and their use for clustering and backward projection of clusters to aerial image. The basis of the algorithm is a calculation of the total error of the network and a change of weights of the network to minimize the error. A classic bipolar sigmoid was used for the activation function of the neurons and the basic method of backpropagation was used for learning. To verify that a set of features is able to represent the image content from the user's perspective, the web application was compiled (ASP.NET on the Microsoft .NET platform). The main achievements include the knowledge that man-made objects in aerial images can be successfully identified by detection of shapes and anomalies. It was also found that the appropriate combination of comprehensive features that describe the colors and selected shapes of individual areas can be useful for image analysis.

  13. Grid-Based Fourier Transform Phase Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad

    Low contrast in x-ray attenuation imaging between different materials of low electron density is a limitation of traditional x-ray radiography. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One recently developed phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a technique recently demonstrated by Bennett et al. that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 microm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 microm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the grid in the Fourier domain. A Matlab code was written to perform the image processing. For the first time, the effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the window function type used to separate the harmonics, and the window widths, were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and new methods investigated to form improved phase contrast images.

  14. Variational contrast enhancement guided by global and local contrast measurements for single-image defogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li; Bi, Du-Yan; He, Lin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The visibility of images captured in foggy conditions is impaired severely by a decrease in the contrasts of objects and veiling with a characteristic gray hue, which may limit the performance of visual applications out of doors. Contrast enhancement together with color restoration is a challenging mission for conventional fog-removal methods, as the degrading effect of fog is largely dependent on scene depth information. Nowadays, people change their minds by establishing a variational framework for contrast enhancement based on a physically based analytical model, unexpectedly resulting in color distortion, dark-patch distortion, or fuzzy features of local regions. Unlike previous work, our method treats an atmospheric veil as a scattering disturbance and formulates a foggy image as an energy functional minimization to estimate direct attenuation, originating from the work of image denoising. In addition to a global contrast measurement based on a total variation norm, an additional local measurement is designed in that optimal problem for the purpose of digging out more local details as well as suppressing dark-patch distortion. Moreover, we estimate the airlight precisely by maximization with a geometric constraint and a natural image prior in order to protect the faithfulness of the scene color. With the estimated direct attenuation and airlight, the fog-free image can be restored. Finally, our method is tested on several benchmark and realistic images evaluated by two assessment approaches. The experimental results imply that our proposed method works well compared with the state-of-the-art defogging methods.

  15. Mitigation of image contrast loss due to mask-side non-telecentricity in an EUV scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chih-Tsung; Yu, Shinn-Sheng; Lu, Yen-Cheng; Chung, Chia-Chun; Chen, Jack J. H.; Yen, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Due to the use of reflective optics in extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), the chief ray angle of incidence at the object (mask) side (CRAO) cannot be zero. If the conventional resolution enhancement technique (RET) of off-axis illumination (OAI) is used, such mask-side non-telecentricity degrades aerial image contrast partly because of asymmetry (w.r.t. the mask) of the two beams in an incident beam pair and partly because of asymmetry (w.r.t. the mask) of the two diffraction orders of either incident beam. The former leads to intensity imbalance of the two incident beams (after leaving the mask) and the latter leads to amplitude and phase imbalance of the two diffraction orders of either incident beam. Solutions proposed previously only alleviate the former and have little help for the latter. In this paper, we introduce n=1 absorber to eliminate the phase imbalance so that the transverse shift between the two aerial images formed by the two incident beams can be minimized and the contrast of the final aerial image (by superposition of the two) can be restored.

  16. EROS main image file - A picture perfect database for Landsat imagery and aerial photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of the Interior in 1966 under the administration of the Geological Survey. It is primarily concerned with the application of remote sensing techniques for the management of natural resources. The retrieval system employed to search the EROS database is called INORAC (Inquiry, Ordering, and Accounting). A description is given of the types of images identified in EROS, taking into account Landsat imagery, Skylab images, Gemini/Apollo photography, and NASA aerial photography. Attention is given to retrieval commands, geographic coordinate searching, refinement techniques, various online functions, and questions regarding the access to the EROS Main Image File.

  17. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray source for mammography: Feasibility study...W81XWH-04-1-0481 TITLE: High Resolution X - ray Phase Contrast Imaging With Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement PRINCIPAL...REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Jun 2005 – 31 May 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER High Resolution X - ray

  18. Ultrasound Activated Contrast Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Goldberg. Nonlinear imaging with a new contrast agent. Ultrasound Med Biol, vol. 29, pp. S97, 2003. R. J. Ro, F. Forsberg, M. Knauer, W. T. Shi, P. A ... Lewin , R. Bernardi. On the temperature and concentration dependency of excitation-enhanced imaging. Proc Biomed Eng Soc Ann Fall Meetg, abstract no

  19. Image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of spatial frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ching-Chung

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate a brand-new method for image enhancement by adjusting the contrast of different spatial frequencies. Fine characteristics of an image are well enhanced with negligible side effects. This method is easy to implement owing to its simple optical basis.

  20. Selective polarization imager for contrast enhancement in extended scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Darren Alexis

    Improved imaging and detection of objects through turbid obscurants is a vital problem of current interest to both military and civilian entities. Image quality is severely degraded when obscurant fields such as fog, smoke, dust, etc., lie between an object and the light-collecting optics. Conventional intensity imaging through turbid media suffers from rapid loss of image contrast due to light scattering from particles (e.g. in fog) or random variations of refractive index (e.g. in medical imaging). Intensity imaging does not differentiate between rays scattered off particles in the obscurant field and those reflected off objects within the field. Scattering degrades image quality in all spectral bands (UV, visible, and IR), although the amount of degradation is wavelength dependent. This dissertation features the development of innovative system designs and techniques that utilize scattered radiation's deterministic polarization state evolution to greatly enhance the image contrast of stand-off objects within obscurant fields such as smoke, fog, or dust using active polarized illumination in the visible. The produced sensors acquire and process image data in real time using computationally non-intensive algorithms that differentiate between radiation that scatters or reflects from obscured objects and the radiation from the scattering media, improving image contrast by factors of ten or greater for dense water vapor obscurants.

  1. Mobile Aerial Tracking and Imaging System (MATRIS) for Aeronautical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Blanchard, R. C.; Miller, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile, rapidly deployable ground-based system to track and image targets of aeronautical interest has been developed. Targets include reentering reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) as well as atmospheric and transatmospheric vehicles. The optics were designed to image targets in the visible and infrared wavelengths. To minimize acquisition cost and development time, the system uses commercially available hardware and software where possible. The conception and initial funding of this system originated with a study of ground-based imaging of global aerothermal characteristics of RLV configurations. During that study NASA teamed with the Missile Defense Agency/Innovative Science and Technology Experimentation Facility (MDA/ISTEF) to test techniques and analysis on two Space Shuttle flights.

  2. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  3. Mechanical compression for contrasting OCT images of biotissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillin, Mikhail Y.; Argba, Pavel D.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.

    2011-06-01

    Contrasting of biotissue layers in OCT images after application of mechanical compression is discussed. The study is performed on ex vivo samples of human rectum, and in vivo on skin of human volunteers. We show that mechanical compression provides contrasting of biotissue layer boundaries due to different mechanical properties of layers. We show that alteration of pressure from 0 up to 0.45 N/mm2 causes contrast increase from 1 to 10 dB in OCT imaging of human rectum ex vivo. Results of ex vivo studies are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Application of pressure of 0.45 N/mm2 causes increase in contrast of epidermis-dermis junction in OCT-images of human skin in vivo for about 10 dB.

  4. A Brief Account of Nanoparticle Contrast Agents for Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V.; Lanza, Gregory M

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds. PMID:23983210

  5. A brief account of nanoparticle contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Kim, Benjamin; Wang, Lihong V; Lanza, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a hybrid, nonionizing modality offering excellent spatial resolution, deep penetration, and high soft tissue contrast. In PAI, signal is generated based on the absorption of laser-generated optical energy by endogenous tissues or exogenous contrast agents leading to acoustic emissions detected by an ultrasound transducer. Research in this area over the years has shown that PAI has the ability to provide both physiological and molecular imaging, which can be viewed alone or used in a hybrid modality fashion to extend the anatomic and hemodynamic sensitivities of clinical ultrasound. PAI may be performed using inherent contrast afforded by light absorbing molecules such as hemoglobin, myoglobin, and melanin or exogenous small molecule contrast agent such as near infrared dyes and porphyrins. However, this review summarizes the potential of exogenous nanoparticle-based agents for PAI applications including contrast based on gold particles, carbon nanotubes, and encapsulated copper compounds.

  6. Semi-auto assessment system on building damage caused by landslide disaster with high-resolution satellite and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Xu, Qihua; He, Jun; Ge, Fengxiang; Wang, Ying

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, earthquake and heavy rain have triggered more and more landslides, which have caused serious economic losses. The timely detection of the disaster area and the assessment of the hazard are necessary and primary for disaster mitigation and relief. As high-resolution satellite and aerial images have been widely used in the field of environmental monitoring and disaster management, the damage assessment by processing satellite and aerial images has become a hot spot of research work. The rapid assessment of building damage caused by landslides with high-resolution satellite or aerial images is the focus of this article. In this paper, after analyzing the morphological characteristics of the landslide disaster, we proposed a set of criteria for rating building damage, and designed a semi-automatic evaluation system. The system is applied to the satellite and aerial images processing. The performance of the experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of our system.

  7. Endogenous contrast blood flow imaging in embryonic hearts using hemoglobin contrast subtraction angiography

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Engin; Jonas, Stephan; Khokha, Mustafa; Choma, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of congenital heart disease (CHD) is yet to be defined, and the interactions between the malformed heart and biomechanical cardiac performance remain poorly understood. Functional optical imaging enables detailed biomechanical phenotyping of cardiac dysfunction in small animal models, which in turn enables specific gene-phenotype relationship. We have developed a new microangiography technique based on flow imaging using endogenous hemoglobin contrast enabling in vivo assessment and biomechanical phenotyping of Xenopus tropicalis embryonic heart. We demonstrated that hemoglobin contrast angiography can be used to quantify physiological response to treatment with well-established cardioactive drugs. PMID:22825198

  8. Development of contrast-enhanced rodent imaging using functional CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yun; Stantz, Keith M.; Krishnamurthi, Ganapathy; Steinmetz, Rosemary; Hutchins, Gary D.

    2003-05-01

    Micro-computed tomography (microCT) is capable of obtaining high-resolution images of skeletal tissues. However its image contrast among soft tissues remains inadequate for tumor detection. High speed functional computed tomography will be needed to image tumors by employing x-ray contrast medium. The functional microCT development will not only facilitate the image contrast enhancement among different tissues but also provide information of tumor physiology. To demonstrate the feasibility of functional CT in mouse imaging, sequential computed tomography is performed in mice after contrast material administration using a high-speed clinical CT scanner. Although the resolution of the clinical scanner is not sufficient to dissolve the anatomic details of rodents, bulky physiological parameters in major organs such as liver, kidney, pancreas, and ovaries (testicular) can be examined. For data analysis, a two-compartmental model is employed and implemented to characterize the tissue physiological parameters (regional blood flow, capillary permeability, and relative compartment volumes.) The measured contrast dynamics in kidneys are fitted with the compartmental model to derive the kidney tissue physiology. The study result suggests that it is feasible to extract mouse tissue physiology using functional CT imaging technology.

  9. Aerial imaging with manned aircraft for precision agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last two decades, numerous commercial and custom-built airborne imaging systems have been developed and deployed for diverse remote sensing applications, including precision agriculture. More recently, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) have emerged as a versatile and cost-effective platform f...

  10. Contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of inflammation in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-11-01

    The cellular immune response plays an important role in almost every major form of cardiovascular disease. The ability to image the key aspects of the immune response in the clinical setting could be used to improve diagnostic information, to provide important prognostic or risk information, and to customize therapy according to disease phenotype. Accordingly, targeted imaging probes for assessing inflammation have been developed for essentially all forms of medical imaging. Molecular imaging of inflammation with contrast ultrasound relies on the detection of targeted microbubble or other gas-filled particle contrast agents. These agents are confined to the vascular space and, hence, have been targeted to either activated leucocytes or endothelial cell adhesion molecules that are upregulated in inflammation and mediate leucocyte recruitment and adhesion. This review focuses on the inflammation-targeting strategies for ultrasound contrast agents and how they have been matched to cardiovascular disease states such as myocardial ischaemia, infarction, atherosclerosis, transplant rejection, and arteriogenesis.

  11. Motility contrast imaging of live porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David

    2013-02-01

    Freshly-harvested porcine oocytes are invested with cumulus granulosa cells in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). The cumulus cell layer is usually too thick to image the living oocyte under a conventional microscope. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the oocyte viability. The low success rate of implantation is the main problem for in vitro fertilization. In this paper, we demonstrate our dynamic imaging technique called motility contrast imaging (MCI) that provides a non-invasive way to monitor the COCs before and after maturation. MCI shows a change of intracellular activity during oocyte maturation, and a measures dynamic contrast between the cumulus granulosa shell and the oocytes. MCI also shows difference in the spectral response between oocytes that were graded into quality classes. MCI is based on shortcoherence digital holography. It uses intracellular motility as the endogenous imaging contrast of living tissue. MCI presents a new approach for cumulus-oocyte complex assessment.

  12. Moving object detection using dynamic motion modelling from UAV aerial images.

    PubMed

    Saif, A F M Saifuddin; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Mahayuddin, Zainal Rasyid

    2014-01-01

    Motion analysis based moving object detection from UAV aerial image is still an unsolved issue due to inconsideration of proper motion estimation. Existing moving object detection approaches from UAV aerial images did not deal with motion based pixel intensity measurement to detect moving object robustly. Besides current research on moving object detection from UAV aerial images mostly depends on either frame difference or segmentation approach separately. There are two main purposes for this research: firstly to develop a new motion model called DMM (dynamic motion model) and secondly to apply the proposed segmentation approach SUED (segmentation using edge based dilation) using frame difference embedded together with DMM model. The proposed DMM model provides effective search windows based on the highest pixel intensity to segment only specific area for moving object rather than searching the whole area of the frame using SUED. At each stage of the proposed scheme, experimental fusion of the DMM and SUED produces extracted moving objects faithfully. Experimental result reveals that the proposed DMM and SUED have successfully demonstrated the validity of the proposed methodology.

  13. Parameter-Based Performance Analysis of Object-Based Image Analysis Using Aerial and Quikbird-2 Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavzoglu, T.; Yildiz, M.

    2014-09-01

    Opening new possibilities for research, very high resolution (VHR) imagery acquired by recent commercial satellites and aerial systems requires advanced approaches and techniques that can handle large volume of data with high local variance. Delineation of land use/cover information from VHR images is a hot research topic in remote sensing. In recent years, object-based image analysis (OBIA) has become a popular solution for image analysis tasks as it considers shape, texture and content information associated with the image objects. The most important stage of OBIA is the image segmentation process applied prior to classification. Determination of optimal segmentation parameters is of crucial importance for the performance of the selected classifier. In this study, effectiveness and applicability of the segmentation method in relation to its parameters was analysed using two VHR images, an aerial photo and a Quickbird-2 image. Multi-resolution segmentation technique was employed with its optimal parameters of scale, shape and compactness that were defined after an extensive trail process on the data sets. Nearest neighbour classifier was applied on the segmented images, and then the accuracy assessment was applied. Results show that segmentation parameters have a direct effect on the classification accuracy, and low values of scale-shape combinations produce the highest classification accuracies. Also, compactness parameter was found to be having minimal effect on the construction of image objects, hence it can be set to a constant value in image classification.

  14. A semi-automated single day image differencing technique to identify animals in aerial imagery.

    PubMed

    Terletzky, Pat; Ramsey, Robert Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Our research presents a proof-of-concept that explores a new and innovative method to identify large animals in aerial imagery with single day image differencing. We acquired two aerial images of eight fenced pastures and conducted a principal component analysis of each image. We then subtracted the first principal component of the two pasture images followed by heuristic thresholding to generate polygons. The number of polygons represented the number of potential cattle (Bos taurus) and horses (Equus caballus) in the pasture. The process was considered semi-automated because we were not able to automate the identification of spatial or spectral thresholding values. Imagery was acquired concurrently with ground counts of animal numbers. Across the eight pastures, 82% of the animals were correctly identified, mean percent commission was 53%, and mean percent omission was 18%. The high commission error was due to small mis-alignments generated from image-to-image registration, misidentified shadows, and grouping behavior of animals. The high probability of correctly identifying animals suggests short time interval image differencing could provide a new technique to enumerate wild ungulates occupying grassland ecosystems, especially in isolated or difficult to access areas. To our knowledge, this was the first attempt to use standard change detection techniques to identify and enumerate large ungulates.

  15. Mesh-based phase contrast Fourier transform imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Sajjad; Bashir, Sajid; MacDonald, C. A.; Petruccelli, Jonathan C.

    2017-04-01

    Traditional x-ray radiography is limited by low attenuation contrast in materials of low electron density. Phase contrast imaging offers the potential to improve the contrast between such materials, but due to the requirements on the spatial coherence of the x-ray beam, practical implementation of such systems with tabletop (i.e. non-synchrotron) sources has been limited. One phase imaging technique employs multiple fine-pitched gratings. However, the strict manufacturing tolerances and precise alignment requirements have limited the widespread adoption of grating-based techniques. In this work, we have investigated a recently developed technique that utilizes a single grid of much coarser pitch. Our system consisted of a low power 100 μm spot Mo source, a CCD with 22 μm pixel pitch, and either a focused mammography linear grid or a stainless steel woven mesh. Phase is extracted from a single image by windowing and comparing data localized about harmonics of the mesh in the Fourier domain. The effects on the diffraction phase contrast and scattering amplitude images of varying grid types and periods, and of varying the width of the window function used to separate the harmonics were investigated. Using the wire mesh, derivatives of the phase along two orthogonal directions were obtained and combined to form improved phase contrast images.

  16. Exogenous contrast agents for thermoacoustic imaging: An investigation into the underlying sources of contrast

    SciTech Connect

    Ogunlade, Olumide Beard, Paul

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Thermoacoustic imaging at microwave excitation frequencies is limited by the low differential contrast exhibited by high water content tissues. To overcome this, exogenous thermoacoustic contrast agents based on gadolinium compounds, iron oxide, and single wall carbon nanotubes have previously been suggested and investigated. However, these previous studies did not fully characterize the electric, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of these agents thus precluding identification of the underlying sources of contrast. To address this, measurements of the complex permittivity, complex permeability, DC conductivity, and Grüneisen parameter have been made. These measurements allowed the origins of the contrast provided by each substance to be identified. Methods: The electric and magnetic properties of the contrast agents were characterized at 3 GHz using two rectangular waveguide cavities. The DC conductivity was measured separately using a conductivity meter. Thermoacoustic signals were then acquired and compared to those generated in water. Finally, 3D electromagnetic simulations were used to decouple the different contributions to the absorbed power density. Results: It was found that the gadolinium compounds provided appreciable electric contrast but not originating from the gadolinium itself. The contrast was either due to dissociation of the gadolinium salt which increased ionic conductivity or its nondissociated polar fraction which increased dielectric polarization loss or a combination of both. In addition, very high concentrations were required to achieve appreciable contrast, to the extent that the Grüneisen parameter increased significantly and became a source of contrast. Iron oxide particles were found to produce low but measurable dielectric contrast due to dielectric polarization loss, but this is attributed to the coating of the particles not the iron oxide. Single wall carbon nanotubes did not provide measurable contrast of any type

  17. Color voltage contrast: A new method of implementing fault contrast with color imaging software

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J.

    1995-12-31

    Although voltage contrast and fault contrast methods are well established, the current methods of implementation are frequently tedious. A new method of mapping voltage contrast (VC) images in a qualitative (stroboscopic) color mode allows multiple logic states to be simultaneously viewed and updated in color. A shortcoming of image subtraction is that only one direction of logic change is represented unless the frames are exclusive OR`ed together. Although this gives fault information it does not include the VC of neighboring unchanged nodes. When tracking failures such as a saturated transistor resulting from a logic short somewhere else, all logic states; both static and transitional need to be understood and viewed simultaneously if an expedient analysis is desired.

  18. Real-time aerial multispectral imaging solutions using dichroic filter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Eric V.; Fish, David E.

    2014-06-01

    The next generation of multispectral sensors and cameras needs to deliver significant improvements in size, weight, portability, and spectral band customization to support widespread commercial deployment for a variety of purposebuilt aerial, unmanned, and scientific applications. The benefits of multispectral imaging are well established for applications including machine vision, biomedical, authentication, and remote sensing environments - but many aerial and OEM solutions require more compact, robust, and cost-effective production cameras to realize these benefits. A novel implementation uses micropatterning of dichroic filters into Bayer and custom mosaics, enabling true real-time multispectral imaging with simultaneous multi-band image acquisition. Consistent with color camera image processing, individual spectral channels are de-mosaiced with each channel providing an image of the field of view. We demonstrate recent results of 4-9 band dichroic filter arrays in multispectral cameras using a variety of sensors including linear, area, silicon, and InGaAs. Specific implementations range from hybrid RGB + NIR sensors to custom sensors with applicationspecific VIS, NIR, and SWIR spectral bands. Benefits and tradeoffs of multispectral sensors using dichroic filter arrays are compared with alternative approaches - including their passivity, spectral range, customization options, and development path. Finally, we report on the wafer-level fabrication of dichroic filter arrays on imaging sensors for scalable production of multispectral sensors and cameras.

  19. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hypoperfused myocardium.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, S; Lange, R A; Gutekunst, D P; Parkey, R W; Willerson, J T; Peshock, R M

    1991-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can define myocardial perfusion defects due to acute coronary occlusion. However, since most clinically important diagnostic examinations involve coronary arteries with subtotal stenoses, we investigated the ability of MR imaging with a manganese contrast agent to detect perfusion abnormalities in a canine model of partial coronary artery stenosis. The contrast agent was administered after the creation of a partial coronary artery stenosis with the addition of the coronary vasodilator dipyridamole in six of 12 animals. The hearts were imaged ex situ using gradient reversal and spin-echo sequences, and images were analyzed to determine differences in signal intensity between hypoperfused and normally perfused myocardium. Comparison of MR images with regional blood flow and thallium-201 measurements showed good concordance of hypoperfused segments in those animals given dipyridamole, with 75% of the abnormal segments correctly identified. In those animals not given dipyridamole, 48% of segments were correctly identified. Thus, ex vivo MR imaging with a paramagnetic contrast enhancement can be used to detect acute regional myocardial perfusion abnormalities due to severe partial coronary artery stenoses.

  20. Contrast Media in PET/Computed Tomography Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Varun Singh; Rana, Neelima; Nazar, Aftab Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Is there a need for the contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) scan or is the low-dose, non-contrast-enhanced PET/CT scan sufficient? The topic has been debated time and again. Although low-dose noncontrast CT serves the purpose of simple anatomic correlation and attenuation correction of PET images, many times patients have to undergo additional contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging modalities, which may lead to a delay in decision-making. In this review, the authors have addressed various such issues related to the use of contrast agents and special techniques of clinical interest based on their utility in dual-modality PET/CT.

  1. Nanoengineered multimodal contrast agent for medical image guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Gregory J.; Zheng, Jinzi; Brock, Kristy; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A.

    2005-04-01

    Multimodality imaging has gained momentum in radiation therapy planning and image-guided treatment delivery. Specifically, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are two complementary imaging modalities often utilized in radiation therapy for visualization of anatomical structures for tumour delineation and accurate registration of image data sets for volumetric dose calculation. The development of a multimodal contrast agent for CT and MR with prolonged in vivo residence time would provide long-lasting spatial and temporal correspondence of the anatomical features of interest, and therefore facilitate multimodal image registration, treatment planning and delivery. The multimodal contrast agent investigated consists of nano-sized stealth liposomes encapsulating conventional iodine and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The average loading achieved was 33.5 +/- 7.1 mg/mL of iodine for iohexol and 9.8 +/- 2.0 mg/mL of gadolinium for gadoteridol. The average liposome diameter was 46.2 +/- 13.5 nm. The system was found to be stable in physiological buffer over a 15-day period, releasing 11.9 +/- 1.1% and 11.2 +/- 0.9% of the total amounts of iohexol and gadoteridol loaded, respectively. 200 minutes following in vivo administration, the contrast agent maintained a relative contrast enhancement of 81.4 +/- 13.05 differential Hounsfield units (ΔHU) in CT (40% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 731.9 +/- 144.2 differential signal intensity (ΔSI) in MR (46% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the blood (aorta), a relative contrast enhancement of 38.0 +/- 5.1 ΔHU (42% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) and 178.6 +/- 41.4 ΔSI (62% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes post-injection) in the liver (parenchyma), a relative contrast enhancement of 9.1 +/- 1.7 ΔHU (94% decrease from the peak signal value achieved 3 minutes

  2. Real-time observations of extreme-ultraviolet aerial images by fluorescence microimaging

    SciTech Connect

    La Fontaine, B. ); White, D.L. ); Wood, O.R. II ); MacDowell, A.A.; Tan, Z. ); Taylor, G.N. ); Tennant, D.M. ); Hulbert, S.L. )

    1994-11-01

    A new technique, fluorescence microimaging (FMI), using single-crystal phosphors was used to look directly at aerial images produced by an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) camera operating at a wavelength of 139 A. The achieved spatial resolution was estimated to be [similar to]0.2 [mu]m. A comparison of this technique with the usual resist-exposure scanning electron microscopy inspection technique as a means of focusing a 20[times]EUV Schwarzschild camera was performed. FMI could in principle be improved to view fluorescent images with features as small as 0.07 [mu]m, in real time.

  3. Using aberration test patterns to optimize the performance of EUV aerial imaging microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Miyakawa, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick; Han, Hak-Seung; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-06-16

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a prototype EUV-wavelength zoneplate microscope that provides high quality aerial image measurements of EUV reticles. To simplify and improve the alignment procedure we have created and tested arrays of aberration-sensitive patterns on EUV reticles and we have compared their images collected with the AIT to the expected shapes obtained by simulating the theoretical wavefront of the system. We obtained a consistent measure of coma and astigmatism in the center of the field of view using two different patterns, revealing a misalignment condition in the optics.

  4. Theoretical Evaluation of Compositional Contrast of Scanning Electron Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Fujiwara, Takafumi; Suga, Hiroshi

    1992-12-01

    The compositional contrast in the scanning electron microscope image is calculated for Al-Cu, Si-Cu and Al-Si contacts. An electron scattering phenomenon in the specimen is simulated in a direct manner. Electron refraction at the boundary, because of the agreement of each Fermi energy at the boundary, is precisely taken into account. The backscattered electron image shows better resolution than the secondary electron image in terms of the boundary contrast when the primary electron energy is 1 keV. The signal intensity varies depending on materials adjacent to the location observed. The ultimate resolution of the compositional contrast of the scanning electron microscope can be below 1 nm.

  5. Blood pool contrast agents for venous magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Irai S.; Li, Weier; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the venous system plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of a wide range of clinically significant disorders. There have been great advances in venous imaging techniques, culminating in the use of magnetic resonance venography (MRV). Although MRV has distinct advantages in anatomic and quantitative cross sectional imaging without ionizing radiation, there are well-known challenges in acquisition timing and contrast administration in patients with renal impairment. The latest advancement involves the addition of new contrast media agents, which have emerged as valuable alternatives in these difficult scenarios. In this review, we will focus on a group of specific contrast agents called blood pool agents and discuss their salient features and clinical applications. PMID:28123972

  6. Film cameras or digital sensors? The challenge ahead for aerial imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Cartographic aerial cameras continue to play the key role in producing quality products for the aerial photography business, and specifically for the National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP). One NAPP photograph taken with cameras capable of 39 lp/mm system resolution can contain the equivalent of 432 million pixels at 11 ??m spot size, and the cost is less than $75 per photograph to scan and output the pixels on a magnetic storage medium. On the digital side, solid state charge coupled device linear and area arrays can yield quality resolution (7 to 12 ??m detector size) and a broader dynamic range. If linear arrays are to compete with film cameras, they will require precise attitude and positioning of the aircraft so that the lines of pixels can be unscrambled and put into a suitable homogeneous scene that is acceptable to an interpreter. Area arrays need to be much larger than currently available to image scenes competitive in size with film cameras. Analysis of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two systems show that the analog approach is more economical at present. However, as arrays become larger, attitude sensors become more refined, global positioning system coordinate readouts become commonplace, and storage capacity becomes more affordable, the digital camera may emerge as the imaging system for the future. Several technical challenges must be overcome if digital sensors are to advance to where they can support mapping, charting, and geographic information system applications.

  7. Computer vision-based orthorectification and georeferencing of aerial image sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Mohammad Reza; Qi, Xiaojun; Jensen, Austin

    2016-07-01

    Generating a georeferenced mosaic map from unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imagery is a challenging task. Direct and indirect georeferencing methods may fail to generate an accurate mosaic map due to the erroneous exterior orientation parameters stored in the inertial measurement unit (IMU), erroneous global positioning system (GPS) data, and difficulty in locating ground control points (GCPs) or having a sufficient number of GCPs. This paper presents a practical framework to orthorectify and georeference aerial images using the robust features-based matching method. The proposed georeferencing process is fully automatic and does not require any GCPs. It is also a near real-time process which can be used to determine whether aerial images taken by UAV cover the entire target area. We also extend this framework to use the inverse georeferencing process to update the IMU/GPS data which can be further used to calibrate the camera of the UAV, reduce IMU/GPS errors, and thus produce more accurate mosaic maps by employing any georeferencing method. Our experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework in producing comparable mosaic maps as commercial software Agisoft and the effectiveness of the extended framework in significantly reducing the errors in the IMU/GPS data.

  8. Moment feature based fast feature extraction algorithm for moving object detection using aerial images.

    PubMed

    Saif, A F M Saifuddin; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Mahayuddin, Zainal Rasyid

    2015-01-01

    Fast and computationally less complex feature extraction for moving object detection using aerial images from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) remains as an elusive goal in the field of computer vision research. The types of features used in current studies concerning moving object detection are typically chosen based on improving detection rate rather than on providing fast and computationally less complex feature extraction methods. Because moving object detection using aerial images from UAVs involves motion as seen from a certain altitude, effective and fast feature extraction is a vital issue for optimum detection performance. This research proposes a two-layer bucket approach based on a new feature extraction algorithm referred to as the moment-based feature extraction algorithm (MFEA). Because a moment represents the coherent intensity of pixels and motion estimation is a motion pixel intensity measurement, this research used this relation to develop the proposed algorithm. The experimental results reveal the successful performance of the proposed MFEA algorithm and the proposed methodology.

  9. Looking into the water with oblique head tilting: revision of the aerial binocular imaging of underwater objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Gábor; Buchta, Krisztián; Varjú, Dezsö

    2003-06-01

    It is a well-known phenomenon that when we look into the water with two aerial eyes, both the apparent position and the apparent shape of underwater objects are different from the real ones because of refraction at the water surface. Earlier studies of the refraction-distorted structure of the underwater binocular visual field of aerial observers were restricted to either vertically or horizontally oriented eyes. We investigate a generalized version of this problem: We calculate the position of the binocular image point of an underwater object point viewed by two arbitrarily positioned aerial eyes, including oblique orientations of the eyes relative to the flat water surface. Assuming that binocular image fusion is performed by appropriate vergent eye movements to bring the object's image onto the foveas, the structure of the underwater binocular visual field is computed and visualized in different ways as a function of the relative positions of the eyes. We show that a revision of certain earlier treatments of the aerial imaging of underwater objects is necessary. We analyze and correct some widespread erroneous or incomplete representations of this classical geometric optical problem that occur in different textbooks. Improving the theory of aerial binocular imaging of underwater objects, we demonstrate that the structure of the underwater binocular visual field of aerial observers distorted by refraction is more complex than has been thought previously. (vision).

  10. Droplet Epitaxy Image Contrast in Mirror Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, S. M.; Zheng, C. X.; Jesson, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Image simulation methods are applied to interpret mirror electron microscopy (MEM) images obtained from a movie of GaAs droplet epitaxy. Cylindrical symmetry of structures grown by droplet epitaxy is assumed in the simulations which reproduce the main features of the experimental MEM image contrast, demonstrating that droplet epitaxy can be studied in real-time. It is therefore confirmed that an inner ring forms at the droplet contact line and an outer ring (or skirt) occurs outside the droplet periphery. We believe that MEM combined with image simulations will be increasingly used to study the formation and growth of quantum structures.

  11. Image degradation in aerial imagery duplicates. [photographic processing of photographic film and reproduction (copying)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A series of Earth Resources Aircraft Program data flights were made over an aerial test range in Arizona for the evaluation of large cameras. Specifically, both medium altitude and high altitude flights were made to test and evaluate a series of color as well as black-and-white films. Image degradation, inherent in duplication processing, was studied. Resolution losses resulting from resolution characteristics of the film types are given. Color duplicates, in general, are shown to be degraded more than black-and-white films because of the limitations imposed by available aerial color duplicating stock. Results indicate that a greater resolution loss may be expected when the original has higher resolution. Photographs of the duplications are shown.

  12. A nonlinear image contrast sharpening approach based on Munsell's scale.

    PubMed

    Matz, Sean C; de Figueiredo, Rui J P

    2006-04-01

    Contrast is a measure of the variation in intensity or gray value in a specified region of an image. The region can be most or all of the image, giving rise to a global concept of contrast. The region might, on the other hand, be a small window in which case the concept of contrast is a locally defined expression. In this work, we introduce a nonlinear local contrast enhancement method. This method utilizes the Munsell value scale which is based upon human visual perception. Use of the Munsell value scale allows for the partitioning of the gray scale into ten discrete subintervals. Subsequent local processing occurs within each of these subintervals. Inside each subinterval, this method constructs a contrast enhancement function that is a smooth approximation to the threshold step function and which maps a given subinterval into itself. This function then thresholds the gray values in a subinterval in a smooth manner about a locally computed quantity called the mean edge gray value. By enhancing the contrast in this way, the original shades of gray are preserved. That is, the groupings of the gray values by subinterval are preserved. As a result, no gray value distortion is introduced into the image.

  13. Phase contrast portal imaging for image-guided microbeam radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, Keiji; Kondoh, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy is a unique treatment technique used to destroy tumors without severely affecting circumjacent healthy tissue. We applied a phase contrast technique to portal imaging in preclinical microbeam radiation therapy experiments. Phase contrast portal imaging is expected to enable us to obtain higherresolution X-ray images at therapeutic X-ray energies compared to conventional portal imaging. Frontal view images of a mouse head sample were acquired in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast images depicted edge-enhanced fine structures of the parietal bones surrounding the cerebrum. The phase contrast technique is expected to be effective in bony-landmark-based verification for image-guided radiation therapy.

  14. Spatial contrast sensitivity through aviator's night vision imaging system.

    PubMed

    Rabin, J

    1993-08-01

    Visual acuity is often used to assess vision through image intensifying devices such as night vision goggles (NVG's). Fewer attempts have been made to measure contrast sensitivity through NVG's. Such information would be useful to better understand contrast processing through NVG's under various stimulus conditions. In this study, computer-generated letter charts were used to measure contrast sensitivity through third generation NVG's for a range of letter sizes. The red phosphor of a standard color monitor proved to be an effective stimulus for third generation devices. Different night sky conditions were simulated over a 3 log unit range. The results illustrate the profile of contrast sensitivity through third generation NVG's over a range of night sky conditions. Comparison of measurements through NVG's to measurements obtained without the device but at the same luminance and color distinguish between effects of luminance and noise on contrast sensitivity.

  15. Multifunctional photosensitizer-based contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Driessen, Wouter; McLaren, Ross; Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U S; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2014-06-18

    Photoacoustic imaging is a novel hybrid imaging modality combining the high spatial resolution of optical imaging with the high penetration depth of ultrasound imaging. Here, for the first time, we evaluate the efficacy of various photosensitizers that are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic (PDT) agents as photoacoustic contrast agents. Photoacoustic imaging of photosensitizers exhibits advantages over fluorescence imaging, which is prone to photobleaching and autofluorescence interference. In this work, we examined the photoacoustic activity of 5 photosensitizers: zinc phthalocyanine, protoporphyrin IX, 2,4-bis [4-(N,N-dibenzylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine, chlorin e6 and methylene blue in phantoms, among which zinc phthalocyanine showed the highest photoacoustic activity. Subsequently, we evaluated its tumor localization efficiency and biodistribution at multiple time points in a murine model using photoacoustic imaging. We observed that the probe localized at the tumor within 10 minutes post injection, reaching peak accumulation around 1 hour and was cleared within 24 hours, thus, demonstrating the potential of photosensitizers as photoacoustic imaging contrast agents in vivo. This means that the known advantages of photosensitizers such as preferential tumor uptake and PDT efficacy can be combined with photoacoustic imaging capabilities to achieve longitudinal monitoring of cancer progression and therapy in vivo.

  16. An airport runway centerline location method for one-off aerial imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shule; Xu, Tingfa; Ni, Guoqiang; Shao, Xiaoguang

    2010-11-01

    An airport runway centerline location method is proposed for extracting airport runway in images from one-off aerial imaging system. One-off aerial imaging system captures image at an altitude about one kilometer or below, thus detailed feature of the scenery reveals itself clearly. The proposed method relies on this precondition to detect and locate centerline of airport runway. This method has four steps: edge detection, dominating line orientation extraction, distance histogram building and centerline location. A salient edge detection method is developed with Sobel detector, which could detect edges of runway strips at the disturbance of edges features from surrounding objects. Then, a traditional Hough transform is performed to build a Hough map, within which the dominating line orientation is extracted. After getting the dominating line orientation, a reference straight line is chosen for building distance histogram. This distance histogram is a one-dimensional one, built up with the distance of all edge pixels in the edge map to the reference line. Airport centerline has a three-peak pattern in the one-dimensional distance histogram, and the center peak is corresponding to the centerline of airport runway. Experiments with simulated images show this method could location airport runway centerline effectively.

  17. Efficient registration of multitemporal and multisensor aerial images based on alignment of nonparametric edge features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Bourbakis, Nikolaos G.

    2010-01-01

    The topic of aerial image registration attracts considerable interest within the imaging research community due to its significance for several applications, including change detection, sensor fusion, and topographic mapping. Our interest is focused on finding the optimal transformation between two aerial images that depict the same visual scene in the presence of pronounced spatial, temporal, and sensor variations. We first introduce a stochastic edge estimation process suitable for geometric shape-based registration, which we also compare to intensity-based registration. Furthermore, we propose an objective function that weights the L2 distances of the edge estimates by the feature points' energy, which we denote by sum of normalized squared differences and compare to standard objective functions, such as mutual information and the sum of absolute centered differences. In the optimization stage, we employ a genetic algorithm scheme in a multiscale image representation scheme to enhance the registration accuracy and reduce the computational load. Our experimental tests, measuring registration accuracy, rate of convergence, and statistical properties of registration errors, suggest that the proposed edge-based representation and objective function in conjunction with genetic algorithm optimization are capable of addressing several forms of imaging variations and producing encouraging registration results.

  18. Dual-frequency chirp imaging for contrast detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chih-Hao; Shen, Che-Chou; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2011-05-01

    The method of dual-frequency (DF) difference excitation is capable of generating a low-frequency envelope component as the driving force of commercial contrast microbubbles by using a high-frequency pulse. Although the DF difference excitation method provides good lateral resolution in high-frequency contrast imaging, it suffers from degraded axial resolution because a longer-than-usual envelope component is required to induce the oscillation of microbubbles. In this study, a coded excitation technique (i.e. chirp waveform) is combined with the DF difference excitation method (also referred to as the DF chirp excitation method) to improve the axial resolution of contrast imaging while maintaining the impinging insonation energy. B-mode images were constructed to compare the performance of the DF chirp excitation method with the conventional tone-burst pulse method. Results indicate that the proposed DF chirp excitation method can provide better axial resolution after pulse compression. Moreover, as compared to the tone-burst pulse with the same pulse duration, the pulse compression results in a higher signal-to-noise ratio because of the temporal concentration of the received energy. Nevertheless, images with the DF chirp excitation method demonstrated noticeable image artefacts resulting from the range sidelobes. The DF chirp excitation method also produced obvious tissue harmonic generation that could degrade the contrast-to-tissue ratio at higher acoustic pressures.

  19. Amplitude-modulation chirp imaging for contrast detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Lin; Kuo, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2010-09-01

    We propose an amplitude-modulation chirp imaging method for contrast detection with high-frequency ultrasound. Our proposed method detects microbubbles by extracting and then selectively compressing the component of the backscattered chirp signal modulated by changes in the radii of microbubbles at their resonance frequency. Microbubbles are sonicated simultaneously with a narrowband, low-frequency pumping signal at their resonance frequency and a wideband, high-frequency imaging chirp signal. Changes in the radii of the resonant microbubbles result in periodic changes in their acoustic cross section that modulate the amplitude of the backscattered imaging chirp signal, forming pumping and imaging frequency sum-and-difference chirp terms. The frequency-sum or -difference chirp component is then extracted by a bandpass filter (BPF). Because a long imaging pulse duration is required to obtain a sufficient modulation depth on the chirp for contrast detection and to facilitate frequency-sum-and-difference signal extraction with the BPF, a chirp with a longer-than-usual waveform is used so pulse compression of the extracted chirp signal can then be performed to maintain the axial resolution, and even further improve the signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-tissue ratio. Experiments performed on flow phantoms with and without a speckle-generating background were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed technique. These results indicate that our proposed method can potentially provide high-resolution contrast detection in the microvasculature.

  20. Dual-frequency chirp imaging for contrast detection.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Hao; Shen, Che-Chou; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2011-05-07

    The method of dual-frequency (DF) difference excitation is capable of generating a low-frequency envelope component as the driving force of commercial contrast microbubbles by using a high-frequency pulse. Although the DF difference excitation method provides good lateral resolution in high-frequency contrast imaging, it suffers from degraded axial resolution because a longer-than-usual envelope component is required to induce the oscillation of microbubbles. In this study, a coded excitation technique (i.e. chirp waveform) is combined with the DF difference excitation method (also referred to as the DF chirp excitation method) to improve the axial resolution of contrast imaging while maintaining the impinging insonation energy. B-mode images were constructed to compare the performance of the DF chirp excitation method with the conventional tone-burst pulse method. Results indicate that the proposed DF chirp excitation method can provide better axial resolution after pulse compression. Moreover, as compared to the tone-burst pulse with the same pulse duration, the pulse compression results in a higher signal-to-noise ratio because of the temporal concentration of the received energy. Nevertheless, images with the DF chirp excitation method demonstrated noticeable image artefacts resulting from the range sidelobes. The DF chirp excitation method also produced obvious tissue harmonic generation that could degrade the contrast-to-tissue ratio at higher acoustic pressures.

  1. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  2. Image contrast enhancement based on a local standard deviation model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Dah-Chung; Wu, Wen-Rong

    1996-12-31

    The adaptive contrast enhancement (ACE) algorithm is a widely used image enhancement method, which needs a contrast gain to adjust high frequency components of an image. In the literature, the gain is usually inversely proportional to the local standard deviation (LSD) or is a constant. But these cause two problems in practical applications, i.e., noise overenhancement and ringing artifact. In this paper a new gain is developed based on Hunt`s Gaussian image model to prevent the two defects. The new gain is a nonlinear function of LSD and has the desired characteristic emphasizing the LSD regions in which details are concentrated. We have applied the new ACE algorithm to chest x-ray images and the simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Reflection-contrast limit of fiber-optic image guides

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Pierre M.; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2009-01-01

    Fiber-optic image guides in confocal reflectance endomicroscopes introduce background backscatter that limits the achievable contrast in these devices. We show the dominant source of backscatter from the image guide is due to Rayleigh scattering at short wavelengths and terminal reflections of the fibers at long wavelengths. The effective Rayleigh scattering coefficient and the wavelength-independent reflectivity due terminal reflections are measured experimentally in a commercial image guide. The Rayleigh scattering component of backscatter can be accurately predicted using the fractional refractive-index difference and length of the fibers in the image guide. We also presented a simple model that can be used to predict signal-to-background ratio in a fiber-optic confocal reflectance endomicroscope for biologically relevant tissues and contrast agents that cover a wide range of reflectivity. PMID:20059266

  4. A new ultrasonic transducer for improved contrast nonlinear imaging.

    PubMed

    Bouakaz, Ayache; Cate, Folkert ten; de Jong, Nico

    2004-08-21

    Second harmonic imaging has provided significant improvement in contrast detection over fundamental imaging. This improvement is a result of a higher contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) achievable at the second harmonic frequency. Nevertheless, the differentiation between contrast and tissue at the second harmonic frequency is still in many situations cumbersome and contrast detection remains nowadays as one of the main challenges, especially in the capillaries. The reduced CTR is mainly caused by the generation of second harmonic energy from nonlinear propagation effects in tissue, which hence obscures the echoes from contrast bubbles. In a previous study, we demonstrated theoretically that the CTR increases with the harmonic number. Therefore the purpose of our study was to increase the CTR by selectively looking to the higher harmonic frequencies. In order to be able to receive these high frequency components (third up to the fifth harmonic), a new ultrasonic phased array transducer has been constructed. The main advantage of the new design is its wide frequency bandwidth. The new array transducer contains two different types of elements arranged in an interleaved pattern (odd and even elements). This design enables separate transmission and reception modes. The odd elements operate at 2.8 MHz and 80% bandwidth, whereas the even elements have a centre frequency of 900 kHz with a bandwidth of 50%. The probe is connected to a Vivid 5 system (GE-Vingmed) and proper software is developed for driving. The total bandwidth of such a transducer is estimated to be more than 150% which enables higher harmonic imaging at an adequate sensitivity and signal to noise ratio compared to standard medical array transducers. We describe in this paper the design and fabrication of the array transducer. Moreover its acoustic properties are measured and its performances for nonlinear contrast imaging are evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The preliminary results demonstrate the advantages of

  5. Mechanisms of contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, D H

    1991-02-01

    The use of contrast agents has increased the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Contrast in MRI is multifactorial, depending not only on T1 and T2 relaxation rates, but also on flow, proton density and, in gradient-echo sequences, on the angle of the induced field. The use of contrast agents in MRI changes the T1 and T2 relaxation rates, producing increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images or decreased signal intensity on T2-weighted images, or both. All contrast agents produce changes in magnetic susceptibility by enhancing local magnetic fields. These effects are caused by interactions between nuclear and paramagnetic substance magnet moments, which produce accentuated transitions between spin states and cause shortening of T1; the paramagnetic substance causes accentuated local fields, which lead to increased dephasing and thus shortening of T2 or T2* relaxation time. The efficacy of shortening of T1, T2 or T2* relaxation time depends on the distance between the proton nucleus and the electronic field of the paramagnetic compound, the time of their interaction (correlation time) and the paramagnetic concentration. The MRI contrast agents currently in use cause shortening of T1, T2 or T2* relaxation time. Metal chelates (e.g., gadolinium-diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid [Gd-DTPA]) in low concentration cause shortening of T1 relaxation times, and the superparamagnetics (e.g., ferrite) cause shortening of T2 relaxation times.

  6. HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING VIA MODAL CONVERGENCE OF DEFORMABLE MIRROR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Feiling

    2012-06-01

    For extremely high contrast imaging, such as direct observation of faint stellar companions, an adaptive optics system is required to produce low-halo and low-speckle regions in the focal plane. A method for deformable mirror control is proposed to achieve this goal. The method relies on a modal convergence of the deformable mirror driven by a focal-plane metric. The modal sets are derived from the Walsh functions. The Walsh-function modes serve two purposes: the expansion of the actuator displacements and the expansion of the phase functions. Taking advantage of the unique properties of the modal functions, a universal control algorithm is devised for the realization of high-contrast focal planes with and without the help of conventional coronagraphy. Numerical modeling is conducted to simulate complete imaging systems under various scenarios. It is shown that the proposed method reliably produces high-contrast focal planes using either a segmented or a membrane mirror. In the presence of random aberration the method is shown to be able to maintain high-contrast focal planes. Requiring neither retrieval of electric fields nor detailed knowledge of the deformable mirrors, this technique may allow high-contrast imaging in real time.

  7. Algorithm for automatic image dodging of unmanned aerial vehicle images using two-dimensional radiometric spatial attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenzhuo; Sun, Kaimin; Li, Deren; Bai, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remote sensing technology has come into wide use in recent years. The poor stability of the UAV platform, however, produces more inconsistencies in hue and illumination among UAV images than other more stable platforms. Image dodging is a process used to reduce these inconsistencies caused by different imaging conditions. We propose an algorithm for automatic image dodging of UAV images using two-dimensional radiometric spatial attributes. We use object-level image smoothing to smooth foreground objects in images and acquire an overall reference background image by relative radiometric correction. We apply the Contourlet transform to separate high- and low-frequency sections for every single image, and replace the low-frequency section with the low-frequency section extracted from the corresponding region in the overall reference background image. We apply the inverse Contourlet transform to reconstruct the final dodged images. In this process, a single image must be split into reasonable block sizes with overlaps due to large pixel size. Experimental mosaic results show that our proposed method reduces the uneven distribution of hue and illumination. Moreover, it effectively eliminates dark-bright interstrip effects caused by shadows and vignetting in UAV images while maximally protecting image texture information.

  8. Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD): evolution and progress.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Shan, Liang; Eckelman, W C; Leung, Kam; Latterner, Martin; Bryant, Stephen H; Menkens, Anne

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of writing this review is to showcase the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD; www.micad.nlm.nih.gov ) to students, researchers, and clinical investigators interested in the different aspects of molecular imaging. This database provides freely accessible, current, online scientific information regarding molecular imaging (MI) probes and contrast agents (CA) used for positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray/computed tomography, optical imaging and ultrasound imaging. Detailed information on >1,000 agents in MICAD is provided in a chapter format and can be accessed through PubMed. Lists containing >4,250 unique MI probes and CAs published in peer-reviewed journals and agents approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration as well as a comma separated values file summarizing all chapters in the database can be downloaded from the MICAD homepage. Users can search for agents in MICAD on the basis of imaging modality, source of signal/contrast, agent or target category, pre-clinical or clinical studies, and text words. Chapters in MICAD describe the chemical characteristics (structures linked to PubChem), the in vitro and in vivo activities, and other relevant information regarding an imaging agent. All references in the chapters have links to PubMed. A Supplemental Information Section in each chapter is available to share unpublished information regarding an agent. A Guest Author Program is available to facilitate rapid expansion of the database. Members of the imaging community registered with MICAD periodically receive an e-mail announcement (eAnnouncement) that lists new chapters uploaded to the database. Users of MICAD are encouraged to provide feedback, comments, or suggestions for further improvement of the database by writing to the editors at micad@nlm.nih.gov.

  9. Damaged road extracting with high-resolution aerial image of post-earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zezhong; Pu, Chengjun; Zhu, Mingcang; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Yalan; Li, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of earth observation technology, remote sensing images have played more important roles, because the high resolution images can provide the original data for object recognition, disaster investigation, and so on. When a disastrous earthquake breaks out, a large number of roads could be damaged instantly. There are a lot of approaches about road extraction, such as region growing, gray threshold, and k-means clustering algorithm. We could not obtain the undamaged roads with these approaches, if the trees or their shadows along the roads are difficult to be distinguished from the damaged road. In the paper, a method is presented to extract the damaged road with high resolution aerial image of post-earthquake. Our job is to extract the damaged road and the undamaged with the aerial image. We utilized the mathematical morphology approach and the k-means clustering algorithm to extract the road. Our method was composed of four ingredients. Firstly, the mathematical morphology filter operators were employed to remove the interferences from the trees or their shadows. Secondly, the k-means algorithm was employed to derive the damaged segments. Thirdly, the mathematical morphology approach was used to extract the undamaged road; Finally, we could derive the damaged segments by overlaying the road networks of pre-earthquake. Our results showed that the earthquake, broken in Yaan, was disastrous for the road, Therefore, we could take more measures to keep it clear.

  10. Model-based neural network algorithm for coffee ripeness prediction using Helios UAV aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furfaro, R.; Ganapol, B. D.; Johnson, L. F.; Herwitz, S.

    2005-10-01

    Over the past few years, NASA has had a great interest in exploring the feasibility of using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), equipped with multi-spectral imaging systems, as long-duration platform for crop monitoring. To address the problem of predicting the ripeness level of the Kauai coffee plantation field using UAV aerial images, we proposed a neural network algorithm based on a nested Leaf-Canopy radiative transport Model (LCM2). A model-based, multi-layer neural network using backpropagation has been designed and trained to learn the functional relationship between the airborne reflectance and the percentage of ripe, over-ripe and under-ripe cherries present in the field. LCM2 was used to generate samples of the desired map. Post-processing analysis and tests on synthetic coffee field data showed that the network has accurately learn the map. A new Domain Projection Technique (DPT) was developed to deal with situations where the measured reflectance fell outside the training set. DPT projected the reflectance into the domain forcing the network to provide a physical solution. Tests were conducted to estimate the error bound. The synergistic combination of neural network algorithms and DPT lays at the core of a more complex algorithm designed to process UAV images. The application of the algorithm to real airborne images shows predictions consistent with post-harvesting data and highlights the potential of the overall methodology.

  11. Shadow detection in color aerial images based on HSI space and color attenuation relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenxuan; Li, Jie

    2012-12-01

    Many problems in image processing and computer vision arise from shadows in a single color aerial image. This article presents a new algorithm by which shadows are extracted from a single color aerial image. Apart from using the ratio value of the hue over the intensity in some state-of-the-art algorithms, this article introduces another ratio map, which is obtained by applying the saturation over the intensity. Candidate shadow and nonshadow regions are separated by applying Otus's thresholding method. The color attenuation relationship that describes the relationship between the attenuation of each color channel is derived from the Planck's blackbody irradiance law. For each region, the color attenuation relationship and other determination conditions are performed iteratively to segment it into smaller sub-regions and to identify whether each sub-region is a true shadow region. Compared with previous methods, the proposed algorithm presents better shadow detection accuracy in the images that contain some dark green lawn, river, or low brightness shadow regions. The experimental results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Automatic orthorectification and mosaicking of oblique images from a zoom lens aerial camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qianfei; Liu, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    For the purpose of image distortion caused by the oblique photography of a zoom lens aerial camera, a fast and accurate image autorectification and mosaicking method in a ground control points (GCPs)-free environment was proposed. With the availability of integrated global positioning system (GPS) and inertial measurement units, the camera's exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) were solved through direct georeferencing. The one-parameter division model was adopted to estimate the distortion coefficient and the distortion center coordinates for the zoom lens to correct the lens distortion. Using the camera's EOPs and the lens distortion parameters, the oblique aerial images specified in the camera frame were geo-orthorectified into the mapping frame and then were mosaicked together based on the mapping coordinates to produce a larger field and high-resolution georeferenced image. Experimental results showed that the orthorectification error was less than 1.80 m at an 1100 m flight height above ground level, when compared with 14 presurveyed ground checkpoints which were measured by differential GPS. The mosaic error was about 1.57 m compared with 18 checkpoints. The accuracy was considered sufficient for urgent response such as military reconnaissance and disaster monitoring where GCPs were not available.

  13. Contrast Imaging in Mouse Embryos Using High-frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Denbeigh, Janet M.; Nixon, Brian A.; Puri, Mira C.; Foster, F. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast-enhanced imaging can convey essential quantitative information regarding tissue vascularity and perfusion and, in targeted applications, facilitate the detection and measure of vascular biomarkers at the molecular level. Within the mouse embryo, this noninvasive technique may be used to uncover basic mechanisms underlying vascular development in the early mouse circulatory system and in genetic models of cardiovascular disease. The mouse embryo also presents as an excellent model for studying the adhesion of microbubbles to angiogenic targets (including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) or αvβ3) and for assessing the quantitative nature of molecular ultrasound. We therefore developed a method to introduce ultrasound contrast agents into the vasculature of living, isolated embryos. This allows freedom in terms of injection control and positioning, reproducibility of the imaging plane without obstruction and motion, and simplified image analysis and quantification. Late gestational stage (embryonic day (E)16.6 and E17.5) murine embryos were isolated from the uterus, gently exteriorized from the yolk sac and microbubble contrast agents were injected into veins accessible on the chorionic surface of the placental disc. Nonlinear contrast ultrasound imaging was then employed to collect a number of basic perfusion parameters (peak enhancement, wash-in rate and time to peak) and quantify targeted microbubble binding in an endoglin mouse model. We show the successful circulation of microbubbles within living embryos and the utility of this approach in characterizing embryonic vasculature and microbubble behavior. PMID:25867243

  14. Development of contrast enhancing agents in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lex, L

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful new diagnostic tool in medicine. In MRI there is a great need to improve the specific identification of different tissues i.e. to enhance the contrast between them. This review tries to cover most of the approaches known for solving this problem.

  15. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  16. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2017-01-31

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  17. Contrast imaging in mouse embryos using high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Denbeigh, Janet M; Nixon, Brian A; Puri, Mira C; Foster, F Stuart

    2015-03-04

    Ultrasound contrast-enhanced imaging can convey essential quantitative information regarding tissue vascularity and perfusion and, in targeted applications, facilitate the detection and measure of vascular biomarkers at the molecular level. Within the mouse embryo, this noninvasive technique may be used to uncover basic mechanisms underlying vascular development in the early mouse circulatory system and in genetic models of cardiovascular disease. The mouse embryo also presents as an excellent model for studying the adhesion of microbubbles to angiogenic targets (including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) or αvβ3) and for assessing the quantitative nature of molecular ultrasound. We therefore developed a method to introduce ultrasound contrast agents into the vasculature of living, isolated embryos. This allows freedom in terms of injection control and positioning, reproducibility of the imaging plane without obstruction and motion, and simplified image analysis and quantification. Late gestational stage (embryonic day (E)16.6 and E17.5) murine embryos were isolated from the uterus, gently exteriorized from the yolk sac and microbubble contrast agents were injected into veins accessible on the chorionic surface of the placental disc. Nonlinear contrast ultrasound imaging was then employed to collect a number of basic perfusion parameters (peak enhancement, wash-in rate and time to peak) and quantify targeted microbubble binding in an endoglin mouse model. We show the successful circulation of microbubbles within living embryos and the utility of this approach in characterizing embryonic vasculature and microbubble behavior.

  18. Denoising in Contrast-Enhanced X-ray Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Gwanggil

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a denoising and contrast-enhancement method for medical images. The main purpose of medical image improvement is to transform lower contrast data into higher contrast, and to reduce high noise levels. To meet this goal, we propose a noise-level estimation method, whereby the noise level is estimated by computing the standard deviation and variance in a local block. The obtained noise level is then used as an input parameter for the block-matching and 3D filtering (BM3D) algorithm, and the denoising process is then performed. Noise-level estimation step is important because the BM3D algorithm does not perform well without correct noise-level information. Simulation results confirm that the proposed method outperforms other benchmarks with respect to both their objective and visual performances.

  19. [Gadolinium-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Muñoz, S; Calles Blanco, C; Marcin, Javier; Fernández Álvarez, C; Lafuente Martínez, J

    2014-06-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents are increasingly being used in magnetic resonance imaging. These agents can improve the contrast in images and provide information about function and metabolism, increasing both sensitivity and specificity. We describe the gadolinium-based contrast agents that have been approved for clinical use, detailing their main characteristics based on their chemical structure, stability, and safety. In general terms, these compounds are safe. Nevertheless, adverse reactions, the possibility of nephrotoxicity from these compounds, and the possibility of developing nephrogenic systemic fibrosis will be covered in this article. Lastly, the article will discuss the current guidelines, recommendations, and contraindications for their clinical use, including the management of pregnant and breast-feeding patients.

  20. Reconstruction of former glacier surface topography from archive oblique aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, N. G.; Tonkin, T. N.

    2017-04-01

    Archive oblique aerial imagery offers the potential to reconstruct the former geometry of valley glaciers and other landscape surfaces. Whilst the use of Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry with multiview stereopsis (MVS) to process small-format imagery is now well established in the geosciences, the potential of the technique for extracting topographic data from archive oblique aerial imagery is unclear. Here, SfM-MVS is used to reconstruct the former topography of two high-Arctic glaciers (Midtre and Austre Lovénbreen, Svalbard, Norway) using three archive oblique aerial images obtained by the Norwegian Polar Institute in 1936. The 1936 point cloud was produced using seven LiDAR-derived ground control points located on stable surfaces in proximity to the former piedmont glacier termini. To assess accuracy, the 1936 data set was compared to a LiDAR data set using the M3C2 algorithm to calculate cloud-to-cloud differences. For stable areas (such as nonglacial surfaces), vertical differences were detected between the two point clouds (RMS M3C2 vertical difference of 8.5 m), with the outwash zones adjacent to the assessed glacier termini showing less extensive vertical discrepancies (94% of M3C2 vertical differences between ± 5 m). This

  1. Robust automatic focus algorithm for low contrast images using a new contrast measure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Yinglin; Tang, Jinshan; Zhang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Low contrast images, suffering from a lack of sharpness, are easily influenced by noise. As a result, many local false peaks may be generated in contrast measurements, making it difficult for the camera's passive auto-focus system to perform its function of locating the focused peak. In this paper, a new passive auto-focus algorithm is proposed to address this problem. First, a noise reduction preprocessing is introduced to make our algorithm robust to both additive noise and multiplicative noise. Then, a new contrast measure is presented to bring in local false peaks, ensuring the presence of a well defined focused peak. In order to gauge the performance of our algorithm, a modified peak search algorithm is used in the experiments. The experimental results from an actual digital camera validate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm.

  2. High Resolution X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Acoustic Tissue-Selective Contrast Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    microfocus x - ray source. Rev. Sci. Instr. 68, 2774 (1997). 8. Krol, A. et al. Laser-based microfocused x - ray ...high spatial coherence, such as synchrotrons 46, microfocus x - ray tubes 7, or laser plasma x - ray sources 8,9are employed is the phase contrast component...imaging apparatus to determine the deflection of the bead as a function of acoustic pressure. The x - rays , generated by a microfocus x - ray tube

  3. Examination of contrast mechanisms in optoacoustic imaging of thermal lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christian; Spirou, Gloria; Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Whelan, William M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2006-02-01

    Optoacoustic Imaging is based on the thermal expansion of tissue caused by a temperature rise due to absorption of short laser pulses. At constant laser fluence, optoacoustic image contrast is proportional to differences in optical absorption and the thermoacoustic efficiency, expressed by the Grueuneisen parameter, Γ. Γ is proportional to the thermal expansion coefficient, the sound velocity squared and the inverse heat capacity at constant pressure. In thermal therapies, these parameters may be modified in the treated area. In this work experiments were performed to examine the influence of these parameters on image contrast. A Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System (LOIS, Fairway Medical Technologies, Houston, Texas) was used to image tissue phantoms comprised of cylindrical Polyvinyl Chloride Plastisol (PVCP) optical absorbing targets imbedded in either gelatin or PVCP as the background medium. Varying concentrations of Black Plastic Color (BPC) and titanium dioxide (TiO II) were added to targets and background to yield desired tissue relevant optical absorption and effective scattering coefficients, respectively. In thermal therapy experiments, ex-vivo bovine liver was heated with laser fibres (805nm laser at 5 W for 600s) to create regions of tissue coagulation. Lesions formed in the liver tissue were visible using the LOIS system with reasonable correspondence to the actual region of tissue coagulation. In the phantom experiments, contrast could be seen with low optical absorbing targets (μ a of 0.50cm -1 down to 0.13cm-1) embedded in a gelatin background (see manuscript for formula). Therefore, the data suggest that small objects (< 5mm) with low absorption coefficients (in the range < 1cm -1) can be imaged using LOIS. PVCP-targets in gelatin were visible, even with the same optical properties as the gelatin, but different Γ. The enhanced contrast may also be caused by differences in the mechanical properties between the target and the surrounding medium

  4. Image quality and high contrast improvements on VLT/NACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Julien H. V.; O'Neal, Jared; Mawet, Dimitri; Kasper, Markus; Zins, Gérard; Neichel, Benoît; Kolb, Johann; Christiaens, Valentin; Tourneboeuf, Martin

    2012-07-01

    NACO is the famous and versatile diffraction limited NIR imager and spectrograph at the VLT with which ESO celebrated 10 years of Adaptive Optics. Since two years a substantial effort has been put in understanding and fixing issues that directly affect the image quality and the high contrast performances of the instrument. Experiments to compensate the non-common-path aberrations and recover the highest possible Strehl ratios have been carried out successfully and a plan is hereafter described to perform such measurements regularly. The drift associated to pupil tracking since 2007 was fixed in october 2011. NACO is therefore even more suited for high contrast imaging and can be used with coronagraphic masks in the image plane. Some contrast measurements are shown and discussed. The work accomplished on NACO will serve as reference for the next generation instruments on the VLT, especially the ones working at the diffraction limit and making use of angular differential imaging (i.e. SPHERE, VISIR, and possibly ERIS).

  5. Clinical study in phase- contrast mammography: image-quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Longo, Renata; Tonutti, Maura; Rigon, Luigi; Arfelli, Fulvia; Dreossi, Diego; Quai, Elisa; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Castelli, Edoardo; Tromba, Giuliana; Cova, Maria A

    2014-03-06

    The first clinical study of phase-contrast mammography (PCM) with synchrotron radiation was carried out at the Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics beamline of the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy) in 2006-2009. The study involved 71 patients with unresolved breast abnormalities after conventional digital mammography and ultrasonography exams carried out at the Radiology Department of Trieste University Hospital. These cases were referred for mammography at the synchrotron radiation facility, with images acquired using a propagation-based phase-contrast imaging technique. To investigate the contribution of phase-contrast effects to the image quality, two experienced radiologists specialized in mammography assessed the visibility of breast abnormalities and of breast glandular structures. The images acquired at the hospital and at the synchrotron radiation facility were compared and graded according to a relative seven-grade visual scoring system. The statistical analysis highlighted that PCM with synchrotron radiation depicts normal structures and abnormal findings with higher image quality with respect to conventional digital mammography.

  6. Quasi-real-time fluorescence imaging with lifetime dependent contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Pei-Chi; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2011-08-01

    Conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging requires complicated algorithms to extract lifetimes of fluorophores and acquisition of multiple data points at progressively longer delay times to characterize tissues. To address diminishing signal-to-noise ratios at these progressively longer time delays, we report a time-resolved fluorescence imaging method, normalized fluorescence yield imaging that does not require the extraction of lifetimes. The concept is to extract the ``contrast'' instead of the lifetime value of the fluorophores by using simple mathematical algorithms. This process converts differences in decay times directly to different intensities. The technique was verified experimentally using a gated iCCD camera and an ultraviolet light-emitting diode light source. It was shown that this method can distinguish between chemical dyes (Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B) and biomedical samples, such as powders of elastin and collagen. Good contrast was obtained between fluorophores that varied by less than 6% in lifetime. Additionally, it was shown that long gate times up to 16 ns achieve good contrast depending upon the samples to be studied. These results support the feasibility of time-resolved fluorescence imaging without lifetime extraction, which has a potential clinical role in noninvasive real-time imaging.

  7. CHAOS: Prenatal imaging findings with post mortem contrast radiographic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanika; Venkatesan, Bhuvaneswari; Manoharan, Kiruba Shankar; Rajalakshmi, Vaithianathan; Menon, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Congenital high airway obstruction syndrome is a rare fetal anomaly with characteristic constellation of prenatal findings on ultrasound and MRI. The typical triad of imaging features are enlarged and echogenic lungs, flattening or inversion of diaphragm and fetal hydrops. Early prenatal recognition of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome by ultrasound and/or MRI is mandatory for the appropriate perinatal management. We report a case of a male fetus with typical imaging findings of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome on ultrasound and MRI at 19 weeks of gestation. The role of contrast radiographs of fetal airways, including retrograde laryngogram, in confirming the postnatal diagnosis of this fetal condition is demonstrated. The prenatal imaging findings were correlated with contrast radiographs of upper airways, sonography of aborted fetus and fetal autopsy findings. PMID:27761192

  8. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T O; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In this study we show, for the first time, contrast-based NS-AO ophthalmoscopy for full-frame in vivo imaging of human and animal eyes. We suggest a robust image quality metric that could be used for any imaging modality, and test its performance against other metrics using (physical) model eyes.

  9. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  10. Contrast-based sensorless adaptive optics for retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaolin; Bedggood, Phillip; Bui, Bang; Nguyen, Christine T.O.; He, Zheng; Metha, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Conventional adaptive optics ophthalmoscopes use wavefront sensing methods to characterize ocular aberrations for real-time correction. However, there are important situations in which the wavefront sensing step is susceptible to difficulties that affect the accuracy of the correction. To circumvent these, wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (or non-wavefront sensing AO; NS-AO) imaging has recently been developed and has been applied to point-scanning based retinal imaging modalities. In this study we show, for the first time, contrast-based NS-AO ophthalmoscopy for full-frame in vivo imaging of human and animal eyes. We suggest a robust image quality metric that could be used for any imaging modality, and test its performance against other metrics using (physical) model eyes. PMID:26417525

  11. The ZIMPOL high contrast imaging polarimeter for SPHERE: polarimetric high contrast commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelfsema, Ronald; Bazzon, Andreas; Schmid, Hans Martin; Pragt, Johan; Govaert, Alain; Gisler, Daniel; Dominik, Carsten; Baruffolo, Andrea; Beuzit, Jean-Luc; Costille, Anne; Dohlen, Kjetil; Downing, Mark; Elswijk, Eddy; de Haan, Menno; Hubin, Norbert; Kasper, Markus; Keller, Christoph; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Mouillet, David; Pavlov, Alexey; Puget, Pascal; Salasnich, Bernardo; Sauvage, Jean-Francois; Wildi, Francois

    2016-07-01

    SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet Research) is a second generation VLT instrument aimed at the direct detection of exo-planets. It has received its first light in May 2014. ZIMPOL (Zurich Imaging Polarimeter) is the imaging polarimeter subsystem of the SPHERE instrument. It's capable of both high accuracy and high sensitivity polarimetry but can also be used as a classical imager. It is located behind an extreme AO system and a stellar coronagraph. ZIMPOL operates at visible wavelengths which is best suited to detect the very faint reflected and hence polarized visible light from extra solar planets. During the SPHERE fourth commissioning period (October 2014) we have made deep coronagraphic observations of the bright star alpha Gru (mR = 1.75) to assess the high contrast polarimetric performance of SPHERE-ZIMPOL. We have integrated on the target for a total time of about 45 minutes during the meridian transit in the Very Broad Band filter (600 - 900 nm) with a classical Lyot coronagraph with 3 λ/D radius focal mask. We reduce the data by a combination of Polarized Background subtraction, Polarimetric Differential Imaging (PDI) and Angular Differential Imaging (ADI). We reach contrasts of 10-6 and 10-7 at a radial distances of respectively 7 and 14 lambda/D from the PSF core. At these radial distances we are respectively a factor of 10 and 2 above the photon noise limit. We discuss our results by considering the temporal and spatial speckle behavior close to the PSF core in combination with low order polarimetric aberrations.

  12. Contrast-enhanced photoacoustic imaging of live lobster nerve cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, Russell S.; Huang, S.; Ashkenazi, S.; Kim, K.; O'Donnell, M.

    2007-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging provides optical contrast with good penetration and high spatial resolution, making it an attractive tool for noninvasive neural applications. We chose a commercial dye (NK2761) commonly used for optical imaging of membrane potential to enhance photoacoustic images of the live lobster nerve cord. The abdominal segment of the nerve cord was excised, stained and positioned in a custom neural recording system, enabling electrical stimulation and recording of compound action potentials. Photoacoustic and pulse echo images were also collected using a commercial ultrasound scanner and a 10-MHz linear probe. A wavelength-tunable pulsed laser source (Surelite TM, 5 ns, ~15 mJ, 30 mJ/cm2) operating at 20 Hz produced photoacoustic waves. Longitudinal photoacoustic scans of a 25-mm segment of the excised nerve cord, including ganglionic and axonal processes, were collected and displayed every 7 seconds. Without the contrast agent, an average of 10 scans produced a peak photoacoustic signal 6 dB over background noise. An additional 29 dB was obtained after the nerve was submerged in the dye for 20 minutes. The gain decreased to 23 dB and 14 dB at 810 nm and 910 nm, respectively - consistent with the dye's optical absorbance measured using a portable spectrometer. The contrast-enhanced photoacoustic signal had a broad spectrum peaking at 4 MHz, and, after high pass filtering, images approached 200-μm spatial resolution. The hybrid imaging system, which provided several hours of electrical stimulation and recording, represents a robust testbed to develop novel photoacoustic contrast for neural applications.

  13. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation.

  14. Point Cloud Generation from Aerial Image Data Acquired by a Quadrocopter Type Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Digital Still Camera

    PubMed Central

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems’ SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft®’s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  15. Density estimation in aerial images of large crowds for automatic people counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Christian; Metzler, Juergen

    2013-05-01

    Counting people is a common topic in the area of visual surveillance and crowd analysis. While many image-based solutions are designed to count only a few persons at the same time, like pedestrians entering a shop or watching an advertisement, there is hardly any solution for counting large crowds of several hundred persons or more. We addressed this problem previously by designing a semi-automatic system being able to count crowds consisting of hundreds or thousands of people based on aerial images of demonstrations or similar events. This system requires major user interaction to segment the image. Our principle aim is to reduce this manual interaction. To achieve this, we propose a new and automatic system. Besides counting the people in large crowds, the system yields the positions of people allowing a plausibility check by a human operator. In order to automatize the people counting system, we use crowd density estimation. The determination of crowd density is based on several features like edge intensity or spatial frequency. They indicate the density and discriminate between a crowd and other image regions like buildings, bushes or trees. We compare the performance of our automatic system to the previous semi-automatic system and to manual counting in images. By counting a test set of aerial images showing large crowds containing up to 12,000 people, the performance gain of our new system will be measured. By improving our previous system, we will increase the benefit of an image-based solution for counting people in large crowds.

  16. A multi-scale registration of urban aerial image with airborne lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuo; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presented a multi-scale progressive registration method of airborne LiDAR data with aerial image. The cores of the proposed method lie in the coarse registration with road networks and the fine registration method using regularized building corners. During the two-stage registration, the exterior orientation parameters (EOP) are continually refined. By validation of the actual flight data of Dunhuang, the experimental result shows that the proposed method can obtain accurate results with low-precision initial EOP, also improve the automatic degree of registration.

  17. Urban road extraction based on shadow removal and road clues detection from high resolution RGB aerial image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herumurti, Darlis; Uchimura, Keiichi; Koutaki, Gou; Uemura, Takumi

    2014-10-01

    In urban areas, the shadow cast by buildings, trees along the road, abundant objects and complex image texture make the extraction of the road on very high Resolution RGB aerial image very difficult and challenging. We propose a method of road extraction from RGB aerial image in the followings steps: Shadow removal, enhanced sobel transform, keypoints extraction based on Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER), feature extraction based on Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) and road construction based on multi-resolution segmentation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves a good result.

  18. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems for Remote Estimation of Flooded Areas Based on Complex Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Dan; Ichim, Loretta; Stoican, Florin

    2017-01-01

    Floods are natural disasters which cause the most economic damage at the global level. Therefore, flood monitoring and damage estimation are very important for the population, authorities and insurance companies. The paper proposes an original solution, based on a hybrid network and complex image processing, to this problem. As first novelty, a multilevel system, with two components, terrestrial and aerial, was proposed and designed by the authors as support for image acquisition from a delimited region. The terrestrial component contains a Ground Control Station, as a coordinator at distance, which communicates via the internet with more Ground Data Terminals, as a fixed nodes network for data acquisition and communication. The aerial component contains mobile nodes—fixed wing type UAVs. In order to evaluate flood damage, two tasks must be accomplished by the network: area coverage and image processing. The second novelty of the paper consists of texture analysis in a deep neural network, taking into account new criteria for feature selection and patch classification. Color and spatial information extracted from chromatic co-occurrence matrix and mass fractal dimension were used as well. Finally, the experimental results in a real mission demonstrate the validity of the proposed methodologies and the performances of the algorithms. PMID:28241479

  19. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems for Remote Estimation of Flooded Areas Based on Complex Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Dan; Ichim, Loretta; Stoican, Florin

    2017-02-23

    Floods are natural disasters which cause the most economic damage at the global level. Therefore, flood monitoring and damage estimation are very important for the population, authorities and insurance companies. The paper proposes an original solution, based on a hybrid network and complex image processing, to this problem. As first novelty, a multilevel system, with two components, terrestrial and aerial, was proposed and designed by the authors as support for image acquisition from a delimited region. The terrestrial component contains a Ground Control Station, as a coordinator at distance, which communicates via the internet with more Ground Data Terminals, as a fixed nodes network for data acquisition and communication. The aerial component contains mobile nodes-fixed wing type UAVs. In order to evaluate flood damage, two tasks must be accomplished by the network: area coverage and image processing. The second novelty of the paper consists of texture analysis in a deep neural network, taking into account new criteria for feature selection and patch classification. Color and spatial information extracted from chromatic co-occurrence matrix and mass fractal dimension were used as well. Finally, the experimental results in a real mission demonstrate the validity of the proposed methodologies and the performances of the algorithms.

  20. New Approach for Segmentation and Extraction of Single Tree from Point Clouds Data and Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homainejad, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses a new approach for reconstructing a 3D model from single trees via Airborne Laser Scanners (ALS) data and aerial images. The approach detects and extracts single tree from ALS data and aerial images. The existing approaches are able to provide bulk segmentation from a group of trees; however, some methods focused on detection and extraction of a particular tree from ALS and images. Segmentation of a single tree within a group of trees is mostly a mission impossible since the detection of boundary lines between the trees is a tedious job and basically it is not feasible. In this approach an experimental formula based on the height of the trees was developed and applied in order to define the boundary lines between the trees. As a result, each single tree was segmented and extracted and later a 3D model was created. Extracted trees from this approach have a unique identification and attribute. The output has application in various fields of science and engineering such as forestry, urban planning, and agriculture. For example in forestry, the result can be used for study in ecologically diverse, biodiversity and ecosystem.

  1. Dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-11-04

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed.

  2. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F. Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging and contrast enhancement. Scientific report

    SciTech Connect

    Swenberg, C.E.; Movius, E.G.

    1988-01-01

    Chapters II through VI of this report discuss: Relaxation of Nuclear Spins; Echo Techniques; Basic Imaging Pulse Sequences; Partial Saturation Recovery; Inversion Recovery; Spin Echo; Effects of Pulse Sequence on Image Contrast; Contrast Agents; Theoretical Aspects; Pharmacokinetics and Toxicity; and Physiological Rationale for Agent Selection. One of the major goals in all medical imaging techniques is to maximize one's ability to visualize and differentiate adjacent tissue regions in the body on the basis of differences in anatomy, physiology, or various pathological processes. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging offers distinct advantages over conventional x-ray imaging because of the possibility of selecting specific pulse sequences that can differentiate adjacent structures on the basis of differences in proton density, T/sub 1/ or T/sub 2/ relaxation rates, or flow. As a result of applying these various pulse sequences, numerous images have been obtained of the brain and other organs that demonstrate considerably more-detailed anatomical structure than had previously been available with computerized tomography, ultrasound, or nuclear medicine techniques. In some situations it is clearly superior, such as in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

  4. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  5. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  6. Characterizing growth patterns in longitudinal MRI using image contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardhan, Avantika; Prastawa, Marcel; Vachet, Clement; Piven, Joseph; Gerig, Guido

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the growth patterns of the early brain is crucial to the study of neuro-development. In the early stages of brain growth, a rapid sequence of biophysical and chemical processes take place. A crucial component of these processes, known as myelination, consists of the formation of a myelin sheath around a nerve fiber, enabling the effective transmission of neural impulses. As the brain undergoes myelination, there is a subsequent change in the contrast between gray matter and white matter as observed in MR scans. In this work, gray-white matter contrast is proposed as an effective measure of appearance which is relatively invariant to location, scanner type, and scanning conditions. To validate this, contrast is computed over various cortical regions for an adult human phantom. MR (Magnetic Resonance) images of the phantom were repeatedly generated using different scanners, and at different locations. Contrast displays less variability over changing conditions of scan compared to intensity-based measures, demonstrating that it is less dependent than intensity on external factors. Additionally, contrast is used to analyze longitudinal MR scans of the early brain, belonging to healthy controls and Down's Syndrome (DS) patients. Kernel regression is used to model subject-specific trajectories of contrast changing with time. Trajectories of contrast changing with time, as well as time-based biomarkers extracted from contrast modeling, show large differences between groups. The preliminary applications of contrast based analysis indicate its future potential to reveal new information not covered by conventional volumetric or deformation-based analysis, particularly for distinguishing between normal and abnormal growth patterns.

  7. Optimal Phase Masks for High Contrast Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruane, Garreth J.

    2016-05-01

    Phase-only optical elements can provide a number of important functions for high-contrast imaging. This thesis presents analytical and numerical optical design methods for accomplishing specific tasks, the most significant of which is the precise suppression of light from a distant point source. Instruments designed for this purpose are known as coronagraphs. Here, advanced coronagraph designs are presented that offer improved theoretical performance in comparison to the current state-of-the-art. Applications of these systems include the direct imaging and characterization of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with high sensitivity. Several new coronagraph designs are introduced and, in some cases, experimental support is provided. In addition, two novel high-contrast imaging applications are discussed: the measurement of sub-resolution information using coronagraphic optics and the protection of sensors from laser damage. The former is based on experimental measurements of the sensitivity of a coronagraph to source displacement. The latter discussion presents the current state of ongoing theoretical work. Beyond the mentioned applications, the main outcome of this thesis is a generalized theory for the design of optical systems with one of more phase masks that provide precise control of radiation over a large dynamic range, which is relevant in various high-contrast imaging scenarios. The optimal phase masks depend on the necessary tasks, the maximum number of optics, and application specific performance measures. The challenges and future prospects of this work are discussed in detail.

  8. High Contrast Imaging with the JWST NIRCAM Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Joseph J.; Beichman, Charles; Basinger, Scott A.; Horner, Scott; Meyer, Michael; Redding, David C.; Rieke, Marcia; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Relative to ground-based telescopes, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will have a substantial sensitivity advantage in the 2.2-5pm wavelength range where brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters are thought to have significant brightness enhancements. To facilitate high contrast imaging within this band, the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCAM) will employ a Lyot coronagraph with an array of band-limited image-plane occulting spots. In this paper, we provide the science motivation for high contrast imaging with NIRCAM, comparing its expected performance to that of the Keck, Gemini and 30 m (TMT) telescopes equipped with Adaptive Optics systems of different capabilities. We then describe our design for the NIRCAM coronagraph that enables imaging over the entire sensitivity range of the instrument while providing significant operational flexibility. We describe the various design tradeoffs that were made in consideration of alignment and aberration sensitivities and present contrast performance in the presence of JWST's expected optical aberrations. Finally we show an example of a that can provide 10-5 companion sensitivity at sub-arcsecond separations.

  9. [Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging: development and problems].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-kai

    2002-09-01

    In spite of the inherent versatility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers and clinicians from both home and aboard have made great achievements in developing safe and effective contrast agents. Many new agents are expected to be available for clinical use in the near future. It is of clinical importance that the agents should expand the diagnostic utility of MRI, improve the detection of tiny lesions and help evaluate specific tissue or organ functions. This article aims to examine current status of contrast agents for MRI and the problems waiting for solutions.

  10. In vivo molecular contrast OCT imaging of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wihan; Applegate, Brian E

    2015-04-01

    An 830-nm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with an integrated 663-nm diode pump laser has been developed to enable molecular contrast OCT imaging of methylene blue (MB), a common vital dye used clinically. The introduction of the 663-nm diode laser, which acts as the pump in this implementation of pump-probe OCT (PPOCT), represents a minor modification to an otherwise typical OCT system. A newly developed background subtraction technique completely removes all background from intensity noise at the pump modulation frequency, simplifying the interpretation of PPOCT images. These developments have enabled the first in vivo imaging of MB with PPOCT. Volumetric images of a zebrafish, stained by submersion in a 0.01% (w/v) solution of MB for 6 h, show accumulation of MB in the mesonephros, the primordial filtration organ.

  11. Cross contrast multi-channel image registration using image synthesis for MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Lee, Junghoon; Roy, Snehashis; Prince, Jerry L

    2017-02-01

    Multi-modal deformable registration is important for many medical image analysis tasks such as atlas alignment, image fusion, and distortion correction. Whereas a conventional method would register images with different modalities using modality independent features or information theoretic metrics such as mutual information, this paper presents a new framework that addresses the problem using a two-channel registration algorithm capable of using mono-modal similarity measures such as sum of squared differences or cross-correlation. To make it possible to use these same-modality measures, image synthesis is used to create proxy images for the opposite modality as well as intensity-normalized images from each of the two available images. The new deformable registration framework was evaluated by performing intra-subject deformation recovery, intra-subject boundary alignment, and inter-subject label transfer experiments using multi-contrast magnetic resonance brain imaging data. Three different multi-channel registration algorithms were evaluated, revealing that the framework is robust to the multi-channel deformable registration algorithm that is used. With a single exception, all results demonstrated improvements when compared against single channel registrations using the same algorithm with mutual information.

  12. Perfusion Imaging with a Freely Diffusible Hyperpolarized Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Aaron K.; Vinogradov, Elena; Wang, Xiaoen; Lenkinski, Robert E.; Alsop, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents that can diffuse freely into or within tissue have numerous attractive features for perfusion imaging. Here we present preliminary data illustrating the suitability of hyperpolarized 13C labeled 2-methylpropan-2-ol (also known as dimethylethanol, tertiary butyl alcohol and tert-butanol) as a freely diffusible contrast agent for magnetic resonance perfusion imaging. Dynamic 13C images acquired in rat brain with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence following administration of hyperpolarized 2-methylpropan-2-ol show that this agent can be imaged with 2–4s temporal resolution, 2mm slice thickness, and 700 micron in-plane resolution while retaining adequate signal-to-noise ratio. 13C relaxation measurements on 2-methylpropan-2-ol in blood at 9.4T yield T1=46±4s and T2=0.55±0.03s. In the rat brain at 4.7T, analysis of the temporal dynamics of the bSSFP image intensity in tissue and venous blood indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol has a T2 of roughly 2–4s and a T1 of 43±24s. In addition, the images indicate that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is freely diffusible in brain and hence has a long residence time in tissue; this in turn makes it possible to image the agent continuously for tens of seconds. These characteristics show that 2-methylpropan-2-ol is a promising agent for robust and quantitative perfusion imaging in the brain and body. PMID:21432901

  13. Adaptive sigmoid function bihistogram equalization for image contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriaga-Garcia, Edgar F.; Sanchez-Yanez, Raul E.; Ruiz-Pinales, Jose; Garcia-Hernandez, Ma. de Guadalupe

    2015-09-01

    Contrast enhancement plays a key role in a wide range of applications including consumer electronic applications, such as video surveillance, digital cameras, and televisions. The main goal of contrast enhancement is to increase the quality of images. However, most state-of-the-art methods induce different types of distortion such as intensity shift, wash-out, noise, intensity burn-out, and intensity saturation. In addition, in consumer electronics, simple and fast methods are required in order to be implemented in real time. A bihistogram equalization method based on adaptive sigmoid functions is proposed. It consists of splitting the image histogram into two parts that are equalized independently by using adaptive sigmoid functions. In order to preserve the mean brightness of the input image, the parameter of the sigmoid functions is chosen to minimize the absolute mean brightness metric. Experiments on the Berkeley database have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of images and preserves their mean brightness. An application to improve the colorfulness of images is also presented.

  14. Analyser-based phase contrast image reconstruction using geometrical optics.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, M J; Pavlov, K M; Siu, K K W; Menk, R H; Tromba, G; Lewis, R A

    2007-07-21

    Analyser-based phase contrast imaging can provide radiographs of exceptional contrast at high resolution (<100 microm), whilst quantitative phase and attenuation information can be extracted using just two images when the approximations of geometrical optics are satisfied. Analytical phase retrieval can be performed by fitting the analyser rocking curve with a symmetric Pearson type VII function. The Pearson VII function provided at least a 10% better fit to experimentally measured rocking curves than linear or Gaussian functions. A test phantom, a hollow nylon cylinder, was imaged at 20 keV using a Si(1 1 1) analyser at the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility. Our phase retrieval method yielded a more accurate object reconstruction than methods based on a linear fit to the rocking curve. Where reconstructions failed to map expected values, calculations of the Takagi number permitted distinction between the violation of the geometrical optics conditions and the failure of curve fitting procedures. The need for synchronized object/detector translation stages was removed by using a large, divergent beam and imaging the object in segments. Our image acquisition and reconstruction procedure enables quantitative phase retrieval for systems with a divergent source and accounts for imperfections in the analyser.

  15. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  16. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deitz, Julia I.; Carnevale, Santino D.; De Graef, Marc; McComb, David W.; Grassman, Tyler J.

    2016-08-01

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  17. Silver Nanoplate Contrast Agents for In Vivo Molecular Photoacoustic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Kimberly A.; Souza, Michael; Truby, Ryan; Luke, Geoffrey P.; Green, Christopher; Vreeland, Erika; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoplates are introduced as a new photoacoustic contrast agent that can be easily functionalized for molecular photoacoustic imaging in vivo. Methods are described for synthesis, functionalization, and stabilization of silver nanoplates using biocompatible (“green”) reagents. Directional antibody conjugation to the nanoplate surface is presented along with proof of molecular sensitivity in vitro with pancreatic cancer cells. Cell viability tests show the antibody-conjugated silver nanoplates to be nontoxic at concentrations up to 1 mg/ml. Furthermore, the silver nanoplates' potential for in vivo application as a molecularly sensitive photoacoustic contrast agent is demonstrated using an orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Results of these studies suggest that the synthesized silver nanoplates are well suited for a host of biomedical imaging and sensing applications. PMID:22188516

  18. Diffeomorphic Registration of Images with Variable Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Guillaume; Jacques, Laurent; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Geets, Xavier; Macq, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Nonrigid image registration is widely used to estimate tissue deformations in highly deformable anatomies. Among the existing methods, nonparametric registration algorithms such as optical flow, or Demons, usually have the advantage of being fast and easy to use. Recently, a diffeomorphic version of the Demons algorithm was proposed. This provides the advantage of producing invertible displacement fields, which is a necessary condition for these to be physical. However, such methods are based on the matching of intensities and are not suitable for registering images with different contrast enhancement. In such cases, a registration method based on the local phase like the Morphons has to be used. In this paper, a diffeomorphic version of the Morphons registration method is proposed and compared to conventional Morphons, Demons, and diffeomorphic Demons. The method is validated in the context of radiotherapy for lung cancer patients on several 4D respiratory-correlated CT scans of the thorax with and without variable contrast enhancement. PMID:21197460

  19. High Contrast Imaging Testbed for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowmman, Andrew E.; Trauger, John T.; Gordon, Brian; Green, Joseph J.; Moody, Dwight; Niessner, Albert F.; Shi, Fang

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission is planning to launch a visible coronagraphic space telescope in 2014. To achieve TPF science goals, the coronagraph must have extreme levels of wavefront correction (less than 1 Angstrom rms over controllable spatial frequencies) and stability to get the necessary suppression of diffracted starlight (approximately l0(exp -10)) contrast at an angular separation approximately 4 (lamda)/D). TPF Coronagraph's primary platform for experimentation is the High Contrast Imaging Testbed, which will provide laboratory validation of key technologies as well as demonstration of a flight-traceable approach to implementation. Precision wavefront control in the testbed is provided by a high actuator density deformable mirror. Diffracted light control is achieved through use of occulting or apodizing masks and stops. Contrast measurements will establish the technical feasibility of TPF requirements, while model and error budget validation will demonstrate implementation viability. This paper describes the current testbed design, development approach, and recent experimental results.

  20. Optical imaging via biological object internal structure contrasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Tereshchenko, Sergei A.; Vorobiev, Nikolai S.; Tomilova, Larisa G.; Smirnov, Alexander V.; Ivanov, Andrei V.

    1995-01-01

    For successful application of laser tomography methods for earlier medical diagnostics the signal-to-noise ratio (contrast) must be increased. For this purpose it is possible to use the absorbing dyes. We have theoretically investigated optical imaging conditions in high scattering medium on a model object. In our experiments a YAG:Nd laser generating picosecond pulses was employed. Output radiation has been recorded by a high speed streak camera with 1.5 ps temporal resolution. The high stability of the laser and of measurement scheme characteristics was provided. We looked for the contrasting substances having tropism with pathologically changed tissue of the tumor. For this purpose some dyphthalocyanines were synthesized. The experiments with laboratory animals have demonstrated that saturated dye concentrations were noticeably lower than toxicologic dangerous concentration values. We have demonstrated a possibility of the contrasting for a model object. The experimental temporal profile of scattered radiation can be explained by the nonstationary two-flow theory.

  1. Iodine contrast cone beam CT imaging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partain, Larry; Prionas, Stavros; Seppi, Edward; Virshup, Gary; Roos, Gerhard; Sutherland, Robert; Boone, John

    2007-03-01

    An iodine contrast agent, in conjunction with an X-ray cone beam CT imaging system, was used to clearly image three, biopsy verified, cancer lesions in two patients. The lesions were approximately in the 10 mm to 6 mm diameter range. Additional regions were also enhanced with approximate dimensions down to 1 mm or less in diameter. A flat panel detector, with 194 μm pixels in 2 x 2 binning mode, was used to obtain 500 projection images at 30 fps with an 80 kVp X-ray system operating at 112 mAs, for an 8-9 mGy dose - equivalent to two view mammography for these women. The patients were positioned prone, while the gantry rotated in the horizontal plane around the uncompressed, pendant breasts. This gantry rotated 360 degrees during the patient's 16.6 sec breath hold. A volume of 100 cc of 320 mg/ml iodine-contrast was power injected at 4 cc/sec, via catheter into the arm vein of the patient. The resulting 512 x 512 x 300 cone beam CT data set of Feldkamp reconstructed ~(0.3 mm) 3 voxels were analyzed. An interval of voxel contrast values, characteristic of the regions with iodine contrast enhancement, were used with surface rendering to clearly identify up to a total of 13 highlighted volumes. This included the three largest lesions, that were previously biopsied and confirmed to be malignant. The other ten highlighted regions, of smaller diameters, are likely areas of increased contrast trapping unrelated to cancer angiogenesis. However the technique itself is capable of resolving lesions that small.

  2. Ultrasound Activated Contrast Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    ultrasound engine with a P4-2 phased array transducer were modified to perform EEI on a vector-by-vector basis in fundamental and pulse inversion harmonic...albumin-encapsulated Abunex® bubble is 18 times greater than that for a free bubble if the two bubbles oscillate with the same relative amplitude at...utilizes two acoustic fields: the activation field for intermittently activating contrast bubbles and the imaging field, applied shortly afterwards, for

  3. Laboratory Demonstrations of High-contrast Imaging for Space Coronagraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, John; Giveon, Amir; Gordon, Brian; Kern, Brian; Krist, John; Kuhnert, Andreas; Moody, Dwight; Traub, Wes; Wilson, Dan

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of the High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) in the design and improvement of space coronagraphs. The objectives of the work are to: (1) Advance the technology readiness of space coronagraph hardware, techniques, algorithms, and predictive models; (2) Provide proof-of-concept demonstrations of coronagraph techniques; and (3) Support collaborations across the exoplanet community in pursuit of the optimal space coronagraph architecture.

  4. The V-SHARK high contrast imager at LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedichini, F.; Ambrosino, F.; Centrone, M.; Farinato, J.; Li Causi, G.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Stangalini, M.; Testa, V.

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the SHARK project the visible channel is a novel instrument synergic to the NIR channel and exploiting the performances of the LBT XAO at visible wavelengths. The status of the project is presented together with the design study of this innovative instrument optimized for high contrast imaging by means of high frame rate. Its expected results will be presented comparing the simulations with the real data of the "Forerunner" experiment taken at 630nm.

  5. Comparison of binary mask defect printability analysis using virtual stepper system and aerial image microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Khoi A.; Spence, Chris A.; Dakshina-Murthy, S.; Bala, Vidya; Williams, Alvina M.; Strener, Steve; Eandi, Richard D.; Li, Junling; Karklin, Linard

    1999-12-01

    As advanced process technologies in the wafer fabs push the patterning processes toward lower k1 factor for sub-wavelength resolution printing, reticles are required to use optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase-shifted mask (PSM) for resolution enhancement. For OPC/PSM mask technology, defect printability is one of the major concerns. Current reticle inspection tools available on the market sometimes are not capable of consistently differentiating between an OPC feature and a true random defect. Due to the process complexity and high cost associated with the making of OPC/PSM reticles, it is important for both mask shops and lithography engineers to understand the impact of different defect types and sizes to the printability. Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS) has been used in the mask shops for a number of years for reticle applications such as aerial image simulation and transmission measurement of repaired defects. The Virtual Stepper System (VSS) provides an alternative method to do defect printability simulation and analysis using reticle images captured by an optical inspection or review system. In this paper, pre- programmed defects and repairs from a Defect Sensitivity Monitor (DSM) reticle with 200 nm minimum features (at 1x) will be studied for printability. The simulated resist lines by AIMS and VSS are both compared to SEM images of resist wafers qualitatively and quantitatively using CD verification.Process window comparison between unrepaired and repaired defects for both good and bad repair cases will be shown. The effect of mask repairs to resist pattern images for the binary mask case will be discussed. AIMS simulation was done at the International Sematech, Virtual stepper simulation at Zygo and resist wafers were processed at AMD-Submicron Development Center using a DUV lithographic process for 0.18 micrometer Logic process technology.

  6. Automatic aerial image shadow detection through the hybrid analysis of RGB and HIS color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Li, Huilin; Peng, Zhiyong

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents our research on automatic shadow detection from high-resolution aerial image through the hybrid analysis of RGB and HIS color space. To this end, the spectral characteristics of shadow are firstly discussed and three kinds of spectral components including the difference between normalized blue and normalized red component - BR, intensity and saturation components are selected as criterions to obtain initial segmentation of shadow region (called primary segmentation). After that, within the normalized RGB color space and HIS color space, the shadow region is extracted again (called auxiliary segmentation) using the OTSU operation, respectively. Finally, the primary segmentation and auxiliary segmentation are combined through a logical AND-connection operation to obtain reliable shadow region. In this step, small shadow areas are removed from combined shadow region and morphological algorithms are apply to fill small holes as well. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can effectively detect the shadow region from high-resolution aerial image and in high degree of automaton.

  7. Aerial Image Microscopes for the Inspection of Defects in EUV Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Taylor, J S; Hudyma, R; Spiller, E; Sweeney, D W; Shelden, G; Urbach, J-P

    2002-10-22

    The high volume inspection equipment currently available to support development of EUV blanks is non-actinic. The same is anticipated for patterned EUV mask inspection. Once potential defects are identified and located by such non-actinic inspection techniques, it is essential to have instrumentation to perform detailed characterization, and if repairs are performed, re-evaluation. The ultimate metric for the acceptance or rejection of a mask due to a defect, is the wafer level impact. Thus measuring the aerial image for the site under question is required. An EUV Aerial Image Microscope (''AIM'') similar to the current AIM tools for 248nm and 193nm exposure wavelength is the natural solution for this task. Due to the complicated manufacturing process of EUV blanks, AIM measurements might also be beneficial to accurately assessing the severity of a blank defect. This is an additional application for an EUV AIM as compared to today's use In recognition of the critical role of an EUV AIM for the successful implementation of EUV blank and mask supply, International SEMATECH initiated this design study with the purpose to define the technical requirements for accurately simulating EUV scanner performance, demonstrating the feasibility to meet these requirements and to explore various technical approaches to building an EUV AIM tool.

  8. Neural-network classifiers for automatic real-world aerial image recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Shlomo; Guterman, Hugo

    1996-08-01

    We describe the application of the multilayer perceptron (MLP) network and a version of the adaptive resonance theory version 2-A (ART 2-A) network to the problem of automatic aerial image recognition (AAIR). The classification of aerial images, independent of their positions and orientations, is required for automatic tracking and target recognition. Invariance is achieved by the use of different invariant feature spaces in combination with supervised and unsupervised neural networks. The performance of neural-network-based classifiers in conjunction with several types of invariant AAIR global features, such as the Fourier-transform space, Zernike moments, central moments, and polar transforms, are examined. The advantages of this approach are discussed. The performance of the MLP network is compared with that of a classical correlator. The MLP neural-network correlator outperformed the binary phase-only filter (BPOF) correlator. It was found that the ART 2-A distinguished itself with its speed and its low number of required training vectors. However, only the MLP classifier was able to deal with a combination of shift and rotation geometric distortions.

  9. Feature-based registration of historical aerial images by Area Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Sudhagar; Schenk, Toni

    2016-06-01

    The registration of historical images plays a significant role in assessing changes in land topography over time. By comparing historical aerial images with recent data, geometric changes that have taken place over the years can be quantified. However, the lack of ground control information and precise camera parameters has limited scientists' ability to reliably incorporate historical images into change detection studies. Other limitations include the methods of determining identical points between recent and historical images, which has proven to be a cumbersome task due to continuous land cover changes. Our research demonstrates a method of registering historical images using Time Invariant Line (TIL) features. TIL features are different representations of the same line features in multi-temporal data without explicit point-to-point or straight line-to-straight line correspondence. We successfully determined the exterior orientation of historical images by minimizing the area formed between corresponding TIL features in recent and historical images. We then tested the feasibility of the approach with synthetic and real data and analyzed the results. Based on our analysis, this method shows promise for long-term 3D change detection studies.

  10. Contrast and resolution in direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging with partially coherent x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Han Shensheng; Yu Hong; Cheng Jing; Gao Chen; Luo Zhenlin

    2004-10-01

    A general treatment of x-ray image formation by direct Fresnel diffraction with partially coherent hard x rays is presented. Contrast and resolution are the criteria used to specify the visibility of an image, which depend primarily on the spatial coherence of the illumination and the distance from object to the image, with chromatic coherence of lesser importance. The dependence of the quality of phase-contrast images on the parameters of in-line imaging configuration is described quantitatively. The influence of spatial coherence of hard x-ray source on the imaging quality is also discussed based on the partially coherent direct Fresnel diffraction phase-contrast imaging theory. Experimental results are also presented for phase-contrast x-ray images with partially coherent hard x rays.

  11. Dual-contrast MR imaging of liver cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Weissleder, R; Saini, S; Stark, D D; Wittenberg, J; Ferrucci, J T

    1988-03-01

    MR contrast agents increase hepatic tumor conspicuity, as measured in terms of contrast-to-noise (C/N) ratios. With an animal model of hepatic metastases from breast cancer, IV administration of Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol/kg) shows a biphasic time response, transiently increasing the signal intensity of liver relative to tumor, with C/N ratio magnitudes increasing from -5.7 to -16.3 (SE 250/20); after a delay, the signal intensity of tumor increases relative to liver with a reversal of the C/N sign from negative to positive and an increase in the C/N magnitude to +25.0. IV administration of ferrite particles (0.05 mmol Fe/kg) shows a monophasic time response, increasing signal intensity of tumor relative to liver from +1.5 to +49.5 (SE 500/30). When both contrast agents were administered together (dual-contrast technique), the tumor-liver C/N magnitude reached a maximum of +67.8 (SE 500/30) 12 min after drug infusion. Analysis of individual contrast and noise factors contributing to this technique revealed a strong correlation between the signal intensity of liver and the signal intensity of ghost artifacts, which increase after administration of Gd-DTPA (r = .89) and decrease after administration of ferrite (r = 1.0). Dual-contrast imaging shows a synergistic addition of contrast and suppression of noise from ghost artifacts, maximizing the C/N and increasing the conspicuity of focal liver lesions.

  12. Hyperpolarized water as an authentic magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    McCarney, Evan R.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Lingwood, Mark D.; Han, Songi

    2007-01-01

    Pure water in a highly 1H spin-polarized state is proposed as a contrast-agent-free contrast agent to visualize its macroscopic evolution in aqueous media by MRI. Remotely enhanced liquids for image contrast (RELIC) utilizes a 1H signal of water that is enhanced outside the sample in continuous-flow mode and immediately delivered to the sample to obtain maximum contrast between entering and bulk fluids. Hyperpolarization suggests an ideal contrast mechanism to highlight the ubiquitous and specific function of water in physiology, biology, and materials because the physiological, chemical, and macroscopic function of water is not altered by the degree of magnetization. We present an approach that is capable of instantaneously enhancing the 1H MRI signal by up to 2 orders of magnitude through the Overhauser effect under ambient conditions at 0.35 tesla by using highly spin-polarized unpaired electrons that are covalently immobilized onto a porous, water-saturated gel matrix. The continuous polarization of radical-free flowing water allowed us to distinctively visualize vortices in model reactors and dispersion patterns through porous media. A 1H signal enhancement of water by a factor of −10 and −100 provides for an observation time of >4 and 7 s, respectively, upon its injection into fluids with a T1 relaxation time of >1.5 s. The implications for chemical engineering or biomedical applications of using hyperpolarized solvents or physiological fluids to visualize mass transport and perfusion with high and authentic MRI contrast originating from water itself, and not from foreign contrast agents, are immediate. PMID:17264210

  13. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  14. Flux or speed? Examining speckle contrast imaging of vascular flows

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Faraji, Ehssan; Davis, Mitchell A.; Huang, Yu-Yen; Zhang, Xiaojing J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    Speckle contrast imaging enables rapid mapping of relative blood flow distributions using camera detection of back-scattered laser light. However, speckle derived flow measures deviate from direct measurements of erythrocyte speeds by 47 ± 15% (n = 13 mice) in vessels of various calibers. Alternatively, deviations with estimates of volumetric flux are on average 91 ± 43%. We highlight and attempt to alleviate this discrepancy by accounting for the effects of multiple dynamic scattering with speckle imaging of microfluidic channels of varying sizes and then with red blood cell (RBC) tracking correlated speckle imaging of vascular flows in the cerebral cortex. By revisiting the governing dynamic light scattering models, we test the ability to predict the degree of multiple dynamic scattering across vessels in order to correct for the observed discrepancies between relative RBC speeds and multi-exposure speckle imaging estimates of inverse correlation times. The analysis reveals that traditional speckle contrast imagery of vascular flows is neither a measure of volumetric flux nor particle speed, but rather the product of speed and vessel diameter. The corrected speckle estimates of the relative RBC speeds have an average 10 ± 3% deviation in vivo with those obtained from RBC tracking. PMID:26203384

  15. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for liver imaging: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Veronica; Borghi, Alberto; Piscaglia, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS), providing relevant informations not available with non-enhanced ultrasonography, greatly impacted the practice of liver imaging. The characterization of focal liver lesions (FLLs), is obtained in a rapid, accurate and safe way and is considered the main hepatic indication; however CEUS offers other established or emergent relevant applications. Metastases detection and assessment of response to locoregional tumor treatment are accepted applications with specific indications. Needle guidance in case of poorly or non visible target lesions at conventional ultrasound is also accepted. The early assessment of response to systemic treatment, and in particular to antiangiogenic ones, by quantification software is an emergent application. The manageability of CEUS determined also its use in the operating theatre, improving the accuracy of intraoperatory US with a significant impact on final surgical strategy. In cirrhotic patients, the role of CEUS was proven highly accurate and sensitive in the characterization of portal vein thrombosis, by identification of contrast arterial enhancement inside the thrombus, that occurs only in case of neoplastic origin. In recent years microbubbles taken up by Kupffer cells, thus possessing a "postvascular" phase, were registered as ultrasound contrast agent in Japan (Sonazoid). During the post-vascular phase tumoral tissue tend to appear as a contrast defect image due to the lack of Kupffer cells, strongly contributing to tumor staging beside characterization. Newly developed techniques, such as fusion imaging or real-time three dimensional US, in addition to other applications of CEUS, in terms of post-transplantation or cholecystitis-related complications, have been recently proposed and will be discussed.

  16. Photo-magnetic Imaging: Resolving Optical Contrast at MRI resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuting; Gao, Hao; Thayer, David; Luk, Alex L.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we establish the mathematical framework of a novel imaging technique, namely Photo-magnetic Imaging (PMI). PMI uses laser to illuminate biological tissues and measure the induced temperature variations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMI overcomes the limitation of conventional optical imaging and allows imaging of optical contrast at MRI spatial resolution. The image reconstruction for PMI, using a finite element-based algorithm with iterative approach, is presented in this paper. The quantitative accuracy of PMI is investigated for various inclusion sizes, depths and absorption values. Then, a comparison between conventional Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) and PMI is carried out to illustrate the superior performance of PMI. An example is presented showing that two 2 mm diameter inclusions embedded 4.5 mm deep and located side by side in a 25 mm diameter circular geometry medium is recovered as a single 6 mm diameter object with DOT. However, these two objects are not only effectively resolved with PMI, but their true concentration are also recovered successfully. PMID:23640084

  17. Object-based Image Classification of Arctic Sea Ice and Melt Ponds through Aerial Photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.; Li, Z.; Lei, R.

    2013-12-01

    The last six years have marked the lowest Arctic summer sea ice extents in the modern era, with a new record summer minimum (3.4 million km2) set on 13 September 2012. It has been predicted that the Arctic could be free of summer ice within the next 25-30. The loss of Arctic summer ice could have serious consequences, such as higher water temperature due to the positive feedback of albedo, more powerful and frequent storms, rising sea levels, diminished habitats for polar animals, and more pollution due to fossil fuel exploitation and/ or increased traffic through the Northwest/ Northeast Passage. In these processes, melt ponds play an important role in Earth's radiation balance since they strongly absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it as snow and ice do. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the ability of predicting the sea ice/ melt pond extents and space-time evolution, which is pivotal to prepare for the variation and uncertainty of the future environment, political, economic, and military needs. A lot of efforts have been put into Arctic sea ice modeling to simulate sea ice processes. However, these sea ice models were initiated and developed based on limited field surveys, aircraft or satellite image data. Therefore, it is necessary to collect high resolution sea ice aerial photo in a systematic way to tune up, validate, and improve models. Currently there are many sea ice aerial photos available, such as Chinese Arctic Exploration (CHINARE 2008, 2010, 2012), SHEBA 1998 and HOTRAX 2005. However, manually delineating of sea ice and melt pond from these images is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, we use the object-based remote sensing classification scheme to extract sea ice and melt ponds efficiently from 1,727 aerial photos taken during the CHINARE 2010. The algorithm includes three major steps as follows. (1) Image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects according to the similarity of spectral and texture

  18. Research on the processing technology of low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shihua; Liu, Yintao; Li, Feida; Zhou, Conglin; Huang, Qing; Xu, Hongwei

    2015-12-01

    The UAV system acts as one of the infrastructure of earth observation, with its mobility, high speed, flexibility, economy and other remarkable technical advantages, has been widely used in various fields of the national economic construction, such as agricultural monitoring, resource development, disaster emergency treatment. Taking an actual engineering as a case study in this paper, the method and the skill of making digital orthophoto map was stated by using the UASMaster, the professional UAV data processing software, based on the eBee unmanned aerial vehicle. Finally, the precision of the DOM was analyzed in detail through two methods, overlapping the DOM with the existing DLG of the region and contrasting the points of the existing DLG of 1:1000 scale with the corresponding checkpoints of the stereomodel.

  19. Phase Contrast X-ray Imaging of Shuttle Insulating Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Zhengwei

    2005-01-01

    X-ray radiation has been widely used for imaging applications since Rontgen first discovered X-rays over a century ago. Its large penetration depth makes it ideal for the nondestructive visualization of internal structure of materials or objects unobtainable otherwise. Currently widely used nondestructive evaluation (NDE) tools-X-ray radiography and tomography are absorption-based, and work well in highly absorbing materials where density or composition variations due to internal structure or defects are high enough to be spatially distinguished in terms of absorption contrast. However, in many cases where materials such as insulating foam are light-weight, the conventional absorption-based X-ray methods for NDE become less effective. Indeed, the low-density shuttle insulating foam used for flight mission poses a great challenge to the standard NDE tools in that the absorption contrast arising from internal defects of such a low- density material is either weak or indistinguishable. In this presentation, the latest progress in phase contrast X-ray imaging of internal defects of insulating foam will be presented and discussed, demonstrating new opportunities to solve challenging issues involved in advanced materials development and processing for space exploration.

  20. Contrast agent stability: a continuous B-mode imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Sboros, V; Moran, C M; Pye, S D; McDicken, W N

    2001-10-01

    The stability of contrast agents in suspensions with various dissolved gas levels has not been reported in the literature. An in vitro investigation has been carried out that studied the combined effect of varying the acoustic pressure along with degassing the suspension environment. In this study, the contrast agents were introduced into suspensions with different oxygen concentration levels, and their relative performance was assessed in terms of decay rate of their backscatter echoes. The partial pressures of oxygen in those solutions ranged between 1.5 and 26 kPa. Two IV and one arterial contrast agents were used: Definity, Quantison, and Myomap. It was found that Quantison and Myomap released free bubbles at high acoustic pressure that also dissolved faster in degassed suspensions. The backscatter decay for Definity did not depend on the air content of the suspensions. The destruction of bubbles was dependent on acoustic pressure. Different backscatter performance was observed by different populations of bubbles of the last two agents. The physical quantity of "overall backscatter" (OB) was defined as the integral of the decay rate over time of the backscatter of the contrast suspensions, and improved significantly the understanding of the behaviour of the agents. A quantitative analysis of the backscatter properties of contrast agents using a continuous imaging approach was difficult to achieve. This is due to the fact that the backscatter in the field of view is representative of a bubble population affected by the ultrasound (US) field, but this bubble population is not representative of the contrast suspension in the whole tank. Single frame insonation is suggested to avoid the effects of decay due to the ultrasonic field, and to measure a tank-representative backscatter. The definition of OB was useful, however, in understanding the behaviour of the agents.

  1. Does bicarbonate prevent contrast-induced nephropathy in cardiovascular patients undergoing contrast imaging?

    PubMed

    Dabare, Dilan; Banihani, Mohammed; Gibbs, Paul; Grewal, Perbinder

    2013-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiovascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether administering sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) prevents contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in cardiovascular patients undergoing contrast imaging. In total, 266 papers were found using the reported search, 16 of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. CIN is thought to occur as a result of ischaemic or oxidative injury to the kidney. It is postulated that NaHCO3attenuates this renal damage by alkanizing renal tubular fluid thus reducing the generation of contrast-induced free radicals, which damage the kidney. Of the 16 trials, 15 recruited patients with various degrees of renal dysfunction at baseline. The benefit of using NaHCO3 was demonstrated at all stages of chronic kidney disease. Apart from four studies, 12 studies used low toxicity, low-osmolar contrast. Merten et al. published the first trial of NaHCO3 vs (saline) NaCl in preventing CIN, demonstrated a significantly lower rate in the NaHCO3 group and advocated its widespread use. Subsequent trials using the same regimen have collaborated these results. However, more recently, Gomes et al. concluded that NaHCO3 is not superior to saline-based hydration. Similarly, Brar et al. randomized 323 patients with moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency to receive either an NaHCO3 or an NaCl infusion and observed no difference in CIN rates. Two studies investigated the effects of rapid urine alkanization with bolus injections of NaHCO3 prior to contrast and found significant reductions in CIN rates compared with NaCl-treated groups. One study observed that NaCl is superior to NaHCO3, while all other studies showed a beneficial effect or no difference between NaCl- and NaHCO3-based hydration. The most recent meta

  2. Vehicle Detection in Aerial Images Based on Region Convolutional Neural Networks and Hard Negative Example Mining

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tianyu; Zhou, Shilin; Deng, Zhipeng; Zou, Huanxin; Lei, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Detecting vehicles in aerial imagery plays an important role in a wide range of applications. The current vehicle detection methods are mostly based on sliding-window search and handcrafted or shallow-learning-based features, having limited description capability and heavy computational costs. Recently, due to the powerful feature representations, region convolutional neural networks (CNN) based detection methods have achieved state-of-the-art performance in computer vision, especially Faster R-CNN. However, directly using it for vehicle detection in aerial images has many limitations: (1) region proposal network (RPN) in Faster R-CNN has poor performance for accurately locating small-sized vehicles, due to the relatively coarse feature maps; and (2) the classifier after RPN cannot distinguish vehicles and complex backgrounds well. In this study, an improved detection method based on Faster R-CNN is proposed in order to accomplish the two challenges mentioned above. Firstly, to improve the recall, we employ a hyper region proposal network (HRPN) to extract vehicle-like targets with a combination of hierarchical feature maps. Then, we replace the classifier after RPN by a cascade of boosted classifiers to verify the candidate regions, aiming at reducing false detection by negative example mining. We evaluate our method on the Munich vehicle dataset and the collected vehicle dataset, with improvements in accuracy and robustness compared to existing methods. PMID:28208587

  3. Vehicle Detection in Aerial Images Based on Region Convolutional Neural Networks and Hard Negative Example Mining.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tianyu; Zhou, Shilin; Deng, Zhipeng; Zou, Huanxin; Lei, Lin

    2017-02-10

    Detecting vehicles in aerial imagery plays an important role in a wide range of applications. The current vehicle detection methods are mostly based on sliding-window search and handcrafted or shallow-learning-based features, having limited description capability and heavy computational costs. Recently, due to the powerful feature representations, region convolutional neural networks (CNN) based detection methods have achieved state-of-the-art performance in computer vision, especially Faster R-CNN. However, directly using it for vehicle detection in aerial images has many limitations: (1) region proposal network (RPN) in Faster R-CNN has poor performance for accurately locating small-sized vehicles, due to the relatively coarse feature maps; and (2) the classifier after RPN cannot distinguish vehicles and complex backgrounds well. In this study, an improved detection method based on Faster R-CNN is proposed in order to accomplish the two challenges mentioned above. Firstly, to improve the recall, we employ a hyper region proposal network (HRPN) to extract vehicle-like targets with a combination of hierarchical feature maps. Then, we replace the classifier after RPN by a cascade of boosted classifiers to verify the candidate regions, aiming at reducing false detection by negative example mining. We evaluate our method on the Munich vehicle dataset and the collected vehicle dataset, with improvements in accuracy and robustness compared to existing methods.

  4. The use of contrast agent for imaging biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Sopko, V.; Jakubek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The technique of X-ray transmission imaging has been available for over a century and is still among the fastest and easiest approaches to the studies of internal structure of biological samples. Recent advances in semiconductor technology have led to the development of new types of X-ray detectors with direct conversion of interacting X-ray photon to an electric signal. Semiconductor pixel detectors seem to be specially promising; compared to the film technique, they provide single-quantum and real-time digital information about the objects being studied. We describe the recently developed radiographic apparatus, equipped with Medipix2 semiconductor pixel detector. The detector is used as an imager that counts individual photons of ionizing radiation, emitted by an X-ray tube (micro- or nano-focus FeinFocus). Thanks to the wide dynamic range of the Medipix2 detector and its high spatial resolution better than 1μm, the setup is particularly suitable for radiographic imaging of small biological samples, including in-vivo observations with contrast agent (Optiray). Along with the description of the apparatus we provide examples of the use iodine contrast agent as a tracer in various insects as model organisms. The motivation of our work is to develop our imaging techniques as non-destructive and non-invasive. Microradiographic imaging helps detect organisms living in a not visible environment, visualize the internal biological processes and also to resolve the details of their body (morphology). Tiny live insects are an ideal object for our studies.

  5. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  6. Detection of laurel wilt disease in avocado using low altitude aerial imaging.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana I; Ehsani, Reza; Ploetz, Randy C; Crane, Jonathan H; Buchanon, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a lethal disease of plants in the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). This devastating disease has spread rapidly along the southeastern seaboard of the United States and has begun to affect commercial avocado production in Florida. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the potential to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees using aerial images taken with a modified camera during helicopter surveys at low-altitude in the commercial avocado production area. The ability to distinguish laurel wilt-affected trees from other factors that produce similar external symptoms was also studied. RmodGB digital values of healthy trees and laurel wilt-affected trees, as well as fruit stress and vines covering trees were used to calculate several vegetation indices (VIs), band ratios, and VI combinations. These indices were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an M-statistic was performed in order to quantify the separability of those classes. Significant differences in spectral values among laurel wilt affected and healthy trees were observed in all vegetation indices calculated, although the best results were achieved with Excess Red (ExR), (Red-Green) and Combination 1 (COMB1) in all locations. B/G showed a very good potential for separate the other factors with symptoms similar to laurel wilt-affected trees, such as fruit stress and vines covering trees, from laurel wilt-affected trees. These consistent results prove the usefulness of using a modified camera (RmodGB) to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees from healthy trees, as well as from other factors that cause the same symptoms and suggest performing the classification in further research. According to our results, ExR and B/G should be utilized to develop an algorithm or decision rules to classify aerial images, since they showed the highest capacity to discriminate laurel wilt-affected trees. This methodology may allow the rapid detection

  7. Detection of Laurel Wilt Disease in Avocado Using Low Altitude Aerial Imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana I.; Ehsani, Reza; Ploetz, Randy C.; Crane, Jonathan H.; Buchanon, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a lethal disease of plants in the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). This devastating disease has spread rapidly along the southeastern seaboard of the United States and has begun to affect commercial avocado production in Florida. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the potential to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees using aerial images taken with a modified camera during helicopter surveys at low-altitude in the commercial avocado production area. The ability to distinguish laurel wilt-affected trees from other factors that produce similar external symptoms was also studied. RmodGB digital values of healthy trees and laurel wilt-affected trees, as well as fruit stress and vines covering trees were used to calculate several vegetation indices (VIs), band ratios, and VI combinations. These indices were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an M-statistic was performed in order to quantify the separability of those classes. Significant differences in spectral values among laurel wilt affected and healthy trees were observed in all vegetation indices calculated, although the best results were achieved with Excess Red (ExR), (Red–Green) and Combination 1 (COMB1) in all locations. B/G showed a very good potential for separate the other factors with symptoms similar to laurel wilt-affected trees, such as fruit stress and vines covering trees, from laurel wilt-affected trees. These consistent results prove the usefulness of using a modified camera (RmodGB) to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees from healthy trees, as well as from other factors that cause the same symptoms and suggest performing the classification in further research. According to our results, ExR and B/G should be utilized to develop an algorithm or decision rules to classify aerial images, since they showed the highest capacity to discriminate laurel wilt-affected trees. This methodology may allow the rapid

  8. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer.

  9. Screening CEST contrast agents using ultrafast CEST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiang; Yadav, Nirbhay N.; Song, Xiaolei; McMahon, Michael T.; Jerschow, Alexej; van Zijl, Peter C. M.; Xu, Jiadi

    2016-04-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiment can be performed in an ultrafast fashion if a gradient field is applied simultaneously with the saturation pulse. This approach has been demonstrated for studying dia- and para-magnetic CEST agents, hyperpolarized Xe gas and in vivo spectroscopy. In this study we present a simple method for the simultaneous screening of multiple samples. Furthermore, by interleaving a number of saturation and readout periods within the TR, a series of images with different saturation times can be acquired, allowing for the quantification of exchange rates using the variable saturation time (QUEST) approach in a much accelerated fashion, thus enabling high throughput screening of CEST contrast agents.

  10. Integrating Spray Plane-Based Remote Sensing and Rapid Image Processing with Variable-Rate Aerial Application.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A remote sensing and variable rate application system was configured for agricultural aircraft. This combination system has the potential of providing a completely integrated solution for all aspects of aerial site-specific application and includes remote sensing, image processing and georegistratio...

  11. Evaluation of imaging characteristics in CTDI phantom size on contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Seong-Su; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Recently, there have been several physics and clinical studies on the use of lower tube potentials in CT imaging, with the purpose of improving image quality or further reducing radiation dose. We investigated an experimental study using a series of different sized, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms, demonstrating the potential strategy for dose reduction and to distinguish component of plaque by imaging their energy responses using CT. We investigated the relationship between different sizes of cylinderic PMMA-equivalent phantoms with diameter of 12, 16, 20, 24, and 32 cm and used contrast at various tube voltages (80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp) using a 16-detector row CT scanner. The contrast represented CT numbers as different materials for the water, calcium chloride, and iodine. Phantom insertions also allow quantitative measures of image noise, contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and figure of merit (FOM). When evaluating FOM, it was found that the lower kVp provided the better CNR. An experimental study was performed to demonstrate reduced dose for both dose efficient and practical feasibility for different patient sizes and diagnostic tasks by relating achievable CNR and the volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). The use of spectra optimized to the specific application could provide further improvements of distinguishing iodine, calcium and plaque component for patient size. The purpose of this study was to evaluate variations in image noise and contrast using different tube potentials in a CTDI phantom on contrast imaging.

  12. Exploration of mineral resource deposits based on analysis of aerial and satellite image data employing artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Gennady

    2013-04-01

    We propose a solution to the problem of exploration of various mineral resource deposits, determination of their forms / classification of types (oil, gas, minerals, gold, etc.) with the help of satellite photography of the region of interest. Images received from satellite are processed and analyzed to reveal the presence of specific signs of deposits of various minerals. Course of data processing and making forecast can be divided into some stages: Pre-processing of images. Normalization of color and luminosity characteristics, determination of the necessary contrast level and integration of a great number of separate photos into a single map of the region are performed. Construction of semantic map image. Recognition of bitmapped image and allocation of objects and primitives known to system are realized. Intelligent analysis. At this stage acquired information is analyzed with the help of a knowledge base, which contain so-called "attention landscapes" of experts. Used methods of recognition and identification of images: a) combined method of image recognition, b)semantic analysis of posterized images, c) reconstruction of three-dimensional objects from bitmapped images, d)cognitive technology of processing and interpretation of images. This stage is fundamentally new and it distinguishes suggested technology from all others. Automatic registration of allocation of experts` attention - registration of so-called "attention landscape" of experts - is the base of the technology. Landscapes of attention are, essentially, highly effective filters that cut off unnecessary information and emphasize exactly the factors used by an expert for making a decision. The technology based on denoted principles involves the next stages, which are implemented in corresponding program agents. Training mode -> Creation of base of ophthalmologic images (OI) -> Processing and making generalized OI (GOI) -> Mode of recognition and interpretation of unknown images. Training mode

  13. Small-animal microangiography using phase-contrast X-ray imaging and gas as contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundström, Ulf; Larsson, Daniel H.; Westermark, Ulrica K.; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2014-03-01

    We use propagation-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging with gas as contrast agent to visualize the microvasculature in small animals like mice and rats. The radiation dose required for absorption X-ray imaging is proportional to the minus fourth power of the structure size to be detected. This makes small vessels impossible to image at reasonable radiation doses using the absorption of conventional iodinated contrast agents. Propagation-based phase contrast gives enhanced contrast for high spatial frequencies by moving the detector away from the sample to let phase variations in the transmitted X-rays develop into intensity variations at the detector. Blood vessels are normally difficult to observe in phase contrast even with iodinated contrast agents as the density difference between blood and most tissues is relatively small. By injecting gas into the blood stream this density difference can be greatly enhanced giving strong phase contrast. One possible gas to use is carbon dioxide, which is a clinically accepted X-ray contrast agent. The gas is injected into the blood stream of patients to temporarily displace the blood in a region and thereby reduce the X-ray absorption in the blood vessels. We have shown that this method can be used to image blood vessels down to 8 μm in diameter in mouse ears. The low dose requirements of this method indicate a potential for live small-animal imaging and longitudinal studies of angiogenesis.

  14. 75 FR 875 - Guidance for Industry on New Contrast Imaging Indication Considerations for Devices and Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on New Contrast Imaging Indication... availability of a guidance for industry entitled ``New Contrast Imaging Indication Considerations for Devices..., FDA agreed to publish guidance for medical imaging devices for use with imaging contrast agents...

  15. Harmonic chirp imaging method for ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Borsboom, Jerome M G; Chin, Chien Ting; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2005-02-01

    Coded excitation is currently used in medical ultrasound to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and penetration depth. We propose a chirp excitation method for contrast agents using the second harmonic component of the response. This method is based on a compression filter that selectively compresses and extracts the second harmonic component from the received echo signal. Simulations have shown a clear increase in response for chirp excitation over pulse excitation with the same peak amplitude. This was confirmed by two-dimensional (2-D) optical observations of bubble response with a fast framing camera. To evaluate the harmonic compression method, we applied it to simulated bubble echoes, to measured propagation harmonics, and to B-mode scans of a flow phantom and compared it to regular pulse excitation imaging. An increase of approximately 10 dB in SNR was found for chirp excitation. The compression method was found to perform well in terms of resolution. Axial resolution was in all cases within 10% of the axial resolution from pulse excitation. Range side-lobe levels were 30 dB below the main lobe for the simulated bubble echoes and measured propagation harmonics. However, side-lobes were visible in the B-mode contrast images.

  16. Molecular photoacoustic imaging using gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chulhong; Cho, Eun Chul; Chen, Jingyi; Song, Kwang Hyun; Au, Leslie; Favazza, Christopher P.; Zhang, Qiang; Cobley, Claire M.; Xia, Younan; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles have received much attention due to their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Gold nanoparticles are attractive in many biomedical applications because of their biocompatibility, easily modifiable surfaces for targeting, lack of heavy metal toxicity, wide range of sizes (35-100 nm), tunable plasmonic resonance peak, encapsulated site-specific drug delivery, and strong optical absorption in the near-infrared regime. Specifically, due to their strong optical absorption, gold nanoparticles have been used as a contrast agent for molecular photoacoustic (PA) imaging of tumor. The plasmonic resonance peak of the gold nanocages (AuNCs) was tuned to the near-infrared region, and the ratio of the absorption cross-section to the extinction cross-section was approximately ~70%, as measured by PA sensing. We used PEGylated gold nanocages (PEG-AuNCs) as a passive targeting contrast agent on melanomas. After 6-h intravenous injection of PEG-AuNCs, PA amplitude was increased by ~14 %. These results strongly suggest PA imaging paired with AuNCs is a promising diagnostic tool for early cancer detection.

  17. Vascular flow and perfusion imaging with ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Matthew; Averkiou, Mike; Tiemann, Klaus; Lohmaier, Stefan; Powers, Jeff; Beach, Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Current techniques for imaging ultrasound (US) contrast agents (UCA) make no distinction between low-velocity microbubbles in the microcirculation and higher-velocity microbubbles in the larger vasculature. A combination of radiofrequency (RF) and Doppler filtering on a low mechanical index (MI) pulse inversion acquisition is presented that differentiates low-velocity microbubbles (on the order of mm/s) associated with perfusion, from the higher-velocity microbubbles (on the order of cm/s) in larger vessels. In vitro experiments demonstrate the ability to separate vascular flow using both harmonic and fundamental Doppler signals. Fundamental and harmonic Doppler signals from microbubbles using a low-MI pulse-inversion acquisition are compared with conventional color Doppler signals in vivo. Due to the lower transmit amplitude and enhanced backscatter from microbubbles, the in vivo signal to clutter ratios for both the fundamental (-11 dB) and harmonic (-4 dB) vascular flow signals were greater than with conventional power Doppler (-51 dB) without contrast agent. The processing investigated here, in parallel with conventional pulse-inversion processing, enables the simultaneous display of both perfusion and vascular flow. In vivo results demonstrating the feasibility and potential utility of the real-time display of both perfusion and vascular flow using US contrast agents are presented and discussed.

  18. Modeled and measured image-plane polychromatic speckle contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zandt, Noah R.; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2016-02-01

    The statistical properties of speckle relevant to short- to medium-range (tactical) active tracking involving polychromatic illumination are investigated. A numerical model is developed to allow rapid simulation of speckled images including the speckle contrast reduction effects of illuminator bandwidth, surface slope, and roughness, and the polarization properties of both the source and the reflection. Regarding surface slope (relative orientation of the surface normal and illumination/observation directions), Huntley's theory for speckle contrast, which employs geometrical approximations to decrease computation time, is modified to increase accuracy by incorporation of a geometrical correction factor and better treatment of roughness and polarization. The resulting model shows excellent agreement with more exact theory over a wide range. An experiment is conducted to validate both the numerical model developed here and existing theory. A diode laser source with coherence length of 259±7 μm is reflected off of a silver-coated diffuse surface. Speckle data are gathered for 16 surface slope angles corresponding to speckle contrast between about 0.55 and 1. Taking the measured data as truth, both equations show error mean and standard deviation of less than 3%. Thus, the theory is validated over the range of this experiment.

  19. Vortex Image Processing (VIP) package for high-contrast direct imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Gonzalez, C.; Absil, O.; Wertz, O.

    2016-05-01

    VIP is a Python instrument-agnostic toolbox featuring a flexible framework for reproducible and robust data reduction. VIP currently supports three high-contrast imaging observational techniques: angular, reference-star and multi-spectral differential imaging. The code can be downloaded from our git repository on Github: http://github.com/vortex-exoplanet/VIP

  20. The CHARIS IFS for high contrast imaging at Subaru

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Limbach, Mary Anne; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian; Brandt, Timothy; Loomis, Craig; Jarosik, Norman; Mede, Kyle; McElwain, Michael William; Leviton, Douglas B.; Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Takato, Naruhisa; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) is an integral field spectrograph (IFS) being built for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS will take spectra of brown dwarfs and hot Jovian planets in the coronagraphic image provided by the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) and AO188 adaptive optics systems. The system is designed to detect objects five orders of magnitude dimmer than their parent star down to an 80 milliarcsecond inner working angle. For characterization, CHARIS has a high-resolution prism providing an average spectral resolution of R82, R69, and R82 in J, H, and K bands respectively. The so-called discovery mode uses a second low-resolution prism with an average spectral resolution of R19 spanning 1.15-2.37 microns (J+H+K bands). This is unique compared to other high contrast IFS designs. It augments low inner working angle performance by reducing the separation at which we can rely on spectral differential imaging. The principal challenge for a high-contrast IFS is quasi-static speckles, which cause undue levels of spectral crosstalk. CHARIS has addressed this through several key design aspects that should constrain crosstalk between adjacent spectral features to be below 1%. Sitting on the Nasmyth platform, the alignment between the lenslet array, prism, and detector will be highly stable, key for the performance of the data pipeline. Nearly every component has arrived and the project is entering its final build phase. Here we review the science case, the resulting design, status of final construction, and lessons learned that are directly applicable to future exoplanet instruments.

  1. Refraction-contrast tomosynthesis imaging using dark-field imaging optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2011-09-01

    A soft tissue tomosynthesis imaging system using Laue-case analyzer for dark-field imaging (DFI) optics is described. Two images from which refraction component is deduced are obtained in a single exposure of DFI, while two exposures are required in diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The measurement time and radiation dose are thus reduced to half those from DEI. Additionally, the proposed reconstruction algorithm, using only one tenth the number of projections required in computed tomography (CT) imaging, produced images in no way inferior to refraction-contrast CT images. We ex vivo imaged an excised human lung tissue using the system constructed at the KEK vertical wiggler beamline PF-BL14C to demonstrate the proposed imaging protocol efficacy.

  2. Fourier domain image fusion for differential X-ray phase-contrast breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Coello, Eduardo; Sperl, Jonathan I; Bequé, Dirk; Benz, Tobias; Scherer, Kai; Herzen, Julia; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina; Grandl, Susanne

    2017-04-01

    X-Ray Phase-Contrast (XPC) imaging is a novel technology with a great potential for applications in clinical practice, with breast imaging being of special interest. This work introduces an intuitive methodology to combine and visualize relevant diagnostic features, present in the X-ray attenuation, phase shift and scattering information retrieved in XPC imaging, using a Fourier domain fusion algorithm. The method allows to present complementary information from the three acquired signals in one single image, minimizing the noise component and maintaining visual similarity to a conventional X-ray image, but with noticeable enhancement in diagnostic features, details and resolution. Radiologists experienced in mammography applied the image fusion method to XPC measurements of mastectomy samples and evaluated the feature content of each input and the fused image. This assessment validated that the combination of all the relevant diagnostic features, contained in the XPC images, was present in the fused image as well.

  3. MR phase-contrast imaging in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Ursula; Reiter, Gert; Fuchsjäger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a life-threatening, multifactorial pathophysiological haemodynamic condition, diagnosed when the mean pulmonary arterial pressure equals or exceeds 25 mmHg at rest during right heart catheterization. Cardiac MRI, in general, and MR phase-contrast (PC) imaging, in particular, have emerged as potential techniques for the standardized assessment of cardiovascular function, morphology and haemodynamics in PH. Allowing the quantification and characterization of macroscopic cardiovascular blood flow, MR PC imaging offers non-invasive evaluation of haemodynamic alterations associated with PH. Techniques used to study the PH include both the routine two-dimensional (2D) approach measuring predominant velocities through an acquisition plane and the rapidly evolving four-dimensional (4D) PC imaging, which enables the assessment of the complete time-resolved, three-directional blood-flow velocity field in a volume. Numerous parameters such as pulmonary arterial mean velocity, vessel distensibility, flow acceleration time and volume and tricuspid regurgitation peak velocity, as well as the duration and onset of vortical blood flow in the main pulmonary artery, have been explored to either diagnose PH or find non-invasive correlates to right heart catheter parameters. Furthermore, PC imaging-based analysis of pulmonary arterial pulse-wave velocities, wall shear stress and kinetic energy losses grants novel insights into cardiopulmonary remodelling in PH. This review aimed to outline the current applications of 2D and 4D PC imaging in PH and show why this technique has the potential to contribute significantly to early diagnosis and characterization of PH.

  4. Confidence Level and Sensitivity Limits in High Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C; LaFreniere, D; Macintosh, B; Doyon, R

    2008-06-02

    In long adaptive optics corrected exposures, exoplanet detections are currently limited by speckle noise originating from the telescope and instrument optics, and it is expected that such noise will also limit future high-contrast imaging instruments for both ground and space-based telescopes. Previous theoretical analysis have shown that the time intensity variations of a single speckle follows a modified Rician. It is first demonstrated here that for a circular pupil this temporal intensity distribution also represents the speckle spatial intensity distribution at a fix separation from the point spread function center; this fact is demonstrated using numerical simulations for coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic data. The real statistical distribution of the noise needs to be taken into account explicitly when selecting a detection threshold appropriate for some desired confidence level. In this paper, a technique is described to obtain the pixel intensity distribution of an image and its corresponding confidence level as a function of the detection threshold. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that in the presence of speckles noise, a detection threshold up to three times higher is required to obtain a confidence level equivalent to that at 5{sigma} for Gaussian noise. The technique is then tested using TRIDENT CFHT and angular differential imaging NIRI Gemini adaptive optics data. It is found that the angular differential imaging technique produces quasi-Gaussian residuals, a remarkable result compared to classical adaptive optic imaging. A power-law is finally derived to predict the 1-3 x 10{sup -7} confidence level detection threshold when averaging a partially correlated non-Gaussian noise.

  5. Confidence Level and Sensitivity Limits in High Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Marois, C

    2007-11-07

    In long adaptive optics corrected exposures, exoplanet detections are currently limited by speckle noise originating from the telescope and instrument optics, and it is expected that such noise will also limit future high-contrast imaging instruments for both ground and space-based telescopes. Previous theoretical analysis have shown that the time intensity variations of a single speckle follows a modified Rician. It is first demonstrated here that for a circular pupil this temporal intensity distribution also represents the speckle spatial intensity distribution at a fix separation from the point spread function center; this fact is demonstrated using numerical simulations for coronagraphic and non-coronagraphic data. The real statistical distribution of the noise needs to be taken into account explicitly when selecting a detection threshold appropriate for some desired confidence level. In this paper, a technique is described to obtain the pixel intensity distribution of an image and its corresponding confidence level as a function of the detection threshold. Using numerical simulations, it is shown that in the presence of speckles noise, a detection threshold up to three times higher is required to obtain a confidence level equivalent to that at 5{sigma} for Gaussian noise. The technique is then tested using TRIDENT CFHT and angular differential imaging NIRI Gemini adaptive optics data. It is found that the angular differential imaging technique produces quasi-Gaussian residuals, a remarkable result compared to classical adaptive optic imaging. A power-law is finally derived to predict the 1-3 x 10{sup -7} confidence level detection threshold when averaging a partially correlated non-Gaussian noise.

  6. An Aerial-Image Dense Matching Approach Based on Optical Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Chen, Shiyu; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Jianya; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    Dense matching plays an important role in many fields, such as DEM (digital evaluation model) producing, robot navigation and 3D environment reconstruction. Traditional approaches may meet the demand of accuracy. But the calculation time and out puts density is hardly be accepted. Focus on the matching efficiency and complex terrain surface matching feasibility an aerial image dense matching method based on optical flow field is proposed in this paper. First, some high accurate and uniformed control points are extracted by using the feature based matching method. Then the optical flow is calculated by using these control points, so as to determine the similar region between two images. Second, the optical flow field is interpolated by using the multi-level B-spline interpolation in the similar region and accomplished the pixel by pixel coarse matching. Final, the results related to the coarse matching refinement based on the combined constraint, which recognizes the same points between images. The experimental results have shown that our method can achieve per-pixel dense matching points, the matching accuracy achieves sub-pixel level, and fully meet the three-dimensional reconstruction and automatic generation of DSM-intensive matching's requirements. The comparison experiments demonstrated that our approach's matching efficiency is higher than semi-global matching (SGM) and Patch-based multi-view stereo matching (PMVS) which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  7. CT Image Contrast of High-Z Elements: Phantom Imaging Studies and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Colborn, Robert E.; Edic, Peter M.; Lambert, Jack W.; Torres, Andrew S.; Bonitatibus, Peter J.; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the computed tomographic (CT) image contrast produced by potentially useful contrast material elements in clinically relevant imaging conditions. Materials and Methods Equal mass concentrations (grams of active element per milliliter of solution) of seven radiodense elements, including iodine, barium, gadolinium, tantalum, ytterbium, gold, and bismuth, were formulated as compounds in aqueous solutions. The compounds were chosen such that the active element dominated the x-ray attenuation of the solution. The solutions were imaged within a modified 32-cm CT dose index phantom at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp at CT. To simulate larger body sizes, 0.2-, 0.5-, and 1.0-mm-thick copper filters were applied. CT image contrast was measured and corrected for measured concentrations and presence of chlorine in some compounds. Results Each element tested provided higher image contrast than iodine at some tube potential levels. Over the range of tube potentials that are clinically practical for average-sized and larger adults—that is, 100 kVp and higher—barium, gadolinium, ytterbium, and tantalum provided consistently increased image contrast compared with iodine, respectively demonstrating 39%, 56%, 34%, and 24% increases at 100 kVp; 39%, 66%, 53%, and 46% increases at 120 kVp; and 40%, 72%, 65%, and 60% increases at 140 kVp, with no added x-ray filter. Conclusion The consistently high image contrast produced with 100–140 kVp by tantalum compared with bismuth and iodine at equal mass concentration suggests that tantalum could potentially be favorable for use as a clinical CT contrast agent. © RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26356064

  8. Second harmonic inversion for ultrasound contrast harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pasovic, Mirza; Danilouchkine, Mike; Faez, Telli; van Neer, Paul L M J; Cachard, Christian; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Basset, Olivier; de Jong, Nico

    2011-06-07

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are small micro-bubbles that behave nonlinearly when exposed to an ultrasound wave. This nonlinear behavior can be observed through the generated higher harmonics in a back-scattered echo. In past years several techniques have been proposed to detect or image harmonics produced by UCAs. In these proposed works, the harmonics generated in the medium during the propagation of the ultrasound wave played an important role, since these harmonics compete with the harmonics generated by the micro-bubbles. We present a method for the reduction of the second harmonic generated during nonlinear-propagation-dubbed second harmonic inversion (SHI). A general expression for the suppression signals is also derived. The SHI technique uses two pulses, p' and p″, of the same frequency f(0) and the same amplitude P(0) to cancel out the second harmonic generated by nonlinearities of the medium. Simulations show that the second harmonic is reduced by 40 dB on a large axial range. Experimental SHI B-mode images, from a tissue-mimicking phantom and UCAs, show an improvement in the agent-to-tissue ratio (ATR) of 20 dB compared to standard second harmonic imaging and 13 dB of improvement in harmonic power Doppler.

  9. Advanced Tie Feature Matching for the Registration of Mobile Mapping Imaging Data and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jende, P.; Peter, M.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping's ability to acquire high-resolution ground data is opposing unreliable localisation capabilities of satellite-based positioning systems in urban areas. Buildings shape canyons impeding a direct line-of-sight to navigation satellites resulting in a deficiency to accurately estimate the mobile platform's position. Consequently, acquired data products' positioning quality is considerably diminished. This issue has been widely addressed in the literature and research projects. However, a consistent compliance of sub-decimetre accuracy as well as a correction of errors in height remain unsolved. We propose a novel approach to enhance Mobile Mapping (MM) image orientation based on the utilisation of highly accurate orientation parameters derived from aerial imagery. In addition to that, the diminished exterior orientation parameters of the MM platform will be utilised as they enable the application of accurate matching techniques needed to derive reliable tie information. This tie information will then be used within an adjustment solution to correct affected MM data. This paper presents an advanced feature matching procedure as a prerequisite to the aforementioned orientation update. MM data is ortho-projected to gain a higher resemblance to aerial nadir data simplifying the images' geometry for matching. By utilising MM exterior orientation parameters, search windows may be used in conjunction with a selective keypoint detection and template matching. Originating from different sensor systems, however, difficulties arise with respect to changes in illumination, radiometry and a different original perspective. To respond to these challenges for feature detection, the procedure relies on detecting keypoints in only one image. Initial tests indicate a considerable improvement in comparison to classic detector/descriptor approaches in this particular matching scenario. This method leads to a significant reduction of outliers due to the limited availability

  10. Mapping temporal changes in connectivity using high-resolution aerial data and object based image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselink, Rens; Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia; Seeger, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Within the field of geomorphology mapping has always been an important tool to interpret spatial and temporal distributions of phenomena and processes at the surface. In the field of connectivity however, although throughout the past decade many articles have been published, there are only very few that go into the mapping of connectivity. This study aimed at developing a new, automated method for mapping connectivity within agricultural catchments. The method, which is a combination of Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) and traditional geomorphological field mapping, was applied to two agricultural catchments in Navarre, Spain, both with an area of approximately 2 sq.km. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was used to take aerial photographs with a resolution of 6 cm, of which a DEM with a 12 cm resolution was created using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. Connectivity was mapped within the study areas using OBIA using a top down method, meaning that connectivity was mapped at different scale levels, starting at the largest scale. Firstly sub-catchments were automatically delineated, after which several characteristics and features that affect connectivity within the sub-catchments were classified, e.g. landuse, landslides, rills, gullies, riparian vegetation, changes in slope, ploughing direction etc. In two consecutive years (2013-2014) photographs were taken and connectivity of both catchments of both years will be compared. Future work will include a quantification of the mapped connectivity (highly connected years vs. low connected years), causes and consequences of these differences in connectivity, comparison to existing connectivity indices and comparison of mapped connectivity in sub-catchments and measured discharge.

  11. Three dimensional monitoring of urban development by means of ortho-rectified aerial photographs and high-resolution satellite images.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, E; Erden, O; Gormus, E T

    2008-12-01

    Nowadays, cities are developing and changing rapidly due to the increases in the population and immigration. Rapid changing brings obligation to control the cities by planning. The satellite images and the aerial photographs enable us to track the urban development and provide the opportunity to get the current data about urban. With the help of these images, cities may have interrogated dynamic structures. This study is composed of three steps. In the first step, orthophoto images have been generated in order to track urban developments by using the aerial photographs and the satellite images. In this step, the panchromatic (PAN), the multi spectral (MS) and the pan-sharpened image of IKONOS satellite have been used as input satellite data and the accuracy of orthophoto images has been investigated in detail, in terms of digital elevation model (DEM), control points, input images and their properties. In the second step, a 3D city model with database has been generated with the help of orthophoto images and the vector layouts. And in the last step, up to date urban information obtained from 3D city model. This study shows that it is possible to detect the unlicensed buildings and the areas which are going to be nationalized and it also shows that it is easy to document the existing alterations in the cities with the help of current development plans and orthophoto images. And since accessing updated data is very essential to control development and monitor the temporal alterations in urban areas, in this study it is proven that the orthophoto images generated by using aerial photos and satellite images are very reliable to use in obtaining topographical information, in change detection and in city planning. When digital orthophoto images used with GIS, they provide quick decision control mechanisms and quick data collection. Besides, they help to find efficient solutions in a short time in the planning applications.

  12. Phase Contrast Imaging on the HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yi; Gong, Shaobo; Xu, Min; Jiang, Wei; Zhong, Wulv; Shi, Zhongbin; Wang, Huajie; Wu, Yifan; Yuan, Boda; Lan, Tao; Ye, Minyou; Duan, Xuru; HL-2A Team

    2016-10-01

    In this article we present the design of a phase contrast imaging (PCI) system on the HL-2A tokamak. This diagnostic is developed to infer line integrated plasma density fluctuations by measuring the phase shift of an expanded CO2 laser beam passing through magnetically confined high temperature plasmas. This system is designed to diagnose plasma density fluctuations with the maximum wavenumber of 66 cm-1. The designed wavenumber resolution is 2.09cm-1, and the time resolution is higher than 0.2 μs. The broad kρs ranging from 0.34 to 13.37 makes it suitable for turbulence measurement. An upgraded PCI system is also discussed, which is designed for the HL-2M tokamak. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Energy Research Project (Grant No. 2015GB120002), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11375053, 11105144, 10905057, 11535013).

  13. SNR and Contrast Enhancement Techniques for the Photoacoustic Radar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents two methods for photoacoustic signal enhancement in biological tissues. One such method is based on the fact that temperature can affect the signals of the photoacoustic radar. Therefore, thermally assisted methods have been used for photoacoustic imaging contrast improvement. Another method is based on harmonic wavelength modulation which results in a differential PA radar signal to strengthen early cancer detection. Two chirped waveforms modulated out-of-phase between 680 nm and 800 nm can effectively suppress the background noise, greatly enhance the SNR and detect small variations in hemoglobin oxygenation levels, thereby distinguishing pre-malignant tumors. Experimental results demonstrate the accuracy of the frequency-modulated differential measurement with sheep blood at different hemoglobin oxygenation (S_tO2) levels.

  14. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation. PMID:23887204

  15. The Need of Nested Grids for Aerial and Satellite Images and Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, G.; Mas, S.; Fernández-Villarino, X.; Martínez-Luceño, J.; Ojeda, J. C.; Pérez-Martín, B.; Tejeiro, J. A.; García-González, C.; López-Romero, E.; Soteres, C.

    2016-06-01

    Usual workflows for production, archiving, dissemination and use of Earth observation images (both aerial and from remote sensing satellites) pose big interoperability problems, as for example: non-alignment of pixels at the different levels of the pyramids that makes it impossible to overlay, compare and mosaic different orthoimages, without resampling them and the need to apply multiple resamplings and compression-decompression cycles. These problems cause great inefficiencies in production, dissemination through web services and processing in "Big Data" environments. Most of them can be avoided, or at least greatly reduced, with the use of a common "nested grid" for mutiresolution production, archiving, dissemination and exploitation of orthoimagery, digital elevation models and other raster data. "Nested grids" are space allocation schemas that organize image footprints, pixel sizes and pixel positions at all pyramid levels, in order to achieve coherent and consistent multiresolution coverage of a whole working area. A "nested grid" must be complemented by an appropriate "tiling schema", ideally based on the "quad-tree" concept. In the last years a "de facto standard" grid and Tiling Schema has emerged and has been adopted by virtually all major geospatial data providers. It has also been adopted by OGC in its "WMTS Simple Profile" standard. In this paper we explain how the adequate use of this tiling schema as common nested grid for orthoimagery, DEMs and other types of raster data constitutes the most practical solution to most of the interoperability problems of these types of data.

  16. Using aerial-acquired images to improve cotton and peanut production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvien, Craig; Waters, Deborah; Pocknee, Stuart; Usery, Lynn; Wells, Natasha

    1996-11-01

    Modern agriculture management is an extraordinarily complex task. The most complex tasks are management for environmental benefits. Chemical, physical and biological characteristics are known to vary over short distances in a field. However, most fields are treated as uniform, leading to over application and environmental pollution, or under application and suboptimal yields. Affordable navigation and positioning systems linked to sensing technologies and integrated into a geographic information system (GIS) are revolutionizing the way agriculture can address environmental variabilities. One challenge to better management of within field variability is the establishment of management zones for various inputs. Our research and development group is currently using aerial acquired images to help establish management zones for nutrients, pest scouting, and to monitor crop growth and development. These images are ground truthed and coupled with additional information layers such as maps of yield, disease, insect and weed pests, soil properties, topography to help establish relationships between the various components affecting crop growth and to help improve management decisions during the growing season.

  17. Exploring silver as a contrast agent for contrast-enhanced dual-energy X-ray breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsourkas, A; Maidment, A D A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Through prior monoenergetic modelling, we have identified silver as a potential alternative to iodine in dual-energy (DE) X-ray breast imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of silver and iodine contrast agents in a commercially available DE imaging system through a quantitative analysis of signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR). Methods: A polyenergetic simulation algorithm was developed to model the signal intensity and noise. The model identified the influence of various technique parameters on SDNR. The model was also used to identify the optimal imaging techniques for silver and iodine, so that the two contrast materials could be objectively compared. Results: The major influences on the SDNR were the low-energy dose fraction and breast thickness. An increase in the value of either of these parameters resulted in a decrease in SDNR. The SDNR for silver was on average 43% higher than that for iodine when imaged at their respective optimal conditions, and 40% higher when both were imaged at the optimal conditions for iodine. Conclusion: A silver contrast agent should provide benefit over iodine, even when translated to the clinic without modification of imaging system or protocol. If the system were slightly modified to reflect the lower k-edge of silver, the difference in SDNR between the two materials would be increased. Advances in knowledge: These data are the first to demonstrate the suitability of silver as a contrast material in a clinical contrast-enhanced DE image acquisition system. PMID:24998157

  18. Laboratory test of a polarimetry imaging subtraction system for the high-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Li, Rong

    2012-09-01

    We propose a polarimetry imaging subtraction test system that can be used for the direct imaging of the reflected light from exoplanets. Such a system will be able to remove the speckle noise scattered by the wave-front error and thus can enhance the high-contrast imaging. In this system, we use a Wollaston Prism (WP) to divide the incoming light into two simultaneous images with perpendicular linear polarizations. One of the images is used as the reference image. Then both the phase and geometric distortion corrections have been performed on the other image. The corrected image is subtracted with the reference image to remove the speckles. The whole procedure is based on an optimization algorithm and the target function is to minimize the residual speckles after subtraction. For demonstration purpose, here we only use a circular pupil in the test without integrating of our apodized-pupil coronagraph. It is shown that best result can be gained by inducing both phase and distortion corrections. Finally, it has reached an extra contrast gain of 50-times improvement in average, which is promising to be used for the direct imaging of exoplanets.

  19. Character segmentation and thresholding in low-contrast scene images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winger, Lowell L.; Jernigan, M. Ed; Robinson, John A.

    1996-03-01

    We are developing a portable text-to-speech system for the vision impaired. The input image is acquired with a lightweight CCD camera that may be poorly focused and aimed, and perhaps taken under inadequate and uneven illumination. We therefore require efficient and effective thresholding and segmentation methods which are robust with respect to character contrast, font, size, and format. In this paper, we present a fast thresholding scheme which combines a local variance measure with a logical stroke-width method. An efficient post- thresholding segmentation scheme utilizing Fisher's linear discriminant to distinguish noise and character components functions as an effective pre-processing step for the application of commercial segmentation and character recognition methods. The performance of this fast new method compared favorably with other methods for the extraction of characters from uncontrolled illumination, omnifont scene images. We demonstrate the suitability of this method for use in an automated portable reader through a software implementation running on a laptop 486 computer in our prototype device.

  20. Optical Fourier techniques for medical image processing and phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.; Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Rao, D.V.G.L.N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the basics of optical Fourier techniques (OFT) and applications for medical image processing as well as phase contrast imaging of live biological specimens. Enhancement of microcalcifications in a mammogram for early diagnosis of breast cancer is the main focus. Various spatial filtering techniques such as conventional 4f filtering using a spatial mask, photoinduced polarization rotation in photosensitive materials, Fourier holography, and nonlinear transmission characteristics of optical materials are discussed for processing mammograms. We also reviewed how the intensity dependent refractive index can be exploited as a phase filter for phase contrast imaging with a coherent source. This novel approach represents a significant advance in phase contrast microscopy. PMID:18458764

  1. Advanced contrast modalities for X-ray radiology: Phase-contrast and dark-field imaging using a grating interferometer.

    PubMed

    Bech, Martin; Jensen, Torben H; Bunk, Oliver; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Weitkamp, Timm; Le Duc, Geraldine; Bravin, Alberto; Cloetens, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Here we review our recent progress in the field of X-ray dark-field and phase-contrast imaging using a grating interferometer. We describe the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary results obtained for simple test objects and biological specimens. Furthermore, we discuss how phase-contrast and dark-field radiography can be combined with the concept of computed tomography, and yield highly detailed three-dimensional insights into biomedical sample. Exemplary results obtained with standard X-ray tube sources and highly brilliant synchrotron sources are presented.

  2. X-ray refraction-contrast computed tomography images using dark-field imaging optics

    SciTech Connect

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Huo, Qingkai; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2010-10-11

    If an x-ray beam containing internal information derived from sample soft tissue is incident upon a Laue-case analyzer, the beam will subsequently split into a forwardly diffracted beam and a separate diffracted beam. Using these beams acquired simultaneously, a refraction-contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging system for biomedical use with lower radiation dose can be easily realized, and has a high depicting capability on the soft tissues compared with conventional x-ray CT based on absorption contrast principles. In this paper, we propose an imaging system using dark-field imaging for CT measurement based on a tandem system of Bragg- and Laue-case crystals with two two-dimensional detectors, along with a data-processing method to extract information on refraction from the measured entangled intensities by use of rocking curve fitting with polynomial functions. Reconstructed images of soft tissues are presented and described.

  3. Low-Level Tie Feature Extraction of Mobile Mapping Data (mls/images) and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jende, P.; Hussnain, Z.; Peter, M.; Oude Elberink, S.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-03-01

    Mobile Mapping (MM) is a technique to obtain geo-information using sensors mounted on a mobile platform or vehicle. The mobile platform's position is provided by the integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). However, especially in urban areas, building structures can obstruct a direct line-of-sight between the GNSS receiver and navigation satellites resulting in an erroneous position estimation. Therefore, derived MM data products, such as laser point clouds or images, lack the expected positioning reliability and accuracy. This issue has been addressed by many researchers, whose aim to mitigate these effects mainly concentrates on utilising tertiary reference data. However, current approaches do not consider errors in height, cannot achieve sub-decimetre accuracy and are often not designed to work in a fully automatic fashion. We propose an automatic pipeline to rectify MM data products by employing high resolution aerial nadir and oblique imagery as horizontal and vertical reference, respectively. By exploiting the MM platform's defective, and therefore imprecise but approximate orientation parameters, accurate feature matching techniques can be realised as a pre-processing step to minimise the MM platform's three-dimensional positioning error. Subsequently, identified correspondences serve as constraints for an orientation update, which is conducted by an estimation or adjustment technique. Since not all MM systems employ laser scanners and imaging sensors simultaneously, and each system and data demands different approaches, two independent workflows are developed in parallel. Still under development, both workflows will be presented and preliminary results will be shown. The workflows comprise of three steps; feature extraction, feature matching and the orientation update. In this paper, initial results of low-level image and point cloud feature extraction methods will be discussed as well as an outline of

  4. X-ray phase contrast imaging at MAMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghazaly, M.; Backe, H.; Lauth, W.; Kube, G.; Kunz, P.; Sharafutdinov, A.; Weber, T.

    2006-05-01

    Experiments have been performed to explore the potential of the low emittance 855MeV electron beam of the Mainz Microtron MAMI for imaging with coherent X-rays. Transition radiation from a micro-focused electron beam traversing a foil stack served as X-ray source with good transverse coherence. Refraction contrast radiographs of low absorbing materials, in particular polymer strings with diameters between 30 and 450μm, were taken with a polychromatic transition radiation X-ray source with a spectral distribution in the energy range between 8 and about 40keV. The electron beam spot size had standard deviation σh = (8.6±0.1)μm in the horizontal and σv = (7.5±0.1)μm in the vertical direction. X-ray films were used as detectors. The source-to-detector distance amounted to 11.4m. The objects were placed in a distance of up to 6m from the X-ray film. Holograms of strings were taken with a beam spot size σv = (0.50±0.05)μm in vertical direction, and a monochromatic X-ray beam of 6keV energy. A good longitudinal coherence has been obtained by the (111) reflection of a flat silicon single crystal in Bragg geometry. It has been demonstrated that a direct exposure CCD chip with a pixel size of 13×13μm^2 provides a highly efficient on-line detector. Contrast images can easily be generated with a complete elimination of all parasitic background. The on-line capability allows a minimization of the beam spot size by observing the smallest visible interference fringe spacings or the number of visible fringes. It has been demonstrated that X-ray films are also very useful detectors. The main advantage in comparison with the direct exposure CCD chip is the resolution. For the Structurix D3 (Agfa) X-ray film the standard deviation of the resolution was measured to be σf = (1.2±0.4)μm, which is about a factor of 6 better than for the direct exposure CCD chip. With the small effective X-ray spot size in vertical direction of σv = (1.2±0.3)μm and a geometrical

  5. High-Contrast NIR Polarization Imaging of MWC480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, M. W.; Kusakabe, N.; Hashimoto, J.; Kudo, T.; Kandori, R.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Tamura, M.; Grady, C. A.; Sitko, M. L.; Werren, C.; Day, A. N.; Beerman, C.; Iye, M.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Brafford, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key predictions of modeling from the IR excess of Herbig Ae stars is that for protoplanetary disks, where significant grain growth and settling has occurred, the dust disk has flattened to the point that it can be partially or largely shadowed by the innermost material at or near the dust sublimation radius. When the self-shadowing has already started, the outer disk is expected to be detected in scattered light only in the exceptional cases that the scale height of the dust disk at the sublimation radius is smaller than usual. High-contrast imaging combined with the IR spectral energy distribution allow us to measure the degree of flattening of the disk, as well as to determine the properties of the outer disk. We present polarimetric differential imaging in H band obtained with Subaru/HiCIAO of one such system, MWC 480. The HiCIAO data were obtained at a historic minimum of the NIR excess. The disk is detected in scattered light from 0".2-1"0 (27.4-137 AU). Together with the marginal detection of the disk from 1998 February 24 by HST / NICMOS, our data constrain the opening half angle for the disk to lie between 1.3 <= Theta <=2.2 deg. When compared with similar measures in CO for the gas disk from the literature, the dust disk subtends only approx 30% of the gas disk scale height (H/R approx 0. 03). Such a dust disk is a factor of 5-7 flatter than transitional disks, which have structural signatures that giant planets have formed.

  6. Optimization of phase contrast imaging using hard x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zabler, S.; Cloetens, P.; Guigay, J.-P.; Baruchel, J.; Schlenker, M.

    2005-07-15

    X ray radiography and tomography are important tools in medicine as well as in life science and materials science. Not long ago an approach called in-line holography based on simple propagation became possible using partially coherent synchrotron beams like the ones available at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Theoretical and experimental work by Cloetens et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett 75, 2912 (1999)] have shown that quantitative retrieval of the optical phase, from a set of radiographs taken at different sample-to-detector distances, is feasible. Mathematically speaking we are dealing with a direct method based on linearization in order to solve an inverse nonlinear problem. The phase retrieval can be combined with classical tomography in order to obtain a three-dimensional representation of the object's electron density (holotomography). In order to optimize the image contrast for the numerical phase retrieval process, we have carried out calculations resulting in an optimized choice of value and number of the sample-to-detector distances as well as of the photon energy. These results were then confirmed by experiments on the ESRF long beamline ID19.

  7. Laser speckle contrast imaging with extended depth of field for in-vivo tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Caravaca-Aguirre, Antonio M.; Atchia, Yaaseen; Conkey, Donald B.; Piestun, Rafael; Levi, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    This work presents, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) technique with extended depth of field (DOF). We employ wavefront coding on the detected beam to gain quantitative information on flow speeds through a DOF extended two-fold compared to the traditional system. We characterize the system in-vitro using controlled microfluidic experiments, and apply it in-vivo to imaging the somatosensory cortex of a rat, showing improved ability to image flow in a larger number of vessels simultaneously. PMID:24466481

  8. Laser speckle contrast imaging with extended depth of field for in-vivo tissue imaging.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Iliya; Gad, Raanan; Caravaca-Aguirre, Antonio M; Atchia, Yaaseen; Conkey, Donald B; Piestun, Rafael; Levi, Ofer

    2013-12-06

    This work presents, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of the Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) technique with extended depth of field (DOF). We employ wavefront coding on the detected beam to gain quantitative information on flow speeds through a DOF extended two-fold compared to the traditional system. We characterize the system in-vitro using controlled microfluidic experiments, and apply it in-vivo to imaging the somatosensory cortex of a rat, showing improved ability to image flow in a larger number of vessels simultaneously.

  9. Evaluation of edge effect due to phase contrast imaging for mammography.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Satoru; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Tohyama, Keiko; Morishita, Junji; Yamada, Katsuhiko; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    It is well-known that the edge effect produced by phase contrast imaging results in the edge enhancement of x-ray images and thereby sharpens those images. It has recently been reported that phase contrast imaging using practical x-ray tubes with small focal spots has improved image sharpness as observed in the phase contrast imaging with x-ray from synchrotron radiation or micro-focus x-ray tubes. In this study, we conducted the phase contrast imaging of a plastic fiber and plant seeds using a customized mammography equipment with a 0.1 mm focal spot, and the improvement of image sharpness was evaluated in terms of spatial frequency response of the images. We observed that the image contrast of the plastic fiber was increased by edge enhancement, and, as predicted elsewhere, spectral analysis revealed that as the spatial frequencies of the x-ray images increased, so did the sharpness gained through phase contrast imaging. Thus, phase contrast imaging using a practical molybdenum anode tube with a 0.1 mm-focal spot would benefit mammography, in which the morphological detectability of small species such as microcalcifications is of great concern. And detectability of tumor-surrounded glandular tissues in dense breast would be also improved by the phase contrast imaging.

  10. Analysis of High Contrast Imaging Techniques for Space Based Direct Planetary Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Gezari, Dan Y.; Nisenson, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report on our ongoing investigations of a number of techniques for direct detection and imaging of Earth-like planets around nearby stellar sources. Herein, we give a quantitative analysis of these techniques and compare and contrast them via computer simulations. The techniques we will be reporting on are Bracewell Interferometry, Nisenson Apodized Square Aperture, and Coronagraphic masking techniques. We parameterize our results with respect to wavelength, aperture size, effects of mirror speckle, both mid- and high-spatial frequency, detector and photon noise as well pointing error. The recent numerous detections of Jupiter and Saturn like planets has driven a resurgence in research of space based high contrast imaging techniques for direct planetary imaging. Work is currently ongoing for concepts for NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder mission and a number of study teams have been funded. The authors are members of one team.

  11. Three-dimensional differential interference contrast microscopy using synthetic aperture imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moonseok; Choi, Youngwoon; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Sung, Yongjin; Kim, Kwanhyung; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We implement differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy using high-speed synthetic aperture imaging that expands the passband of coherent imaging by a factor of 2.2. For an aperture synthesized coherent image, we apply for the numerical post-processing and obtain a high-contrast DIC image for arbitrary shearing direction and bias retardation. In addition, we obtain images at different depths without a scanning objective lens by numerically propagating the acquired coherent images. Our method achieves high-resolution and high-contrast 3-D DIC imaging of live biological cells. The proposed method will be useful for monitoring 3-D dynamics of intracellular particles. PMID:22463035

  12. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  13. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  14. Aerial Images from AN Uav System: 3d Modeling and Tree Species Classification in a Park Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, R.; Passoni, D.; Pinto, L.; Sona, G.

    2012-07-01

    The use of aerial imagery acquired by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is scheduled within the FoGLIE project (Fruition of Goods Landscape in Interactive Environment): it starts from the need to enhance the natural, artistic and cultural heritage, to produce a better usability of it by employing audiovisual movable systems of 3D reconstruction and to improve monitoring procedures, by using new media for integrating the fruition phase with the preservation ones. The pilot project focus on a test area, Parco Adda Nord, which encloses various goods' types (small buildings, agricultural fields and different tree species and bushes). Multispectral high resolution images were taken by two digital compact cameras: a Pentax Optio A40 for RGB photos and a Sigma DP1 modified to acquire the NIR band. Then, some tests were performed in order to analyze the UAV images' quality with both photogrammetric and photo-interpretation purposes, to validate the vector-sensor system, the image block geometry and to study the feasibility of tree species classification. Many pre-signalized Control Points were surveyed through GPS to allow accuracy analysis. Aerial Triangulations (ATs) were carried out with photogrammetric commercial software, Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) and PhotoModeler, with manual or automatic selection of Tie Points, to pick out pros and cons of each package in managing non conventional aerial imagery as well as the differences in the modeling approach. Further analysis were done on the differences between the EO parameters and the corresponding data coming from the on board UAV navigation system.

  15. Satellite Images and Aerial Photographs of the Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barras, John A.

    2007-01-01

    -water datasets derived from the Landsat TM satellite imagery were combined with 2001 marsh vegetative communities (Chabreck and others, unpub. data, 2001) to identify land-water configurations by marsh community before and after the hurricanes. Links to the Landsat TM images and aerial photographs are given below (figs. 1-29). Comparison of land area before the storms to land area after the storms is made possible by the inclusion of Landsat TM images and aerial photographs taken in the years and months before the storms. The figures are arranged geographically from east to west to follow the chronology of the effects of the storms. For a more detailed analysis of the changes wrought by these storms, see 'Land Area Changes in Coastal Louisiana After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita' (Barras, in press).

  16. Feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic image based on multiscale analysis and morphology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shibin; Yu, Shaode; Yang, Yuhan; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII).

  17. Feature and Contrast Enhancement of Mammographic Image Based on Multiscale Analysis and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shibin; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for feature and contrast enhancement of mammographic images is proposed in this paper. The approach bases on multiscale transform and mathematical morphology. First of all, the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid operator is applied to transform the mammography into different scale subband images. In addition, the detail or high frequency subimages are equalized by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and low-pass subimages are processed by mathematical morphology. Finally, the enhanced image of feature and contrast is reconstructed from the Laplacian Gaussian pyramid coefficients modified at one or more levels by contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization and mathematical morphology, respectively. The enhanced image is processed by global nonlinear operator. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective for feature and contrast enhancement of mammogram. The performance evaluation of the proposed algorithm is measured by contrast evaluation criterion for image, signal-noise-ratio (SNR), and contrast improvement index (CII). PMID:24416072

  18. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  19. Application of high resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles for hydrology and rangeland science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C. A.; Perini, N. A.; Saripalli, S.; Laliberte, A.

    2012-12-01

    A common problem in many natural resource disciplines is the lack of high-enough spatial resolution images that can be used for monitoring and modeling purposes. Advances have been made in the utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in hydrology and rangeland science. By utilizing low flight altitudes and velocities, UAVs are able to produce high resolution (5 cm) images as well as stereo coverage (with 75% forward overlap and 40% sidelap) to extract digital elevation models (DEM). Another advantage of flying at low altitude is that the potential problems of atmospheric haze obscuration are eliminated. Both small fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft have been used in our experiments over two rangeland areas in the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico and the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. The fixed-wing UAV has a digital camera in the wing and six-band multispectral camera in the nose, while the rotary-wing UAV carries a digital camera as payload. Because we have been acquiring imagery for several years, there are now > 31,000 photos at one of the study sites, and 177 mosaics over rangeland areas have been constructed. Using the DEM obtained from the imagery we have determined the actual catchment areas of three watersheds and compared these to previous estimates. At one site, the UAV-derived watershed area is 4.67 ha which is 22% smaller compared to a manual survey using a GPS unit obtained several years ago. This difference can be significant in constructing a watershed model of the site. From a vegetation species classification, we also determined that two of the shrub types in this small watershed(mesquite and creosote with 6.47 % and 5.82% cover, respectively) grow in similar locations(flat upland areas with deep soils), whereas the most predominant shrub(mariola with 11.9% cover) inhabits hillslopes near stream channels(with steep shallow soils). The positioning of these individual shrubs throughout the catchment using

  20. CO2-based in-line phase contrast imaging of small intestine in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rongbiao; Li, Wei-Xia; Huang, Wei; Yan, Fuhua; Chai, Wei-Min; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the potential of CO2 single contrast in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI) for pre-clinical small intestine investigation. The absorption and phase contrast images of CO2 gas production were attained and compared. A further increase in image contrast was observed in PCI. Compared with CO2-based absorption contrast imaging (ACI), CO2-based PCI significantly enhanced the detection of mucosal microstructures, such as pits and folds. The CO2-based PCI could provide sufficient image contrast for clearly showing the intestinal mucosa in living mice without using barium. We concluded that CO2-based PCI might be a novel and promising imaging method for future studies of gastrointestinal disorders.

  1. Feasibility study of hidden flow imaging based on laser speckle technique using multiperspectives contrast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Moshe, Tomer

    2014-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the insertion of lens array in the front of a CCD camera in a laser speckle imaging (LSI) like-technique to acquire multiple speckle reflectance projections for imaging blood flow in an intact biological tissue. In some of LSI applications, flow imaging is obtained by thinning or removing of the upper tissue layers to access blood vessels. In contrast, with the proposed approach flow imaging can be achieved while the tissue is intact. In the system, each lens from an hexagonal lens array observed the sample from slightly different perspectives and captured with a CCD camera. In the computer, these multiview raw images are converted to speckled contrast maps. Then, a self-deconvolution shift-and-add algorithm is employed for processing yields high contrast flow information. The method is experimentally validated first with a plastic tube filled with scattering liquid running at different controlled flow rates hidden in a biological tissue and then extensively tested for imaging of cerebral blood flow in an intact rodent head experience different conditions. A total of fifteen mice were used in the experiments divided randomly into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=5) consisted of injured mice experience hypoxic ischemic brain injury monitored for ~40 min. Group 2 (n=5) injured mice experience anoxic brain injury monitored up to 20 min. Group 3 (n=5) experience functional activation monitored up to ~35 min. To increase tissue transparency and the penetration depth of photons through head tissue layers, an optical clearing method was employed. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time the use of lens array in LSI scheme.

  2. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  3. Estimating Mixed Broadleaves Forest Stand Volume Using Dsm Extracted from Digital Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, H.

    2012-07-01

    In mixed old growth broadleaves of Hyrcanian forests, it is difficult to estimate stand volume at plot level by remotely sensed data while LiDar data is absent. In this paper, a new approach has been proposed and tested for estimating stand forest volume. The approach is based on this idea that forest volume can be estimated by variation of trees height at plots. In the other word, the more the height variation in plot, the more the stand volume would be expected. For testing this idea, 120 circular 0.1 ha sample plots with systematic random design has been collected in Tonekaon forest located in Hyrcanian zone. Digital surface model (DSM) measure the height values of the first surface on the ground including terrain features, trees, building etc, which provides a topographic model of the earth's surface. The DSMs have been extracted automatically from aerial UltraCamD images so that ground pixel size for extracted DSM varied from 1 to 10 m size by 1m span. DSMs were checked manually for probable errors. Corresponded to ground samples, standard deviation and range of DSM pixels have been calculated. For modeling, non-linear regression method was used. The results showed that standard deviation of plot pixels with 5 m resolution was the most appropriate data for modeling. Relative bias and RMSE of estimation was 5.8 and 49.8 percent, respectively. Comparing to other approaches for estimating stand volume based on passive remote sensing data in mixed broadleaves forests, these results are more encouraging. One big problem in this method occurs when trees canopy cover is totally closed. In this situation, the standard deviation of height is low while stand volume is high. In future studies, applying forest stratification could be studied.

  4. Medical image visual appearance improvement using bihistogram Bezier curve contrast enhancement: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    PubMed

    Gan, Hong-Seng; Swee, Tan Tian; Abdul Karim, Ahmad Helmy; Sayuti, Khairil Amir; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Tham, Weng-Kit; Wong, Liang-Xuan; Chaudhary, Kashif T; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined image can assist user to identify region of interest during segmentation. However, complex medical image is usually characterized by poor tissue contrast and low background luminance. The contrast improvement can lift image visual quality, but the fundamental contrast enhancement methods often overlook the sudden jump problem. In this work, the proposed bihistogram Bezier curve contrast enhancement introduces the concept of "adequate contrast enhancement" to overcome sudden jump problem in knee magnetic resonance image. Since every image produces its own intensity distribution, the adequate contrast enhancement checks on the image's maximum intensity distortion and uses intensity discrepancy reduction to generate Bezier transform curve. The proposed method improves tissue contrast and preserves pertinent knee features without compromising natural image appearance. Besides, statistical results from Fisher's Least Significant Difference test and the Duncan test have consistently indicated that the proposed method outperforms fundamental contrast enhancement methods to exalt image visual quality. As the study is limited to relatively small image database, future works will include a larger dataset with osteoarthritic images to assess the clinical effectiveness of the proposed method to facilitate the image inspection.

  5. High contrast optical imaging methods for image guided laser ablation of dental caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaMantia, Nicole R.; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Laser based methods are well suited for automation and can be used to selectively remove dental caries to minimize the loss of healthy tissues and render the underlying enamel more resistant to acid dissolution. The purpose of this study was to determine which imaging methods are best suited for image-guided ablation of natural non-cavitated carious lesions on occlusal surfaces. Multiple caries imaging methods were compared including near-IR and visible reflectance and quantitative light fluorescence (QLF). In order for image-guided laser ablation to be feasible, chemical and physical modification of tooth surfaces due to laser irradiation cannot greatly reduce the contrast between sound and demineralized dental hard tissues. Sound and demineralized surfaces of 48 extracted human molar teeth with non-cavitated lesions were examined. Images were acquired before and after laser irradiation using visible and near-IR reflectance and QLF at several wavelengths. Polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography was used to confirm that lesions were present. The highest contrast was attained at 1460-nm and 1500-1700-nm, wavelengths coincident with higher water absorption. The reflectance did not decrease significantly after laser irradiation for those wavelengths.

  6. Influence of imaging geometry on noise texture in quantitative in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A

    2009-08-17

    Quantitative in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging methods seek to reconstruct separate images that depict an object's projected absorption and refractive properties. An understanding of the statistical properties of the reconstructed images can facilitate the identification of optimal imaging parameters for specific diagnostic tasks. However, the statistical properties of quantitative X-ray phase-contrast imaging remain largely unexplored. In this work, we derive analytic expressions that describe the second-order statistics of the reconstructed absorption and phase images. Concepts from statistical decision theory are applied to demonstrate how the statistical properties of images corresponding to distinct imaging geometries can influence signal detectability.

  7. High Contrast Ultrafast Imaging of the Human Heart

    PubMed Central

    Papadacci, Clement; Pernot, Mathieu; Couade, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive ultrafast imaging for human cardiac applications is a big challenge to image intrinsic waves such as electromechanical waves or remotely induced shear waves in elastography imaging techniques. In this paper we propose to perform ultrafast imaging of the heart with adapted sector size by using diverging waves emitted from a classical transthoracic cardiac phased array probe. As in ultrafast imaging with plane wave coherent compounding, diverging waves can be summed coherently to obtain high-quality images of the entire heart at high frame rate in a full field-of-view. To image shear waves propagation at high SNR, the field-of-view can be adapted by changing the angular aperture of the transmitted wave. Backscattered echoes from successive circular wave acquisitions are coherently summed at every location in the image to improve the image quality while maintaining very high frame rates. The transmitted diverging waves, angular apertures and subapertures size are tested in simulation and ultrafast coherent compounding is implemented on a commercial scanner. The improvement of the imaging quality is quantified in phantom and in vivo on human heart. Imaging shear wave propagation at 2500 frame/s using 5 diverging waves provides a strong increase of the Signal to noise ratio of the tissue velocity estimates while maintaining a high frame rate. Finally, ultrafast imaging with a 1 to 5 diverging waves is used to image the human heart at a frame rate of 900 frames/s over an entire cardiac cycle. Thanks to spatial coherent compounding, a strong improvement of imaging quality is obtained with a small number of transmitted diverging waves and a high frame rate, which allows imaging the propagation of electromechanical and shear waves with good image quality. PMID:24474135

  8. Joint contrast optimization and object segmentation in active polarimetric images.

    PubMed

    Anna, Guillaume; Bertaux, Nicolas; Galland, Frédéric; Goudail, François; Dolfi, Daniel

    2012-08-15

    We present a method for automatic target detection based on the iterative interplay between an active polarimetric imager with adaptive capabilities and a snake-based image segmentation algorithm. It successfully addresses the difficult situations where the target and the background differ only by their polarimetric properties. This method illustrates the benefits of integrating digital processing algorithms at the heart of the image acquisition process rather than using them only for postprocessing.

  9. Novel Imaging Contrast Methods for Hyperpolarized 13 C Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Galen Durant

    Magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized 13C-labeled small molecules has emerged as an extremely powerful tool for the in vivo monitoring of perfusion and metabolism. This work presents methods for improved imaging, parameter mapping, and image contrast generation for in vivo hyperpolarized 13C MRI. Angiography using hyperpolarized urea was greatly improved with a highly T2-weighted acquisition in combination with 15N labeling of the urea amide groups. This is due to the fact that the T2 of [13C]urea is strongly limited by the scalar coupling to the neighboring quadrupolar 14N. The long in vivo T2 values of [13C, 15N2]urea were utilized for sub-millimeter projection angiography using a contrast agent that could be safely injected in concentrations of 10-100 mM while still tolerated in patients with renal insufficiency. This study also presented the first method for in vivo T2 mapping of hyperpolarized 13C compounds. The in vivo T2 of urea was short in the blood and long within the kidneys. This persistent signal component was isolated to the renal filtrate, thus enabling for the first time direct detection of an imaging contrast agent undergoing glomerular filtration. While highly T2-weighted acquisitions select for molecules with short rotational correlation times, high diffusion weighting selects for those with the long translational correlation times. A specialized spin-echo EPI sequence was developed in order to generate highly diffusion-weighted hyperpolarized 13C images on a clinical MRI system operating within clinical peak- RF and gradient amplitude constraints. Low power adiabatic spin echo pulses were developed in order to generate a sufficiently large refocused bandwidth while maintaining low nominal power. This diffusion weighted acquisition gave enhanced tumor contrast-to-noise ratio when imaging [1-13C]lactate after infusion of [1-13C]pyruvate. Finally, the first in-man hyperpolarized 13C MRI clinical trial is discussed.

  10. X-ray elastography: Modification of x-ray phase contrast images using ultrasonic radiation pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Theron J.; Bailat, Claude; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J.; Gehring, Stephan; Laperle, Christopher M.; Wands, Jack

    2009-05-15

    The high resolution characteristic of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging can be used in conjunction with directed ultrasound to detect small displacements in soft tissue generated by differential acoustic radiation pressure. The imaging method is based on subtraction of two x-ray images, the first image taken with, and the second taken without the presence of ultrasound. The subtraction enhances phase contrast features and, to a large extent, removes absorption contrast so that differential movement of tissues with different acoustic impedances or relative ultrasonic absorption is highlighted in the image. Interfacial features of objects with differing densities are delineated in the image as a result of both the displacement introduced by the ultrasound and the inherent sensitivity of x-ray phase contrast imaging to density variations. Experiments with ex vivo murine tumors and human tumor phantoms point out a diagnostic capability of the method for identifying tumors.

  11. Study of quality perception in medical images based on comparison of contrast enhancement techniques in mammographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheus, B.; Verçosa, L. B.; Barufaldi, B.; Schiabel, H.

    2014-03-01

    With the absolute prevalence of digital images in mammography several new tools became available for radiologist; such as CAD schemes, digital zoom and contrast alteration. This work focuses in contrast variation and how the radiologist reacts to these changes when asked to evaluated image quality. Three contrast enhancing techniques were used in this study: conventional equalization, CCB Correction [1] - a digitization correction - and value subtraction. A set of 100 images was used in tests from some available online mammographic databases. The tests consisted of the presentation of all four versions of an image (original plus the three contrast enhanced images) to the specialist, requested to rank each one from the best up to worst quality for diagnosis. Analysis of results has demonstrated that CCB Correction [1] produced better images in almost all cases. Equalization, which mathematically produces a better contrast, was considered the worst for mammography image quality enhancement in the majority of cases (69.7%). The value subtraction procedure produced images considered better than the original in 84% of cases. Tests indicate that, for the radiologist's perception, it seems more important to guaranty full visualization of nuances than a high contrast image. Another result observed is that the "ideal" scanner curve does not yield the best result for a mammographic image. The important contrast range is the middle of the histogram, where nodules and masses need to be seen and clearly distinguished.

  12. ISSUES IN DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR MAPPING SUBMERSED AQUATIC VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the numerous issues that needed to be addressed when developing a methodology for mapping Submersed Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) from digital aerial photography. Specifically, we discuss 1) choice of film; 2) consideration of tide and weather constraints; 3) in-s...

  13. A general theoretical formalism for X-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2003-01-01

    The in-line phase-contrast imaging has great potential for clinical imaging applications. This work presents a general theoretical formalism for the in-line phase-contrast imaging. The theoretical formalism developed in this work is derived by taking a new strategy to calculate the Fourier transform of image intensity directly. Different from the transport of intensity equation (TIE) formalism for phase-contrast imaging in literature [6], this general formalism covers both the near field regime and the holography regime of phase-contrast imaging. The image intensity formulas have been derived in both the image space and frequency space. Especially our results show that the Fresnel diffraction image intensity is a sum of convolutions of the cosine- and sine-Fresnel filters with the object attenuation A20(x) and attenuated phase A20(x)φ(x), respectively. The Pogany-Gao-Wilkins (PGW) formalism is recovered as a special case of our general formalism. In addition, in the low-resolution approximation, the general formula is reduced a spherical wave-generalization of the TIE-based formula for phase-contrast imaging. This spherical wave-generalization will be useful for phase-contrast imaging with a micro-focus x-ray tube. The transition of the formalism from 1-D to 2-D cases has been provided as well.

  14. X-ray spatial frequency heterodyne imaging of protein-based nanobubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rand, Danielle; Uchida, Masaki; Douglas, Trevor; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2014-09-22

    Spatial Frequency Heterodyne Imaging (SFHI) is a novel x-ray scatter imaging technique that utilizes nanoparticle contrast agents. The enhanced sensitivity of this new technique relative to traditional absorption-based x-ray radiography makes it promising for applications in biomedical and materials imaging. Although previous studies on SFHI have utilized only metal nanoparticle contrast agents, we show that nanomaterials with a much lower electron density are also suitable. We prepared protein-based "nanobubble" contrast agents that are comprised of protein cage architectures filled with gas. Results show that these nanobubbles provide contrast in SFHI comparable to that of gold nanoparticles of similar size.

  15. Magnetic nanobeads as potential contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H; Hickling, William J; Japp, Emily A; Rodriguez, Olga C; Ghosh, Anup; Albanese, Chris; Nishida, Maki; Van Keuren, Edward; Fricke, Stanley; Dollahon, Norman; Stoll, Sarah L

    2013-10-22

    Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible copolymer based on a water stable, nontoxic, mixed-metal-oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(L)16(H2O)4, where L is acetate or vinyl benzoic acid, and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity and was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 = 29.5 mM(-1) s(-1). Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. The metal-oxo cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid) can be copolymerized with styrene under miniemulsion conditions. Miniemulsion allows for the formation of nanometer-sized paramagnetic beads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.

  16. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Alexander S; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent-named photoacoustic nanodroplet-has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths.

  17. Contrast Media for X-ray and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Development, Current Status and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Thomas; Lawaczeck, Rüdiger; Taupitz, Matthias; Jost, Gregor; Lohrke, Jessica; Sieber, Martin A; Pietsch, Hubertus

    2015-09-01

    Over the last 120 years, the extensive advances in medical imaging allowed enhanced diagnosis and therapy of many diseases and thereby improved the quality of life of many patient generations. From the beginning, all technical solutions and imaging procedures were combined with dedicated pharmaceutical developments of contrast media, to further enhance the visualization of morphology and physiology. This symbiosis of imaging hardware and contrast media development was of high importance for the development of modern clinical radiology. Today, all available clinically approved contrast media fulfill the highest requirements for clinical safety and efficacy. All new concepts to increase the efficacy of contrast media have also to consider the high clinical safety standards and cost of goods of current marketed contrast media. Nevertheless, diagnostic imaging will contribute significantly to the progresses in medicine, and new contrast media developments are mandatory to address the medical needs of the future.

  18. Image correction method for the colour contrast effect using inverse processes of the brain.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Kazushi; Miura, Mai

    2010-09-01

    In the colour contrast effect, the impression of a colour changes according to the situation; cases occur in which the colour appearance is misunderstood. We propose an image signal processing method for preventing such misperception of colour. Many conventional image improving methods emphasize the contrast of images as same as the brain does. However, by their processes, the colour contrast effect is not canceled; we misunderstand the colour. The objective of this study is to perceive original colour. Therefore, we propose an image correction method using inverse processes of the brain in order to cancel the processes of the brain, the colour contrast effect. We verified whether the proposed method corrected the colour contrast effect by conducting a psychological experiment. The results show that the method succeeds in canceling the colour contrast effect.

  19. Estimation of chromatic errors from broadband images for high contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirbu, Dan; Belikov, Ruslan

    2015-09-01

    Usage of an internal coronagraph with an adaptive optical system for wavefront correction for direct imaging of exoplanets is currently being considered for many mission concepts, including as an instrument addition to the WFIRST-AFTA mission to follow the James Web Space Telescope. The main technical challenge associated with direct imaging of exoplanets with an internal coronagraph is to effectively control both the diffraction and scattered light from the star so that the dim planetary companion can be seen. For the deformable mirror (DM) to recover a dark hole region with sufficiently high contrast in the image plane, wavefront errors are usually estimated using probes on the DM. To date, most broadband lab demonstrations use narrowband filters to estimate the chromaticity of the wavefront error, but this reduces the photon flux per filter and requires a filter system. Here, we propose a method to estimate the chromaticity of wavefront errors using only a broadband image. This is achieved by using special DM probes that have sufficient chromatic diversity. As a case example, we simulate the retrieval of the spectrum of the central wavelength from broadband images for a simple shaped- pupil coronagraph with a conjugate DM and compute the resulting estimation error.

  20. Optical lock-in detection imaging microscopy for contrast-enhanced imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Gerard; Mao, Shu; Sakata, Tomoyo; Ran, Jing; Jackson, David K; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Gomez, Timothy J; Warp, Erica; Tulyathan, Orapim; Aaron, Holly L; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Yan, Yuling

    2008-11-18

    One of the limitations on imaging fluorescent proteins within living cells is that they are usually present in small numbers and need to be detected over a large background. We have developed the means to isolate specific fluorescence signals from background by using lock-in detection of the modulated fluorescence of a class of optical probe termed "optical switches." This optical lock-in detection (OLID) approach involves modulating the fluorescence emission of the probe through deterministic, optical control of its fluorescent and nonfluorescent states, and subsequently applying a lock-in detection method to isolate the modulated signal of interest from nonmodulated background signals. Cross-correlation analysis provides a measure of correlation between the total fluorescence emission within single pixels of an image detected over several cycles of optical switching and a reference waveform detected within the same image over the same switching cycles. This approach to imaging provides a means to selectively detect the emission from optical switch probes among a larger population of conventional fluorescent probes and is compatible with conventional microscopes. OLID using nitrospirobenzopyran-based probes and the genetically encoded Dronpa fluorescent protein are shown to generate high-contrast images of specific structures and proteins in labeled cells in cultured and explanted neurons and in live Xenopus embryos and zebrafish larvae.

  1. Digital contrast enhancement of 18Fluorine-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography images in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Sharma, Punit; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The role of 18fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) is limited for detection of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) due to low contrast to the tumor, and normal hepatocytes (background). The aim of the present study was to improve the contrast between the tumor and background by standardizing the input parameters of a digital contrast enhancement technique. Materials and Methods: A transverse slice of PET image was adjusted for the best possible contrast, and saved in JPEG 2000 format. We processed this image with a contrast enhancement technique using 847 possible combinations of input parameters (threshold “m” and slope “e”). The input parameters which resulted in an image having a high value of 2nd order entropy, and edge content, and low value of absolute mean brightness error, and saturation evaluation metrics, were considered as standardized input parameters. The same process was repeated for total nine PET-computed tomography studies, thus analyzing 7623 images. Results: The selected digital contrast enhancement technique increased the contrast between the HCC tumor and background. In seven out of nine images, the standardized input parameters “m” had values between 150 and 160, and for other two images values were 138 and 175, respectively. The value of slope “e” was 4 in 4 images, 3 in 3 images and 1 in 2 images. It was found that it is important to optimize the input parameters for the best possible contrast for each image; a particular value was not sufficient for all the HCC images. Conclusion: The use of above digital contrast enhancement technique improves the tumor to background ratio in PET images of HCC and appears to be useful. Further clinical validation of this finding is warranted. PMID:26917889

  2. Collecting Inexpensive High Resolution Aerial and Stereo Images of Small- to Mid-Scale Geomorphic and Tectonic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelwright, R. J.; White, W. S.; Willis, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    Methods for collecting accurate, mm- to cm-scale stereoscopic aerial imagery of both small- and mid-scale geomorphic features are developed for a one-time cost of under $1500. High resolution aerial images are valuable for documenting and analyzing small- to mid-scale geomorphic and tectonic features. However, collecting images of mid-scale features such as landslides, rock glaciers, fault scarps, and cinder cones is expensive and makes studies that rely on high resolution repeat imagery prohibitive for undergraduate geology departments with limited budgets. In addition to cost, collecting images of smaller scale geomorphic features such as gravel bars is often impeded by overhanging vegetation or other features in the immediate environment that make impractical the collection of aerial images using standard airborne techniques. The methods provide high resolution stereo photos suitable for image processing and stereographic analysis; the images are potentially suitable for change analyses, velocity tracking, and construction of lidar-resolution digital elevation models. We developed two techniques. The technique suitable for small-scale features (such as gravel bars) utilizes two Nikon D3000 digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras attached to a system of poles that suspends the cameras at a height of 4 meters with a variable camera separation of 0.6 to 0.9 m. The poles are oriented such that they do not appear in the photographs. The cameras are simultaneously remotely activated to collect stereo pairs at a resolution of 64 pixels/cm2 (pixel length is 1.2 mm). Ground control on the images is provided by pegs placed 5 meters apart, GPS positioning, and a meter-stick included in each photograph. Initial photo data gathered of a gravel bar on the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River, north of Rexburg, Idaho is sharp and readily segmented using the MatLab-based CLASTS image processing algorithm. The technique developed for imaging mid-scale features (such as cinder

  3. Electrical biasing and voltage contrast imaging in a focused ion beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.N.; Soden, J.M.; Rife, J.L.; Lee, R.G.

    1995-09-01

    We present two new techniques that enhance conventional focused ion beam (FIB) system capabilities for integrated circuit (IC) analysis: in situ electrical biasing and voltage contrast imaging. We have used in situ electrical biasing to enable a number of advanced failure analysis applications including (1) real time evaluation of device electrical behavior during milling and deposition, (2) verification of IC functional modifications without removal from the FIB system, and (3) ultraprecision control for cross sectioning of deep submicron structures, such as programmed amorphous silicon antifuses. We have also developed FIB system voltage contrast imaging that can be used for a variety of failure analysis applications. The use of passive voltage contrast imaging for defect localization and for navigation on planarized devices will be illustrated. In addition, we describe new, biased voltage contrast imaging techniques and provide examples of their application to the failure analysis of complex ICs. We discuss the necessary changes in system operating parameters to perform biased voltage contrast imaging.

  4. Contrast and harmonic imaging improves accuracy and efficiency of novice readers for dobutamine stress echocardiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlassak, Irmien; Rubin, David N.; Odabashian, Jill A.; Garcia, Mario J.; King, Lisa M.; Lin, Steve S.; Drinko, Jeanne K.; Morehead, Annitta J.; Prior, David L.; Asher, Craig R.; Klein, Allan L.; Thomas, James D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Newer contrast agents as well as tissue harmonic imaging enhance left ventricular (LV) endocardial border delineation, and therefore, improve LV wall-motion analysis. Interpretation of dobutamine stress echocardiography is observer-dependent and requires experience. This study was performed to evaluate whether these new imaging modalities would improve endocardial visualization and enhance accuracy and efficiency of the inexperienced reader interpreting dobutamine stress echocardiography. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-nine consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography. Both fundamental (2.5 MHZ) and harmonic (1.7 and 3.5 MHZ) mode images were obtained in four standard views at rest and at peak stress during a standard dobutamine infusion stress protocol. Following the noncontrast images, Optison was administered intravenously in bolus (0.5-3.0 ml), and fundamental and harmonic images were obtained. The dobutamine echocardiography studies were reviewed by one experienced and one inexperienced echocardiographer. LV segments were graded for image quality and function. Time for interpretation also was recorded. Contrast with harmonic imaging improved the diagnostic concordance of the novice reader to the expert reader by 7.1%, 7.5%, and 12.6% (P < 0.001) as compared with harmonic imaging, fundamental imaging, and fundamental imaging with contrast, respectively. For the novice reader, reading time was reduced by 47%, 55%, and 58% (P < 0.005) as compared with the time needed for fundamental, fundamental contrast, and harmonic modes, respectively. With harmonic imaging, the image quality score was 4.6% higher (P < 0.001) than for fundamental imaging. Image quality scores were not significantly different for noncontrast and contrast images. CONCLUSION: Harmonic imaging with contrast significantly improves the accuracy and efficiency of the novice dobutamine stress echocardiography reader. The use

  5. Material decomposition and virtual non-contrast imaging in photon counting computed tomography: an animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutjahr, R.; Polster, C.; Kappler, S.; Pietsch, H.; Jost, G.; Hahn, K.; Schöck, F.; Sedlmair, M.; Allmendinger, T.; Schmidt, B.; Krauss, B.; Flohr, T. G.

    2016-03-01

    The energy resolving capabilities of Photon Counting Detectors (PCD) in Computed Tomography (CT) facilitate energy-sensitive measurements. The provided image-information can be processed with Dual Energy and Multi Energy algorithms. A research PCD-CT firstly allows acquiring images with a close to clinical configuration of both the X-ray tube and the CT-detector. In this study, two algorithms (Material Decomposition and Virtual Non-Contrast-imaging (VNC)) are applied on a data set acquired from an anesthetized rabbit scanned using the PCD-CT system. Two contrast agents (CA) are applied: A gadolinium (Gd) based CA used to enhance contrasts for vascular imaging, and xenon (Xe) and air as a CA used to evaluate local ventilation of the animal's lung. Four different images are generated: a) A VNC image, suppressing any traces of the injected Gd imitating a native scan, b) a VNC image with a Gd-image as an overlay, where contrast enhancements in the vascular system are highlighted using colored labels, c) another VNC image with a Xe-image as an overlay, and d) a 3D rendered image of the animal's lung, filled with Xe, indicating local ventilation characteristics. All images are generated from two images based on energy bin information. It is shown that a modified version of a commercially available dual energy software framework is capable of providing images with diagnostic value obtained from the research PCD-CT system.

  6. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  7. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of pancreatic cancer using nanocage contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Kimberly; Shah, Jignesh; Gomez, Sobeyda; Gensler, Heidi; Karpiouk, Andrei; Brannon-Peppas, L.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    A new metallodielectric nanoparticle consisting of a silica core and silver outer cage was developed for the purpose of enhancing photoacoustic imaging contrast in pancreatic tissue. These nanocages were injected into an ex vivo porcine pancreas and imaged using a combined photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) assembly. This custom-designed PAUS assembly delivered 800 nm light through a fiber optical light delivery system integrated with 128 element linear array transducer operating at 7.5 MHz center frequency. Imaging results prove that the nanocage contrast agents have the ability to enhance photoacoustic imaging contrast. Furthermore, the value of the combined PAUS imaging modality was demonstrated as the location of nanocages against background native tissue was evident. Future applications of these nanocage contrast agents could include targeting them to pancreatic cancer for enhancement of photoacoustic imaging for diagnosis and therapy.

  8. High contrast two-photon imaging of fingermarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-04-01

    Optically-acquired fingermarks are widely used as evidence across law enforcement agencies as well as in the courts of law. A common technique for visualizing latent fingermarks on nonporous surfaces consists of cyanoacrylate fuming of the fingerprint material, followed by impregnation with a fluorescent dye, which under ultra violet (UV) illumination makes the fingermarks visible and thus accessible for digital recording. However, there exist critical circumstances, when the image quality is compromised due to high background scattering, high auto-fluorescence of the substrate material, or other detrimental photo-physical and photo-chemical effects such as light-induced damage to the sample. Here we present a novel near-infrared (NIR), two-photon induced fluorescence imaging modality, which significantly enhances the quality of the fingermark images, especially when obtained from highly reflective and/or scattering surfaces, while at the same time reducing photo-damage to sensitive forensic samples.

  9. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G.-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence.

  10. Moxifloxacin: Clinically compatible contrast agent for multiphoton imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Taejun; Jang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Seunghun; Yoon, Calvin J.; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Bumju; Hwang, Sekyu; Hong, Chun-Pyo; Yoon, Yeoreum; Lee, Gilgu; Le, Viet-Hoan; Bok, Seoyeon; Ahn, G-One; Lee, Jaewook; Gho, Yong Song; Chung, Euiheon; Kim, Sungjee; Jang, Myoung Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae; Kim, Myoung Joon; So, Peter T. C.; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a nonlinear fluorescence microscopic technique widely used for cellular imaging of thick tissues and live animals in biological studies. However, MPM application to human tissues is limited by weak endogenous fluorescence in tissue and cytotoxicity of exogenous probes. Herein, we describe the applications of moxifloxacin, an FDA-approved antibiotic, as a cell-labeling agent for MPM. Moxifloxacin has bright intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence, good tissue penetration and high intracellular concentration. MPM with moxifloxacin was demonstrated in various cell lines, and animal tissues of cornea, skin, small intestine and bladder. Clinical application is promising since imaging based on moxifloxacin labeling could be 10 times faster than imaging based on endogenous fluorescence. PMID:27283889

  11. High contrast two-photon imaging of fingermarks

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Optically-acquired fingermarks are widely used as evidence across law enforcement agencies as well as in the courts of law. A common technique for visualizing latent fingermarks on nonporous surfaces consists of cyanoacrylate fuming of the fingerprint material, followed by impregnation with a fluorescent dye, which under ultra violet (UV) illumination makes the fingermarks visible and thus accessible for digital recording. However, there exist critical circumstances, when the image quality is compromised due to high background scattering, high auto-fluorescence of the substrate material, or other detrimental photo-physical and photo-chemical effects such as light-induced damage to the sample. Here we present a novel near-infrared (NIR), two-photon induced fluorescence imaging modality, which significantly enhances the quality of the fingermark images, especially when obtained from highly reflective and/or scattering surfaces, while at the same time reducing photo-damage to sensitive forensic samples. PMID:27053515

  12. An efficient method for accurate segmentation of LV in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryanarayana K., Venkata; Mitra, Abhishek; Srikrishnan, V.; Jo, Hyun Hee; Bidesi, Anup

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced cardiac MR images is a challenging task because of high variability in the image intensity. This is due to a) wash-in and wash-out of the contrast agent over time and b) poor contrast around the epicardium (outer wall) region. Current approaches for segmentation of the endocardium (inner wall) usually involve application of a threshold within the region of interest, followed by refinement techniques like active contours. A limitation of this method is under-segmentation of the inner wall because of gradual loss of contrast at the wall boundary. On the other hand, the challenge in outer wall segmentation is the lack of reliable boundaries because of poor contrast. There are four main contributions in this paper to address the aforementioned issues. First, a seed image is selected using variance based approach on 4D time-frame images over which initial endocardium and epicardium is segmented. Secondly, we propose a patch based feature which overcomes the problem of gradual contrast loss for LV endocardium segmentation. Third, we propose a novel Iterative-Edge-Refinement (IER) technique for epicardium segmentation. Fourth, we propose a greedy search algorithm for propagating the initial contour segmented on seed-image across other time frame images. We have experimented our technique on five contrast-enhanced cardiac MR Datasets (4D) having a total of 1097 images. The segmentation results for all 1097 images have been visually inspected by a clinical expert and have shown good accuracy.

  13. Modified Sigmoid Function Based Gray Scale Image Contrast Enhancement Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Harish Kumar; Pal, Sandeep

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of an image enhancement is to improve eminence by maximizing the information content in the test image. Conventional contrast enhancement techniques either often fails to produce reasonable results for a broad variety of low-contrast and high contrast images, or cannot be automatically applied to different images, because they are parameters dependent. Hence this paper introduces a novel hybrid image enhancement approach by taking both the local and global information of an image. In the present work, sigmoid function is being modified on the basis of contrast of the images. The gray image enhancement problem is treated as nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints and solved by particle swarm optimization. The entropy and edge information is included in the objective function as quality measure of an image. The effectiveness of modified sigmoid function based enhancement over conventional methods namely linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and adaptive histogram equalization are better revealed by the enhanced images and further validated by statistical analysis of these images.

  14. Contrast enhancement of subcutaneous blood vessel images by means of visible and near-infrared hyper-spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrašnik, Jaka; Bürmen, Miran; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2009-02-01

    Visualization of subcutaneous veins is very difficult with the naked eye, but important for diagnosis of medical conditions and different medical procedures such as catheter insertion and blood withdrawal. Moreover, recent studies showed that the images of subcutaneous veins could be used for biometric identification. The majority of methods used for enhancing the contrast between the subcutaneous veins and surrounding tissue are based on simple imaging systems utilizing CMOS or CCD cameras with LED illumination capable of acquiring images from the near infrared spectral region, usually near 900 nm. However, such simplified imaging methods cannot exploit the full potential of the spectral information. In this paper, a new highly versatile method for enhancing the contrast of subcutaneous veins based on state-of-the-art high-resolution hyper-spectral imaging system utilizing the spectral region from 550 to 1700 nm is presented. First, a detailed analysis of the contrast between the subcutaneous veins and the surrounding tissue as a function of wavelength, for several different positions on the human arm, was performed in order to extract the spectral regions with the highest contrast. The highest contrast images were acquired at 1100 nm, however, combining the individual images from the extracted spectral regions by the proposed contrast enhancement method resulted in a single image with up to ten-fold better contrast. Therefore, the proposed method has proved to be a useful tool for visualization of subcutaneous veins.

  15. Bisphosphonate-Based Contrast Agents for Radiological Imaging of Microcalcifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    treatment of patients with bone metastases [5]. Two such commercially available compounds are pamidronate disodium, available as Aredia® from...reaction has superior yield (>70%) to the 18-21% yield for pamidronate - IRDye-78 (LI-COR) conjugation reported previously [6]. Representative images are

  16. Thresholds for visual detection of Young's modulus contrast in simulated ultrasound image movies.

    PubMed

    Miller, N R; Bamber, J C

    2000-08-01

    Elasticity imaging (EI) is being developed to allow the evaluation of the mechanical properties of soft tissue, but these properties are already assessed in routine ultrasound breast examination using a method that involves the subjective interpretation of tissue motion seen in real-time B-mode image movies during palpation. We refer to this method as relative motion assessment (RMA). The purpose of this study was to begin a process of learning about the usefulness and limitations of RMA relative to the emerging method of elasticity imaging. Perception experiments were performed to measure Young's modulus contrast thresholds for positive contrast lesions under controlled conditions that could subsequently be repeated to evaluate elasticity imaging for the same task. Observer ability to grade relative lesion contrast using RMA was also assessed. Simulated sequences of B-scans of tissue moving in response to an applied force were generated and used in a two-alternative forced-choice (2-AFC) experiment to measure contrast thresholds for the detection of disc-shaped elastic lesions by RMA in the absence of ultrasound echo contrast. Results were obtained for four observers at a lesion area of about 77 speckle cells and for five observers at lesion areas of about 42 and 139 speckle cells. Young's modulus contrast thresholds were found to decrease with increasing lesion size and were well within the range of contrast values that have been measured for breast tumours in vitro. It was also found that observers were quite skilled at using RMA to grade the relative strain contrast of lesions. The nonlinear relationship between the object contrast (Young's modulus contrast) and the image contrast (strain contrast) prevented observers from detecting very small lesions with 100% accuracy, no matter how high the object contrast. A preliminary comparison of the results for RMA with published thresholds for elastography indicated that elastography is likely to offer great benefit

  17. [Building Change Detection Based on Multi-Level Rules Classification with Airborne LiDAR Data and Aerial Images].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi-long; Yan, Li

    2015-05-01

    The present paper proposes a new building change detection method combining Lidar point cloud with aerial image, using multi-level rules classification algorithm, to solve building change detection problem between these two kinds of heterogeneous data. Then, a morphological post-processing method combined with area threshold is proposed. Thus, a complete building change detection processing flow that can be applied to actual production is proposed. Finally, the effectiveness of the building change detection method is evaluated, processing the 2010 airborne LiDAR point cloud data and 2009 high resolution aerial image of Changchun City, Jilin province, China; in addition, compared with the object-oriented building change detection method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification, more analysis and evaluation of the suggested method is given. Experiment results show that the performance of the proposed building change detection method is ideal. Its Kappa index is 0. 90, and correctness is 0. 87, which is higher than the object-oriented building change detection method based on SVM classification.

  18. Tissue Necrosis Monitoring for HIFU Ablation with T1 Contrast MRI Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, San-Chao; Yao, Ching; Kuo, Ih-Yuan; Tsai, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Hsu

    2011-09-01

    In MR-guided HIFU ablation, MTC (Magnetization Transfer Contrast) or perfusion imaging is usually used after ablation to evaluate the ablated area based on the thermally induced necrosis contrast. In our MR-guided HIFU ablation study, a T1 contrast MRI scan sequence has been used to distinguish between necrotic and non-necrotic tissue. The ablation of porcine meat in-vitro and in-vivo pig leg muscle show that the necrotic area of T1 contrast MRI image coincides with the photographs of sliced specimen. The sequence is considerably easier to apply than MTC or perfusion imaging, while giving good necrosis contrast. In addition, no injection of contrast agent is needed, allowing multiple scans to be applied throughout the entire ablation procedure.

  19. High-Accuracy Ultrasound Contrast Agent Detection Method for Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Noro, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Yukari; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Shiga, Kiyoto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoki, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    An accurate method for detecting contrast agents using diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems is proposed. Contrast agents, such as microbubbles, passing through a blood vessel during ultrasound imaging are detected as blinking signals in the temporal axis, because their intensity value is constantly in motion. Ultrasound contrast agents are detected by evaluating the intensity variation of a pixel in the temporal axis. Conventional methods are based on simple subtraction of ultrasound images to detect ultrasound contrast agents. Even if the subject moves only slightly, a conventional detection method will introduce significant error. In contrast, the proposed technique employs spatiotemporal analysis of the pixel intensity variation over several frames. Experiments visualizing blood vessels in the mouse tail illustrated that the proposed method performs efficiently compared with conventional approaches. We also report that the new technique is useful for observing temporal changes in microvessel density in subiliac lymph nodes containing tumors. The results are compared with those of contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

  20. Color-coded LED microscopy for multi-contrast and quantitative phase-gradient imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donghak; Ryu, Suho; Kim, Uihan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-contrast microscope based on color-coded illumination and computation. A programmable three-color light-emitting diode (LED) array illuminates a specimen, in which each color corresponds to a different illumination angle. A single color image sensor records light transmitted through the specimen, and images at each color channel are then separated and utilized to obtain bright-field, dark-field, and differential phase contrast (DPC) images simultaneously. Quantitative phase imaging is also achieved based on DPC images acquired with two different LED illumination patterns. The multi-contrast and quantitative phase imaging capabilities of our method are demonstrated by presenting images of various transparent biological samples. PMID:26713205

  1. A preliminary evaluation of self-made nanobubble in contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Wu, Kaizhi; Li, Jing; Liu, Haijuan; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2014-03-01

    Nanoscale bubbles (nanobubbles) have been reported to improve contrast in tumor-targeted ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, a self-made nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was preliminarily characterized and evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Fundamental properties such as morphology appearance, size distribution, zeta potential, bubble concentration (bubble numbers per milliliter contrast agent suspension) and the stability of nanobubbles were assessed by light microscope and particle sizing analysis. Then the concentration intensity curve and time intensity curves (TICs) were acquired by ultrasound imaging experiment in-vitro. Finally, the contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was performed on rat to investigate the procedure of liver perfusion. The results showed that the nanobubbles had good shape and uniform distribution with the average diameter of 507.9 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.527, and zeta potential of -19.17 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in in-vitro ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently in-vitro. Slightly contrast enhancement was observed in in-vivo ultrasound imaging, indicating that the nanobubbles are not stable enough in-vivo. Future work will be focused on improving the ultrasonic imaging performance, stability, and antibody binding of the nanoscale ultrasound contrast agent.

  2. Exploring Planetary System Evolution Through High-Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Thomas; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Kalas, Paul; Graham, James R.; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Gpies Team

    2015-01-01

    Direct imaging of circumstellar disks provides unique information about planetary system construction and evolution. Several hundred nearby main-sequence stars are known to host debris disks, which are produced by mutual collisions of orbiting planetesimals during a phase thought to coincide with terrestrial planet formation. Therefore, detection of the dust in such systems through scattered near-infrared starlight offers a view of the circumstellar environment during the epoch of planet assembly. We have used ground-based coronagraphic angular differential imaging (ADI) with Keck NIRC2 and Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) to investigate disk structures that may act as signposts of planets. ADI and its associated image processing algorithms (e.g., LOCI) are powerful tools for suppressing the stellar PSF and quasistatic speckles that can contaminate disk signal. However, ADI PSF-subtraction also attenuates disk surface brightness in a spatially- and parameter-dependent manner, thereby biasing photometry and compromising inferences regarding the physical processes responsible for the dust distribution. To account for this disk "self-subtraction," we developed a novel technique to forward model the disk structure and compute a self-subtraction map for a given ADI-processed image. Applying this method to NIRC2 near-IR imaging of the HD 32297 debris disk, we combined the high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ADI data with unbiased photometry to measure midplane curvature in the edge-on disk and a break in the disk's radial brightness profile. Such a break may indicate the location of a planetesimal ring that is a source of the light-scattering micron-sized grains. For the HD 61005 debris disk, we examined similar data together with GPI 1.6-micron polarization data and detected the dust ring's swept-back morphology, brightness asymmetry, stellocentric offset, and inner clearing. To study the physical mechanism behind these features, we explored how eccentricity and mutual

  3. Using GPS/INS data to enhance image matching for real-time aerial triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanathong, Supannee; Lee, Impyeong

    2014-11-01

    Direct georeferencing is a promising technique for determining the exterior orientation parameters (EO) of a camera in real-time through the integration of GPS/INS sensors. Instead of using expensive devices, we improve the accuracy of the directly measured EOs through aerial triangulation (AT) and rely on tie-points. In this work, using GPS/INS data, we enhance the KLT tracker to achieve accuracy and speed that is compatible with real-time aerial triangulation. Given GPS/INS data from medium-grade sensors, the proposed system is 48% faster than the original work and tie-points extracted by our system are 6.33% more accurate and more evenly distributed than tie-points extracted by the original work. The AT processing results show that tie-points from the proposed work can reduce the RMSE of the directly measured EOs by 17.87% for position and 23.37% for attitude. Thus, we conclude that our proposed system can be integrated with real-time aerial triangulation.

  4. Training set size, scale, and features in Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis of very high resolution unmanned aerial vehicle imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lei; Cheng, Liang; Li, Manchun; Liu, Yongxue; Ma, Xiaoxue

    2015-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) has been used increasingly for natural resource applications in recent years due to their greater availability and the miniaturization of sensors. In addition, Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) has received more attention as a novel paradigm for remote sensing earth observation data. However, GEOBIA generates some new problems compared with pixel-based methods. In this study, we developed a strategy for the semi-automatic optimization of object-based classification, which involves an area-based accuracy assessment that analyzes the relationship between scale and the training set size. We found that the Overall Accuracy (OA) increased as the training set ratio (proportion of the segmented objects used for training) increased when the Segmentation Scale Parameter (SSP) was fixed. The OA increased more slowly as the training set ratio became larger and a similar rule was obtained according to the pixel-based image analysis. The OA decreased as the SSP increased when the training set ratio was fixed. Consequently, the SSP should not be too large during classification using a small training set ratio. By contrast, a large training set ratio is required if classification is performed using a high SSP. In addition, we suggest that the optimal SSP for each class has a high positive correlation with the mean area obtained by manual interpretation, which can be summarized by a linear correlation equation. We expect that these results will be applicable to UAV imagery classification to determine the optimal SSP for each class.

  5. Managing the optical wavefront for high contrast exoplanet imaging with the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John T.; Krist, John E.; Moody, Dwight

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of extreme high contrast astronomical imaging from space has inspired developments of new coronagraph methods for exoplanet imaging and spectroscopy. However, the requisite contrast, at levels of a billion to one or better for the direct imaging of cool mature exoplanets in reflected visible starlight, leads to challenging new requirements on the stability and control of the optical wavefront at levels currently beyond the reach of ground based telescopes. We briefly review the designs, laboratory validations, and science prospects for direct imaging and spectroscopic characterization of exoplanet systems with an actively corrected Lyot coronagraph. We review exoplanet science performance predicted for NASA's WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph. Together with a pair of deformable mirrors for optical wavefront control, the Lyot coronagraph creates high contrast dark fields of view extending to angular separations within 0.1 arcsec from the central star at visible wavelengths. Performance metrics are presented, including image contrast and spectral bandwidth, and laboratory validation experience.

  6. High-contrast imaging through scattering media using structured illumination and Fourier filtering.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, Edouard; Pettersson, Sven-Göran; Kristensson, Elias

    2016-12-01

    We show in this Letter a novel approach for high-contrast imaging through scattering media by combining structured illumination and Fourier filtering (SIF). To assess the image contrast enhancement at different image spatial frequencies, the modulation transfer function is calculated for four detection schemes: (1) no filtering, (2) Fourier filtering, (3) structured illumination, and (4) SIF filtering. A scattering solution consisting of D=7.3  μm polystyrene spheres immersed in distilled water and illuminated at λ=671  nm is used here. We demonstrate the possibility of obtaining, with SIF, an image contrast up to 60% at an optical depth of OD=10, improving the contrast by a factor of 40 over conventional transmission imaging.

  7. Quantitative characterization of edge enhancement in phase contrast x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Monnin, P; Bulling, S; Hoszowska, J; Valley, J F; Meuli, R; Verdun, F R

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to model the edge enhancement effect in in-line holography phase contrast imaging. A simple analytical approach was used to quantify refraction and interference contrasts in terms of beam energy and imaging geometry. The model was applied to predict the peak intensity and frequency of the edge enhancement for images of cylindrical fibers. The calculations were compared with measurements, and the relationship between the spatial resolution of the detector and the amplitude of the phase contrast signal was investigated. Calculations using the analytical model were in good agreement with experimental results for nylon, aluminum and copper wires of 50 to 240 microm diameter, and with numerical simulations based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory. A relationship between the defocusing distance and the pixel size of the image detector was established. This analytical model is a useful tool for optimizing imaging parameters in phase contrast in-line holography, including defocusing distance, detector resolution and beam energy.

  8. MaNIAC-UAV - a methodology for automatic pavement defects detection using images obtained by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Castelo Branco, Luiz; César Lima Segantine, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems - ITS is a set of integrated technologies (Remote Sensing, Image Processing, Communications Systems and others) that aim to offer services and advanced traffic management for the several transportation modes (road, air and rail). Collect data on the characteristics and conditions of the road surface and keep them update is an important and difficult task that needs to be currently managed in order to reduce accidents and vehicle maintenance costs. Nowadays several roads and highways are paved, but usually there is insufficient updated data about current condition and status. There are different types of pavement defects on the roads and to keep them in good condition they should be constantly monitored and maintained according to pavement management strategy. This paper presents a methodology to obtain, automatically, information about the conditions of the highway asphalt pavement. Data collection was done through remote sensing using an UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) and the image processing and pattern recognition techniques through Geographic Information System.

  9. A contrast and registration template for magnetic resonance image data guided dental implant placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Cosgarea, Raluca; Rieker, Marcus; Kress, Bodo; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    An oral imaging template was developed to address the shortcomings of MR image data for image guided dental implant planning and placement. The template was conctructed as a gadolinium filled plastic shell to give contrast to the dentition and also to be accurately re-attachable for use in image guided dental implant placement. The result of segmentation and modelling of the dentition from MR Image data with the template was compared to plaster casts of the dentition. In a phantom study dental implant placement was performed based on MR image data. MR imaging with the contrast template allowed complete representation of the existing dentition. In the phantom study, a commercially available system for image guided dental implant placement was used. Transformation of the imaging contrast template into a surgical drill guide based on the MR image data resulted in pilot burr hole placement with an accuracy of 2 mm. MRI based imaging of the existing dentition for proper image guided planning is possible with the proposed template. Using the image data and the template resulted in less accurate pilot burr hole placement in comparison to CT-based image guided implant placement.

  10. Infrared and color visible image fusion system based on luminance-contrast transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Gong, Wenfeng; Wang, Chensheng

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, an infrared and color image fusion algorithm based on luminance-contrast transfer technique is presented. This algorithm shall operate YCbCr transform on color visible image, and obtain the luminance component. Then, the grey-scale image fusion methods are utilized to fuse the luminance component of visible and infrared images to acquire grey-scale fusion image. After that, the grey-scale fusion image and visible image are fused to form color fusion image based on inversed YCbCr transform. To acquire better details appearance, a natural-sense color transfer fusion algorithm based on reference image is proposed. Furthermore, a real-time infrared/visible image fusion system based on FPGA is realized. Finally, this design and achievement is verified experimentally, and the experimental results show that the system can produce a color fusion image with good image quality and real-time performance.

  11. Evolution of pulmonary perfusion defects demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Howarth, N R; Beziat, C; Berthezène, Y

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary perfusion defects can be demonstrated with contrast-enhanced dynamic MR perfusion imaging. We present the case of a patient with a pulmonary artery sarcoma who presented with a post-operative pulmonary embolus and was followed in the post-operative period with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR perfusion imaging. This technique allows rapid imaging of the first passage of contrast material through the lung after bolus injection in a peripheral vein. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe the use of this MR technique in showing the evolution of peripheral pulmonary perfusion defects associated with pulmonary emboli.

  12. Contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate to map verteporfin delivery in photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Bryant, Amber; Gunn, Jason R.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-12-01

    The use of in vivo contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging as a surrogate for photosensitizer (verteporfin) dosimetry in photodynamic therapy of pancreas cancer is demonstrated by correlating MR contrast uptake to ex vivo fluorescence images on excised tissue. An orthotopic pancreatic xenograft mouse model was used for the study. A strong correlation (r=0.57) was found for bulk intensity measurements of T1-weighted gadolinium enhancement and verteporfin fluorescence in the tumor region of interest. The use of contrast-enhanced MR imaging shows promise as a method for treatment planning and photosensitizer dosimetry in human photodynamic therapy (PDT) of pancreas cancer.

  13. Image reconstruction technique of electrical capacitance tomography for low-contrast dielectrics using Calderon's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhang; Xu, Lijun; Wang, Huaxiang

    2009-10-01

    Calderon's method was introduced to electrical capacitance tomography in this paper. It is a direct algorithm of the image reconstruction for low-contrast dielectrics, as no matrix inversion or iterative process is needed. It was implemented through numerical integration. Since the Gauss-Legendre quadrature was applied and can be predetermined, the image reconstruction process was fast and resulted in images of high quality. Simulations were carried out to study the effect of different dielectric contrasts and different electrode numbers. Both simulated and experimental results validated the feasibility and effectiveness of Calderon's method in electrical capacitance tomography for low-contrast dielectrics.

  14. A methodology for near real-time change detection between Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and wide area satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytsilis, Anastasios L.; Prokos, Anthony; Koutroumbas, Konstantinos D.; Michail, Dimitrios; Kontoes, Charalambos C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a novel integrated hybrid methodology for unsupervised change detection between Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and satellite images, which can be utilized in various fields like security applications (e.g. border surveillance) and damage assessment, is proposed. This is a challenging problem mainly due to the difference in geographic coverage and the spatial resolution of the two images, as well as to the acquisition modes which lead to misregistration errors. The methodology consists of the following steps: (a) pre-processing, where the part of the satellite image that corresponds to the UAV image is determined and the UAV image is ortho-rectified using information provided by a Digital Terrain Model, (b) the detection of potential changes, which is based exclusively on intensity and image gradient information, (c) the generation of the region map, where homogeneous regions are produced by the previous potential changes via a seeded region growing algorithm and placed on the region map, and (d) the evaluation of the above regions, in order to characterize them as true changes or not. The methodology has been applied on demanding real datasets with very encouraging results. Finally, its robustness to the misregistration errors is assessed via extensive experimentation.

  15. Sensitive segmentation of low-contrast multispectral images based on multiparameter space-resonance imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetshin, Alexander M.; Akhmetshin, Lyudmila G.

    2001-10-01

    A new method of low contrast multispectral, hyperspectral and multiparameter images segmentation is outlined. The one has significant advantage in sensitivity and space resolving power of segmentation in comparison with known methods such as principal component transformation and fuzzy C-means clustering segmentation ones. New method is based on using of two important stages: 1) application virtual long-wave holographic transformation to each separate image of analyzed multispectral sequence (it is needed for increasing sensitivity of further analysis); 2) to each pixel of analyzed multispectral image is compare a virtual nonrecursive digital filter with complex coefficients. The one is characterized by its amplitude-frequency (AFC) and phase-frequency (PFC) characteristics. Information features used for visualization and segmentation are frequencies corresponded to maximum (resonance point) or minimum (antiresonance point) of AFC and group delay function calculated on base PFC. Information possibilities of new method are demonstrated on examples of multispectral remote sensing, various physical nature geophysical fields fusion and multiparameter MRI brain tumor hidden area influence detection.

  16. Super-nonlinear fluorescence microscopy for high-contrast deep tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lu; Zhu, Xinxin; Chen, Zhixing; Min, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) offers the highest penetration depth with subcellular resolution in light microscopy, due to its unique advantage of nonlinear excitation. However, a fundamental imaging-depth limit, accompanied by a vanishing signal-to-background contrast, still exists for TPFM when imaging deep into scattering samples. Formally, the focusing depth, at which the in-focus signal and the out-of-focus background are equal to each other, is defined as the fundamental imaging-depth limit. To go beyond this imaging-depth limit of TPFM, we report a new class of super-nonlinear fluorescence microscopy for high-contrast deep tissue imaging, including multiphoton activation and imaging (MPAI) harnessing novel photo-activatable fluorophores, stimulated emission reduced fluorescence (SERF) microscopy by adding a weak laser beam for stimulated emission, and two-photon induced focal saturation imaging with preferential depletion of ground-state fluorophores at focus. The resulting image contrasts all exhibit a higher-order (third- or fourth- order) nonlinear signal dependence on laser intensity than that in the standard TPFM. Both the physical principles and the imaging demonstrations will be provided for each super-nonlinear microscopy. In all these techniques, the created super-nonlinearity significantly enhances the imaging contrast and concurrently extends the imaging depth-limit of TPFM. Conceptually different from conventional multiphoton processes mediated by virtual states, our strategy constitutes a new class of fluorescence microscopy where high-order nonlinearity is mediated by real population transfer.

  17. Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

  18. A primer on the methods and applications for contrast echocardiography in clinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Seol, Sang-Hoon; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2014-09-01

    Contrast echocardiography is broadly described as a variety of techniques whereby the blood pool on cardiac ultrasound is enhanced with encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles or other acoustically active nano- or microparticles. The development of this technology has occurred primarily in response to the need improve current diagnostic applications of echocardiography such as the need to better define left ventricular cavity volumes, regional wall motion, or the presence or absence of masses and thrombi. A secondary reason for the development of contrast echocardiography has been to expand the capabilities of echocardiography. These new applications include myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of ischemia and viability, perfusion imaging of masses/tumors, and molecular imaging. The ability to fill all of these current and future clinical roles has been predicated on the ability to produce robust contrast signal which, in turn, has relied on technical innovation with regards to the microbubble contrast agents and the ultrasound imaging paradigms. In this review, we will discuss the basics of contrast echocardiography including the composition of microbubble contrast agents, the unique imaging methods used to optimize contrast signal-to-noise ratio, and the clinical applications of contrast echocardiography that have made a clinical impact.

  19. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  20. [An adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization based on image contrast analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongquan

    2011-12-01

    In order to get real time ultrasound images with clear structure and improved contrast, an adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization method based on image contrast analysis was investigated. It firstly introduced the dynamic beamforming of ultrasound system, as well as the definition of assumed system's sound speed and the true sound speed propagated in tissues the degrade image quality due to their mismatch was also discussed. After given the pixel gray level value based ultrasound image contrast ratio, the basic idea to precisely estimate the true sound speed for real time system sound speed was proposed. Algorithms have been verified both in tissue-mimicking phantoms with known sound speeds and in vivo ultrasound images, compared with other existing method. The testing results showed that this new method not only produced accurate sound speed for ultrasound image optimization, but also finely met the critical computation requirement for real time applications.

  1. Ultrasonic Imaging Using a Flexible Array: Improvements to the Maximum Contrast Autofocus Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2009-03-01

    In previous work, we have presented the maximum contrast autofocus algorithm for estimating unknown imaging parameters, e.g., for imaging through complicated surfaces using a flexible ultrasonic array. This paper details recent improvements to the algorithm. The algorithm operates by maximizing the image contrast metric with respect to the imaging parameters. For a flexible array, the relative positions of the array elements are parameterized using a cubic spline function and the spline control points are estimated by iterative maximisation of the image contrast via simulated annealing. The resultant spline gives an estimate of the array geometry and the profile of the surface that it has conformed to, allowing the generation of a well-focused image. A pre-processing step is introduced to obtain an initial estimate of the array geometry, reducing the time taken for the algorithm to convergence. Experimental results are demonstrated using a flexible array prototype.

  2. ULTRASONIC IMAGING USING A FLEXIBLE ARRAY: IMPROVEMENTS TO THE MAXIMUM CONTRAST AUTOFOCUS ALGORITHM

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2009-03-03

    In previous work, we have presented the maximum contrast autofocus algorithm for estimating unknown imaging parameters, e.g., for imaging through complicated surfaces using a flexible ultrasonic array. This paper details recent improvements to the algorithm. The algorithm operates by maximizing the image contrast metric with respect to the imaging parameters. For a flexible array, the relative positions of the array elements are parameterized using a cubic spline function and the spline control points are estimated by iterative maximisation of the image contrast via simulated annealing. The resultant spline gives an estimate of the array geometry and the profile of the surface that it has conformed to, allowing the generation of a well-focused image. A pre-processing step is introduced to obtain an initial estimate of the array geometry, reducing the time taken for the algorithm to convergence. Experimental results are demonstrated using a flexible array prototype.

  3. Assessment and Monitoring Tumor Vascularity With Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Maximum Intensity Persistence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Foygel, Kira; Panje, Cedric M.; Needles, Andrew; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is increasingly being used in the clinic for assessment of tissue vascularity. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of different contrast administration parameters on the in vivo ultrasound imaging signal in tumor-bearing mice using a maximum intensity persistence (MIP) algorithm and to evaluate the reliability of in vivo MIP imaging in assessing tumor vascularity. The potential of in vivo MIP imaging for monitoring tumor vascularity during antiangiogenic cancer treatment was further evaluated. Materials and Methods In intraindividual experiments, varying contrast microbubble concentrations (5 × 105, 5 × 106, 5 × 107, 5 × 108 microbubbles in 100 µL saline) and contrast injection rates (0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mL/min) in subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice were applied and their effects on in vivo contrast-enhanced ultrasound MIP imaging plateau values were obtained using a dedicated small animal ultrasound imaging system (40 MHz). Reliability of MIP ultrasound imaging was tested following 2 injections of the same micro-bubble concentration (5 × 107 microbubbles at 1.2 mL/min) in the same tumors. In mice with subcutaneous human colon cancer xenografts, longitudinal contrast-enhanced ultrasound MIP imaging plateau values (baseline and at 48 hours) were compared between mice with and without antiangiogenic treatment (anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody). Ex vivo CD31 immunostaining of tumor tissue was used to correlate in vivo MIP imaging plateau values with microvessel density analysis. Results In vivo MIP imaging plateau values correlated significantly (P = 0.001) with contrast microbubble doses. At 3 different injection rates of 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mL/min, MIP imaging plateau values did not change significantly (P = 0.61). Following 2 injections with the same microbubble dose and injection rate, MIP imaging plateau values were obtained with high reliability with an intraclass correlation

  4. Uncertainty analysis of quantitative imaging features extracted from contrast-enhanced CT in lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinzhong; Zhang, Lifei; Fave, Xenia J.; Fried, David V.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Ng, Chaan S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the uncertainty of quantitative imaging features extracted from contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans of lung cancer patients in terms of the dependency on the time after contrast injection and the feature reproducibility between scans. Methods Eight patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT scans of lung tumors on two sessions 2–7 days apart. Each session included 6 CT scans of the same anatomy taken every 15 seconds, starting 50 seconds after contrast injection. Image features based on intensity histogram, co-occurrence matrix, neighborhood gray-tone difference matrix, run-length matrix, and geometric shape were extracted from the tumor for each scan. Spearman’s correlation was used to examine the dependency of features on the time after contrast injection, with values over 0.50 considered time-dependent. Concordance correlation coefficients were calculated to examine the reproducibility of each feature between times of scans after contrast injection and between scanning sessions, with values greater than 0.90 considered reproducible. Results The features were found to have little dependency on the time between the contrast injection and the CT scan. Most features were reproducible between times of scans after contrast injection and between scanning sessions. Some features were more reproducible when they were extracted from a CT scan performed at a longer time after contrast injection. Conclusion The quantitative imaging features tested here are mostly reproducible and show little dependency on the time after contrast injection. PMID:26745258

  5. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  6. Tailored Near-Infrared Contrast Agents for Image Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Njiojob, Costyl N.; Owens, Eric A.; Narayana, Lakshminarayana; Hyun, Hoon; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    The success of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence to be employed for intraoperative imaging relies on the ability to develop a highly stable, NIR fluorescent, nontoxic, biocompatible, and highly excreted compound that retains a reactive functionality for conjugation to a cancer-recognizing peptide. Herein, systematic modifications to previously detailed fluorophore ZW800-1 are explored. Specific modifications, including the isosteric replacement of the O atom of ZW800-1, include nucleophilic amine and sulfur species attached to the heptamethine core. These novel compounds have shown similar satisfactory results in biodistribution and clearance while also expressing increased stability in serum. Most importantly, all of the synthesized and evaluated compounds display a reactive functionality (either a free amino group or carboxylic acid moiety) for further bioconjugation. The results obtained from the newly prepared derivatives demonstrate that the central substitution with the studied linking agents retains the ultralow background in vivo performance of the fluorophores regardless of the total net charge. PMID:25711712

  7. Liposomes loaded with hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles: Preparation and application as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    German, S V; Navolokin, N A; Kuznetsova, N R; Zuev, V V; Inozemtseva, O A; Anis'kov, A A; Volkova, E K; Bucharskaya, A B; Maslyakova, G N; Fakhrullin, R F; Terentyuk, G S; Vodovozova, E L; Gorin, D A

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fluid-loaded liposomes (MFLs) were fabricated using magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and natural phospholipids via the thin film hydration method followed by extrusion. The size distribution and composition of MFLs were studied using dynamic light scattering and spectrophotometry. The effective ranges of magnetite concentration in MNPs hydrosol and MFLs for contrasting at both T2 and T1 relaxation were determined. On T2 weighted images, the MFLs effectively increased the contrast if compared with MNPs hydrosol, while on T1 weighted images, MNPs hydrosol contrasting was more efficient than that of MFLs. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasting properties of MFLs and their effects on tumor and normal tissues morphology, were investigated in rats with transplanted renal cell carcinoma upon intratumoral administration of MFLs. No significant morphological changes in rat internal organs upon intratumoral injection of MFLs were detected, suggesting that the liposomes are relatively safe and can be used as the potential contrasting agents for MRI.

  8. Requirements for dynamical differential phase contrast x-ray imaging with a laboratory source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macindoe, David; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Irvine, Sarah C.; Fouras, Andreas; Morgan, Kaye S.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray phase contrast enables weakly-attenuating structures to be imaged, with bright synchrotron sources adding the ability to capture time sequences and analyse sample dynamics. Here, we describe the translation of dynamical differential phase contrast imaging from the synchrotron to a compact x-ray source, in order to achieve this kind of time sequence imaging in the laboratory. We formulate broadly-applicable set-up guidelines for the single-grid, single-exposure imaging technique using a divergent source, exploring the experimental factors that restrict set-up size, imaging sensitivity and sample size. Experimental images are presented using the single-grid phase contrast technique with a steel attenuation grid and a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, enabling exposure times as short as 0.5 s for dynamic imaging. Differential phase contrast images were retrieved from phantoms, incorporating noise filtering to improve the low-count images encountered when imaging dynamics using short exposures.

  9. Detection of Tree Crowns Based on Reclassification Using Aerial Images and LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, S.; Zarea, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Arefi, H.

    2013-09-01

    Tree detection using aerial sensors in early decades was focused by many researchers in different fields including Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry. This paper is intended to detect trees in complex city areas using aerial imagery and laser scanning data. Our methodology is a hierarchal unsupervised method consists of some primitive operations. This method could be divided into three sections, in which, first section uses aerial imagery and both second and third sections use laser scanners data. In the first section a vegetation cover mask is created in both sunny and shadowed areas. In the second section Rate of Slope Change (RSC) is used to eliminate grasses. In the third section a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) is obtained from LiDAR data. By using DTM and Digital Surface Model (DSM) we would get to Normalized Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Then objects which are lower than a specific height are eliminated. Now there are three result layers from three sections. At the end multiplication operation is used to get final result layer. This layer will be smoothed by morphological operations. The result layer is sent to WG III/4 to evaluate. The evaluation result shows that our method has a good rank in comparing to other participants' methods in ISPRS WG III/4, when assessed in terms of 5 indices including area base completeness, area base correctness, object base completeness, object base correctness and boundary RMS. With regarding of being unsupervised and automatic, this method is improvable and could be integrate with other methods to get best results.

  10. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  11. Phase-contrast enhanced mammography: A new diagnostic tool for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; David, Christian; Roessl, Ewald; Trippel, Mafalda; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Singer, Gad; Hohl, Michael K.; Hauser, Nik; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-07-31

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging can potentially revolutionize the radiological approach to breast imaging by providing additional and complementary information to conventional, absorption-based methods. We investigated native, non-fixed whole breast samples using a grating interferometer with an X-ray tube-based configuration. Our approach simultaneously recorded absorption, differential phase contrast and small-angle scattering signals. The results show that this novel technique - combined with a dedicated image fusion algorithm - has the potential to deliver enhanced breast imaging with complementary information for an improved diagnostic process.

  12. High accuracy and contrast resolution in ultra-low field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Agartz, I; Sääf, J; Wahlund, B; Wahlund, L O; Wetterberg, L

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at low magnetic field strengths is known to have a comparatively high contrast resolution. Current techniques increasing the signal to noise ratio 3 to 4 times allow for an improvement in the spatial resolution still maintaining the high contrast resolution. The contributing features to this advancement are improvements in software, development of new radiofrequency coils and image processing computors. The subsequent improvement in image evaluation and the access to added information make for a high accuracy in clinical diagnosis and research. The present potential of imaging at ultra-low (0.02 tesla) magnetic field strengths is illustrated with examples from clinical practice and research.

  13. Semi-automted analysis of high-resolution aerial images to quantify docks in Upper Midwest glacial lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, Marcus W.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Hatch, Lorin K.; Vinje, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Lake resources can be negatively affected by environmental stressors originating from multiple sources and different spatial scales. Shoreline development, in particular, can negatively affect lake resources through decline in habitat quality, physical disturbance, and impacts on fisheries. The development of remote sensing techniques that efficiently characterize shoreline development in a regional context could greatly improve management approaches for protecting and restoring lake resources. The goal of this study was to develop an approach using high-resolution aerial photographs to quantify and assess docks as indicators of shoreline development. First, we describe a dock analysis workflow that can be used to quantify the spatial extent of docks using aerial images. Our approach incorporates pixel-based classifiers with object-based techniques to effectively analyze high-resolution digital imagery. Second, we apply the analysis workflow to quantify docks for 4261 lakes managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Overall accuracy of the analysis results was 98.4% (87.7% based on ) after manual post-processing. The analysis workflow was also 74% more efficient than the time required for manual digitization of docks. These analyses have immediate relevance for resource planning in Minnesota, whereas the dock analysis workflow could be used to quantify shoreline development in other regions with comparable imagery. These data can also be used to better understand the effects of shoreline development on aquatic resources and to evaluate the effects of shoreline development relative to other stressors.

  14. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance tomoangiography: a new imaging technique for studying thoracic great vessels.

    PubMed

    Revel, D; Loubeyre, P; Delignette, A; Douek, P; Amiel, M

    1993-01-01

    The authors propose a new imaging approach for studying thoracic great vessels, using high-speed MR imaging combined with intravenous rapid bolus injection of a paramagnetic contrast media. The decrease of the T1 relaxation time of flowing blood induced by the contrast agent (Gd-DOTA) caused an increased signal intensity within the vessel lumen for a time period allowing multiplanar imaging of various vascular structures. The intraluminal signal enhancement is mainly related to the blood concentration of the contrast agent as in conventional X-ray angiography. Information on the aorta and pulmonary arteries obtained by the so-called contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance tomoangiography appears complementary to that obtained with other vascular MR imaging procedures such as cine-MRI and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA).

  15. A phantom study to characterize the imaging quality of a phase-contrast tomosynthesis prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Ghani, Muhammad U.; Miao, Hui; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2013-02-01

    This research is aimed at studying the advantages of an x-ray phase-contrast tomosynthesis prototype by using phantoms. A prototype system is assembled with a micro-focus x-ray source, a rotating stage and a computed radiography detector mounted on an optical rail. A custom designed bubble wrap phantom is used in experiments. Angular projection images are acquired from -20° to +20° with 2° interval. The in-plane slices are reconstructed. The feature area on the phantom is observed. The prototype system provides an intrinsic way to investigate the potential and imaging quality of a phase-contrast tomosynthesis imaging method. As the result, phase-contrast tomosynthesis imaging method is demonstrated for its advantages in avoiding structure noise and overlapping issues by comparing the results acquired by computed radiography and phase-contrast radiography.

  16. Closed Loop, DM Diversity-based, Wavefront Correction Algorithm for High Contrast Imaging Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Give'on, Amir; Belikov, Ruslan; Shaklan, Stuart; Kasdin, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    High contrast imaging from space relies on coronagraphs to limit diffraction and a wavefront control systems to compensate for imperfections in both the telescope optics and the coronagraph. The extreme contrast required (up to 10(exp -10) for terrestrial planets) puts severe requirements on the wavefront control system, as the achievable contrast is limited by the quality of the wavefront. This paper presents a general closed loop correction algorithm for high contrast imaging coronagraphs by minimizing the energy in a predefined region in the image where terrestrial planets could be found. The estimation part of the algorithm reconstructs the complex field in the image plane using phase diversity caused by the deformable mirror. This method has been shown to achieve faster and better correction than classical speckle nulling.

  17. Wavelength-Dependent Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy: Selectively Imaging Nanoparticle Probes in Live Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Fang, Ning; and Yeung, Edward S.

    2009-11-15

    Gold and silver nanoparticles display extraordinarily large apparent refractive indices near their plasmon resonance (PR) wavelengths. These nanoparticles show good contrast in a narrow spectral band but are poorly resolved at other wavelengths in differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. The wavelength dependence of DIC contrast of gold/silver nanoparticles is interpreted in terms of Mie's theory and DIC working principles. We further exploit this wavelength dependence by modifying a DIC microscope to enable simultaneous imaging at two wavelengths. We demonstrate that gold/silver nanoparticles immobilized on the same glass slides through hybridization can be differentiated and imaged separately. High-contrast, video-rate images of living cells can be recorded both with and without illuminating the gold nanoparticle probes, providing definitive probe identification. Dual-wavelength DIC microscopy thus presents a new approach to the simultaneous detection of multiple probes of interest for high-speed live-cell imaging.

  18. High contrast imaging at the LBT: the LEECH exoplanet imaging survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip; Esposito, Simone; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Defrère, Denis; Bailey, Vanessa; Leisenring, Jarron; Apai, Daniel; Biller, Beth; Bonnefoy, Mickaël.; Brandner, Wolfgang; Buenzli, Esther; Close, Laird; Crepp, Justin; De Rosa, Robert J.; Desidera, Silvano; Eisner, Josh; Fortney, Jonathan; Henning, Thomas; Hofmann, Karl-Heinz; Kopytova, Taisiya; Maire, Anne-Lise; Males, Jared R.; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Morzinski, Katie; Oza, Apurva; Patience, Jenny; Rajan, Abhijith; Rieke, George; Schertl, Dieter; Schlieder, Joshua; Su, Kate; Vaz, Amali; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Weigelt, Gerd; Woodward, Charles E.; Zimmerman, Neil

    2014-07-01

    In Spring 2013, the LEECH (LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt) survey began its ~130-night campaign from the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) atop Mt Graham, Arizona. This survey benefits from the many technological achievements of the LBT, including two 8.4-meter mirrors on a single fixed mount, dual adaptive secondary mirrors for high Strehl performance, and a cold beam combiner to dramatically reduce the telescope's overall background emissivity. LEECH neatly complements other high-contrast planet imaging efforts by observing stars at L' (3.8 μm), as opposed to the shorter wavelength near-infrared bands (1-2.4 μm) of other surveys. This portion of the spectrum offers deep mass sensitivity, especially around nearby adolescent (~0.1-1 Gyr) stars. LEECH's contrast is competitive with other extreme adaptive optics systems, while providing an alternative survey strategy. Additionally, LEECH is characterizing known exoplanetary systems with observations from 3-5μm in preparation for JWST.

  19. Quantitative analysis of drainage obtained from aerial photographs and RBV/LANDSAT images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Formaggio, A. R.; Epiphanio, J. C. N.; Filho, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained from aerial photographs (1:60,000) and LANDSAT return beam vidicon imagery (1:100,000) concerning drainage density, drainage texture, hydrography density, and the average length of channels were compared. Statistical analysis shows that significant differences exist in data from the two sources. The highly drained area lost more information than the less drained area. In addition, it was observed that the loss of information about the number of rivers was higher than that about the length of the channels.

  20. Object Based Agricultural Land Cover Classification Map of Shadowed Areas from Aerial Image and LIDAR Data Using Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R. T.; Serrano, S. C.; Damian, G. B.; Camaso, E. E.; Celestino, A. B.; Hernando, P. J. C.; Isip, M. F.; Orge, K. M.; Quinto, M. J. C.; Tagaca, R. C.

    2016-06-01

    Aerial image and LiDAR data offers a great possibility for agricultural land cover mapping. Unfortunately, these images leads to shadowy pixels. Management of shadowed areas for classification without image enhancement were investigated. Image segmentation approach using three different segmentation scales were used and tested to segment the image for ground features since only the ground features are affected by shadow caused by tall features. The RGB band and intensity were the layers used for the segmentation having an equal weights. A segmentation scale of 25 was found to be the optimal scale that will best fit for the shadowed and non-shadowed area classification. The SVM using Radial Basis Function kernel was then applied to extract classes based on properties extracted from the Lidar data and orthophoto. Training points for different classes including shadowed areas were selected homogeneously from the orthophoto. Separate training points for shadowed areas were made to create additional classes to reduced misclassification. Texture classification and object-oriented classifiers have been examined to reduced heterogeneity problem. The accuracy of the land cover classification using 25 scale segmentation after accounting for the shadow detection and classification was significantly higher compared to higher scale of segmentation.

  1. Fusion of aerial images with mean shift-based upsampled elevation data for improved building block classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyftakis, S.; Tsenoglou, T.; Bratsolis, E.; Charou, Eleni; Vassilas, N.

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing demand for detailed 3D modeling of buildings using elevation data such as those acquired from LiDAR airborne scanners. The various techniques that have been developed for this purpose typically perform segmentation into homogeneous regions followed by boundary extraction and are based on some combination of LiDAR data, digital maps, satellite images and aerial orthophotographs. In the present work, our dataset includes an aerial RGB orthophoto, a DSM and a DTM with spatial resolutions of 20cm, 1m and 2m respectively. Next, a normalized DSM (nDSM) is generated and fused with the optical data in order to increase its resolution to 20cm. The proposed methodology can be described as a two-step approach. First, a nearest neighbor interpolation is applied on the low resolution nDSM to obtain a low quality, ragged, elevation image. Next, we performed a mean shift-based discontinuity preserving smoothing on the fused data. The outcome is on the one hand a more homogeneous RGB image, with smoothed terrace coloring while at the same time preserving the optical edges and on the other hand an upsampled elevation data with considerable improvement regarding region filling and "straightness" of elevation discontinuities. Besides the apparent visual assessment of the increased accuracy of building boundaries, the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated using the processed dataset as input to five supervised classification methods. The performance of each method is evaluated using a subset of the test area as ground truth. Comparisons with classification results obtained with the original data demonstrate that preprocessing the input dataset using the mean shift algorithm improves significantly the performance of all tested classifiers for building block extraction.

  2. Comparison of multispectral wide-field optical imaging modalities to maximize image contrast for objective discrimination of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblyer, Darren; Kurachi, Cristina; Stepanek, Vanda; Schwarz, Richard A.; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Lee, J. Jack; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2010-11-01

    Multispectral widefield optical imaging has the potential to improve early detection of oral cancer. The appropriate selection of illumination and collection conditions is required to maximize diagnostic ability. The goals of this study were to (i) evaluate image contrast between oral cancer/precancer and non-neoplastic mucosa for a variety of imaging modalities and illumination/collection conditions, and (ii) use classification algorithms to evaluate and compare the diagnostic utility of these modalities to discriminate cancers and precancers from normal tissue. Narrowband reflectance, autofluorescence, and polarized reflectance images were obtained from 61 patients and 11 normal volunteers. Image contrast was compared to identify modalities and conditions yielding greatest contrast. Image features were extracted and used to train and evaluate classification algorithms to discriminate tissue as non-neoplastic, dysplastic, or cancer; results were compared to histologic diagnosis. Autofluorescence imaging at 405-nm excitation provided the greatest image contrast, and the ratio of red-to-green fluorescence intensity computed from these images provided the best classification of dysplasia/cancer versus non-neoplastic tissue. A sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85% were achieved in the validation set. Multispectral widefield images can accurately distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue; however, the ability to separate precancerous lesions from cancers with this technique was limited.

  3. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T 1, spin-lattice relaxation and T 2, spin-spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T 1 and T 2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T 1 and 1/T 2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T 2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T 1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents.

  4. Nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging: from simple to dual contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Estelrich, Joan; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Busquets, Maria Antònia

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become one of the most widely used and powerful tools for noninvasive clinical diagnosis owing to its high degree of soft tissue contrast, spatial resolution, and depth of penetration. MRI signal intensity is related to the relaxation times (T1, spin–lattice relaxation and T2, spin–spin relaxation) of in vivo water protons. To increase contrast, various inorganic nanoparticles and complexes (the so-called contrast agents) are administered prior to the scanning. Shortening T1 and T2 increases the corresponding relaxation rates, 1/T1 and 1/T2, producing hyperintense and hypointense signals respectively in shorter times. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio can be improved with the acquisition of a large number of measurements. The contrast agents used are generally based on either iron oxide nanoparticles or ferrites, providing negative contrast in T2-weighted images; or complexes of lanthanide metals (mostly containing gadolinium ions), providing positive contrast in T1-weighted images. Recently, lanthanide complexes have been immobilized in nanostructured materials in order to develop a new class of contrast agents with functions including blood-pool and organ (or tumor) targeting. Meanwhile, to overcome the limitations of individual imaging modalities, multimodal imaging techniques have been developed. An important challenge is to design all-in-one contrast agents that can be detected by multimodal techniques. Magnetoliposomes are efficient multimodal contrast agents. They can simultaneously bear both kinds of contrast and can, furthermore, incorporate targeting ligands and chains of polyethylene glycol to enhance the accumulation of nanoparticles at the site of interest and the bioavailability, respectively. Here, we review the most important characteristics of the nanoparticles or complexes used as MRI contrast agents. PMID:25834422

  5. 'Edge illumination' in X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, Peter R. T.; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Diemoz, Paul C.; Szafraniec, Magdalena B.; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Millard, Thomas P.; Zapata, Cesar E.; Speller, Robert D.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2012-07-31

    In the late '90s, the concept of 'edge illumination' was developed at ELETTRA in Italy as an alternative method to increase the phase sensitivity of an imaging system. The main idea was to be able to reproduce the fine angular selection of 'analyzer' crystals without actually using a crystal, as this would allow employing the method with divergent and polychromatic (i.e. conventional) x-ray sources. It was observed that this could be achieved by illuminating only the edges of the detector pixels, and that the method's sensitivity could be progressively increased by illuminating smaller pixel fractions closer to its physical edge. A few years later the idea was adapted for use with a conventional source by means of two sets of x-ray masks ('coded aperture' masks), which enabled obtaining the same effect for each row (or column) of pixels of an area detector illuminated by a cone beam. This article reviews the method and presents recent examples of application.

  6. An MR Contrast Agent for Intra-Prostatic Imaging of Prostatic Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra-prostatic distribution of...develop a magnetic nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra...the receptor in a convenient animal model, the normal mouse. The GRP receptor is expressed at high levels in the normal rodent pancreas. I. Synthesis

  7. Intact Imaging of Human Heart Structure Using X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Gen; Hoshino, Masato; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kiyozo; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Yagi, Naoto; Okita, Yutaka; Tsukube, Takuro

    2017-02-01

    Structural examination of human heart specimens at the microscopic level is a prerequisite for understanding congenital heart diseases. It is desirable not to destroy or alter the properties of such specimens because of their scarcity. However, many of the currently available imaging techniques either destroy the specimen through sectioning or alter the chemical and mechanical properties of the specimen through staining and contrast agent injection. As a result, subsequent studies may not be possible. X-ray phase-contrast tomography is an imaging modality for biological soft tissues that does not destroy or alter the properties of the specimen. The feasibility of X-ray phase-contrast tomography for the structural examination of heart specimens was tested using infantile and fetal heart specimens without congenital diseases. X-ray phase-contrast tomography was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility using the Talbot grating interferometer at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 to visualize the structure of five non-pretreated whole heart specimens obtained by autopsy. High-resolution, three-dimensional images were obtained for all specimens. The images clearly showed the myocardial structure, coronary vessels, and conduction bundle. X-ray phase-contrast tomography allows high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of human heart specimens. Intact imaging using X-ray phase-contrast tomography can contribute to further structural investigation of heart specimens with congenital heart diseases.

  8. Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic) Acid as a Carrier for Imaging Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Doiron, Amber L.; Homan, Kimberly A.; Emelianov, Stanislav; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose With the broadening field of nanomedicine poised for future molecular level therapeutics, nano-and microparticles intended for the augmentation of either single- or multimodal imaging are created with PLGA as the chief constituent and carrier. Methods Emulsion techniques were used to encapsulate hydrophilic and hydrophobic imaging contrast agents in PLGA particles. The imaging contrast properties of these PLGA particles were further enhanced by reducing silver onto the PLGA surface, creating a silver cage around the polymeric core. Results The MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA and the exogenous dye rhodamine 6G were both encapsulated in PLGA and shown to enhance MR and fluorescence contrast, respectively. The silver nanocage built around PLGA nanoparticles exhibited strong near infrared light absorbance properties, making it a suitable contrast agent for optical imaging strategies such as photoacoustic imaging. Conclusions The biodegradable polymer PLGA is an extremely versatile nano- and micro-carrier for several imaging contrast agents with the possibility of targeting diseased states at a molecular level. PMID:19034628

  9. Refracting Roentgen's rays: Propagation-based x-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S. C.; Nesterets, Ya.; Pogany, A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wilkins, S. W.; Myers, D. E.; Paganin, D. M.

    2009-05-15

    Absorption-contrast x-ray imaging serves to visualize the variation in x-ray attenuation within the volume of a given sample, whereas phase contrast allows one to visualize variations in x-ray refractive index. The former imaging mechanism has been well known and widely utilized since the time of Roentgen's Nobel prize winning work, whereas the latter mechanism--sought for, but not found, by Roentgen himself--has laid the foundation for a revolution in x-ray imaging which is the central topic of this review. We consider the physical imaging mechanisms underlying both absorption contrast and phase contrast, together with the associated inverse problem of how one may obtain quantitative two- or three-dimensional information regarding a sample, given one or more phase-contrast images of the same. Practical questions are considered, regarding optimized phase-contrast imaging geometries as a function of detector resolution, source size, x-ray spectrum, and dose. Experimental examples pertaining to biomedical applications are given, and prospects for the future outlined.

  10. Characterization of nanoparticle-based contrast agents for molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Chopra, Arvind; Leung, Kam; Eckelman, William C.; Menkens, Anne E.

    2012-09-01

    The development of molecular imaging agents is currently undergoing a dramatic expansion. As of October 2011, 4,800 newly developed agents have been synthesized and characterized in vitro and in animal models of human disease. Despite this rapid progress, the transfer of these agents to clinical practice is rather slow. To address this issue, the National Institutes of Health launched the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agents Database (MICAD) in 2005 to provide freely accessible online information regarding molecular imaging probes and contrast agents for the imaging community. While compiling information regarding imaging agents published in peer-reviewed journals, the MICAD editors have observed that some important information regarding the characterization of a contrast agent is not consistently reported. This makes it difficult for investigators to evaluate and meta-analyze data generated from different studies of imaging agents, especially for the agents based on nanoparticles. This article is intended to serve as a guideline for new investigators for the characterization of preclinical studies performed with nanoparticle-based MRI contrast agents. The common characterization parameters are summarized into seven categories: contrast agent designation, physicochemical properties, magnetic properties, in vitro studies, animal studies, MRI studies, and toxicity. Although no single set of parameters is suitable to define the properties of the various types of contrast agents, it is essential to ensure that these agents meet certain quality control parameters at the preclinical stage, so that they can be used without delay for clinical studies.

  11. Optical contrast enhancement of high-resolution ocular fundus imaging in vivo using polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hansheng; Rao, Xuejun; Zhang, Yudong

    2007-11-01

    The adaptive optics (AO) retina imaging was performed with contrast enhancement by characterizing polarization parameters of the living retina. A removable pair of polarization state generating unit near the optical source and analysis unit near the CCD camera was incorporated into the basic 37-channle deformable mirror AO microscopic ophthalmoscope. Double-pass imaging polarimetry of the human eye was carried out, then incomplete Mueller matrix was calculated and analyzed to optimize the retina imaging condition using polarized light, which caused the subretinal structures with different polarization properties to emerge from the scattering light background, so the contrast of the image can be substantially enhanced. This method is demonstrated briefly and its validity was tested in the laboratory. The high-resolution images of ocular fundus are compared with 8-frame-averaging images we obtained prior to this method. The experiment results now show improved visualization of fundus structures to some extent without greatly sacrificing image resolution.

  12. a Novel Approach for Edge Detection of Low Contrast Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. K.; Bajpai, M. K.; Pandey, R. K.

    2015-03-01

    Discrimination between texture edges and geometrical edges is very difficult in low contrast images. Satellite images are low contrast images. It is important to extract the edges that are not clearly visible in case of Satellite images. The present work encompasses a new edge detection algorithm using newly constructed differentiator. Chebyshev polynomial based fractional order differentiator has been used for filtering operation on an image. High pass and Low pass filters are designed with the concept of Quadrature Mirror Filter (QMF). Pre-processing has been performed by using this filter. Sobel edge detection method has been applied on this pre-processed image. The algorithm has been tested with two different satellite images.

  13. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Han; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Lynch, Susanna K.; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Xiao Xianghui; Liu Chian; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-15

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 {mu}m pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 {mu}m, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  14. Comparison of laser Doppler and laser speckle contrast imaging using a concurrent processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shen; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R.; He, Diwei; Zhu, Yiqun; Huynh, Nam T.; Morgan, Stephen P.

    2016-08-01

    Full field laser Doppler imaging (LDI) and single exposure laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) are directly compared using a novel instrument which can concurrently image blood flow using both LDI and LSCI signal processing. Incorporating a commercial CMOS camera chip and a field programmable gate array (FPGA) the flow images of LDI and the contrast maps of LSCI are simultaneously processed by utilizing the same detected optical signals. The comparison was carried out by imaging a rotating diffuser. LDI has a linear response to the velocity. In contrast, LSCI is exposure time dependent and does not provide a linear response in the presence of static speckle. It is also demonstrated that the relationship between LDI and LSCI can be related through a power law which depends on the exposure time of LSCI.

  15. Inclusion of coherence in Monte Carlo models for simulation of x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Cipiccia, Silvia; Vittoria, Fabio A; Weikum, Maria; Olivo, Alessandro; Jaroszynski, Dino A

    2014-09-22

    Interest in phase contrast imaging methods based on electromagnetic wave coherence has increased significantly recently, particularly at X-ray energies. This is giving rise to a demand for effective simulation methods. Coherent imaging approaches are usually based on wave optics, which require significant computational resources, particularly for producing 2D images. Monte Carlo (MC) methods, used to track individual particles/photons for particle physics, are not considered appropriate for describing coherence effects. Previous preliminary work has evaluated the possibility of incorporating coherence in Monte Carlo codes. However, in this paper, we present the implementation of refraction in a model that is based on time of flight calculations and the Huygens-Fresnel principle, which allow reproducing the formation of phase contrast images in partially and fully coherent experimental conditions. The model is implemented in the FLUKA Monte Carlo code and X-ray phase contrast imaging simulations are compared with experiments and wave optics calculations.

  16. Diagnosis of Popliteal Venous Entrapment Syndrome by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Blood-Pool Contrast Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Beitzke, Dietrich Wolf, Florian; Juelg, Gregor; Lammer, Johannes; Loewe, Christian

    2011-02-15

    Popliteal vascular entrapment syndrome is caused by aberrations or hypertrophy of the gastrocnemius muscles, which compress the neurovascular structures of the popliteal fossa, leading to symptoms of vascular and degeneration as well as aneurysm formation. Imaging of popliteal vascular entrapment may be performed with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography angiography, and conventional angiography. The use of blood-pool contrast agents in MRI when popliteal vascular entrapment is suspected offers the possibility to perform vascular imaging with first-pass magnetic resonance angiographic, high-resolution, steady-state imaging and allows functional tests all within one examination with a single dose of contrast agent. We present imaging findings in a case of symptomatic popliteal vein entrapment diagnosed by the use of blood pool contrast-enhanced MRI.

  17. Differential structured illumination microendoscopy for in vivo imaging of molecular contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Keahey, Pelham; Ramalingam, Preetha; Schmeler, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Fiber optic microendoscopy has shown promise for visualization of molecular contrast agents used to study disease in vivo. However, fiber optic microendoscopes have limited optical sectioning capability, and image contrast is limited by out-of-focus light generated in highly scattering tissue. Optical sectioning techniques have been used in microendoscopes to remove out-of-focus light but reduce imaging speed or rely on bulky optical elements that prevent in vivo imaging. Here, we present differential structured illumination microendoscopy (DSIMe), a fiber optic system that can perform structured illumination in real time for optical sectioning without any opto-mechanical components attached to the distal tip of the fiber bundle. We demonstrate the use of DSIMe during in vivo fluorescence imaging in patients undergoing surgery for cervical adenocarcinoma in situ. Images acquired using DSIMe show greater contrast than standard microendoscopy, improving the ability to detect cellular atypia associated with neoplasia. PMID:27621464

  18. Interferometric hard x-ray phase contrast imaging at 204 nm grating period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Han; Wolfe, Douglas E.; Gomella, Andrew A.; Miao, Houxun; Xiao, Xianghui; Liu, Chian; Lynch, Susanna K.; Morgan, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    We report on hard x-ray phase contrast imaging experiments using a grating interferometer of approximately 1/10th the grating period achieved in previous studies. We designed the gratings as a staircase array of multilayer stacks which are fabricated in a single thin film deposition process. We performed the experiments at 19 keV x-ray energy and 0.8 μm pixel resolution. The small grating period resulted in clear separation of different diffraction orders and multiple images on the detector. A slitted beam was used to remove overlap of the images from the different diffraction orders. The phase contrast images showed detailed features as small as 10 μm, and demonstrated the feasibility of high resolution x-ray phase contrast imaging with nanometer scale gratings.

  19. Optimisation of image reconstruction for phase-contrast x-ray Talbot-Lau imaging with regard to mechanical robustness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, M.; Kaeppler, S.; Hauke, C.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Rieger, J.; Michel, T.; Riess, C.; Anton, G.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging opens new opportunities, inter alia, in medical imaging and non-destructive testing. Because, information about the attenuation properties and about the refractive properties of an object are gained simultaneously. Talbot-Lau imaging requires the knowledge of a reference or free-field image. The long-term stability of a Talbot-Lau interferometer is related to the time span of the validity of a measured reference image. It would be desirable to keep the validity of the reference image for a day or longer to improve feasibility of Talbot-Lau imaging. However, for example thermal and other long-term external influences result in drifting effects of the phase images. Therefore, phases are shifting over time and the reference image is not valid for long-term measurements. Thus, artifacts occur in differential phase-contrast images. We developed an algorithm to determine the differential phase-contrast image with the help of just one calibration image, which is valid for a long time-period. With the help of this algorithm, called phase-plane-fit method, it is possible to save measurement-time, as it is not necessary to take a reference image for each measurement. Additionally, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, short-term effects like vibrations or distortions of the system lead to imperfections within the phase-stepping procedure. Consequently, artifacts occur in all three image modalities (differential phase-contrast image, attenuation image and dark-field image) of Talbot-Lau imaging. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging for example in clinical routine or non-destructive testing. In this publication an algorithm of Vargas et al is applied and complemented to correct inaccurate phase-step positions with the help of a principal component analysis (PCA

  20. A technique for multi-dimensional optimization of radiation dose, contrast dose, and image quality in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Abadi, Ehsan; Sanders, Jeremiah; Becchetti, Marc; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to substantiate the interdependency of image quality, radiation dose, and contrast material dose in CT towards the patient-specific optimization of the imaging protocols. The study deployed two phantom platforms. First, a variable sized phantom containing an iodinated insert was imaged on a representative CT scanner at multiple CTDI values. The contrast and noise were measured from the reconstructed images for each phantom diameter. Linearly related to iodine-concentration, contrast to noise ratio (CNR), was calculated for different iodine-concentration levels. Second, the analysis was extended to a recently developed suit of 58 virtual human models (5D-XCAT) with added contrast dynamics. Emulating a contrast-enhanced abdominal image procedure and targeting a peak-enhancement in aorta, each XCAT phantom was "imaged" using a CT simulation platform. 3D surfaces for each patient/size established the relationship between iodine-concentration, dose, and CNR. The Sensitivity of Ratio (SR), defined as ratio of change in iodine-concentration versus dose to yield a constant change in CNR was calculated and compared at high and low radiation dose for both phantom platforms. The results show that sensitivity of CNR to iodine concentration is larger at high radiation dose (up to 73%). The SR results were highly affected by radiation dose metric; CTDI or organ dose. Furthermore, results showed that the presence of contrast material could have a profound impact on optimization results (up to 45%).

  1. An optimal point spread function subtraction algorithm for high-contrast imaging: a demonstration with angular differential imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, D; Marois, C; Doyon, R; Artigau, E; Nadeau, D

    2006-09-19

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is limited by bright quasi-static speckles in the point spread function (PSF) of the central star. This limitation can be reduced by subtraction of reference PSF images. We have developed an algorithm to construct an optimal reference PSF image from an arbitrary set of reference images. This image is built as a linear combination of all available images and is optimized independently inside multiple subsections of the image to ensure that the absolute minimum residual noise is achieved within each subsection. The algorithm developed is completely general and can be used with many high contrast imaging observing strategies, such as angular differential imaging (ADI), roll subtraction, spectral differential imaging, reference star observations, etc. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated for ADI data. It is shown that for this type of data the new algorithm provides a gain in sensitivity by up 22 to a factor 3 at small separation over the algorithm previously used.

  2. X-ray phase-contrast imaging: transmission functions separable in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guohua; Hamilton, Theron J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2007-04-01

    In-line, x-ray phase-contrast imaging is responsive to both phase changes and absorption as the x radiation traverses a body. Expressions are derived for phase-contrast imaging of objects having transmission functions separable in Cartesian coordinates. Starting from the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral formula for image formation, an expression is found for the phase-contrast image produced by an x-ray source with nonvanishing dimensions. This expression is evaluated in limiting cases where the source-to-object distance is large, where the source acts as a point source, and where the weak phase approximation is valid. The integral expression for the image is evaluated for objects with simple geometrical shapes, showing the influence of the source dimensions on the visibility of phase-contrast features. The expressions derived here are evaluated for cases where the magnification is substantially greater than one as would be employed in biological imaging. Experiments are reported using the in-line phase-contrast imaging method with a microfocus x-ray source and a CCD camera.

  3. On Detailed Contrast of Biomedical Object in X-ray Dark-Field Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Shimao, Daisuke; Mori, Koichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Kunisada, Toshiyuki; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Ando, Masami

    2007-01-19

    Over the past 10 years, refraction-based X-ray imaging has been studied together with a perspective view to clinical application. X-ray Dark-Field Imaging that utilizes a Laue geometry analyzer has recently been proposed and has the proven ability to depict articular cartilage in an intact human finger. In the current study, we researched detailed image contrast using X-ray Dark-Field Imaging by observing the edge contrast of an acrylic rod as a simple case, and found differences in image contrast between the right and left edges of the rod. This effect could cause undesirable contrast in the thin articular cartilage on the head of the phalanx. To avoid overlapping with this contrast at the articular cartilage, which would lead to a wrong diagnosis, we suggest that a joint surface on which articular cartilage is located should be aligned in the same sense as the scattering vector of the Laue case analyzer crystal. Defects of articular cartilage were successfully detected under this condition. When utilized under appropriate imaging conditions, X-ray Dark-Field Imaging will be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of arthropathy, as minute changes in articular cartilage may be early-stage features of this disease.

  4. [Comparison of film-screen combination in a contrast detail diagram and with interactive image analysis. 1: Contrast detail diagram].

    PubMed

    Hagemann, G; Eichbaum, G

    1997-07-01

    The following three film-screen combinations were compared: a) a combination of anticrossover film and UV-light emitting screens, b) a combination of blue-light emitting screens and film, and c) a conventional green fluorescing screen film combination. Radiographs of a specially designed plexiglass phantom (0.2 x 0.2 x 0.12 m3) were obtained that contained bar patterns of lead and plaster (calcium sulfate) to test high and intermediate contrast resolution and bar patterns of air to test low contrast resolution, respectively. An aluminum step wedge was integrated to evaluate dose-density curves of the radiographs. The dose values for the various step thicknesses were measured as percentage of the dose value in air for 60, 81, and 117 kV. Exposure conditions were the following: 12 pulse generator, 0.6 mm focus size, 4.7 mm aluminum prefilter, a grid with 40 lines/cm (12:1), and a focus-detector distance of 1.15 m. The thresholds of visible bars of the various pattern materials were assessed by seven radiologists, one technician, and the authors. The resulting contrast detail diagram could not prove any significant differences between the three tested screen film combinations. The pairwise comparison, however, found 8 of the 18 paired differences to be statistically significant between the conventional and the two new screen-film combinations. The authors concluded that subjective visual assessment of the threshold in a contrast detail study alone is of only limited value to grade image quality if no well-defined criteria are used (BIR report 20 [1989] 137-139). The statistical approach of paired differences of the estimated means appeared to be more appropriate.

  5. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian; Chabior, Michael; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Bamberg, Fabian

    2013-09-01

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  6. Intravenous Imaging Contrast Media Complications: The Basics That Every Clinician Needs to Know.

    PubMed

    Rose, Trevor A; Choi, Jung W

    2015-09-01

    Intravenous contrast is commonly used in noninvasive imaging procedures such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography and can evaluate blood vessels and better characterize soft-tissue lesions. Although the incidence of adverse events after administration of contrast is low, it is important that clinicians and radiologists minimize risks and respond quickly and effectively when reactions occur. We will discuss a range of adverse events to iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast agents, including allergic-like reactions, nephrotoxicity, extravasation, and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. We will review risk stratification for patients, as well as premedication and treatment of adverse events.

  7. Poly(iohexol) nanoparticles as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qian; Yap, Felix Y; Yin, Lichen; Ma, Liang; Zhou, Qin; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Fan, Timothy M; Gaba, Ron C; Cheng, Jianjun

    2013-09-18

    Biocompatible poly(iohexol) nanoparticles, prepared through cross-linking of iohexol and hexamethylene diisocyanate followed by coprecipitation of the resulting cross-linked polymer with mPEG-polylactide, were utilized as contrast agents for in vivo X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. Compared to conventional small-molecule contrast agents, poly(iohexol) nanoparticles exhibited substantially protracted retention within the tumor bed and a 36-fold increase in CT contrast 4 h post injection, which makes it possible to acquire CT images with improved diagnosis accuracy over a broad time frame without multiple administrations.

  8. A Mobile System for Measuring Water Surface Velocities Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement technologies for velocity of river flow are divided into intrusive and nonintrusive methods. Intrusive method requires infield operations. The measuring process of intrusive methods are time consuming, and likely to cause damages of operator and instrument. Nonintrusive methods require fewer operators and can reduce instrument damages from directly attaching to the flow. Nonintrusive measurements may use radar or image velocimetry to measure the velocities at the surface of water flow. The image velocimetry, such as large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) accesses not only the point velocity but the flow velocities in an area simultaneously. Flow properties of an area hold the promise of providing spatially information of flow fields. This study attempts to construct a mobile system UAV-LSPIV by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with LSPIV to measure flows in fields. The mobile system consists of a six-rotor UAV helicopter, a Sony nex5T camera, a gimbal, an image transfer device, a ground station and a remote control device. The activate gimbal helps maintain the camera lens orthogonal to the water surface and reduce the extent of images being distorted. The image transfer device can monitor the captured image instantly. The operator controls the UAV by remote control device through ground station and can achieve the flying data such as flying height and GPS coordinate of UAV. The mobile system was then applied to field experiments. The deviation of velocities measured by UAV-LSPIV of field experiments and handhold Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is under 8%. The results of the field experiments suggests that the application of UAV-LSPIV can be effectively applied to surface flow studies.

  9. Building Roof Segmentation from Aerial Images Using a Line-and Region-Based Watershed Segmentation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Merabet, Youssef El; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  10. PSMA-targeted contrast agents for intraoperative imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Kai; Lee, Jeong Heon; Kang, Homan; Park, G Kate; El Fakhri, Georges; Choi, Hak Soo

    2017-02-04

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) can serve as a molecular cell surface target for the detection and treatment of prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging enables highly sensitive, rapid, and non-radioactive imaging of PSMA, though specific targeting still remains a challenge because no optimized contrast agents exist.

  11. Image Discrimination Predictions of a Single Channel Model with Contrast Gain Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Null, Cynthia H.

    1995-01-01

    Image discrimination models predict the number of just-noticeable-differences between two images. We report the predictions of a single channel model with contrast masking for a range of standard discrimination experiments. Despite its computational simplicity, this model has performed as well as a multiple channel model in an object detection task.

  12. Back-illuminated CCD imager adapted for contrast transfer function measurements thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Peter A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Stripe patterns of varying spatial frequency, formed in the top-metalization of a back-illuminated solid-state imager, facilitate on-line measurement of contrast transfer function during wafer-probe testing. The imager may be packaged to allow front-illumination during in-the-field testing after its manufacture.

  13. Reflective THz and MR imaging of burn wounds: a potential clinical validation of THz contrast mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Nowroozi, Bryan; Sung, Shijun; Garritano, James; Maccabi, Ashkan; Tewari, Priyamvada; Culjat, Martin; Singh, Rahul; Alger, Jeffry; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2012-10-01

    Terahertz (THz) imaging is an expanding area of research in the field of medical imaging due to its high sensitivity to changes in tissue water content. Previously reported in vivo rat studies demonstrate that spatially resolved hydration mapping with THz illumination can be used to rapidly and accurately detect fluid shifts following induction of burns and provide highly resolved spatial and temporal characterization of edematous tissue. THz imagery of partial and full thickness burn wounds acquired by our group correlate well with burn severity and suggest that hydration gradients are responsible for the observed contrast. This research aims to confirm the dominant contrast mechanism of THz burn imaging using a clinically accepted diagnostic method that relies on tissue water content for contrast generation to support the translation of this technology to clinical application. The hydration contrast sensing capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically T2 relaxation times and proton density values N(H), are well established and provide measures of mobile water content, lending MRI as a suitable method to validate hydration states of skin burns. This paper presents correlational studies performed with MR imaging of ex vivo porcine skin that confirm tissue hydration as the principal sensing mechanism in THz burn imaging. Insights from this preliminary research will be used to lay the groundwork for future, parallel MRI and THz imaging of in vivo rat models to further substantiate the clinical efficacy of reflective THz imaging in burn wound care.

  14. Application of image processing techniques for contrast enhancement in dense breast digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Fatima d. L. d. S.; Schiabel, Homero; Benatti, Rodrigo H.

    1999-05-01

    Dense breasts, that usually are characteristic of women less than 40 years old, difficult many times early detection of breast cancer. In this work we present the application of some image processing techniques intended to enhance the contrast in dense breast images, regarding the detection of clustered microcalcifications. The procedure was, firstly, determining in the literature the main techniques used for mammographic images contrast enhancement. The results indicate that, in general: (1) as expected, the overall performance of the CAD scheme for clusters detection decreased when applied exclusively to dense breast images, compared to the application to a set of images without this characteristic; (2) most of the techniques for contrast enhancement used successfully in generic mammography images databases are not able to enhance structures of athirst in databases formed only by dense breasts images, due to the very poor contrast between microcalcifications, for example, and other tissues. These features should stress, therefore, the need of developing a methodology specifically for this type of images in order to provide better conditions to the detection of breast suspicious structures in these group of women.

  15. Phase contrast imaging using a micro focus x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-09-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging, a new technique to increase the imaging contrast for the tissues with close attenuation coefficients, has been studied since mid 1990s. This technique reveals the possibility to show the clear details of the soft tissues and tumors in small scale resolution. A compact and low cost phase contrast imaging system using a conventional x-ray source is described in this paper. Using the conventional x-ray source is of great importance, because it provides the possibility to use the method in hospitals and clinical offices. Simple materials and components are used in the setup to keep the cost in a reasonable and affordable range.Tungsten Kα1 line with the photon energy 59.3 keV was used for imaging. Some of the system design details are discussed. The method that was used to stabilize the system is introduced. A chicken thigh bone tissue sample was used for imaging followed by the image quality, image acquisition time and the potential clinical application discussion. High energy x-ray beam can be used in phase contrast imaging. Therefore the radiation dose to the patients can be greatly decreased compared to the traditional x-ray radiography.

  16. Phase-contrast imaging using a scanning-double-grating configuration.

    PubMed

    Nesterets, Ya I; Wilkins, S W

    2008-04-14

    A new double-grating-based phase-contrast imaging technique is described. This technique differs from the conventional double-grating imaging method by the image acquisition strategy. The novelty of the proposed method is in lateral scanning of both gratings simultaneously while an image is collected. The collected image is not contaminated by a Moiré pattern and can be recorded even by using a high-spatial-resolution integrating detector (e.g. X-ray film), thus facilitating improved resolution and/or contrast in the image. A detailed theoretical analysis of image formation in the scanning-double-grating method is carried out within the rigorous wave-optical formalism. The transfer function for the scanning-double-grating imaging system is derived. An approximate geometrical-optics solution for the image intensity distribution is derived from the exact wave-optical formula using the stationary-phase approach. Based on the present formalism, the effects of finite source size on the preferred operating conditions and of polychromaticity on the image contrast and resolution are investigated.

  17. Magnetic resonance contrast media sensing in vivo molecular imaging agents: an overview.

    PubMed

    Amanlou, Massoud; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Norouzian, Dariush; Ebrahimi, Seyed Esmaeil Sadat; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Ghorbani, Masoud; Alavidjeh, Mohammad Shafiee; Inanlou, Davoud Nouri; Arabzadeh, Ali Jabbari; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic imaging is commonly performed by nuclear medicine facilities such as PET or SPECT, etc. The production and biomedical applications of bio-molecular sensing in vivo MRI metabolic contrast agents has recently become of great universal research interest, which follows its great success as a potential cost effective, less radioactive, nuclear medicine alternative. Temperature, redox potential, enzyme activity, free radial/metal ion responsive and/or pH sensitive molecular metabolic MR contrast agents are among the famous instances exemplified, which basically promote MR image contrast enhancement ability to distinguish molecular metabolic/gene expression features. Overall, these MRI contrast agents provide a framework to achieve a greater degree of accuracy from MRI as a low cost, more available facility, non radioactive radiation producing and highly sensitive biomedical tool to propound as a new suggesting opponent for PET nuclear medicine imaging. In the present review, the design, development, examination and future of the above agents will be discussed in detail.

  18. CW-THz image contrast enhancement using wavelet transform and Retinex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Min; Hu, Qi-fan; Huang, Ying-Xue; Liang, Hua-Wei

    2015-10-01

    To enhance continuous wave terahertz (CW-THz) scanning images contrast and denoising, a method based on wavelet transform and Retinex theory was proposed. In this paper, the factors affecting the quality of CW-THz images were analysed. Second, an approach of combination of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and a designed nonlinear function in wavelet domain for the purpose of contrast enhancing was applied. Then, we combine the Retinex algorithm for further contrast enhancement. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method in qualitative and quantitative, it was compared with the adaptive histogram equalization method, the homomorphic filtering method and the SSR(Single-Scale-Retinex) method. Experimental results demonstrated that the presented algorithm can effectively enhance the contrast of CW-THZ image and obtain better visual effect.

  19. Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg; Ippolito, Corey

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results from a mission architecture study of planetary aerial explorers. In this study, several mission scenarios were developed in simulation and evaluated on success in meeting mission goals. This aerial explorer mission architecture study is unique in comparison with previous Mars airplane research activities. The study examines how aerial vehicles can find and gain access to otherwise inaccessible terrain features of interest. The aerial explorer also engages in a high-level of (indirect) surface interaction, despite not typically being able to takeoff and land or to engage in multiple flights/sorties. To achieve this goal, a new mission paradigm is proposed: aerial explorers should be considered as an additional element in the overall Entry, Descent, Landing System (EDLS) process. Further, aerial vehicles should be considered primarily as carrier/utility platforms whose purpose is to deliver air-deployed sensors and robotic devices, or symbiotes, to those high-value terrain features of interest.

  20. Ultrasound Contrast Materials in Cardiovascular Medicine: from Perfusion Assessment to Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klibanov, Alexander L

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used in cardiovascular diagnostics. Contrast agents expand the range of tasks that ultrasound can perform. In the clinic in US, endocardial border delineation and left ventricle opacification have been an approved indication for more than a decade. However, myocardial perfusion contrast ultrasound studies are still at the clinical trials stage. Blood pool contrast and perfusion in other tissues might be an easier indication to achieve: general blood pool ultrasound contrast is in wider use in Europe, Canada, Japan, and China. Targeted (molecular) contrast microbubbles will be the next generation of ultrasound imaging probes, capable of specific delineation of the areas of disease by adherence to molecular targets. The shell of targeted microbubbles (currently in the preclinical research and early stage clinical trials) is decorated with the ligands (antibodies, peptides or mimetics, hormones, carbohydrates) that ensure firm binding to the molecular markers of disease. PMID:23913363

  1. Contrast Media Extravasation of Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Management Guidelines for the Radiologist.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Refky; Shaqdan, Khalid Wael; Aran, Shima; Prabhakar, Anand M; Singh, Ajay Kumar; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous contrast administration has been of great importance in diagnostic radiology, but it is not without risks either due to the local, systemic allergic reactions or due to subcutaneous extravasation of contrast media. Subcutaneous contrast medium extravasationis an infrequent, yet a well-recognized complication. However, most incidents are minor and can be managed conservatively, but there are a few cases that require immediate surgical intervention. This article discusses the risks factors, clinical manifestations, and conservative and surgical approaches of subcutaneous contrast media extravasation for both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Cuckoo search algorithm based satellite image contrast and brightness enhancement using DWT-SVD.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, A K; Soni, V; Kumar, A; Singh, G K

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a new contrast enhancement approach which is based on Cuckoo Search (CS) algorithm and DWT-SVD for quality improvement of the low contrast satellite images. The input image is decomposed into the four frequency subbands through Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), and CS algorithm used to optimize each subband of DWT and then obtains the singular value matrix of the low-low thresholded subband image and finally, it reconstructs the enhanced image by applying IDWT. The singular value matrix employed intensity information of the particular image, and any modification in the singular values changes the intensity of the given image. The experimental results show superiority of the proposed method performance in terms of PSNR, MSE, Mean and Standard Deviation over conventional and state-of-the-art techniques.

  3. Zero-loss image formation and modified contrast transfer theory in EFTEM.

    PubMed

    Angert, I; Majorovits, E; Schröder, R R

    2000-04-01

    For a weak phase/weak amplitude object the information transfer in the imaging process of TEM is described by the common formalism of the contrast transfer function (CTF). So far the effects of inelastic scattering were not accounted for in this formalism. In conventional imaging they were simply neglected. In energy filtering TEM (EFTEM), where removal of inelastic electrons leads to higher specimen contrast, they were modelled by a global increase of the elastic amplitude contrast. Thus, the description of inelastic and elastic scattering was mixed. Here a new ansatz is proposed which treats elastic and inelastic contrast transfer separately by adding an inelastic contribution to the scattering potentials. In EFTEM this has the effect of adding a filter contrast which depends on the characteristics of the inelastic scattering. For samples with dominant plasmon loss the additional filter contrast is restricted to low resolution. Because of its strong dependence on the nature of the inelastic scattering process, the filter contrast cannot in general be unified with the conventional elastic amplitude contrast. The modified CTF theory for EFTEM was tested experimentally on a variety of samples. Images of amorphous layers of copper, aluminium, and carbon films, as well as zero-loss images of proteins embedded in amorphous ice were evaluated. The values of the parameters of the additional filter contrast were determined for carbon film and proteins embedded in vitrified ice. Comparison of different CTF models used to reconstruct 3D volumes from zero-loss images confirmed that best agreement with the atomic model is attained with the new, modified CTF theory.

  4. Single grating phase contrast imaging for x-ray microscopy and microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyndonckx, P.; Sasov, A.; Pauwels, B.

    2014-09-01

    The grating based approach to phase contrast imaging is rather inefficient in the use of the available x-ray flux due to the presence of two absorption gratings and it requires longer scan times compared to conventional CT because multiple images are needed at each projection angle. To avoid these drawbacks, a proof-of-principle experiment was developed to obtain absorption, phase contrast (DPC) and dark field images (DCI) in a single exposure using only a non-absorbing phase grating, a micro-focus source in cone-beam geometry and a highresolution x-ray detector.

  5. Liver-specific agents for contrast-enhanced MRI: role in oncological imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thian, Yee Liang; Riddell, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Liver-specific magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents are increasingly used in evaluation of the liver. They are effective in detection and morphological characterization of lesions, and can be useful for evaluation of biliary tree anatomy and liver function. The typical appearances and imaging pitfalls of various tumours at MR imaging performed with these agents can be understood by the interplay of pharmacokinetics of these contrast agents and transporter expression of the tumour. This review focuses on the applications of these agents in oncological imaging. PMID:24434892

  6. Nonrigid registration and classification of the kidneys in 3D dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Ghafourian, Pegah; Sharma, Puneet; Salman, Khalil; Martin, Diego; Fei, Baowei

    2012-02-01

    We have applied image analysis methods in the assessment of human kidney perfusion based on 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI data. This approach consists of 3D non-rigid image registration of the kidneys and fuzzy C-mean classification of kidney tissues. The proposed registration method reduced motion artifacts in the dynamic images and improved the analysis of kidney compartments (cortex, medulla, and cavities). The dynamic intensity curves show the successive transition of the contrast agent through kidney compartments. The proposed method for motion correction and kidney compartment classification may be used to improve the validity and usefulness of further model-based pharmacokinetic analysis of kidney function.

  7. Cryptic microtextures and geological histories of K-rich alkali feldspars revealed by charge contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, Stephanie; Lee, Martin R.; Sherlock, Sarah C.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2012-06-01

    Charge contrast imaging in the scanning electron microscope can provide new insights into the scale and composition of alkali feldspar microtextures, and such information helps considerably with the interpretation of their geological histories and results of argon isotope thermochronological analyses. The effectiveness of this technique has been illustrated using potassium-rich alkali feldspars from the Dartmoor granite (UK). These feldspars contain strain-controlled lamellar crypto- and microperthites that are cross-cut by strain-free deuteric microperthites. The constituent albite- and orthoclase-rich phases of both microperthite generations can be readily distinguished by atomic number contrast imaging. The charge contrast results additionally show that sub-micrometre-sized albite `platelets' are commonplace between coarser exsolution lamellae and occur together to make cryptoperthites. Furthermore, charge contrast imaging reveals that the orthoclase-rich feldspar is an intergrowth of two phases, one that is featureless with uniform contrast and another that occurs as cross-cutting veins and grains with the {110} adularia habit. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the featureless feldspar is tweed orthoclase, whereas the veins and euhedral grains are composed of irregular microcline that has formed from orthoclase by `unzipping' during deuteric or hydrothermal alteration. The charge contrast imaging results are especially important in demonstrating that deuteric perthites are far more abundant in alkali feldspars than would be concluded from investigations using conventional microscopy techniques. The unexpected presence of such a high volume of replacement products has significant implications for understanding the origins and geological histories of crustal rocks and the use of alkali feldspars in geo- and thermochronology. Whilst the precise properties of feldspars that generate contrast remain unclear, the similarity between charge contrast images

  8. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: basic principles, present situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-11-14

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS.

  9. Value of MR contrast media in image-guided body interventions.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Maythem; Wilson, Mark

    2012-01-28

    In the past few years, there have been multiple advances in magnetic resonance (MR) instrumentation, in vivo devices, real-time imaging sequences and interventional procedures with new therapies. More recently, interventionists have started to use minimally invasive image-guided procedures and local therapies, which reduce the pain from conventional surgery and increase drug effectiveness, respectively. Local therapy also reduces the systemic dose and eliminates the toxic side effects of some drugs to other organs. The success of MR-guided procedures depends on visualization of the targets in 3D and precise deployment of ablation catheters, local therapies and devices. MR contrast media provide a wealth of tissue contrast and allows 3D and 4D image acquisitions. After the development of fast imaging sequences, the clinical applications of MR contrast media have been substantially expanded to include pre- during- and post-interventions. Prior to intervention, MR contrast media have the potential to localize and delineate pathologic tissues of vital organs, such as the brain, heart, breast, kidney, prostate, liver and uterus. They also offer other options such as labeling therapeutic agents or cells. During intervention, these agents have the capability to map blood vessels and enhance the contrast between the endovascular guidewire/catheters/devices, blood and tissues as well as direct therapies to the target. Furthermore, labeling therapeutic agents or cells aids in visualizing their delivery sites and tracking their tissue distribution. After intervention, MR contrast media have been used for assessing the efficacy of ablation and therapies. It should be noted that most image-guided procedures are under preclinical research and development. It can be concluded that MR contrast media have great value in preclinical and some clinical interventional procedures. Future applications of MR contrast media in image-guided procedures depend on their safety, tolerability

  10. Gold nanoclusters as contrast agents for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aili; Tu, Yu; Qin, Songbing; Li, Yan; Zhou, Juying; Chen, Na; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Bingbo

    2012-04-15

    Multimodal imaging technique is an alternative approach to improve sensitivity of early cancer diagnosis. In this study, highly fluorescent and strong X-ray absorption coefficient gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) are synthesized as dual-modality imaging contrast agents (CAs) for fluorescent and X-ray dual-modality imaging. The experimental results show that the as-prepared Au NCs are well constructed with ultrasmall sizes, reliable fluorescent emission, high computed tomography (CT) value and fine biocompatibility. In vivo imaging results indicate that the obtained Au NCs are capable of fluorescent and X-ray enhanced imaging.

  11. Acoustic angiography: a new high frequency contrast ultrasound technique for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Sarah E.; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Gessner, Ryan; Lee, Yueh; Aylward, Stephen; Lee, Hyunggyun; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F. Stuart; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Angiography is a new approach to high-resolution contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging enabled by ultra-broadband transducer designs. The high frequency imaging technique provides signal separation from tissue which does not produce significant harmonics in the same frequency range, as well as high resolution. This approach enables imaging of microvasculature in-vivo with high resolution and signal to noise, producing images that resemble x-ray angiography. Data shows that acoustic angiography can provide important information about the presence of disease based on vascular patterns, and may enable a new paradigm in medical imaging.

  12. Optimization Of Phase-Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging Of D-T Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B

    2005-06-17

    Phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging has been demonstrated for characterization of D-T layers inside of beryllium shells. These first demonstrations used both scintillator and direct-detection imaging. This memo details tradeoffs between the two methods in order to optimize the imaging. The guiding principle for optimization is to minimize the exposure time while maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio at the D-T solid-vapor interface. Direct-detection and scintillator performance are comparable when imaging the full capsule. However, a scintillator allows for higher-resolution images necessary for studying local defects in the D-T layer.

  13. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  14. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Baran, P; Pacile, S; Nesterets, Y I; Mayo, S C; Dullin, C; Dreossi, D; Arfelli, F; Thompson, D; Lockie, D; McCormack, M; Taba, S T; Brun, F; Pinamonti, M; Nickson, C; Hall, C; Dimmock, M; Zanconati, F; Cholewa, M; Quiney, H; Brennan, P C; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  15. Design Principles of Nanoparticles as Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Liang; Gu, Xinbin; Wang, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging field that introduces molecular agents into traditional imaging techniques, enabling visualization, characterization and measurement of biological processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. The promise of molecular imaging lies in its potential for selective potency by targeting biomarkers or molecular targets and the imaging agents serve as reporters for the selectivity of targeting. Development of an efficient molecular imaging agent depends on well-controlled high-quality experiment design involving target selection, agent synthesis, in vitro characterization, and in vivo animal characterization before it is applied in humans. According to the analysis from the Molecular Imaging and Contrast Agent Database (MICAD, ), more than 6000 molecular imaging agents with sufficient preclinical evaluation have been reported to date in the literature and this number increases by 250-300 novel agents each year. The majority of these agents are radionuclides, which are developed for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) account for only a small part. This is largely due to the fact that MRI is currently not a fully quantitative imaging technique and is less sensitive than PET and SPECT. However, because of the superior ability to simultaneously extract molecular and anatomic information, molecular MRI is attracting significant interest and various targeted nanoparticle contrast agents have been synthesized for MRI. The first and one of the most critical steps in developing a targeted nanoparticle contrast agent is target selection, which plays the central role and forms the basis for success of molecular imaging. This chapter discusses the design principles of targeted contrast agents in the emerging frontiers of molecular MRI.

  16. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  17. Clinical implementation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging: theoretical foundations and design considerations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2003-08-01

    Theoretical foundation and design considerations of a clinical feasible x-ray phase contrast imaging technique were presented in this paper. Different from the analysis of imaging phase object with weak absorption in literature, we proposed a new formalism for in-line phase-contrast imaging to analyze the effects of four clinically important factors on the phase contrast. These are the body parts attenuation, the spatial coherence of spherical waves from a finite-size focal spot, and polychromatic x-ray and radiation doses to patients for clinical applications. The theory presented in this paper can be applied widely in diagnostic x-ray imaging procedures. As an example, computer simulations were conducted and optimal design parameters were derived for clinical mammography. The results of phantom experiments were also presented which validated the theoretical analysis and computer simulations.

  18. Motionless phase stepping in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a compact source

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Houxun; Chen, Lei; Bennett, Eric E.; Adamo, Nick M.; Gomella, Andrew A.; DeLuca, Alexa M.; Patel, Ajay; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Wen, Han

    2013-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging offers a way to visualize the internal structures of an object without the need to deposit significant radiation, and thereby alleviate the main concern in X-ray diagnostic imaging procedures today. Grating-based differential phase contrast imaging techniques are compatible with compact X-ray sources, which is a key requirement for the majority of clinical X-ray modalities. However, these methods are substantially limited by the need for mechanical phase stepping. We describe an electromagnetic phase-stepping method that eliminates mechanical motion, thus removing the constraints in speed, accuracy, and flexibility. The method is broadly applicable to both projection and tomography imaging modes. The transition from mechanical to electromagnetic scanning should greatly facilitate the translation of X-ray phase contrast techniques into mainstream applications. PMID:24218599

  19. Quantitative characterization of the contrast mechanisms of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, F.; Long, G. G.; Levine, L.E.; Ilavsky, J.; Jemain, P.R.; NIST

    2008-04-01

    A general treatment of X-ray imaging contrast for ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) imaging is presented; this approach makes use of phase propagation and dynamical diffraction theory to account quantitatively for the intensity distribution at the detector plane. Simulated results from a model system of micrometer-sized spherical SiO{sub 2} particles embedded in a polypropylene matrix show good agreement with experimental measurements. Simulations by means of a separate geometrical ray-tracing method also account for the features in the USAXS images and offer a complementary view of small-angle X-ray scattering as a contrast mechanism. The ray-tracing analysis indicates that refraction, in the form of Porod scattering, and, to a much lesser extent, X-ray reflection account for the USAXS imaging contrast.

  20. Multi-stage classification method oriented to aerial image based on low-rank recovery and multi-feature fusion sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xu; Cheng, Yongmei; Hao, Shuai

    2016-12-10

    Automatic classification of terrain surfaces from an aerial image is essential for an autonomous unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) landing at an unprepared site by using vision. Diverse terrain surfaces may show similar spectral properties due to the illumination and noise that easily cause poor classification performance. To address this issue, a multi-stage classification algorithm based on low-rank recovery and multi-feature fusion sparse representation is proposed. First, color moments and Gabor texture feature are extracted from training data and stacked as column vectors of a dictionary. Then we perform low-rank matrix recovery for the dictionary by using augmented Lagrange multipliers and construct a multi-stage terrain classifier. Experimental results on an aerial map database that we prepared verify the classification accuracy and robustness of the proposed method.

  1. Region-Based 3d Surface Reconstruction Using Images Acquired by Low-Cost Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; Al-Rawabdeh, A.; He, F.; Habib, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate 3D surface reconstruction of our environment has become essential for an unlimited number of emerging applications. In the past few years, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are evolving as low-cost and flexible platforms for geospatial data collection that could meet the needs of aforementioned application and overcome limitations of traditional airborne and terrestrial mobile mapping systems. Due to their payload restrictions, these systems usually include consumer-grade imaging and positioning sensor which will negatively impact the quality of the collected geospatial data and reconstructed surfaces. Therefore, new surface reconstruction surfaces are needed to mitigate the impact of using low-cost sensors on the final products. To date, different approaches have been proposed to for 3D surface construction using overlapping images collected by imaging sensor mounted on moving platforms. In these approaches, 3D surfaces are mainly reconstructed based on dense matching techniques. However, generated 3D point clouds might not accurately represent the scanned surfaces due to point density variations and edge preservation problems. In order to resolve these problems, a new region-based 3D surface renostruction trchnique is introduced in this paper. This approach aims to generate a 3D photo-realistic model of individually scanned surfaces within the captured images. This approach is initiated by a Semi-Global dense Matching procedure is carried out to generate a 3D point cloud from the scanned area within the collected images. The generated point cloud is then segmented to extract individual planar surfaces. Finally, a novel region-based texturing technique is implemented for photorealistic reconstruction of the extracted planar surfaces. Experimental results using images collected by a camera mounted on a low-cost UAS demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach for photorealistic 3D surface reconstruction.

  2. Neurosurgical confocal endomicroscopy: A review of contrast agents, confocal systems, and future imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Zehri, Aqib H.; Ramey, Wyatt; Georges, Joseph F.; Mooney, Michael A.; Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Preul, Mark C.; Nakaji, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background: The clinical application of fluorescent contrast agents (fluorescein, indocyanine green, and aminolevulinic acid) with intraoperative microscopy has led to advances in intraoperative brain tumor imaging. Their properties, mechanism of action, history of use, and safety are analyzed in this report along with a review of current laser scanning confocal endomicroscopy systems. Additional imaging modalities with potential neurosurgical utility are also analyzed. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed utilizing PubMed and key words: In vivo confocal microscopy, confocal endomicroscopy, fluorescence imaging, in vivo diagnostics/neoplasm, in vivo molecular imaging, and optical imaging. Articles were reviewed that discussed clinically available fluorophores in neurosurgery, confocal endomicroscopy instrumentation, confocal microscopy systems, and intraoperative cancer diagnostics. Results: Current clinically available fluorescent contrast agents have specific properties that provide microscopic delineation of tumors when imaged with laser scanning confocal endomicroscopes. Other imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, confocal reflectance microscopy, fluorescent lifetime imaging (FLIM), two-photon microscopy, and second harmonic generation may also have potential in neurosurgical applications. Conclusion: In addition to guiding tumor resection, intraoperative fluorescence and microscopy have the potential to facilitate tumor identification and complement frozen section analysis during surgery by providing real-time histological assessment. Further research, including clinical trials, is necessary to test the efficacy of fluorescent contrast agents and optical imaging instrumentation in order to establish their role in neurosurgery. PMID:24872922

  3. Evaluation of chirp reversal power modulation sequence for contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Novell, A; Sennoga, C A; Escoffre, J M; Chaline, J; Bouakaz, A

    2014-09-07

    Over the last decade, significant research effort has been focused on the use of chirp for contrast agent imaging because chirps are known to significantly increase imaging contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). New imaging schemes, such as chirp reversal (CR), have been developed to improve contrast detection by increasing non-linear microbubble responses. In this study we evaluated the contrast enhancement efficiency of various chirped imaging sequences in combination with well-established imaging schemes such as power modulation (PM) and pulse inversion (PI). The imaging schemes tested were implemented on a fully programmable open scanner and evaluated by ultrasonically scanning (excitation frequency of 2.5 MHz; amplitude of 350 kPa) a tissue-mimicking flow phantom comprising a 4 mm diameter tube through which aqueous dispersions (dilution fraction of 1/2000) of the commercial ultrasound contrast agent, SonoVue(®) were continuously circulated. The recovery of non-linear microbubble responses after chirp compression requires the development and the optimization of a specific filter. A compression filter was therefore designed and used to compress and extract several non-linear components from the received microbubble responses. The results showed that using chirps increased the image CNR by approximately 10 dB, as compared to conventional Gaussian apodized sine burst excitation but degraded the axial resolution by a factor of 1.4, at -3 dB. We demonstrated that the highest CNR and contrast-to-noise ratio (CTR) were achievable when CR was combined with PM as compared to other imaging schemes such as PI.

  4. Automated Identification of Rivers and Shorelines in Aerial Imagery Using Image Texture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    defining the criteria for segmenting the image. For these cases certain automated, unsupervised (or minimally supervised), image classification ...banks, image analysis, edge finding, photography, satellite, texture, entropy 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT...high resolution bank geometry. Much of the globe is covered by various sorts of multi- or hyperspectral imagery and numerous techniques have been

  5. Momentum transfer