Science.gov

Sample records for aerial image intensity

  1. A Non-destructive Imaging Method for Detecting Defect in Mortal Sample by High-intensity Aerial Ultrasonic Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osumi, Ayumu; Ito, Youichi

    We have studied a method of non-contact ultrasonic inspection that uses high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves and optical equipment. Specially, the object is excited in noncontact way using high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves and the vibration velocity on the object surface is measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). We analysis the vibration information on the surface of the object with the defect area and image the defect shape in materials. In this paper, it was examined to detect the defect in mortal by proposed method.

  2. Aerial Image Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Robert E.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial images produce the best stereoscopic images of the viewed world. Despite the fact that every optic in existence produces an aerial image, few persons are aware of their existence and possible uses. Constant reference to the eye and other optical systems have produced a psychosis of design that only considers "focal planes" in the design and analysis of optical systems. All objects in the field of view of the optical device are imaged by the device as an aerial image. Use of aerial images in vision and visual display systems can provide a true stereoscopic representation of the viewed world. This paper discusses aerial image systems - their applications and designs and presents designs and design concepts that utilize aerial images to obtain superior visual displays, particularly with application to visual simulation.

  3. Theoretical study for aerial image intensity in resist in high numerical aperture projection optics and experimental verification with one-dimensional patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Masato; Takada, Akira; Nakashima, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    In optical lithography, high-performance exposure tools are indispensable to obtain not only fine patterns but also preciseness in pattern width. Since an accurate theoretical method is necessary to predict these values, some pioneer and valuable studies have been proposed. However, there might be some ambiguity or lack of consensus regarding the treatment of diffraction by object, incoming inclination factor onto image plane in scalar imaging theory, and paradoxical phenomenon of the inclined entrance plane wave onto image in vector imaging theory. We have reconsidered imaging theory in detail and also phenomenologically resolved the paradox. By comparing theoretical aerial image intensity with experimental pattern width for one-dimensional pattern, we have validated our theoretical consideration.

  4. Calculating aerial images from EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistor, Thomas V.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1999-06-01

    Aerial images for line/space patterns, arrays of posts and an arbitrary layout pattern are calculated for EUV masks in a 4X EUV imaging system. Both mask parameters and illumination parameters are varied to investigate their effects on the aerial image. To facilitate this study, a parallel version of TEMPEST with a Fourier transform boundary condition was developed and run on a network of 24 microprocessors. Line width variations are observed when absorber thickness or sidewall angle changes. As the line/space pattern scales to smaller dimensions, the aspect ratios of the absorber features increase, introducing geometric shadowing and reducing aerial image intensity and contrast. 100nm square posts have circular images of diameter close to 100nm, but decreasing in diameter significantly when the corner round radius at the mask becomes greater than 50 nm. Exterior mask posts image slightly smaller and with higher ellipticity than interior mask posts. The aerial image of the arbitrary test pattern gives insight into the effects of the off-axis incidence employed in EUV lithography systems.

  5. Aerial Photographs and Satellite Images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Photographs and other images of the Earth taken from the air and from space show a great deal about the planet's landforms, vegetation, and resources. Aerial and satellite images, known as remotely sensed images, permit accurate mapping of land cover and make landscape features understandable on regional, continental, and even global scales. Transient phenomena, such as seasonal vegetation vigor and contaminant discharges, can be studied by comparing images acquired at different times. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which began using aerial photographs for mapping in the 1930's, archives photographs from its mapping projects and from those of some other Federal agencies. In addition, many images from such space programs as Landsat, begun in 1972, are held by the USGS. Most satellite scenes can be obtained only in digital form for use in computer-based image processing and geographic information systems, but in some cases are also available as photographic products.

  6. Aerial Video Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    When Michael Henry wanted to start an aerial video service, he turned to Johnson Space Center for assistance. Two NASA engineers - one had designed and developed TV systems in Apollo, Skylab, Apollo- Soyuz and Space Shuttle programs - designed a wing-mounted fiberglass camera pod. Camera head and angles are adjustable, and the pod is shaped to reduce vibration. The controls are located so a solo pilot can operate the system. A microprocessor displays latitude, longitude, and bearing, and a GPS receiver provides position data for possible legal references. The service has been successfully utilized by railroads, oil companies, real estate companies, etc.

  7. Floating aerial LED signage based on aerial imaging by retro-reflection (AIRR).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Tomiyama, Yuka; Suyama, Shiro

    2014-11-01

    We propose a floating aerial LED signage technique by utilizing retro-reflection. The proposed display is composed of LEDs, a half mirror, and retro-reflective sheeting. Directivity of the aerial image formation and size of the aerial image have been investigated. Furthermore, a floating aerial LED sign has been successfully formed in free space.

  8. Aerial photographs and satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1995-01-01

    Because photographs and images taken from the air or from space are acquired without direct contact with the ground, they are referred to as remotely sensed images. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has used remote sensing from the early years of the 20th century to support earth science studies and for mapping purposes.

  9. Discovering discriminative graphlets for aerial image categories recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luming; Han, Yahong; Yang, Yi; Song, Mingli; Yan, Shuicheng; Tian, Qi

    2013-12-01

    Recognizing aerial image categories is useful for scene annotation and surveillance. Local features have been demonstrated to be robust to image transformations, including occlusions and clutters. However, the geometric property of an aerial image (i.e., the topology and relative displacement of local features), which is key to discriminating aerial image categories, cannot be effectively represented by state-of-the-art generic visual descriptors. To solve this problem, we propose a recognition model that mines graphlets from aerial images, where graphlets are small connected subgraphs reflecting both the geometric property and color/texture distribution of an aerial image. More specifically, each aerial image is decomposed into a set of basic components (e.g., road and playground) and a region adjacency graph (RAG) is accordingly constructed to model their spatial interactions. Aerial image categories recognition can subsequently be casted as RAG-to-RAG matching. Based on graph theory, RAG-to-RAG matching is conducted by comparing all their respective graphlets. Because the number of graphlets is huge, we derive a manifold embedding algorithm to measure different-sized graphlets, after which we select graphlets that have highly discriminative and low redundancy topologies. Through quantizing the selected graphlets from each aerial image into a feature vector, we use support vector machine to discriminate aerial image categories. Experimental results indicate that our method outperforms several state-of-the-art object/scene recognition models, and the visualized graphlets indicate that the discriminative patterns are discovered by our proposed approach. PMID:23955764

  10. Design of an integrated aerial image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jing; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-05-01

    The subject of this paper is a novel integrated aerial image sensor (IAIS) system suitable for integration within the surface of an autonomous test wafer. The IAIS could be used as a lithography processing monitor, affording a "wafer's eye view" of the process, and therefore facilitating advanced process control and diagnostics without integrating (and dedicating) the sensor to the processing equipment. The IAIS is composed of an aperture mask and an array of photo-detectors. In order to retrieve nanometer scale resolution of the aerial image with a practical photo-detector pixel size, we propose a design of an aperture mask involving a series of spatial phase "moving" aperture groups. We demonstrate a design example aimed at the 65nm technology node through TEMPEST simulation. The optimized, key design parameters include an aperture width in the range of 30nm, aperture thickness in the range of 70nm, and offer a spatial resolution of about 5nm, all with comfortable fabrication tolerances. Our preliminary simulation work indicates the possibility of the IAIS being applied to the immersion lithography. A bench-top far-field experiment verifies that our approach of the spatial frequency down-shift through forming large Moire patterns is feasible.

  11. Calculation and uses of the lithographic aerial image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagello, Donis G.; Smith, Daniel G.

    2012-09-01

    Beginning with the seminal Dill papers of 1975, the aerial image has been essential for understanding the process of microlithography. From the aerial image, we can predict the performance of a given lithographic process in terms of depth of focus, exposure latitude, etc. As lithographic technologies improved, reaching smaller and smaller printed features, the sophistication of aerial image calculations has had to increase from simple incoherent imaging theory, to partial coherence, polarization effects, thin film effects at the resist, thick mask effects, and so on. This tutorial provides an overview and semihistorical development of the aerial image calculation and then provides a review of some of the various ways in which the aerial image is typically used to estimate the performance of the lithographic process.

  12. An algorithm for approximate rectification of digital aerial images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-resolution aerial photography is one of the most valuable tools available for managing extensive landscapes. With recent advances in digital camera technology, computer hardware, and software, aerial photography is easier to collect, store, and transfer than ever before. Images can be automa...

  13. Aerial image retargeting (AIR): achieving litho-friendly designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia Hamouda, Ayman; Word, James; Anis, Mohab; Karim, Karim S.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present a new technique to detect non-Litho-Friendly design areas based on their Aerial Image signature. The aerial image is calculated for the litho target (pre-OPC). This is followed by the fixing (retargeting) the design to achieve a litho friendly OPC target. This technique is applied and tested on 28 nm metal layer and shows a big improvement in the process window performance. For an optimized Aerial-Image-Retargeting (AIR) recipe is very computationally efficient and its runtime doesn't consume more than 1% of the OPC flow runtime.

  14. HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH 15 SEPTEMBER 1950. NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - San Francisco National Cemetery, 1 Lincoln Boulevard, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. Historic Image: Aerial view of Mount of Victory Plot. Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic Image: Aerial view of Mount of Victory Plot. Photograph 1961. NCA History Collection - Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Mount of Victory Plot Unit, 625 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  16. Optimization and application of Retinex algorithm in aerial image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; He, Jun; Li, Hongyu

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we provide a segmentation based Retinex for improving the visual quality of aerial images obtained under complex weather conditions. With the method, an aerial image will be segmented into different regions, and then an adaptive Gaussian based on the segmentations will be used to process it. The method addresses the problems existing in previously developed Retinex algorithms, such as halo artifacts and graying-out artifacts. The experimental result also shows evidence of its better effect.

  17. Aerial image simulation for partial coherent system with programming development in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Nazmul; Rahman, Md. Momtazur; Udoy, Ariful Banna

    2014-10-01

    Aerial image can be calculated by either Abbe's method or sum of coherent system decomposition (SOCS) method for partial coherent system. This paper introduces a programming with Matlab code that changes the analytical representation of Abbe's method to the matrix form, which has advantages for both Abbe's method and SOCS since matrix calculation is easier than double integration over object plane or pupil plane. First a singular matrix P is derived from a pupil function and effective light source in the spatial frequency domain. By applying Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to the matrix P, eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are obtained. The aerial image can then be computed by the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions without calculation of Transmission Cross Coefficient (TCC). The aerial final image is almost identical as an original cross mask and the intensity distribution on image plane shows that it is almost uniform across the linewidth of the mask.

  18. Semantic Segmentation of Aerial Images with AN Ensemble of Cnns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmanis, D.; Wegner, J. D.; Galliani, S.; Schindler, K.; Datcu, M.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a deep learning approach to semantic segmentation of very high resolution (aerial) images. Deep neural architectures hold the promise of end-to-end learning from raw images, making heuristic feature design obsolete. Over the last decade this idea has seen a revival, and in recent years deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have emerged as the method of choice for a range of image interpretation tasks like visual recognition and object detection. Still, standard CNNs do not lend themselves to per-pixel semantic segmentation, mainly because one of their fundamental principles is to gradually aggregate information over larger and larger image regions, making it hard to disentangle contributions from different pixels. Very recently two extensions of the CNN framework have made it possible to trace the semantic information back to a precise pixel position: deconvolutional network layers undo the spatial downsampling, and Fully Convolution Networks (FCNs) modify the fully connected classification layers of the network in such a way that the location of individual activations remains explicit. We design a FCN which takes as input intensity and range data and, with the help of aggressive deconvolution and recycling of early network layers, converts them into a pixelwise classification at full resolution. We discuss design choices and intricacies of such a network, and demonstrate that an ensemble of several networks achieves excellent results on challenging data such as the ISPRS semantic labeling benchmark, using only the raw data as input.

  19. Advanced Image Processing of Aerial Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glenn; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Aerial imagery of the Earth is an invaluable tool for the assessment of ground features, especially during times of disaster. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have developed techniques which have proven to be useful for such imagery. Aerial imagery from various sources, including Langley's Boeing 757 Aries aircraft, has been studied extensively. This paper discusses these studies and demonstrates that better-than-observer imagery can be obtained even when visibility is severely compromised. A real-time, multi-spectral experimental system will be described and numerous examples will be shown.

  20. Wafer weak point detection based on aerial images or WLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Philipp, Peter; Litt, Lloyd C.; Ackmann, Paul; Crell, Christian; Chen, Norman

    2015-10-01

    Aerial image measurement is a key technique for model based optical proximity correction (OPC) verification. Actual aerial images obtained by AIMS (aerial image measurement system) or WLCD (wafer level critical dimension) can detect printed wafer weak point structures in advance of wafer exposure and defect inspection. Normally, the potential wafer weak points are determined based on optical rule check (ORC) simulation in advance. However, the correlation to real wafer weak points is often not perfect due to the contribution of mask three dimension (M3D) effects, actual mask errors, and scanner lens effects. If the design weak points can accurately be detected in advance, it will reduce the wafer fab cost and improve cycle time. WLCD or AIMS tools are able to measure the aerial images CD and bossung curve through focus window. However, it is difficult to detect the wafer weak point in advance without defining selection criteria. In this study, wafer weak points sensitive to mask mean-to-nominal values are characterized for a process with very high MEEF (normally more than 4). Aerial image CD uses fixed threshold to detect the wafer weak points. By using WLCD through threshold and focus window, the efficiency of wafer weak point detection is also demonstrated. A novel method using contrast range evaluation is shown in the paper. Use of the slope of aerial images for more accurate detection of the wafer weak points using WLCD is also discussed. The contrast range can also be used to detect the wafer weak points in advance. Further, since the mean to nominal of the reticle contributes to the effective contrast range in a high MEEF area this work shows that control of the mask error is critical for high MEEF layers such as poly, active and metal layers. Wafer process based weak points that cannot be detected by wafer lithography CD or WLCD will be discussed.

  1. PSM and thin OMOG reticles aerial imaging metrology comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yaron; Finders, Jo; Mangan, Shmoolik; Englard, Ilan; Mouraille, Orion; Janssen, Maurice; Miyazaki, Junji; Connolly, Brid; Kojima, Yosuke; Higuchi, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    For sub 20nm features, IC (integrated circuits) designs include an increasing number of features approaching the resolution limits of the scanner compared to the previous generation of IC designs. This trend includes stringent design rules and complex, ever smaller optical proximity correction (OPC) structures. In this regime, a new type of mask, known as opaque MoSi on glass (OMOG), has been introduced to overcome the shortcomings of the well-established phase shift masks (PSM). This paper reviews the fundamental aerial imaging differences between identically designed PSM and thin OMOG masks. The masks were designed for scanner qualification tests and therefore contain large selections of 1D and 2D features, including various biases and OPCs. Aerial critical dimension uniformity (CDU) performance for various features on both masks are reported. Furthermore, special efforts have been made to emphasize the advantages of aerial imaging metrology versus wafer metrology in terms of shortening scanner qualification cycle time.

  2. Basic Study of Detecting Defects in Solid Materials Using High-Intensity Aerial Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osumi, Ayumu; Kobayashi, Hiromasa; Ito, Youichi

    2012-07-01

    Recently, developments have improved methods employing aerial ultrasonic waves for detecting defects in solid materials such as metals, pipe walls, and fiber-reinforced plastics. These methods can be performed using a noncontacting aerial ultrasonic probe. In a previous study, we developed a new method using high-intensity aerial ultrasonic waves to successfully detect peeling, artificially created by inserting an air gap between tiles and concrete plates. In the present study, we use the same method to detect the depth and size of defects in a homogeneous medium.

  3. HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF THE CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF THE CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON 6 APRIL 1968. NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  4. A Low-Cost Imaging System for Aerial Applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available and versatile platform for airborne remote sensing. Although various airborne imaging systems are being used for research and commercial applications, most of these systems are either too expensive or too complex to be of practical use for aerial app...

  5. Intra-field CDU map correlation between SEMs and aerial image characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Philipp, Peter; Litt, Lloyd C.; Meusemann, Stefan; Thaler, Thomas; Schulz, Kristian; Tschinkl, Martin; Ackmann, Paul

    2014-09-01

    Reticle critical dimension uniformity (CDU) is one of the major sources of wafer CD variations which include both inter-field variations and intra-field variations. Generally, wafer critical dimension (CD) measurement sample size interfield is much less than intra-field. Intra-field CDU correction requires time-consumption of metrology. In order to improve wafer intra-field CDU, several methods can be applied such as intra-field dose correction to improve wafer intra-field CDU. Corrections can be based on CD(SEM) or aerial image metrology data from the reticle. Reticle CDU and wafer CDU maps are based on scanning electron microscope (SEM) metrology, while reticle inspection intensity mapping (NuFLare 6000) and wafer level critical dimension (WLCD) utilize aerial images or optical techniques. Reticle inspecton tools such as those from KLA and NuFlare, offer the ability to collect optical measurement data to produce an optical CDU map. WLCD of Zeiss has the advantage of using the same illumination condition as the scanner to measure the aerial images or optical CD. In this study, the intra-field wafer CDU map correlation between SEMs and aerial images are characterized. The layout of metrology structures is very important for the correlation between wafer intra-field CDU, measured by SEM, and the CDU determined by aerial images. The selection of metrology structures effects on the correlation to SEM CD to wafer is also demonstrated. Both reticle CDU, intensity CDU and WLCD are candidates for intra-field wafer CDU characterization and the advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed.

  6. An improved dehazing algorithm of aerial high-definition image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wentao; Ji, Ming; Huang, Xiying; Wang, Chao; Yang, Yizhou; Li, Tao; Wang, Jiaoying; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    For unmanned aerial vehicle(UAV) images, the sensor can not get high quality images due to fog and haze weather. To solve this problem, An improved dehazing algorithm of aerial high-definition image is proposed. Based on the model of dark channel prior, the new algorithm firstly extracts the edges from crude estimated transmission map and expands the extracted edges. Then according to the expended edges, the algorithm sets a threshold value to divide the crude estimated transmission map into different areas and makes different guided filter on the different areas compute the optimized transmission map. The experimental results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithm is substantially the same as the one based on dark channel prior and guided filter. The average computation time of the new algorithm is around 40% of the one as well as the detection ability of UAV image is improved effectively in fog and haze weather.

  7. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  8. Observation of coral reefs on Ishigaki Island, Japan, using Landsat TM images and aerial photographs

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Kayanne, Hajime

    1997-06-01

    Ishigaki Island is located at the southwestern end of Japanese Islands and famous for its fringing coral reefs. More than twenty LANDSAT TM images in twelve years and aerial photographs taken on 1977 and 1994 were used to survey two shallow reefs on this island, Shiraho and Kabira. Intensive field surveys were also conducted in 1995. All satellite images of Shiraho were geometrically corrected and overlaid to construct a multi-date satellite data set. The effects of solar elevation and tide on satellite imagery were studied with this data set. The comparison of aerial and satellite images indicated that significant changes occurred between 1977 and 1984 in Kabira: rapid formation in the western part and decrease in the eastern part of dark patches. The field surveys revealed that newly formed dark patches in the west contain young corals. These results suggest that remote sensing is useful for not only mapping but also monitoring of shallow coral reefs.

  9. Accuracy of Measurements in Oblique Aerial Images for Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, W.

    2016-10-01

    Oblique aerial images have been a source of data for urban areas for several years. However, the accuracy of measurements in oblique images during this time has been limited to a single meter due to the use of direct -georeferencing technology and the underlying digital elevation model. Therefore, oblique images have been used mostly for visualization purposes. This situation changed in recent years as new methods, which allowed for a higher accuracy of exterior orientation, were developed. Current developments include the process of determining exterior orientation and the previous but still crucial process of tie point extraction. Progress in this area was shown in the ISPRS/EUROSDR Benchmark on Multi-Platform Photogrammetry and is also noticeable in the growing interest in the use of this kind of imagery. The higher level of accuracy in the orientation of oblique aerial images that has become possible in the last few years should result in a higher level of accuracy in the measurements of these types of images. The main goal of this research was to set and empirically verify the accuracy of measurements in oblique aerial images. The research focused on photogrammetric measurements composed of many images, which use a high overlap within an oblique dataset and different view angles. During the experiments, two series of images of urban areas were used. Both were captured using five DigiCam cameras in a Maltese cross configuration. The tilt angles of the oblique cameras were 45 degrees, and the position of the cameras during flight used a high grade GPS/INS navigation system. The orientation of the images was set using the Pix4D Mapper Pro software with both measurements of the in-flight camera position and the ground control points (measured with GPS RTK technology). To control the accuracy, check points were used (which were also measured with GPS RTK technology). As reference data for the whole study, an area of the city-based map was used. The archived results

  10. Increased productivity of repair verification by offline analysis of aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Ernesto; Sartelli, Luca; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Scheruebl, Thomas; Richter, Rigo; Thaler, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Using AIMSTM to qualify repairs of defects on photomasks is the industry standard. AIMSTM provides a reasonable matching of lithographic imaging performances without the need of wafer prints. The need of utilisation of this capability by photomask manufacturers has risen due to the increased complexity of layouts incorporating aggressive RET and phase shift technologies as well as tighter specifications have pushed aerial image metrology to consider CD performance results in addition to the traditional intensity verification. The content of the paper describes the utilisation of the AIMSTM Repair Verification (RV) software for the verification of aerial images in a mask shop production environment. The software is used to analyze images from various AIMSTM tool generations and the two main routines, Multi Slice Analysis (MSA) and Image Compare (IC), are used to compare defective and non-defective areas of aerial images. It is detailed how the RV software cleans "non real" errors potentially induced by operator misjudgements, thus providing accurate and repeatable analyses all proven against the results achieved manually. A user friendly GUI drives the user through few simple, fast and safe operations and automatically provides summary tables containing all the relevant results of the analysis that can be easily exported in a proper format and sent out to the customer as a technical documentation. This results in a sensible improvement of the throughput of the printability evaluation process in a mask manufacturing environment, providing reliable analyses at a higher productivity.

  11. D City Transformations by Time Series of Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, A.

    2015-02-01

    Recent photogrammetric applications, based on dense image matching algorithms, allow to use not only images acquired by digital cameras, amateur or not, but also to recover the vast heritage of analogue photographs. This possibility opens up many possibilities in the use and enhancement of existing photos heritage. The research of the original figuration of old buildings, the virtual reconstruction of disappeared architectures and the study of urban development are some of the application areas that exploit the great cultural heritage of photography. Nevertheless there are some restrictions in the use of historical images for automatic reconstruction of buildings such as image quality, availability of camera parameters and ineffective geometry of image acquisition. These constrains are very hard to solve and it is difficult to discover good dataset in the case of terrestrial close range photogrammetry for the above reasons. Even the photographic archives of museums and superintendence, while retaining a wealth of documentation, have no dataset for a dense image matching approach. Compared to the vast collection of historical photos, the class of aerial photos meets both criteria stated above. In this paper historical aerial photographs are used with dense image matching algorithms to realize 3d models of a city in different years. The models can be used to study the urban development of the city and its changes through time. The application relates to the city centre of Verona, for which some time series of aerial photographs have been retrieved. The models obtained in this way allowed, right away, to observe the urban development of the city, the places of expansion and new urban areas. But a more interesting aspect emerged from the analytical comparison between models. The difference, as the Euclidean distance, between two models gives information about new buildings or demolitions. As considering accuracy it is necessary point out that the quality of final

  12. Aberration analysis in aerial images formed by lithographic lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Wolfgang; Grossmann, Wilfried; Grunewald, Uwe

    1992-05-01

    A test procedure for the final assembly of lenses that does not need exposed photographic plates is introduced. It is based on the metrological simulation of optical ray tracing. A measuring example illustrates its suitabilty for ultraviolet optical systems in particular. The measuring apparatus displays the distortion vectors directly in the aerial image, gives a wave-front analysis, and performs an analogous distortion analysis.

  13. Moving object detection using dynamic motion modelling from UAV aerial images.

    PubMed

    Saif, A F M Saifuddin; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Mahayuddin, Zainal Rasyid

    2014-01-01

    Motion analysis based moving object detection from UAV aerial image is still an unsolved issue due to inconsideration of proper motion estimation. Existing moving object detection approaches from UAV aerial images did not deal with motion based pixel intensity measurement to detect moving object robustly. Besides current research on moving object detection from UAV aerial images mostly depends on either frame difference or segmentation approach separately. There are two main purposes for this research: firstly to develop a new motion model called DMM (dynamic motion model) and secondly to apply the proposed segmentation approach SUED (segmentation using edge based dilation) using frame difference embedded together with DMM model. The proposed DMM model provides effective search windows based on the highest pixel intensity to segment only specific area for moving object rather than searching the whole area of the frame using SUED. At each stage of the proposed scheme, experimental fusion of the DMM and SUED produces extracted moving objects faithfully. Experimental result reveals that the proposed DMM and SUED have successfully demonstrated the validity of the proposed methodology.

  14. Moving Object Detection Using Dynamic Motion Modelling from UAV Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Saif, A. F. M. Saifuddin; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Mahayuddin, Zainal Rasyid

    2014-01-01

    Motion analysis based moving object detection from UAV aerial image is still an unsolved issue due to inconsideration of proper motion estimation. Existing moving object detection approaches from UAV aerial images did not deal with motion based pixel intensity measurement to detect moving object robustly. Besides current research on moving object detection from UAV aerial images mostly depends on either frame difference or segmentation approach separately. There are two main purposes for this research: firstly to develop a new motion model called DMM (dynamic motion model) and secondly to apply the proposed segmentation approach SUED (segmentation using edge based dilation) using frame difference embedded together with DMM model. The proposed DMM model provides effective search windows based on the highest pixel intensity to segment only specific area for moving object rather than searching the whole area of the frame using SUED. At each stage of the proposed scheme, experimental fusion of the DMM and SUED produces extracted moving objects faithfully. Experimental result reveals that the proposed DMM and SUED have successfully demonstrated the validity of the proposed methodology. PMID:24892103

  15. Moving object detection using dynamic motion modelling from UAV aerial images.

    PubMed

    Saif, A F M Saifuddin; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Mahayuddin, Zainal Rasyid

    2014-01-01

    Motion analysis based moving object detection from UAV aerial image is still an unsolved issue due to inconsideration of proper motion estimation. Existing moving object detection approaches from UAV aerial images did not deal with motion based pixel intensity measurement to detect moving object robustly. Besides current research on moving object detection from UAV aerial images mostly depends on either frame difference or segmentation approach separately. There are two main purposes for this research: firstly to develop a new motion model called DMM (dynamic motion model) and secondly to apply the proposed segmentation approach SUED (segmentation using edge based dilation) using frame difference embedded together with DMM model. The proposed DMM model provides effective search windows based on the highest pixel intensity to segment only specific area for moving object rather than searching the whole area of the frame using SUED. At each stage of the proposed scheme, experimental fusion of the DMM and SUED produces extracted moving objects faithfully. Experimental result reveals that the proposed DMM and SUED have successfully demonstrated the validity of the proposed methodology. PMID:24892103

  16. a Fast Approach for Stitching of Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    The last few years have witnessed an increasing volume of aerial image data because of the extensive improvements of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). These newly developed UAVs have led to a wide variety of applications. A fast assessment of the achieved coverage and overlap of the acquired images of a UAV flight mission is of great help to save the time and cost of the further steps. A fast automatic stitching of the acquired images can help to visually assess the achieved coverage and overlap during the flight mission. This paper proposes an automatic image stitching approach that creates a single overview stitched image using the acquired images during a UAV flight mission along with a coverage image that represents the count of overlaps between the acquired images. The main challenge of such task is the huge number of images that are typically involved in such scenarios. A short flight mission with image acquisition frequency of one second can capture hundreds to thousands of images. The main focus of the proposed approach is to reduce the processing time of the image stitching procedure by exploiting the initial knowledge about the images positions provided by the navigation sensors. The proposed approach also avoids solving for all the transformation parameters of all the photos together to save the expected long computation time if all the parameters were considered simultaneously. After extracting the points of interest of all the involved images using Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm, the proposed approach uses the initial image's coordinates to build an incremental constrained Delaunay triangulation that represents the neighborhood of each image. This triangulation helps to match only the neighbor images and therefore reduces the time-consuming features matching step. The estimated relative orientation between the matched images is used to find a candidate seed image for the stitching process. The pre-estimated transformation

  17. Application of machine learning for the evaluation of turfgrass plots using aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ke; Raheja, Amar; Bhandari, Subodh; Green, Robert L.

    2016-05-01

    Historically, investigation of turfgrass characteristics have been limited to visual ratings. Although relevant information may result from such evaluations, final inferences may be questionable because of the subjective nature in which the data is collected. Recent advances in computer vision techniques allow researchers to objectively measure turfgrass characteristics such as percent ground cover, turf color, and turf quality from the digital images. This paper focuses on developing a methodology for automated assessment of turfgrass quality from aerial images. Images of several turfgrass plots of varying quality were gathered using a camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. The quality of these plots were also evaluated based on visual ratings. The goal was to use the aerial images to generate quality evaluations on a regular basis for the optimization of water treatment. Aerial images are used to train a neural network so that appropriate features such as intensity, color, and texture of the turfgrass are extracted from these images. Neural network is a nonlinear classifier commonly used in machine learning. The output of the neural network trained model is the ratings of the grass, which is compared to the visual ratings. Currently, the quality and the color of turfgrass, measured as the greenness of the grass, are evaluated. The textures are calculated using the Gabor filter and co-occurrence matrix. Other classifiers such as support vector machines and simpler linear regression models such as Ridge regression and LARS regression are also used. The performance of each model is compared. The results show encouraging potential for using machine learning techniques for the evaluation of turfgrass quality and color.

  18. An automatic high precision registration method between large area aerial images and aerial light detection and ranging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Q.; Xie, D.; Sun, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The integration of digital aerial photogrammetry and Light Detetion And Ranging (LiDAR) is an inevitable trend in Surveying and Mapping field. We calculate the external orientation elements of images which identical with LiDAR coordinate to realize automatic high precision registration between aerial images and LiDAR data. There are two ways to calculate orientation elements. One is single image spatial resection using image matching 3D points that registered to LiDAR. The other one is Position and Orientation System (POS) data supported aerotriangulation. The high precision registration points are selected as Ground Control Points (GCPs) instead of measuring GCPs manually during aerotriangulation. The registration experiments indicate that the method which registering aerial images and LiDAR points has a great advantage in higher automation and precision compare with manual registration.

  19. Fitting of Parametric Building Models to Oblique Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, U. S.; Gerke, M.

    2011-09-01

    In literature and in photogrammetric workstations many approaches and systems to automatically reconstruct buildings from remote sensing data are described and available. Those building models are being used for instance in city modeling or in cadastre context. If a roof overhang is present, the building walls cannot be estimated correctly from nadir-view aerial images or airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. This leads to inconsistent building outlines, which has a negative influence on visual impression, but more seriously also represents a wrong legal boundary in the cadaster. Oblique aerial images as opposed to nadir-view images reveal greater detail, enabling to see different views of an object taken from different directions. Building walls are visible from oblique images directly and those images are used for automated roof overhang estimation in this research. A fitting algorithm is employed to find roof parameters of simple buildings. It uses a least squares algorithm to fit projected wire frames to their corresponding edge lines extracted from the images. Self-occlusion is detected based on intersection result of viewing ray and the planes formed by the building whereas occlusion from other objects is detected using an ALS point cloud. Overhang and ground height are obtained by sweeping vertical and horizontal planes respectively. Experimental results are verified with high resolution ortho-images, field survey, and ALS data. Planimetric accuracy of 1cm mean and 5cm standard deviation was obtained, while buildings' orientation were accurate to mean of 0.23° and standard deviation of 0.96° with ortho-image. Overhang parameters were aligned to approximately 10cm with field survey. The ground and roof heights were accurate to mean of - 9cm and 8cm with standard deviations of 16cm and 8cm with ALS respectively. The developed approach reconstructs 3D building models well in cases of sufficient texture. More images should be acquired for completeness of

  20. Large-Scale Aerial Image Categorization Using a Multitask Topological Codebook.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luming; Wang, Meng; Hong, Richang; Yin, Bao-Cai; Li, Xuelong

    2016-02-01

    Fast and accurately categorizing the millions of aerial images on Google Maps is a useful technique in pattern recognition. Existing methods cannot handle this task successfully due to two reasons: 1) the aerial images' topologies are the key feature to distinguish their categories, but they cannot be effectively encoded by a conventional visual codebook and 2) it is challenging to build a realtime image categorization system, as some geo-aware Apps update over 20 aerial images per second. To solve these problems, we propose an efficient aerial image categorization algorithm. It focuses on learning a discriminative topological codebook of aerial images under a multitask learning framework. The pipeline can be summarized as follows. We first construct a region adjacency graph (RAG) that describes the topology of each aerial image. Naturally, aerial image categorization can be formulated as RAG-to-RAG matching. According to graph theory, RAG-to-RAG matching is conducted by enumeratively comparing all their respective graphlets (i.e., small subgraphs). To alleviate the high time consumption, we propose to learn a codebook containing topologies jointly discriminative to multiple categories. The learned topological codebook guides the extraction of the discriminative graphlets. Finally, these graphlets are integrated into an AdaBoost model for predicting aerial image categories. Experimental results show that our approach is competitive to several existing recognition models. Furthermore, over 24 aerial images are processed per second, demonstrating that our approach is ready for real-world applications. PMID:25794407

  1. Large-Scale Aerial Image Categorization Using a Multitask Topological Codebook.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luming; Wang, Meng; Hong, Richang; Yin, Bao-Cai; Li, Xuelong

    2016-02-01

    Fast and accurately categorizing the millions of aerial images on Google Maps is a useful technique in pattern recognition. Existing methods cannot handle this task successfully due to two reasons: 1) the aerial images' topologies are the key feature to distinguish their categories, but they cannot be effectively encoded by a conventional visual codebook and 2) it is challenging to build a realtime image categorization system, as some geo-aware Apps update over 20 aerial images per second. To solve these problems, we propose an efficient aerial image categorization algorithm. It focuses on learning a discriminative topological codebook of aerial images under a multitask learning framework. The pipeline can be summarized as follows. We first construct a region adjacency graph (RAG) that describes the topology of each aerial image. Naturally, aerial image categorization can be formulated as RAG-to-RAG matching. According to graph theory, RAG-to-RAG matching is conducted by enumeratively comparing all their respective graphlets (i.e., small subgraphs). To alleviate the high time consumption, we propose to learn a codebook containing topologies jointly discriminative to multiple categories. The learned topological codebook guides the extraction of the discriminative graphlets. Finally, these graphlets are integrated into an AdaBoost model for predicting aerial image categories. Experimental results show that our approach is competitive to several existing recognition models. Furthermore, over 24 aerial images are processed per second, demonstrating that our approach is ready for real-world applications.

  2. Building FAÇADE Separation in Vertical Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, P.; Wendel, A.; Bischof, H.; Leberl, F.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional models of urban environments have great appeal and offer promises of interesting applications. While initially it was of interest to just have such 3D data, it increasingly becomes evident that one really would like to have interpreted urban objects. To be able to interpret buildings we have to split a visible whole building block into its different single buildings. Usually this is done using cadastral information to divide the single land parcels. The problem in this case is that sometimes the building boundaries derived from the cadastre are insufficiently accurate due to several reasons like old databases with lower accuracies or inaccuracies due to transformation between two coordinate systems. For this reason it can happen that a cadastral boundary coming from an old map is displaced by up to several meters and therefore divides two buildings incorrectly. To overcome such problems we incorporate the information from vertical aerial images. We introduce a façade separation method that is able to find individual building façades using multi view stereo. The purpose is to identify the individual façades and separate them from one another before on proceeds with the analysis of a façade's details. The source was a set of overlapping, thus "redundant" vertical aerial images taken by an UltraCam digital aerial camera. Therefore in a first step we determine the building block outlines using the building classification and use the height values from the Digital Surface Model (DSM) to determine approximate "façade quadrilaterals". We also incorporate height discontinuities using the height profiles along the building outlines to enhance our façade separation. In a next step we detect repeated pattern in these "façade images" and use them to separate the façades respectively building blocks from one another. We show that this method can be successfully used to separate building façades using vertical aerial images with a very high detection

  3. a New Paradigm for Matching - and Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, T.; Zhuo, X.; Reinartz, P.; Fraundorfer, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the performance of SIFT-based image matching regarding large differences in image scaling and rotation, as this is usually the case when trying to match images captured from UAVs and airplanes. This task represents an essential step for image registration and 3d-reconstruction applications. Various real world examples presented in this paper show that SIFT, as well as A-SIFT perform poorly or even fail in this matching scenario. Even if the scale difference in the images is known and eliminated beforehand, the matching performance suffers from too few feature point detections, ambiguous feature point orientations and rejection of many correct matches when applying the ratio-test afterwards. Therefore, a new feature matching method is provided that overcomes these problems and offers thousands of matches by a novel feature point detection strategy, applying a one-to-many matching scheme and substitute the ratio-test by adding geometric constraints to achieve geometric correct matches at repetitive image regions. This method is designed for matching almost nadir-directed images with low scene depth, as this is typical in UAV and aerial image matching scenarios. We tested the proposed method on different real world image pairs. While standard SIFT failed for most of the datasets, plenty of geometrical correct matches could be found using our approach. Comparing the estimated fundamental matrices and homographies with ground-truth solutions, mean errors of few pixels can be achieved.

  4. Error Estimation Techniques to Refine Overlapping Aerial Image Mosaic Processes via Detected Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, William Glenn

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I propose to demonstrate a means of error estimation preprocessing in the assembly of overlapping aerial image mosaics. The mosaic program automatically assembles several hundred aerial images from a data set by aligning them, via image registration using a pattern search method, onto a GIS grid. The method presented first locates…

  5. Direct Penguin Counting Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, C. U.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents an application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images to monitor penguin colony in Baton Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica. The area around Narębski Point located on the southeast coast of Barton Peninsula was designated as Antarctic Specially Protected Area No. 171 (ASPA 171), and Chinstrap and Gentoo penguins inhabit in this area. The UAV images were acquired in a part of ASPA 171 from four flights in a single day, Jan 18, 2014. About 360 images were mosaicked as an image of about 3 cm spatial resolution and then a subset including representative penguin rookeries was selected. The subset image was segmented based on gradient map of pixel values, and spectral and spatial attributes were assigned to each segment. The object based image analysis (OBIA) was conducted with consideration of spectral attributes including mean and minimum values of each segment and various shape attributes such as area, length, compactness and roundness to detect individual penguin. The segments indicating individual penguin were effectively detected on rookeries with high contrasts in the spectral and shape attributes. The importance of periodic and precise monitoring of penguins has been recognized because variations of their populations reflect environmental changes and disturbance from human activities. Utilization of very high resolution imaging method shown in this study can be applied to other penguin habitats in Antarctica, and the results will be able to support establishing effective environmental management plans.

  6. Realization of an aerial 3D image that occludes the background scenery.

    PubMed

    Kakeya, Hideki; Ishizuka, Shuta; Sato, Yuya

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we describe an aerial 3D image that occludes far background scenery based on coarse integral volumetric imaging (CIVI) technology. There have been many volumetric display devices that present floating 3D images, most of which have not reproduced the visual occlusion. CIVI is a kind of multilayered integral imaging and realizes an aerial volumetric image with visual occlusion by combining multiview and volumetric display technologies. The conventional CIVI, however, cannot show a deep space, for the number of layered panels is limited because of the low transmittance of each panel. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel optical design to attain an aerial 3D image that occludes far background scenery. In the proposed system, a translucent display panel with 120 Hz refresh rate is located between the CIVI system and the aerial 3D image. The system modulates between the aerial image mode and the background image mode. In the aerial image mode, the elemental images are shown on the CIVI display and the inserted translucent display is uniformly translucent. In the background image mode, the black shadows of the elemental images in a white background are shown on the CIVI display and the background scenery is displayed on the inserted translucent panel. By alternation of these two modes at 120 Hz, an aerial 3D image that visually occludes the far background scenery is perceived by the viewer.

  7. Oblique Aerial Images and Their Use in Cultural Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhle, J.

    2013-07-01

    Oblique images enable three-dimensional (3d) modelling of objects with vertical dimensions. Such imagery is nowadays systematically taken of cities and may easily become available. The documentation of cultural heritage can take advantage of these sources of information. Two new oblique camera systems are presented and characteristics of such images are summarized. A first example uses images of a new multi-camera system for the derivation of orthoimages, façade plots with photo texture, 3d scatter plots, and dynamic 3d models of a historic church. The applied methodology is based on automatically derived point clouds of high density. Each point will be supplemented with colour and other attributes. The problems experienced in these processes and the solutions to these problems are presented. The applied tools are a combination of professional tools, free software, and of own software developments. Special attention is given to the quality of input images. Investigations are carried out on edges in the images. The combination of oblique and nadir images enables new possibilities in the processing. The use of the near-infrared channel besides the red, green, and blue channel of the applied multispectral imagery is also of advantage. Vegetation close to the object of interest can easily be removed. A second example describes the modelling of a monument by means of a non-metric camera and a standard software package. The presented results regard achieved geometric accuracy and image quality. It is concluded that the use of oblique aerial images together with image-based processing methods yield new possibilities of economic and accurate documentation of tall monuments.

  8. Aerial imaging manages pipeline right-of-way programs

    SciTech Connect

    Jadkowski, M.A.; Convery, P.

    1996-02-01

    Pipeline companies that own and manage extensive rights-of-way corridors are facing ever-increasing regulatory pressures, operating issues and ongoing needs to remain competitive in today`s marketplace. The digital aerial rights-of-way monitoring system (DARMS) is a personal computer-based digital charge-coupled device (CCD) camera integrated with a high-capacity tape recorder. DARMS was developed through NASA by the Stennis Space Center for use in a Sewall aircraft. Sewall is responsible for its operational testing and developing the image products for pipeline monitoring. DARMS consists of a personal computer main control unit (MCU), a Kodak Megaplus 1.4-CCD camera head, a monochrome video monitor for in-flight operation, and an Exabyte 8500 8-millimeter tape recorder for image data storage. The system is designed to be operated in a small, unpressurized aircraft flown by a single pilot. The control program software provides a highly autonomous turnkey operation. After a mission has been flown, Exabyte tape is loaded onto a Sun workstation and the images are contrast-balanced and spatially enhanced using a mid-high filtering algorithm. Depending on client requirements, images also may be geo-referenced to a coordinate system or mosaicked together. The resulting image frames are indexed using their GPS location, delivered to the client and archived.

  9. Application of Digital Image Correlation Method to Improve the Accuracy of Aerial Photo Stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shih-Heng; Jhou, You-Liang; Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Hsiao, Han-Wei; Sung, Wen-Pei

    2016-04-01

    Satellite images and traditional aerial photos have been used in remote sensing for a long time. However, there are some problems with these images. For example, the resolution of satellite image is insufficient, the cost to obtain traditional images is relatively high and there is also human safety risk in traditional flight. These result in the application limitation of these images. In recent years, the control technology of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is rapidly developed. This makes unmanned aerial vehicle widely used in obtaining aerial photos. Compared to satellite images and traditional aerial photos, these aerial photos obtained using UAV have the advantages of higher resolution, low cost. Because there is no crew in UAV, it is still possible to take aerial photos using UAV under unstable weather conditions. Images have to be orthorectified and their distortion must be corrected at first. Then, with the help of image matching technique and control points, these images can be stitched or used to establish DEM of ground surface. These images or DEM data can be used to monitor the landslide or estimate the volume of landslide. For the image matching, we can use such as Harris corner method, SIFT or SURF to extract and match feature points. However, the accuracy of these methods for matching is about pixel or sub-pixel level. The accuracy of digital image correlation method (DIC) during image matching can reach about 0.01pixel. Therefore, this study applies digital image correlation method to match extracted feature points. Then the stitched images are observed to judge the improvement situation. This study takes the aerial photos of a reservoir area. These images are stitched under the situations with and without the help of DIC. The results show that the misplacement situation in the stitched image using DIC to match feature points has been significantly improved. This shows that the use of DIC to match feature points can actually improve the accuracy of

  10. Initial Efforts toward Mission-Representative Imaging Surveys from Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanich, Greg; Plice, Laura; Ippolito, Corey; Young, Larry A.; Lau, Benton; Lee, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Numerous researchers have proposed the use of robotic aerial explorers to perform scientific investigation of planetary bodies in our solar system. One of the essential tasks for any aerial explorer is to be able to perform scientifically valuable imaging surveys. The focus of this paper is to discuss the challenges implicit in, and recent observations related to, acquiring mission-representative imaging data from a small fixed-wing UAV, acting as a surrogate planetary aerial explorer. This question of successfully performing aerial explorer surveys is also tied to other topics of technical investigation, including the development of unique bio-inspired technologies.

  11. Grab a coffee: your aerial images are already analyzed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Anthony; Rademacher, Thomas; Schulz, Kristian

    2015-07-01

    For over 2 decades the AIMTM platform has been utilized in mask shops as the standard for actinic review of photomask sites in order to perform defect disposition and repair review. Throughout this time the measurement throughput of the systems has been improved in order to keep pace with the requirements demanded by a manufacturing environment, however the analysis of the sites captured has seen little improvement and remained a manual process. This manual analysis of aerial images is time consuming, subject to error and unreliability and contributes to holding up turn-around time (TAT) and slowing process flow in a manufacturing environment. AutoAnalysis, the first application available for the FAVOR® platform, offers a solution to these problems by providing fully automated data transfer and analysis of AIMTM aerial images. The data is automatically output in a customizable format that can be tailored to your internal needs and the requests of your customers. Savings in terms of operator time arise from the automated analysis which no longer needs to be performed. Reliability is improved as human error is eliminated making sure the most defective region is always and consistently captured. Finally the TAT is shortened and process flow for the back end of the line improved as the analysis is fast and runs in parallel to the measurements. In this paper the concept and approach of AutoAnalysis will be presented as well as an update to the status of the project. A look at the benefits arising from the automation and the customizable approach of the solution will be shown.

  12. Coastline Extraction from Aerial Images Based on Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paravolidakis, V.; Moirogiorgou, K.; Ragia, L.; Zervakis, M.; Synolakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays coastline extraction and tracking of its changes become of high importance because of the climate change, global warming and rapid growth of human population. Coastal areas play a significant role for the economy of the entire region. In this paper we propose a new methodology for automatic extraction of the coastline using aerial images. A combination of a four step algorithm is used to extract the coastline in a robust and generalizable way. First, noise distortion is reduced in order to ameliorate the input data for the next processing steps. Then, the image is segmented into two regions, land and sea, through the application of a local threshold to create the binary image. The result is further processed by morphological operators with the aim that small objects are being eliminated and only the objects of interest are preserved. Finally, we perform edge detection and active contours fitting in order to extract and model the coastline. These algorithmic steps are illustrated through examples, which demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology.

  13. Net-Faim: distributed computation of aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerbach, Uwe

    1998-06-01

    Simulation of aerial images is an important part of modern microchip manufacturing, but computation of the image of an entire mask is a challenging problem requiring a large amount of memory and CPU time. Fortunately, it is possible to decompose the large problem of computing the full image into many smaller, mostly independent, sub-problems. In this paper, one particular decomposition is described and implemented. The target platform is a heterogeneous group of networked workstations. The program, net-faim, was designed to be robust, to scale well with available resources, and to place modest demands on participating workstations. All of these design criteria have been realized. The overall performance of the distributed computation is linearly proportional to the sum of the performances of the individual processors, up to a rather high level of parallelism. Robustness is achieved by not relying on any one server to complete a given task; instead, if an idle server is available, the task is sent out to the idle server even if it has previously been sent to another server. The task is only retired when a server returns the completed answer. This 'paranoid' method of processing tasks has the pleasant side effect of doing automatic dynamic load balancing. The results of runs with several different configurations, both of participating workstations and of sub- domain sizes, are displayed.

  14. Density estimation in aerial images of large crowds for automatic people counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Christian; Metzler, Juergen

    2013-05-01

    Counting people is a common topic in the area of visual surveillance and crowd analysis. While many image-based solutions are designed to count only a few persons at the same time, like pedestrians entering a shop or watching an advertisement, there is hardly any solution for counting large crowds of several hundred persons or more. We addressed this problem previously by designing a semi-automatic system being able to count crowds consisting of hundreds or thousands of people based on aerial images of demonstrations or similar events. This system requires major user interaction to segment the image. Our principle aim is to reduce this manual interaction. To achieve this, we propose a new and automatic system. Besides counting the people in large crowds, the system yields the positions of people allowing a plausibility check by a human operator. In order to automatize the people counting system, we use crowd density estimation. The determination of crowd density is based on several features like edge intensity or spatial frequency. They indicate the density and discriminate between a crowd and other image regions like buildings, bushes or trees. We compare the performance of our automatic system to the previous semi-automatic system and to manual counting in images. By counting a test set of aerial images showing large crowds containing up to 12,000 people, the performance gain of our new system will be measured. By improving our previous system, we will increase the benefit of an image-based solution for counting people in large crowds.

  15. Nonlinear Estimation Approach to Real-Time Georegistration from Aerial Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Padgett, Curtis W.

    2012-01-01

    When taking aerial images, it is important to know locations of specific points of interest in an Earth-centered coordinate system (latitude, longitude, height). The correspondence between a pixel location in the image and its Earth coordinate is known as georegistration. There are two main technical challenges arising in the intended application. The first is that no known features are assumed to be available in any of the images. The second is that the intended applications are real time. Here, images are taken at regular intervals (i.e. once per second), and it is desired to make decisions in real time based on the geolocation of specific objects seen in the images as they arrive. This is in sharp contrast to most current methods for geolocation that operate "after-the-fact" by processing, on the ground, a database of stored images using computationally intensive methods. The solution is a nonlinear estimation algorithm that combines processed realtime camera images with vehicle position and attitude information ob tained from an onboard GPS receiver. This approach provides accurate georegistration estimates (latitude, longitude, height) of arbitrary features and/or points of interest seen in the camera images. This solves the georegistration problem at the modest cost of augmenting the camera information with a GPS receiver carried onboard the vehicle.

  16. Automatic aerial image shadow detection through the hybrid analysis of RGB and HIS color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Li, Huilin; Peng, Zhiyong

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents our research on automatic shadow detection from high-resolution aerial image through the hybrid analysis of RGB and HIS color space. To this end, the spectral characteristics of shadow are firstly discussed and three kinds of spectral components including the difference between normalized blue and normalized red component - BR, intensity and saturation components are selected as criterions to obtain initial segmentation of shadow region (called primary segmentation). After that, within the normalized RGB color space and HIS color space, the shadow region is extracted again (called auxiliary segmentation) using the OTSU operation, respectively. Finally, the primary segmentation and auxiliary segmentation are combined through a logical AND-connection operation to obtain reliable shadow region. In this step, small shadow areas are removed from combined shadow region and morphological algorithms are apply to fill small holes as well. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can effectively detect the shadow region from high-resolution aerial image and in high degree of automaton.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of mask phase defects from through-focus EUV aerial images

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-02-21

    Mask defects inspection and imaging is one of the most important issues for any pattern transfer lithography technology. This is especially true for EUV lithography where the wavelength-specific properties of masks and defects necessitate actinic inspection for a faithful prediction of defect printability and repair performance. In this paper we will present a technique to obtain a quantitative characterization of mask phase defects from EUV aerial images. We apply this technique to measure the aerial image phase of native defects on a blank mask, measured with the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) an EUV zoneplate microscope that operates at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measured phase is compared with predictions made from AFM top-surface measurements of those defects. While amplitude defects are usually easy to recognize and quantify with standard inspection techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), defects or structures that have a phase component can be much more challenging to inspect. A phase defect can originate from the substrate or from any level of the multilayer. In both cases its effect on the reflected field is not directly related to the local topography of the mask surface, but depends on the deformation of the multilayer structure. Using the AIT, we have previously showed that EUV inspection provides a faithful and reliable way to predict the appearance of mask defect on the printed wafer; but to obtain a complete characterization of the defect we need to evaluate quantitatively its phase component. While aerial imaging doesn't provide a direct measurement of the phase of the object, this information is encoded in the through focus evolution of the image intensity distribution. Recently we developed a technique that allows us to extract the complex amplitude of EUV mask defects using two aerial images from different focal planes. The method for the phase reconstruction is derived from the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS

  18. Vehicle detection from high-resolution aerial images based on superpixel and color name features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ziyi; Cao, Liujuan; Yu, Zang; Chen, Yiping; Wang, Cheng; Li, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Automatic vehicle detection from aerial images is emerging due to the strong demand of large-area traffic monitoring. In this paper, we present a novel framework for automatic vehicle detection from the aerial images. Through superpixel segmentation, we first segment the aerial images into homogeneous patches, which consist of the basic units during the detection to improve efficiency. By introducing the sparse representation into our method, powerful classification ability is achieved after the dictionary training. To effectively describe a patch, the Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) is used. We further propose to integrate color information to enrich the feature representation by using the color name feature. The final feature consists of both HOG and color name based histogram, by which we get a strong descriptor of a patch. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robust performance of the proposed algorithm for vehicle detection from aerial images.

  19. Study of Automatic Image Rectification and Registration of Scanned Historical Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. R.; Tseng, Y. H.

    2016-06-01

    Historical aerial photographs directly provide good evidences of past times. The Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences (RCHSS) of Taiwan Academia Sinica has collected and scanned numerous historical maps and aerial images of Taiwan and China. Some maps or images have been geo-referenced manually, but most of historical aerial images have not been registered since there are no GPS or IMU data for orientation assisting in the past. In our research, we developed an automatic process of matching historical aerial images by SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) for handling the great quantity of images by computer vision. SIFT is one of the most popular method of image feature extracting and matching. This algorithm extracts extreme values in scale space into invariant image features, which are robust to changing in rotation scale, noise, and illumination. We also use RANSAC (Random sample consensus) to remove outliers, and obtain good conjugated points between photographs. Finally, we manually add control points for registration through least square adjustment based on collinear equation. In the future, we can use image feature points of more photographs to build control image database. Every new image will be treated as query image. If feature points of query image match the features in database, it means that the query image probably is overlapped with control images.With the updating of database, more and more query image can be matched and aligned automatically. Other research about multi-time period environmental changes can be investigated with those geo-referenced temporal spatial data.

  20. Aberration measurement based on principal component analysis of aerial images of optimized marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guanyong; Wang, Xiangzhao; Li, Sikun; Yang, Jishuo; Xu, Dongbo

    2014-10-01

    We propose an aberration measurement technique based on principal component analysis of aerial images of optimized marks (AMAI-OM). Zernike aberrations are retrieved using a linear relationship between the aerial image and Zernike coefficients. The linear relationship is composed of the principal components (PCs) and regression matrix. A centering process is introduced to compensate position offsets of the measured aerial image. A new test mark is designed in order to improve the centering accuracy and theoretical accuracy of aberration measurement together. The new test marks are composed of three spaces with different widths, and their parameters are optimized by using an accuracy evaluation function. The offsets of the measured aerial image are compensated in the centering process and the adjusted PC coefficients are obtained. Then the Zernike coefficients are calculated according to these PC coefficients using a least square method. The simulations using the lithography simulators PROLITH and Dr.LiTHO validate the accuracy of our method. Compared with the previous aberration measurement technique based on principal component analysis of aerial image (AMAI-PCA), the measurement accuracy of Zernike aberrations under the real measurement condition of the aerial image is improved by about 50%.

  1. A Featureless Approach to 3D Polyhedral Building Modeling from Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. PMID:22346575

  2. A featureless approach to 3D polyhedral building modeling from aerial images.

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. PMID:22346575

  3. Object-based Image Classification of Arctic Sea Ice and Melt Ponds through Aerial Photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.; Li, Z.; Lei, R.

    2013-12-01

    The last six years have marked the lowest Arctic summer sea ice extents in the modern era, with a new record summer minimum (3.4 million km2) set on 13 September 2012. It has been predicted that the Arctic could be free of summer ice within the next 25-30. The loss of Arctic summer ice could have serious consequences, such as higher water temperature due to the positive feedback of albedo, more powerful and frequent storms, rising sea levels, diminished habitats for polar animals, and more pollution due to fossil fuel exploitation and/ or increased traffic through the Northwest/ Northeast Passage. In these processes, melt ponds play an important role in Earth's radiation balance since they strongly absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it as snow and ice do. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the ability of predicting the sea ice/ melt pond extents and space-time evolution, which is pivotal to prepare for the variation and uncertainty of the future environment, political, economic, and military needs. A lot of efforts have been put into Arctic sea ice modeling to simulate sea ice processes. However, these sea ice models were initiated and developed based on limited field surveys, aircraft or satellite image data. Therefore, it is necessary to collect high resolution sea ice aerial photo in a systematic way to tune up, validate, and improve models. Currently there are many sea ice aerial photos available, such as Chinese Arctic Exploration (CHINARE 2008, 2010, 2012), SHEBA 1998 and HOTRAX 2005. However, manually delineating of sea ice and melt pond from these images is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, we use the object-based remote sensing classification scheme to extract sea ice and melt ponds efficiently from 1,727 aerial photos taken during the CHINARE 2010. The algorithm includes three major steps as follows. (1) Image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects according to the similarity of spectral and texture

  4. Line Matching Algorithm for Aerial Image Combining image and object space similarity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxue; Wang, Weixi; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Zhenyu; Zhu, Hong; Li, Miao; He, Biao; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new straight line matching method for aerial images is proposed in this paper. Compared to previous works, similarity constraints combining radiometric information in image and geometry attributes in object plane are employed in these methods. Firstly, initial candidate lines and the elevation values of lines projection plane are determined by corresponding points in neighborhoods of reference lines. Secondly, project reference line and candidate lines back forward onto the plane, and then similarity measure constraints are enforced to reduce the number of candidates and to determine the finial corresponding lines in a hierarchical way. Thirdly, "one-to-many" and "many-to-one" matching results are transformed into "one-to-one" by merging many lines into the new one, and the errors are eliminated simultaneously. Finally, endpoints of corresponding lines are detected by line expansion process combing with "image-object-image" mapping mode. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can be able to obtain reliable line matching results for aerial images.

  5. Aerial imaging study of the mask-induced line-width roughness of EUV lithography masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdyla, Antoine; Donoghue, Alexander; Benk, Markus P.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography uses reflective photomasks to print features on a wafer through the formation of an aerial image. The aerial image is influenced by the mask's substrate and pattern roughness and by photon shot noise, which collectively affect the line-width on wafer prints, with an impact on local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). We have used SHARP, an actinic mask-imaging microscope, to study line-width roughness (LWR) in aerial images at sub-nanometer resolution. We studied the impact of photon density and the illumination partial coherence on recorded images, and found that at low coherence settings, the line-width roughness is dominated by photon noise, while at high coherence setting, the effect of speckle becomes more prominent, dominating photon noise for exposure levels of 4 photons/nm2 at threshold on the mask size.

  6. Critical Assessment of Object Segmentation in Aerial Image Using Geo-Hausdorff Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Y.; Wang, G.

    2016-06-01

    Aerial Image records the large-range earth objects with the ever-improving spatial and radiometric resolution. It becomes a powerful tool for earth observation, land-coverage survey, geographical census, etc., and helps delineating the boundary of different kinds of objects on the earth both manually and automatically. In light of the geo-spatial correspondence between the pixel locations of aerial image and the spatial coordinates of ground objects, there is an increasing need of super-pixel segmentation and high-accuracy positioning of objects in aerial image. Besides the commercial software package of eCognition and ENVI, many algorithms have also been developed in the literature to segment objects of aerial images. But how to evaluate the segmentation results remains a challenge, especially in the context of the geo-spatial correspondence. The Geo-Hausdorff Distance (GHD) is proposed to measure the geo-spatial distance between the results of various object segmentation that can be done with the manual ground truth or with the automatic algorithms.Based on the early-breaking and random-sampling design, the GHD calculates the geographical Hausdorff distance with nearly-linear complexity. Segmentation results of several state-of-the-art algorithms, including those of the commercial packages, are evaluated with a diverse set of aerial images. They have different signal-to-noise ratio around the object boundaries and are hard to trace correctly even for human operators. The GHD value is analyzed to comprehensively measure the suitability of different object segmentation methods for aerial images of different spatial resolution. By critically assessing the strengths and limitations of the existing algorithms, the paper provides valuable insight and guideline for extensive research in automating object detection and classification of aerial image in the nation-wide geographic census. It is also promising for the optimal design of operational specification of remote

  7. Approach to standardizing MR image intensity scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyul, Laszlo G.; Udupa, Jayaram K.

    1999-05-01

    Despite the many advantages of MR images, they lack a standard image intensity scale. MR image intensity ranges and the meaning of intensity values vary even for the same protocol (P) and the same body region (D). This causes many difficulties in image display and analysis. We propose a two-step method for standardizing the intensity scale in such a way that for the same P and D, similar intensities will have similar meanings. In the first step, the parameters of the standardizing transformation are 'learned' from an image set. In the second step, for each MR study, these parameters are used to map their histogram into the standardized histogram. The method was tested quantitatively on 90 whole brain FSE T2, PD and T1 studies of MS patients and qualitatively on several other SE PD, T2 and SPGR studies of the grain and foot. Measurements using mean squared difference showed that the standardized image intensities have statistically significantly more consistent range and meaning than the originals. Fixed windows can be established for standardized imags and used for display without the need of per case adjustment. Preliminary results also indicate that the method facilitates improving the degree of automation of image segmentation.

  8. An Aerial-Image Dense Matching Approach Based on Optical Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Chen, Shiyu; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Jianya; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    Dense matching plays an important role in many fields, such as DEM (digital evaluation model) producing, robot navigation and 3D environment reconstruction. Traditional approaches may meet the demand of accuracy. But the calculation time and out puts density is hardly be accepted. Focus on the matching efficiency and complex terrain surface matching feasibility an aerial image dense matching method based on optical flow field is proposed in this paper. First, some high accurate and uniformed control points are extracted by using the feature based matching method. Then the optical flow is calculated by using these control points, so as to determine the similar region between two images. Second, the optical flow field is interpolated by using the multi-level B-spline interpolation in the similar region and accomplished the pixel by pixel coarse matching. Final, the results related to the coarse matching refinement based on the combined constraint, which recognizes the same points between images. The experimental results have shown that our method can achieve per-pixel dense matching points, the matching accuracy achieves sub-pixel level, and fully meet the three-dimensional reconstruction and automatic generation of DSM-intensive matching's requirements. The comparison experiments demonstrated that our approach's matching efficiency is higher than semi-global matching (SGM) and Patch-based multi-view stereo matching (PMVS) which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  9. High Density Aerial Image Matching: State-Of and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haala, N.; Cavegn, S.

    2016-06-01

    Ongoing innovations in matching algorithms are continuously improving the quality of geometric surface representations generated automatically from aerial images. This development motivated the launch of the joint ISPRS/EuroSDR project "Benchmark on High Density Aerial Image Matching", which aims on the evaluation of photogrammetric 3D data capture in view of the current developments in dense multi-view stereo-image matching. Originally, the test aimed on image based DSM computation from conventional aerial image flights for different landuse and image block configurations. The second phase then put an additional focus on high quality, high resolution 3D geometric data capture in complex urban areas. This includes both the extension of the test scenario to oblique aerial image flights as well as the generation of filtered point clouds as additional output of the respective multi-view reconstruction. The paper uses the preliminary outcomes of the benchmark to demonstrate the state-of-the-art in airborne image matching with a special focus of high quality geometric data capture in urban scenarios.

  10. A low-cost dual-camera imaging system for aerial applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available remote sensing platform as low-cost and easy-to-use consumer-grade cameras are being increasingly used for aerial imaging. In this article, we report on a dual-camera imaging system we recently assembled that can capture RGB and near-infrared (NIR) i...

  11. A Comparison of Visual Statistics for the Image Enhancement of FORESITE Aerial Images with Those of Major Image Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2006-01-01

    Aerial images from the Follow-On Radar, Enhanced and Synthetic Vision Systems Integration Technology Evaluation (FORESITE) flight tests with the NASA Langley Research Center's research Boeing 757 were acquired during severe haze and haze/mixed clouds visibility conditions. These images were enhanced using the Visual Servo (VS) process that makes use of the Multiscale Retinex. The images were then quantified with visual quality metrics used internally with the VS. One of these metrics, the Visual Contrast Measure, has been computed for hundreds of FORESITE images, and for major classes of imaging--terrestrial (consumer), orbital Earth observations, orbital Mars surface imaging, NOAA aerial photographs, and underwater imaging. The metric quantifies both the degree of visual impairment of the original, un-enhanced images as well as the degree of visibility improvement achieved by the enhancement process. The large aggregate data exhibits trends relating to degree of atmospheric visibility attenuation, and its impact on limits of enhancement performance for the various image classes. Overall results support the idea that in most cases that do not involve extreme reduction in visibility, large gains in visual contrast are routinely achieved by VS processing. Additionally, for very poor visibility imaging, lesser, but still substantial, gains in visual contrast are also routinely achieved. Further, the data suggest that these visual quality metrics can be used as external standalone metrics for establishing performance parameters.

  12. A comparison of visual statistics for the image enhancement of FORESITE aerial images with those of major image classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2006-05-01

    Aerial images from the Follow-On Radar, Enhanced and Synthetic Vision Systems Integration Technology Evaluation (FORESITE) flight tests with the NASA Langley Research Center's research Boeing 757 were acquired during severe haze and haze/mixed clouds visibility conditions. These images were enhanced using the Visual Servo (VS) process that makes use of the Multiscale Retinex. The images were then quantified with visual quality metrics used internally within the VS. One of these metrics, the Visual Contrast Measure, has been computed for hundreds of FORESITE images, and for major classes of imaging-terrestrial (consumer), orbital Earth observations, orbital Mars surface imaging, NOAA aerial photographs, and underwater imaging. The metric quantifies both the degree of visual impairment of the original, un-enhanced images as well as the degree of visibility improvement achieved by the enhancement process. The large aggregate data exhibits trends relating to degree of atmospheric visibility attenuation, and its impact on the limits of enhancement performance for the various image classes. Overall results support the idea that in most cases that do not involve extreme reduction in visibility, large gains in visual contrast are routinely achieved by VS processing. Additionally, for very poor visibility imaging, lesser, but still substantial, gains in visual contrast are also routinely achieved. Further, the data suggest that these visual quality metrics can be used as external standalone metrics for establishing performance parameters.

  13. Comparison of analysis techniques for aerial image metrology on advanced photomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seolchong; Woo, Sungha; Jang, Heeyeon; Lee, Youngmo; Kim, Sangpyo; Yang, Hyunjo; Schulz, Kristian; Garetto, Anthony

    2016-05-01

    The standard method for defect disposition and verification of repair success in the mask shop is through the utilization of the aerial imaging platform, AIMSTM. The CD (Critical Dimension) deviation of the defective or repaired region as well as the pattern shift can be calculated by comparing the measured aerial images of this region to that of a reference. Through this analysis it can be determined if the defect or repaired region will be printed on the wafer under the illumination conditions of the scanner. The analysis of the measured aerial images from the AIMSTM are commonly performed manually using the analysis software available on the system or with the help of an analysis software called RV (Repair Verification). Because the process is manual, it is not standardized and is subject to operator variations. This method of manual aerial image analysis is time consuming, dependent on the skill level of the operator and significantly contributes to the overall mask manufacturing process flow. AutoAnalysis (AA), the first application available for the FAVOR® platform, provides fully automated analysis of AIMSTM aerial images [1] and runs in parallel to the measurement of the aerial images. In this paper, we investigate the initial AutoAnalysis performance compared to the conventional method using RV and its application to a production environment. The evaluation is based on the defect CD of three pattern types: contact holes, dense line and spaces and peripheral structure. The defect analysis results for different patterns and illumination conditions will be correlated and challenges in transitioning to the new approach will be discussed.

  14. Vehicle Detection of Aerial Image Using TV-L1 Texture Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Li, Y.; Huang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Vehicle detection from high-resolution aerial image facilitates the study of the public traveling behavior on a large scale. In the context of road, a simple and effective algorithm is proposed to extract the texture-salient vehicle among the pavement surface. Texturally speaking, the majority of pavement surface changes a little except for the neighborhood of vehicles and edges. Within a certain distance away from the given vector of the road network, the aerial image is decomposed into a smoothly-varying cartoon part and an oscillatory details of textural part. The variational model of Total Variation regularization term and L1 fidelity term (TV-L1) is adopted to obtain the salient texture of vehicles and the cartoon surface of pavement. To eliminate the noise of texture decomposition, regions of pavement surface are refined by seed growing and morphological operation. Based on the shape saliency analysis of the central objects in those regions, vehicles are detected as the objects of rectangular shape saliency. The proposed algorithm is tested with a diverse set of aerial images that are acquired at various resolution and scenarios around China. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can detect vehicles at the rate of 71.5% and the false alarm rate of 21.5%, and that the speed is 39.13 seconds for a 4656 x 3496 aerial image. It is promising for large-scale transportation management and planning.

  15. Aerial-image enables diagrams and animation to be inserted in motion pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, S. J., Jr.; Tressel, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Aerial-image unit makes it possible to insert diagrams and animation into live motion pictures, and also lift an element from a confusing background by suppressing general details. The unit includes a combination of two separate lens systems, the camera-projector system and the field lens system.

  16. Application of high resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles for hydrology and range science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A common problem in many natural resource disciplines is the lack of high-enough spatial resolution images that can be used for monitoring and modeling purposes. Advances have been made in the utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in hydrology and rangeland science. By utilizing low fligh...

  17. A low-cost single-camera imaging system for aerial applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available and versatile platform for airborne remote sensing. Although various airborne imaging systems are available, most of these systems are either too expensive or too complex to be of practical use for aerial applicators. The objective of this study was ...

  18. Registration of multitemporal aerial optical images using line features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenyang; Goshtasby, A. Ardeshir

    2016-07-01

    Registration of multitemporal images is generally considered difficult because scene changes can occur between the times the images are obtained. Since the changes are mostly radiometric in nature, features are needed that are insensitive to radiometric differences between the images. Lines are geometric features that represent straight edges of rigid man-made structures. Because such structures rarely change over time, lines represent stable geometric features that can be used to register multitemporal remote sensing images. An algorithm to establish correspondence between lines in two images of a planar scene is introduced and formulas to relate the parameters of a homography transformation to the parameters of corresponding lines in images are derived. Results of the proposed image registration on various multitemporal images are presented and discussed.

  19. Semi-automatic detection of linear archaeological traces from orthorectified aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figorito, Benedetto; Tarantino, Eufemia

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-automatic approach for archaeological traces detection from aerial images. The method developed was based on the multiphase active contour model (ACM). The image was segmented into three competing regions to improve the visibility of buried remains showing in the image as crop marks (i.e. centuriations, agricultural allocations, ancient roads, etc.). An initial determination of relevant traces can be quickly carried out by the operator by sketching straight lines close to the traces. Subsequently, tuning parameters (i.e. eccentricity, orientation, minimum area and distance from input line) are used to remove non-target objects and parameterize the detected traces. The algorithm and graphical user interface for this method were developed in a MATLAB environment and tested on high resolution orthorectified aerial images. A qualitative analysis of the method was lastly performed by comparing the traces extracted with ancient traces verified by archaeologists.

  20. Aerial Vehicle Surveys of other Planetary Atmospheres and Surfaces: Imaging, Remote-sensing, and Autonomy Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Gregory; Ippolito, Corey; Alena, Rick

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the anticipated imaging and remote-sensing technology requirements for aerial vehicle survey missions to other planetary bodies in our Solar system that can support in-atmosphere flight. In the not too distant future such planetary aerial vehicle (a.k.a. aerial explorers) exploration missions will become feasible. Imaging and remote-sensing observations will be a key objective for these missions. Accordingly, it is imperative that optimal solutions in terms of imaging acquisition and real-time autonomous analysis of image data sets be developed for such vehicles.

  1. Evaluation of Color Settings in Aerial Images with the Use of Eye-Tracking User Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirijovsky, J.; Popelka, S.

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of presented paper is to find the most realistic and preferred color settings for four different types of surfaces on the aerial images. This will be achieved through user study with the use of eye-movement recording. Aerial images taken by the unmanned aerial system were used as stimuli. From each image, squared crop area containing one of the studied types of surfaces (asphalt, concrete, water, soil, and grass) was selected. For each type of surface, the real value of reflectance was found with the use of precise spectroradiometer ASD HandHeld 2 which measures the reflectance. The device was used at the same time as aerial images were captured, so lighting conditions and state of vegetation were equal. The spectral resolution of the ASD device is better than 3.0 nm. For defining the RGB values of selected type of surface, the spectral reflectance values recorded by the device were merged into wider groups. Finally, we get three groups corresponding to RGB color system. Captured images were edited with the graphic editor Photoshop CS6. Contrast, clarity, and brightness were edited for all surface types on images. Finally, we get a set of 12 images of the same area with different color settings. These images were put into the grid and used as stimuli for the eye-tracking experiment. Eye-tracking is one of the methods of usability studies and it is considered as relatively objective. Eye-tracker SMI RED 250 with the sampling frequency 250 Hz was used in the study. As respondents, a group of 24 students of Geoinformatics and Geography was used. Their task was to select which image in the grid has the best color settings. The next task was to select which color settings they prefer. Respondents' answers were evaluated and the most realistic and most preferable color settings were found. The advantage of the eye-tracking evaluation was that also the process of the selection of the answers was analyzed. Areas of Interest were marked around each image in the

  2. First results for an image processing workflow for hyperspatial imagery acquired with a low-cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Very high-resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have great potential for use in rangeland monitoring and assessment, because the imagery fills the gap between ground-based observations and remotely sensed imagery from aerial or satellite sensors. However, because UAV imagery is ofte...

  3. Intensity-based segmentation of microarray images.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan

    2003-07-01

    The underlying principle in microarray image analysis is that the spot intensity is a measure of the gene expression. This implicitly assumes the gene expression of a spot to be governed entirely by the distribution of the pixel intensities. Thus, a segmentation technique based on the distribution of the pixel intensities is appropriate for the current problem. In this paper, clustering-based segmentation is described to extract the target intensity of the spots. The approximate boundaries of the spots in the microarray are determined by manual adjustment of rectilinear grids. The distribution of the pixel intensity in a grid containing a spot is assumed to be the superposition of the foreground and the local background. The k-means clustering technique and the partitioning around medoids (PAM) were used to generate a binary partition of the pixel intensity distribution. The median (k-means) and the medoid (PAM) of the cluster members are chosen as the cluster representatives. The effectiveness of the clustering-based segmentation techniques was tested on publicly available arrays generated in a lipid metabolism experiment (Callow et al., 2000). The results are compared against those obtained using the region-growing approach (SPOT) (Yang et al., 2001). The effect of additive white Gaussian noise is also investigated. PMID:12906242

  4. Shoreline extraction from light detection and ranging digital elevation model data and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Karim, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased demand for understanding the accurate position of the shorelines. The automatic extraction of shorelines utilizing the digital elevation models (DEMs) obtained from light detection and ranging (LiDAR), aerial images, and multispectral images has become very promising. In this article, we develop two innovative algorithms that can effectively extract shorelines depending on the available data sources. The first is a multistep morphological technique that works on LiDAR DEM with respect to a tidal datum, whereas the second depends on the availability of training data to extract shorelines from LiDAR DEM fused with aerial images. Unlike similar techniques, the morphological approach detects and eliminates the outliers that result from waves, etc., by means of an anomaly test with neighborhood constraints. Additionally, it eliminates docks, bridges, and fishing piers along the extracted shorelines by means of Hough transform. The second approach extracts the shoreline by means of color space conversion of the aerial images and the support vector machines classifier to segment the fused data into water and land. We perform Monte-Carlo simulations to estimate the confidence interval for the error in shoreline position. Compared with other relevant techniques in literature, the proposed methods offer better accuracy in shoreline extraction.

  5. Detection and clustering of features in aerial images by neuron network-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozenilek, Vit

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the algorithm for detection and clustering of feature in aerial photographs based on artificial neural networks. The presented approach is not focused on the detection of specific topographic features, but on the combination of general features analysis and their use for clustering and backward projection of clusters to aerial image. The basis of the algorithm is a calculation of the total error of the network and a change of weights of the network to minimize the error. A classic bipolar sigmoid was used for the activation function of the neurons and the basic method of backpropagation was used for learning. To verify that a set of features is able to represent the image content from the user's perspective, the web application was compiled (ASP.NET on the Microsoft .NET platform). The main achievements include the knowledge that man-made objects in aerial images can be successfully identified by detection of shapes and anomalies. It was also found that the appropriate combination of comprehensive features that describe the colors and selected shapes of individual areas can be useful for image analysis.

  6. Mobile Aerial Tracking and Imaging System (MATRIS) for Aeronautical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Blanchard, R. C.; Miller, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile, rapidly deployable ground-based system to track and image targets of aeronautical interest has been developed. Targets include reentering reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) as well as atmospheric and transatmospheric vehicles. The optics were designed to image targets in the visible and infrared wavelengths. To minimize acquisition cost and development time, the system uses commercially available hardware and software where possible. The conception and initial funding of this system originated with a study of ground-based imaging of global aerothermal characteristics of RLV configurations. During that study NASA teamed with the Missile Defense Agency/Innovative Science and Technology Experimentation Facility (MDA/ISTEF) to test techniques and analysis on two Space Shuttle flights.

  7. EROS main image file - A picture perfect database for Landsat imagery and aerial photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of the Interior in 1966 under the administration of the Geological Survey. It is primarily concerned with the application of remote sensing techniques for the management of natural resources. The retrieval system employed to search the EROS database is called INORAC (Inquiry, Ordering, and Accounting). A description is given of the types of images identified in EROS, taking into account Landsat imagery, Skylab images, Gemini/Apollo photography, and NASA aerial photography. Attention is given to retrieval commands, geographic coordinate searching, refinement techniques, various online functions, and questions regarding the access to the EROS Main Image File.

  8. A methodology for near real-time change detection between Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and wide area satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytsilis, Anastasios L.; Prokos, Anthony; Koutroumbas, Konstantinos D.; Michail, Dimitrios; Kontoes, Charalambos C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a novel integrated hybrid methodology for unsupervised change detection between Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and satellite images, which can be utilized in various fields like security applications (e.g. border surveillance) and damage assessment, is proposed. This is a challenging problem mainly due to the difference in geographic coverage and the spatial resolution of the two images, as well as to the acquisition modes which lead to misregistration errors. The methodology consists of the following steps: (a) pre-processing, where the part of the satellite image that corresponds to the UAV image is determined and the UAV image is ortho-rectified using information provided by a Digital Terrain Model, (b) the detection of potential changes, which is based exclusively on intensity and image gradient information, (c) the generation of the region map, where homogeneous regions are produced by the previous potential changes via a seeded region growing algorithm and placed on the region map, and (d) the evaluation of the above regions, in order to characterize them as true changes or not. The methodology has been applied on demanding real datasets with very encouraging results. Finally, its robustness to the misregistration errors is assessed via extensive experimentation.

  9. Semi-auto assessment system on building damage caused by landslide disaster with high-resolution satellite and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Xu, Qihua; He, Jun; Ge, Fengxiang; Wang, Ying

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, earthquake and heavy rain have triggered more and more landslides, which have caused serious economic losses. The timely detection of the disaster area and the assessment of the hazard are necessary and primary for disaster mitigation and relief. As high-resolution satellite and aerial images have been widely used in the field of environmental monitoring and disaster management, the damage assessment by processing satellite and aerial images has become a hot spot of research work. The rapid assessment of building damage caused by landslides with high-resolution satellite or aerial images is the focus of this article. In this paper, after analyzing the morphological characteristics of the landslide disaster, we proposed a set of criteria for rating building damage, and designed a semi-automatic evaluation system. The system is applied to the satellite and aerial images processing. The performance of the experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of our system.

  10. Parameter-Based Performance Analysis of Object-Based Image Analysis Using Aerial and Quikbird-2 Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavzoglu, T.; Yildiz, M.

    2014-09-01

    Opening new possibilities for research, very high resolution (VHR) imagery acquired by recent commercial satellites and aerial systems requires advanced approaches and techniques that can handle large volume of data with high local variance. Delineation of land use/cover information from VHR images is a hot research topic in remote sensing. In recent years, object-based image analysis (OBIA) has become a popular solution for image analysis tasks as it considers shape, texture and content information associated with the image objects. The most important stage of OBIA is the image segmentation process applied prior to classification. Determination of optimal segmentation parameters is of crucial importance for the performance of the selected classifier. In this study, effectiveness and applicability of the segmentation method in relation to its parameters was analysed using two VHR images, an aerial photo and a Quickbird-2 image. Multi-resolution segmentation technique was employed with its optimal parameters of scale, shape and compactness that were defined after an extensive trail process on the data sets. Nearest neighbour classifier was applied on the segmented images, and then the accuracy assessment was applied. Results show that segmentation parameters have a direct effect on the classification accuracy, and low values of scale-shape combinations produce the highest classification accuracies. Also, compactness parameter was found to be having minimal effect on the construction of image objects, hence it can be set to a constant value in image classification.

  11. A Semi-Automated Single Day Image Differencing Technique to Identify Animals in Aerial Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Terletzky, Pat; Ramsey, Robert Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Our research presents a proof-of-concept that explores a new and innovative method to identify large animals in aerial imagery with single day image differencing. We acquired two aerial images of eight fenced pastures and conducted a principal component analysis of each image. We then subtracted the first principal component of the two pasture images followed by heuristic thresholding to generate polygons. The number of polygons represented the number of potential cattle (Bos taurus) and horses (Equus caballus) in the pasture. The process was considered semi-automated because we were not able to automate the identification of spatial or spectral thresholding values. Imagery was acquired concurrently with ground counts of animal numbers. Across the eight pastures, 82% of the animals were correctly identified, mean percent commission was 53%, and mean percent omission was 18%. The high commission error was due to small mis-alignments generated from image-to-image registration, misidentified shadows, and grouping behavior of animals. The high probability of correctly identifying animals suggests short time interval image differencing could provide a new technique to enumerate wild ungulates occupying grassland ecosystems, especially in isolated or difficult to access areas. To our knowledge, this was the first attempt to use standard change detection techniques to identify and enumerate large ungulates. PMID:24454827

  12. Application of Technical Measures and Software in Constructing Photorealistic 3D Models of Historical Building Using Ground-Based and Aerial (UAV) Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnowski, Aleksander; Banaszek, Anna; Banaszek, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Preparing digital documentation of historical buildings is a form of protecting cultural heritage. Recently there have been several intensive studies using non-metric digital images to construct realistic 3D models of historical buildings. Increasingly often, non-metric digital images are obtained with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Technologies and methods of UAV flights are quite different from traditional photogrammetric approaches. The lack of technical guidelines for using drones inhibits the process of implementing new methods of data acquisition. This paper presents the results of experiments in the use of digital images in the construction of photo-realistic 3D model of a historical building (Raphaelsohns' Sawmill in Olsztyn). The aim of the study at the first stage was to determine the meteorological and technical conditions for the acquisition of aerial and ground-based photographs. At the next stage, the technology of 3D modelling was developed using only ground-based or only aerial non-metric digital images. At the last stage of the study, an experiment was conducted to assess the possibility of 3D modelling with the comprehensive use of aerial (UAV) and ground-based digital photographs in terms of their labour intensity and precision of development. Data integration and automatic photo-realistic 3D construction of the models was done with Pix4Dmapper and Agisoft PhotoScan software Analyses have shown that when certain parameters established in an experiment are kept, the process of developing the stock-taking documentation for a historical building moves from the standards of analogue to digital technology with considerably reduced cost.

  13. Object Based Agricultural Land Cover Classification Map of Shadowed Areas from Aerial Image and LIDAR Data Using Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R. T.; Serrano, S. C.; Damian, G. B.; Camaso, E. E.; Celestino, A. B.; Hernando, P. J. C.; Isip, M. F.; Orge, K. M.; Quinto, M. J. C.; Tagaca, R. C.

    2016-06-01

    Aerial image and LiDAR data offers a great possibility for agricultural land cover mapping. Unfortunately, these images leads to shadowy pixels. Management of shadowed areas for classification without image enhancement were investigated. Image segmentation approach using three different segmentation scales were used and tested to segment the image for ground features since only the ground features are affected by shadow caused by tall features. The RGB band and intensity were the layers used for the segmentation having an equal weights. A segmentation scale of 25 was found to be the optimal scale that will best fit for the shadowed and non-shadowed area classification. The SVM using Radial Basis Function kernel was then applied to extract classes based on properties extracted from the Lidar data and orthophoto. Training points for different classes including shadowed areas were selected homogeneously from the orthophoto. Separate training points for shadowed areas were made to create additional classes to reduced misclassification. Texture classification and object-oriented classifiers have been examined to reduced heterogeneity problem. The accuracy of the land cover classification using 25 scale segmentation after accounting for the shadow detection and classification was significantly higher compared to higher scale of segmentation.

  14. Using aberration test patterns to optimize the performance of EUV aerial imaging microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Miyakawa, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick; Han, Hak-Seung; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-06-16

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a prototype EUV-wavelength zoneplate microscope that provides high quality aerial image measurements of EUV reticles. To simplify and improve the alignment procedure we have created and tested arrays of aberration-sensitive patterns on EUV reticles and we have compared their images collected with the AIT to the expected shapes obtained by simulating the theoretical wavefront of the system. We obtained a consistent measure of coma and astigmatism in the center of the field of view using two different patterns, revealing a misalignment condition in the optics.

  15. Film cameras or digital sensors? The challenge ahead for aerial imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Cartographic aerial cameras continue to play the key role in producing quality products for the aerial photography business, and specifically for the National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP). One NAPP photograph taken with cameras capable of 39 lp/mm system resolution can contain the equivalent of 432 million pixels at 11 ??m spot size, and the cost is less than $75 per photograph to scan and output the pixels on a magnetic storage medium. On the digital side, solid state charge coupled device linear and area arrays can yield quality resolution (7 to 12 ??m detector size) and a broader dynamic range. If linear arrays are to compete with film cameras, they will require precise attitude and positioning of the aircraft so that the lines of pixels can be unscrambled and put into a suitable homogeneous scene that is acceptable to an interpreter. Area arrays need to be much larger than currently available to image scenes competitive in size with film cameras. Analysis of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two systems show that the analog approach is more economical at present. However, as arrays become larger, attitude sensors become more refined, global positioning system coordinate readouts become commonplace, and storage capacity becomes more affordable, the digital camera may emerge as the imaging system for the future. Several technical challenges must be overcome if digital sensors are to advance to where they can support mapping, charting, and geographic information system applications.

  16. Image degradation in aerial imagery duplicates. [photographic processing of photographic film and reproduction (copying)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A series of Earth Resources Aircraft Program data flights were made over an aerial test range in Arizona for the evaluation of large cameras. Specifically, both medium altitude and high altitude flights were made to test and evaluate a series of color as well as black-and-white films. Image degradation, inherent in duplication processing, was studied. Resolution losses resulting from resolution characteristics of the film types are given. Color duplicates, in general, are shown to be degraded more than black-and-white films because of the limitations imposed by available aerial color duplicating stock. Results indicate that a greater resolution loss may be expected when the original has higher resolution. Photographs of the duplications are shown.

  17. Automatic orthorectification and mosaicking of oblique images from a zoom lens aerial camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qianfei; Liu, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    For the purpose of image distortion caused by the oblique photography of a zoom lens aerial camera, a fast and accurate image autorectification and mosaicking method in a ground control points (GCPs)-free environment was proposed. With the availability of integrated global positioning system (GPS) and inertial measurement units, the camera's exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) were solved through direct georeferencing. The one-parameter division model was adopted to estimate the distortion coefficient and the distortion center coordinates for the zoom lens to correct the lens distortion. Using the camera's EOPs and the lens distortion parameters, the oblique aerial images specified in the camera frame were geo-orthorectified into the mapping frame and then were mosaicked together based on the mapping coordinates to produce a larger field and high-resolution georeferenced image. Experimental results showed that the orthorectification error was less than 1.80 m at an 1100 m flight height above ground level, when compared with 14 presurveyed ground checkpoints which were measured by differential GPS. The mosaic error was about 1.57 m compared with 18 checkpoints. The accuracy was considered sufficient for urgent response such as military reconnaissance and disaster monitoring where GCPs were not available.

  18. Damaged road extracting with high-resolution aerial image of post-earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zezhong; Pu, Chengjun; Zhu, Mingcang; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Yalan; Li, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of earth observation technology, remote sensing images have played more important roles, because the high resolution images can provide the original data for object recognition, disaster investigation, and so on. When a disastrous earthquake breaks out, a large number of roads could be damaged instantly. There are a lot of approaches about road extraction, such as region growing, gray threshold, and k-means clustering algorithm. We could not obtain the undamaged roads with these approaches, if the trees or their shadows along the roads are difficult to be distinguished from the damaged road. In the paper, a method is presented to extract the damaged road with high resolution aerial image of post-earthquake. Our job is to extract the damaged road and the undamaged with the aerial image. We utilized the mathematical morphology approach and the k-means clustering algorithm to extract the road. Our method was composed of four ingredients. Firstly, the mathematical morphology filter operators were employed to remove the interferences from the trees or their shadows. Secondly, the k-means algorithm was employed to derive the damaged segments. Thirdly, the mathematical morphology approach was used to extract the undamaged road; Finally, we could derive the damaged segments by overlaying the road networks of pre-earthquake. Our results showed that the earthquake, broken in Yaan, was disastrous for the road, Therefore, we could take more measures to keep it clear.

  19. Radar imaging of intense nonlinear Ekman divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoqiang; Perrie, William; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; He, Yijun; Shen, Hui; Zhang, Biao; Hu, Haibo

    2016-09-01

    In general, given an oceanic thermal front, there is a strong positive correlation between sea surface temperature (SST) gradients and surface winds, and the marine atmospheric boundary layer is unstable over the warm side of the oceanic thermal front. The Gulf Stream is a notable example of an oceanic thermal front, and its warm side is often detected as enhanced backscatter in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. However, in some "anomalous" SAR images, low backscatter is sometimes observed on the warm side of the front, which seems inconsistent. Therefore, we propose a mechanism to interpret the generation of the low backscatter, based on interactions between ocean surface wind waves and intense nonlinear Ekman divergence. This mechanism is verified by showing that patterns in an observed anomalous SAR image are in good agreement with those in the simulated radar signature. In addition, this methodology and analysis demonstrate that SAR is potentially important for detecting and diagnosing small scale air-sea interactions and upper ocean dynamics with strong vertical transports induced by submesoscale processes.

  20. Integration of airborne Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data and digitized aerial photography via an ISH transformation. [Intensity Saturation Hue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosia, Vincent G.; Myers, Jeffrey S.; Ekstrand, Robert E.; Fitzgerald, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple method for enhancing the spatial and spectral resolution of disparate data sets is presented. Two data sets, digitized aerial photography at a nominal spatial resolution 3,7 meters and TMS digital data at 24.6 meters, were coregistered through a bilinear interpolation to solve the problem of blocky pixel groups resulting from rectification expansion. The two data sets were then subjected to intensity-saturation-hue (ISH) transformations in order to 'blend' the high-spatial-resolution (3.7 m) digitized RC-10 photography with the high spectral (12-bands) and lower spatial (24.6 m) resolution TMS digital data. The resultant merged products make it possible to perform large-scale mapping, ease photointerpretation, and can be derived for any of the 12 available TMS spectral bands.

  1. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation.

  2. Point Cloud Generation from Aerial Image Data Acquired by a Quadrocopter Type Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Digital Still Camera

    PubMed Central

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems’ SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft®’s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  3. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  4. Analyzing Spectral Characteristics of Shadow Area from ADS-40 High Radiometric Resolution Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ta; Wu, Shou-Tsung; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Chen, Jan-Chang

    2016-06-01

    The shadows in optical remote sensing images are regarded as image nuisances in numerous applications. The classification and interpretation of shadow area in a remote sensing image are a challenge, because of the reduction or total loss of spectral information in those areas. In recent years, airborne multispectral aerial image devices have been developed 12-bit or higher radiometric resolution data, including Leica ADS-40, Intergraph DMC. The increased radiometric resolution of digital imagery provides more radiometric details of potential use in classification or interpretation of land cover of shadow areas. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to analyze the spectral properties of the land cover in the shadow areas by ADS-40 high radiometric resolution aerial images, and to investigate the spectral and vegetation index differences between the various shadow and non-shadow land covers. According to research findings of spectral analysis of ADS-40 image: (i) The DN values in shadow area are much lower than in nonshadow area; (ii) DN values received from shadowed areas that will also be affected by different land cover, and it shows the possibility of land cover property retrieval as in nonshadow area; (iii) The DN values received from shadowed regions decrease in the visible band from short to long wavelengths due to scattering; (iv) The shadow area NIR of vegetation category also shows a strong reflection; (v) Generally, vegetation indexes (NDVI) still have utility to classify the vegetation and non-vegetation in shadow area. The spectral data of high radiometric resolution images (ADS-40) is potential for the extract land cover information of shadow areas.

  5. New Approach for Segmentation and Extraction of Single Tree from Point Clouds Data and Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homainejad, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses a new approach for reconstructing a 3D model from single trees via Airborne Laser Scanners (ALS) data and aerial images. The approach detects and extracts single tree from ALS data and aerial images. The existing approaches are able to provide bulk segmentation from a group of trees; however, some methods focused on detection and extraction of a particular tree from ALS and images. Segmentation of a single tree within a group of trees is mostly a mission impossible since the detection of boundary lines between the trees is a tedious job and basically it is not feasible. In this approach an experimental formula based on the height of the trees was developed and applied in order to define the boundary lines between the trees. As a result, each single tree was segmented and extracted and later a 3D model was created. Extracted trees from this approach have a unique identification and attribute. The output has application in various fields of science and engineering such as forestry, urban planning, and agriculture. For example in forestry, the result can be used for study in ecologically diverse, biodiversity and ecosystem.

  6. Urban Object Extraction from Digital Surface Model and Digital Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigillo, D.; Kanjir, U.

    2012-07-01

    The paper describes two different methods for extraction of two types of urban objects from lidar digital surface model (DSM) and digital aerial images. Within the preprocessing digital terrain model (DTM) and orthoimages for three test areas were generated from aerial images using automatic photogrammetric methods. Automatic building extraction was done using DSM and multispectral orthoimages. First, initial building mask was created from the normalized digital surface model (nDSM), then vegetation was eliminated from the building mask using multispectral orthoimages. The final building mask was produced employing several morphological operations and buildings were vectorised using Hough transform. Automatic extraction of other green urban features (trees and natural ground) started from orthoimages using iterative object-based classification. This method required careful selection of segmentation parameters; in addition to basic spectral bands also information from nDSM was included. After the segmentation of images the segments were classified based on their attributes (spatial, spectral, geometrical, texture) using rule set classificator. First iteration focused on visible (i.e. unshaded) urban features, and second iteration on objects in deep shade. Results from both iterations were merged into appropriate classes. Evaluation of the final results (completeness, correctness and quality) was carried out on a per-area level and on a per-object level by ISPRS Commission III, WG III/4.

  7. Fractal methods for extracting artificial objects from the unmanned aerial vehicle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have become used increasingly in earth surface observations, with a special interest put into automatic modes of environmental control and recognition of artificial objects. Fractal methods for image processing well detect the artificial objects in digital space images but were not applied previously to the UAV-produced imagery. Parameters of photography, on-board equipment, and image characteristics differ considerably for spacecrafts and UAVs. Therefore, methods that work properly with space images can produce different results for the UAVs. In this regard, testing the applicability of fractal methods for the UAV-produced images and determining the optimal range of parameters for these methods represent great interest. This research is dedicated to the solution of this problem. Specific features of the earth's surface images produced with UAVs are described in the context of their interpretation and recognition. Fractal image processing methods for extracting artificial objects are described. The results of applying these methods to the UAV images are presented.

  8. Aerial imaging technology for photomask qualification: from a microscope to a metrology tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Anthony; Scherübl, Thomas; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2012-09-01

    Photomasks carry the structured information of the chip designs printed with lithography scanners onto wafers. These structures, for the most modern technologies, are enlarged by a factor of 4 with respect to the final circuit design, and 20-60 of these photomasks are needed for the production of a single completed chip used, for example, in computers or cell phones. Lately, designs have been reported to be on the drawing board with close to 100 of these layers. Each of these photomasks will be reproduced onto the wafer several hundred times and typically 5000-50 000 wafers will be produced with each of them. Hence, the photomasks need to be absolutely defect-free to avoid any fatal electrical shortcut in the design or drastic performance degradation. One well-known method in the semiconductor industry is to analyze the aerial image of the photomask in a dedicated tool referred to as Aerial Imaging Measurement System, which emulates the behavior of the respective lithography scanner used for the imaging of the mask. High-end lithography scanners use light with a wavelength of 193 nm and high numerical apertures (NAs) of 1.35 utilizing a water film between the last lens and the resist to be illuminated (immersion scanners). Complex illumination shapes enable the imaging of structures well below the wavelength used. Future lithography scanners will work at a wavelength of 13.5 nm [extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] and require the optical system to work with mirrors in vacuum instead of the classical lenses used in current systems. The exact behavior of these systems is emulated by the Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS™; a Trademark of Carl Zeiss). With these systems, any position of the photomask can be imaged under the same illumination condition used by the scanners, and hence, a prediction of the printing behavior of any structure can be derived. This system is used by mask manufacturers in their process flow to review critical defects or verify defect repair

  9. Comparison of binary mask defect printability analysis using virtual stepper system and aerial image microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Khoi A.; Spence, Chris A.; Dakshina-Murthy, S.; Bala, Vidya; Williams, Alvina M.; Strener, Steve; Eandi, Richard D.; Li, Junling; Karklin, Linard

    1999-12-01

    As advanced process technologies in the wafer fabs push the patterning processes toward lower k1 factor for sub-wavelength resolution printing, reticles are required to use optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase-shifted mask (PSM) for resolution enhancement. For OPC/PSM mask technology, defect printability is one of the major concerns. Current reticle inspection tools available on the market sometimes are not capable of consistently differentiating between an OPC feature and a true random defect. Due to the process complexity and high cost associated with the making of OPC/PSM reticles, it is important for both mask shops and lithography engineers to understand the impact of different defect types and sizes to the printability. Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS) has been used in the mask shops for a number of years for reticle applications such as aerial image simulation and transmission measurement of repaired defects. The Virtual Stepper System (VSS) provides an alternative method to do defect printability simulation and analysis using reticle images captured by an optical inspection or review system. In this paper, pre- programmed defects and repairs from a Defect Sensitivity Monitor (DSM) reticle with 200 nm minimum features (at 1x) will be studied for printability. The simulated resist lines by AIMS and VSS are both compared to SEM images of resist wafers qualitatively and quantitatively using CD verification.Process window comparison between unrepaired and repaired defects for both good and bad repair cases will be shown. The effect of mask repairs to resist pattern images for the binary mask case will be discussed. AIMS simulation was done at the International Sematech, Virtual stepper simulation at Zygo and resist wafers were processed at AMD-Submicron Development Center using a DUV lithographic process for 0.18 micrometer Logic process technology.

  10. Aerial Image Microscopes for the Inspection of Defects in EUV Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Taylor, J S; Hudyma, R; Spiller, E; Sweeney, D W; Shelden, G; Urbach, J-P

    2002-10-22

    The high volume inspection equipment currently available to support development of EUV blanks is non-actinic. The same is anticipated for patterned EUV mask inspection. Once potential defects are identified and located by such non-actinic inspection techniques, it is essential to have instrumentation to perform detailed characterization, and if repairs are performed, re-evaluation. The ultimate metric for the acceptance or rejection of a mask due to a defect, is the wafer level impact. Thus measuring the aerial image for the site under question is required. An EUV Aerial Image Microscope (''AIM'') similar to the current AIM tools for 248nm and 193nm exposure wavelength is the natural solution for this task. Due to the complicated manufacturing process of EUV blanks, AIM measurements might also be beneficial to accurately assessing the severity of a blank defect. This is an additional application for an EUV AIM as compared to today's use In recognition of the critical role of an EUV AIM for the successful implementation of EUV blank and mask supply, International SEMATECH initiated this design study with the purpose to define the technical requirements for accurately simulating EUV scanner performance, demonstrating the feasibility to meet these requirements and to explore various technical approaches to building an EUV AIM tool.

  11. Feature-based registration of historical aerial images by Area Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Sudhagar; Schenk, Toni

    2016-06-01

    The registration of historical images plays a significant role in assessing changes in land topography over time. By comparing historical aerial images with recent data, geometric changes that have taken place over the years can be quantified. However, the lack of ground control information and precise camera parameters has limited scientists' ability to reliably incorporate historical images into change detection studies. Other limitations include the methods of determining identical points between recent and historical images, which has proven to be a cumbersome task due to continuous land cover changes. Our research demonstrates a method of registering historical images using Time Invariant Line (TIL) features. TIL features are different representations of the same line features in multi-temporal data without explicit point-to-point or straight line-to-straight line correspondence. We successfully determined the exterior orientation of historical images by minimizing the area formed between corresponding TIL features in recent and historical images. We then tested the feasibility of the approach with synthetic and real data and analyzed the results. Based on our analysis, this method shows promise for long-term 3D change detection studies.

  12. Three-dimensional building roof boundary extraction using high-resolution aerial image and LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Poz, A. P.; Fazan, Antonio J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a semiautomatic method for rectilinear building roof boundary extraction, based on the integration of high-resolution aerial image and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data. The proposed method is formulated as an optimization problem, in which a snakes-based objective function is developed to represent the building roof boundaries in an object-space coordinate system. Three-dimensional polylines representing building roof boundaries are obtained by optimizing the objective function using the dynamic programming optimization technique. The results of our experiments showed that the proposed method satisfactorily performed the task of extracting different building roof boundaries from aerial image and LiDAR data.

  13. a computational modeling for image motion velocity on focal plane of aerial & aerospace frame camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Jin, G.; Li, Z. Y.

    As the resolving power and geometric accuracy of aerial aerospace imaging is demanded to be higher the researches in technology of IMC become very important In order to compensate the image motion on focal plane the rule of FPIMV Focal Plane Image Motion Velocity should be grasped while the posture of aircraft and the modes of imaging are under changing In this paper a reasonable computational modeling scheme to the problem is introduced Coordinates transformation method is utilized for calculation of forward FPIMV under different condition of vertical and sloped imaging meanwhile integrated with three axes posture and angle velocity of aircraft Forward FPIMV combine with pitch roll and yaw FPIMV is considered simultaneously and the derivation calculating expressions of frame camera FPIMV under different conditions is presented in detail The solution is applied to computational simulation and has been confirmed to be effective based on the calculation result and it lays the foundation for our farther researches on frame camera IMC technology Key words IMC FPIMV Focal Plane Image Motion Velocity Coordinates transformation method

  14. Implementation of a segmentation method for agricultural fields in aerial sequences of images based on CSAR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haijun; Houkes, Zweitze

    1998-09-01

    In this paper, a segmentation method for agricultural fields in aerial sequences of images based on the Circular Symmetri Auto-Regressive (CSAR) model is presented. The image sequences assumed to be acquired by a video camera (RGB-CCD system) from an aeroplane, which moves linearly over the scene. The objects in the scenes being considered in this paper, are agricultural fields. The classes of agricultural fields to be distinguished are determined by the type of crop, e.g. potatoes sugar beet, wheat, etc. In order to recognize and classify these fields from aerial sequence of images, a reliable segmentatio is required. Here texture features are used for segmentation. The implementation of segmentation for agricultural fields in aerial sequences of images is based on CSAR model in texture analysis. By comparing the estimated parameters of CSAR model from different area in an image, the characteristics and the class of a texture may be determined. The paper describes the segmentation method and its evaluation through experiments. Based on segmentation results, classification for surface texture of vegetation from aerial sequences of images is realized.

  15. Multi-Scale Matching for the Automatic Location of Control Points in Large Scale Aerial Images Using Terrestrial Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berveglieri, A.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.

    2014-03-01

    A technique to automatically locate Ground Control Points (GCPs) in large aerial images is presented considering the availability of low accuracy direct georeferencing data. The approach is based on image chips of GCPs extracted from vertical terrestrial images. A strategy combining image matching techniques was implemented to select correct matches. These matches were used to define a 2D transformation with which the GCP is projected close to its correct position, reducing the search space in the aerial image. Area-based matching with some refinements is used to locate GCPs with sub-pixel precision. Experiments were performed with multi-scale images and assessed with a bundle block adjustment simulating an indirect sensor orientation. The accuracy analysis was accomplished based on discrepancies obtained from GCPs and check points. The results were better than interactive measurements and a planimetric accuracy of 1/5 of the Ground Sample Distance (GSD) for the check points was achieved.

  16. Convergence of intense aerial acoustic waves radiated by a rectangular transverse vibrating plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Tomoki; Asami, Takuya; Miura, Hikaru

    2016-07-01

    A stripe-mode rectangular transverse vibrating plate can be used as a sound source that emits intense ultrasonic waves in air by placing a jut driving point outside the vibrating plate. The aim of this research was to use this vibrating plate to focus sound waves in the direction perpendicular to the nodal lines of the vibrating plate, which differs from the conventional direction. In this study, we investigated new methods for focusing the emitted sound waves by arranging reflective plates around the vibrating plate, using a design equation for each node between nodes in the vibrating plate, and placing additional reflective plates at an outer position beyond the convergence point, and found that a powerful acoustic field can be formed at an arbitrary position.

  17. Detection of Laurel Wilt Disease in Avocado Using Low Altitude Aerial Imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana I.; Ehsani, Reza; Ploetz, Randy C.; Crane, Jonathan H.; Buchanon, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a lethal disease of plants in the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). This devastating disease has spread rapidly along the southeastern seaboard of the United States and has begun to affect commercial avocado production in Florida. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the potential to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees using aerial images taken with a modified camera during helicopter surveys at low-altitude in the commercial avocado production area. The ability to distinguish laurel wilt-affected trees from other factors that produce similar external symptoms was also studied. RmodGB digital values of healthy trees and laurel wilt-affected trees, as well as fruit stress and vines covering trees were used to calculate several vegetation indices (VIs), band ratios, and VI combinations. These indices were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an M-statistic was performed in order to quantify the separability of those classes. Significant differences in spectral values among laurel wilt affected and healthy trees were observed in all vegetation indices calculated, although the best results were achieved with Excess Red (ExR), (Red–Green) and Combination 1 (COMB1) in all locations. B/G showed a very good potential for separate the other factors with symptoms similar to laurel wilt-affected trees, such as fruit stress and vines covering trees, from laurel wilt-affected trees. These consistent results prove the usefulness of using a modified camera (RmodGB) to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees from healthy trees, as well as from other factors that cause the same symptoms and suggest performing the classification in further research. According to our results, ExR and B/G should be utilized to develop an algorithm or decision rules to classify aerial images, since they showed the highest capacity to discriminate laurel wilt-affected trees. This methodology may allow the rapid

  18. Detection of laurel wilt disease in avocado using low altitude aerial imaging.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana I; Ehsani, Reza; Ploetz, Randy C; Crane, Jonathan H; Buchanon, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a lethal disease of plants in the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). This devastating disease has spread rapidly along the southeastern seaboard of the United States and has begun to affect commercial avocado production in Florida. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the potential to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees using aerial images taken with a modified camera during helicopter surveys at low-altitude in the commercial avocado production area. The ability to distinguish laurel wilt-affected trees from other factors that produce similar external symptoms was also studied. RmodGB digital values of healthy trees and laurel wilt-affected trees, as well as fruit stress and vines covering trees were used to calculate several vegetation indices (VIs), band ratios, and VI combinations. These indices were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an M-statistic was performed in order to quantify the separability of those classes. Significant differences in spectral values among laurel wilt affected and healthy trees were observed in all vegetation indices calculated, although the best results were achieved with Excess Red (ExR), (Red-Green) and Combination 1 (COMB1) in all locations. B/G showed a very good potential for separate the other factors with symptoms similar to laurel wilt-affected trees, such as fruit stress and vines covering trees, from laurel wilt-affected trees. These consistent results prove the usefulness of using a modified camera (RmodGB) to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees from healthy trees, as well as from other factors that cause the same symptoms and suggest performing the classification in further research. According to our results, ExR and B/G should be utilized to develop an algorithm or decision rules to classify aerial images, since they showed the highest capacity to discriminate laurel wilt-affected trees. This methodology may allow the rapid detection

  19. Detection of laurel wilt disease in avocado using low altitude aerial imaging.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana I; Ehsani, Reza; Ploetz, Randy C; Crane, Jonathan H; Buchanon, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a lethal disease of plants in the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). This devastating disease has spread rapidly along the southeastern seaboard of the United States and has begun to affect commercial avocado production in Florida. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the potential to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees using aerial images taken with a modified camera during helicopter surveys at low-altitude in the commercial avocado production area. The ability to distinguish laurel wilt-affected trees from other factors that produce similar external symptoms was also studied. RmodGB digital values of healthy trees and laurel wilt-affected trees, as well as fruit stress and vines covering trees were used to calculate several vegetation indices (VIs), band ratios, and VI combinations. These indices were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an M-statistic was performed in order to quantify the separability of those classes. Significant differences in spectral values among laurel wilt affected and healthy trees were observed in all vegetation indices calculated, although the best results were achieved with Excess Red (ExR), (Red-Green) and Combination 1 (COMB1) in all locations. B/G showed a very good potential for separate the other factors with symptoms similar to laurel wilt-affected trees, such as fruit stress and vines covering trees, from laurel wilt-affected trees. These consistent results prove the usefulness of using a modified camera (RmodGB) to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees from healthy trees, as well as from other factors that cause the same symptoms and suggest performing the classification in further research. According to our results, ExR and B/G should be utilized to develop an algorithm or decision rules to classify aerial images, since they showed the highest capacity to discriminate laurel wilt-affected trees. This methodology may allow the rapid detection

  20. Integrating Spray Plane-Based Remote Sensing and Rapid Image Processing with Variable-Rate Aerial Application.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A remote sensing and variable rate application system was configured for agricultural aircraft. This combination system has the potential of providing a completely integrated solution for all aspects of aerial site-specific application and includes remote sensing, image processing and georegistratio...

  1. Building roof segmentation from aerial images using a lineand region-based watershed segmentation technique.

    PubMed

    El Merabet, Youssef; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-02-02

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG.

  2. An asymmetric re-weighting method for the precision combined bundle adjustment of aerial oblique images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Linfu; Hu, Han; Wang, Jingxue; Zhu, Qing; Chen, Min

    2016-07-01

    Combined bundle adjustment is a fundamental step in the processing of massive oblique images. Traditional bundle adjustment designed for nadir images gives identical weights to different parts of image point observations made from different directions, due to the assumption that the errors in the observations follow the same Gaussian distribution. However, because of their large tilt angles, aerial oblique images have trapezoidal footprints on the ground, and their areas correspond to conspicuously different ground sample distances. The errors in different observations no longer conform to the above assumption, which leads to suboptimal bundle adjustment accuracy and restricts subsequent 3D applications. To model the distribution of the errors correctly for the combined bundle adjustment of oblique images, this paper proposes an asymmetric re-weighting method. The scale of each pixel is used to determine a re-weighting factor, and each pixel is subsequently projected onto the ground to identify another anisotropic re-weighting factor using the shape of its quadrangle. Next, these two factors are integrated into the combined bundle adjustment using asymmetric weights for the image point observations; greater weights are assigned to observations with fine resolutions, and those with coarse resolutions are penalized. This paper analyzes urban and rural images captured by three different five-angle camera systems, from both proprietary datasets and the ISPRS/EuroSDR benchmark. The results reveal that the proposed method outperforms the traditional method in both back-projected and triangulated precision by approximately 5-10% in most cases. Furthermore, the misalignments of point clouds generated by the different cameras are significantly alleviated after combined bundle adjustment.

  3. Infrared Surveys of Hawaiian Volcanoes: Aerial surveys with infrared imaging radiometer depict volcanic thermal patterns and structural features.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W A; Moxham, R M; Polcyn, F; Landis, G H

    1964-11-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs issuing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  4. Multimodal detection of man-made objects in simulated aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Matthew S.; Tutwiler, Richard L.; Natale, Donald J.; Bassett, Michael S.; Harner, Matthew P.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents an approach to multi-modal detection of man-made objects from aerial imagery. Detections are made in polarization imagery, hyperspectral imagery, and LIDAR point clouds then fused into a single confidence map. The detections are based on reflective, spectral, and geometric features of man-made objects in airborne images. The polarization imagery detector uses the Stokes parameters and the degree of linear polarization to find highly polarizing objects. The hyperspectral detector matches scene spectra to a library of man-made materials using a combination of the spectral gradient angle and the generalized likelihood ratio test. The LIDAR detector clusters 3D points into objects using principle component analysis and prunes the detections by size and shape. Once the three channels are mapped into detection images, the information can be fused without some of the problems of multi-modal fusion, such as edge reversal. The imagery used in this system was simulated with a first-principles ray tracing image generator known as DIRSIG.

  5. Advanced Tie Feature Matching for the Registration of Mobile Mapping Imaging Data and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jende, P.; Peter, M.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping's ability to acquire high-resolution ground data is opposing unreliable localisation capabilities of satellite-based positioning systems in urban areas. Buildings shape canyons impeding a direct line-of-sight to navigation satellites resulting in a deficiency to accurately estimate the mobile platform's position. Consequently, acquired data products' positioning quality is considerably diminished. This issue has been widely addressed in the literature and research projects. However, a consistent compliance of sub-decimetre accuracy as well as a correction of errors in height remain unsolved. We propose a novel approach to enhance Mobile Mapping (MM) image orientation based on the utilisation of highly accurate orientation parameters derived from aerial imagery. In addition to that, the diminished exterior orientation parameters of the MM platform will be utilised as they enable the application of accurate matching techniques needed to derive reliable tie information. This tie information will then be used within an adjustment solution to correct affected MM data. This paper presents an advanced feature matching procedure as a prerequisite to the aforementioned orientation update. MM data is ortho-projected to gain a higher resemblance to aerial nadir data simplifying the images' geometry for matching. By utilising MM exterior orientation parameters, search windows may be used in conjunction with a selective keypoint detection and template matching. Originating from different sensor systems, however, difficulties arise with respect to changes in illumination, radiometry and a different original perspective. To respond to these challenges for feature detection, the procedure relies on detecting keypoints in only one image. Initial tests indicate a considerable improvement in comparison to classic detector/descriptor approaches in this particular matching scenario. This method leads to a significant reduction of outliers due to the limited availability

  6. The Need of Nested Grids for Aerial and Satellite Images and Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, G.; Mas, S.; Fernández-Villarino, X.; Martínez-Luceño, J.; Ojeda, J. C.; Pérez-Martín, B.; Tejeiro, J. A.; García-González, C.; López-Romero, E.; Soteres, C.

    2016-06-01

    Usual workflows for production, archiving, dissemination and use of Earth observation images (both aerial and from remote sensing satellites) pose big interoperability problems, as for example: non-alignment of pixels at the different levels of the pyramids that makes it impossible to overlay, compare and mosaic different orthoimages, without resampling them and the need to apply multiple resamplings and compression-decompression cycles. These problems cause great inefficiencies in production, dissemination through web services and processing in "Big Data" environments. Most of them can be avoided, or at least greatly reduced, with the use of a common "nested grid" for mutiresolution production, archiving, dissemination and exploitation of orthoimagery, digital elevation models and other raster data. "Nested grids" are space allocation schemas that organize image footprints, pixel sizes and pixel positions at all pyramid levels, in order to achieve coherent and consistent multiresolution coverage of a whole working area. A "nested grid" must be complemented by an appropriate "tiling schema", ideally based on the "quad-tree" concept. In the last years a "de facto standard" grid and Tiling Schema has emerged and has been adopted by virtually all major geospatial data providers. It has also been adopted by OGC in its "WMTS Simple Profile" standard. In this paper we explain how the adequate use of this tiling schema as common nested grid for orthoimagery, DEMs and other types of raster data constitutes the most practical solution to most of the interoperability problems of these types of data.

  7. Mass image data storage system for high resolution aerial photographic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Luan; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Zhongwen

    2008-10-01

    In order to make it possible for an image data acquisition and storage system used for aerial photographic survey to have a continuous storage speed of 144 MB/s and data storage capacity of 260GB, three main problems have been solved in this paper. First, with multi-channel synchronous DMA transfer, parallel data storage of four SCSI hard disks is realized. It solved the problem of the data transfer rate too high for direct storage. Then, to increase the data transfer rate, a high speed BUS based on LVDS and a SCSI control circuit based on FAS368M were designed. It solved the problem of PCI BUS limiting the storage speed. Finally, the problem of the SCSI hard disk continuous storage speed declining led by much time interval between two DMA transfers is solved by optimizing DMA channel. The practical system test shows that the acquisition and storage system has a continuous storage speed of 150 MB/s and a data storage capacity of 280GB. Therefore, it is a new storage method for high speed and mass image data.

  8. Model-based recognition and classification for surface texture of vegetation from an aerial sequence of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haijun; Houkes, Zweitze

    1997-12-01

    In this paper, a model based recognition and classification method for surface texture of vegetation from aerial sequence of images is presented. The image sequences are assumed to be acquired by a video camera (RGB-CCD system) from an aeroplane, which moves linearly over the scene. The objects in the scenes being considered in this paper, are agricultural fields. The classes of agricultural fields to be distinguished are determined by the type of crop, e.g. potatoes, sugar beet, what, etc. In order to recognize and classify these fields from aerial sequence of images, a common approach is in the use of surface texture. Here the circular symmetric auto- regressive (CSAR) random model is used for texture analysis. By manipulating the estimated value against its real value, the characteristics of a texture image may be determined. A hypothesize-and verify algorithm is used for model recognition. Based on all kinds of models, classification for surface texture of vegetation from aerial sequences of images is realized.

  9. Active Contours Using Additive Local and Global Intensity Fitting Models for Intensity Inhomogeneous Image Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Soomro, Shafiullah; Kim, Jeong Heon; Soomro, Toufique Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an improved region based active contour method with a level set formulation. The proposed energy functional integrates both local and global intensity fitting terms in an additive formulation. Local intensity fitting term influences local force to pull the contour and confine it to object boundaries. In turn, the global intensity fitting term drives the movement of contour at a distance from the object boundaries. The global intensity term is based on the global division algorithm, which can better capture intensity information of an image than Chan-Vese (CV) model. Both local and global terms are mutually assimilated to construct an energy function based on a level set formulation to segment images with intensity inhomogeneity. Experimental results show that the proposed method performs better both qualitatively and quantitatively compared to other state-of-the-art-methods. PMID:27800011

  10. Device for imaging scenes with very large ranges of intensity

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance Albert

    2011-11-15

    A device for imaging scenes with a very large range of intensity having a pair of polarizers, a primary lens, an attenuating mask, and an imaging device optically connected along an optical axis. Preferably, a secondary lens, positioned between the attenuating mask and the imaging device is used to focus light on the imaging device. The angle between the first polarization direction and the second polarization direction is adjustable.

  11. Precisely detecting atomic position of atomic intensity images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhijun; Guo, Yaolin; Tang, Sai; Li, Junjie; Wang, Jincheng; Zhou, Yaohe

    2015-03-01

    We proposed a quantitative method to detect atomic position in atomic intensity images from experiments such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and simulation such as phase field crystal modeling. The evaluation of detection accuracy proves the excellent performance of the method. This method provides a chance to precisely determine atomic interactions based on the detected atomic positions from the atomic intensity image, and hence to investigate the related physical, chemical and electrical properties.

  12. Transport of intensity phase imaging in a volume holographic microscope.

    PubMed

    Waller, Laura; Luo, Yuan; Yang, Se Young; Barbastathis, George

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate a method for single-shot quantitative phase imaging based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) in a volume holographic microscope (VHM). The VHM system uses a multiplexed volume hologram to laterally separate images from different focal planes. This axial intensity information is then used to solve the TIE and recover object phase quantitatively. Further, we show improved phase recovery by using five multiplexed gratings in one hologram. PMID:20808383

  13. Low-Level Tie Feature Extraction of Mobile Mapping Data (mls/images) and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jende, P.; Hussnain, Z.; Peter, M.; Oude Elberink, S.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-03-01

    Mobile Mapping (MM) is a technique to obtain geo-information using sensors mounted on a mobile platform or vehicle. The mobile platform's position is provided by the integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). However, especially in urban areas, building structures can obstruct a direct line-of-sight between the GNSS receiver and navigation satellites resulting in an erroneous position estimation. Therefore, derived MM data products, such as laser point clouds or images, lack the expected positioning reliability and accuracy. This issue has been addressed by many researchers, whose aim to mitigate these effects mainly concentrates on utilising tertiary reference data. However, current approaches do not consider errors in height, cannot achieve sub-decimetre accuracy and are often not designed to work in a fully automatic fashion. We propose an automatic pipeline to rectify MM data products by employing high resolution aerial nadir and oblique imagery as horizontal and vertical reference, respectively. By exploiting the MM platform's defective, and therefore imprecise but approximate orientation parameters, accurate feature matching techniques can be realised as a pre-processing step to minimise the MM platform's three-dimensional positioning error. Subsequently, identified correspondences serve as constraints for an orientation update, which is conducted by an estimation or adjustment technique. Since not all MM systems employ laser scanners and imaging sensors simultaneously, and each system and data demands different approaches, two independent workflows are developed in parallel. Still under development, both workflows will be presented and preliminary results will be shown. The workflows comprise of three steps; feature extraction, feature matching and the orientation update. In this paper, initial results of low-level image and point cloud feature extraction methods will be discussed as well as an outline of

  14. Matching Aerial Images to 3d Building Models Based on Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Bang, K.; Sohn, G.; Armenakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model-to-image framework to automatically align a single airborne image with existing 3D building models using geometric hashing is proposed. As a prerequisite process for various applications such as data fusion, object tracking, change detection and texture mapping, the proposed registration method is used for determining accurate exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. This model-to-image matching process consists of three steps: 1) feature extraction, 2) similarity measure and matching, and 3) adjustment of EOPs of a single image. For feature extraction, we proposed two types of matching cues, edged corner points representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges and contextual relations among the edged corner points within an individual roof. These matching features are extracted from both 3D building and a single airborne image. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on co-linearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of single image's EOP can be achievable by the proposed registration approach as an alternative to labour-intensive manual registration process.

  15. Three-dimensional imaging applications in Earth Sciences using video data acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Tara

    For three dimensional (3D) aerial images, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are cheaper to operate and easier to fly than the typical manned craft mounted with a laser scanner. This project explores the feasibility of using 2D video images acquired with a UAV and transforming them into 3D point clouds. The Aeryon Scout -- a quad-copter micro UAV -- flew two missions: the first at York University Keele campus and the second at the Canadian Wollastonite Mine Property. Neptec's ViDAR software was used to extract 3D information from the 2D video using structure from motion. The resulting point clouds were sparsely populated, yet captured vegetation well. They were used successfully to measure fracture orientation in rock walls. Any improvement in the video resolution would cascade through the processing and improve the overall results.

  16. A supervised method for object-based 3D building change detection on aerial stereo images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, R.; Gruen, A.

    2014-08-01

    There is a great demand for studying the changes of buildings over time. The current trend for building change detection combines the orthophoto and DSM (Digital Surface Models). The pixel-based change detection methods are very sensitive to the quality of the images and DSMs, while the object-based methods are more robust towards these problems. In this paper, we propose a supervised method for building change detection. After a segment-based SVM (Support Vector Machine) classification with features extracted from the orthophoto and DSM, we focus on the detection of the building changes of different periods by measuring their height and texture differences, as well as their shapes. A decision tree analysis is used to assess the probability of change for each building segment and the traffic lighting system is used to indicate the status "change", "non-change" and "uncertain change" for building segments. The proposed method is applied to scanned aerial photos of the city of Zurich in 2002 and 2007, and the results have demonstrated that our method is able to achieve high detection accuracy.

  17. Remote sensing for precision agriculture: Within-field spatial variability analysis and mapping with aerial digital multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalapillai, Sreekala

    2000-10-01

    Advances in remote sensing technology and biological sensors provided the motivation for this study on the applications of aerial multispectral remote sensing in precision agriculture. The feasibility of using high-resolution multispectral remote sensing for precision farming applications such as soil type delineation, identification of crop nitrogen levels, and modeling and mapping of weed density distribution and yield potential within a crop field was explored in this study. Some of the issues such as image calibration for variable lighting conditions and soil background influence were also addressed. Intensity normalization and band ratio methods were found to be adequate image calibration methods to compensate for variable illumination and soil background influence. Several within-field variability factors such as growth stage, field conditions, nutrient availability, crop cultivar, and plant population were found to be dominant in different periods. Unsupervised clustering of color infrared (CIR) image of a field soil was able to identify soil mapping units with an average accuracy of 76%. Spectral reflectance from a crop field was highly correlated to the chlorophyll reading. A regression model developed to predict nitrogen stress in corn identified nitrogen-stressed areas from nitrogen-sufficient areas with a high accuracy (R2 = 0.93). Weed density was highly correlated to the spectral reflectance from a field. One month after planting was found to be a good time to map spatial weed density. The optimum range of resolution for weed mapping was 4 m to 4.5 m for the remote sensing system and the experimental field used in this study. Analysis of spatial yield with respect to spectral reflectance showed that the visible and NIR reflectance were negatively correlated to yield and crop population in heavily weed-infested areas. The yield potential was highly correlated to image indices, especially to normalized brightness. The ANN model developed for one of the

  18. Miniaturization of high spectral spatial resolution hyperspectral imagers on unmanned aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Samuel L.; Clemens, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Traditional airborne environmental monitoring has frequently deployed hyperspectral imaging as a leading tool for characterizing and analyzing a scene's critical spectrum-based signatures for applications in agriculture genomics and crop health, vegetation and mineral monitoring, and hazardous material detection. As the acceptance of hyperspectral evaluation grows in the airborne community, there has been a dramatic trend in moving the technology from use on midsize aircraft to Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). The use of UAS accomplishes a number of goals including the reduction in cost to run multiple seasonal evaluations over smaller but highly valuable land-areas, the ability to use frequent data collections to make rapid decisions on land management, and the improvement of spatial resolution by flying at lower altitudes (<500 ft.). Despite this trend, there are several key parameters affecting the use of traditional hyperspectral instruments in UAS with payloads less than 10 lbs. where size, weight and power (SWAP) are critical to how high and how far a given UAS can fly. Additionally, on many of the light-weight UAS, users are frequently trying to capture data from one or more instruments to augment the hyperspectral data collection, thus reducing the amount of SWAP available to the hyperspectral instrumentation. The following manuscript will provide an analysis on a newly-developed miniaturized hyperspectral imaging platform, the Nano-Hyperspec®, which provides full hyperspectral resolution and traditional hyperspectral capabilities without sacrificing performance to accommodate the decreasing SWAP of smaller and smaller UAS platforms. The analysis will examine the Nano-Hyperspec flown in several UAS airborne environments and the correlation of the systems data with LiDAR and other GIS datasets.

  19. Comparative evaluation of iterative and non-iterative methods to ground coordinate determination from single aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yongwei

    2004-04-01

    The single-ray backprojection problem refers to the process of determining ground coordinates of pixels in a single aerial image with the support of a digital surface model or a digital elevation model. Several methods have been employed to solve this problem. The iterative photogrammetric (IP) method, based on the inverse collinearity equations, is widely used in photogrammetry. The ray-tracing (RT) method, which is popular in computer graphics, computes the coordinates by intersecting the view ray with the surface. A third one is an iterative ray-tracing (IRT) method, which finds the intersection point by extending the view ray towards the surface by a certain step once a time until it hits the surface. Since the methods become diversified, there is a need to compare and evaluate them. This paper analyzes the principles of these three methods, tests them using a variety of data sets, and provides a comprehensive comparison on their strategies, parameter selection, divergence, occlusion-compliance, precision, robustness, and efficiency. The major difference of these methods is in the strategy of computing the intersection between the view ray and the surface, and this leads to their varied performance. It is found that the IP method is the most computationally efficient and can produce precise coordinates for simple surfaces, but it may surfer from the divergence and occlusion-induced problems for complicated ones. The rigorous RT method is precise, occlusion-compliant and parameter-free, but it is computationally intensive. The IRT method is intermediate in terms of efficiency. If the initial step is small enough, it can adequately address the occlusion-induced problem and produce satisfactory coordinates for complicated surfaces. This comparison provides a guide to method selection for the single-ray backprojection problem.

  20. Correction of aeroheating-induced intensity nonuniformity in infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Yan, Luxin; Zhao, Hui; Dai, Xiaobing; Zhang, Tianxu

    2016-05-01

    Aeroheating-induced intensity nonuniformity effects severely influence the effective performance of an infrared (IR) imaging system in high-speed flight. In this paper, we propose a new approach to the correction of intensity nonuniformity in IR images. The basic assumption is that the low-frequency intensity bias is additive and smoothly varying so that it can be modeled as a bivariate polynomial and estimated by using an isotropic total variation (TV) model. A half quadratic penalty method is applied to the isotropic form of TV discretization. And an alternating minimization algorithm is adopted for solving the optimization model. The experimental results of simulated and real aerothermal images show that the proposed correction method can effectively improve IR image quality.

  1. Learning Scene Categories from High Resolution Satellite Image for Aerial Video Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2011-01-01

    Automatic scene categorization can benefit various aerial video processing applications. This paper addresses the problem of predicting the scene category from aerial video frames using a prior model learned from satellite imagery. We show that local and global features in the form of line statistics and 2-D power spectrum parameters respectively can characterize the aerial scene well. The line feature statistics and spatial frequency parameters are useful cues to distinguish between different urban scene categories. We learn the scene prediction model from highresolution satellite imagery to test the model on the Columbus Surrogate Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (CSUAV) dataset ollected by high-altitude wide area UAV sensor platform. e compare the proposed features with the popular Scale nvariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features. Our experimental results show that proposed approach outperforms te SIFT model when the training and testing are conducted n disparate data sources.

  2. Satellite Images and Aerial Photographs of the Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barras, John A.

    2007-01-01

    -water datasets derived from the Landsat TM satellite imagery were combined with 2001 marsh vegetative communities (Chabreck and others, unpub. data, 2001) to identify land-water configurations by marsh community before and after the hurricanes. Links to the Landsat TM images and aerial photographs are given below (figs. 1-29). Comparison of land area before the storms to land area after the storms is made possible by the inclusion of Landsat TM images and aerial photographs taken in the years and months before the storms. The figures are arranged geographically from east to west to follow the chronology of the effects of the storms. For a more detailed analysis of the changes wrought by these storms, see 'Land Area Changes in Coastal Louisiana After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita' (Barras, in press).

  3. Aerial Images from AN Uav System: 3d Modeling and Tree Species Classification in a Park Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, R.; Passoni, D.; Pinto, L.; Sona, G.

    2012-07-01

    The use of aerial imagery acquired by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is scheduled within the FoGLIE project (Fruition of Goods Landscape in Interactive Environment): it starts from the need to enhance the natural, artistic and cultural heritage, to produce a better usability of it by employing audiovisual movable systems of 3D reconstruction and to improve monitoring procedures, by using new media for integrating the fruition phase with the preservation ones. The pilot project focus on a test area, Parco Adda Nord, which encloses various goods' types (small buildings, agricultural fields and different tree species and bushes). Multispectral high resolution images were taken by two digital compact cameras: a Pentax Optio A40 for RGB photos and a Sigma DP1 modified to acquire the NIR band. Then, some tests were performed in order to analyze the UAV images' quality with both photogrammetric and photo-interpretation purposes, to validate the vector-sensor system, the image block geometry and to study the feasibility of tree species classification. Many pre-signalized Control Points were surveyed through GPS to allow accuracy analysis. Aerial Triangulations (ATs) were carried out with photogrammetric commercial software, Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) and PhotoModeler, with manual or automatic selection of Tie Points, to pick out pros and cons of each package in managing non conventional aerial imagery as well as the differences in the modeling approach. Further analysis were done on the differences between the EO parameters and the corresponding data coming from the on board UAV navigation system.

  4. Robust Intensity Standardization in Brain Magnetic Resonance Images.

    PubMed

    De Nunzio, Giorgio; Cataldo, Rosella; Carlà, Alessandra

    2015-12-01

    The paper is focused on a tiSsue-Based Standardization Technique (SBST) of magnetic resonance (MR) brain images. Magnetic Resonance Imaging intensities have no fixed tissue-specific numeric meaning, even within the same MRI protocol, for the same body region, or even for images of the same patient obtained on the same scanner in different moments. This affects postprocessing tasks such as automatic segmentation or unsupervised/supervised classification methods, which strictly depend on the observed image intensities, compromising the accuracy and efficiency of many image analyses algorithms. A large number of MR images from public databases, belonging to healthy people and to patients with different degrees of neurodegenerative pathology, were employed together with synthetic MRIs. Combining both histogram and tissue-specific intensity information, a correspondence is obtained for each tissue across images. The novelty consists of computing three standardizing transformations for the three main brain tissues, for each tissue class separately. In order to create a continuous intensity mapping, spline smoothing of the overall slightly discontinuous piecewise-linear intensity transformation is performed. The robustness of the technique is assessed in a post hoc manner, by verifying that automatic segmentation of images before and after standardization gives a high overlapping (Dice index >0.9) for each tissue class, even across images coming from different sources. Furthermore, SBST efficacy is tested by evaluating if and how much it increases intertissue discrimination and by assessing gaussianity of tissue gray-level distributions before and after standardization. Some quantitative comparisons to already existing different approaches available in the literature are performed.

  5. Semi-Automated Classification of Gray Scale Aerial Photographs using Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harb Rabia, Ahmed; Terribile, Fabio

    2013-04-01

    Aerial photography is an important source of high resolution remotely sensed data. Before 1970, aerial photographs were the only remote sensing data source for land use and land cover classification. Using these old aerial photographs improve the final output of land use and land cover change detection. However, classic techniques of aerial photographs classification like manual interpretation or screen digitization require great experience, long processing time and vast effort. A new technique needs to be developed in order to reduce processing time and effort and to give better results. Geographic object based image analysis (GEOBIA) is a newly developed area of Geographic Information Science and remote sensing in which automatic segmentation of images into objects of similar spectral, temporal and spatial characteristics is undertaken. Unlike pixel-based technique, GEOBIA deals with the object properties such as texture, square fit, roundness and many other properties that can improve classification results. GEOBIA technique can be divided into two main steps; segmentation and classification. Segmentation process is grouping adjacent pixels into objects of similar spectral and spatial characteristics. Classification process is assigning classes to the generated objects based on the characteristics of the individual objects. This study aimed to use GEOBIA technique to develop a novel approach for land use and land cover classification of aerial photographs that saves time and effort and gives improved results. Aerial photographs from 1954 of Valle Telesina in Italy were used in this study. Images were rectified and georeferenced in Arcmap using topographic maps. Images were then processed in eCognition software to generate land use and land cover map of 1954. A decision tree rule set was developed in eCognition to classify images and finally nine classes of general land use and land cover in the study area were recognized (forest, trees stripes, agricultural

  6. The construction of landslides achieves by using 1969 CORONA (KH-4B) image and aerial photos- A case study of the catchment of Te-chi reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Chia-Hung; Dirk, Wenske; Lin, Jiun-Chuan; Böse, Margot

    2010-05-01

    Landslides are common phenomenon in Taiwan for the extreme climate, intensive tectonic movement and highly fracture bedrock. In the study of landslides, to make the historical archive is critical for both long term monitoring and landform evolution research. For the first three decades since the 1950s, only few maps and written documents are available for the high mountain areas, so historical remote sensing data can be a viable way to achieve detailed information about human activities and landscape reaction in terms of increasing denudation. In this study, we try to use different kind of data to identify landslides, including CORONA imagery of 969, ortho-rectified aerial photo map of 1980 and ortho-rectified aerial photo of 2004. The historical CORONA imagery can be orthorectified and georeferenced therefore can be used as a source of data for landslides identification and landslide archive construction. The study area is in the upper catchment of Ta-chia River. This area is the homeland to Taiyal aboriginal tribe. The Tachia River is "Taiwan's TVA" in terms of its vast hydroelectric power potential. The rough terrain makes accessibility very difficult, isolating the upper Tachia basin from the rest of Taiwan's densely populated areas. The construction of the Central Cross-Island Highway officially started in July 1956 and was completed in May 1960. It connects the towns of Tong-shi in the west and Taroko in the east, across the upper Ta-chia basin. There are branches off to the town of Pu-li in the south and I-lan in the north, so the upper Ta-chia basin becomes the pivotal node for cross-island traffic in four directions. Apart from its military purposes, the Central Cross-Island Highway has a substantial impact on the mountainous areas of upper Tachia basin, the most important aspect being the increase of population and farming. The rough terrain makes the human accessibility very lower so the upper Ta-chia basin is isolated from the rest of densely populated

  7. Intensity-based image registration by minimizing residual complexity.

    PubMed

    Myronenko, Andriy; Song, Xubo

    2010-11-01

    Accurate definition of the similarity measure is a key component in image registration. Most commonly used intensity-based similarity measures rely on the assumptions of independence and stationarity of the intensities from pixel to pixel. Such measures cannot capture the complex interactions among the pixel intensities, and often result in less satisfactory registration performances, especially in the presence of spatially-varying intensity distortions. We propose a novel similarity measure that accounts for intensity nonstationarities and complex spatially-varying intensity distortions in mono-modal settings. We derive the similarity measure by analytically solving for the intensity correction field and its adaptive regularization. The final measure can be interpreted as one that favors a registration with minimum compression complexity of the residual image between the two registered images. One of the key advantages of the new similarity measure is its simplicity in terms of both computational complexity and implementation. This measure produces accurate registration results on both artificial and real-world problems that we have tested, and outperforms other state-of-the-art similarity measures in these cases.

  8. Identification of disrupted surfaces due to military activity at the Ft. Irwin National Training Center: An aerial photograph and satellite image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, L.E.; Marsh, S.E.; Lee, C.

    1996-07-01

    Concern for environmental management of our natural resources is most often focused on the anthropogenic impacts placed upon these resources. Desert landscapes, in particular, are fragile environments, and minimal stresses on surficial materials can greatly increase the rate and character of erosional responses. The National Training Center, Ft. Irwin, located in the middle of the Mojave Desert, California, provides an isolated study area of intense ORV activity occurring over a 50-year period. Geomorphic surfaces, and surficial disruption from two study sites within the Ft. Irwin area were mapped from 1947, 1:28,400, and 1993 1:12,000 black and white aerial photographs. Several field checks were conducted to verify this mapping. However, mapping from black and white aerial photography relies heavily on tonal differences, patterns, and morphological criteria. Satellite imagery, sensitive to changes in mineralogy, can help improve the ability to distinguish geomorphic units in desert regions. In order to assess both the extent of disrupted surfaces and the surficial geomorphology discemable from satellite imagery, analysis was done on SPOT panchromatic and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral imagery acquired during the spring of 1987 and 1993. The resulting classified images provide a clear indication of the capabilities of the satellite data to aid in the delineation of disrupted geomorphic surfaces.

  9. Application of high resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles for hydrology and rangeland science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C. A.; Perini, N. A.; Saripalli, S.; Laliberte, A.

    2012-12-01

    A common problem in many natural resource disciplines is the lack of high-enough spatial resolution images that can be used for monitoring and modeling purposes. Advances have been made in the utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in hydrology and rangeland science. By utilizing low flight altitudes and velocities, UAVs are able to produce high resolution (5 cm) images as well as stereo coverage (with 75% forward overlap and 40% sidelap) to extract digital elevation models (DEM). Another advantage of flying at low altitude is that the potential problems of atmospheric haze obscuration are eliminated. Both small fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft have been used in our experiments over two rangeland areas in the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico and the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. The fixed-wing UAV has a digital camera in the wing and six-band multispectral camera in the nose, while the rotary-wing UAV carries a digital camera as payload. Because we have been acquiring imagery for several years, there are now > 31,000 photos at one of the study sites, and 177 mosaics over rangeland areas have been constructed. Using the DEM obtained from the imagery we have determined the actual catchment areas of three watersheds and compared these to previous estimates. At one site, the UAV-derived watershed area is 4.67 ha which is 22% smaller compared to a manual survey using a GPS unit obtained several years ago. This difference can be significant in constructing a watershed model of the site. From a vegetation species classification, we also determined that two of the shrub types in this small watershed(mesquite and creosote with 6.47 % and 5.82% cover, respectively) grow in similar locations(flat upland areas with deep soils), whereas the most predominant shrub(mariola with 11.9% cover) inhabits hillslopes near stream channels(with steep shallow soils). The positioning of these individual shrubs throughout the catchment using

  10. Estimating Mixed Broadleaves Forest Stand Volume Using Dsm Extracted from Digital Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, H.

    2012-07-01

    In mixed old growth broadleaves of Hyrcanian forests, it is difficult to estimate stand volume at plot level by remotely sensed data while LiDar data is absent. In this paper, a new approach has been proposed and tested for estimating stand forest volume. The approach is based on this idea that forest volume can be estimated by variation of trees height at plots. In the other word, the more the height variation in plot, the more the stand volume would be expected. For testing this idea, 120 circular 0.1 ha sample plots with systematic random design has been collected in Tonekaon forest located in Hyrcanian zone. Digital surface model (DSM) measure the height values of the first surface on the ground including terrain features, trees, building etc, which provides a topographic model of the earth's surface. The DSMs have been extracted automatically from aerial UltraCamD images so that ground pixel size for extracted DSM varied from 1 to 10 m size by 1m span. DSMs were checked manually for probable errors. Corresponded to ground samples, standard deviation and range of DSM pixels have been calculated. For modeling, non-linear regression method was used. The results showed that standard deviation of plot pixels with 5 m resolution was the most appropriate data for modeling. Relative bias and RMSE of estimation was 5.8 and 49.8 percent, respectively. Comparing to other approaches for estimating stand volume based on passive remote sensing data in mixed broadleaves forests, these results are more encouraging. One big problem in this method occurs when trees canopy cover is totally closed. In this situation, the standard deviation of height is low while stand volume is high. In future studies, applying forest stratification could be studied.

  11. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  12. Refinement of Colored Mobile Mapping Data Using Intensity Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, T.; Fukano, K.; Onodera, R.; Masuda, H.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile mapping systems (MMS) can capture dense point-clouds of urban scenes. For visualizing realistic scenes using point-clouds, RGB colors have to be added to point-clouds. To generate colored point-clouds in a post-process, each point is projected onto camera images and a RGB color is copied to the point at the projected position. However, incorrect colors are often added to point-clouds because of the misalignment of laser scanners, the calibration errors of cameras and laser scanners, or the failure of GPS acquisition. In this paper, we propose a new method to correct RGB colors of point-clouds captured by a MMS. In our method, RGB colors of a point-cloud are corrected by comparing intensity images and RGB images. However, since a MMS outputs sparse and anisotropic point-clouds, regular images cannot be obtained from intensities of points. Therefore, we convert a point-cloud into a mesh model and project triangle faces onto image space, on which regular lattices are defined. Then we extract edge features from intensity images and RGB images, and detect their correspondences. In our experiments, our method worked very well for correcting RGB colors of point-clouds captured by a MMS.

  13. Geomatics techniques applied to time series of aerial images for multitemporal geomorphological analysis of the Miage Glacier (Mont Blanc).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, Luigi; Carletti, Roberto; Giardino, Marco; Mortara, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The Miage glacier is the major one in the Italian side of the Mont Blanc Massif, the third by area and the first by longitudinal extent among Italian glaciers. It is a typical debris covered glacier, since the end of the L.I.A. The debris coverage reduces ablation, allowing a relative stability of the glacier terminus, which is characterized by a wide and articulated moraine apparatus. For its conservative landforms, the Miage Glacier has a great importance for the analysis of the geomorphological response to recent climatic changes. Thanks to an organized existing archive of multitemporal aerial images (1935 to present) a photogrammetric approach has been applied to detect recent geomorphological changes in the Miage glacial basin. The research team provided: a) to digitize all the available images (still in analogic form) through photogrammetric scanners (very low image distortions devices) taking care of correctly defining the resolution of the acquisition compared to the scale mapping images are suitable for; b) to import digitized images into an appropriate digital photogrammetry software environment; c) to manage images in order, where possible, to carried out the stereo models orientation necessary for 3D navigation and plotting of critical geometric features of the glacier. Recognized geometric feature, referring to different periods, can be transferred to vector layers and imported in a GIS for further comparisons and investigations; d) to produce multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models for glacier volume changes; e) to perform orthoprojection of such images to obtain multitemporal orthoimages useful for areal an planar terrain evaluation and thematic analysis; f) to evaluate both planimetric positioning and height determination accuracies reachable through the photogrammetric process. Users have to known reliability of the measures they can do over such products. This can drive them to define the applicable field of this approach and this can help them to

  14. The low intensity X-ray imaging scope /Lixiscope/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.; Trombka, J. I.; Seltzer, S. M.; Webber, R. L.; Farr, M. R.; Rennie, J.

    1978-01-01

    A fully portable, small-format X-ray imaging system, Lixiscope (low intensity X-ray imaging scope) is described. In the prototype, which has been built to demonstrate the feasibility of the Lixiscope concept, only well-developed and available components have been used. Consideration is given to the principles of operation of the device, some of its performance characteristics as well as possible dental, medical and industrial applications.

  15. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process. PMID:27338410

  16. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process. PMID:27338410

  17. Transport of intensity phase imaging using Bessel sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccelli, Jonathan C.; Chakraborty, Tonmoy

    2016-05-01

    Propagation-based phase contrast using the transport of intensity equation (TIE) allows rapid, deterministic phase retrieval from defocused images. For weakly attenuating objects, phase can be retrieved from a single image. However, the TIE suffers from significant low frequency artifacts due to enhancement of noise during phase retrieval. We demonstrate that by patterning the illumination source as approximately a modified Bessel function of the 2nd kind of zero order, quantitative phase can be imaged directly at the detector within a spatial frequency band. Outside of that band, Bessel sources still improve low frequency performance in phase retrieval.

  18. Enhancing images with Intensity-Dependent Spread functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reese, Greg

    1992-01-01

    The theory of Intensity-Dependent Spread functions (IDS), a model of the human visual system proposed by Cornsweet (1985), is applied to image enhancement. An artificial image is examined which illustrates the characteristics of IDS processing and shows how the theoretical results translate into visual effects. Examples of realistic scenes that have been enhanced by IDS are presented. The system is shown to be particularly useful for bringing out detail in regions of low-contrast images. IDS can be readily implemented on a parallel computer.

  19. ISSUES IN DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR MAPPING SUBMERSED AQUATIC VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the numerous issues that needed to be addressed when developing a methodology for mapping Submersed Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) from digital aerial photography. Specifically, we discuss 1) choice of film; 2) consideration of tide and weather constraints; 3) in-s...

  20. EUV pattern defect detection sensitivity based on aerial image linewidth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Naulleau, P.; Liang, T.; Yan, P.-Y.; Huh, S.

    2010-02-12

    As the quality of EUV-wavelength mask inspection microscopes improves over time, the image properties and intensity profiles of reflected light can be evaluated in ever-greater detail. The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is one such microscope, featuring mask resolution values that match or exceed those available through lithographic printing in current photoresists. In order to evaluate the defect detection sensitivity of the AIT for dense line patterns on typical masks, the authors study the line width roughness (LWR) on two masks, as measured in the EUV images. They report the through-focus and pitch dependence of contrast, image log slope, linewidth, and LWR. The AIT currently reaches LWR 3{sigma} values close to 9 nm for 175 nm half-pitch lines. This value is below 10% linewidth for nearly all lines routinely measured in the AIT. Evidence suggests that this lower level may arise from the mask's inherent pattern roughness. While the sensitivity limit of the AlT has not yet been established, it is clear that the AIT has the required sensitivity to detect defects that cause 10% linewidth changes in line sizes of 125 nm and larger.

  1. Collecting Inexpensive High Resolution Aerial and Stereo Images of Small- to Mid-Scale Geomorphic and Tectonic Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelwright, R. J.; White, W. S.; Willis, J. B.

    2010-12-01

    Methods for collecting accurate, mm- to cm-scale stereoscopic aerial imagery of both small- and mid-scale geomorphic features are developed for a one-time cost of under $1500. High resolution aerial images are valuable for documenting and analyzing small- to mid-scale geomorphic and tectonic features. However, collecting images of mid-scale features such as landslides, rock glaciers, fault scarps, and cinder cones is expensive and makes studies that rely on high resolution repeat imagery prohibitive for undergraduate geology departments with limited budgets. In addition to cost, collecting images of smaller scale geomorphic features such as gravel bars is often impeded by overhanging vegetation or other features in the immediate environment that make impractical the collection of aerial images using standard airborne techniques. The methods provide high resolution stereo photos suitable for image processing and stereographic analysis; the images are potentially suitable for change analyses, velocity tracking, and construction of lidar-resolution digital elevation models. We developed two techniques. The technique suitable for small-scale features (such as gravel bars) utilizes two Nikon D3000 digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras attached to a system of poles that suspends the cameras at a height of 4 meters with a variable camera separation of 0.6 to 0.9 m. The poles are oriented such that they do not appear in the photographs. The cameras are simultaneously remotely activated to collect stereo pairs at a resolution of 64 pixels/cm2 (pixel length is 1.2 mm). Ground control on the images is provided by pegs placed 5 meters apart, GPS positioning, and a meter-stick included in each photograph. Initial photo data gathered of a gravel bar on the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River, north of Rexburg, Idaho is sharp and readily segmented using the MatLab-based CLASTS image processing algorithm. The technique developed for imaging mid-scale features (such as cinder

  2. Intensity inhomogeneity correction of magnetic resonance images using patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Bazin, Pierre-Louis; Prince, Jerry L.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a patch-based non-parametric approach to the correction of intensity inhomogeneity from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the human brain. During image acquisition, the inhomogeneity present in the radio-frequency coil, is usually manifested on the reconstructed MR image as a smooth shading effect. This artifact can significantly deteriorate the performance of any kind of image processing algorithm that uses intensities as a feature. Most of the current inhomogeneity correction techniques use explicit smoothness assumptions on the inhomogeneity field, which sometimes limit their performance if the actual inhomogeneity is not smooth, a problem that becomes prevalent in high fields. The proposed patch-based inhomogeneity correction method does not assume any parametric smoothness model, instead, it uses patches from an atlas of an inhomogeneity-free image to do the correction. Preliminary results show that the proposed method is comparable to N3, a current state of the art method, when the inhomogeneity is smooth, and outperforms N3 when the inhomogeneity contains non-smooth elements.

  3. [Building Change Detection Based on Multi-Level Rules Classification with Airborne LiDAR Data and Aerial Images].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi-long; Yan, Li

    2015-05-01

    The present paper proposes a new building change detection method combining Lidar point cloud with aerial image, using multi-level rules classification algorithm, to solve building change detection problem between these two kinds of heterogeneous data. Then, a morphological post-processing method combined with area threshold is proposed. Thus, a complete building change detection processing flow that can be applied to actual production is proposed. Finally, the effectiveness of the building change detection method is evaluated, processing the 2010 airborne LiDAR point cloud data and 2009 high resolution aerial image of Changchun City, Jilin province, China; in addition, compared with the object-oriented building change detection method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification, more analysis and evaluation of the suggested method is given. Experiment results show that the performance of the proposed building change detection method is ideal. Its Kappa index is 0. 90, and correctness is 0. 87, which is higher than the object-oriented building change detection method based on SVM classification.

  4. Segmentation of intensity inhomogeneous brain MR images using active contours.

    PubMed

    Akram, Farhan; Kim, Jeong Heon; Lim, Han Ul; Choi, Kwang Nam

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of intensity inhomogeneous regions is a well-known problem in image analysis applications. This paper presents a region-based active contour method for image segmentation, which properly works in the context of intensity inhomogeneity problem. The proposed region-based active contour method embeds both region and gradient information unlike traditional methods. It contains mainly two terms, area and length, in which the area term practices a new region-based signed pressure force (SPF) function, which utilizes mean values from a certain neighborhood using the local binary fitted (LBF) energy model. In turn, the length term uses gradient information. The novelty of our method is to locally compute new SPF function, which uses local mean values and is able to detect boundaries of the homogenous regions. Finally, a truncated Gaussian kernel is used to regularize the level set function, which not only regularizes it but also removes the need of computationally expensive reinitialization. The proposed method targets the segmentation problem of intensity inhomogeneous images and reduces the time complexity among locally computed active contour methods. The experimental results show that the proposed method yields better segmentation result as well as less time complexity compared with the state-of-the-art active contour methods. PMID:25143780

  5. MaNIAC-UAV - a methodology for automatic pavement defects detection using images obtained by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Castelo Branco, Luiz; César Lima Segantine, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems - ITS is a set of integrated technologies (Remote Sensing, Image Processing, Communications Systems and others) that aim to offer services and advanced traffic management for the several transportation modes (road, air and rail). Collect data on the characteristics and conditions of the road surface and keep them update is an important and difficult task that needs to be currently managed in order to reduce accidents and vehicle maintenance costs. Nowadays several roads and highways are paved, but usually there is insufficient updated data about current condition and status. There are different types of pavement defects on the roads and to keep them in good condition they should be constantly monitored and maintained according to pavement management strategy. This paper presents a methodology to obtain, automatically, information about the conditions of the highway asphalt pavement. Data collection was done through remote sensing using an UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) and the image processing and pattern recognition techniques through Geographic Information System.

  6. Detection of Tree Crowns Based on Reclassification Using Aerial Images and LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, S.; Zarea, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Arefi, H.

    2013-09-01

    Tree detection using aerial sensors in early decades was focused by many researchers in different fields including Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry. This paper is intended to detect trees in complex city areas using aerial imagery and laser scanning data. Our methodology is a hierarchal unsupervised method consists of some primitive operations. This method could be divided into three sections, in which, first section uses aerial imagery and both second and third sections use laser scanners data. In the first section a vegetation cover mask is created in both sunny and shadowed areas. In the second section Rate of Slope Change (RSC) is used to eliminate grasses. In the third section a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) is obtained from LiDAR data. By using DTM and Digital Surface Model (DSM) we would get to Normalized Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Then objects which are lower than a specific height are eliminated. Now there are three result layers from three sections. At the end multiplication operation is used to get final result layer. This layer will be smoothed by morphological operations. The result layer is sent to WG III/4 to evaluate. The evaluation result shows that our method has a good rank in comparing to other participants' methods in ISPRS WG III/4, when assessed in terms of 5 indices including area base completeness, area base correctness, object base completeness, object base correctness and boundary RMS. With regarding of being unsupervised and automatic, this method is improvable and could be integrate with other methods to get best results.

  7. Quantitative analysis of drainage obtained from aerial photographs and RBV/LANDSAT images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Formaggio, A. R.; Epiphanio, J. C. N.; Filho, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained from aerial photographs (1:60,000) and LANDSAT return beam vidicon imagery (1:100,000) concerning drainage density, drainage texture, hydrography density, and the average length of channels were compared. Statistical analysis shows that significant differences exist in data from the two sources. The highly drained area lost more information than the less drained area. In addition, it was observed that the loss of information about the number of rivers was higher than that about the length of the channels.

  8. High throughput phenotyping using an unmanned aerial vehicle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trials are expensive and labor-intensive to carry out. Strategies to maximize data collection from these trials will improve research efficiencies. We have purchased a small unmanned aerial vehicle (AEV) to collect digital images from field plots. The AEV is remote-controlled and can be guided...

  9. Semi-automted analysis of high-resolution aerial images to quantify docks in Upper Midwest glacial lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, Marcus W.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Hatch, Lorin K.; Vinje, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Lake resources can be negatively affected by environmental stressors originating from multiple sources and different spatial scales. Shoreline development, in particular, can negatively affect lake resources through decline in habitat quality, physical disturbance, and impacts on fisheries. The development of remote sensing techniques that efficiently characterize shoreline development in a regional context could greatly improve management approaches for protecting and restoring lake resources. The goal of this study was to develop an approach using high-resolution aerial photographs to quantify and assess docks as indicators of shoreline development. First, we describe a dock analysis workflow that can be used to quantify the spatial extent of docks using aerial images. Our approach incorporates pixel-based classifiers with object-based techniques to effectively analyze high-resolution digital imagery. Second, we apply the analysis workflow to quantify docks for 4261 lakes managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Overall accuracy of the analysis results was 98.4% (87.7% based on ) after manual post-processing. The analysis workflow was also 74% more efficient than the time required for manual digitization of docks. These analyses have immediate relevance for resource planning in Minnesota, whereas the dock analysis workflow could be used to quantify shoreline development in other regions with comparable imagery. These data can also be used to better understand the effects of shoreline development on aquatic resources and to evaluate the effects of shoreline development relative to other stressors.

  10. Fusion of aerial images with mean shift-based upsampled elevation data for improved building block classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyftakis, S.; Tsenoglou, T.; Bratsolis, E.; Charou, Eleni; Vassilas, N.

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing demand for detailed 3D modeling of buildings using elevation data such as those acquired from LiDAR airborne scanners. The various techniques that have been developed for this purpose typically perform segmentation into homogeneous regions followed by boundary extraction and are based on some combination of LiDAR data, digital maps, satellite images and aerial orthophotographs. In the present work, our dataset includes an aerial RGB orthophoto, a DSM and a DTM with spatial resolutions of 20cm, 1m and 2m respectively. Next, a normalized DSM (nDSM) is generated and fused with the optical data in order to increase its resolution to 20cm. The proposed methodology can be described as a two-step approach. First, a nearest neighbor interpolation is applied on the low resolution nDSM to obtain a low quality, ragged, elevation image. Next, we performed a mean shift-based discontinuity preserving smoothing on the fused data. The outcome is on the one hand a more homogeneous RGB image, with smoothed terrace coloring while at the same time preserving the optical edges and on the other hand an upsampled elevation data with considerable improvement regarding region filling and "straightness" of elevation discontinuities. Besides the apparent visual assessment of the increased accuracy of building boundaries, the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated using the processed dataset as input to five supervised classification methods. The performance of each method is evaluated using a subset of the test area as ground truth. Comparisons with classification results obtained with the original data demonstrate that preprocessing the input dataset using the mean shift algorithm improves significantly the performance of all tested classifiers for building block extraction.

  11. An optimized transport-of-intensity solution for phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Partha; Basunia, Mahmudunnabi; Poon, Ting-Chung; Zhang, Hongbo

    2016-05-01

    The transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) is often used to determine the phase and amplitude profile of a complex object by monitoring the intensities at different distances of propagation or around the image plane. TIE results from the imaginary part of the paraxial wave equation and is equivalent to the conservation of energy. The real part of the paraxial wave equation gives the eikonal equation in the presence of diffraction. Since propagation of the optical field between different planes is governed by the (paraxial) wave equation, both real and imaginary parts need to be satisfied at every propagation plane. In this work, the solution of the TIE is optimized by using the real part of the paraxial wave equation as a constraint. This technique is applied to the more exact determination of imaging the induced phase of a liquid heated by a focused laser beam, which has been previously computed using TIE only. Retrieval of imaged phase using the TIE is performed by using the constraint that naturally arises from the real part of the paraxial wave equation.

  12. In-focus quantitative intensity and phase imaging with the numerical focusing transport of intensity equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiaolin; Meng, Xin; Yu, Wei; Song, Xiaojun; Xue, Liang; Liu, Cheng; Wang, Shouyu

    2016-10-01

    Microscopy combined with the transport of intensity equation is capable of retrieving both intensity and phase distributions of samples from both in-focus and defocus intensities. However, during measurements, the focal plane is often decided artificially and the improper choice may induce errors in quantitative intensity and phase retrieval. In order to obtain accurate in-focus information, quantitative intensity and phase imaging with the numerical focusing transport of intensity equation method combined with cellular duty ratio criterion and numerical wavefront propagation is introduced in this paper. Both numerical simulations and experimental measurements are provided proving this designed method can increase both retrieved in-focus intensity and phase accuracy and reduce dependence of focal plane determination in transport of intensity equation measurements. It is believed that the proposed method can be potentially applied in various fields as in-focus compensation for quantitative phase imaging and automatic focal plane determination, etc.

  13. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  14. Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg; Ippolito, Corey

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results from a mission architecture study of planetary aerial explorers. In this study, several mission scenarios were developed in simulation and evaluated on success in meeting mission goals. This aerial explorer mission architecture study is unique in comparison with previous Mars airplane research activities. The study examines how aerial vehicles can find and gain access to otherwise inaccessible terrain features of interest. The aerial explorer also engages in a high-level of (indirect) surface interaction, despite not typically being able to takeoff and land or to engage in multiple flights/sorties. To achieve this goal, a new mission paradigm is proposed: aerial explorers should be considered as an additional element in the overall Entry, Descent, Landing System (EDLS) process. Further, aerial vehicles should be considered primarily as carrier/utility platforms whose purpose is to deliver air-deployed sensors and robotic devices, or symbiotes, to those high-value terrain features of interest.

  15. A Mobile System for Measuring Water Surface Velocities Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement technologies for velocity of river flow are divided into intrusive and nonintrusive methods. Intrusive method requires infield operations. The measuring process of intrusive methods are time consuming, and likely to cause damages of operator and instrument. Nonintrusive methods require fewer operators and can reduce instrument damages from directly attaching to the flow. Nonintrusive measurements may use radar or image velocimetry to measure the velocities at the surface of water flow. The image velocimetry, such as large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) accesses not only the point velocity but the flow velocities in an area simultaneously. Flow properties of an area hold the promise of providing spatially information of flow fields. This study attempts to construct a mobile system UAV-LSPIV by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with LSPIV to measure flows in fields. The mobile system consists of a six-rotor UAV helicopter, a Sony nex5T camera, a gimbal, an image transfer device, a ground station and a remote control device. The activate gimbal helps maintain the camera lens orthogonal to the water surface and reduce the extent of images being distorted. The image transfer device can monitor the captured image instantly. The operator controls the UAV by remote control device through ground station and can achieve the flying data such as flying height and GPS coordinate of UAV. The mobile system was then applied to field experiments. The deviation of velocities measured by UAV-LSPIV of field experiments and handhold Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is under 8%. The results of the field experiments suggests that the application of UAV-LSPIV can be effectively applied to surface flow studies.

  16. Building Roof Segmentation from Aerial Images Using a Line-and Region-Based Watershed Segmentation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Merabet, Youssef El; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  17. Unsupervised and stable LBG algorithm for data classification: application to aerial multicomponent images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, A.; Chehdi, K.; Cariou, C.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a stable and unsupervised Linde-Buzo-Gray (LBG) algorithm named LBGO is presented. The originality of the proposed algorithm relies: i) on the utilization of an adaptive incremental technique to initialize the class centres that calls into question the intermediate initializations; this technique makes the algorithm stable and deterministic, and the classification results do not vary from a run to another, and ii) on the unsupervised evaluation criteria of the intermediate classification result to estimate the optimal number of classes; this makes the algorithm unsupervised. The efficiency of this optimized version of LBG is shown through some experimental results on synthetic and real aerial hyperspectral data. More precisely we have tested our proposed classification approach regarding three aspects: firstly for its stability, secondly for its correct classification rate, and thirdly for the correct estimation of number of classes.

  18. Research on the processing technology of low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shihua; Liu, Yintao; Li, Feida; Zhou, Conglin; Huang, Qing; Xu, Hongwei

    2015-12-01

    The UAV system acts as one of the infrastructure of earth observation, with its mobility, high speed, flexibility, economy and other remarkable technical advantages, has been widely used in various fields of the national economic construction, such as agricultural monitoring, resource development, disaster emergency treatment. Taking an actual engineering as a case study in this paper, the method and the skill of making digital orthophoto map was stated by using the UASMaster, the professional UAV data processing software, based on the eBee unmanned aerial vehicle. Finally, the precision of the DOM was analyzed in detail through two methods, overlapping the DOM with the existing DLG of the region and contrasting the points of the existing DLG of 1:1000 scale with the corresponding checkpoints of the stereomodel.

  19. Region-Based 3d Surface Reconstruction Using Images Acquired by Low-Cost Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; Al-Rawabdeh, A.; He, F.; Habib, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate 3D surface reconstruction of our environment has become essential for an unlimited number of emerging applications. In the past few years, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are evolving as low-cost and flexible platforms for geospatial data collection that could meet the needs of aforementioned application and overcome limitations of traditional airborne and terrestrial mobile mapping systems. Due to their payload restrictions, these systems usually include consumer-grade imaging and positioning sensor which will negatively impact the quality of the collected geospatial data and reconstructed surfaces. Therefore, new surface reconstruction surfaces are needed to mitigate the impact of using low-cost sensors on the final products. To date, different approaches have been proposed to for 3D surface construction using overlapping images collected by imaging sensor mounted on moving platforms. In these approaches, 3D surfaces are mainly reconstructed based on dense matching techniques. However, generated 3D point clouds might not accurately represent the scanned surfaces due to point density variations and edge preservation problems. In order to resolve these problems, a new region-based 3D surface renostruction trchnique is introduced in this paper. This approach aims to generate a 3D photo-realistic model of individually scanned surfaces within the captured images. This approach is initiated by a Semi-Global dense Matching procedure is carried out to generate a 3D point cloud from the scanned area within the collected images. The generated point cloud is then segmented to extract individual planar surfaces. Finally, a novel region-based texturing technique is implemented for photorealistic reconstruction of the extracted planar surfaces. Experimental results using images collected by a camera mounted on a low-cost UAS demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach for photorealistic 3D surface reconstruction.

  20. Mapping potential of digitized aerial photographs and space images for site-specific crop management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Gerald A.; Long, Daniel S.; Queen, Lloyd P.

    1996-11-01

    In site-specific crop management, treatments (e.g., fertilizer and herbicides) are applied precisely where they are needed. Global positioning system receivers allow accurate navigation of field implements and creation of crop yield maps. Remote sensing products help producers explain the wide range of yields shown on these maps and become the basis for digitized field management maps. Previous sources of remote sensing products for agriculture did not provide services that generated a sustained demand by crop producers, often because data were not delivered quickly enough. Public Access Resource Centers could provide a nearly uninterrupted electronic flow of data from NASA's MODIS and other sensors that could help producers and their advisors monitor crop conditions. This early warning/opportunity system would provide a low-cost way to discover conditions that merit examination on the ground. High-spatial-resolution digital aerial photographs or data from new commercial satellite companies would provide the basis for site-specific treatments. These detailed data are too expensive to acquire often and must be timed so as to represent differences in water supply characteristics and crop yield potentials. Remote sensing products must be linked to specific prescriptions that crop produces use to control operations and improve outcomes.

  1. Exploration of mineral resource deposits based on analysis of aerial and satellite image data employing artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Gennady

    2013-04-01

    includes noncontact registration of eye motion, reconstruction of "attention landscape" fixed by the expert, recording the comments of the expert who is a specialist in the field of images` interpretation, and transfer this information into knowledge base.Creation of base of ophthalmologic images (OI) includes making semantic contacts from great number of OI based on analysis of OI and expert's comments.Processing of OI and making generalized OI (GOI) is realized by inductive logic algorithms and consists in synthesis of structural invariants of OI. The mode of recognition and interpretation of unknown images consists of several stages, which include: comparison of unknown image with the base of structural invariants of OI; revealing of structural invariants in unknown images; ynthesis of interpretive message of the structural invariants base and OI base (the experts` comments stored in it). We want to emphasize that the training mode does not assume special involvement of experts to teach the system - it is realized in the process of regular experts` work on image interpretation and it becomes possible after installation of a special apparatus for non contact registration of experts` attention. Consequently, the technology, which principles is described there, provides fundamentally new effective solution to the problem of exploration of mineral resource deposits based on computer analysis of aerial and satellite image data.

  2. Monitoring morphological changes in an arid zone by spaceborne images and aerial photography between 1945 - 2009; the Yamin Plateau, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetz, Guy; Blumberg, Dan; Avraham, Dody; Cohen, Hai

    2010-05-01

    This research focuses on a geomorphic mapping of the Yamin Plateau in southern Israel which is part of the Yamin-Rotem Syncline and covers about 200 km2. This area has been restricted since the 1950s and therefore, provides a unique opportunity to study undisturbed geomorphic processes. Nowadays, the national nuclear waste depository is located in this area accepting waste from industrial factories, research institutes and hospitals. This is the main reason why environmental processes are of major interest in terms of landform changes in space and time. The exposed geology section of the Yamin Plateau mostly consists of the Miocene Hazeva Group where sedimentary processes started 20 million years ago and continued for 12-14 million years. Two formations of the Miocene Hazeva Group appear in the study area Zefa and Rotem. The compositions of these two formations are similar and sometimes defined as "the main sand body" in the Hazeva Group. The restriction of the area stopped the grazing and let the development of a biological soil crust on the surface. The research objective was to document and characterize landform changes from 1945 until 2009 within the Yamin Plateau based on spaceborne images and aerial photography. All the parameters we extracted in the laboratory were validated with field measurements. A combination of the spaceborne images, aerial photography and field measurements leads us to the following conclusions: The research results show that soil stabilization processes took place earlier than the area closure. Inspite of decreasing precipitation tendencies as measured during the last 50 years in Yamin Plateau, the vegetation cover increased from 55% in 1945 to 67% in 2009. The main reason for this is the area closure and reduction in grazing along with developing of vegetation and biological soil crusts. Field studies and image processing of aerial photographs and recent QuickBird images alongside grain-size distribution show that in the past there

  3. Image processing by Intensity-Dependent Spread (IDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornsweet, Tom N.

    1989-01-01

    As retinal illuminance is lowered, the human visual system integrates the effects of photon absorptions over larger areas and longer times. A theory of the process that might underlie these changes is called Intensity-Dependent Spread (IDS). Each input point gives rise to a pattern of excitation that spreads to a region of the total excitation it sees. The unique aspect of the theory is the assumption that, although the amplitude of the excitation pattern at its center increases with input illuminance, its width decreases in such a way that its volume remains constant. Application of this theory to image processing reveals that it displays a number of unexpected and potentially useful properties. Among them are edge enhancement and independence from scene illumination.

  4. An aerial composite imaging method with multiple upright cameras based on axis-shift theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Junyong; Liu, Xue; Xue, Yongqi; Tong, Qingxi

    2010-11-01

    Several composite camera systems were made for wide coverage by using 3 or 4 oblique cameras. A virtual projecting center and image was used for geometrical correction and mosaic with different projecting angles and different spatial resolutions caused by oblique cameras. An imaging method based axis-shift theory is proposed to acquire wide coverage images by several upright cameras. Four upright camera lenses have the same wide angle of view. The optic axis of lens is not on the center of CCD, and each CCD in each camera covers only one part of the whole focus plane. Oblique deformation caused by oblique camera would be avoided by this axis-shift imaging method. The principle and parameters are given and discussed. A prototype camera system is constructed by common DLSR (digital single lens reflex) cameras. The angle of view could exceed 80 degrees along the flight direction when the focal length is 24mm, and the ratio of base line to height could exceed 0.7 when longitudinal overlap is 60%. Some original and mosaic images captured by this prototype system in some ground and airborne experiments are given at last. Experimental results of image test show that the upright imaging method can effectively avoid the oblique deformation and meet the geometrical precision of image mosaic.

  5. A Method for Georeferencing Very-Large-Scale-Aerial (VLSA) Images in Sagebrush Steppe Communities.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    VLSA imagery is captured with a digital camera, mounted on a light, piloted aircraft. VLSA images are high quality and have been used to measure cover of plant functional groups and some species, bare ground, litter, and rock, but the actual image location is known imprecisely (± 30 m). This impreci...

  6. EROS Main Image File: A Picture Perfect Database for Landsat Imagery and Aerial Photography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Robert F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes Earth Resources Observation System online database, which provides access to computerized images of Earth obtained via satellite. Highlights include retrieval system and commands, types of images, search strategies, other online functions, and interpretation of accessions. Satellite information, sources and samples of accessions, and…

  7. Tracking Energy Flow Using a Volumetric Acoustic Intensity Imager (VAIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob; Williams, Earl G.; Valdivia, Nicolas P.

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement device has been invented at the Naval Research Laboratory which images instantaneously the intensity vector throughout a three-dimensional volume nearly a meter on a side. The measurement device consists of a nearly transparent spherical array of 50 inexpensive microphones optimally positioned on an imaginary spherical surface of radius 0.2m. Front-end signal processing uses coherence analysis to produce multiple, phase-coherent holograms in the frequency domain each related to references located on suspect sound sources in an aircraft cabin. The analysis uses either SVD or Cholesky decomposition methods using ensemble averages of the cross-spectral density with the fixed references. The holograms are mathematically processed using spherical NAH (nearfield acoustical holography) to convert the measured pressure field into a vector intensity field in the volume of maximum radius 0.4 m centered on the sphere origin. The utility of this probe is evaluated in a detailed analysis of a recent in-flight experiment in cooperation with Boeing and NASA on NASA s Aries 757 aircraft. In this experiment the trim panels and insulation were removed over a section of the aircraft and the bare panels and windows were instrumented with accelerometers to use as references for the VAIM. Results show excellent success at locating and identifying the sources of interior noise in-flight in the frequency range of 0 to 1400 Hz. This work was supported by NASA and the Office of Naval Research.

  8. Underwater image quality enhancement through composition of dual-intensity images and Rayleigh-stretching.

    PubMed

    Abdul Ghani, Ahmad Shahrizan; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi

    2014-01-01

    The quality of underwater image is poor due to the properties of water and its impurities. The properties of water cause attenuation of light travels through the water medium, resulting in low contrast, blur, inhomogeneous lighting, and color diminishing of the underwater images. This paper proposes a method of enhancing the quality of underwater image. The proposed method consists of two stages. At the first stage, the contrast correction technique is applied to the image, where the image is applied with the modified Von Kries hypothesis and stretching the image into two different intensity images at the average value with respects to Rayleigh distribution. At the second stage, the color correction technique is applied to the image where the image is first converted into hue-saturation-value (HSV) color model. The modification of the color component increases the image color performance. Qualitative and quantitative analyses indicate that the proposed method outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of contrast, details, and noise reduction.

  9. Underwater image quality enhancement through composition of dual-intensity images and Rayleigh-stretching.

    PubMed

    Abdul Ghani, Ahmad Shahrizan; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi

    2014-01-01

    The quality of underwater image is poor due to the properties of water and its impurities. The properties of water cause attenuation of light travels through the water medium, resulting in low contrast, blur, inhomogeneous lighting, and color diminishing of the underwater images. This paper proposes a method of enhancing the quality of underwater image. The proposed method consists of two stages. At the first stage, the contrast correction technique is applied to the image, where the image is applied with the modified Von Kries hypothesis and stretching the image into two different intensity images at the average value with respects to Rayleigh distribution. At the second stage, the color correction technique is applied to the image where the image is first converted into hue-saturation-value (HSV) color model. The modification of the color component increases the image color performance. Qualitative and quantitative analyses indicate that the proposed method outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of contrast, details, and noise reduction. PMID:25674483

  10. Weed mapping in early-season maize fields using object-based analysis of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images.

    PubMed

    Peña, José Manuel; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; de Castro, Ana Isabel; Kelly, Maggi; López-Granados, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    The use of remote imagery captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has tremendous potential for designing detailed site-specific weed control treatments in early post-emergence, which have not possible previously with conventional airborne or satellite images. A robust and entirely automatic object-based image analysis (OBIA) procedure was developed on a series of UAV images using a six-band multispectral camera (visible and near-infrared range) with the ultimate objective of generating a weed map in an experimental maize field in Spain. The OBIA procedure combines several contextual, hierarchical and object-based features and consists of three consecutive phases: 1) classification of crop rows by application of a dynamic and auto-adaptive classification approach, 2) discrimination of crops and weeds on the basis of their relative positions with reference to the crop rows, and 3) generation of a weed infestation map in a grid structure. The estimation of weed coverage from the image analysis yielded satisfactory results. The relationship of estimated versus observed weed densities had a coefficient of determination of r(2)=0.89 and a root mean square error of 0.02. A map of three categories of weed coverage was produced with 86% of overall accuracy. In the experimental field, the area free of weeds was 23%, and the area with low weed coverage (<5% weeds) was 47%, which indicated a high potential for reducing herbicide application or other weed operations. The OBIA procedure computes multiple data and statistics derived from the classification outputs, which permits calculation of herbicide requirements and estimation of the overall cost of weed management operations in advance.

  11. Weed mapping in early-season maize fields using object-based analysis of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images.

    PubMed

    Peña, José Manuel; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; de Castro, Ana Isabel; Kelly, Maggi; López-Granados, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    The use of remote imagery captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has tremendous potential for designing detailed site-specific weed control treatments in early post-emergence, which have not possible previously with conventional airborne or satellite images. A robust and entirely automatic object-based image analysis (OBIA) procedure was developed on a series of UAV images using a six-band multispectral camera (visible and near-infrared range) with the ultimate objective of generating a weed map in an experimental maize field in Spain. The OBIA procedure combines several contextual, hierarchical and object-based features and consists of three consecutive phases: 1) classification of crop rows by application of a dynamic and auto-adaptive classification approach, 2) discrimination of crops and weeds on the basis of their relative positions with reference to the crop rows, and 3) generation of a weed infestation map in a grid structure. The estimation of weed coverage from the image analysis yielded satisfactory results. The relationship of estimated versus observed weed densities had a coefficient of determination of r(2)=0.89 and a root mean square error of 0.02. A map of three categories of weed coverage was produced with 86% of overall accuracy. In the experimental field, the area free of weeds was 23%, and the area with low weed coverage (<5% weeds) was 47%, which indicated a high potential for reducing herbicide application or other weed operations. The OBIA procedure computes multiple data and statistics derived from the classification outputs, which permits calculation of herbicide requirements and estimation of the overall cost of weed management operations in advance. PMID:24146963

  12. Use of Aerial Images for Regular Updates of Buildings in the Fundamental Base of Geographic Data of the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hron, V.; Halounova, L.

    2015-03-01

    Digital aerial images (DAI) include position, elevation and also spectral information (visible bands and near-infrared band) about the captured area. The aim of this paper is to present the possibilities of automatic analysis of DAI for updating of the Fundamental Base of Geographic Data of the Czech Republic with a focus on buildings. Regular updates of buildings (automatic detection of new and demolished buildings) are based on the analysis of coloured point clouds created by an automatic image matching technique from each time period. The created approach compares point clouds from different time periods to each other. The advantage of this solution is that it is independent of the manner of keeping the buildings in the database. It does not matter whether the buildings in the database have correct positions and their footprints correspond to the roof shapes or external walls. The involved method is robust because a digital surface model generated by image matching techniques can contain numerous errors. Shaded areas and objects with blurred textures are problematic for automatic image correlation algorithms and lead to false results. For this reason, derived layers containing additional information are used. Shadow masks (layers with modelled shadows) are used for the verification of indications and to filter out errors in the shaded areas using a contextual evaluation. Furthermore, additional information about the road and railway networks and morphological operations of opening and closing were used to achieve more accurate results. All these information sources are then evaluated using decision logic, which uses the generally applicable rules that are available for different datasets without the need for modification. The method was tested on different datasets with various types of buildings (villages, suburbs and city centres) which cover more than 20 square kilometres. The developed solution leads to very promising results without the need of acquiring

  13. Weed Mapping in Early-Season Maize Fields Using Object-Based Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Images

    PubMed Central

    Peña, José Manuel; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; de Castro, Ana Isabel; Kelly, Maggi; López-Granados, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    The use of remote imagery captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has tremendous potential for designing detailed site-specific weed control treatments in early post-emergence, which have not possible previously with conventional airborne or satellite images. A robust and entirely automatic object-based image analysis (OBIA) procedure was developed on a series of UAV images using a six-band multispectral camera (visible and near-infrared range) with the ultimate objective of generating a weed map in an experimental maize field in Spain. The OBIA procedure combines several contextual, hierarchical and object-based features and consists of three consecutive phases: 1) classification of crop rows by application of a dynamic and auto-adaptive classification approach, 2) discrimination of crops and weeds on the basis of their relative positions with reference to the crop rows, and 3) generation of a weed infestation map in a grid structure. The estimation of weed coverage from the image analysis yielded satisfactory results. The relationship of estimated versus observed weed densities had a coefficient of determination of r2=0.89 and a root mean square error of 0.02. A map of three categories of weed coverage was produced with 86% of overall accuracy. In the experimental field, the area free of weeds was 23%, and the area with low weed coverage (<5% weeds) was 47%, which indicated a high potential for reducing herbicide application or other weed operations. The OBIA procedure computes multiple data and statistics derived from the classification outputs, which permits calculation of herbicide requirements and estimation of the overall cost of weed management operations in advance. PMID:24146963

  14. Do Maximum Intensity Projection Images Truly Capture Tumor Motion?

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kwangyoul Huang, Long; Gagne, Havaleh; Papiez, Lech

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: For the treatment of patients with lung cancer, internal target volume frequently is determined by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) images generated by means of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). To check the accuracy of MIPs for various target motions, especially for targets moving irregularly, we performed phantom studies using a programmable dynamic lung phantom. Methods and Materials: A custom-built programmable lung phantom was used to simulate irregular target motions along the superior-inferior direction. After scanning in helical mode using 4D-CT, reconstructed phase and MIP images were imported into the Pinnacle 8.0 treatment planning system for image analysis. Results: For all regular periodic target motions with constant amplitude and period, the measured MIP target span along the superior-inferior direction was accurate within 2-3 mm of the real target motion span. For irregular target motions with varying amplitudes and periods, the measured MIP target span systematically underrepresented the real range of target motion by more than 1 cm in some cases. The difference between measured MIP target span and real target span decreased as the target moved faster. We associate these discrepancies with the fact that current reconstruction algorithms of commercial 4D-CT are based on phase binning. Conclusions: According to our phantom measurements, MIP accurately reflects the range of target motion for regular target motion. However, it generally underestimates the range of target motion when the motion is irregular in amplitude and periodicity. Clinical internal target volume determination using MIP requires caution, especially when there is breathing irregularity.

  15. Mobile Aerial Tracking and Imaging System (MATrIS) for Aeronautical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Miller, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile, rapidly deployable ground-based system to track and image targets of aeronautical interest has been developed. Targets include reentering reusable launch vehicles as well as atmospheric and transatmospheric vehicles. The optics were designed to image targets in the visible and infrared wavelengths. To minimize acquisition cost and development time, the system uses commercially available hardware and software where possible. The conception and initial funding of this system originated with a study of ground-based imaging of global aerothermal characteristics of reusable launch vehicle configurations. During that study the National Aeronautics and Space Administration teamed with the Missile Defense Agency/Innovative Science and Technology Experimentation Facility to test techniques and analysis on two Space Shuttle flights.

  16. Assessing the Accuracy of Ortho-image using Photogrammetric Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H. H.; Park, J. W.; Kim, J. S.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    Smart-camera can not only be operated under network environment anytime and any place but also cost less than the existing photogrammetric UAV since it provides high-resolution image, 3D location and attitude data on a real-time basis from a variety of built-in sensors. This study's proposed UAV photogrammetric method, low-cost UAV and smart camera were used. The elements of interior orientation were acquired through camera calibration. The image triangulation was conducted in accordance with presence or absence of consideration of the interior orientation (IO) parameters determined by camera calibration, The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was constructed using the image data photographed at the target area and the results of the ground control point survey. This study also analyzes the proposed method's application possibility by comparing a Ortho-image the results of the ground control point survey. Considering these study findings, it is suggested that smartphone is very feasible as a payload for UAV system. It is also expected that smartphone may be loaded onto existing UAV playing direct or indirect roles significantly.

  17. Advances in hardware, software, and automation for 193nm aerial image measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Schmid, R.; Seyfarth, A.; Waechter, M.; Harnisch, W.; Doornmalen, H. v.

    2005-05-01

    A new, second generation AIMS fab 193 system has been developed which is capable of emulating lithographic imaging of any type of reticles such as binary and phase shift masks (PSM) including resolution enhancement technologies (RET) such as optical proximity correction (OPC) or scatter bars. The system emulates the imaging process by adjustment of the lithography equivalent illumination and imaging conditions of 193nm wafer steppers including circular, annular, dipole and quadrupole type illumination modes. The AIMS fab 193 allows a rapid prediction of wafer printability of critical mask features, including dense patterns and contacts, defects or repairs by acquiring through-focus image stacks by means of a CCD camera followed by quantitative image analysis. Moreover the technology can be readily applied to directly determine the process window of a given mask under stepper imaging conditions. Since data acquisition is performed electronically, AIMS in many applications replaces the need for costly and time consuming wafer prints using a wafer stepper/ scanner followed by CD SEM resist or wafer analysis. The AIMS fab 193 second generation system is designed for 193nm lithography mask printing predictability down to the 65nm node. In addition to hardware improvements a new modular AIMS software is introduced allowing for a fully automated operation mode. Multiple pre-defined points can be visited and through-focus AIMS measurements can be executed automatically in a recipe based mode. To increase the effectiveness of the automated operation mode, the throughput of the system to locate the area of interest, and to acquire the through-focus images is increased by almost a factor of two in comparison with the first generation AIMS systems. In addition a new software plug-in concept is realised for the tools. One new feature has been successfully introduced as "Global CD Map", enabling automated investigation of global mask quality based on the local determination of

  18. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun; Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha

    2015-08-15

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  19. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Qu, Miao; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun

    2015-08-01

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm(2) and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  20. Automated identification of rivers and shorelines in aerial imagery using image texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Paul; Blain, Cheryl Ann; Linzell, Robert

    2011-06-01

    A method has been developed which automatically extracts river and river bank locations from arbitrarily sourced high resolution (~1m) visual spectrum imagery without recourse to multi-spectral or even color information. This method relies on quantifying the difference in image texture between the relatively smooth surface of the river water and the rougher surface of the vegetated land or built environment bordering it and then segmenting the image into high and low roughness regions. The edges of the low roughness regions then define the river banks. The method can be coded in any language without recourse to proprietary tools and requires minimal operator intervention. As this sort of imagery is increasingly being made freely available through such services as Google Earth or Worldwind this technique can be used to extract river features when more specialized imagery or software is not available.

  1. Effects of light pollution revealed during a nocturnal aerial survey by two hyperspectral imagers.

    PubMed

    Barducci, Alessandro; Marcoionni, Paolo; Pippi, Ivan; Poggesi, Marco

    2003-07-20

    A remote-sensing campaign was performed in September 2001 at nighttime under clear-sky conditions before moonrise to assess the level of light pollution of urban and industrial origin. Two hyperspectral sensors, namely, the Multispectral Infrared and Visible Imaging Spectrometer and the Visible Infrared Scanner-200, which provide spectral coverage from the visible to the thermal infrared, were flown over the Tuscany coast (Italy) on board a Casa 212 airplane. The acquired images were processed to produce radiometrically calibrated data, which were then analyzed and compared with ground-based spectral measurements. Calibrated data acquired at high spectral resolution (approximately 2.5 nm) showed a maximum scene brightness almost of the same order of magnitude as that observed during similar daytime measurements, whereas their average luminosity was 3 orders of magnitude lower. The measurement analysis confirmed that artificial illumination hinders astronomical observations and produces noticeable effects even at great distances from the sources of the illumination.

  2. Urban 3D GIS From LiDAR and digital aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Song, C.; Simmers, J.; Cheng, P.

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method, which integrates image knowledge and Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data for urban digital terrain model (DTM) and digital building model (DBM) generation. The DBM is an Object-Oriented data structure, in which each building is considered as a building object, i.e., an entity of the building class. The attributes of each building include roof types, polygons of the roof surfaces, height, parameters describing the roof surfaces, and the LiDAR point array within the roof surfaces. Each polygon represents a roof surface of building. This type of data structure is flexible for adding other building attributes in future, such as texture information and wall information. Using image knowledge extracted, we developed a new method of interpolating LiDAR raw data into grid digital surface model (DSM) with considering the steep discontinuities of buildings. In this interpolation method, the LiDAR data points, which are located in the polygon of roof surfaces, first are determined, and then interpolation via planar equation is employed for grid DSM generation. The basic steps of our research are: (1) edge detection by digital image processing algorithms; (2) complete extraction of the building roof edges by digital image processing and human-computer interactive operation; (3) establishment of DBM; (4) generation of DTM by removing surface objects. Finally, we implement the above functions by MS VC++ programming. The outcome of urban 3D DSM, DTM and DBM is exported into urban database for urban 3D GIS.

  3. Integration of historical aerial and satellite photos, recent satellite images and geophysical surveys for the knowledge of the ancient Dyrrachium (Durres, Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfitana, Daniele; Shehi, Eduard; Masini, Nicola; Scardozzi, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    The paper presents the preliminary results of an integrated multidiscipliary research project concerning the urban area of the modern Durres (ancient Dyrrachium). Here a joint Italian and Albanian researcher are starting preliminary investigations on the place of an ancient roman villa placed in the urban centre of the modern town. In a initial phase are offering interesting results the use of a rich multitemporal remote sensing data-set, historical aerial photos of 1920s and 1930s, photos of USA spy satellites of 1960s and 1970s (Corona KH-4A and KH-4B), and very high resolution satellite imagery. The historical aerial documentation is very rich and includes aerial photogrammetrich flights of two Italian Institutions: the private company SARA - Società Anonima Rilevamenti Aerofotogrammetrici in Rome (1928) and the IGM - Istituto Geografico Militare (1936, 1937 e 1941), which flew on Durres for purposes of cartographic production and military. These photos offer an image of the city before the urban expansion after the Second World War and in recent decades, progressively documented by satellite images of the 1960s-1970s and recent years. They enable a reconstruction of the ancient topography of the urban area, even with the possibility of detailed analysis, as in the case of the the Roman villa, nowadays buried under a modern garden, but also investigated with a GPR survey, in order to rebuild its plan and contextualize the villa in relation to the urban area of the ancient Dyrrachium.

  4. An Improved Snake Model for Refinement of Lidar-Derived Building Roof Contours Using Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Shugen; Liu, Xiuguo

    2016-06-01

    Building roof contours are considered as very important geometric data, which have been widely applied in many fields, including but not limited to urban planning, land investigation, change detection and military reconnaissance. Currently, the demand on building contours at a finer scale (especially in urban areas) has been raised in a growing number of studies such as urban environment quality assessment, urban sprawl monitoring and urban air pollution modelling. LiDAR is known as an effective means of acquiring 3D roof points with high elevation accuracy. However, the precision of the building contour obtained from LiDAR data is restricted by its relatively low scanning resolution. With the use of the texture information from high-resolution imagery, the precision can be improved. In this study, an improved snake model is proposed to refine the initial building contours extracted from LiDAR. First, an improved snake model is constructed with the constraints of the deviation angle, image gradient, and area. Then, the nodes of the contour are moved in a certain range to find the best optimized result using greedy algorithm. Considering both precision and efficiency, the candidate shift positions of the contour nodes are constrained, and the searching strategy for the candidate nodes is explicitly designed. The experiments on three datasets indicate that the proposed method for building contour refinement is effective and feasible. The average quality index is improved from 91.66% to 93.34%. The statistics of the evaluation results for every single building demonstrated that 77.0% of the total number of contours is updated with higher quality index.

  5. Local region statistics combining multi-parameter intensity fitting module for medical image segmentation with intensity inhomogeneity and complex composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Wenda; Qu, Feng; Sui, Long

    2016-08-01

    It is difficult to segment medical image with intensity inhomogeneity and complex composition, because most region-based modules relay on the intensity distributions. In this paper, we propose a novel method which uses local region statistics and multi-parameter intensity fitting as well. By replacing the original local region statistics with the novel local region statistics after bias field correction, the effect of intensity inhomogeneity can be eliminated. Then we devise a maximum likelihood energy function based on the distribution of each local region. Segmentation and bias field estimation can be jointly obtained by minimizing the proposed energy function. Furthermore, in order to characterize the features of each local region effectively, two parameters are used to fit the average intensity inside and outside of the counter, respectively. This can well handle the medical images with complex composition, such as larger gray difference even in the same region. Comparisons with several representative methods on synthetic and medical images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over other representative algorithms.

  6. Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    John Hill, a pilot and commercial aerial photographer, needed an information base. He consulted NERAC and requested a search of the latest developments in camera optics. NERAC provided information; Hill contacted the manufacturers of camera equipment and reduced his photographic costs significantly.

  7. Roughness Estimation from Point Clouds - A Comparison of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Image Matching by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutzinger, Martin; Bremer, Magnus; Ragg, Hansjörg

    2013-04-01

    Recently, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and matching of images acquired by unmanned arial vehicles (UAV) are operationally used for 3D geodata acquisition in Geoscience applications. However, the two systems cover different application domains in terms of acquisition conditions and data properties i.e. accuracy and line of sight. In this study we investigate the major differences between the two platforms for terrain roughness estimation. Terrain roughness is an important input for various applications such as morphometry studies, geomorphologic mapping, and natural process modeling (e.g. rockfall, avalanche, and hydraulic modeling). Data has been collected simultaneously by TLS using an Optech ILRIS3D and a rotary UAV using an octocopter from twins.nrn for a 900 m² test site located in a riverbed in Tyrol, Austria (Judenbach, Mieming). The TLS point cloud has been acquired from three scan positions. These have been registered using iterative closest point algorithm and a target-based referencing approach. For registration geometric targets (spheres) with a diameter of 20 cm were used. These targets were measured with dGPS for absolute georeferencing. The TLS point cloud has an average point density of 19,000 pts/m², which represents a point spacing of about 5 mm. 15 images where acquired by UAV in a height of 20 m using a calibrated camera with focal length of 18.3 mm. A 3D point cloud containing RGB attributes was derived using APERO/MICMAC software, by a direct georeferencing approach based on the aircraft IMU data. The point cloud is finally co-registered with the TLS data to guarantee an optimal preparation in order to perform the analysis. The UAV point cloud has an average point density of 17,500 pts/m², which represents a point spacing of 7.5 mm. After registration and georeferencing the level of detail of roughness representation in both point clouds have been compared considering elevation differences, roughness and representation of different grain

  8. A fast and mobile system for registration of low-altitude visual and thermal aerial images using multiple small-scale UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahyanejad, Saeed; Rinner, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    The use of multiple small-scale UAVs to support first responders in disaster management has become popular because of their speed and low deployment costs. We exploit such UAVs to perform real-time monitoring of target areas by fusing individual images captured from heterogeneous aerial sensors. Many approaches have already been presented to register images from homogeneous sensors. These methods have demonstrated robustness against scale, rotation and illumination variations and can also cope with limited overlap among individual images. In this paper we focus on thermal and visual image registration and propose different methods to improve the quality of interspectral registration for the purpose of real-time monitoring and mobile mapping. Images captured by low-altitude UAVs represent a very challenging scenario for interspectral registration due to the strong variations in overlap, scale, rotation, point of view and structure of such scenes. Furthermore, these small-scale UAVs have limited processing and communication power. The contributions of this paper include (i) the introduction of a feature descriptor for robustly identifying corresponding regions of images in different spectrums, (ii) the registration of image mosaics, and (iii) the registration of depth maps. We evaluated the first method using a test data set consisting of 84 image pairs. In all instances our approach combined with SIFT or SURF feature-based registration was superior to the standard versions. Although we focus mainly on aerial imagery, our evaluation shows that the presented approach would also be beneficial in other scenarios such as surveillance and human detection. Furthermore, we demonstrated the advantages of the other two methods in case of multiple image pairs.

  9. Image Labeling for LIDAR Intensity Image Using K-Nn of Feature Obtained by Convolutional Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Masaki; Hotta, Kazuhiro; Nonaka, Hideki; Oda, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    We propose an image labeling method for LIDAR intensity image obtained by Mobile Mapping System (MMS) using K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) of feature obtained by Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). Image labeling assigns labels (e.g., road, cross-walk and road shoulder) to semantic regions in an image. Since CNN is effective for various image recognition tasks, we try to use the feature of CNN (Caffenet) pre-trained by ImageNet. We use 4,096-dimensional feature at fc7 layer in the Caffenet as the descriptor of a region because the feature at fc7 layer has effective information for object classification. We extract the feature by the Caffenet from regions cropped from images. Since the similarity between features reflects the similarity of contents of regions, we can select top K similar regions cropped from training samples with a test region. Since regions in training images have manually-annotated ground truth labels, we vote the labels attached to top K similar regions to the test region. The class label with the maximum vote is assigned to each pixel in the test image. In experiments, we use 36 LIDAR intensity images with ground truth labels. We divide 36 images into training (28 images) and test sets (8 images). We use class average accuracy and pixel-wise accuracy as evaluation measures. Our method was able to assign the same label as human beings in 97.8% of the pixels in test LIDAR intensity images.

  10. Tidal Flooding and Vegetation Patterns in a Salt Marsh Tidal Creek Imaged by Low-altitude Balloon Aerial Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Madsen, E.

    2013-12-01

    soil water content. These other factors are all directly affected by the hydroperiod, creating a complex system of feedbacks. Inundation frequencies show a pronounced relationship to zonation. Creek bank height and the hydroperiod have a curvilinear relationship at low bank heights such that small decreases in creek bank height can result in large increases in inundation frequency. Biological zonation is not simply a result of bank height and inundation frequency, other contributing factors include species competition, adaptability, and groundwater flow. Vegetation patterns delineated by a ground-based GPS survey and image classification from the aerial photos show that not all changes in eco-zonation are a direct function of elevation. Some asymmetry across the creek is observed in plant habitat, and eliminating topography (and thereby tidal inundation) as a factor, we attribute the remaining variability to groundwater flow.

  11. A Gauss-Newton approach to joint image registration and intensity correction.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mehran; Lausch, Anthony; Martel, Anne L

    2013-12-01

    We develop a new efficient numerical methodology for automated simultaneous registration and intensity correction of images. The approach separates the intensity correction term from the images being registered in a regularized expression. Our formulation is consistent with the existing non-parametric image registration techniques, however, an extra additive intensity correction term is carried throughout. An objective functional is formed for which the corresponding Hessian and Jacobian is computed and employed in a multi-level Gauss-Newton minimization approach. In this paper, our experiments are based on elastic regularization on the transformation and total variation on the intensity correction. Validations on dynamic contrast enhanced MR abdominal images for both real and simulated data verified the efficacy of the model. The pursued approach is flexible in which we can exploit various forms of regularization on the transformation and the intensity correction. PMID:24075154

  12. A Gauss-Newton approach to joint image registration and intensity correction.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mehran; Lausch, Anthony; Martel, Anne L

    2013-12-01

    We develop a new efficient numerical methodology for automated simultaneous registration and intensity correction of images. The approach separates the intensity correction term from the images being registered in a regularized expression. Our formulation is consistent with the existing non-parametric image registration techniques, however, an extra additive intensity correction term is carried throughout. An objective functional is formed for which the corresponding Hessian and Jacobian is computed and employed in a multi-level Gauss-Newton minimization approach. In this paper, our experiments are based on elastic regularization on the transformation and total variation on the intensity correction. Validations on dynamic contrast enhanced MR abdominal images for both real and simulated data verified the efficacy of the model. The pursued approach is flexible in which we can exploit various forms of regularization on the transformation and the intensity correction.

  13. A Variational Level Set Approach to Segmentation and Bias Correction of Images with Intensity Inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rui; Ding, Zhaohua; Gatenby, Chris; Metaxas, Dimitris; Gore, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a variational level set approach to joint segmentation and bias correction of images with intensity inhomogeneity. Our method is based on an observation that intensities in a relatively small local region are separable, despite of the inseparability of the intensities in the whole image caused by the intensity inhomogeneity. We first define a weighted K-means clustering objective function for image intensities in a neighborhood around each point, with the cluster centers having a multiplicative factor that estimates the bias within the neighborhood. The objective function is then integrated over the entire domain and incorporated into a variational level set formulation. The energy minimization is performed via a level set evolution process. Our method is able to estimate bias of quite general profiles. Moreover, it is robust to initialization, and therefore allows automatic applications. The proposed method has been used for images of various modalities with promising results. PMID:18982712

  14. Nonparametric segmentation of multispectral MR images incorporating spatial and intensity information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derganc, Joze; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2002-05-01

    Image segmentation is concerned with partitioning an image into non-overlapping, constituent regions, which are homogeneous with respect to certain features. In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the most discriminative and commonly used features are the image intensities themselves. However, due to noise, partial volume effects, natural and spurious intensity variations, intensity distributions of distinct tissues generally overlap, which makes segmentation difficult and less precise. Using multi-spectral MR images and mapping intensities into a multidimensional feature space may help in segmentation. To further facilitate segmentation, we map the intensities and second derivatives of multi-spectral images into a common multidimensional feature space. Integration of intensity and spatial information may yield complex clusters that cannot be described by Gaussian mixture models or by hyper-spherical shapes. For this reason we devise a novel segmentation method based on non-parametric valley-seeking clustering. The valleys are found by estimating feature density gradients. The proposed segmentation method, with and without spatial information, is tested on simulated and real, single- and multi-spectral, MR brain images. The segmentation results are highly consistent with the gold standard, especially when combined with a procedure for intensity non-uniformity correction, presented in MI 4684-177.

  15. Thermal Imaging Using Small-Aerial Platforms for Assessment of Crop Water Stress in Humid Subtropical Climates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf- or canopy-to-air temperature difference (hereafter called CATD) can provide information on crop energy status. Thermal imagery from agricultural aircraft or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have the potential of providing thermal data for calculation of CATD and visual snapshots that can guide ...

  16. PCATMIP: enhancing signal intensity in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Pai, V M; Rapacchi, S; Kellman, P; Croisille, P; Wen, H

    2011-06-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI studies generally lose signal intensity to physiological motion, which can adversely affect quantification/diagnosis. Averaging over multiple repetitions, often used to improve image quality, does not eliminate the signal loss. In this article, PCATMIP, a combined principal component analysis and temporal maximum intensity projection approach, is developed to address this problem. Data are first acquired for a fixed number of repetitions. Assuming that physiological fluctuations of image intensities locally are likely temporally correlated unlike random noise, a local moving boxcar in the spatial domain is used to reconstruct low-noise images by considering the most relevant principal components in the temporal domain. Subsequently, a temporal maximum intensity projection yields a high signal-intensity image. Numerical and experimental studies were performed for validation and to determine optimal parameters for increasing signal intensity and minimizing noise. Subsequently, a combined principal component analysis and temporal maximum intensity projection approach was used to analyze diffusion-weighted porcine liver MRI scans. In these scans, the variability of apparent diffusion coefficient values among repeated measurements was reduced by 59% relative to averaging, and there was an increase in the signal intensity with higher intensity differences observed at higher b-values. In summary, a combined principal component analysis and temporal maximum intensity projection approach is a postprocessing approach that corrects for bulk motion-induced signal loss and improves apparent diffusion coefficient measurement reproducibility. PMID:21590803

  17. Thermal Imaging of Subsurface Coal Fires by means of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in the Autonomous Province Xinjiang, PRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasterling, Margarete; Schloemer, Stefan; Fischer, Christian; Ehrler, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Spontaneous combustion of coal and resulting coal fires lead to very high temperatures in the subsurface. To a large amount the heat is transferred to the surface by convective and conductive transport inducing a more or less pronounced thermal anomaly. During the past decade satellite-based infrared-imaging (ASTER, MODIS) was the method of choice for coal fire detection on a local and regional scale. However, the resolution is by far too low for a detailed analysis of single coal fires which is essential prerequisite for corrective measures (i.e. fire fighting) and calculation of carbon dioxide emission based on a complex correlation between energy release and CO2 generation. Consequently, within the framework of the Sino-German research project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in Northern China", a new concept was developed and successfully tested. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was equipped with a lightweight camera for thermografic (resolution 160 by 120 pixel, dynamic range -20 to 250°C) and for visual imaging. The UAV designed as an octocopter is able to hover at GPS controlled waypoints during predefined flight missions. The application of a UAV has several advantages. Compared to point measurements on the ground the thermal imagery quickly provides the spatial distribution of the temperature anomaly with a much better resolution. Areas otherwise not accessible (due to topography, fire induced cracks, etc.) can easily be investigated. The results of areal surveys on two coal fires in Xinjiang are presented. Georeferenced thermal and visual images were mosaicked together and analyzed. UAV-born data do well compared to temperatures measured directly on the ground and cover large areas in detail. However, measuring surface temperature alone is not sufficient. Simultaneous measurements made at the surface and in roughly 15cm depth proved substantial temperature gradients in the upper soil. Thus the temperature

  18. Parameter optimization of image classification techniques to delineate crowns of coppice trees on UltraCam-D aerial imagery in woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanifard, Yousef; Stereńczak, Krzysztof; Behnia, Negin

    2014-01-01

    Estimating the optimal parameters of some classification techniques becomes their negative aspect as it affects their performance for a given dataset and reduces classification accuracy. It was aimed to optimize the combination of effective parameters of support vector machine (SVM), artificial neural network (ANN), and object-based image analysis (OBIA) classification techniques by the Taguchi method. The optimized techniques were applied to delineate crowns of Persian oak coppice trees on UltraCam-D very high spatial resolution aerial imagery in Zagros semiarid woodlands, Iran. The imagery was classified and the maps were assessed by receiver operating characteristic curve and other performance metrics. The results showed that Taguchi is a robust approach to optimize the combination of effective parameters in these image classification techniques. The area under curve (AUC) showed that the optimized OBIA could well discriminate tree crowns on the imagery (AUC=0.897), while SVM and ANN yielded slightly less AUC performances of 0.819 and 0.850, respectively. The indices of accuracy (0.999) and precision (0.999) and performance metrics of specificity (0.999) and sensitivity (0.999) in the optimized OBIA were higher than with other techniques. The optimization of effective parameters of image classification techniques by the Taguchi method, thus, provided encouraging results to discriminate the crowns of Persian oak coppice trees on UltraCam-D aerial imagery in Zagros semiarid woodlands.

  19. Fully Polarimetric Differential Intensity W-band Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Kelly, James F.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Lechelt, Wayne M.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2013-05-31

    We present a novel architecture based upon a Dicke-switched heterodyne radiometer architecture employing two identical input sections consisting of horn and orthomode transducer to detect the difference between the H and V polarization states of two separate object patches imaged by the radiometer. We have constructed and described previously a fully polarimetric W-band passive millimeter wave imager constructed to study the phenomenology of anomaly detection using polarimetric image exploitation of the Stokes images. The heterodyne radiometer used a PIN diode switch between the input millimeter wave energy and that of a reference load in order to eliminate the effects of component drifts and reduce the effects of 1/f noise. The differential approach differs from our previous work by comparing H and V polarization states detected by each of the two input horns instead of a reference load to form signals delta H and delta V from closely adjacent paired object patches. This novel imaging approach reduces common mode noise and enhances detection of small changes between the H and V polarization states of two object patches, now given as difference terms of the fully polarimetric radiometer. We present the theory of operation, initial proof of concept experimental results, and extension of the differential radiometer to a system with a binocular fore optics that allow adjustment of the convergence or shear of the object patches viewed by the differential polarimetric imager.

  20. Digital Pathology: Data-Intensive Frontier in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lee A. D.; Carter, Alexis B.; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Widener, Patrick; Pan, Tony C.; Cholleti, Sharath R.; Sharma, Ashish; Kurc, Tahsin M.; Brat, Daniel J.; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Pathology is a medical subspecialty that practices the diagnosis of disease. Microscopic examination of tissue reveals information enabling the pathologist to render accurate diagnoses and to guide therapy. The basic process by which anatomic pathologists render diagnoses has remained relatively unchanged over the last century, yet advances in information technology now offer significant opportunities in image-based diagnostic and research applications. Pathology has lagged behind other healthcare practices such as radiology where digital adoption is widespread. As devices that generate whole slide images become more practical and affordable, practices will increasingly adopt this technology and eventually produce an explosion of data that will quickly eclipse the already vast quantities of radiology imaging data. These advances are accompanied by significant challenges for data management and storage, but they also introduce new opportunities to improve patient care by streamlining and standardizing diagnostic approaches and uncovering disease mechanisms. Computer-based image analysis is already available in commercial diagnostic systems, but further advances in image analysis algorithms are warranted in order to fully realize the benefits of digital pathology in medical discovery and patient care. In coming decades, pathology image analysis will extend beyond the streamlining of diagnostic workflows and minimizing interobserver variability and will begin to provide diagnostic assistance, identify therapeutic targets, and predict patient outcomes and therapeutic responses. PMID:25328166

  1. Fusion of infrared polarization and intensity images using support value transform and fuzzy combination rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fengbao; Wei, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Infrared polarization and intensity imagery provide complementary and discriminative information in image understanding and interpretation. In this paper, a novel fusion method is proposed by effectively merging the information with various combination rules. It makes use of both low-frequency and high-frequency images components from support value transform (SVT), and applies fuzzy logic in the combination process. Images (both infrared polarization and intensity images) to be fused are firstly decomposed into low-frequency component images and support value image sequences by the SVT. Then the low-frequency component images are combined using a fuzzy combination rule blending three sub-combination methods of (1) region feature maximum, (2) region feature weighting average, and (3) pixel value maximum; and the support value image sequences are merged using a fuzzy combination rule fusing two sub-combination methods of (1) pixel energy maximum and (2) region feature weighting. With the variables of two newly defined features, i.e. the low-frequency difference feature for low-frequency component images and the support-value difference feature for support value image sequences, trapezoidal membership functions are proposed and developed in tuning the fuzzy fusion process. Finally the fused image is obtained by inverse SVT operations. Experimental results of visual inspection and quantitative evaluation both indicate the superiority of the proposed method to its counterparts in image fusion of infrared polarization and intensity images.

  2. Improving image quality in compressed ultrafast photography with a space- and intensity-constrained reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liren; Chen, Yujia; Liang, Jinyang; Gao, Liang; Ma, Cheng; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-03-01

    The single-shot compressed ultrafast photography (CUP) camera is the fastest receive-only camera in the world. In this work, we introduce an external CCD camera and a space- and intensity-constrained (SIC) reconstruction algorithm to improve the image quality of CUP. The CCD camera takes a time-unsheared image of the dynamic scene. Unlike the previously used unconstrained algorithm, the proposed algorithm incorporates both spatial and intensity constraints, based on the additional prior information provided by the external CCD camera. First, a spatial mask is extracted from the time-unsheared image to define the zone of action. Second, an intensity threshold constraint is determined based on the similarity between the temporally projected image of the reconstructed datacube and the time-unsheared image taken by the external CCD. Both simulation and experimental studies showed that the SIC reconstruction improves the spatial resolution, contrast, and general quality of the reconstructed image.

  3. Light labeling with temporal intensity modulations for hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, Scott R.; Winters, David G.; Bartels, Randy A.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the theoretical framework of a new method of performing spectroscopy: labeling a unique intensity modulation frequency onto the optical frequencies of an incident or illumination power spectrum. In a manner similar to Fourier transform spectroscopy, we rescale the optical angular frequencies of the power spectrum down to readily measured frequencies on a square-law detector enabling rapid spectral update rates on a single element detector.

  4. Intensity correction with a pair of spoiled gradient recalled echo images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, Olivier; Anderson, Mark; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael, Sir

    2009-06-01

    Intensity inhomogeneities in magnetic resonance images (MRI) are a frequently occurring artefact, and result in the same tissue class to have vastly different intensities within an image. These inhomogeneities can be modelled by a slowly varying field, which is also called the bias field. Previous phantom-, image- or sequence based approaches suffer from long scan times, post-processing times or do not sufficiently remove the intensity variations. These intensity variations cause problems for quantitative image analysis algorithms (segmentation, registration) as well as clinicians (e.g. by complicating the visual assessment). This paper presents a novel technique (COIN, correction of intensity inhomogeneities) that uses two calibration images (fast spoiled gradient echo) to map a parameter containing the bias field, which is specific to the patient during a particular exam. This parametric map can then be used to correct any other images acquired during the same exam, regardless of the sequence employed. By using a short repetition time (less than 5 ms) for the calibration scans, the additional scan time is reduced to 60 s (max). The subsequent post-processing time is approximately 60 s per 20 slices. We successfully validate our approach on simulated brain MRI as well as real liver and spinal images. These images were acquired with a number of different coils, sequences and weightings. A comparison of our method with an existing, commercially available algorithm by radiologists shows that COIN is superior.

  5. PCATMIP: Enhancing Signal Intensity in Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pai, V. M.; Rapacchi, S.; Kellman, P.; Croisille, P.; Wen, H.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI studies generally lose signal intensity to physiological motion which can adversely affect quantification/diagnosis. Averaging over multiple repetitions, often used to improve image quality, does not eliminate the signal loss. In this paper, PCATMIP, a combined principal component analysis (PCA) and temporal maximum intensity projection (TMIP) approach is developed to address this problem. Data is first acquired for a fixed number of repetitions. Assuming that physiological fluctuations of image intensities locally are likely temporally-correlated unlike random noise, a local moving boxcar in the spatial domain is used to reconstruct low-noise images by considering the most relevant principal components in the temporal domain. Subsequently, a temporal maximum intensity projection yields a high signal-intensity image. Numerical and experimental studies were performed for validation and to determine optimal parameters for increasing signal intensity and minimizing noise. Subsequently, PCATMIP was used to analyze diffusion-weighted porcine liver MRI scans. In these scans, the variability of ADC values among repeated measurements was reduced by 59% relative to averaging and there was an increase in the signal intensity with higher intensity differences observed at higher b-values. In summary, PCATMIP is a post-processing approach that corrects for bulk motion-induced signal loss and improves ADC measurement reproducibility. PMID:21590803

  6. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion. PMID:24264647

  7. Intensity-based registration and fusion of thermal and visual facial-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, Musa Serdar; Elbakaray, Mohamed I.; Reza, Shamim; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.

    2012-10-01

    Fusion of images from different modalities provides information that cannot be obtained by viewing the images separately and consecutively. Automatic fusion of thermal and visual images is of great interest in defense and medical applications. In this study, we implemented automatic intensity-based illumination, translation and scale invariant registration of deformable objects in thermal and visual images by maximization of a similarity measure such as generalized correlation ratio. This method was originally used to register ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance images (MRI) successfully. In our current work, we propose a major modification to the original algorithm by investigating appropriate information content in the input data. The registration of facial thermal and visual images in this algorithm is achieved by maximization of the similarity measure between the input images in the appropriate image channel. The algorithm is tested using real facial images with illumination, scale, and translation variations and the results show acceptable accuracy.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M51 total intensity image at 333MHz (Mulcahy+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, D. D.; Fletcher, A.; Beck, R.; Mitra, D.; Scaife, A. M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Total intensity image M51 with the 325MHz receiver of the GMRT at 15-arcsec resolution. Only the upperband data was used and thus the central frequency is 333MHz. Full details of the observation,calibration and imaging can be seen in the paper. (2 data files).

  9. Iterative image reconstruction algorithms using wave-front intensity and phase variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiney, H. M.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.

    2005-07-01

    Iterative algorithms that reconstruct images from far-field x-ray diffraction data are plagued with convergence difficulties. An iterative image reconstruction algorithm is described that ameliorates these convergence difficulties through the use of diffraction data obtained with illumination modulated in both intensity and phase.

  10. Brain MR image segmentation using local and global intensity fitting active contours/surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Chunming; Sun, Quansen; Xia, Deshen; Kao, Chiu-Yen

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an improved region-based active contour/surface model for 2D/3D brain MR image segmentation. Our model combines the advantages of both local and global intensity information, which enable the model to cope with intensity inhomogeneity. We define an energy functional with a local intensity fitting term and an auxiliary global intensity fitting term. In the associated curve evolution, the motion of the contour is driven by a local intensity fitting force and a global intensity fitting force, induced by the local and global terms in the proposed energy functional, respectively. The influence of these two forces on the curve evolution is complementary. When the contour is close to object boundaries, the local intensity fitting force became dominant, which attracts the contour toward object boundaries and finally stops the contour there. The global intensity fitting force is dominant when the contour is far away from object boundaries, and it allows more flexible initialization of contours by using global image information. The proposed model has been applied to both 2D and 3D brain MR image segmentation with promising results.

  11. Quantitative label-free sperm imaging by means of transport of intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poola, Praveen Kumar; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; Jayaraman, Varshini; John, Renu

    2016-03-01

    Most living cells are optically transparent which makes it difficult to visualize them under bright field microscopy. Use of contrast agents or markers and staining procedures are often followed to observe these cells. However, most of these staining agents are toxic and not applicable for live cell imaging. In the last decade, quantitative phase imaging has become an indispensable tool for morphological characterization of the phase objects without any markers. In this paper, we report noninterferometric quantitative phase imaging of live sperm cells by solving transport of intensity equations with recorded intensity measurements along optical axis on a commercial bright field microscope.

  12. Image intensity standardization in 3D rotational angiography and its application to vascular segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogunović, Hrvoje; Radaelli, Alessandro G.; De Craene, Mathieu; Delgado, David; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2008-03-01

    Knowledge-based vascular segmentation methods typically rely on a pre-built training set of segmented images, which is used to estimate the probability of each voxel to belong to a particular tissue. In 3D Rotational Angiography (3DRA) the same tissue can correspond to different intensity ranges depending on the imaging device, settings and contrast injection protocol. As a result, pre-built training sets do not apply to all images and the best segmentation results are often obtained when the training set is built specifically for each individual image. We present an Image Intensity Standardization (IIS) method designed to ensure a correspondence between specific tissues and intensity ranges common to every image that undergoes the standardization process. The method applies a piecewise linear transformation to the image that aligns the intensity histogram to the histogram taken as reference. The reference histogram has been selected from a high quality image not containing artificial objects such as coils or stents. This is a pre-processing step that allows employing a training set built on a limited number of standardized images for the segmentation of standardized images which were not part of the training set. The effectiveness of the presented IIS technique in combination with a well-validated knowledge-based vasculature segmentation method is quantified on a variety of 3DRA images depicting cerebral arteries and intracranial aneurysms. The proposed IIS method offers a solution to the standardization of tissue classes in routine medical images and effectively improves automation and usability of knowledge-based vascular segmentation algorithms.

  13. Preliminary applications of Landsat images and aerial photography for determining land-use, geologic, and hydrologic characteristics, Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimes, F.J.; Moore, G.K.; Steele, T.D.

    1978-01-01

    Expanded energy- and recreation-related activities in the Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming, have caused a rapid increase in economic development which will result in increased demand and competition for natural resources. In planning for efficient allocation of the basin 's natural resources, Landsat images and small-scale color and color-infrared photographs were used for selected geologic, hydrologic and land-use applications within the Yampa River basin. Applications of Landsat data included: (1) regional land-use classification and mapping, (2) lineament mapping, and (3) areal snow-cover mapping. Results from the Landsat investigations indicated that: (1) Landsat land-use classification maps, at a regional level, compared favorably with areal land-use patterns that were defined from available ground information, (2) lineaments were mapped in sufficient detail using recently developed techniques for interpreting aerial photographs, (3) snow cover generally could be mapped for large areas with the exception of some densely forested areas of the basin and areas having a large percentage of winter-season cloud cover. Aerial photographs were used for estimation of turbidity for eight stream locations in the basin. Spectral reflectance values obtained by digitizing photographs were compared with measured turbidity values. Results showed strong correlations (variances explained of greater than 90 percent) between spectral reflectance obtained from color photographs and measured turbidity values. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Analyzing the Effect of JPEG Compression on Local Variance of Image Intensity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianquan; Zhu, Guopu; Shi, Yun-Qing

    2016-06-01

    The local variance of image intensity is a typical measure of image smoothness. It has been extensively used, for example, to measure the visual saliency or to adjust the filtering strength in image processing and analysis. However, to the best of our knowledge, no analytical work has been reported about the effect of JPEG compression on image local variance. In this paper, a theoretical analysis on the variation of local variance caused by JPEG compression is presented. First, the expectation of intensity variance of 8×8 non-overlapping blocks in a JPEG image is derived. The expectation is determined by the Laplacian parameters of the discrete cosine transform coefficient distributions of the original image and the quantization step sizes used in the JPEG compression. Second, some interesting properties that describe the behavior of the local variance under different degrees of JPEG compression are discussed. Finally, both the simulation and the experiments are performed to verify our derivation and discussion. The theoretical analysis presented in this paper provides some new insights into the behavior of local variance under JPEG compression. Moreover, it has the potential to be used in some areas of image processing and analysis, such as image enhancement, image quality assessment, and image filtering. PMID:27093626

  15. Analyzing the Effect of JPEG Compression on Local Variance of Image Intensity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianquan; Zhu, Guopu; Shi, Yun-Qing

    2016-06-01

    The local variance of image intensity is a typical measure of image smoothness. It has been extensively used, for example, to measure the visual saliency or to adjust the filtering strength in image processing and analysis. However, to the best of our knowledge, no analytical work has been reported about the effect of JPEG compression on image local variance. In this paper, a theoretical analysis on the variation of local variance caused by JPEG compression is presented. First, the expectation of intensity variance of 8×8 non-overlapping blocks in a JPEG image is derived. The expectation is determined by the Laplacian parameters of the discrete cosine transform coefficient distributions of the original image and the quantization step sizes used in the JPEG compression. Second, some interesting properties that describe the behavior of the local variance under different degrees of JPEG compression are discussed. Finally, both the simulation and the experiments are performed to verify our derivation and discussion. The theoretical analysis presented in this paper provides some new insights into the behavior of local variance under JPEG compression. Moreover, it has the potential to be used in some areas of image processing and analysis, such as image enhancement, image quality assessment, and image filtering.

  16. Adaptive optimization of reference intensity for optical coherence imaging using galvanometric mirror tilting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji-hyun; Han, Jae-Ho; Jeong, Jichai

    2015-09-01

    Integration time and reference intensity are important factors for achieving high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity in optical coherence tomography (OCT). In this context, we present an adaptive optimization method of reference intensity for OCT setup. The reference intensity is automatically controlled by tilting a beam position using a Galvanometric scanning mirror system. Before sample scanning, the OCT system acquires two dimensional intensity map with normalized intensity and variables in color spaces using false-color mapping. Then, the system increases or decreases reference intensity following the map data for optimization with a given algorithm. In our experiments, the proposed method successfully corrected the reference intensity with maintaining spectral shape, enabled to change integration time without manual calibration of the reference intensity, and prevented image degradation due to over-saturation and insufficient reference intensity. Also, SNR and sensitivity could be improved by increasing integration time with automatic adjustment of the reference intensity. We believe that our findings can significantly aid in the optimization of SNR and sensitivity for optical coherence tomography systems.

  17. Multi-temporal analysis of aerial images for the investigation of spatial-temporal dynamics of shallow erosion - a case study from the Tyrolean Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, C.; Geitner, C.; Heinrich, K.; Rutzinger, M.

    2012-04-01

    Small and shallow eroded areas characterize the landscape of many pastures and meadows in the Alps. The extent of such erosion phenomena varies between 2 m2 and 200 m2. These patches tend to be only a few decimetres thick, with a maximum depth of 2 m. The processes involved are shallow landslides, superficial erosion by snow and livestock trampling. Key parameters that influence the emergence of shallow erosion are the geological, topographical and climatic circumstances in an area as well as its soils, vegetation and land use. The negative impact of this phenomenon includes not only the loss of soil but also the reduced attractiveness of the landscape, especially in tourist regions. One approach identifying and mapping geomorphological elements is remote sensing. The analysis of aerial images is a suitable method for identifying the multi-temporal dynamics of shallow eroded areas because of the good spatial and temporal resolution. For this purpose, we used a pixel-based approach to detect these areas semi-automatically in an orthophoto. In a first step, each aerial image was classified using dynamic thresholds derived from the histogram of the orthophoto. In a second step, the identified areas of erosion were filtered and visually in-terpreted. Based on this procedure, eroded areas with a minimum size of 5 m2 were detected in a test site located in the Inner Schmirn Valley (Tyrol, Austria). The altitude of the test site ranges between 1,980 m and 2,370 m, with a mean inclination of 36°, facing E to SE. Geologically, the slope is part of the "Hohe Tauern Window", characterized by "Bündner schists" deficient in lime and regolith. Until the 1960s, the slope was used as a hay meadow. Orthophotos from 2000, 2003, 2007 and 2010 were used for this investigation. Older aerial images were not suitable because of their lower resolution and poor ortho-rectification. However, they are useful for relating the results of the ten-year time-span to a larger temporal context

  18. Analysis of nanometer-isolated trench diffract aerial image of both conventional and second-generation synchrotron-based proximity x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changqing; Chen, Dapeng; Liu, Ming; Ye, Tianchun; Yi, Futing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, Beam Propagation Method (BPM) with Fast Fourier Transforms(FFT) is employed to efficiently calculate the diffract image in the wafer plane for both conventional and second generation synchrotron-based proximity x-ray lithography(PXL). In the simulation, a dark-field isolated space pattern silicon nitride/Ta x-ray mask is used for conventional PXL and a diamond /Ta x-ray mask is used for second generation PXL, the diffract image"s dependency on absorber thickness, mask-wafer gap, effective total blur, linewidth and absorber sidewall slope has been numerically evaluated. For conventional PXL, in order to obtain a isolated trench resolution of 50nm, the mask-wafer gap should be controlled below 5 micron, the optimization condition is mask-wafer gap 5 micron, Ta absorber thickness 300nm, effective total blur 10nm, absorber sidewall slope 3°, the corresponding aerial image contrast is 0.457; For second generation, in order to obtain a isolated trench resolution of 50nm, the mask-wafer gap can be as large as 10 micron. In order to obtain a isolated trench resolution of 35nm, mask-wafer gap should be controlled below 5 micron.

  19. Imaging Hidden Objects with Spatial Speckle Intensity Correlations over Object Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Jason A.; Luo, Qiaoen; Webb, Kevin J.

    2016-02-01

    We present a coherent optical method for wavelength-resolution imaging of moving objects hidden within thick randomly scattering media. Spatial speckle intensity correlations as a function of object position are shown to provide access to the spatially dependent dielectric constant of the moving object. This speckle correlation imaging method yields field-based information previously inaccessible in heavily scattering environments. Proof of concept experimental results show excellent agreement with the theory. This new imaging approach will be valuable in high resolution imaging in tissue and other scattering environments where natural motion occurs or the object position can be controlled.

  20. Maximum intensity projection imaging for dynamic analysis of mental sweating by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ohmi, Masato; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2009-02-01

    A novel 3-D image construction method with maximum intensity projection (MIP) of B-mode OCT images is proposed for in vivo dynamic analysis of mental sweating on human fingertips. Time-sequential MIP-OCT images with the frame spacing as short as 1.4 sec provide us quantitative analysis of the sweating dynamics to evaluate of activity of sympathetic nerve. Dynamic changes in the microstructure of eccrin sweat glands can be clearly observed in the 3-D images constructed by volume rendering.

  1. Improving image quality in intensity-interferometric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Intensity-interferometric spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (I-SD-OCT), devised recently as a classical analog of quantum OCT, enables axially scanless cross-sectional imaging with an immunity to group-velocity dispersion and a factor-of-\\sqrt{2} resolution improvement. However, unwanted artifacts inevitably emerge in the resultant image. In this paper, it is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that such artifacts can be reduced without any difficulty by means of either a mechanical displacement of the detector for capturing spectral intensity patterns or a numerical displacement of the spectral intensity patterns stored in a computer. Furthermore, it is proved that the I-SD-OCT signal can be extracted from the conventional SD-OCT setup under a certain condition. These two features serve to improve the image quality in I-SD-OCT.

  2. The Kilauea 1974 Flow: Quantitative Morphometry of Lava Flows using Low Altitude Aerial Image Data using a Kite-based Platform in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, S. P.; Whelley, P.; Hamilton, C.; Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.

    2015-12-01

    The December 31, 1974 lava flow from Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii within the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park was selected for field campaigns as a terrestrial analog for Mars in support of NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) research and the Remote, In Situ and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration (RIS4E) node of the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) program). The lava flow was a rapidly emplaced unit that was strongly influenced by existing topography, which favored the formation of a tributary lava flow system. The unit includes a diverse range of surface textures (e.g., pāhoehoe, ´áā, and transitional lavas), and structural features (e.g., streamlined islands, pits, and interactions with older tumuli). However, these features are generally below the threshold of visibility within previously acquired airborne and spacecraft data. In this study, we have generated unique, high-resolution digital images using low-altitude Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) system during field campaigns in 2014 and 2015 (National Park Service permit #HAVO-2012-SCI-0025). The kite-based mapping platform (nadir-viewing) and a radio-controlled gimbal (allowing pointing) provided similar data as from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), but with longer flight time, larger total data volumes per sortie, and fewer regulatory challenges and cost. Images acquired from KAP and UAVs are used to create orthomosaics and DEMs using Multi-View Stereo-Photogrammetry (MVSP) software. The 3-Dimensional point clouds are extremely dense, resulting in a grid resolution of < 2 cm. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) / Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) data have been collected for these areas and provide a basis of comparison or "ground truth" for the photogrammetric data. Our results show a good comparison with LiDAR/TLS data, each offering their own unique advantages and potential for data fusion.

  3. Intensity inhomogeneity correction for magnetic resonance imaging of human brain at 7T

    SciTech Connect

    Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Ito, Kenji; Sasaki, Makoto; Kudo, Kohsuke Goodwin, Jonathan; Harada, Taisuke; Ogawa, Akira

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and efficacy for intensity inhomogeneity correction of various sequences of the human brain in 7T MRI using the extended version of the unified segmentation algorithm. Materials: Ten healthy volunteers were scanned with four different sequences (2D spin echo [SE], 3D fast SE, 2D fast spoiled gradient echo, and 3D time-of-flight) by using a 7T MRI system. Intensity inhomogeneity correction was performed using the “New Segment” module in SPM8 with four different values (120, 90, 60, and 30 mm) of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in Gaussian smoothness. The uniformity in signals in the entire white matter was evaluated using the coefficient of variation (CV); mean signal intensities between the subcortical and deep white matter were compared, and contrast between subcortical white matter and gray matter was measured. The length of the lenticulostriate (LSA) was measured on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images in the original and corrected images. Results: In all sequences, the CV decreased as the FWHM value decreased. The differences of mean signal intensities between subcortical and deep white matter also decreased with smaller FWHM values. The contrast between white and gray matter was maintained at all FWHM values. LSA length was significantly greater in corrected MIP than in the original MIP images. Conclusions: Intensity inhomogeneity in 7T MRI can be successfully corrected using SPM8 for various scan sequences.

  4. Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches for the Diagnosis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ciulla, Carlo; Veljanovski, Dimitar; Rechkoska Shikoska, Ustijana; Risteski, Filip A.

    2015-01-01

    This research presents signal-image post-processing techniques called Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches with application to the diagnosis of human brain tumors detected through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Post-processing of the MRI of the human brain encompasses the following model functions: (i) bivariate cubic polynomial, (ii) bivariate cubic Lagrange polynomial, (iii) monovariate sinc, and (iv) bivariate linear. The following Intensity-Curvature Measurement Approaches were used: (i) classic-curvature, (ii) signal resilient to interpolation, (iii) intensity-curvature measure and (iv) intensity-curvature functional. The results revealed that the classic-curvature, the signal resilient to interpolation and the intensity-curvature functional are able to add additional information useful to the diagnosis carried out with MRI. The contribution to the MRI diagnosis of our study are: (i) the enhanced gray level scale of the tumor mass and the well-behaved representation of the tumor provided through the signal resilient to interpolation, and (ii) the visually perceptible third dimension perpendicular to the image plane provided through the classic-curvature and the intensity-curvature functional. PMID:26644943

  5. A Partial Intensity Invariant Feature Descriptor for Multimodal Retinal Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Tian, Jie; Lee, Noah; Zheng, Jian; Smith, R. Theodore; Laine, Andrew F.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of vascular bifurcations is a challenging task in multimodal retinal image registration. Existing algorithms based on bifurcations usually fail in correctly aligning poor quality retinal image pairs. To solve this problem, we propose a novel highly distinctive local feature descriptor named partial intensity invariant feature descriptor (PIIFD) and describe a robust automatic retinal image registration framework named Harris-PIIFD. PIIFD is invariant to image rotation, partially invariant to image intensity, affine transformation, and viewpoint/perspective change. Our Harris-PIIFD framework consists of four steps. First, corner points are used as control point candidates instead of bifurcations since corner points are sufficient and uniformly distributed across the image domain. Second, PIIFDs are extracted for all corner points, and a bilateral matching technique is applied to identify corresponding PIIFDs matches between image pairs. Third, incorrect matches are removed and inaccurate matches are refined. Finally, an adaptive transformation is used to register the image pairs. PIIFD is so distinctive that it can be correctly identified even in nonvascular areas. When tested on 168 pairs of multimodal retinal images, the Harris-PIIFD far outperforms existing algorithms in terms of robustness, accuracy, and computational efficiency. PMID:20176538

  6. A partial intensity invariant feature descriptor for multimodal retinal image registration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Tian, Jie; Lee, Noah; Zheng, Jian; Smith, R Theodore; Laine, Andrew F

    2010-07-01

    Detection of vascular bifurcations is a challenging task in multimodal retinal image registration. Existing algorithms based on bifurcations usually fail in correctly aligning poor quality retinal image pairs. To solve this problem, we propose a novel highly distinctive local feature descriptor named partial intensity invariant feature descriptor (PIIFD) and describe a robust automatic retinal image registration framework named Harris-PIIFD. PIIFD is invariant to image rotation, partially invariant to image intensity, affine transformation, and viewpoint/perspective change. Our Harris-PIIFD framework consists of four steps. First, corner points are used as control point candidates instead of bifurcations since corner points are sufficient and uniformly distributed across the image domain. Second, PIIFDs are extracted for all corner points, and a bilateral matching technique is applied to identify corresponding PIIFDs matches between image pairs. Third, incorrect matches are removed and inaccurate matches are refined. Finally, an adaptive transformation is used to register the image pairs. PIIFD is so distinctive that it can be correctly identified even in nonvascular areas. When tested on 168 pairs of multimodal retinal images, the Harris-PIIFD far outperforms existing algorithms in terms of robustness, accuracy, and computational efficiency.

  7. An Automated Approach to Agricultural Tile Drain Detection and Extraction Utilizing High Resolution Aerial Imagery and Object-Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Richard A.

    Subsurface drainage from agricultural fields in the Maumee River watershed is suspected to adversely impact the water quality and contribute to the formation of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Erie. In early August of 2014, a HAB developed in the western Lake Erie Basin that resulted in over 400,000 people being unable to drink their tap water due to the presence of a toxin from the bloom. HAB development in Lake Erie is aided by excess nutrients from agricultural fields, which are transported through subsurface tile and enter the watershed. Compounding the issue within the Maumee watershed, the trend within the watershed has been to increase the installation of tile drains in both total extent and density. Due to the immense area of drained fields, there is a need to establish an accurate and effective technique to monitor subsurface farmland tile installations and their associated impacts. This thesis aimed at developing an automated method in order to identify subsurface tile locations from high resolution aerial imagery by applying an object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach utilizing eCognition. This process was accomplished through a set of algorithms and image filters, which segment and classify image objects by their spectral and geometric characteristics. The algorithms utilized were based on the relative location of image objects and pixels, in order to maximize the robustness and transferability of the final rule-set. These algorithms were coupled with convolution and histogram image filters to generate results for a 10km2 study area located within Clay Township in Ottawa County, Ohio. The eCognition results were compared to previously collected tile locations from an associated project that applied heads-up digitizing of aerial photography to map field tile. The heads-up digitized locations were used as a baseline for the accuracy assessment. The accuracy assessment generated a range of agreement values from 67.20% - 71.20%, and an average

  8. Perspective Intensity Images for Co-Registration of Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Digital Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yubin; Qiu, Yan; Cui, Tiejun

    2016-06-01

    Co-registration of terrestrial laser scanner and digital camera has been an important topic of research, since reconstruction of visually appealing and measurable models of the scanned objects can be achieved by using both point clouds and digital images. This paper presents an approach for co-registration of terrestrial laser scanner and digital camera. A perspective intensity image of the point cloud is firstly generated by using the collinearity equation. Then corner points are extracted from the generated perspective intensity image and the camera image. The fundamental matrix F is then estimated using several interactively selected tie points and used to obtain more matches with RANSAC. The 3D coordinates of all the matched tie points are directly obtained or estimated using the least squares method. The robustness and effectiveness of the presented methodology is demonstrated by the experimental results. Methods presented in this work may also be used for automatic registration of terrestrial laser scanning point clouds.

  9. A level set method for image segmentation in the presence of intensity inhomogeneities with application to MRI.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunming; Huang, Rui; Ding, Zhaohua; Gatenby, J Chris; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Gore, John C

    2011-07-01

    Intensity inhomogeneity often occurs in real-world images, which presents a considerable challenge in image segmentation. The most widely used image segmentation algorithms are region-based and typically rely on the homogeneity of the image intensities in the regions of interest, which often fail to provide accurate segmentation results due to the intensity inhomogeneity. This paper proposes a novel region-based method for image segmentation, which is able to deal with intensity inhomogeneities in the segmentation. First, based on the model of images with intensity inhomogeneities, we derive a local intensity clustering property of the image intensities, and define a local clustering criterion function for the image intensities in a neighborhood of each point. This local clustering criterion function is then integrated with respect to the neighborhood center to give a global criterion of image segmentation. In a level set formulation, this criterion defines an energy in terms of the level set functions that represent a partition of the image domain and a bias field that accounts for the intensity inhomogeneity of the image. Therefore, by minimizing this energy, our method is able to simultaneously segment the image and estimate the bias field, and the estimated bias field can be used for intensity inhomogeneity correction (or bias correction). Our method has been validated on synthetic images and real images of various modalities, with desirable performance in the presence of intensity inhomogeneities. Experiments show that our method is more robust to initialization, faster and more accurate than the well-known piecewise smooth model. As an application, our method has been used for segmentation and bias correction of magnetic resonance (MR) images with promising results. PMID:21518662

  10. Multispectral upconversion luminescence intensity ratios for ascertaining the tissue imaging depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yu; Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Ding, Yadan; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Zhang, Hong

    2014-07-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have in recent years emerged as excellent contrast agents for in vivo luminescence imaging of deep tissues. But information abstracted from these images is in most cases restricted to 2-dimensions, without the depth information. In this work, a simple method has been developed to accurately ascertain the tissue imaging depth based on the relative luminescence intensity ratio of multispectral NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ UCNPs. A theoretical mode was set up, where the parameters in the quantitative relation between the relative intensities of the upconversion luminescence spectra and the depth of the UCNPs were determined using tissue mimicking liquid phantoms. The 540 nm and 650 nm luminescence intensity ratios (G/R ratio) of NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ UCNPs were monitored following excitation path (Ex mode) and emission path (Em mode) schemes, respectively. The model was validated by embedding NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ UCNPs in layered pork muscles, which demonstrated a very high accuracy of measurement in the thickness up to centimeter. This approach shall promote significantly the power of nanotechnology in medical optical imaging by expanding the imaging information from 2-dimensional to real 3-dimensional.Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) have in recent years emerged as excellent contrast agents for in vivo luminescence imaging of deep tissues. But information abstracted from these images is in most cases restricted to 2-dimensions, without the depth information. In this work, a simple method has been developed to accurately ascertain the tissue imaging depth based on the relative luminescence intensity ratio of multispectral NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ UCNPs. A theoretical mode was set up, where the parameters in the quantitative relation between the relative intensities of the upconversion luminescence spectra and the depth of the UCNPs were determined using tissue mimicking liquid phantoms. The 540 nm and 650 nm luminescence intensity ratios (G/R ratio) of NaYF4:Yb3

  11. Color enhancement of highly correlated images. I - Decorrelation and HSI contrast stretches. [hue saturation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.; Kahle, Anne B.; Walker, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional enhancements for the color display of multispectral images are based on independent contrast modifications or 'stretches' of three input images. This approach is not effective if the image channels are highly correlated or if the image histograms are strongly bimodal or more complex. Any of several procedures that tend to 'stretch' color saturation while leaving hue unchanged may better utilize the full range of colors for the display of image information. Two conceptually different enhancements are discussed: the 'decorrelation stretch', based on principal-component (PC) analysis, and the 'stretch' of 'hue' - 'saturation' - intensity (HSI) transformed data. The PC transformation in scene-dependent, but the HSI transformation is invariant. Examples of images enhanced by conventional linear stretches, decorrelation stretch, and by stretches of HSI transformed data are compared. Schematic variation diagrams or two- and three-dimensional histograms are used to illustrate the 'decorrelation stretch' method and the effect of the different enhancements.

  12. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-08-03

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Diffusion Weighted MR Images of Brain Tumor Using Signal Intensity Gradient Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shanbhag, S. S.; Udupi, G. R.; Patil, K. M.; Ranganath, K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of diffusion weighted-magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) in the examination and classification of brain tumors, namely, glioma and meningioma. Our hypothesis was that as signal intensity variations on diffusion weighted (DW) images depend on histology and cellularity of the tumor, analysing the signal intensity characteristics on DW images may allow differentiating between the tumor types. Towards this end the signal intensity variations on DW images of the entire tumor volume data of 20 subjects with glioma and 12 subjects with meningioma were investigated and quantified using signal intensity gradient (SIG) parameter. The relative increase in the SIG values (RSIG) for the subjects with glioma and meningioma was in the range of 10.08–28.36 times and 5.60–9.86 times, respectively, compared to their corresponding SIG values on the contralateral hemisphere. The RSIG values were significantly different between the subjects with glioma and meningioma (P < 0.01), with no overlap between RSIG values across the two tumors. The results indicate that the quantitative changes in the RSIG values could be applied in the differential diagnosis of glioma and meningioma, and their adoption in clinical diagnosis and treatment could be helpful and informative. PMID:27006934

  14. Intensity Weighted Subtraction Microscopy Approach for Image Contrast and Resolution Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobchevskaya, Kseniya; Peres, Chiara; Li, Zhibin; Antipov, Alexei; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel subtraction microscopy algorithm, exploiting fluorescence emission difference or switching laser mode and their derivatives for image enhancement. The key novelty of the proposed approach lies in the weighted subtraction coefficient, adjusted pixel-by-pixel with respect to the intensity distributions of initial images. This method produces significant resolution enhancement and minimizes image distortions. Our theoretical and experimental studies demonstrate that this approach can be applied to any optical microscopy techniques, including label free and non-linear methods, where common super-resolution techniques cannot be used.

  15. A low-cost vector processor boosting compute-intensive image processing operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adorf, Hans-Martin

    1992-01-01

    Low-cost vector processing (VP) is within reach of everyone seriously engaged in scientific computing. The advent of affordable add-on VP-boards for standard workstations complemented by mathematical/statistical libraries is beginning to impact compute-intensive tasks such as image processing. A case in point in the restoration of distorted images from the Hubble Space Telescope. A low-cost implementation is presented of the standard Tarasko-Richardson-Lucy restoration algorithm on an Intel i860-based VP-board which is seamlessly interfaced to a commercial, interactive image processing system. First experience is reported (including some benchmarks for standalone FFT's) and some conclusions are drawn.

  16. Intensity Weighted Subtraction Microscopy Approach for Image Contrast and Resolution Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Korobchevskaya, Kseniya; Peres, Chiara; Li, Zhibin; Antipov, Alexei; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel subtraction microscopy algorithm, exploiting fluorescence emission difference or switching laser mode and their derivatives for image enhancement. The key novelty of the proposed approach lies in the weighted subtraction coefficient, adjusted pixel-by-pixel with respect to the intensity distributions of initial images. This method produces significant resolution enhancement and minimizes image distortions. Our theoretical and experimental studies demonstrate that this approach can be applied to any optical microscopy techniques, including label free and non-linear methods, where common super-resolution techniques cannot be used. PMID:27174367

  17. Rapid measurements of intensities for safety assessment of advanced imaging sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav G.

    2014-03-01

    FDA requires that intensity and safety parameters are measured for all imaging schemes for clinical imaging. This is often cumbersome, since the scan sequence has to broken apart, measurements conducted for the individually emitted beams, and the final intensity levels calculated by combining the intensities from the individual beams. This paper suggests a fast measurement scheme using the multi-line sampling capability of modern scanners and research systems. The hydrophone is connected to one sampling channel in the research system, and the intensity is measured for all imaging lines in one emission sequence. This makes it possible to map out the pressure field and hence intensity level for all imaging lines in a single measurement. The approach has several advantages: the scanner does not have to be re-programmed and can use the scan sequence without modification. The measurements are orders of magnitude faster (minutes rather than hours) and the final intensity level calculation can be made generic and reused for any kind of scan sequence by just knowing the number of imaging lines and the pulse repetition time. The scheme has been implemented on the Acoustic Intensity Measurement System AIMS III (Onda, Sunnyvale, California, USA). The research scanner SARUS is used for the experiments, where one of the channels is used for the hydrophone signal. A 3 MHz BK 8820e (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) convex array with 192 elements is used along with an Onda HFL-0400 hydrophone connected to a AH-2010 pre-amplifier (Onda Corporation, Sunnyvale, USA). A single emission sequence is employed for testing and calibrating the approach. The measurements using the AIMS III and SARUS systems after calibration agree within a relative standard deviation of 0.24%. A duplex B-mode and flow sequence is also investigated. The complex intensity map is measured and the time averaged spatial peak intensity is found. A single point measurement takes 3.43 seconds and the whole sequence can

  18. Rigorous LiDAR Strip Adjustment with Triangulated Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. J.; Xiong, X. D.; Hu, X. Y.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method. Firstly, aero-triangulation of the simultaneously obtained aerial images is conducted with a few photogrammetry-specific ground control points. Secondly, LiDAR intensity images are generated from the reflectance signals of laser foot points, and conjugate points are automatically matched between the LiDAR intensity image and the aero-triangulated aerial image. Control points used in LiDAR strip adjustment are derived from these conjugate points. Finally, LiDAR strip adjustment of real data is conducted with the POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method proposed in this paper, and comparison experiment using three-dimensional similarity transformation method is also performed. The results indicate that the POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method can significantly correct the planimetric and vertical errors of LiDAR strips. The planimetric correction accuracy is higher than average point distance while the vertical correction accuracy is comparable to that of the result of aero-triangulation. Moreover, the proposed method is obliviously superior to the traditional three-dimensional similarity transformation method.

  19. Silicon wafer microstructure imaging using InfraRed Transport of Intensity Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongru; Feng, Guoying; Bourgade, Thomas; Zuo, Chao; Du, Yongzhao; Zhou, Shouhuan; Asundi, Anand

    2015-03-01

    A novel quantitative 3D imaging system of silicon microstructures using InfraRed Transport of Intensity Equation (IRTIE) is proposed in this paper. By recording the intensity at multiple planes and using FFT or DCT based TIE solver, fast and accurate phase retrieval for both uniform and non-uniform intensity distributions is proposed. Numerical simulation and experiments confirm the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method. The application of IR-TIE for inspection of micro-patterns in visibly opaque media using 1310 nm light source is demonstrated. For comparison, micro-patterns are also inspected by the contact scanning mode Taylor Hobson system. Quantitative agreement suggests the possibility of using IR-TIE for phase imaging of silicon wafers.

  20. Magneto-optical imaging of magnetic domain pattern produced by intense femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Jaivarhan; Mohan, Shyam; Banerjee, S. S.; Kahaly, S.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2009-03-01

    An important and intriguing area of research is laser plasma generated giant magnetic field pulses. Interaction of ultrashort high intensity laser pulses with matter involves several mechanisms for generating ultrastrong magnetic fields. By irradiating a magnetic recordable tape constituting of γ-Fe2O3 particles with an intense p-polarized femtosecond laser pulses (˜ 10^16 W cm-2, 100fs), we have found complex magnetic field patterns stored in the tape. We image the local magnetic field distribution around the irradiated region [1] using the high sensitivity magneto-optical imaging technique. We understand the complex magnetic domains patterns recoded on the tape in terms of interesting instabilities [1] generated in the plasma produced during the irradiation of the tape with intense laser pulses. [0pt] [1] Jaivardhan Sinha, Shyam Mohan, S. S Banerjee, S. Kahaly, G. Ravindra Kumar, Phys. Rev. E 77, 046118(2008). *satyajit@iitk.ac.in

  1. Maximum-Intensity-Projection Imaging for Dynamic Analysis of Mental Sweating by Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Akihiro; Ohmi, Masato; Ohnishi, Makoto; Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2008-09-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) shows great potential for microscopic observation of human sweating dynamics. It should be a key technology in the development of new techniques for the study of dynamic physiology. In this study, the dynamic motion of eccrin sweat glands is visualized by three-dimensional (3-D) OCT imaging, and a novel 3-D image construction method, using maximum intensity projection (MIP) of B-mode OCT images, is proposed for in vivo dynamic analysis of mental sweating on human fingertips. Time-sequential MIP-OCT images with a frame spacing of 1.4 s provide quantitative analysis of the sweating dynamics, which in turn leads to the evaluation of the activity of the sympathetic nerve. Dynamic changes in the microstructure of eccrin sweat glands can be clearly observed in the 3-D images constructed by volume rendering.

  2. TH-A-18C-10: Dynamic Intensity Weighted Region of Interest Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, E; Pan, X; Pelizzari, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: For image guidance tasks full image quality is not required throughout the entire image. With dynamic filtration of the kV imaging beam the noise properties of the CT image can be locally controlled, providing a high quality image around the target volume with a lower quality surrounding region while providing substantial dose sparing to the patient as well as reduced scatter fluence on the detector. Methods: A dynamic collimation device with 3mm copper blades has been designed to mount in place of the bowtie filter on the On-Board Imager (Varian Medical Systems). The beam intensity is reduced by 95% behind the copper filters and the aperture is controlled dynamically to conformally illuminate a given ROI during a standard cone-beam CT scan. A data correction framework to account for the physical effects of the collimator prior to reconstruction was developed. Furthermore, to determine the dose savings and scatter reduction a monte carlo model was built in BEAMnrc with specifics from the Varian Monte Carlo Data Package. The MC model was validated with Gafchromic film. Results: The reconstructed image shows image quality comparable to a standard scan in the specified ROI, with higher noise and streaks in the outer region but still sufficient information for alignment to high contrast structures. The monte carlo modeling showed that the scatter-to-primary ratio was reduced from 1.26 for an unfiltered scan to 0.45 for an intensity weighted scan, suggesting that image quality may be improved in the inner ROI. Dose in the inner region was reduced 10–15% due to reduced scatter and by as much as 75% in the outer region. Conclusion: Dynamic intensity-weighted ROI imaging allows reduction of imaging dose to sensitive organs away from the target region while providing images that retain their utility for patient setup and procedure guidance. Funding was provided in part by Varian Medical Systems and NIH Grants 1RO1CA120540, T32EB002103, S10 RR021039 and P30 CA

  3. Land cover mapping using aerial and VHR satellite images for distributed hydrological modelling of periurban catchments: Application to the Yzeron catchment (Lyon, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacqueminet, C.; Kermadi, S.; Michel, K.; Béal, D.; Gagnage, M.; Branger, F.; Jankowfsky, S.; Braud, I.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryThe rapid progression of urbanization in periurban areas affects the hydrological cycle of periurban rivers. To quantify these changes, distributed hydrological modelling tools able to simulate the hydrology of periurban catchments are being developed. Land cover information is one of the data sources used to define the model mesh and parameters. The land cover in periurban catchments is characterized by a very large heterogeneity, where the vegetated and the artificial surfaces are finely overlapping. The study is conducted in the Yzeron catchment (150 km2), close to the city of Lyon, France. We explore the potential of very high-resolution (VHR) optical images (0.50-2.50 m) for retrieving information useful for those distributed hydrological models at two scales. For detailed object-oriented models, applicable to catchments of a few km2, where hydrological units are based on the cadastral units, manual digitizing based on the 0.5 m resolution image, was found to be the most accurate to provide the required information. For larger catchments of about 100 km2, three semi-automated mapping procedures (pixel based and object-oriented classifications), applied to aerial images (BD-Ortho®IGN), and two satellite images (Quickbird and Spot 5) were compared. We showed that each image/processing provided some interesting and accurate information about some of the land cover classes. We proposed to combine them into a synthesis map, taking profit of the strength of each image/processing in identifying the land cover classes and their physical properties. This synthesis map was shown to be more accurate than each map separately. We illustrate the interest of the derived maps in terms of distributed hydrological modelling. The maps were used to propose a classification of the Yzeron sub-catchments in terms of dominant vegetation cover and imperviousness. We showed that according to the image processing and images characteristics, the calculated imperviousness rates

  4. Mass and heat flux balance of La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe) from aerial infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Beauducel, François; Coutant, Olivier; Delacourt, Christophe; Richon, Patrick; de Chabalier, Jean-Bernard; Hammouya, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    La Soufrière of Guadeloupe is an active volcano of Lesser Antilles that is closely monitored due to a high eruptive hazard potential. Since 1992 it exhibits a medium-level but sustained background hydrothermal activity with low-energy and shallow seismicity, hot springs temperature increase and high flux acidic gas fumaroles at the summit. The problem of estimating the heat balance and quantifying the evolution of hydrothermal activity has become a key challenge for surveillance. This work is the first attempt of a global mapping and quantification of La Soufrière thermal activity performed in February 2010 using aerial thermal infrared imagery. After instrument calibration and data processing, we present a global map of thermal anomalies allowing to spot the main active sites: the summit area (including the fumaroles of Tarissan Pit and South Crater), the Ty Fault fumarolic zone, and the hot springs located at the vicinity of the dome. In a second step, we deduce the mass and the energy fluxes released by the volcano. In particular, we propose a simple model of energy balance to estimate the mass flux of the summit fumaroles from their brightness temperature and size. In February 2010, Tarissan Pit had a 22.8 ± 8.1 kg s -1 flux (1970 ± 704 tons day -1), while South Crater vents had a total of 19.5 ± 4.0 kg s -1 (1687 ± 348 tons day -1). Once converted into energy flux, summit fumaroles represent 98% of the 106 ± 30 MW released by the volcano, the 2% remaining being split between the hot springs and the thermal anomalies at the summit and at the Ty Fault fumarolic zone. These values are in the high range of the previous estimations, highlighting the short-term variability of the expelled fluxes. Such a heat flux requires the cooling of 1500 m 3 of magma per day, in good agreement with previous geochemical studies.

  5. Probability mapping of scarred myocardium using texture and intensity features in CMR images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The myocardium exhibits heterogeneous nature due to scarring after Myocardial Infarction (MI). In Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) imaging, Late Gadolinium (LG) contrast agent enhances the intensity of scarred area in the myocardium. Methods In this paper, we propose a probability mapping technique using Texture and Intensity features to describe heterogeneous nature of the scarred myocardium in Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) images after Myocardial Infarction (MI). Scarred tissue and non-scarred tissue are represented with high and low probabilities, respectively. Intermediate values possibly indicate areas where the scarred and healthy tissues are interwoven. The probability map of scarred myocardium is calculated by using a probability function based on Bayes rule. Any set of features can be used in the probability function. Results In the present study, we demonstrate the use of two different types of features. One is based on the mean intensity of pixel and the other on underlying texture information of the scarred and non-scarred myocardium. Examples of probability maps computed using the mean intensity of pixel and the underlying texture information are presented. We hypothesize that the probability mapping of myocardium offers alternate visualization, possibly showing the details with physiological significance difficult to detect visually in the original CMR image. Conclusion The probability mapping obtained from the two features provides a way to define different cardiac segments which offer a way to identify areas in the myocardium of diagnostic importance (like core and border areas in scarred myocardium). PMID:24053280

  6. Hybrid point-and-intensity-based deformable registration for abdominal CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Jay B.; Maurer, Calvin R., Jr.; Dooley, John R.

    2005-04-01

    In this paper, we examine the problem of non-rigid, image-to-image registration for CT images of the abdomen. This problem has been previously addressed in many different contexts (e.g., visualization using different imaging modalities, modelling of organ deformation after surgical resection). The particular application in which we are interested is modelling of respiratory motion of abdominal organs, so that we may achieve a more accurate representation of the dose distribution in both targeted structures and non-targeted areas during radiosurgical treatment. Our goal is to register two CT images, each acquired at different positions in the respiratory cycle. We use a transformation model based on B-splines, and take advantage of B-splines' "locality" or "compact support" property to ensure computational efficiency and robust convergence to a satisfactory result. We demonstrate that, although a purely intensity-based registration metric performs well in matching the deformation of the lungs during the respiratory cycle, the movement of other organs (e.g., liver and kidney) is poorly represented due to the poor contrast within and between these organs in the CT images. We introduce a registration metric that is a weighted combination of intensity difference and distance between corresponding points that are manually identified in the two images being registered; we show how the influence of these points can be elegantly added to the metric so that it remains differentiable with respect to the spline control points. Visual inspection reveals that resulting registrations appear to be superior to the intensity-only ones in terms of representation of visceral organ deformation and movement.

  7. Urban land-use intensity extraction based on Quickbird high resolution image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chen; Liu, Yanfang

    2008-12-01

    The abundance of high resolution image information and the intensity of urban spatial system can be combined organically in the process of image understanding, information extraction and quota measurement. The evaluation indices of urban land use intensity extracted from Quickbird image include building density, floor ratio area, green ratio, vacancy ratio, and etc. Firstly, land use condition in the research area is acquired through the overlay of Quickbird image and Wuhan land use map. Secondly, the study adopts spectral threshold segmentation method to extract building shadow, object-oriented classification method to obtain building base area, shadow-based height reversion approach to estimate building height in typical urban residential block and object-oriented segmentation and classification approach to estimate concerned indices in city village. In the end, the comparison and discussion of urban land intensity are made according to BD and FAR in urban residential block and city village respectively. It is concluded that FAR (floor ratio area) in urban residential block can be planned higher and BD (building density) in city village should be lower according to the present planning regulations in Wuhan.

  8. Intracranial Lesions with Low Signal Intensity on T2-weighted MR Images - Review of Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Zimny, Anna; Neska-Matuszewska, Małgorzata; Bladowska, Joanna; Sąsiadek, Marek J

    2015-01-01

    In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1. Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces. Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of lesion location and clinical symptoms enable a correct choice of a further diagnostic algorithm or, in many cases, final diagnosis based exclusively on an MRI examination. PMID:25628772

  9. Bayesian inference on multiscale models for poisson intensity estimation: applications to photon-limited image denoising.

    PubMed

    Lefkimmiatis, Stamatios; Maragos, Petros; Papandreou, George

    2009-08-01

    We present an improved statistical model for analyzing Poisson processes, with applications to photon-limited imaging. We build on previous work, adopting a multiscale representation of the Poisson process in which the ratios of the underlying Poisson intensities (rates) in adjacent scales are modeled as mixtures of conjugate parametric distributions. Our main contributions include: 1) a rigorous and robust regularized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for maximum-likelihood estimation of the rate-ratio density parameters directly from the noisy observed Poisson data (counts); 2) extension of the method to work under a multiscale hidden Markov tree model (HMT) which couples the mixture label assignments in consecutive scales, thus modeling interscale coefficient dependencies in the vicinity of image edges; 3) exploration of a 2-D recursive quad-tree image representation, involving Dirichlet-mixture rate-ratio densities, instead of the conventional separable binary-tree image representation involving beta-mixture rate-ratio densities; and 4) a novel multiscale image representation, which we term Poisson-Haar decomposition, that better models the image edge structure, thus yielding improved performance. Experimental results on standard images with artificially simulated Poisson noise and on real photon-limited images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  10. Classification of Urban Feature from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Images Using Gasvm Integration and Multi-Scale Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modiri, M.; Salehabadi, A.; Mohebbi, M.; Hashemi, A. M.; Masumi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The use of UAV in the application of photogrammetry to obtain cover images and achieve the main objectives of the photogrammetric mapping has been a boom in the region. The images taken from REGGIOLO region in the province of, Italy Reggio -Emilia by UAV with non-metric camera Canon Ixus and with an average height of 139.42 meters were used to classify urban feature. Using the software provided SURE and cover images of the study area, to produce dense point cloud, DSM and Artvqvtv spatial resolution of 10 cm was prepared. DTM area using Adaptive TIN filtering algorithm was developed. NDSM area was prepared with using the difference between DSM and DTM and a separate features in the image stack. In order to extract features, using simultaneous occurrence matrix features mean, variance, homogeneity, contrast, dissimilarity, entropy, second moment, and correlation for each of the RGB band image was used Orthophoto area. Classes used to classify urban problems, including buildings, trees and tall vegetation, grass and vegetation short, paved road and is impervious surfaces. Class consists of impervious surfaces such as pavement conditions, the cement, the car, the roof is stored. In order to pixel-based classification and selection of optimal features of classification was GASVM pixel basis. In order to achieve the classification results with higher accuracy and spectral composition informations, texture, and shape conceptual image featureOrthophoto area was fencing. The segmentation of multi-scale segmentation method was used.it belonged class. Search results using the proposed classification of urban feature, suggests the suitability of this method of classification complications UAV is a city using images. The overall accuracy and kappa coefficient method proposed in this study, respectively, 47/93% and 84/91% was.

  11. Intensity of an oxygen saturation image improved using scanning NIR-LED light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Ching-Ching; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    A near-infrared (940 nm) image of skin tissue can be substantially enhanced using optical scanning technology (OST) that can reduce the scattering effect and remove the wrinkles or fine hair in the image. Using OST to create the skin tissue image ensured that the contour of blood vessels became more clear than that obtained from the divergent light source. In addition, the oxygen saturation of the blood vessels and tissues obtained using OST were approximately 98.65 and 93.17%, respectively, exhibiting an increase of more than 20% compared with that obtained using divergent light, and approached the value when measured using commercial pulse oximetry. Because the proposed method has a deep light penetration depth and high image intensity and resolution for oxygen saturation analysis, it is highly appropriate to be applied to future studies on diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  12. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Jonathan S; Mellor, Matthew P; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  13. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Jonathan S; Mellor, Matthew P; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2015-10-09

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  14. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  15. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  16. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  17. Aerial radiation surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Jobst, J.

    1980-01-01

    A recent aerial radiation survey of the surroundings of the Vitro mill in Salt Lake City shows that uranium mill tailings have been removed to many locations outside their original boundary. To date, 52 remote sites have been discovered within a 100 square kilometer aerial survey perimeter surrounding the mill; 9 of these were discovered with the recent aerial survey map. Five additional sites, also discovered by aerial survey, contained uranium ore, milling equipment, or radioactive slag. Because of the success of this survey, plans are being made to extend the aerial survey program to other parts of the Salt Lake valley where diversions of Vitro tailings are also known to exist.

  18. Intensity Enhanced Cerenkov Luminescence Imaging Using Terbium-Doped Gd2O2S Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xin; Chen, Xueli; Kang, Fei; Zhan, Yonghua; Cao, Xu; Wang, Jing; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2015-06-10

    Weak intensity and poor penetration depth are two big obstacles toward clinical use of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI). In this proof-of-concept study, we overcame these limitations by using lanthanides-based radioluminescent microparticles (RLMPs), called terbium doped Gd2O2S. The characterization experiment showed that the emission excited by Cerenkov luminescence can be neglected whereas the spectrum experiment demonstrated that the RLMPs can actually be excited by γ-rays. A series of in vitro experiments demonstrated that RLMPs significantly improve the intensity and the penetration capacity of CLI, which has been extended to as deep as 15 mm. In vivo pseudotumor study further prove the huge potential of this enhancement strategy for Cerenkov luminescence imaging in living animal studies.

  19. Performance of surface plasmon resonance imaging system based on angular modulation and intensity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu-lu; Chen, Xing; Cui, Da-fu

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging system based on angular modulation (AM) and intensity measurement (IM) together to avoid the mechanical errors of the angle scanning device. The SPR resonant angle was found by angular scanning method and then the light intensity changes were collected at a fixed incident angle. Glycerol gradient solution (0%, 1%, 2%, 3% (weight percentage) glycerol dissolved in water) experiments were conducted, which indicate that the best fixed angle location is the middle of the linear range of SPR absorption peak and the central area signals are more uniform than those of the border areas. The sensitivity differences of different areas of SPR images are studied, and an optimized algorithm is developed.

  20. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) array system for image-guided ablative therapy (IGAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczkowski, Peter J.; Keilman, George W.; Cunitz, Bryan W.; Martin, Roy W.; Vaezy, Shahram; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-06-01

    Recent interest in using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for surgical applications such as hemostasis and tissue necrosis has stimulated the development of image-guided systems for non-invasive HIFU therapy. Seeking an all-ultrasound therapeutic modality, we have developed a clinical HIFU system comprising an integrated applicator that permits precisely registered HIFU therapy delivery and high quality ultrasound imaging using two separate arrays, a multi-channel signal generator and RF amplifier system, and a software program that provides the clinician with a graphical overlay of the ultrasound image and therapeutic protocol controls. Electronic phasing of a 32 element 2 MHz HIFU annular array allows adjusting the focus within the range of about 4 to 12 cm from the face. A central opening in the HIFU transducer permits mounting a commercial medical imaging scanhead (ATL P7-4) that is held in place within a special housing. This mechanical fixture ensures precise coaxial registration between the HIFU transducer and the image plane of the imaging probe. Recent enhancements include development of an acoustic lens using numerical simulations for use with a 5-element array. Our image-guided therapy system is very flexible and enables exploration of a variety of new HIFU therapy delivery and monitoring approaches in the search for safe, effective, and efficient treatment protocols.

  1. Embedding intensity image in grid-cross down-sampling (GCD) binary holograms based on block truncation coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, P. W. M.; Poon, T.-C.; Jiao, A. S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Past research has demonstrated that a three-dimensional (3D) intensity image can be preserved to a reasonable extent with a binary Fresnel hologram called the grid-cross down-sampling (GCD) binary hologram, if the intensity image is first down-sampled with a grid-cross lattice prior to the generation of the hologram. It has also been shown that the binary hologram generated with such means can be embedded with a binary image without causing observable artifact on the reconstructed image. Hence, the method can be further extended to embed an intensity image by binarizing it with error diffusion. Despite the favorable findings, the visual quality of the retrieved embedded intensity image from the hologram is rather poor. In this paper, we propose a method to overcome this problem. First, we employ the block truncation coding (BTC) to convert the intensity image into a binary bit stream. Next, the binary bit stream is embedded into the GCD binary hologram. The embedded image can be recovered with a BTC decoder, as well as a noise suppression scheme if the hologram is partially damaged. Experimental results demonstrate that with our proposed method, the visual quality of the embedded intensity image is superior to that of the existing approach, and the extracted image preserves favorably even if the binary hologram is damaged and contaminated with noise.

  2. Fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM) for quantitative and sensitive live-cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Sébastien; Elgass, Kirstin; Sackrow, Marcus; Caesar, Katharina; Born, Anne-Kathrin; Maniura, Katharina; Harter, Klaus; Meixner, Alfred J.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

    2010-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy became an invaluable tool in cell biology in the past 20 years. However, the information that lies in these studies is often corrupted by a cellular fluorescence background known as autofluorescence. Since the unspecific background often overlaps with most commonly used labels in terms of fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime, the use of spectral filters in the emission beampath or timegating in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is often no appropriate means for distinction between signal and background. Despite the prevalence of fluorescence techniques only little progress has been reported in techniques that specifically suppress autofluorescence or that clearly discriminate autofluorescence from label fluorescence. Fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM) is a novel technique which is based on the image acquisition protocol of FLIM. Whereas FLIM spatially resolved maps the average fluorescence lifetime distribution in a heterogeneous sample such as a cell, FIDSAM enhances the dynamic image contrast by determination of the autofluorescence contribution by comparing the fluorescence decay shape to a reference function. The technique therefore makes use of the key difference between label and autofluorescence, i.e. that for label fluorescence only one emitting species contributes to fluorescence intensity decay curves whereas many different species of minor intensity contribute to autofluorescence. That way, we were able to suppress autofluorescence contributions from chloroplasts in Arabidopsis stoma cells and from cell walls in Arabidopsis hypocotyl cells to background level. Furthermore, we could extend the method to more challenging labels such as the cyan fluorescent protein CFP in human fibroblasts.

  3. Visible-light optical coherence tomography-based multimodal retinal imaging for improvement of fluorescent intensity quantification

    PubMed Central

    Nafar, Zahra; Jiang, Minshan; Wen, Rong; Jiao, Shuliang

    2016-01-01

    We developed a spectral-domain visible-light optical coherence tomography (VIS-OCT) based multimodal imaging technique which can accomplish simultaneous OCT and fluorescence imaging with a single broadband light source. Phantom experiments showed that by using the simultaneously acquired OCT images as a reference, the effect of light attenuation on the intensity of the fluorescent images by materials in front of the fluorescent target can be compensated. This capability of the multimodal imaging technique is of high importance for achieving quantification of the true intensities of autofluorescence (AF) imaging of the retina. We applied the technique in retinal imaging including AF imaging of the retinal pigment epithelium and fluorescein angiography (FA). We successfully demonstrated the effect of compensation on AF and FA images with the simultaneously acquired VIS-OCT images. PMID:27699094

  4. Visible-light optical coherence tomography-based multimodal retinal imaging for improvement of fluorescent intensity quantification

    PubMed Central

    Nafar, Zahra; Jiang, Minshan; Wen, Rong; Jiao, Shuliang

    2016-01-01

    We developed a spectral-domain visible-light optical coherence tomography (VIS-OCT) based multimodal imaging technique which can accomplish simultaneous OCT and fluorescence imaging with a single broadband light source. Phantom experiments showed that by using the simultaneously acquired OCT images as a reference, the effect of light attenuation on the intensity of the fluorescent images by materials in front of the fluorescent target can be compensated. This capability of the multimodal imaging technique is of high importance for achieving quantification of the true intensities of autofluorescence (AF) imaging of the retina. We applied the technique in retinal imaging including AF imaging of the retinal pigment epithelium and fluorescein angiography (FA). We successfully demonstrated the effect of compensation on AF and FA images with the simultaneously acquired VIS-OCT images.

  5. Improved superficial brain hemorrhage visualization in susceptibility weighted images by constrained minimum intensity projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John

    2016-03-01

    Minimum intensity projection is a technique commonly used to display magnetic resonance susceptibility weighted images, allowing the observer to better visualize hemorrhages and vasculature. The technique displays the minimum intensity in a given projection within a thick slab, allowing different connectivity patterns to be easily revealed. Unfortunately, the low signal intensity of the skull within the thick slab can mask superficial tissues near the skull base and other regions. Because superficial microhemorrhages are a common feature of traumatic brain injury, this effect limits the ability to proper diagnose and follow up patients. In order to overcome this limitation, we developed a method to allow minimum intensity projection to properly display superficial tissues adjacent to the skull. Our approach is based on two brain masks, the largest of which includes extracerebral voxels. The analysis of the rind within both masks containing the actual brain boundary allows reclassification of those voxels initially missed in the smaller mask. Morphological operations are applied to guarantee accuracy and topological correctness, and the mean intensity within the mask is assigned to all outer voxels. This prevents bone from dominating superficial regions in the projection, enabling superior visualization of cortical hemorrhages and vessels.

  6. A hybrid biomechanical intensity based deformable image registration of lung 4DCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samavati, Navid; Velec, Michael; Brock, Kristy

    2015-04-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) has been extensively studied over the past two decades due to its essential role in many image-guided interventions (IGI). IGI demands a highly accurate registration that maintains its accuracy across the entire region of interest. This work evaluates the improvement in accuracy and consistency by refining the results of Morfeus, a biomechanical model-based DIR algorithm. A hybrid DIR algorithm is proposed based on, a biomechanical model-based DIR algorithm and a refinement step based on a B-spline intensity-based algorithm. Inhale and exhale reconstructions of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) lung images from 31 patients were initially registered using the biomechanical DIR by modeling contact surface between the lungs and the chest cavity. The resulting deformations were then refined using the intensity-based algorithm to reduce any residual uncertainties. Important parameters in the intensity-based algorithm, including grid spacing, number of pyramids, and regularization coefficient, were optimized on 10 randomly-chosen patients (out of 31). Target registration error (TRE) was calculated by measuring the Euclidean distance of common anatomical points on both images after registration. For each patient a minimum of 30 points/lung were used. Grid spacing of 8 mm, 5 levels of grid pyramids, and regularization coefficient of 3.0 were found to provide optimal results on 10 randomly chosen patients. Overall the entire patient population (n = 31), the hybrid method resulted in mean ± SD (90th%) TRE of 1.5 ± 1.4 (2.9) mm compared to 3.1 ± 1.9 (5.6) using biomechanical DIR and 2.6 ± 2.5 (6.1) using intensity-based DIR alone. The proposed hybrid biomechanical modeling intensity based algorithm is a promising DIR technique which could be used in various IGI procedures. The current investigation shows the efficacy of this approach for the registration of 4DCT images of the lungs with average accuracy of 1.5 mm.

  7. A hybrid biomechanical intensity based deformable image registration of lung 4DCT.

    PubMed

    Samavati, Navid; Velec, Michael; Brock, Kristy

    2015-04-21

    Deformable image registration (DIR) has been extensively studied over the past two decades due to its essential role in many image-guided interventions (IGI). IGI demands a highly accurate registration that maintains its accuracy across the entire region of interest. This work evaluates the improvement in accuracy and consistency by refining the results of Morfeus, a biomechanical model-based DIR algorithm. A hybrid DIR algorithm is proposed based on, a biomechanical model-based DIR algorithm and a refinement step based on a B-spline intensity-based algorithm. Inhale and exhale reconstructions of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) lung images from 31 patients were initially registered using the biomechanical DIR by modeling contact surface between the lungs and the chest cavity. The resulting deformations were then refined using the intensity-based algorithm to reduce any residual uncertainties. Important parameters in the intensity-based algorithm, including grid spacing, number of pyramids, and regularization coefficient, were optimized on 10 randomly-chosen patients (out of 31). Target registration error (TRE) was calculated by measuring the Euclidean distance of common anatomical points on both images after registration. For each patient a minimum of 30 points/lung were used. Grid spacing of 8 mm, 5 levels of grid pyramids, and regularization coefficient of 3.0 were found to provide optimal results on 10 randomly chosen patients. Overall the entire patient population (n = 31), the hybrid method resulted in mean ± SD (90th%) TRE of 1.5 ± 1.4 (2.9) mm compared to 3.1 ± 1.9 (5.6) using biomechanical DIR and 2.6 ± 2.5 (6.1) using intensity-based DIR alone. The proposed hybrid biomechanical modeling intensity based algorithm is a promising DIR technique which could be used in various IGI procedures. The current investigation shows the efficacy of this approach for the registration of 4DCT images of the lungs with average accuracy of 1.5 mm.

  8. Curvature wavefront sensing based on a single defocused image and intensity compensation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhixu; Bai, Hua; Cui, Xiangqun

    2016-04-01

    Curvature wavefront sensing usually requires the measurement of two defocused images at equal distances before and after the focus. In this paper, a new wavefront recovery algorithm based on only one defocused image is proposed. This algorithm contains the following four steps: response matrix calculation, establishment of intensity distribution equations, Zernike coefficients solution derived from the least squares method, and defocused image compensation with the solved Zernike coefficients. The performance of the algorithm in a large obscuration ratio and fast focal ratio optical system on axis and the edge of the field of view (FOV) is examined. Two optical systems of the Hubble telescope and a modified Paul-Baker telescope are employed to test the algorithm. The simulations show that the proposed algorithm outperforms in structural simplicity, and applications are expected in the wavefront recovery of the extreme environment (i.e., in space and the Antarctic). PMID:27139686

  9. Curvature wavefront sensing based on a single defocused image and intensity compensation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhixu; Bai, Hua; Cui, Xiangqun

    2016-04-01

    Curvature wavefront sensing usually requires the measurement of two defocused images at equal distances before and after the focus. In this paper, a new wavefront recovery algorithm based on only one defocused image is proposed. This algorithm contains the following four steps: response matrix calculation, establishment of intensity distribution equations, Zernike coefficients solution derived from the least squares method, and defocused image compensation with the solved Zernike coefficients. The performance of the algorithm in a large obscuration ratio and fast focal ratio optical system on axis and the edge of the field of view (FOV) is examined. Two optical systems of the Hubble telescope and a modified Paul-Baker telescope are employed to test the algorithm. The simulations show that the proposed algorithm outperforms in structural simplicity, and applications are expected in the wavefront recovery of the extreme environment (i.e., in space and the Antarctic).

  10. Intensity-Corrected Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) for Improved Pediatric Brain Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Matus; Iv, Michael; Moseley, Michael E.; Barnes, Patrick D.; Skare, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Here we investigate the utility of a dual-echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) approach to improve lesion conspicuity in pediatric imaging. This method delivers two ‘echo images’ for one diffusion-preparation period. We also demonstrate how the echoes can be utilized to remove transmit/receive coil-induced and static magnetic field intensity modulations on both echo images, which often mimic pathology and thereby pose diagnostic challenges. DE-EPI DWI data were acquired in 18 pediatric patients with abnormal diffusion lesions, and 46 pediatric patient controls at 3T. Echo1 [TE = 45ms] and Echo2 [TE = 86ms] were corrected for signal intensity variation across the images by exploiting the images equivalent coil-sensitivity and susceptibility-induced modulations. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed Echo1 and Echo2 and their intensity-corrected variants (cEcho1 and cEcho2) on a 7-point Likert scale, with grading on lesion conspicuity diagnostic confidence. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map from Echo1 was used to validate presence of true pathology. Echo2 was unanimously favored over Echo1 for its sensitivity for detecting acute brain injury, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.7/4.4 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.1/4.3 (p = 0.025). cEcho2 was rated higher than cEcho1, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.5/4.3 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.4/4.4 (p < 0.005). cEcho2 was favored over all echoes for its diagnostic reliability, particularly in regions close to the head coil. This work concludes that DE-EPI DWI is a useful alternative to conventional single-echo EPI DWI, whereby Echo2 and cEcho2 allows for improved lesion detection and overall higher diagnostic confidence. PMID:26069959

  11. Assessment of incident intensity on laser speckle contrast imaging using a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Mitchell A.; Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the effects of incident intensity and effective camera dynamic range on image acquisition of both frozen and time-averaged dynamic speckle patterns, and their effects on laser speckle contrast imaging are addressed. A nematic liquid crystal, phase-only, spatial light modulator (SLM) was employed to generate laser speckle in a controlled and repeatable fashion. By addressing the calculated spatial contrast of frozen and time-averaged dynamic speckle patterns imaged across a wide range of intensities, we present a description of optimum intensity characteristics that should be observed when using LSCI. The results indicate the importance of assessing the intensity of the signal quantized by the camera in LSCI. By analyzing intensity PDF's during image acquisition of speckle patterns used in LSCI, an optimum incident intensity can be detected when a single, polarized speckle frame displays the first order statistics characteristic of fully developed speckle. Our results indicate that there is a range of laser power densities where the ensuing imaged speckle exhibit optimum sensitivity to flow as well as relatively constant calculated contrast values. It is clear that at high intensities, high frequency information is lost due to camera saturation, resulting in a decrease in contrast. When imaging speckle at low intensity, there is a risk for loss of data during the digital quantization process. The results are presented in a generalized fashion, so they should be applicable to any LSCI system, regardless of incident laser power or camera depth.

  12. Model-based automatic 3d building model generation by integrating LiDAR and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, A.; Kwak, E.; Al-Durgham, M.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate, detailed, and up-to-date 3D building models are important for several applications such as telecommunication network planning, urban planning, and military simulation. Existing building reconstruction approaches can be classified according to the data sources they use (i.e., single versus multi-sensor approaches), the processing strategy (i.e., data-driven, model-driven, or hybrid), or the amount of user interaction (i.e., manual, semiautomatic, or fully automated). While it is obvious that 3D building models are important components for many applications, they still lack the economical and automatic techniques for their generation while taking advantage of the available multi-sensory data and combining processing strategies. In this research, an automatic methodology for building modelling by integrating multiple images and LiDAR data is proposed. The objective of this research work is to establish a framework for automatic building generation by integrating data driven and model-driven approaches while combining the advantages of image and LiDAR datasets.

  13. SU-E-J-112: Intensity-Based Pulmonary Image Registration: An Evaluation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F; Meyer, J; Sandison, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate alignment of thoracic CT images is essential for dose tracking and to safely implement adaptive radiotherapy in lung cancers. At the same time it is challenging given the highly elastic nature of lung tissue deformations. The objective of this study was to assess the performances of three state-of-art intensity-based algorithms in terms of their ability to register thoracic CT images subject to affine, barrel, and sinusoid transformation. Methods: Intensity similarity measures of the evaluated algorithms contained sum-of-squared difference (SSD), local mutual information (LMI), and residual complexity (RC). Five thoracic CT scans obtained from the EMPIRE10 challenge database were included and served as reference images. Each CT dataset was distorted by realistic affine, barrel, and sinusoid transformations. Registration performances of the three algorithms were evaluated for each distortion type in terms of intensity root mean square error (IRMSE) between the reference and registered images in the lung regions. Results: For affine distortions, the three algorithms differed significantly in registration of thoracic images both visually and nominally in terms of IRMSE with a mean of 0.011 for SSD, 0.039 for RC, and 0.026 for LMI (p<0.01; Kruskal-Wallis test). For barrel distortion, the three algorithms showed nominally no significant difference in terms of IRMSE with a mean of 0.026 for SSD, 0.086 for RC, and 0.054 for LMI (p=0.16) . A significant difference was seen for sinusoid distorted thoracic CT data with mean lung IRMSE of 0.039 for SSD, 0.092 for RC, and 0.035 for LMI (p=0.02). Conclusion: Pulmonary deformations might vary to a large extent in nature in a daily clinical setting due to factors ranging from anatomy variations to respiratory motion to image quality. It can be appreciated from the results of the present study that the suitability of application of a particular algorithm for pulmonary image registration is deformation-dependent.

  14. A fast color image enhancement algorithm based on Max Intensity Channel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Han, Long; Guo, Baolong; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui

    2014-03-30

    In this paper, we extend image enhancement techniques based on the retinex theory imitating human visual perception of scenes containing high illumination variations. This extension achieves simultaneous dynamic range modification, color consistency, and lightness rendition without multi-scale Gaussian filtering which has a certain halo effect. The reflection component is analyzed based on the illumination and reflection imaging model. A new prior named Max Intensity Channel (MIC) is implemented assuming that the reflections of some points in the scene are very high in at least one color channel. Using this prior, the illumination of the scene is obtained directly by performing a gray-scale closing operation and a fast cross-bilateral filtering on the MIC of the input color image. Consequently, the reflection component of each RGB color channel can be determined from the illumination and reflection imaging model. The proposed algorithm estimates the illumination component which is relatively smooth and maintains the edge details in different regions. A satisfactory color rendition is achieved for a class of images that do not satisfy the gray-world assumption implicit to the theoretical foundation of the retinex. Experiments are carried out to compare the new method with several spatial and transform domain methods. Our results indicate that the new method is superior in enhancement applications, improves computation speed, and performs well for images with high illumination variations than other methods. Further comparisons of images from National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a wearable camera eButton have shown a high performance of the new method with better color restoration and preservation of image details. PMID:25110395

  15. A fast color image enhancement algorithm based on Max Intensity Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wei; Han, Long; Guo, Baolong; Jia, Wenyan; Sun, Mingui

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we extend image enhancement techniques based on the retinex theory imitating human visual perception of scenes containing high illumination variations. This extension achieves simultaneous dynamic range modification, color consistency, and lightness rendition without multi-scale Gaussian filtering which has a certain halo effect. The reflection component is analyzed based on the illumination and reflection imaging model. A new prior named Max Intensity Channel (MIC) is implemented assuming that the reflections of some points in the scene are very high in at least one color channel. Using this prior, the illumination of the scene is obtained directly by performing a gray-scale closing operation and a fast cross-bilateral filtering on the MIC of the input color image. Consequently, the reflection component of each RGB color channel can be determined from the illumination and reflection imaging model. The proposed algorithm estimates the illumination component which is relatively smooth and maintains the edge details in different regions. A satisfactory color rendition is achieved for a class of images that do not satisfy the gray-world assumption implicit to the theoretical foundation of the retinex. Experiments are carried out to compare the new method with several spatial and transform domain methods. Our results indicate that the new method is superior in enhancement applications, improves computation speed, and performs well for images with high illumination variations than other methods. Further comparisons of images from National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a wearable camera eButton have shown a high performance of the new method with better color restoration and preservation of image details.

  16. Partial gating image intensifier based on liquid crystal auto-controlling light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruixia; Tang, Yuanhe; Liu, Kai; Liu, Hanchen; Yang, Xusan; Gao, Haiyang; Liang, Yuan; Li, Qing; Ye, Na; Zhao, Gaoxiang

    2008-12-01

    In order to enlarge the dynamic range of image intensifier, and CCD can work normally under the strong light (105lx), based on the generation II image intensifier, we have brought forward an novel equipment of double lens optical system including a liquid crystal panel (twisted nematic liquid crystal panel LCX023-CMT) and a photometric CCD which detects the illuminance real-time. The light intensity is controlled by liquid crystal automatically and the partial gating can be realized. The principle of auto-controlling light intensity is introduced detailedly in this paper. And the transmittance of liquid crystal has been simulated. Experimental result displays that the optical transmittance changed from 1.28% to 25.60% with the gray levels from 0 to 250. The high linearity relation of transmittance to gray levels is obtained when the gray levels change from 90 to 220. The feasibility of partial light intensity auto-controlled by liquid crystal has been further proved by the two obvious contrast pictures that one is photographed with the liquid crystal panel and another without.

  17. Monitoring a boreal wildfire using multi-temporal Radarsat-1 intensity and coherence images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rykhus, Russ; Lu, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-five C-band Radarsat-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images acquired from the summer of 2002 to the summer of 2005 are used to map a 2003 boreal wildfire (B346) in the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska under conditions of near-persistent cloud cover. Our analysis is primarily based on the 15 SAR scenes acquired during arctic growing seasons. The Radarsat-1 intensity data are used to map the onset and progression of the fire, and interferometric coherence images are used to qualify burn severity and monitor post-fire recovery. We base our analysis of the fire on three test sites, two from within the fire and one unburned site. The B346 fire increased backscattered intensity values for the two burn study sites by approximately 5-6 dB and substantially reduced coherence from background levels of approximately 0.8 in unburned background forested areas to approximately 0.2 in the burned area. Using ancillary vegetation information from the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) and information on burn severity from Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) data, we conclude that burn site 2 was more severely burned than burn site 1 and that C-band interferometric coherence data are useful for mapping landscape changes due to fire. Differences in burn severity and topography are determined to be the likely reasons for the observed differences in post-fire intensity and coherence trends between burn sites.

  18. Multiresolution image registration in digital x-ray angiography with intensity variation modeling.

    PubMed

    Nejati, Mansour; Pourghassem, Hossein

    2014-02-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a widely used technique for visualization of vessel anatomy in diagnosis and treatment. However, due to unavoidable patient motions, both externally and internally, the subtracted angiography images often suffer from motion artifacts that adversely affect the quality of the medical diagnosis. To cope with this problem and improve the quality of DSA images, registration algorithms are often employed before subtraction. In this paper, a novel elastic registration algorithm for registration of digital X-ray angiography images, particularly for the coronary location, is proposed. This algorithm includes a multiresolution search strategy in which a global transformation is calculated iteratively based on local search in coarse and fine sub-image blocks. The local searches are accomplished in a differential multiscale framework which allows us to capture both large and small scale transformations. The local registration transformation also explicitly accounts for local variations in the image intensities which incorporated into our model as a change of local contrast and brightness. These local transformations are then smoothly interpolated using thin-plate spline interpolation function to obtain the global model. Experimental results with several clinical datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in motion artifact reduction.

  19. A statistical pixel intensity model for segmentation of confocal laser scanning microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Calapez, Alexandre; Rosa, Agostinho

    2010-09-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the life sciences for the characterization of cell processes because it allows the recording of the distribution of fluorescence-tagged macromolecules on a section of the living cell. It is in fact the cornerstone of many molecular transport and interaction quantification techniques where the identification of regions of interest through image segmentation is usually a required step. In many situations, because of the complexity of the recorded cellular structures or because of the amounts of data involved, image segmentation either is too difficult or inefficient to be done by hand and automated segmentation procedures have to be considered. Given the nature of CLSM images, statistical segmentation methodologies appear as natural candidates. In this work we propose a model to be used for statistical unsupervised CLSM image segmentation. The model is derived from the CLSM image formation mechanics and its performance is compared to the existing alternatives. Results show that it provides a much better description of the data on classes characterized by their mean intensity, making it suitable not only for segmentation methodologies with known number of classes but also for use with schemes aiming at the estimation of the number of classes through the application of cluster selection criteria.

  20. A statistical pixel intensity model for segmentation of confocal laser scanning microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Calapez, Alexandre; Rosa, Agostinho

    2010-09-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the life sciences for the characterization of cell processes because it allows the recording of the distribution of fluorescence-tagged macromolecules on a section of the living cell. It is in fact the cornerstone of many molecular transport and interaction quantification techniques where the identification of regions of interest through image segmentation is usually a required step. In many situations, because of the complexity of the recorded cellular structures or because of the amounts of data involved, image segmentation either is too difficult or inefficient to be done by hand and automated segmentation procedures have to be considered. Given the nature of CLSM images, statistical segmentation methodologies appear as natural candidates. In this work we propose a model to be used for statistical unsupervised CLSM image segmentation. The model is derived from the CLSM image formation mechanics and its performance is compared to the existing alternatives. Results show that it provides a much better description of the data on classes characterized by their mean intensity, making it suitable not only for segmentation methodologies with known number of classes but also for use with schemes aiming at the estimation of the number of classes through the application of cluster selection criteria. PMID:20363677

  1. Multiresolution image registration in digital x-ray angiography with intensity variation modeling.

    PubMed

    Nejati, Mansour; Pourghassem, Hossein

    2014-02-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a widely used technique for visualization of vessel anatomy in diagnosis and treatment. However, due to unavoidable patient motions, both externally and internally, the subtracted angiography images often suffer from motion artifacts that adversely affect the quality of the medical diagnosis. To cope with this problem and improve the quality of DSA images, registration algorithms are often employed before subtraction. In this paper, a novel elastic registration algorithm for registration of digital X-ray angiography images, particularly for the coronary location, is proposed. This algorithm includes a multiresolution search strategy in which a global transformation is calculated iteratively based on local search in coarse and fine sub-image blocks. The local searches are accomplished in a differential multiscale framework which allows us to capture both large and small scale transformations. The local registration transformation also explicitly accounts for local variations in the image intensities which incorporated into our model as a change of local contrast and brightness. These local transformations are then smoothly interpolated using thin-plate spline interpolation function to obtain the global model. Experimental results with several clinical datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm in motion artifact reduction. PMID:24469684

  2. The concept of cyclic sound intensity and its application to acoustical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, B.; Antoni, J.; Sidahmed, M.; Polac, L.

    2011-04-01

    This paper demonstrates how to take advantage of the cyclostationarity property of engine signals to define a new acoustical quantity, the cyclic sound intensity, which displays the instantaneous flux of acoustical energy in the angle-frequency domain during an average engine cycle. This quantity is attractive in that it possesses the ability of being instantaneous and averaged at the same time, thus reconciling two conflicting properties into a rigourous and unambiguous framework. Cyclic sound intensity is a rich concept with several original ramifications. Among other things, it returns a unique decomposition into instantaneous active and reactive parts. Associated to acoustical imaging techniques, it allows the construction of sound radiation movies that evolve within the engine cycle and whose each frame is a sound intensity map calculated at a specific time - or crankshaft angle - in the engine cycle. This enables the accurate localisation of sources in space, in frequency and in time (crankshaft angle). Furthermore, associated to cyclic Wiener filtering, this methodology makes it possible to decompose the overall radiated sound into several noise source contributions whose cyclic sound intensities can then be analysed independently.

  3. 11. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the U.S. Forest Service, Toiyabe National Forest, Carson District Office). AERIAL VIEW OF THE GENOA PEAK ROAD, SPUR. - Genoa Peak Road, Spur, Glenbrook, Douglas County, NV

  4. 3D Coincidence Imaging Disentangles Intense Field Double Detachment of SF6(–).

    PubMed

    Kandhasamy, Durai Murugan; Albeck, Yishai; Jagtap, Krishna; Strasser, Daniel

    2015-07-23

    The efficient intense field double detachment of molecular anions observed in SF6(–) is studied by 3D coincidence imaging of the dissociation products. The dissociation anisotropy and kinetic energy release distributions are determined for the energetically lowest double detachment channel by virtue of disentangling the SF5(+) + F fragmentation products. The observed nearly isotropic dissociation with respect to the linear laser polarization and surprisingly high kinetic energy release events suggest that the dissociation occurs on a highly excited state. Rydberg (SF6(+))* states composed of a highly repulsive dication core and a Rydberg electron are proposed to explain the observed kinetic energy release, accounting also for the efficient production of all possible cationic fragments at equivalent laser intensities.

  5. Image interpolation for division of focal plane polarimeters with intensity correlation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junchao; Luo, Haibo; Hui, Bin; Chang, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Division of focal plane (DoFP) polarimeters operate by integrating micro-polarizer elements with a focal plane. These polarization imaging sensors reduce spatial resolution output and each pixel has a varying instantaneous field of view (IFoV). These drawbacks can be mitigated by applying proper interpolation methods. In this paper, we present a new interpolation method for DoFP polarimeters by using intensity correlation. We employ the correlation of intensity measurements in different orientations to detect edges and then implement interpolation along edges. The performance of the proposed method is compared with several previous methods by using root mean square error (RMSE) comparison and visual comparison. Experimental results showed that our proposed method can achieve better visual effects and a lower RMSE than other methods. PMID:27607683

  6. Including signal intensity increases the performance of blind source separation on brain imaging data.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Liu, Yadong; Chen, Fanglin; Hu, Dewen

    2015-02-01

    When analyzing brain imaging data, blind source separation (BSS) techniques critically depend on the level of dimensional reduction. If the reduction level is too slight, the BSS model would be overfitted and become unavailable. Thus, the reduction level must be set relatively heavy. This approach risks discarding useful information and crucially limits the performance of BSS techniques. In this study, a new BSS method that can work well even at a slight reduction level is presented. We proposed the concept of "signal intensity" which measures the significance of the source. Only picking the sources with significant intensity, the new method can avoid the overfitted solutions which are nonexistent artifacts. This approach enables the reduction level to be set slight and retains more useful dimensions in the preliminary reduction. Comparisons between the new and conventional algorithms were performed on both simulated and real data. PMID:25314698

  7. Intracranial lesions with high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images - review of pathologies.

    PubMed

    Zimny, Anna; Zińska, Lidia; Bladowska, Joanna; Neska-Matuszewska, Małgorzata; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2013-10-01

    In the article we present pathological intracranial substances and lesions, which produce high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images. Six groups of substances are discussed: 1. Gadolinium - based contrast agents, 2.hemoglobin degradation products (intra- and extra-cellular methemoglobin), 3. lipid-containing lesions (lipoma, dermoid cyst, implanted fatty materials, laminar cortical necrosis), 4. substances with high concentration of proteins (colloid cyst, craniopharyngioma, Rathke's cleft cyst, ectopic posterior pituitary gland), 5. melanin (metastatic melanoma), 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium (calcifications, Fahr's disease), copper (Wilson's disease) and manganese (hepatic encephalopathy, manganese intoxication in intravenous drug abusers). Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of location of lesions and clinical symptoms enables planning of further diagnostics and, in many cases, establishing the final diagnosis based on MR examination. PMID:24505222

  8. OCT imaging with temporal dispersion induced intense and short coherence laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Suman K.; le Gall, Stephen; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    Lower coherence length and higher intensity are two indispensable requirements on the light source for high resolution and large penetration depth OCT imaging. While tremendous interest is being paid on engineering various laser sources to enlarge their bandwidth and hence lowering the coherence length, here we demonstrate another approach by employing strong temporal dispersion onto the existing laser source. Cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) cells with suitable dispersive slope at the edge of 1-D organic photonic band gap have been designed to provide maximum reduction in coherence volume while maintaining the intensity higher than 50%. As an example, the coherence length of a multimode He-Ne laser is reduced by more than 730 times.

  9. Intracranial lesions with high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images – review of pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Zimny, Anna; Zińska, Lidia; Bladowska, Joanna; Neska-Matuszewska, Małgorzata; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the article we present pathological intracranial substances and lesions, which produce high signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images. Six groups of substances are discussed: 1. Gadolinium – based contrast agents, 2.hemoglobin degradation products (intra- and extra-cellular methemoglobin), 3. lipid-containing lesions (lipoma, dermoid cyst, implanted fatty materials, laminar cortical necrosis), 4. substances with high concentration of proteins (colloid cyst, craniopharyngioma, Rathke’s cleft cyst, ectopic posterior pituitary gland), 5. melanin (metastatic melanoma), 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium (calcifications, Fahr’s disease), copper (Wilson’s disease) and manganese (hepatic encephalopathy, manganese intoxication in intravenous drug abusers). Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of location of lesions and clinical symptoms enables planning of further diagnostics and, in many cases, establishing the final diagnosis based on MR examination. PMID:24505222

  10. Intracranial Lesions with Low Signal Intensity on T2-weighted MR Images – Review of Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Zimny, Anna; Neska-Matuszewska, Małgorzata; Bladowska, Joanna; Sąsiadek, Marek J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this article we presented intracranial pathological substances and lesions with low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Eight groups of substances were discussed i.e. 1. Gadolinium-based contrast materials, 2. hemoglobin degradation products 3. melanin, 4. mucous- or protein-containing lesions, 5. highly cellular lesions, 6. lesions containing mineral substances such as: calcium, copper and iron, 7. turbulent and rapid blood or CSF flow 8. air-containing spaces. Appropriate interpretation of signal intensity as well as analysis of lesion location and clinical symptoms enable a correct choice of a further diagnostic algorithm or, in many cases, final diagnosis based exclusively on an MRI examination. PMID:25628772

  11. Transvaginal 3D Image-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Robert; Nguyen, Thuc Nghi; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a transvaginal image-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) device using piezocomposite HIFU array technology, and commercially-available ultrasound imaging. Potential applications include treatment of uterine fibroids and abnormal uterine bleeding. The HIFU transducer was an annular phased array, with a focal length range of 30-60 mm, an elliptically-shaped aperture of 35×60 mm, and an operating frequency of 3 MHz. A pillow-shaped bag with water circulation will be used for coupling the HIFU energy into the tissue. An intra-cavity imaging probe (C9-5, Philips) was integrated with the HIFU array such that the focal axis of the HIFU transducer was within the image plane. The entire device will be covered by a gel-filled condom when inserted in the vaginal cavity. To control it, software packages were developed in the LabView programming environment. An imaging algorithm processed the ultrasound image to remove noise patterns due to the HIFU signal. The device will be equipped with a three-dimensional tracking system, using a six-degrees-of-freedom articulating arm. Necrotic lesions were produced in a tissue-mimicking phantom and a turkey breast sample for all focal lengths. Various HIFU doses allow various necrotic lesion shapes, including thin ellipsoidal, spherical, wide cylindrical, and teardrop-shaped. Software control of the device allows multiple foci to be activated sequentially for desired lesion patterns. Ultrasound imaging synchronization can be achieved using hardware signals obtained from the imaging system, or software signals determined empirically for various imaging probes. The image-guided HIFU device will provide a valuable tool in visualization of uterine fibroid tumors for the purposes of planning and subsequent HIFU treatment of the tumor, all in a 3D environment. The control system allows for various lesions of different shapes to be optimally positioned in the tumor to cover the entire tumor

  12. Comparison between Different Intensity Normalization Methods in 123I-Ioflupane Imaging for the Automatic Detection of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Brahim, A.; Ramírez, J.; Górriz, J. M.; Khedher, L.; Salas-Gonzalez, D.

    2015-01-01

    Intensity normalization is an important pre-processing step in the study and analysis of DaTSCAN SPECT imaging. As most automatic supervised image segmentation and classification methods base their assumptions regarding the intensity distributions on a standardized intensity range, intensity normalization takes on a very significant role. In this work, a comparison between different novel intensity normalization methods is presented. These proposed methodologies are based on Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) image filtering and mean-squared error (MSE) optimization. The GMM-based image filtering method is achieved according to a probability threshold that removes the clusters whose likelihood are negligible in the non-specific regions. The MSE optimization method consists of a linear transformation that is obtained by minimizing the MSE in the non-specific region between the intensity normalized image and the template. The proposed intensity normalization methods are compared to: i) a standard approach based on the specific-to-non-specific binding ratio that is widely used, and ii) a linear approach based on the α-stable distribution. This comparison is performed on a DaTSCAN image database comprising analysis and classification stages for the development of a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for Parkinsonian syndrome (PS) detection. In addition, these proposed methods correct spatially varying artifacts that modulate the intensity of the images. Finally, using the leave-one-out cross-validation technique over these two approaches, the system achieves results up to a 92.91% of accuracy, 94.64% of sensitivity and 92.65 % of specificity, outperforming previous approaches based on a standard and a linear approach, which are used as a reference. The use of advanced intensity normalization techniques, such as the GMM-based image filtering and the MSE optimization improves the diagnosis of PS. PMID:26086379

  13. Imaging monitored loosening of dense fibrous tissues using high-intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Li, Pai-Chi; Shih, Wen-Pin; Huang, Pei-Shin; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is proposed as a new alternative treatment for contracture of dense fibrous tissue. It is hypothesized that the pulsed-HIFU can release the contracted tissues by attenuating tensile stiffness along the fiber axis, and that the stiffness reduction can be quantitatively monitored by change of B-mode images. Fresh porcine tendons and ligaments were adapted to an ex vivo model and insonated with pulsed-HIFU for durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. The pulse length was 91 µs with a repetition frequency of 500 Hz, and the peak rarefactional pressure was 6.36 MPa. The corresponding average intensities were kept around 1606 W cm-2 for ISPPA and 72.3 W cm-2 for ISPTA. B-mode images of the tissues were acquired before and after pulsed-HIFU exposure, and the changes in speckle intensity and organization were analyzed. The tensile stiffness of the HIFU-exposed tissues along the longitudinal axis was examined using a stretching machine. Histology examinations were performed by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Pulsed-HIFU exposure significantly decreased the tensile stiffness of the ligaments and tendons. The intensity and organization of tissue speckles in the exposed region were also decreased. The speckle changes correlated well with the degree of stiffness alteration. Histology examinations revealed that pulsed-HIFU exposure probably damages tissues via a cavitation-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that pulsed-HIFU with a low duty factor is a promising tool for developing new treatment strategies for orthopedic disorders.

  14. Draper Laboratory small autonomous aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBitetto, Paul A.; Johnson, Eric N.; Bosse, Michael C.; Trott, Christian A.

    1997-06-01

    The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. and students from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston University have cooperated to develop an autonomous aerial vehicle that won the 1996 International Aerial Robotics Competition. This paper describes the approach, system architecture and subsystem designs for the entry. This entry represents a combination of many technology areas: navigation, guidance, control, vision processing, human factors, packaging, power, real-time software, and others. The aerial vehicle, an autonomous helicopter, performs navigation and control functions using multiple sensors: differential GPS, inertial measurement unit, sonar altimeter, and a flux compass. The aerial transmits video imagery to the ground. A ground based vision processor converts the image data into target position and classification estimates. The system was designed, built, and flown in less than one year and has provided many lessons about autonomous vehicle systems, several of which are discussed. In an appendix, our current research in augmenting the navigation system with vision- based estimates is presented.

  15. Basal ganglia intensity indices and diffusion weighted imaging in manganese-exposed welders

    PubMed Central

    Criswell, Susan R; Perlmutter, Joel S; Huang, John L; Golchin, Nima; Flores, Hubert P; Hobson, Angela; Aschner, Michael; Erikson, Keith M; Checkoway, Harvey; Racette, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Manganese exposure leads to diffuse cerebral metal deposition with the highest concentration in the globus pallidus associated with increased T1-weighted MRI signal. T1 signal intensity in extra-pallidal basal ganglia (caudate and putamen) has not been studied in occupationally exposed workers. Diffusion weighted imaging is a non-invasive measure of neuronal damage and may provide a quantification of neurotoxicity associated with welding and manganese exposure. This study investigated extra-pallidal T1 basal ganglia signal intensity as a marker of manganese exposure and basal ganglia diffusion weighted imaging abnormalities as a potential marker of neurotoxicity. Methods A 3T MR case:control imaging study was performed on 18 welders and 18 age- and gender-matched controls. Basal ganglia regions of interest were identified for each subject. T1-weighted intensity indices and apparent diffusion coefficients were generated for each region. Results All regional indices were higher in welders than controls (p≤0.05). Combined basal ganglia (ρ=0.610), caudate (ρ=0.645), anterior (ρ=0.595) and posterior putamen (ρ=0.511) indices were more correlated with exposure than pallidal (ρ=0.484) index. Welder apparent diffusion coefficient values were lower than controls for globus pallidus (p=0.03) and anterior putamen (p=0.004). Conclusions Welders demonstrated elevated T1 indices throughout the basal ganglia. Combined basal ganglia, caudate and putamen indices were more correlated with exposure than pallidal index suggesting more inclusive basal ganglia sampling results in better exposure markers. Elevated indices were associated with diffusion weighted abnormalities in the pallidum and anterior putamen suggesting neurotoxicity in these regions. PMID:22447645

  16. Small Whiskbroom Imager for atmospheric compositioN monitorinG (SWING) from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV): Results from the 2014 AROMAT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Tack, Frederik; Constantin, Daniel; Fayt, Caroline; Maes, Jeroen; Mingireanu, Florin; Mocanu, Ionut; Georgescu, Lucian; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The Small Whiskbroom Imager for atmospheric compositioN monitorinG (SWING) is an instrument dedicated to atmospheric trace gas retrieval from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The payload is based on a compact visible spectrometer and a scanning mirror to collect scattered sunlight. Its weight, size, and power consumption are respectively 920 g, 27x12x12 cm3, and 6 W. The custom-built 2.5 m flying wing UAV is electrically powered, has a typical airspeed of 100 km/h, and can operate at a maximum altitude of 3 km. Both the payload and the UAV were developed in the framework of a collaboration between the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) and the Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Romania. We present here SWING-UAV test flights dedicated to NO2 measurements and performed in Romania on 10 and 11 September 2014, during the Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign. The UAV performed 5 flights in the vicinity of the large thermal power station of Turceni (44.67° N, 23.4° E). The UAV was operated in visual range during the campaign, up to 900 m AGL , downwind of the plant and crossing its exhaust plume. The spectra recorded on flight are analyzed with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. The retrieved NO2 Differential Slant Column Densities (DSCDs) are up to 1.5e17 molec/cm2 and reveal the horizontal gradients around the plant. The DSCDs are converted to vertical columns and compared with coincident car-based DOAS measurements. We also present the near-future perspective of the SWING-UAV observation system, which includes flights in 2015 above the Black Sea to quantify ship emissions, the addition of SO2 as a target species, and autopilot flights at higher altitudes to cover a typical satellite pixel extent (10x10 km2).

  17. Looking for an old aerial photograph

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Attempts to photograph the surface of the Earth date from the 1800's, when photographers attached cameras to balloons, kites, and even pigeons. Today, aerial photographs and satellite images are commonplace. The rate of acquiring aerial photographs and satellite images has increased rapidly in recent years. Views of the Earth obtained from aircraft or satellites have become valuable tools to Government resource planners and managers, land-use experts, environmentalists, engineers, scientists, and a wide variety of other users. Many people want historical aerial photographs for business or personal reasons. They may want to locate the boundaries of an old farm or a piece of family property. Or they may want a photograph as a record of changes in their neighborhood, or as a gift. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains the Earth Science Information Centers (ESIC?s) to sell aerial photographs, remotely sensed images from satellites, a wide array of digital geographic and cartographic data, as well as the Bureau?s wellknown maps. Declassified photographs from early spy satellites were recently added to the ESIC offerings of historical images. Using the Aerial Photography Summary Record System database, ESIC researchers can help customers find imagery in the collections of other Federal agencies and, in some cases, those of private companies that specialize in esoteric products.

  18. Switching circuit to improve the frequency modulation difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, N. K.; Dean, P.; Khanna, S. P.; Salih, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.

    2015-04-24

    We demonstrate new switching circuit for difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) imaging by amplitude modulation and lock in detection. The switching circuit is designed to improve the frequency modulation so that it can stably lock the amplitude modulation of the QCL and the detector output. The combination of a voltage divider and a buffer in switching circuit to quickly switch the amplitude of the QCL biases of 15.8 V and 17.2 V is successfully to increase the frequency modulation up to ∼100 Hz.

  19. Measuring stress intensity factors with a camera: Integrated digital image correlation (I-DIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2006-01-01

    A novel 'integrated' approach coupling image correlation and elastic displacement field identification provides a powerful and accurate tool to evaluate mode I and II stress intensity factors. This technique is applied to silicon carbide subjected to a sandwiched three-point bend test, using digital pictures obtained in optical microscopy where the pixel physical scale is about 2 μm. A crack whose maximum opening is 500 nm can be detected and its geometry identified. The toughness is determined well within a 10%uncertainty. To cite this article: F. Hild, S. Roux, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  20. Quantitative extraction of bedrock exposed rate based on unmanned aerial vehicle data and TM image in Karst Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wang, hongyan; li, qiangzi; du, xin; zhao, longcai

    2016-04-01

    In the karst regions of Southwest China, rocky desertification is one of the most serious problems of land degradation. The bedrock exposed rate is one of the important indexes to assess the degree of rocky desertification in the karst regions. Because of the inherent merits of macro scale, frequency, efficiency and synthesis, remote sensing is the promising method to monitor and assess karst rocky desertification on large scale. However, the actual measurement of bedrock exposed rate is difficult and existing remote sensing methods cannot directly be exploited to extract the bedrock exposed rate owing to the high complexity and heterogeneity of karst environments. Therefore, based on the UAV and TM data, the paper selected Xingren County as the research area, and the quantitative extraction of the bedrock exposed rate based on the multi scale remote sensing data was developed. Firstly, we used the object oriented method to carry out the accurate classification of UAV image and based on the results of rock extraction, the bedrock exposed rate was calculated in the 30m grid scale. Parts of the calculated samples were as training data and another samples were as the model validation data. Secondly, in each grid the band reflectivity of TM data was extracted and we also calculated a variety of rock index and vegetation index (NDVI, SAVI etc.). Finally, the network model was established to extract the bedrock exposed rate, the correlation coefficient (R) of the network model was 0.855 and the correlation coefficient (R) of the validation model was 0.677, the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.073. Based on the quantitative inversion model, the distribution map of the bedrock exposed rate in Xingren County was obtained. Keywords: Bedrock exposed rate, quantitative extraction, UAV and TM data, Karst rocky desertification.

  1. Closed-loop control for cardiopulmonary management and intensive care unit sedation using digital imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholami, Behnood

    assessed by expert and non-expert human examiners. Next, we consider facial expression recognition using an unsupervised learning framework. We show that different facial expressions reside on distinct subspaces if the manifold is unfolded. In particular, semi-definite embedding is used to reduce the dimensionality and unfold the manifold of facial images. Next, generalized principal component analysis is used to fit a series of subspaces to the data points and associate each data point to a subspace. Data points that belong to the same subspace are shown to belong to the same facial expression. In clinical intensive care unit practice sedative/analgesic agents are titrated to achieve a specific level of sedation. The level of sedation is currently based on clinical scoring systems. Examples include the motor activity assessment scale (MAAS), the Richmond agitation-sedation scale (RASS), and the modified Ramsay sedation scale (MRSS). In general, the goal of the clinician is to find the drug dose that maintains the patient at a sedation score corresponding to a moderately sedated state. In this research, we use pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to find an optimal drug dosing control policy to drive the patient to a desired MRSS score. Atrial fibrillation, a cardiac arrhythmia characterized by unsynchronized electrical activity in the atrial chambers of the heart, is a rapidly growing problem in modern societies. One treatment, referred to as catheter ablation, targets specific parts of the left atrium for radio frequency ablation using an intracardiac catheter. As a first step towards the general solution to the computer-assisted segmentation of the left atrial wall, we use shape learning and shape-based image segmentation to identify the endocardial wall of the left atrium in the delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance images. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. Detecting mitoses in time-lapse images of embryonic epithelia using intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Siva, Parthipan; Brodland, G Wayne; Clausi, David

    2009-12-01

    Although the frequency and orientation of mitoses can significantly affect the mechanics of early embryo development, these data have not been available due to a shortage of suitable automated techniques. Fluorescence imaging, though popular, requires biochemical intervention and is not always possible or desirable. Here, a new technique that takes advantage of a localized intensity change that occurs in bright field images is used to identify mitoses. The algorithm involves mapping a deformable, sub-cellular triangular mesh from one time-lapse image to the next so that corresponding regions can be identified. Triangles in the mesh that undergo darkening of a sufficient degree over a period consistent with mitosis are flagged. Mitoses are assumed to occur along the short axis of elliptical areas fit to suitably sized clusters of flagged triangles. The algorithm is less complex than previous approaches and it has strong discrimination characteristics. When applied to 15 image sets from neurulation-stage axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) embryos, it was able to correctly detect 86% of the manually identified mitoses, had less than 5% false positives and produced average angular errors of only 15 degrees . The new algorithm is simpler to implement than those previously available, is substantially more accurate, and provides data that is important for understanding the mechanics of morphogenetic movements. PMID:19757061

  3. Investigation of therapy improvement using real-time photoacoustic imaging guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong

    There are a lot of risks in cancer treatment by invasive surgery, such as bleeding, wound infection, and long recovery time, etc. Therefore, there is great need for minimally- or non-invasive treatment. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a rapidly growing and truly non-invasive technology. It has been widely used in therapeutic applications, such as rapid tissue heating and tissue ablation. With proper imaging guidance, HIFU treatment can be performed totally noninvasively. Currently, ultrasound imaging-guided HIFU has been extensively studied. However, ultrasound imaging guidance is less precise because of the relatively low imaging contrast, sensitivity, and specificity for noninvasive detection. In this study, we employed photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technique, which has been developed a novel promising imaging technique for early cancer detection, to guide HIFU treatment. The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of PAI to guide, monitor in real time and enhance the HIFU therapy. In this dissertation, as the first step, the integrated PAI and HIFU system had been shown to have the feasibility to guide HIFU both ex vivo and in vivo. Then, the system was improved and developed to a real-time PAI-guided HIFU system. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of PA detection for HIFU lesion is very high and the saturation of PA signals can be used as the indicator for tissue coagulation. During the temperature measurement using this system, laser-enhanced HIFU heating was found. Thus, we further investigated the laser enhanced technique in both HIFU heating and pulsed HIFU thrombolysis. In the HIFU therapy, laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. We demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to significantly enhance HIFU by reducing cavitation threshold.

  4. WE-G-18C-05: Characterization of Cross-Vendor, Cross-Field Strength MR Image Intensity Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E; Prah, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Variations in MR image intensity and image intensity nonuniformity (IINU) can challenge the accuracy of intensity-based image segmentation and registration algorithms commonly applied in radiotherapy. The goal of this work was to characterize MR image intensity variations across scanner vendors and field strengths commonly used in radiotherapy. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 1.5T and 3.0T on GE (450w and 750, 23.1), Siemens (Espree and Verio, VB17B), and Philips (Ingenia, 4.1.3) scanners using commercial spin-echo sequences with matched parameters (TE/TR: 20/500 ms, rBW: 62.5 kHz, TH/skip: 5/5mm). Two radiofrequency (RF) coil combinations were used for each scanner: body coil alone, and combined body and phased-array head coils. Vendorspecific B1- corrections (PURE/Pre-Scan Normalize/CLEAR) were applied in all head coil cases. Images were transferred offline, corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm, and normalized. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) and peak image uniformity (PIU = 1−(Smax−Smin)/(Smax+Smin)) estimates were calculated for one homogeneous phantom slice. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests compared mean MR signal intensities and differences between original and N3 image CV and PIU. Results: Wide variations in both MR image intensity and IINU were observed across scanner vendors, field strengths, and RF coil configurations. Applying the MNI N3 correction for IINU resulted in significant improvements in both CV and PIU (p=0.0115, p=0.0235). However, wide variations in overall image intensity persisted, requiring image normalization to improve consistency across vendors, field strengths, and RF coils. These results indicate that B1- correction routines alone may be insufficient in compensating for IINU and image scaling, warranting additional corrections prior to use of MR images in radiotherapy. Conclusions: MR image intensities and IINU vary as a function of scanner vendor, field strength, and RF coil

  5. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The National Cartographic Information Center of the U.S. Geological Survey maintains records of aerial photographic coverage of the United States and its Territories, based on reports from other Federal agencies as well as State governmental agencies and commercial companies. From these records, the Center furnishes data to prospective purchasers on available photography and the agency holding the aerial film.

  6. Near Field Intensity Trends of Main Laser Alignment Images in the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Beltsar, I; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Kamm, V M; Salmon, T; Wilhelmsen, K

    2015-01-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes 192 high-energy laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to potentially initiate a fusion reaction. NIF has been operational for six years; during that time, thousands of successful laser firings or shots have been executed. Critical instrument measurements and camera images are carefully recorded for each shot. The result is a massive and complex database or ‘big data’ archive that can be used to investigate the state of the laser system at any point in its history or to locate and track trends in the laser operation over time. In this study, the optical light throughput for more than 1600 NIF shots for each of the 192 main laser beams and 48 quads was measured over a three year period from January 2009 to October 2012. The purpose was to verify that the variation in the transmission of light through the optics over time performed within design expectations during this time period. Differences between average or integrated intensity from images recorded by the input sensor package (ISP) and by the output sensor package (OSP) in the NIF beam-line were examined. A metric is described for quantifying changes in the integrated intensity measurements and was used to view potential trends. Results are presented for the NIF input and output sensor package trends and changes over the three year time-frame.

  7. On Using Intensity Interferometry for Feature Identification and Imaging of Remote Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan

    2013-01-01

    We derive an approximation to the intensity covariance function of two scanning pinhole detectors, facing a distant source (e.g., a star) being occluded partially by an absorptive object (e.g., a planet). We focus on using this technique to identify or image an object that is in the line-of-sight between a well-characterized source and the detectors. We derive the observed perturbation to the intensity covariance map due to the object, showing that under some reasonable approximations it is proportional to the real part of the Fourier transform of the source's photon-flux density times the Fourier transform of the object's intensity absorption. We highlight the key parameters impacting its visibility and discuss the requirements for estimating object-related parameters, e.g., its size, velocity or shape. We consider an application of this result to determining the orbit inclination of an exoplanet orbiting a distant star. Finally, motivated by the intrinsically weak nature of the signature, we study its signal-to-noise ratio and determine the impact of system parameters.

  8. Monitoring tropical cyclone intensity using wind fields derived from short-interval satellite images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. B.; Gentry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid scan visible images from the Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer sensor on board SMS-2 and GOES-1 were used to derive high resolution upper and lower tropospheric environmental wind fields around three western Atlantic tropical cyclones (1975-78). These wind fields were used to derive upper and lower tropospheric areal mean relative vorticity and their differences, the net relative angular momentum balance and upper tropospheric mass outflow. These kinematic parameters were shown by studies using composite rawinsonde data to be strongly related to tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. Also, the role of forced synoptic scale subsidence in tropical cyclone formation was examined. The studies showed that satellite-derived lower and upper tropospheric wind fields can be used to monitor and possibly predict tropical cyclone formation and intensity changes. These kinematic analyses showed that future changes in tropical cyclone intensity are mainly related to the "spin-up" of the storms by the net horizontal transport of relative angular momentum caused by convergence of cyclonic vorticity in the lower troposphere and to a lesser extent the divergence of anticyclone vorticity in the upper troposphere.

  9. Uncertainties and biases of source masses derived from fits of integrated fluxes or image intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men'shchikov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Fitting spectral distributions of total fluxes or image intensities are two standard methods for estimating the masses of starless cores and protostellar envelopes. These mass estimates, which are the main source and basis of our knowledge of the origin and evolution of self-gravitating cores and protostars, are uncertain. It is important to clearly understand sources of statistical and systematic errors stemming from the methods and minimize the errors. In this model-based study, a grid of radiative transfer models of starless cores and protostellar envelopes was computed and their total fluxes and image intensities were fitted to derive the model masses. To investigate intrinsic effects related to the physical objects, all observational complications were explicitly ignored. Known true values of the numerical models allow assessment of the qualities of the methods and fitting models, as well as the effects of nonuniform temperatures, far-infrared opacity slope, selected subsets of wavelengths, background subtraction, and angular resolutions. The method of fitting intensities gives more accurate masses for more resolved objects than the method of fitting fluxes. With the latter, a fitting model that assumes optically thin emission gives much better results than the one allowing substantial optical depths. Temperature excesses within the objects above the mass-averaged values skew their spectral shapes towards shorter wavelengths, leading to masses underestimated typically by factors 2-5. With a fixed opacity slope deviating from the true value by a factor of 1.2, masses are inaccurate within a factor of 2. The most accurate masses are estimated by fitting just two or three of the longest wavelength measurements. Conventional algorithm of background subtraction is a likely source of large systematic errors. The absolute values of masses of the unresolved or poorly resolved objects in star-forming regions are uncertain to within at least a factor of 2-3.

  10. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound: Current Status for Image-Guided Therapy.

    PubMed

    Copelan, Alexander; Hartman, Jason; Chehab, Monzer; Venkatesan, Aradhana M

    2015-12-01

    Image-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an innovative therapeutic technology, permitting extracorporeal or endocavitary delivery of targeted thermal ablation while minimizing injury to the surrounding structures. While ultrasound-guided HIFU was the original image-guided system, MR-guided HIFU has many inherent advantages, including superior depiction of anatomic detail and superb real-time thermometry during thermoablation sessions, and it has recently demonstrated promising results in the treatment of both benign and malignant tumors. HIFU has been employed in the management of prostate cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, uterine leiomyomas, and breast tumors, and has been associated with success in limited studies for palliative pain management in pancreatic cancer and bone tumors. Nonthermal HIFU bioeffects, including immune system modulation and targeted drug/gene therapy, are currently being explored in the preclinical realm, with an emphasis on leveraging these therapeutic effects in the care of the oncology patient. Although still in its early stages, the wide spectrum of therapeutic capabilities of HIFU offers great potential in the field of image-guided oncologic therapy. PMID:26622104

  11. Spectroscopic and Intensity Modulated Photocurrent Imaging of Polymer/Fullerene Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongqian; Wise, Adam J; Thomas, Alan K; Grey, John K

    2016-01-13

    Molecular spectroscopic and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) imaging techniques are used to map morphology-dependent charge recombination in organic polymer/fullerene solar cells. IMPS uses a small (∼10%) sinusoidal modulation of an excitation light source and photocurrent responses are measured while modulation frequencies are swept over several decades (∼1 Hz-20 kHz). Solar cells consisting of either poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and poly(2-methoxy-5-(3'-7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MDMO-PPV) blended with a soluble fullerene derivative, [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) are used as targets. The morphologies of these polymer/fullerene systems are distinctly different due to PCBM miscibility in various polymer conformers. IMPS responses of both blend solar cells show unique morphology-dependent charge generation, transport and extraction signatures that can be spatially correlated to microscopic variations in local composition and packing by constructing IMPS images along with corresponding molecular spectroscopic imaging over the same scan area. We find that boundaries separating enriched polymer and fullerene domains promote nongeminate charge recombination appearing as positive phase shifts in the IMPS response. These zones are susceptible to degradation and we propose the approaches herein can be used to probe material and device degradation in situ under various conditions, such as oxygen content, temperature and ionizing radiation.

  12. Monitoring and Assuring the Quality of Digital Aerial Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopherson, Jon

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation explains the USGS plan for monitoring and assuring the quality of digital aerial data. The contents include: 1) History of USGS Aerial Imaging Involvement; 2) USGS Research and Results; 3) Outline of USGS Quality Assurance Plan; 4) Other areas of Interest; and 5) Summary

  13. Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) as a Tool for Field Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneously be integrated in geographic information systems…

  14. Imaging the evanescent intensity gradients of an optical waveguide using a tapping-mode near-field scanning optical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chi W.; Tsai, Din Ping; Jackson, Howard E.

    1999-11-01

    Imaging the local evanescent intensity gradients by using a tapping-mode near-field scanning optical microscope is developed. Two different optical structures, one a well- characterized BK-7 glass prism in the total internal reflection configuration, and the other a side-polished optical fiber waveguide with a step index of refraction, were studied. Results show distinct imaging contrast of the intensity gradients, the reveal the variations of the local index of refraction of waveguide. This is a novel near-field optical method, and can be used in the imaging of local index of refraction of a variety of optical waveguide structures.

  15. A new technique for the detection of large scale landslides in glacio-lacustrine deposits using image correlation based upon aerial imagery: A case study from the French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Paz; Whitworth, Malcolm

    2016-10-01

    Landslide monitoring has benefited from recent advances in the use of image correlation of high resolution optical imagery. However, this approach has typically involved satellite imagery that may not be available for all landslides depending on their time of movement and location. This study has investigated the application of image correlation techniques applied to a sequence of aerial imagery to an active landslide in the French Alps. We apply an indirect landslide monitoring technique (COSI-Corr) based upon the cross-correlation between aerial photographs, to obtain horizontal displacement rates. Results for the 2001-2003 time interval are presented, providing a spatial model of landslide activity and motion across the landslide, which is consistent with previous studies. The study has identified areas of new landslide activity in addition to known areas and through image decorrelation has identified and mapped two new lateral landslides within the main landslide complex. This new approach for landslide monitoring is likely to be of wide applicability to other areas characterised by complex ground displacements.

  16. Oriental - Automatic Geo-Referencing and Ortho-Rectification of Archaeological Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karel, W.; Doneus, M.; Verhoeve, G.; Bries, C.; Ressl, C.; Pfeifer, N.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the newly developed software OrientAL, which aims at providing a fully automated processing chain from aerial photographs to orthophoto maps. It considers the special requirements of archaeological aerial images, including oblique imagery, single images, poor approximate georeferencing, and historic photographs. As a first step the automatic relative orientation of images from an archaeological image archive is presented.

  17. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal-noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  18. Real-time multi-intensity image reconstruction from projections for multi-processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. K.

    1980-12-01

    The use of microprocessors to perform video data analysis is discussed. The application of projections in data analysis represents a significant data reduction while contributing to improved tracking algorithms and the enhancement of image identification. A mathematical analysis of the ambiguity of multi-intensity pictures (digitized video) with respect to their projections is presented. Two unique classes are defined that are general enough to represent a large class of digitized video pictures. The two classes are the band class and the bar class. A detailed description with proofs of uniqueness are given for each class. They are the basic building blocks for the reconstruction of ambiguous pictures. Since it is desired to reconstruct a picture using its projections in realtime, only fast reconstruction approximations are investigated. Four methods that accomplish fast reconstructions are presented in this dissertation. All four methods depend on block reconstruction techniques. Simulation results of all methods are presented.

  19. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  20. Improved highly accurate localized motion imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Sugiyama, Ryusuke; Kanazawa, Kengo; Seki, Mika; Sasaki, Akira; Takeuchi, Hideki; Fujiwara, Keisuke; Itani, Kazunori; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    Visualizing an area subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is necessary for controlling the amount of HIFU exposure. One of the promising monitoring methods is localized motion imaging (LMI), which estimates coagulation length by detecting the change in stiffness. In this study, we improved the accuracy of our previous LMI by dynamic cross-correlation window (DCCW) and maximum vibration amount (MVA) methods. The DCCW method was used to increase the accuracy of estimating vibration amplitude, and the MVA method was employed to increase signal–noise ratio of the decrease ratio at the coagulated area. The qualitative comparison of results indicated that the two proposed methods could suppress the effect of noise. Regarding the results of the quantitative comparison, coagulation length was estimated with higher accuracy by the improved LMI method, and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) was reduced from 2.51 to 1.69 mm.

  1. Signal Intensity of Superb Microvascular Imaging Correlates with the Severity of Acute Cholecystitis

    PubMed Central

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the severity of acute cholecystitis is critical for the management of this condition. Superb microvascular imaging (SMI) enables the assessment of slow blood flow of small vessels without any contrast medium. An 84-year-old man visited our hospital with right upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography and abdominal ultrasonography showed a slight thickening of the gallbladder. White blood cell count and C-reactive protein levels were elevated. He was diagnosed with acute cholecystitis and treated conservatively with antibiotics. Two days later, his condition worsened and percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD) was performed. The patient recovered and was discharged, and his drainage was withdrawn 7 days later. On admission, color-coded SMI (cSMI) showed pulsatory signals on the slightly thickened gallbladder wall. On the day of PTGBD, the intensity of the signal on cSMI had increased. Once the patient was cured, no further signal was observed on the gallbladder wall with either cSMI or mSMI. In conclusion, the strong pulsatory signal correlated with the severity of acute cholecystitis observed with cSMI and mSMI. Illustrating the signal intensity is useful for the evaluation of the severity of acute cholecystitis. PMID:27721732

  2. Time Integrated Soft X-ray Imaging in High Intensity Laser Experiments (thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, David

    2009-01-01

    2009 marks a significant achievement and the dawn of a new era in high intensity laser research with the final commissioning of all 192 beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). NIF is a department of energy (DOE) funded project more than 10 years in the making located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The following research was done as one of many preliminary experiments done to prepare for these historic events. The primary focus of the experimental campaign this paper addresses is to test and develop a thermal x-radiation source using a short pulse laser. This data is hoped to provide information about the thermal transport mechanisms important in the development of prediction models in High Energy Density (HED) science. One of several diagnostics fielded was a soft x-ray imager (SXRI) which is detailed in this paper. The SXRI will be used to measure the relative size of the heated region and also the relative level of specific x-ray emissions among several shot and target configurations. The laser system used was the Titan laser located in the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Titan uses the JLF Janus Nd:glass laser west frontend system with a Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification (OPCPA) in place of the nanosecond oscillator. The system is capable of producing laser intensities of over a petawatt with several tens of joules delivered in the beam.

  3. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of thermal ghost imaging based on positive-negative intensity correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shu-Chun; Sun, Ming-Jie; Wu, Ling-An

    2016-05-01

    Ghost imaging with thermal light is a topic in optical imaging that has aroused great interest in recent years. However, the imaging quality must be greatly improved before the technology can be transferred from the lab to engineering applications. By means of correspondence ghost imaging (CGI) with a pseudo-thermal light source and appropriate sorting of the intensity fluctuations of the signal and reference beams, we obtain the positive and negative Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity correlation characteristics of the optical field. Then, for ghost imaging of a transmissive binary object, we find that by subtracting the negative from the positive fluctuation frames of the presorted reference detector signals, the signal-to-noise ratio can be effectively increased, with almost all the background noise eliminated. Our results show that, compared with the generic CGI technique, the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by nearly 60%.

  4. Automatic grading of appearance retention of carpets using intensity and range images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orjuela Vargas, Sergio Alejandro; Ortiz-Jaramillo, Benhur; Vansteenkiste, Ewout; Rooms, Filip; De Meulemeester, Simon; de Keyser, Robain; Van Langenhove, Lieva; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-04-01

    Textiles are mainly used for decoration and protection. In both cases, their original appearance and its retention are important factors for customers. Therefore, evaluation of appearance parameters are critical for quality assurance purposes, during and after manufacturing, to determine the lifetime and/or beauty of textile products. In particular, appearance retention of textile products is commonly certified with grades, which are currently assigned by human experts. However, manufacturers would prefer a more objective system. We present an objective system for grading appearance retention, particularly, for textile floor coverings. Changes in appearance are quantified by using linear regression models on texture features extracted from intensity and range images. Range images are obtained by our own laser scanner, reconstructing the carpet surface using two methods that have been previously presented. We extract texture features using a variant of the local binary pattern technique based on detecting those patterns whose frequencies are related to the appearance retention grades. We test models for eight types of carpets. Results show that the proposed approach describes the degree of wear with a precision within the range allowed to human inspectors by international standards. The methodology followed in this experiment has been designed to be general for evaluating global deviation of texture in other types of textiles, as well as other surface materials.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of boiling induced by high intensity focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Canney, Michael S.; Lee, Donghoon; Marro, Kenneth I.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Both mechanically induced acoustic cavitation and thermally induced boiling can occur during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) medical therapy. The goal was to monitor the temperature as boiling was approached using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tissue phantoms were heated for 20 s in a 4.7-T magnet using a 2-MHz HIFU source with an aperture and radius of curvature of 44 mm. The peak focal pressure was 27.5 MPa with corresponding beam width of 0.5 mm. The temperature measured in a single MRI voxel by water proton resonance frequency shift attained a maximum value of only 73 °C after 7 s of continuous HIFU exposure when boiling started. Boiling was detected by visual observation, by appearance on the MR images, and by a marked change in the HIFU source power. Nonlinear modeling of the acoustic field combined with a heat transfer equation predicted 100 °C after 7 s of exposure. Averaging of the calculated temperature field over the volume of the MRI voxel (0.3×0.5×2 mm3) yielded a maximum of 73 °C that agreed with the MR thermometry measurement. These results have implications for the use of MRI-determined temperature values to guide treatments with clinical HIFU systems. PMID:19354416

  6. "A" Is for Aerial Maps and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Reese H.; Delahunty, Tina

    2007-01-01

    The technology of satellite imagery and remote sensing adds a new dimension to teaching and learning about maps with elementary school children. Just a click of the mouse brings into view some images of the world that could only be imagined a generation ago. Close-up aerial pictures of the school and neighborhood quickly catch the interest of…

  7. Aerial Scene Recognition using Efficient Sparse Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2012-01-01

    Advanced scene recognition systems for processing large volumes of high-resolution aerial image data are in great demand today. However, automated scene recognition remains a challenging problem. Efficient encoding and representation of spatial and structural patterns in the imagery are key in developing automated scene recognition algorithms. We describe an image representation approach that uses simple and computationally efficient sparse code computation to generate accurate features capable of producing excellent classification performance using linear SVM kernels. Our method exploits unlabeled low-level image feature measurements to learn a set of basis vectors. We project the low-level features onto the basis vectors and use simple soft threshold activation function to derive the sparse features. The proposed technique generates sparse features at a significantly lower computational cost than other methods~\\cite{Yang10, newsam11}, yet it produces comparable or better classification accuracy. We apply our technique to high-resolution aerial image datasets to quantify the aerial scene classification performance. We demonstrate that the dense feature extraction and representation methods are highly effective for automatic large-facility detection on wide area high-resolution aerial imagery.

  8. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R(2) = 0.821 at p < 0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated the

  9. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal spot localization using harmonic motion imaging (HMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-08-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the  -3dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R2 = 0.821 at p  <  0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated

  10. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Focal Spot Localization Using Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yang; Hou, Gary Yi; Wang, Shutao; Konofagou, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Several ultrasound-based imaging modalities have been proposed for image guidance and monitoring of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. However, accurate localization and characterization of the effective region of treatment (focal spot) remain important obstacles in the clinical implementation of HIFU ablation. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a HIFU monitoring technique that utilizes radiation-force-induced localized oscillatory displacement. HMIFU has been shown to correctly identify the formation and extent of HIFU thermal ablation lesions. However a significant problem remains in identifying the location of the HIFU focus, which is necessary for treatment planning. In this study, the induced displacement was employed to localize the HIFU focal spot inside the tissue prior to treatment. Feasibility was shown with two separate systems. The 1D HMIFU system consisted of a HIFU transducer emitting an amplitude-modulated HIFU beam for mechanical excitation and a confocal single-element, pulse-echo transducer for simultaneous RF acquisition. The 2D HIFU system consists of a HIFU phased array, and a co-axial imaging phased array for simultaneous imaging. Initial feasibility was first performed on tissue-mimicking gelatin phantoms and the focal zone was defined as the region corresponding to the −3 dB full width at half maximum of the HMI displacement. Using the same parameters, in vitro experiments were performed in canine liver specimens to compare the defined focal zone with the lesion. In vitro measurements showed good agreement between the HMI predicted focal zone and the induced HIFU lesion location. HMIFU was experimentally shown to be capable of predicting and tracking the focal region in both phantoms and in vitro tissues. The accuracy of focal spot localization was evaluated by comparing with the lesion location in post-ablative tissues, with a R2 = 0.821 at p<0.002 in the 2D HMI system. We demonstrated the

  11. Performance comparison of fully adaptive and static passive polarimetric imagers in the presence of intensity and polarization contrast.

    PubMed

    Goudail, François; Boffety, Matthieu

    2016-09-01

    We address the comparison of contrast improvement obtained with a fully adaptive polarimetric imager and the best channel of a static polarimetric imager in the presence of both intensity and polarization differences between the target and the background. We develop an in-depth quantitative study of the performance loss incurred by a static imager compared to a fully adaptive one in this case. These results are useful to make a well-informed choice between these two polarimetric imaging architectures in a given application. PMID:27607513

  12. Study on cavitation behavior during high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure by using optical and ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kei; Takagi, Ryo; Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to enhance the heating effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In our previous study, the use of a “triggered HIFU” sequence consisting of a high-intensity pulse and a relatively low-intensity burst was proposed as an effective method to utilize the effect of cavitation bubbles. However, the duration of each component in the sequence has not been optimized. In this study, optical imaging was carried out to observe the behavior of cavitation bubbles in a gel phantom during the triggered HIFU exposure. Ultrasound imaging using the pulse inversion method was also conducted to detect the behavior of the bubbles. The results suggest that the oscillation of cavitation bubbles become inactive as the duration of HIFU burst exposure increases to the order of 10 ms. It was also suggested that ultrasonic imaging has potential use for detecting a change in the oscillation of cavitation bubbles for optimizing a triggered HIFU sequence.

  13. 1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE. - Fort Delaware, Sea Wall, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  14. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  15. Rationale and development of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy post-prostatectomy: the present standard of care?

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Julia R; McNair, Helen A; Dearnaley, David P

    2015-01-01

    The indications for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy have evolved over the last decade, although the optimal timing, dose, and target volume remain to be well defined. The target volume is susceptible to anatomical variations with its borders interfacing with the rectum and bladder. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become the gold standard for radical prostate radiotherapy. Here we review the current evidence for image-guided techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed and describe current strategies to reduce or account for interfraction and intrafraction motion. PMID:26635484

  16. The application of GPS precise point positioning technology in aerial triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiuxiao; Fu, Jianhong; Sun, Hongxing; Toth, Charles

    In traditional GPS-supported aerotriangulation, differential GPS (DGPS) positioning technology is used to determine the 3-dimensional coordinates of the perspective centers at exposure time with an accuracy of centimeter to decimeter level. This method can significantly reduce the number of ground control points (GCPs). However, the establishment of GPS reference stations for DGPS positioning is not only labor-intensive and costly, but also increases the implementation difficulty of aerial photography. This paper proposes aerial triangulation supported with GPS precise point positioning (PPP) as a way to avoid the use of the GPS reference stations and simplify the work of aerial photography. Firstly, we present the algorithm for GPS PPP in aerial triangulation applications. Secondly, the error law of the coordinate of perspective centers determined using GPS PPP is analyzed. Thirdly, based on GPS PPP and aerial triangulation software self-developed by the authors, four sets of actual aerial images taken from surveying and mapping projects, different in both terrain and photographic scale, are given as experimental models. The four sets of actual data were taken over a flat region at a scale of 1:2500, a mountainous region at a scale of 1:3000, a high mountainous region at a scale of 1:32000 and an upland region at a scale of 1:60000 respectively. In these experiments, the GPS PPP results were compared with results obtained through DGPS positioning and traditional bundle block adjustment. In this way, the empirical positioning accuracy of GPS PPP in aerial triangulation can be estimated. Finally, the results of bundle block adjustment with airborne GPS controls from GPS PPP are analyzed in detail. The empirical results show that GPS PPP applied in aerial triangulation has a systematic error of half-meter level and a stochastic error within a few decimeters. However, if a suitable adjustment solution is adopted, the systematic error can be eliminated in GPS

  17. Intensity JND comes from Poisson neural noise: implications for image coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Jont B.

    2000-06-01

    While problems of image coding and audio coding have frequently been assumed to have similarities, specific sets of relationships have remained vague. One area where there should be a meaningful comparison is with central masking noise estimates, which define the codec's quantizer step size. In the past few years, progress has been made on this problem in the auditory domain (Allen and Neely, J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 102, 1997, 3628-46; Allen, 1999, Wiley Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Vol. 17, p. 422-437, Ed. Webster, J.G., John Wiley & Sons, Inc, NY). It is possible that some useful insights might now be obtained by comparing the auditory and visual cases. In the auditory case it has been shown, directly from psychophysical data, that below about 5 sones (a measure of loudness, a unit of psychological intensity), the loudness JND is proportional to the square root of the loudness (Delta) pounds sterling(pounds sterling) varies direct as (root)pounds sterling(I). This is true for both wideband noise and tones, having a frequency of 250 Hz or greater. Allen and Neely interpret this to mean that the internal noise is Poisson, as would be expected from neural point process noise. It follows directly that the Weber fraction (the relative loudness JND), decreases as one over the square root of the loudness, namely (Delta) pounds sterling/pounds sterling varies direct as 1/(root)pounds sterling. Above pounds sterling equals 5 sones, the relative loudness JND (Delta) pounds sterling/pounds sterling approximately equals 0.03 (i.e., Ekman law). It would be very interesting to know if this same relationship holds for the visual case between brightness (Beta) (I) and the brightness JND (Delta) (Beta) (I). This might be tested by measuring both the brightness JND and the brightness as a function of intensity, and transforming the intensity JND into a brightness JND, namely (Delta) (Beta) (I) equals (Beta) (I + (Delta) I) - (Beta) (I) approximately equals

  18. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  19. CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

    2012-02-16

    National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

  20. Aerial Photography Summary Record System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    The Aerial Photography Summary Record System (APSRS) describes aerial photography projects that meet specified criteria over a given geographic area of the United States and its territories. Aerial photographs are an important tool in cartography and a number of other professions. Land use planners, real estate developers, lawyers, environmental specialists, and many other professionals rely on detailed and timely aerial photographs. Until 1975, there was no systematic approach to locate an aerial photograph, or series of photographs, quickly and easily. In that year, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) inaugurated the APSRS, which has become a standard reference for users of aerial photographs.

  1. Pulse-coupled neural nets: translation, rotation, scale, distortion, and intensity signal invariance for images.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J L

    1994-09-10

    The linking-field neural network model of Eckhorn et al. [Neural Comput. 2, 293-307 (1990)] was introduced to explain the experimentally observed synchronous activity among neural assemblies in the cat cortex induced by feature-dependent visual activity. The model produces synchronous bursts of pulses from neurons with similar activity, effectively grouping them by phase and pulse frequency. It gives a basic new function: grouping by similarity. The synchronous bursts are obtained in the limit of strong linking strengths. The linking-field model in the limit of moderate-to-weak linking characterized by few if any multiple bursts is investigated. In this limit dynamic, locally periodic traveling waves exist whose time signal encodes the geometrical structure of a two-dimensional input image. The signal can be made insensitive to translation, scale, rotation, distortion, and intensity. The waves transmit information beyond the physical interconnect distance. The model is implemented in an optical hybrid demonstration system. Results of the simulations and the optical system are presented.

  2. Possible fractionated regimens for image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy of large arteriovenous malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Schultz, Christopher J.; Li, X. Allen

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate a plausible α/β ratio for arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) based on reported clinical data, and to design possible fractionation regimens suitable for image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for large AVMs based on the newly obtained α/β ratio. The commonly used obliteration rate (OR) for AVMs with a three year angiographic follow-up from many institutes was fitted to linear-quadratic (LQ) formalism and the Poisson OR model. The determined parameters were then used to calculate possible fractionation regimens for IG-IMRT based on the concept of a biologically effective dose (BED) and an equivalent uniform dose (EUD). The radiobiological analysis yields a α/β ratio of 2.2 ± 1.6 Gy for AVMs. Three sets of possible fractionated schemes were designed to achieve equal or better biological effectiveness than the single-fraction treatments while maintaining the same probability of normal brain complications. A plausible α/β ratio was derived for AVMs and possible fractionation regimens that may be suitable for IG-IMRT for large AVM treatment are proposed. The sensitivity of parameters on the calculation was also studied. The information may be useful to design new clinical trials that use IG-IMRT for the treatment of large AVMs.

  3. Beyond the partial light intensity imager: Eliminating Moiré patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yuanhe; Liu, Qingsong; Wu, Yong; Yu, Yang; Yang, Xusan; Gao, Haiyang; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-11-01

    A partial light intensity imager (PLII) was proposed in our previous research for enhancing the dynamic range to 2.2×105 lx in strong light. Moiré patterns may occur, however, since the PLII employs both a liquid crystal display (LCD) and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera as its key devices, which can be regarded as two gratings. This research calculates the fringe widths and spectra for both the LCD and the CCD, and analyzes the relationship between the fringe width and the applied voltage on each pixel of the LCD. According to the theoretical results, we find that changing the rotational angle of the liquid crystal (LC) molecule by regulating the applied voltage is an effective method to eliminate the Moiré patterns in the PLII. Based on this principle, an experiment has been designed, and the Moiré patterns fringe width is alleviated from 20 pixels to10 pixels distance before and after, and the results verify the correctness of the theoretical analysis.

  4. Dissociable neural responses related to pain intensity, stimulus intensity, and stimulus awareness within the anterior cingulate cortex: a parametric single-trial laser functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Büchel, Christian; Bornhovd, Karin; Quante, Markus; Glauche, Volkmar; Bromm, Burkhard; Weiller, Cornelius

    2002-02-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activations in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) related to the affective component of pain, but not to stimulus intensity. However, it is possible that the low spatial resolution of positron emission tomography, as used in the majority of these studies, obscured areas coding stimulus intensity. We revisited this issue, using a parametric single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging design, and investigated pain, stimulus intensity, and stimulus awareness (i.e., pain unrelated) responses within the ACC in nine healthy volunteers. Four different stimulus intensities ranging from warm to painful (300-600 mJ) were applied with a thulium yttrium-aluminum granite infrared laser in a randomized order and rated by the subjects on a five point scale (P0-P4). Pain-related regions in the ventral posterior ACC showed a response that did not distinguish between innocuous trials (P0 and P1) but showed a positive linear relationship with the blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast signal for painful trials (P2-P4). Regions in the dorsal anterior ACC along the cingulate sulcus differentiated between P0 (not perceived) and P1 but exhibited no additional signal increase with P2; these regions are related to stimulus awareness and probably to cognitive processing. Most importantly, we identified a region in the dorsal posterior ACC showing a response that discriminated between nonpainful trials (P0 and P1); therefore, this region was simply related to basic sensory processing and not to pain intensity. Stimulus-related activations were all located adjacent to the cingulate motor area, highlighting the strategic link of stimulus processing and response generation in the posterior ACC.

  5. Aerial Explorers and Robotic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg

    2004-01-01

    A unique bio-inspired approach to autonomous aerial vehicle, a.k.a. aerial explorer technology is discussed. The work is focused on defining and studying aerial explorer mission concepts, both as an individual robotic system and as a member of a small robotic "ecosystem." Members of this robotic ecosystem include the aerial explorer, air-deployed sensors and robotic symbiotes, and other assets such as rovers, landers, and orbiters.

  6. Unmanned aerial survey of elephants.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Cédric; Lejeune, Philippe; Lisein, Jonathan; Sawadogo, Prosper; Bouché, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The use of a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) was tested to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing ×100™ equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to test animal reaction as the UAS passed, and visibility on the images. No reaction was recorded as the UAS passed at a height of 100 m. Observations, made on a set of more than 7000 images, revealed that only elephants (Loxodonta africana) were easily visible while medium and small sized mammals were not. The easy observation of elephants allows experts to enumerate them on images acquired at a height of 100 m. We, therefore, implemented an aerial strip sample count along transects used for the annual wildlife foot count. A total of 34 elephants were recorded on 4 transects, each overflown twice. The elephant density was estimated at 2.47 elephants/km(2) with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 36.10%. The main drawback of our UAS was its low autonomy (45 min). Increased endurance of small UAS is required to replace manned aircraft survey of large areas (about 1000 km of transect per day vs 40 km for our UAS). The monitoring strategy should be adapted according to the sampling plan. Also, the UAS is as expensive as a second-hand light aircraft. However the logistic and flight implementation are easier, the running costs are lower and its use is safer. Technological evolution will make civil UAS more efficient, allowing them to compete with light aircraft for aerial wildlife surveys.

  7. Unmanned Aerial Survey of Elephants

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Cédric; Lejeune, Philippe; Lisein, Jonathan; Sawadogo, Prosper; Bouché, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The use of a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) was tested to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing ×100™ equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to test animal reaction as the UAS passed, and visibility on the images. No reaction was recorded as the UAS passed at a height of 100 m. Observations, made on a set of more than 7000 images, revealed that only elephants (Loxodonta africana) were easily visible while medium and small sized mammals were not. The easy observation of elephants allows experts to enumerate them on images acquired at a height of 100 m. We, therefore, implemented an aerial strip sample count along transects used for the annual wildlife foot count. A total of 34 elephants were recorded on 4 transects, each overflown twice. The elephant density was estimated at 2.47 elephants/km2 with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 36.10%. The main drawback of our UAS was its low autonomy (45 min). Increased endurance of small UAS is required to replace manned aircraft survey of large areas (about 1000 km of transect per day vs 40 km for our UAS). The monitoring strategy should be adapted according to the sampling plan. Also, the UAS is as expensive as a second-hand light aircraft. However the logistic and flight implementation are easier, the running costs are lower and its use is safer. Technological evolution will make civil UAS more efficient, allowing them to compete with light aircraft for aerial wildlife surveys. PMID:23405088

  8. Calibration of ultrasound backscatter temperature imaging for high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Ter Haar, Gail; Morris, Hugh; Coussios, Constantin; Friend, Peter; Bamber, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is rapidly gaining acceptance as a non-invasive method for soft tissue tumor ablation, but improvements in the methods of treatment delivery, planning and monitoring are still required. Backscatter temperature imaging (BTI) uses ultrasound to visualize heating-induced echo strain and may be used to indicate the position of the HIFU focal region using low-power "sub-lesioning" exposure. The technique may also provide a quantitative tool for assessing the efficacy of treatment delivery if apparent strain measurements can be related to the underlying temperature rise. To obtain temperature estimates from strain measurements, the relationship between these variables has to be either measured or otherwise assumed from previous calibrations in similar tissues. This article describes experimental measurements aimed at deriving the relationship between temperature rise and apparent strain in the laboratory environment using both ex vivo bovine liver tissue samples and normothermically perfused porcine livers. A BTI algorithm was applied to radiofrequency ultrasound echo data acquired from a clinical ultrasound scanner (Z.One, Zonare Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA, USA) where the imaging probe was aligned with the focal region of a HIFU transducer. Temperature measurements were obtained using needle thermocouples implanted in the liver tissue. A series of "non-ablative" HIFU exposures giving peak temperatures below 10°C were made in three separate ex vivo bovine livers, yielding an average strain/temperature coefficient of 0.126 ± 0.088 percentage strain per degree Celsius. In the perfused porcine livers at a starting temperature of 38°C (normal body temperature) the strain/temperature coefficients were found to be 0.040 ± 0.029 percentage strain per degree Celsius. The uncertainty in these results is directly linked to the precision of the strain measurement, as well as the naturally occurring variance between different

  9. Aerial Perspective Artistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a lesson centering on aerial perspective artistry of students and offers suggestions on how art teachers should carry this project out. This project serves to develop students' visual perception by studying reproductions by famous artists. This lesson allows one to imagine being lured into a landscape capable of captivating…

  10. Aerial of the VAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Even in this aerial view at KSC, the Vehicle Assembly Building is imposing. In front of it is the Launch Control Center. In the background is the Rotation/Processing Facility, next to the Banana Creek. In the foreground is the Saturn Causeway that leads to Launch Pads 39A and 39B.

  11. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1971-01-01

    Geological Survey vertical aerial photography is obtained primarily for topographic and geologic mapping. Reproductions from this photography are usually satisfactory for general use. Because reproductions are not stocked, but are custom processed for each order, they cannot be returned for credit or refund.

  12. Evaluating the intensity of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging: Preliminary in vitro results.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cho-Chiang; Lai, Ting-Yu; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2016-08-01

    The ability to measure the elastic properties of plaques and vessels is significant in clinical diagnosis, particularly for detecting a vulnerable plaque. A novel concept of combining intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging has recently been proposed. This method has potential in elastography for distinguishing between the stiffness of plaques and arterial vessel walls. However, the intensity of the acoustic radiation force requires calibration as a standard for the further development of an ARFI-IVUS imaging device that could be used in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-frequency transducer with 11MHz and 48MHz was used to measure the association between the biological tissue displacement and the applied acoustic radiation force. The output intensity of the acoustic radiation force generated by the pushing element ranged from 1.8 to 57.9mW/cm(2), as measured using a calibrated hydrophone. The results reveal that all of the acoustic intensities produced by the transducer in the experiments were within the limits specified by FDA regulations and could still displace the biological tissues. Furthermore, blood clots with different hematocrits, which have elastic properties similar to the lipid pool of plaques, with stiffness ranging from 0.5 to 1.9kPa could be displaced from 1 to 4μm, whereas the porcine arteries with stiffness ranging from 120 to 291kPa were displaced from 0.4 to 1.3μm when an acoustic intensity of 57.9mW/cm(2) was used. The in vitro ARFI images of the artery with a blood clot and artificial arteriosclerosis showed a clear distinction of the stiffness distributions of the vessel wall. All the results reveal that ARFI-IVUS imaging has the potential to distinguish the elastic properties of plaques and vessels. Moreover, the acoustic intensity used in ARFI imaging has been experimentally quantified. Although the size of this two-element transducer is unsuitable for IVUS imaging, the

  13. COCOA: tracking in aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Saad; Shah, Mubarak

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming a core intelligence asset for reconnaissance, surveillance and target tracking in urban and battlefield settings. In order to achieve the goal of automated tracking of objects in UAV videos we have developed a system called COCOA. It processes the video stream through number of stages. At first stage platform motion compensation is performed. Moving object detection is performed to detect the regions of interest from which object contours are extracted by performing a level set based segmentation. Finally blob based tracking is performed for each detected object. Global tracks are generated which are used for higher level processing. COCOA is customizable to different sensor resolutions and is capable of tracking targets as small as 100 pixels. It works seamlessly for both visible and thermal imaging modes. The system is implemented in Matlab and works in a batch mode.

  14. Theoretical scheme of thermal-light many-ghost imaging by Nth-order intensity correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingchuan; Kuang Leman

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, we propose a theoretical scheme of many-ghost imaging in terms of Nth-order correlated thermal light. We obtain the Gaussian thin lens equations in the many-ghost imaging protocol. We show that it is possible to produce N-1 ghost images of an object at different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a higher order correlated imaging process with an Nth-order correlated thermal source and correlation measurements. We investigate the visibility of the ghost images in the scheme and obtain the upper bounds of the visibility for the Nth-order correlated thermal-light ghost imaging. It is found that the visibility of the ghost images can be dramatically enhanced when the order of correlation becomes larger. It is pointed out that the many-ghost imaging phenomenon is an observable physical effect induced by higher order coherence or higher order correlations of optical fields.

  15. A study to analyze six band multispectral images and fabricate a Fourier transform detector. [optical data processing - aerial photography/forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, R. G.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An automatic Fourier transform diffraction pattern sampling system, used to investigate techniques for forestry classification of six band multispectral aerial photography is presented. Photographs and diagrams of the design, development and fabrication of a hybrid optical-digital Fourier transform detector are shown. The detector was designed around a concentric ring fiber optic array. This array was formed from many optical fibers which were sorted into concentric rings about a single fiber. All the fibers in each ring were collected into a bundle and terminated into a single photodetector. An optical/digital interface unit consisting of a high level multiplexer, and an analog-to-digital amplifier was also constructed and is described.

  16. Dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} in intense femtosecond laser fields studied by coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P. Q.; Sayler, A. M.; Carnes, K. D.; Xia, J. F.; Smith, M. A.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2006-10-15

    The dissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +} in an intense laser field has been experimentally studied using femtosecond laser pulses at 790 nm in the intensity range of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Kinematically complete measurements of both the ionic H{sup +} and neutral H fragments dissociated from a vibrationally excited H{sub 2}{sup +} beam have been achieved by a coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging system. Angular-resolved kinetic energy release spectra for a series of different intensity ranges have been obtained using the intensity-difference spectrum method, thus disentangling the problem caused by the intensity volume effect. Our results indicate that the dissociation dynamics are drastically different for 'long' (135 fs) and 'short' (45 fs) laser pulses at similar high laser intensities. Specifically, bond softening is found to be the main feature in long pulses, while above threshold dissociation is dominant in short pulses whose durations are comparable with the vibrational period of the molecule. Bond softening in short pulses appears at low kinetic energy release with a narrow angular distribution. The experimental results are well interpreted by solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in the Born-Oppenheimer representation without nuclear rotation.

  17. Area and Elevation Changes of a Debris-Covered Glacier and a Clean-Ice Glacier Between 1952-2013 Using Aerial Images and Structure-from-Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardeux, P.; Glasser, N. F.; Holt, T.; Irvine-Fynn, T. D.; Hubbard, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1952, the clean-ice Glacier Blanc has retreated twice as fast as the adjacent debris-covered Glacier Noir. Located in the French Alps and separated by only 1 km, both glaciers experience the same climatic conditions, making them ideal to evaluate the impact of debris cover on glacier evolution. We used aerial photographs from 16 acquisitions from 1952 to 2013 to reconstruct and analyze glacier elevation changes using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) techniques. Here, we present the process of developing sub-metric resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) from these aerial photographs. By combining 16 DEMs, we produced a dataset of elevation changes of Glacier Noir and Glacier Blanc, including time-series analysis of lateral and longitudinal profiles, glacier hypsometry and mass balance variation. Our preliminary results indicate that Glacier Noir and Glacier Blanc have both thinned to a similar magnitude, ≤ 20 m, despite a 1 km retreat for Glacier Blanc and only 500 m for Glacier Noir. However, these elevation change reconstructions are hampered by large uncertainties, principally due to the lack of independent camera calibration on the historical imagery. Initial attempts using posteriori correction grids have proven to significantly increase the accuracy of these data. We will present some of the uncertainties and solutions linked to the use of SfM on such a large scale and on such an old dataset. This study demonstrates how SfM can be used to investigate long-term trends in environmental change, allowing glacier monitoring to be up-scaled. It also highlights the need for on-going validation of methods to increase the accuracy and precision of SfM in glaciology. This work is not only advancing our understanding of the role of the debris layer, but will also aid glacial geology more generally with, for example, detailed geomorphological analysis of proglacial terrain and Quaternary sciences with quick and accurate reconstruction of a glacial paleo-environment.

  18. A method for automatic segmentation of nuclei in phase-contrast images based on intensity, convexity and texture.

    PubMed

    Dewan, M Ali Akber; Ahmad, M Omair; Swamy, M N S

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic segmentation of nuclei in phase-contrast images using the intensity, convexity and texture of the nuclei. The proposed method consists of three main stages: preprocessing, h-maxima transformation-based marker controlled watershed segmentation ( h-TMC), and texture analysis. In the preprocessing stage, a top-hat filter is used to increase the contrast and suppress the non-uniform illumination, shading, and other imaging artifacts in the input image. The nuclei segmentation stage consists of a distance transformation, h-maxima transformation and watershed segmentation. These transformations utilize the intensity information and the convexity property of the nucleus for the purpose of detecting a single marker in every nucleus; these markers are then used in the h-TMC watershed algorithm to obtain segments of the nuclei. However, dust particles, imaging artifacts, or prolonged cell cytoplasm may falsely be segmented as nuclei at this stage, and thus may lead to an inaccurate analysis of the cell image. In order to identify and remove these non-nuclei segments, in the third stage a texture analysis is performed, that uses six of the Haralick measures along with the AdaBoost algorithm. The novelty of the proposed method is that it introduces a systematic framework that utilizes intensity, convexity, and texture information to achieve a high accuracy for automatic segmentation of nuclei in the phase-contrast images. Extensive experiments are performed demonstrating the superior performance ( precision = 0.948; recall = 0.924; F1-measure = 0.936; validation based on  ∼ 4850 manually-labeled nuclei) of the proposed method.

  19. Region-of-interest image reconstruction with intensity weighting in circular cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungryong; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles A; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2009-04-01

    Imaging plays a vital role in radiation therapy and with recent advances in technology considerable emphasis has been placed on cone-beam CT (CBCT). Attaching a kV x-ray source and a flat panel detector directly to the linear accelerator gantry has enabled progress in target localization techniques, which can include daily CBCT setup scans for some treatments. However, with an increasing number of CT scans there is also an increasing concern for patient exposure. An intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) technique, which has the potential to greatly reduce CBCT dose, in conjunction with the chord-based backprojection-filtration (BPF) reconstruction algorithm, has been developed and its feasibility in clinical use is demonstrated in this article. A nonuniform filter is placed in the x-ray beam to create regions of two different beam intensities. In this manner, regions outside the target area can be given a reduced dose but still visualized with a lower contrast to noise ratio. Image artifacts due to transverse data truncation, which would have occurred in conventional reconstruction algorithms, are avoided and image noise levels of the low- and high-intensity regions are well controlled by use of the chord-based BPF reconstruction algorithm. The proposed IWROI technique can play an important role in image-guided radiation therapy. PMID:19472624

  20. Region-of-interest image reconstruction with intensity weighting in circular cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seungryong; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles A.; Pan Xiaochuan

    2009-04-15

    Imaging plays a vital role in radiation therapy and with recent advances in technology considerable emphasis has been placed on cone-beam CT (CBCT). Attaching a kV x-ray source and a flat panel detector directly to the linear accelerator gantry has enabled progress in target localization techniques, which can include daily CBCT setup scans for some treatments. However, with an increasing number of CT scans there is also an increasing concern for patient exposure. An intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) technique, which has the potential to greatly reduce CBCT dose, in conjunction with the chord-based backprojection-filtration (BPF) reconstruction algorithm, has been developed and its feasibility in clinical use is demonstrated in this article. A nonuniform filter is placed in the x-ray beam to create regions of two different beam intensities. In this manner, regions outside the target area can be given a reduced dose but still visualized with a lower contrast to noise ratio. Image artifacts due to transverse data truncation, which would have occurred in conventional reconstruction algorithms, are avoided and image noise levels of the low- and high-intensity regions are well controlled by use of the chord-based BPF reconstruction algorithm. The proposed IWROI technique can play an important role in image-guided radiation therapy.

  1. Cumulative radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging in intensive care unit patients

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Fiachra; Fama, Daniel; Twomey, Maria; O’Leary, Ruth; Houlihane, Conor; Murphy, Kevin P; O’Neill, Siobhan B; O’Connor, Owen J; Breen, Dorothy; Maher, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To quantify cumulative effective dose of intensive care unit (ICU) patients attributable to diagnostic imaging. METHODS: This was a prospective, interdisciplinary study conducted in the ICU of a large tertiary referral and level 1 trauma center. Demographic and clinical data including age, gender, date of ICU admission, primary reason for ICU admission, APACHE II score, length of stay, number of days intubated, date of death or discharge, and re-admission data was collected on all patients admitted over a 1-year period. The overall radiation exposure was quantified by the cumulative effective radiation dose (CED) in millisieverts (mSv) and calculated using reference effective doses published by the United Kingdom National Radiation Protection Board. Pediatric patients were selected for subgroup-analysis. RESULTS: A total of 2737 studies were performed in 421 patients. The total CED was 1704 mSv with a median CED of 1.5 mSv (IQR 0.04-6.6 mSv). Total CED in pediatric patients was 74.6 mSv with a median CED of 0.07 mSv (IQR 0.01-4.7 mSv). Chest radiography was the most commonly performed examination accounting for 83% of all studies but only 2.7% of total CED. Computed tomography (CT) accounted for 16% of all studies performed and contributed 97% of total CED. Trauma patients received a statistically significant higher dose [median CED 7.7 mSv (IQR 3.5-13.8 mSv)] than medical [median CED 1.4 mSv (IQR 0.05-5.4 mSv)] and surgical [median CED 1.6 mSv (IQR 0.04-7.5 mSv)] patients. Length of stay in ICU [OR = 1.12 (95%CI: 1.079-1.157)] was identified as an independent predictor of receiving a CED greater than 15 mSv. CONCLUSION: Trauma patients and patients with extended ICU admission times are at increased risk of higher CEDs. CED should be minimized where feasible, especially in young patients. PMID:27158429

  2. Laser-driven proton sources and their applications: femtosecond intense laser plasma driven simultaneous proton and x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Daido, H.; Yogo, A.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Mori, M.; Ma, J.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Kiriyama, H.; Kanazawa, S.; Kondo, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Shimoura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Nakai, Y.; Akutsu, A.; Nagashima, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Z.; Kimura, T.; Tajima, T.; Nemoto, K.; Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Noda, A.; Iwashita, Y.; Shirai, T.; Nakamura, S.; Choi, I. W.; Yu, T. J.; Sung, J. H.; Kim, H. T.; Jeong, T. M.; Hong, K.-H.; Noh, Y.-C.; Ko, D.-K.; Lee, J.

    2008-05-01

    We have performed simultaneous proton and X-ray imaging with an ultra-short and high-intensity Ti: Sap laser system. More than 1010 protons, whose maximum energy reaches 2.5 MeV, were delivered within a ~ps bunch. At the same time, keV X-ray is generated at almost the same place where protons are emitted. We have performed the simultaneous imaging of the copper mesh by using proton and x-ray beams, in practical use of the characteristics of the laser produced plasma that it can provide those beams simultaneously without any serious problems on synchronization.

  3. Sea Ice Mapping using Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbø, S.; Storvold, R.

    2011-12-01

    Mapping of sea ice extent and sea ice features is an important task in climate research. Since the arctic coastal and oceanic areas have a high probability of cloud coverage, aerial platforms are superior to satellite measurements for high-resolution optical measurements. However, routine observations of sea ice conditions present a variety of problems using conventional piloted aircrafts. Specially, the availability of suitable aircrafts for lease does not cover the demand in major parts of the arctic. With the recent advances in unmanned aerial systems (UAS), there is a high possibility of establishing routine, cost effective aerial observations of sea ice conditions in the near future. Unmanned aerial systems can carry a wide variety of sensors useful for characterizing sea-ice features. For instance, the CryoWing UAS, a system initially designed for measurements of the cryosphere, can be equipped with digital cameras, surface thermometers and laser altimeters for measuring freeboard of ice flows. In this work we will present results from recent CryoWing sea ice flights on Svalbard, Norway. The emphasis will be on data processing for stitching together images acquired with the non-stabilized camera payload, to form high-resolution mosaics covering large spatial areas. These data are being employed to map ice conditions; including ice and lead features and melt ponds. These high-resolution mosaics are also well suited for sea-ice mechanics, classification studies and for validation of satellite sea-ice products.

  4. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-06-09

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

  5. Measurement and simulation of ICRF wave intensity with a recalibrated phase contrast imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are one of the major tools to heat fusion plasmas. Full-wave simulations are essential to predict the wave propagation and absorption quantitatively, and it is important that these codes be validated against actual experimental measurements. In this work, the absolute intensity of the ICRF waves previously measured with a phase contrast imaging diagnostic was recalibrated and compared once more with full-wave predictions. In the earlier work, significant discrepancies were found between the measured and the simulated mode converted wave intensity [N. Tsujii et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082508]. With the new calibration of the detector array, the measured mode converted wave intensity is now in much better agreement with the full-wave predictions. The agreement is especially good for comparisons performed close to the antenna.

  6. Measurement and simulation of ICRF wave intensity with a recalibrated phase contrast imaging diagnostic on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-12-10

    Waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are one of the major tools to heat fusion plasmas. Full-wave simulations are essential to predict the wave propagation and absorption quantitatively, and it is important that these codes be validated against actual experimental measurements. In this work, the absolute intensity of the ICRF waves previously measured with a phase contrast imaging diagnostic was recalibrated and compared once more with full-wave predictions. In the earlier work, significant discrepancies were found between the measured and the simulated mode converted wave intensity [N. Tsujii et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082508]. With the new calibration of the detector array, the measured mode converted wave intensity is now in much better agreement with the full-wave predictions. The agreement is especially good for comparisons performed close to the antenna.

  7. Segmentation of scarred and non-scarred myocardium in LG enhanced CMR images using intensity-based textural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kotu, Lasya Priya; Engan, Kjersti; Eftestøl, Trygve; Ørn, Stein; Woie, Leik

    2011-01-01

    The Late Gadolinium (LG) enhancement in Cardiac Magnetic Resonance (CMR) imaging is used to increase the intensity of scarred area in myocardium for thorough examination. Automatic segmentation of scar is important because scar size is largely responsible in changing the size, shape and functioning of left ventricle and it is a preliminary step required in exploring the information present in scar. We have proposed a new technique to segment scar (infarct region) from non-scarred myocardium using intensity-based texture analysis. Our new technique uses dictionary-based texture features and dc-values to segment scarred and non-scarred myocardium using Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) based Bayes classification. Texture analysis aided with intensity values gives better segmentation of scar from myocardium with high sensitivity and specificity values in comparison to manual segmentation by expert cardiologists.

  8. Wavelet-transform-based active imaging of cavitation bubbles in tissues induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    Cavitation detection and imaging are essential for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapies. In this paper, an active cavitation imaging method based on wavelet transform is proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The Yang-Church model, which is a combination of the Keller-Miksis equation with the Kelvin-Voigt equation for the pulsations of gas bubbles in simple linear viscoelastic solids, is utilized to construct the bubble wavelet. Experiments with porcine muscles demonstrate that image quality is associated with the initial radius of the bubble wavelet and the scale. Moreover, the Yang-Church model achieves a somewhat better performance compared with the Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model. Furthermore, the pulse inversion (PI) technique is combined with bubble wavelet transform to achieve further improvement. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of the best tissue bubble wavelet transform (TBWT) mode image is improved by 5.1 dB compared with that of the B-mode image, while the CTR of the best PI-based TBWT mode image is improved by 7.9 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image. This work will be useful for better monitoring of cavitation in HIFU-induced therapies.

  9. Wavelet-transform-based active imaging of cavitation bubbles in tissues induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    Cavitation detection and imaging are essential for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapies. In this paper, an active cavitation imaging method based on wavelet transform is proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The Yang-Church model, which is a combination of the Keller-Miksis equation with the Kelvin-Voigt equation for the pulsations of gas bubbles in simple linear viscoelastic solids, is utilized to construct the bubble wavelet. Experiments with porcine muscles demonstrate that image quality is associated with the initial radius of the bubble wavelet and the scale. Moreover, the Yang-Church model achieves a somewhat better performance compared with the Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model. Furthermore, the pulse inversion (PI) technique is combined with bubble wavelet transform to achieve further improvement. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of the best tissue bubble wavelet transform (TBWT) mode image is improved by 5.1 dB compared with that of the B-mode image, while the CTR of the best PI-based TBWT mode image is improved by 7.9 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image. This work will be useful for better monitoring of cavitation in HIFU-induced therapies. PMID:27586712

  10. A novel intensity similarity metric with soft spatial constraint for a deformable image registration problem in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Khamene, Ali; Zikic, Darko; Diallo, Mamadou; Boettger, Thomas; Rietzel, Eike

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel similarity metric and a method for deformable registration of two images for a specific clinical application. The basic assumption in almost all deformable registration approaches is that there exist explicit correspondences between pixels across the two images. This principle is used to design image (dis)similarity metrics, such as sum of squared differences (SSD) or mutual information (MI). This assumption is strongly violated, for instance, within specific regions of images from abdominal or pelvic section of a patient taken at two different time points. Nevertheless, in some clinical applications, it is required to compute a smooth deformation field for all the regions within the image including the boundaries of such regions. In this paper, we propose a deformable registration method, which utilizes a priori intensity distributions of the regions delineated on one of the images to devise a new similarity measure that varies across regions of the image to establish a smooth and robust deformation field. We present validation results of the proposed method in mapping bladder, prostate, and rectum contours of computer tomography (CT) volumes of 10 patients taken for prostate cancer radiotherapy treatment planning and verification.

  11. Mapping grape berry photosynthesis by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging: the effect of saturating pulse intensity in different tissues.

    PubMed

    Breia, Richard; Vieira, Sónia; da Silva, Jorge Marques; Gerós, Hernâni; Cunha, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Grape berry development and ripening depends mainly on imported photosynthates from leaves, however, fruit photosynthesis may also contribute to the carbon economy of the fruit. In this study pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (imaging-PAM) was used to assess photosynthetic properties of tissues of green grape berries. In particular, the effect of the saturation pulse (SP) intensity was investigated. A clear tissue-specific distribution pattern of photosynthetic competence was observed. The exocarp revealed the highest photosynthetic capacity and the lowest susceptibility to photoinhibition, and the mesocarp exhibited very low fluorescence signals and photochemical competence. Remarkably, the seed outer integument revealed a photosynthetic ability similar to that of the exocarp. At a SP intensity of 5000 μmol m(-2) s(-1) several photochemical parameters were decreased, including maximum fluorescence in dark-adapted (F(m)) and light-adapted (F'(m)) samples and effective quantum yield of PSII (Φ(II)), but the inner tissues were susceptible to a SP intensity as low as 3200 μmol m(-2) s(-1) under light-adapted conditions, indicating a photoinhibitory interaction between SP and actinic light intensities and repetitive exposure to SP. These results open the way to further studies concerning the involvement of tissue-specific photosynthesis in the highly compartmentalized production and accumulation of organic compounds during grape berry development.

  12. Assessment of incident intensity on laser speckle contrast imaging using a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Mitchell A; Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J

    2016-03-01

    Before laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) can be used reliably and quantitatively in a clinical setting, there are several theoretical and practical issues that still must be addressed. In order to address some of these issues, an electro-optical system that utilizes a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) to mimic LSCI experiments was assembled. The focus of this paper is to address the issue of how incident intensity affects LSCI results. Using the SLM-based system, we systematically adjusted incident intensity on the SLM and assessed the resulting first- and second-order statistics of the imaged speckle to explain the corresponding spatial contrast values in both frozen and time-integrated speckle patterns. The SLM-based system was used to generate speckle patterns with a controlled minimum speckle size, probability intensity distribution, and temporal decorrelation behavior. By eliminating many experimental parameters, this system is capable of serving as a useful intermediary tool between computer simulation and physical experimentation for further developing LSCI as a quantitative imaging modality. PMID:26942934

  13. Assessment of incident intensity on laser speckle contrast imaging using a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Mitchell A.; Khaksari, Kosar; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.

    2016-03-01

    Before laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) can be used reliably and quantitatively in a clinical setting, there are several theoretical and practical issues that still must be addressed. In order to address some of these issues, an electro-optical system that utilizes a nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) to mimic LSCI experiments was assembled. The focus of this paper is to address the issue of how incident intensity affects LSCI results. Using the SLM-based system, we systematically adjusted incident intensity on the SLM and assessed the resulting first- and second-order statistics of the imaged speckle to explain the corresponding spatial contrast values in both frozen and time-integrated speckle patterns. The SLM-based system was used to generate speckle patterns with a controlled minimum speckle size, probability intensity distribution, and temporal decorrelation behavior. By eliminating many experimental parameters, this system is capable of serving as a useful intermediary tool between computer simulation and physical experimentation for further developing LSCI as a quantitative imaging modality.

  14. Relationship of Aerial Broad Band Reflectance to Meloidogyne incognita Density in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, T. A.; Kaufman, H. W.

    2003-01-01

    Aerial images were obtained on 22 July 1999 and 4 August 2000 from five cotton sites infested with Meloidogyne incognita. Images contained three broad bands representing the green (500-600 nm), red (600-700 nm), and near-infrared (700-900 nm) spectrum. Soil samples were collected and assayed for nematodes in the fall at these sites. Sampling locations were identified from images, by locating the coordinates of a wide range of light intensity (measured as a digital number) for each single band, and combinations of bands. There was no single band or band combination in which reflectance consistently predicted M. incognita density. In all 10 site-year combinations, the minimum number of samples necessary to estimate M. incognita density within 25% of the population mean was greater when sampling by reflectance-based classes (3 to 4 per site) than sampling based on the entire site as one unit. Two sites were sampled at multiple times during the growing season. At these sites, there was no single time during the growing season optimal to take images for nematode sampling. Aerial infrared photography conducted during the growing season could not be used to accurately determine fall population densities of M. incognita. PMID:19265974

  15. Photogrammetric mapping using unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graça, N.; Mitishita, E.; Gonçalves, J.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology has attracted attention for aerial photogrammetric mapping. The low cost and the feasibility to automatic flight along commanded waypoints can be considered as the main advantages of this technology in photogrammetric applications. Using GNSS/INS technologies the images are taken at the planned position of the exposure station and the exterior orientation parameters (position Xo, Yo, Zo and attitude ω, φ, χ) of images can be direct determined. However, common UAVs (off-the-shelf) do not replace the traditional aircraft platform. Overall, the main shortcomings are related to: difficulties to obtain the authorization to perform the flight in urban and rural areas, platform stability, safety flight, stability of the image block configuration, high number of the images and inaccuracies of the direct determination of the exterior orientation parameters of the images. In this paper are shown the obtained results from the project photogrammetric mapping using aerial images from the SIMEPAR UAV system. The PIPER J3 UAV Hydro aircraft was used. It has a micro pilot MP2128g. The system is fully integrated with 3-axis gyros/accelerometers, GPS, pressure altimeter, pressure airspeed sensors. A Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W300 was calibrated and used to get the image block. The flight height was close to 400 m, resulting GSD near to 0.10 m. The state of the art of the used technology, methodologies and the obtained results are shown and discussed. Finally advantages/shortcomings found in the study and main conclusions are presented

  16. Imaging-intensive guidance with confirmatory physiological mapping for neurosurgery of movement disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauta, Haring J.; Bonnen, J. G.; Soukup, V. M.; Gonzalez, A.; Schiess, Mya C.

    1998-06-01

    Stereotactic surgery for movement disorders is typically performed using both imaging and physiologic guidance. However, different neurosurgical centers vary in the emphasis placed on either the imaging or the physiological mapping used to locate the target in the brain. The relative ease with which imaging data is acquired currently and the relative complexity and invasiveness associated with physiologic mapping prompted an evaluation of a method that seeks to maximize the imaging component of the guidance in order to minimize the need for the physiologic mapping. The evaluation was carried out in 37 consecutive stereotactic procedures for movement disorders in 28 patients. Imaging was performed with the patients in a stereotactic head frame. Imaging data from MRI in three planes, CT and positive contrast ventriculography was all referenced to this headframe and combined in a stereotactic planning computer. Physiologic definition of the target was performed by macroelectrode stimulation. Any discrepancy between the coordinates of the imaging predicted target and physiologically defined target was measured. The imaging- predicted target coordinates allowed the physiologically defined target to be reached on the first electrode penetration in 70% of procedures and within two penetrations in 92%. The mean error between imaging predicted and physiologically defined target position was 1.24 mm. Lesion location was confirmed by postoperative MRI. There were no permanent complications in this series. Functional outcomes were comparable to those achieved by centers mapping with multiple microelectrode penetrations. The findings suggest that while physiologic guidance remains necessary, the extent to which it is needed can be reduced by acquiring as much imaging information as possible in the initial stages of the procedure. These data can be combined and prioritized in a stereotactic planning computer such that the surgeon can take full advantage of the most reliable

  17. Turbulence intensity measurements using particle image velocimetry in diseased carotid artery models: effect of stenosis severity, plaque eccentricity, and ulceration.

    PubMed

    Kefayati, Sarah; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision-making for the treatment of patients with diseased carotid artery is mainly based on the severity of the stenosis. However, stenosis severity alone is not a sensitive indicator, and other local factors for the assessment of stroke risk are required. Flow disturbance is of particular interest due to its proven association with increased thromboembolic activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the level of turbulence intensity (TI) with regards to certain geometrical features of the plaque - namely stenosis severity, eccentricity, and ulceration. A family of eight carotid-artery bifurcation models was examined using particle image velocimetry. Results showed a marked difference in turbulence intensity among these models; increasing degree of stenosis severity resulted in increased turbulence intensity, going from 0.12 m/s for mild stenosis to 0.37 m/s for severe stenosis (with concentric geometry). Moreover, independent of stenosis severity, eccentricity led to further elevations in turbulence intensity, increasing TI by 0.05-0.10 m/s over the counterpart concentric plaque. The presence of ulceration (in a 50% eccentric plaque) produced a larger portion of moderate turbulence intensity (~0.10 m/s) compared to the non-ulcerated model, more proximal to the bifurcation apex in the post-stenotic recirculation zone. The effect of plaque eccentricity and ulceration in enhancing the downstream turbulence has potential clinical implications for a more sensitive assessment of stroke risk beyond stenosis severity alone.

  18. Drogue tracking using 3D flash lidar for autonomous aerial refueling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao-I.; Stettner, Roger

    2011-06-01

    Autonomous aerial refueling (AAR) is an important capability for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to increase its flying range and endurance without increasing its size. This paper presents a novel tracking method that utilizes both 2D intensity and 3D point-cloud data acquired with a 3D Flash LIDAR sensor to establish relative position and orientation between the receiver vehicle and drogue during an aerial refueling process. Unlike classic, vision-based sensors, a 3D Flash LIDAR sensor can provide 3D point-cloud data in real time without motion blur, in the day or night, and is capable of imaging through fog and clouds. The proposed method segments out the drogue through 2D analysis and estimates the center of the drogue from 3D point-cloud data for flight trajectory determination. A level-set front propagation routine is first employed to identify the target of interest and establish its silhouette information. Sufficient domain knowledge, such as the size of the drogue and the expected operable distance, is integrated into our approach to quickly eliminate unlikely target candidates. A statistical analysis along with a random sample consensus (RANSAC) is performed on the target to reduce noise and estimate the center of the drogue after all 3D points on the drogue are identified. The estimated center and drogue silhouette serve as the seed points to efficiently locate the target in the next frame.

  19. Object-Based Arctic Sea Ice Feature Extraction through High Spatial Resolution Aerial photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution aerial photographs used to detect and classify sea ice features can provide accurate physical parameters to refine, validate, and improve climate models. However, manually delineating sea ice features, such as melt ponds, submerged ice, water, ice/snow, and pressure ridges, is time-consuming and labor-intensive. An object-based classification algorithm is developed to automatically extract sea ice features efficiently from aerial photographs taken during the Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition in summer 2010 (CHINARE 2010) in the MIZ near the Alaska coast. The algorithm includes four steps: (1) the image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects based on the similarity of spectral and textural information; (2) the random forest classifier distinguishes four general classes: water, general submerged ice (GSI, including melt ponds and submerged ice), shadow, and ice/snow; (3) the polygon neighbor analysis separates melt ponds and submerged ice based on spatial relationship; and (4) pressure ridge features are extracted from shadow based on local illumination geometry. The producer's accuracy of 90.8% and user's accuracy of 91.8% are achieved for melt pond detection, and shadow shows a user's accuracy of 88.9% and producer's accuracies of 91.4%. Finally, pond density, pond fraction, ice floes, mean ice concentration, average ridge height, ridge profile, and ridge frequency are extracted from batch processing of aerial photos, and their uncertainties are estimated.

  20. Non-rigid registration between 3D ultrasound and CT images of the liver based on intensity and gradient information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duhgoon; Nam, Woo Hyun; Lee, Jae Young; Ra, Jong Beom

    2011-01-01

    In order to utilize both ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) images of the liver concurrently for medical applications such as diagnosis and image-guided intervention, non-rigid registration between these two types of images is an essential step, as local deformation between US and CT images exists due to the different respiratory phases involved and due to the probe pressure that occurs in US imaging. This paper introduces a voxel-based non-rigid registration algorithm between the 3D B-mode US and CT images of the liver. In the proposed algorithm, to improve the registration accuracy, we utilize the surface information of the liver and gallbladder in addition to the information of the vessels inside the liver. For an effective correlation between US and CT images, we treat those anatomical regions separately according to their characteristics in US and CT images. Based on a novel objective function using a 3D joint histogram of the intensity and gradient information, vessel-based non-rigid registration is followed by surface-based non-rigid registration in sequence, which improves the registration accuracy. The proposed algorithm is tested for ten clinical datasets and quantitative evaluations are conducted. Experimental results show that the registration error between anatomical features of US and CT images is less than 2 mm on average, even with local deformation due to different respiratory phases and probe pressure. In addition, the lesion registration error is less than 3 mm on average with a maximum of 4.5 mm that is considered acceptable for clinical applications.

  1. Analytical reconstructions of intensity modulated x-ray phase-contrast imaging of human scale phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Włodarczyk, Bartłomiej; Pietrzak, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents analytical approach to modeling of a full planar and volumetric acquisition system with image reconstructions originated from partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging at a human scale using graphics processor units. The model is based on x-ray tracing and wave optics methods to develop a numerical framework for predicting the performance of a preclinical phase-contrast imaging system of a human-scaled phantom. In this study, experimental images of simple numerical phantoms and high resolution anthropomorphic phantoms of head and thorax based on non-uniform rational b-spline shapes (NURBS) prove the correctness of the model. Presented results can be used to simulate the performance of partial illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging system on various preclinical applications. PMID:26600991

  2. The Clinical Value of High-Intensity Signals on the Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaques: Noncontrast T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ehara, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Kenji; Shimada, Kenei

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, significant progress has been made in the pathohistological assessment of vulnerable plaques and in invasive intravascular imaging techniques. However, the assessment of plaque morphology by invasive modalities is of limited value for the detection of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and the subsequent prediction or prevention of acute cardiovascular events. Recently, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technology has reached a sufficient level of spatial resolution, which allowed the plaque visualization of large and static arteries such as the carotids and aorta. However, coronary wall imaging by MR is still challenging due to the small size of coronary arteries, cardiac and respiratory motion, and the low contrast-to-noise ratio between the coronary artery wall and the surrounding structures. Following the introduction of carotid plaque imaging with noncontrast T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), some investigators have reported that coronary artery high-intensity signals on T1WI are associated with vulnerable plaque morphology and an increased risk of future cardiac events. Although there are several limitations and issues that need to be resolved, this novel MR technique for coronary plaque imaging could influence treatment strategies for atherothrombotic disease and may be useful for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of atherothrombotic plaque formation. PMID:27455243

  3. High Resolution Urban Land Cover Mapping Using NAIP Aerial Photography and Image Processing for the USEPA National Atlas of Sustainability and Ecosystem Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilant, A. N.; Baynes, J.; Dannenberg, M.

    2012-12-01

    The US EPA National Atlas for Sustainability is a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application that allows users to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services in a specific region. The Atlas provides users with a visual method for interpreting ecosystem services and understanding how they can be conserved and enhanced for a sustainable future. The Urban Atlas component of the National Atlas will provide fine-scale information linking human health and well-being to environmental conditions such as urban heat islands, near-road pollution, resource use, access to recreation, drinking water quality and other quality of life indicators. The National Land Cover Data (NLCD) derived from 30 m scale 2006 Landsat imagery provides the land cover base for the Atlas. However, urban features and phenomena occur at finer spatial scales, so higher spatial resolution and more current LC maps are required. We used 4 band USDA NAIP imagery (1 m pixel size) and various classification approaches to produce urban land cover maps with these classes: impervious surface, grass and herbaceous, trees and forest, soil and barren, and water. Here we present the remote sensing methods used and results from four pilot cities in this effort, highlighting the pros and cons of the approach, and the benefits to sustainability and ecosystem services analysis. Example of high resolution land cover map derived from USDA NAIP aerial photo. Compare 30 m and 1 m resolution land cover maps of downtown Durham, NC.

  4. Blending zone determination for aerial orthimage mosaicking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chao-Hung; Chen, Bo-Heng; Lin, Bo-Yi; Chou, Han-Szu

    2016-09-01

    Creating a composed image from a set of aerial images is a fundamental step in orthomosaic generation. One of the processes involved in this technique is determining an optimal seamline in an overlapping region to stitch image patches seamlessly. Most previous studies have solved this optimization problem by searching for a one-pixel-wide seamline with an objective function. This strategy significantly reduced pixel mismatches on the seamline caused by geometric distortions of images but did not fully consider color discontinuity and mismatch problems that occur around the seamline, which sometimes cause mosaicking artifacts. This study proposes a blending zone determination scheme with a novel path finding algorithm to reduce the occurrence of unwanted artifacts. Instead of searching for a one-pixel-wide seamline, a blending zone, which is a k-pixel-wide seamline that passes through high-similarity pixels in the overlapping region, is determined using a hierarchical structure. This strategy allows for not only seamless stitching but also smooth color blending of neighboring image patches. Moreover, the proposed method searches for a blending zone without the pre-process of highly mismatched pixel removal and additional geographic data of road vectors and digital surface/elevation models, which increases the usability of the approach. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of aerial images demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method to related methods in terms of avoidance of passing highly mismatched pixels.

  5. A Texture Thesaurus for Browsing Large Aerial Photographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Wei-Ying; Manjunath, B. S.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a texture-based image-retrieval system for browsing large-scale aerial photographs. System components include texture-feature extraction, image segmentation and grouping, learning-similarity measure, and a texture-thesaurus model for fast search and indexing. Testing has demonstrated the system's effectiveness in searching and selecting…

  6. Locating buildings in aerial photos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Algorithms and techniques for use in the identification and location of large buildings in digitized copies of aerial photographs are developed and tested. The building data would be used in the simulation of objects located in the vicinity of an airport that may be detected by aircraft radar. Two distinct approaches are considered. Most building footprints are rectangular in form. The first approach studied is to search for right-angled corners that characterize rectangular objects and then to connect these corners to complete the building. This problem is difficult because many nonbuilding objects, such as street corners, parking lots, and ballparks often have well defined corners which are often difficult to distinguish from rooftops. Furthermore, rooftops come in a number of shapes, sizes, shadings, and textures which also limit the discrimination task. The strategy used linear sequences of different samples to detect straight edge segments at multiple angles and to determine when these segments meet at approximately right-angles with respect to each other. This technique is effective in locating corners. The test image used has a fairly rectangular block pattern oriented about thirty degrees clockwise from a vertical alignment, and the overall measurement data reflect this. However, this technique does not discriminate between buildings and other objects at an operationally suitable rate. In addition, since multiple paths are tested for each image pixel, this is a time consuming task. The process can be speeded up by preprocessing the image to locate the more optimal sampling paths. The second approach is to rely on a human operator to identify and select the building objects and then to have the computer determine the outline and location of the selected structures. When presented with a copy of a digitized aerial photograph, the operator uses a mouse and cursor to select a target building. After a button on the mouse is pressed, with the cursor fully within

  7. Unenhanced MDCT in Suspected Urolithiasis: Improved Stone Detection and Density Measurements Using Coronal Maximum-Intensity-Projection Images

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Michael T.; Hsu, Margaret; McGahan, John P.; Wilson, Machelle; Lamba, Ramit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to determine whether coronal maximum-intensity-projection (MIP) reformations improve urinary tract stone detection and density measurements compared with routine axial and coronal images. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty-five consecutive patients who underwent MDCT for suspected urolithiasis were included. Two radiologists independently determined the number of stones on 5-, 3-, and 1.25-mm axial, 5- and 3-mm coronal, and 5-mm coronal MIP images. The reference standard was obtained by consensus review using all six datasets. Stone density was determined for all calculi 4 mm or larger on all datasets. RESULTS There were a total of 115 stones. Reader 1 identified 111 (96.5%), 112 (97.4%), 97 (84.3%), 102 (88.7%), 99 (86.1%), and 85 (73.9%) stones and reader 2 identified 105 (91.3%), 102 (88.7%), 85 (73.9%), 89 (77.4%), 89 (77.4%), and 76 (66.1%) stones on the MIP, 1.25-mm axial, 3-mm axial, 3-mm coronal, 5-mm coronal, and 5-mm axial images, respectively. Both readers identified more stones on the MIP images than on the 3- or 5-mm axial or coronal images (p < 0.0001). The mean difference in stone attenuation compared with the thin axial images was significantly less for the MIP images (44.6 HU) compared with 3-mm axial (235 HU), 3-mm coronal (309 HU), and 5-mm coronal (329.6 HU) or axial images (347.8 HU) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION Coronal MIP reformations allow more accurate identification and density measurements of urinary tract stones compared with routine axial and coronal reformations. PMID:24147474

  8. Aerial views of the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.

    1988-01-01

    These aerial photographs of the San Andreas fault were taken in 1965 by Robert E. Wallace of the U.S Geological Survey. The pictures were taken with a Rolliflex camera on 20 format black and white flim; Wallace was aboard a light, fixed-wing aircraft, flying mostly at low altitudes. He photographed the fault from San Francisco near its north end where it enters by the Salton Sea. These images represent only a sampling of the more than 300 images prodcued during this project. All the photographs reside in the U.S Geological Survey Library in Menlo Park, California. 

  9. Implementation of intensity ratio change and line-of-sight rate change algorithms for imaging infrared trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viau, C. R.

    2012-06-01

    The use of the intensity change and line-of-sight (LOS) change concepts have previously been documented in the open-literature as techniques used by non-imaging infrared (IR) seekers to reject expendable IR countermeasures (IRCM). The purpose of this project was to implement IR counter-countermeasure (IRCCM) algorithms based on target intensity and kinematic behavior for a generic imaging IR (IIR) seeker model with the underlying goal of obtaining a better understanding of how expendable IRCM can be used to defeat the latest generation of seekers. The report describes the Intensity Ratio Change (IRC) and LOS Rate Change (LRC) discrimination techniques. The algorithms and the seeker model are implemented in a physics-based simulation product called Tactical Engagement Simulation Software (TESS™). TESS is developed in the MATLAB®/Simulink® environment and is a suite of RF/IR missile software simulators used to evaluate and analyze the effectiveness of countermeasures against various classes of guided threats. The investigation evaluates the algorithm and tests their robustness by presenting the results of batch simulation runs of surface-to-air (SAM) and air-to-air (AAM) IIR missiles engaging a non-maneuvering target platform equipped with expendable IRCM as self-protection. The report discusses how varying critical parameters such track memory time, ratio thresholds and hold time can influence the outcome of an engagement.

  10. Biosensing of BCR/ABL fusion gene using an intensity-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiangling; Huang, Yu; Bian, Xintong; Li, DanDan; Cheng, Quan; Ding, Shijia

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a custom-made intensity-interrogation surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) system has been developed to directly detect a specific sequence of BCR/ABL fusion gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The variation in the reflected light intensity detected from the sensor chip composed of gold islands array is proportional to the change of refractive index due to the selective hybridization of surface-bound DNA probes with target ssDNA. SPRi measurements were performed with different concentrations of synthetic target DNA sequence. The calibration curve of synthetic target sequence shows a good relationship between the concentration of synthetic target and the change of reflected light intensity. The detection limit of this SPRi measurement could approach 10.29 nM. By comparing SPRi images, the target ssDNA and non-complementary DNA sequence are able to be distinguished. This SPRi system has been applied for assay of BCR/ABL fusion gene extracted from real samples. This nucleic acid-based SPRi biosensor therefore offers an alternative high-effective, high-throughput label-free tool for DNA detection in biomedical research and molecular diagnosis.

  11. Intensity and Range Image Based Features for Object Detection in Mobile Mapping Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, R.; Borck, M.; West, G.; Tan, T.

    2012-07-01

    Mobile mapping is used for asset management, change detection, surveying and dimensional analysis. There is a great desire to automate these processes given the very large amounts of data, especially when 3-D point cloud data is combined with co-registered imagery - termed "3-D images". One approach requires low-level feature extraction from the images and point cloud data followed by pattern recognition and machine learning techniques to recognise the various high level features (or objects) in the images. This paper covers low-level feature analysis and investigates a number of different feature extraction methods for their usefulness. The features of interest include those based on the "bag of words" concept in which many low-level features are used e.g. histograms of gradients, as well as those describing the saliency (how unusual a region of the image is). These mainly image based features have been adapted to deal with 3-D images. The performance of the various features are discussed for typical mobile mapping scenarios and recommendations made as to the best features to use.

  12. The impact of skull bone intensity on the quality of compressed CT neuro images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalik-Urbaniak, Ilona; Vrscay, Edward R.; Wang, Zhou; Cavaro-Menard, Christine; Koff, David; Wallace, Bill; Obara, Boguslaw

    2012-02-01

    The increasing use of technologies such as CT and MRI, along with a continuing improvement in their resolution, has contributed to the explosive growth of digital image data being generated. Medical communities around the world have recognized the need for efficient storage, transmission and display of medical images. For example, the Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) has recommended compression ratios for various modalities and anatomical regions to be employed by lossy JPEG and JPEG2000 compression in order to preserve diagnostic quality. Here we investigate the effects of the sharp skull edges present in CT neuro images on JPEG and JPEG2000 lossy compression. We conjecture that this atypical effect is caused by the sharp edges between the skull bone and the background regions as well as between the skull bone and the interior regions. These strong edges create large wavelet coefficients that consume an unnecessarily large number of bits in JPEG2000 compression because of its bitplane coding scheme, and thus result in reduced quality at the interior region, which contains most diagnostic information in the image. To validate the conjecture, we investigate a segmentation based compression algorithm based on simple thresholding and morphological operators. As expected, quality is improved in terms of PSNR as well as the structural similarity (SSIM) image quality measure, and its multiscale (MS-SSIM) and informationweighted (IW-SSIM) versions. This study not only supports our conjecture, but also provides a solution to improve the performance of JPEG and JPEG2000 compression for specific types of CT images.

  13. Variational level set combined with Markov random field modeling for simultaneous intensity non-uniformity correction and segmentation of MR images.

    PubMed

    Shahvaran, Zahra; Kazemi, Kamran; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh; Jafarian, Nassim; Noorizadeh, Negar

    2012-08-15

    Noise and intensity non-uniformity are causing major difficulties in magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation. This paper introduces a variational level set approach for simultaneous MR image segmentation and intensity non-uniformity correction. The proposed energy functional is based on local Gaussian intensity fitting with local means and variances. Furthermore, the proposed model utilizes Markov random fields to model the spatial correlation between neighboring pixels/voxels. The improvements achieved with our method are demonstrated by brain segmentation experiments with simulated and real magnetic resonance images with different noise and bias level. In particular, it is superior in term of accuracy as compared to LGDF and FSL-FAST methods.

  14. Aerial photography for sensing plant anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Cardenas, R.; Hart, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    Changes in the red tonal response of Kodak Ektrachrome Infrared Aero 8443 film (EIR) are often incorrectly attributed solely to variations in infrared light reflectance of plant leaves, when the primary influence is a difference in visible light reflectance induced by varying chlorophyll contents. Comparisons are made among aerial photographic images of high- and low-chlorophyll foliage. New growth, foot rot, and boron and chloride nutrient toxicites produce low-chlorophyll foliage, and EIR transparency images of light red or white compared with dark-red images of high-chlorophyll foliage. Deposits of the sooty mold fungus that subsists on the honeydew produced by brown soft scale insects, obscure the citrus leaves' green color. Infected trees appear as black images on EIR film transparencies compared with red images of healthy trees.

  15. D Surface Generation from Aerial Thermal Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaei, B.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadras Javan, F.; Hasani, H.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial thermal imagery has been recently applied to quantitative analysis of several scenes. For the mapping purpose based on aerial thermal imagery, high accuracy photogrammetric process is necessary. However, due to low geometric resolution and low contrast of thermal imaging sensors, there are some challenges in precise 3D measurement of objects. In this paper the potential of thermal video in 3D surface generation is evaluated. In the pre-processing step, thermal camera is geometrically calibrated using a calibration grid based on emissivity differences between the background and the targets. Then, Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation from thermal video imagery is performed in four steps. Initially, frames are extracted from video, then tie points are generated by Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm. Bundle adjustment is then applied and the camera position and orientation parameters are determined. Finally, multi-resolution dense image matching algorithm is used to create 3D point cloud of the scene. Potential of the proposed method is evaluated based on thermal imaging cover an industrial area. The thermal camera has 640×480 Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) sensor, equipped with a 25 mm lens which mounted in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The obtained results show the comparable accuracy of 3D model generated based on thermal images with respect to DSM generated from visible images, however thermal based DSM is somehow smoother with lower level of texture. Comparing the generated DSM with the 9 measured GCPs in the area shows the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) value is smaller than 5 decimetres in both X and Y directions and 1.6 meters for the Z direction.

  16. Active contours driven by local and global intensity fitting energy with application to brain MR image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Li, Chunming; Sun, Quansen; Xia, Deshen; Kao, Chiu-Yen

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we propose an improved region-based active contour model in a variational level set formulation. We define an energy functional with a local intensity fitting term, which induces a local force to attract the contour and stops it at object boundaries, and an auxiliary global intensity fitting term, which drives the motion of the contour far away from object boundaries. Therefore, the combination of these two forces allows for flexible initialization of the contours. This energy is then incorporated into a level set formulation with a level set regularization term that is necessary for accurate computation in the corresponding level set method. The proposed model is first presented as a two-phase level set formulation and then extended to a multi-phase formulation. Experimental results show the advantages of our method in terms of accuracy and robustness. In particular, our method has been applied to brain MR image segmentation with desirable results.

  17. Using Passive Cavitation Images to Classify High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Corregan, Nicholas M.; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Passive cavitation imaging provides spatially resolved monitoring of cavitation emissions. However the diffraction limit of a linear imaging array results in relatively poor range resolution. Poor range resolution has limited prior analyses of the spatial specificity and sensitivity of passive cavitation imaging for predicting thermal lesion formation. In this study, this limitation is overcome by orienting a linear array orthogonal to the HIFU propagation direction and performing passive imaging. Fourteen lesions were formed in ex vivo bovine liver samples as a result of 1.1 MHz continuous-wave ultrasound exposure. The lesions were classified as focal, “tadpole”, or pre-focal based on their shape and location. Passive cavitation images were beam-formed from emissions at the fundamental, harmonic, ultraharmonic, and inharmonic frequencies with an established algorithm. Using the area under a receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC), fundamental, harmonic, and ultraharmonic emissions were shown to be significant predictors of lesion formation for all lesion types. For both harmonic and ultraharmonic emissions, pre-focal lesions were classified most successfully (AUROC values of 0.87 and 0.88, respectively), followed by tadpole lesions (AUROC values of 0.77 and 0.64, respectively), and focal lesions (AUROC values of 0.65 and 0.60, respectively). PMID:26051309

  18. Intensity fluctuation analysis of cell scattering/imaging with clinical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Raji; Sullivan, R.; Schneider, P. S.; Holden, T.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Cheung, E.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D. H.; Cheung, T. D.; Garcia, F.; Bewry, N.; Pennie, N.

    2007-06-01

    Cell scattering produces a speckle pattern, while imaging produces a contrast pattern. This family of fluctuation signals can be studied by analysis techniques such as correlation and fractal dimension. Human breast cell (normal and cancerous) samples were investigated using laser speckle and imaging microscopy. Image data from tetraploid human cell motion and quorum sensing biofilm growth were studied as well, and we found that the signal fluctuations could be interpreted as gene expression fluctuations occurring during inter-cell communication. We have mapped nucleotide sequences as images and studied the fluctuation. We showed that the fractal dimension and correlation can be used for the description of bio-information from the DNA (nanometer) scale to the tissue (millimeter) level. Fluctuations of the HAR1 nucleotide sequence and IRF-6 single-mutation cases in the van der Woude syndrome were discussed. Sub-cell structures such as the 40S ribosome, GroEL, and lysozyme, were shown to carry texture fractal dimension information in their images consistent with their biological states. Clinical applications to X-ray mammography and Parkinson disease MRI data were discussed.

  19. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Photon Radiotherapy Using Multifractionated Regimen to Paraspinal Chordomas and Rare Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lovelock, D. Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Hunt, Margaret A.; Zatcky, Joan N.P.; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy enables delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors close to the spinal cord. We report our experience with multifractionated regimens using image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy to treat gross paraspinal disease to doses beyond cord tolerance. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 27 consecutive patients with partially resected or unresectable paraspinal tumors irradiated to >5,300 cGy in standard fractionation. Results: The median follow-up was 17.4 months (range, 2.1-47.3). Eighteen sarcomas, seven chordomas, and two ependymomas were treated. The median dose to the planning target volume was 6,600 cGy (range, 5,396-7,080) in 180- or 200-cGy fractions. The median planning target volume was 164 cm{sup 3} (range, 29-1,116). Seven patients developed recurrence at the treatment site (26%), and 6 of these patients had high-grade tumors. Three patients with recurrence had metastatic disease at the time of radiotherapy. The 2-year local control rate was 65%, and the 2-year overall survival rate was 79%. Of the 5 patients who died, 4 had metastatic disease at death. Twenty-three patients (84%) reported either no pain or improved pain at the last follow-up visit. Sixteen patients discontinued narcotic use after treatment (62.5%). Twenty-three patients (89%) had a stable or improved American Spine Injury Association score at the last follow-up visit. No patient experienced radiation-induced myelopathy. Conclusions: The dose to paraspinal tumors has traditionally been limited to respect cord tolerance. With image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy, greater doses of radiation delivered in multiple fractions can be prescribed with excellent target coverage, effective palliation, and acceptable toxicity and local control.

  20. Rule-Based Interpreting Of Aerial Photographs Using LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. A.; Laffey, T. J.; Nguyen, T. A.

    1985-04-01

    Human photo-interpreters use expert knowledge and contextual information to help them analyze a scene. We have experimented with the Lockheed Expert System (LES) to see if contextual information can be useful in interpreting aerial photographs. First, the grey-scale image is segmented into uniform or slowly-varying intensity regions or contiguous textured regions using an edge-based segmentation technique. Next, the system computes a set of attributes for each region. Some of these attributes are based on local properties of that region only (e.g., area, average-intensity, texture-strength, etc.), while others are based on contextual or global information (e.g., adjacent-regions and nearby-regions). Finally, LES is given the task of classifying all the regions using the attribute values. It makes use of multiple goals and multiple rule sets to determine the best classification; regions, which do not satisfy any of the rules, are left unclassified. Unlike programs which use statistical methods, LES uses contextual information such as the fact that cars are likely to be adjacent to roads, which significantly improves its performance on regions which are difficult to classify.

  1. Evaluation of the short-term sea cliff retreat along the Tróia-Sines Embayed Coast (Costa da Galé sector), using stereo digital aerial images and Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, C.; Jalobeanu, A.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring the sediment budget of coastal systems is essential to understand the costal equilibrium, and is an important aspect to be considered in coastal management. Thus, the identification and the quantitative evaluation of sedimentary sources and sinks are the first steps towards a better understanding of the dynamics of coastal morphology. The Tróia-Sines Embayed Coast (TSEC) in the southwest Portuguese coast corresponds to a continuous sandy beach that extends for approximately 65 km. It is limited at north by the Sado river estuary and at south by the Sines cape. Beaches are discontinuously limited landward by dunes (≈42 km) and by sea cliffs (≈18 km) made of poorly consolidated Plio-Plistocene detrital deposits. Cliff erosion by subaerial processes or gullying is a continuous phenomenon that contributes a significant amount of sediment to the TSEC coastal system, which is what we want to measure. Mainly due to winter rainfall, sea cliffs develop debris fans at the backshore inner limit, therefore we chose to make morphological measurements at one year interval. Thus, two series digital aerial images at 20 cm resolution were acquired in Oct 2008 and July 2009, supported by a collection of ground control points (GCP) to constrain the sensor orientation. Digital aerial stereo image pairs are used as main data source to reconstruct digital surface models (DSM). A new stereo photogrammetric method is used, based on dense disparity maps and Bayesian inference (Jalobeanu et al, 2010 and Jalobeanu, 2011). The originality of this method is in the computation of the spatial distribution of elevation errors in the DSM using stochastic modelling and probabilistic inference, which helps to detect the statistically significant changes in the estimated topography. The difference between the two generated DSMs is used to characterize the variability of the main subaerial beach morphodynamics parameters, such as: i) the alongshore beach configuration; ii) the beach

  2. Infrared film for aerial photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, William H.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable interest has developed recently in the use of aerial photographs for agricultural management. Even the simplest hand-held aerial photographs, especially those taken with color infrared film, often provide information not ordinarily available through routine ground observation. When fields are viewed from above, patterns and variations become more apparent, often allowing problems to be spotted which otherwise may go undetected.

  3. Region-based Active Contour Model based on Markov Random Field to Segment Images with Intensity Non-Uniformity and Noise.

    PubMed

    Shahvaran, Zahra; Kazemi, Kamran; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh; Jafarian, Nassim

    2012-01-01

    This paper represents a new region-based active contour model that can be used to segment images with intensity non-uniformity and high-level noise. The main idea of our proposed method is to use Gaussian distributions with different means and variances with incorporation of intensity non-uniformity model for image segmentation. In order to integrate the spatial information between neighboring pixels in our proposed method, we use Markov Random Field. Our experiments on synthetic images and cerebral magnetic resonance images show the advantages of the proposed method over state-of-art methods, i.e. local Gaussian distribution fitting.

  4. Automatic Sea Bird Detection from High Resolution Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, S.; Grenzdörffer, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    Great efforts are presently taken in the scientific community to develop computerized and (fully) automated image processing methods allowing for an efficient and automatic monitoring of sea birds and marine mammals in ever-growing amounts of aerial imagery. Currently the major part of the processing, however, is still conducted by especially trained professionals, visually examining the images and detecting and classifying the requested subjects. This is a very tedious task, particularly when the rate of void images regularly exceeds the mark of 90%. In the content of this contribution we will present our work aiming to support the processing of aerial images by modern methods from the field of image processing. We will especially focus on the combination of local, region-based feature detection and piecewise global image segmentation for automatic detection of different sea bird species. Large image dimensions resulting from the use of medium and large-format digital cameras in aerial surveys inhibit the applicability of image processing methods based on global operations. In order to efficiently handle those image sizes and to nevertheless take advantage of globally operating segmentation algorithms, we will describe the combined usage of a simple performant feature detector based on local operations on the original image with a complex global segmentation algorithm operating on extracted sub-images. The resulting exact segmentation of possible candidates then serves as a basis for the determination of feature vectors for subsequent elimination of false candidates and for classification tasks.

  5. Determination of the effect of source intensity profile on speckle contrast using coherent spatial frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Tyler B.; Konecky, Soren D.; Owen, Christopher; Choi, Bernard; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-01-01

    Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI) is fast, noninvasive technique to image particle dynamics in scattering media such as biological tissue. While LSI measurements are independent of the overall intensity of the laser source, we find that spatial variations in the laser source profile can impact measured flow rates. This occurs due to differences in average photon path length across the profile, and is of significant concern because all lasers have some degree of natural Gaussian profile in addition to artifacts potentially caused by projecting optics. Two in vivo measurement are performed to show that flow rates differ based on location with respect to the beam profile. A quantitative analysis is then done through a speckle contrast forward model generated within a coherent Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (cSFDI) formalism. The model predicts remitted speckle contrast as a function of spatial frequency, optical properties, and scattering dynamics. Comparison with experimental speckle contrast images were done using liquid phantoms with known optical properties for three common beam shapes. cSFDI is found to accurately predict speckle contrast for all beam shapes to within 5% root mean square error. Suggestions for improving beam homogeneity are given, including a widening of the natural beam Gaussian, proper diffusing glass spreading, and flat top shaping using microlens arrays. PMID:22741080

  6. Detecting cells in time varying intensity images in confocal microscopy for gene expression studies in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Debasis; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Ray, Judhajeet; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2015-03-01

    In this work we present a time-lapsed confocal microscopy image analysis technique for an automated gene expression study of multiple single living cells. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) is a technology by which molecule-to-molecule interactions are visualized. We analyzed a dynamic series of ~102 images obtained using confocal microscopy of fluorescence in yeast cells containing RNA reporters that give a FRET signal when the gene promoter is activated. For each time frame, separate images are available for three spectral channels and the integrated intensity snapshot of the system. A large number of time-lapsed frames must be analyzed to identify each cell individually across time and space, as it is moving in and out of the focal plane of the microscope. This makes it a difficult image processing problem. We have proposed an algorithm here, based on scale-space technique, which solves the problem satisfactorily. The algorithm has multiple directions for even further improvement. The ability to rapidly measure changes in gene expression simultaneously in many cells in a population will open the opportunity for real-time studies of the heterogeneity of genetic response in a living cell population and the interactions between cells that occur in a mixed population, such as the ones found in the organs and tissues of multicellular organisms.

  7. Imaging Changes in Pediatric Intracranial Ependymoma Patients Treated With Proton Beam Radiation Therapy Compared to Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Sato, Mariko; Chintagumpala, Murali; Ketonen, Leena; Jones, Jeremy Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Okcu, M. Fatih; Su, Jack M.; Weinberg, Jeffrey; Boehling, Nicholas S.; Khatua, Soumen; Adesina, Adekunle; Dauser, Robert; Whitehead, William E.; Mahajan, Anita

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The clinical significance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes after radiation therapy (RT) in children with ependymoma is not well defined. We compared imaging changes following proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT) to those after photon-based intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients with nonmetastatic intracranial ependymoma who received postoperative RT (37 PBRT, 35 IMRT) were analyzed retrospectively. MRI images were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists. Results: Sixteen PBRT patients (43%) developed postradiation MRI changes at 3.8 months (median) with resolution by 6.1 months. Six IMRT patients (17%) developed changes at 5.3 months (median) with 8.3 months to resolution. Mean age at radiation was 4.4 and 6.9 years for PBRT and IMRT, respectively (P=.06). Age at diagnosis (>3 years) and time of radiation (≥3 years) was associated with fewer imaging changes on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR]: 0.35, P=.048; OR: 0.36, P=.05). PBRT (compared to IMRT) was associated with more frequent imaging changes, both on univariate (OR: 3.68, P=.019) and multivariate (OR: 3.89, P=.024) analyses. Seven (3 IMRT, 4 PBRT) of 22 patients with changes had symptoms requiring intervention. Most patients were treated with steroids; some PBRT patients also received bevacizumab and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. None of the IMRT patients had lasting deficits, but 2 patients died from recurrent disease. Three PBRT patients had persistent neurological deficits, and 1 child died secondarily to complications from radiation necrosis. Conclusions: Postradiation MRI changes are more common with PBRT and in patients less than 3 years of age at diagnosis and treatment. It is difficult to predict causes for development of imaging changes that progress to clinical significance. These changes are usually self-limiting, but some require medical intervention, especially those involving the brainstem.

  8. Imaging of Plasmas using Proton Beams Generated by Ultra-Intense Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Borghesi, M,; Campbell, D.H.; Clarke, R.J.; Galimberti, M.; Gizzi, L.A.; Haines, M.G.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Schiavi, A.; Willi, O.

    2002-01-15

    Proton imaging is a diagnostic with enormous potential for the investigation of fundamental plasma physics problems which were impossible to explore up to now. By using this diagnostic, for the first time the measurement of transient electric fields in dense plasmas has been obtained, determining their evolution on a picosecond scale with micrometric spatial resolution. The data is of great relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion both in the conventional and Fast Ignitor approach. Detailed analysis and modeling is presently undergoing.

  9. MRI Signal Intensity Based B-Spline Nonrigid Registration for Pre- and Intraoperative Imaging During Prostate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Oguro, Sota; Tokuda, Junichi; Elhawary, Haytham; Haker, Steven; Kikinis, Ron; Tempany, Clare M.C.; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To apply an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm to MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy clinical data and to assess its accuracy. Materials and Methods A nonrigid registration of preoperative MRI to intraoperative MRI images was carried out in 16 cases using a Basis-Spline algorithm in a retrospective manner. The registration was assessed qualitatively by experts’ visual inspection and quantitatively by measuring the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) for total gland (TG), central gland (CG), and peripheral zone (PZ), the mutual information (MI) metric, and the fiducial registration error (FRE) between corresponding anatomical landmarks for both the nonrigid and a rigid registration method. Results All 16 cases were successfully registered in less than 5 min. After the nonrigid registration, DSC values for TG, CG, PZ were 0.91, 0.89, 0.79, respectively, the MI metric was −0.19 ± 0.07 and FRE presented a value of 2.3 ± 1.8 mm. All the metrics were significantly better than in the case of rigid registration, as determined by one-sided t-tests. Conclusion The intensity-based nonrigid registration method using clinical data was demonstrated to be feasible and showed statistically improved metrics when compare to only rigid registration. The method is a valuable tool to integrate pre- and intraoperative images for brachytherapy. PMID:19856437

  10. Observation of a Large Landslide on La Reunion Island Using Differential Sar Interferometry (JERS and Radarsat) and Correlation of Optical (Spot5 and Aerial) Images.

    PubMed

    Delacourt, Christophe; Raucoules, Daniel; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Carnec, Claudie; Feurer, Denis; Allemand, Pascal; Cruchet, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Slope instabilities are one of the most important geo-hazards in terms of socio-economic costs. The island of La Réunion (Indian Ocean) is affected by constant slope movements and huge landslides due to a combination of rough topography, wet tropical climate and its specific geological context. We show that remote sensing techniques (Differential SAR Interferometry and correlation of optical images) provide complementary means to characterize landslides on a regional scale. The vegetation cover generally hampers the analysis of C-band interferograms. We used JERS-1 images to show that the L-band can be used to overcome the loss of coherence observed in Radarsat C-band interferograms. Image correlation was applied to optical airborne and SPOT 5 sensors images. The two techniques were applied to a landslide near the town of Hellbourg in order to assess their performance for detecting and quantifying the ground motion associated to this landslide. They allowed the mapping of the unstable areas. Ground displacement of about 0.5 m yr(-1) was measured.

  11. Observation of a Large Landslide on La Reunion Island Using Differential Sar Interferometry (JERS and Radarsat) and Correlation of Optical (Spot5 and Aerial) Images

    PubMed Central

    Delacourt, Christophe; Raucoules, Daniel; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Carnec, Claudie; Feurer, Denis; Allemand, Pascal; Cruchet, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Slope instabilities are one of the most important geo-hazards in terms of socio-economic costs. The island of La Réunion (Indian Ocean) is affected by constant slope movements and huge landslides due to a combination of rough topography, wet tropical climate and its specific geological context. We show that remote sensing techniques (Differential SAR Interferometry and correlation of optical images) provide complementary means to characterize landslides on a regional scale. The vegetation cover generally hampers the analysis of C–band interferograms. We used JERS-1 images to show that the L-band can be used to overcome the loss of coherence observed in Radarsat C-band interferograms. Image correlation was applied to optical airborne and SPOT 5 sensors images. The two techniques were applied to a landslide near the town of Hellbourg in order to assess their performance for detecting and quantifying the ground motion associated to this landslide. They allowed the mapping of the unstable areas. Ground displacement of about 0.5 m yr-1 was measured. PMID:22389620

  12. Observation of a Large Landslide on La Reunion Island Using Differential Sar Interferometry (JERS and Radarsat) and Correlation of Optical (Spot5 and Aerial) Images.

    PubMed

    Delacourt, Christophe; Raucoules, Daniel; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Carnec, Claudie; Feurer, Denis; Allemand, Pascal; Cruchet, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Slope instabilities are one of the most important geo-hazards in terms of socio-economic costs. The island of La Réunion (Indian Ocean) is affected by constant slope movements and huge landslides due to a combination of rough topography, wet tropical climate and its specific geological context. We show that remote sensing techniques (Differential SAR Interferometry and correlation of optical images) provide complementary means to characterize landslides on a regional scale. The vegetation cover generally hampers the analysis of C-band interferograms. We used JERS-1 images to show that the L-band can be used to overcome the loss of coherence observed in Radarsat C-band interferograms. Image correlation was applied to optical airborne and SPOT 5 sensors images. The two techniques were applied to a landslide near the town of Hellbourg in order to assess their performance for detecting and quantifying the ground motion associated to this landslide. They allowed the mapping of the unstable areas. Ground displacement of about 0.5 m yr(-1) was measured. PMID:22389620

  13. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  14. Geometry-based vs. intensity-based medical image registration: A comparative study on 3D CT data.

    PubMed

    Savva, Antonis D; Economopoulos, Theodore L; Matsopoulos, George K

    2016-02-01

    Spatial alignment of Computed Tomography (CT) data sets is often required in numerous medical applications and it is usually achieved by applying conventional exhaustive registration techniques, which are mainly based on the intensity of the subject data sets. Those techniques consider the full range of data points composing the data, thus negatively affecting the required processing time. Alternatively, alignment can be performed using the correspondence of extracted data points from both sets. Moreover, various geometrical characteristics of those data points can be used, instead of their chromatic properties, for uniquely characterizing each point, by forming a specific geometrical descriptor. This paper presents a comparative study reviewing variations of geometry-based, descriptor-oriented registration techniques, as well as conventional, exhaustive, intensity-based methods for aligning three-dimensional (3D) CT data pairs. In this context, three general image registration frameworks were examined: a geometry-based methodology featuring three distinct geometrical descriptors, an intensity-based methodology using three different similarity metrics, as well as the commonly used Iterative Closest Point algorithm. All techniques were applied on a total of thirty 3D CT data pairs with both known and unknown initial spatial differences. After an extensive qualitative and quantitative assessment, it was concluded that the proposed geometry-based registration framework performed similarly to the examined exhaustive registration techniques. In addition, geometry-based methods dramatically improved processing time over conventional exhaustive registration.

  15. 1:500 Scale Aerial Triangulation Test with Unmanned Airship in Hubei Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feifei, Xie; Zongjian, Lin; Dezhu, Gui

    2014-03-01

    A new UAVS (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System) for low altitude aerial photogrammetry is introduced for fine surveying and mapping, including the platform airship, sensor system four-combined wide-angle camera and photogrammetry software MAP-AT. It is demonstrated that this low-altitude aerial photogrammetric system meets the precision requirements of 1:500 scale aerial triangulation based on the test of this system in Hubei province, including the working condition of the airship, the quality of image data and the data processing report. This work provides a possibility for fine surveying and mapping.

  16. Rule-Based Interpreting Of Aerial Photographs Using The Lockheed Expert System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, W. A.; Faffey, T. J.; Nguyen, T. A.

    1986-03-01

    Human photointerpreters use expert knowledge and contextual information to help them analyze a scene. We have experimented with the Lockheed Expert System (LES) to see if contextual information can be useful in interpreting aerial photographs. First, the gray-scale image is segmented into uniform or slowly varying intensity regions or contiguous textured regions using an edge-based segmentation technique. Next, the system computes a set of attributes for each region. Some of these attributes are based on local properties of that region only (e.g., area, average intensity, texture strength, etc.); others are based on contextual or global information (e.g., adjacent regions and nearby regions). Finally, LES is given the task of classifying all the regions using the attribute values. It utilizes multiple goals and multiple rule sets to determine the best classification; regions that do not satisfy any of the rules are left unclassified. The authors obtained the rules by an introspection technique after studying many aerial photographs. Unlike programs that use only statistics in the region under consideration, LES can use contextual information such as the fact that cars are likely to be adjacent to roads, which significantly improves its performance on regions that are difficult to classify.

  17. Tracking objects outside the line of sight using 2D intensity images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jonathan; Peters, Christoph; Martín, Jaime; Laurenzis, Martin; Hullin, Matthias B.

    2016-08-01

    The observation of objects located in inaccessible regions is a recurring challenge in a wide variety of important applications. Recent work has shown that using rare and expensive optical setups, indirect diffuse light reflections can be used to reconstruct objects and two-dimensional (2D) patterns around a corner. Here we show that occluded objects can be tracked in real time using much simpler means, namely a standard 2D camera and a laser pointer. Our method fundamentally differs from previous solutions by approaching the problem in an analysis-by-synthesis sense. By repeatedly simulating light transport through the scene, we determine the set of object parameters that most closely fits the measured intensity distribution. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach is capable of following the translation of unknown objects, and translation and orientation of a known object, in real time.

  18. Tracking objects outside the line of sight using 2D intensity images.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jonathan; Peters, Christoph; Martín, Jaime; Laurenzis, Martin; Hullin, Matthias B

    2016-08-31

    The observation of objects located in inaccessible regions is a recurring challenge in a wide variety of important applications. Recent work has shown that using rare and expensive optical setups, indirect diffuse light reflections can be used to reconstruct objects and two-dimensional (2D) patterns around a corner. Here we show that occluded objects can be tracked in real time using much simpler means, namely a standard 2D camera and a laser pointer. Our method fundamentally differs from previous solutions by approaching the problem in an analysis-by-synthesis sense. By repeatedly simulating light transport through the scene, we determine the set of object parameters that most closely fits the measured intensity distribution. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach is capable of following the translation of unknown objects, and translation and orientation of a known object, in real time.

  19. Tracking objects outside the line of sight using 2D intensity images.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jonathan; Peters, Christoph; Martín, Jaime; Laurenzis, Martin; Hullin, Matthias B

    2016-01-01

    The observation of objects located in inaccessible regions is a recurring challenge in a wide variety of important applications. Recent work has shown that using rare and expensive optical setups, indirect diffuse light reflections can be used to reconstruct objects and two-dimensional (2D) patterns around a corner. Here we show that occluded objects can be tracked in real time using much simpler means, namely a standard 2D camera and a laser pointer. Our method fundamentally differs from previous solutions by approaching the problem in an analysis-by-synthesis sense. By repeatedly simulating light transport through the scene, we determine the set of object parameters that most closely fits the measured intensity distribution. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach is capable of following the translation of unknown objects, and translation and orientation of a known object, in real time. PMID:27577969

  20. Tracking objects outside the line of sight using 2D intensity images

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Jonathan; Peters, Christoph; Martín, Jaime; Laurenzis, Martin; Hullin, Matthias B.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of objects located in inaccessible regions is a recurring challenge in a wide variety of important applications. Recent work has shown that using rare and expensive optical setups, indirect diffuse light reflections can be used to reconstruct objects and two-dimensional (2D) patterns around a corner. Here we show that occluded objects can be tracked in real time using much simpler means, namely a standard 2D camera and a laser pointer. Our method fundamentally differs from previous solutions by approaching the problem in an analysis-by-synthesis sense. By repeatedly simulating light transport through the scene, we determine the set of object parameters that most closely fits the measured intensity distribution. We experimentally demonstrate that this approach is capable of following the translation of unknown objects, and translation and orientation of a known object, in real time. PMID:27577969

  1. AERIAL MEASURING SYSTEM IN JAPAN

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Craig; Colton, David

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency’s Aerial Measuring System deployed personnel and equipment to partner with the U.S. Air Force in Japan to conduct multiple aerial radiological surveys. These were the first and most comprehensive sources of actionable information for U.S. interests in Japan and provided early confirmation to the government of Japan as to the extent of the release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Generation Station. Many challenges were overcome quickly during the first 48 hours; including installation and operation of Aerial Measuring System equipment on multiple U.S. Air Force Japan aircraft, flying over difficult terrain, and flying with talented pilots who were unfamiliar with the Aerial Measuring System flight patterns. These all combined to make for a dynamic and non-textbook situation. In addition, the data challenges of the multiple and on-going releases, and integration with the Japanese government to provide valid aerial radiological survey products that both military and civilian customers could use to make informed decisions, was extremely complicated. The Aerial Measuring System Fukushima response provided insight in addressing these challenges and gave way to an opportunity for the expansion of the Aerial Measuring System’s mission beyond the borders of the US.

  2. Satellite image simulations for model-supervised, dynamic retrieval of crop type and land use intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, H.; Klug, P.; Ruf, T.; Migdall, S.; Schlenz, F.; Hank, T.; Mauser, W.

    2015-04-01

    To support food security, information products about the actual cropping area per crop type, the current status of agricultural production and estimated yields, as well as the sustainability of the agricultural management are necessary. Based on this information, well-targeted land management decisions can be made. Remote sensing is in a unique position to contribute to this task as it is globally available and provides a plethora of information about current crop status. M4Land is a comprehensive system in which a crop growth model (PROMET) and a reflectance model (SLC) are coupled in order to provide these information products by analyzing multi-temporal satellite images. SLC uses modelled surface state parameters from PROMET, such as leaf area index or phenology of different crops to simulate spatially distributed surface reflectance spectra. This is the basis for generating artificial satellite images considering sensor specific configurations (spectral bands, solar and observation geometries). Ensembles of model runs are used to represent different crop types, fertilization status, soil colour and soil moisture. By multi-temporal comparisons of simulated and real satellite images, the land cover/crop type can be classified in a dynamically, model-supervised way and without in-situ training data. The method is demonstrated in an agricultural test-site in Bavaria. Its transferability is studied by analysing PROMET model results for the rest of Germany. Especially the simulated phenological development can be verified on this scale in order to understand whether PROMET is able to adequately simulate spatial, as well as temporal (intra- and inter-season) crop growth conditions, a prerequisite for the model-supervised approach. This sophisticated new technology allows monitoring of management decisions on the field-level using high resolution optical data (presently RapidEye and Landsat). The M4Land analysis system is designed to integrate multi-mission data and is

  3. Intensity Inhomogeneity Correction of Structural MR Images: A Data-Driven Approach to Define Input Algorithm Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ganzetti, Marco; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Intensity non-uniformity (INU) in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a major issue when conducting analyses of brain structural properties. An inaccurate INU correction may result in qualitative and quantitative misinterpretations. Several INU correction methods exist, whose performance largely depend on the specific parameter settings that need to be chosen by the user. Here we addressed the question of how to select the best input parameters for a specific INU correction algorithm. Our investigation was based on the INU correction algorithm implemented in SPM, but this can be in principle extended to any other algorithm requiring the selection of input parameters. We conducted a comprehensive comparison of indirect metrics for the assessment of INU correction performance, namely the coefficient of variation of white matter (CVWM), the coefficient of variation of gray matter (CVGM), and the coefficient of joint variation between white matter and gray matter (CJV). Using simulated MR data, we observed the CJV to be more accurate than CVWM and CVGM, provided that the noise level in the INU-corrected image was controlled by means of spatial smoothing. Based on the CJV, we developed a data-driven approach for selecting INU correction parameters, which could effectively work on actual MR images. To this end, we implemented an enhanced procedure for the definition of white and gray matter masks, based on which the CJV was calculated. Our approach was validated using actual T1-weighted images collected with 1.5 T, 3 T, and 7 T MR scanners. We found that our procedure can reliably assist the selection of valid INU correction algorithm parameters, thereby contributing to an enhanced inhomogeneity correction in MR images. PMID:27014050

  4. A Phosphorus Phthalocyanine Formulation with Intense Absorbance at 1000 nm for Deep Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Depeng; Zhang, Yumiao; Chitgupi, Upendra; Geng, Jumin; Wang, Yuehang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Cook, Timothy R.; Xia, Jun; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Although photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) operates with high spatial resolution in biological tissues deeper than other optical modalities, light scattering is a limiting factor. The use of longer near infrared wavelengths reduces scattering. Recently, the rational design of a stable phosphorus phthalocyanine (P-Pc) with a long wavelength absorption band beyond 1000 nm has been reported. Here, we show that when dissolved in liquid surfactants, P-Pc can give rise to formulations with absorbance of greater than 1000 (calculated for a 1 cm path length) at wavelengths beyond 1000 nm. Using the broadly accessible Nd:YAG pulse laser emission output of 1064 nm, P-Pc could be imaged through 11.6 cm of chicken breast with PACT. P-Pc accumulated passively in tumors following intravenous injection in mice as observed by PACT. Following oral administration, P-Pc passed through the intestine harmlessly, and PACT could be used to non-invasively observe intestine function. When the contrast agent placed under the arm of a healthy adult human, a PACT transducer on the top of the arm could readily detect P-Pc through the entire 5 cm limb. Thus, the approach of using contrast media with extreme absorption at 1064 nm readily enables high quality optical imaging in vitro and in vivo in humans at exceptional depths. PMID:27022416

  5. Transrectal high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of prostate cancer: effective treatment requiring accurate imaging.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Souchon, Rémi; Salomir, Rarès; Gelet, Albert; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Lyonnet, Denis

    2007-09-01

    Transrectal HIFU ablation has become a reasonable option for the treatment of localized prostate cancer in non-surgical patients, with 5-year disease-free survival similar to that of radiation therapy. It is also a promising salvage therapy of local recurrence after radiation therapy. These favourable results are partly due to recent improvements in prostate cancer imaging. However, further improvements are needed in patient selection, pre-operative localization of the tumor foci, assessment of the volume treated and early detection of recurrence. A better knowledge of the factors influencing the HIFU-induced tissue destruction and a better pre-operative assessment of them by imaging techniques should improve treatment outcome. Whereas prostate HIFU ablation is currently performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance, MR guidance with real-time operative monitoring of temperature will be available in the near future. If this technique will give better targeting and more uniform tissue destruction, its cost-effectiveness will have to be carefully evaluated. Finally, a recently reported synergistic effect between HIFU ablation and chemotherapy opens possibilities for treatment in high-risk or clinically advanced tumors.

  6. Combining OCT and a fluorescence intensity imaging method for atherosclerosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shanshan; Saidi, Arya; Jing, Joe; Liu, Gangjun; Yin, Jiechen; Narula, Jagat; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-02-01

    Coronary heart disease (like myocardial infarction) is caused by atherosclerosis. It cause over 30% of all deaths in North America and are the most common cause of death in European men under 65 years of age and the second most common cause in women. To diagnose this atherosclerosis before it gets rupture is the most effect way to increase the chance of survival for patients who suffer from this disease. The crucial tusk is how to find out vulnerable plaques. In resent years optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become a very useful tool for intravascular imaging, since it has high axial and transverse resolution. OCT can tell the detail structure inside the plaque like the thickness of plaque cap which is an important factor to identify vulnerable plaques. But we still need to find out the biochemical characteristics that is unique for vulnerable plaques (like inflammation). Fluorescence molecular imaging is a standard way to exam the biochemical property of biological samples. So we integrate these two techniques together into one probe. Our probe is comprised of a double-clad fiber (DCF) and a grin lens, and rotates with a micro mirror in front. The single-mode inner core of the DCF transmits both OCT and fluorescence excitation light, and the multimode inner cladding is used to detect fluorescence signal. In vitro result shows that this is a possible way for more accurate diagnose of vulnerable plaques.

  7. Semiautomatic segmentation of the heart from CT images based on intensity and morphological features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redwood, Abena B.; Camp, Jon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2005-04-01

    The incidence of certain types of cardiac arrhythmias is increasing. Effective, minimally invasive treatment has remained elusive. Pharmacologic treatment has been limited by drug intolerance and recurrence of disease. Catheter based ablation has been moderately successful in treating certain types of cardiac arrhythmias, including typical atrial flutter and fibrillation, but there remains a relatively high rate of recurrence. Additional side effects associated with cardiac ablation procedures include stroke, perivascular lung damage, and skin burns caused by x-ray fluoroscopy. Access to patient specific 3-D cardiac images has potential to significantly improve the process of cardiac ablation by providing the physician with a volume visualization of the heart. This would facilitate more effective guidance of the catheter, increase the accuracy of the ablative process, and eliminate or minimize the damage to surrounding tissue. In this study, a semiautomatic method for faithful cardiac segmentation was investigated using Analyze - a comprehensive processing software package developed at the Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic. This method included use of interactive segmentation based on math morphology and separation of the chambers based on morphological connections. The external surfaces of the hearts were readily segmented, while accurate separation of individual chambers was a challenge. Nonetheless, a skilled operator could manage the task in a few minutes. Useful improvements suggested in this paper would give this method a promising future.

  8. A Phosphorus Phthalocyanine Formulation with Intense Absorbance at 1000 nm for Deep Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Wang, Depeng; Zhang, Yumiao; Chitgupi, Upendra; Geng, Jumin; Wang, Yuehang; Zhang, Yuzhen; Cook, Timothy R; Xia, Jun; Lovell, Jonathan F

    2016-01-01

    Although photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) operates with high spatial resolution in biological tissues deeper than other optical modalities, light scattering is a limiting factor. The use of longer near infrared wavelengths reduces scattering. Recently, the rational design of a stable phosphorus phthalocyanine (P-Pc) with a long wavelength absorption band beyond 1000 nm has been reported. Here, we show that when dissolved in liquid surfactants, P-Pc can give rise to formulations with absorbance of greater than 1000 (calculated for a 1 cm path length) at wavelengths beyond 1000 nm. Using the broadly accessible Nd:YAG pulse laser emission output of 1064 nm, P-Pc could be imaged through 11.6 cm of chicken breast with PACT. P-Pc accumulated passively in tumors following intravenous injection in mice as observed by PACT. Following oral administration, P-Pc passed through the intestine harmlessly, and PACT could be used to non-invasively observe intestine function. When the contrast agent placed under the arm of a healthy adult human, a PACT transducer on the top of the arm could readily detect P-Pc through the entire 5 cm limb. Thus, the approach of using contrast media with extreme absorption at 1064 nm readily enables high quality optical imaging in vitro and in vivo in humans at exceptional depths.

  9. Aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal infrared scanning from an aircraft is a convenient and commercially available means for determining relative rates of energy loss from building roofs. The need to conserve energy as fuel costs makes the mass survey capability of aerial thermography an attractive adjunct to community energy awareness programs. Background information on principles of aerial thermography is presented. Thermal infrared scanning systems, flight and environmental requirements for data acquisition, preparation of thermographs for display, major users and suppliers of thermography, and suggested specifications for obtaining aerial scanning services were reviewed.

  10. Preliminary assessment of aerial photography techniques for canvasback population analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munro, R.E.; Trauger, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Recent intensive research on the canvasback has focused attention on the need for more precise estimates of population parameters. During the 1972-75 period, various types of aerial photographing equipment were evaluated to determine the problems and potentials for employing these techniques in appraisals of canvasback populations. The equipment and procedures available for automated analysis of aerial photographic imagery were also investigated. Serious technical problems remain to be resolved, but some promising results were obtained. Final conclusions about the feasibility of operational implementation await a more rigorous analysis of the data collected.

  11. Towards aerial natural gas leak detection system based on TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuyang; Zhou, Tao; Jia, Xiaodong

    2014-11-01

    Pipeline leakage is a complex scenario for sensing system due to the traditional high cost, low efficient and labor intensive detection scheme. TDLAS has been widely accepted as industrial trace gas detection method and, thanks to its high accuracy and reasonable size, it has the potential to meet pipeline gas leakage detection requirements if it combines with the aerial platform. Based on literature study, this paper discussed the possibility of applying aerial TDLAS principle in pipeline gas leak detection and the key technical foundation of implementing it. Such system is able to result in a high efficiency and accuracy measurement which will provide sufficient data in time for the pipeline leakage detection.

  12. The use of twinkling artifact of Doppler imaging to monitor cavitation in tissue during high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana; Li, Tong; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, it is important to monitor the presence and activity of microbubbles in tissue during treatment. The current methods, - passive cavitation detection (PCD) and B-mode imaging - have limited sensitivity, especially to small-size, non-violently-collapsing microbubbles. Here, a new method for microbubble detection is proposed, based on “twinkling” artifact (TA) of Doppler imaging. TA occurs when Color Doppler ultrasound is used to image hard objects in tissue (e.g., kidney stones), and is displayed as brightly colored spots. As demonstrated recently, TA can be explained by irregular scattering of the Doppler ensemble pulses from the fluctuating microbubbles trapped in crevices of the kidney stone. In this work, TA was used to detect cavitation in tissue and in polyacrylamide gel phantoms during pulsed 1 MHz HIFU exposures with different peak negative pressures (1.5–11 MPa). At each pressure level, the probability of cavitation occurrence was characterized using TA and the broadband signals recorded by PCD, aligned confocally with the HIFU transducer. The results indicate that TA is more sensitive to the onset of cavitation than conventional PCD detection, and allows for accurate spatial localization of the bubbles. Work supported by RFBR and NIH (EB007643, 1K01EB015745, R01CA154451). PMID:26185591

  13. Magnetic resonance guided high-intensity focused ultrasound for image-guided temperature-induced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hijnen, Nicole; Langereis, Sander; Grüll, Holger

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic resonance guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a versatile technology platform for noninvasive thermal therapies in oncology. Since MR-HIFU allows heating of deep-seated tissue to well-defined temperatures under MR image guidance, this novel technology has great potential for local heat-mediated drug delivery from temperature-sensitive liposomes (TSLs). In particular, MR provides the ability for image guidance of the drug delivery when an MRI contrast agent is co-encapsulated with the drug in the aqueous lumen of the liposomes. Monitoring of the tumor drug coverage offers possibilities for a personalized thermal treatment in oncology. This review focuses on MR-HIFU as a noninvasive technology platform, temperature-sensitive liposomal formulations for drug delivery and image-guided drug delivery, and the effect of HIFU-induced hyperthermia on the TSL and drug distribution. Finally, the opportunities and challenges of localized MR-HIFU-mediated drug delivery from temperature-sensitive liposomes in oncology are discussed.

  14. Image tracking for the high similarity drug tablets based on light intensity reflective energy and artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhongwei; Zhou, Liang; Liu, Xiaochu; Wang, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    It is obvious that tablet image tracking exerts a notable influence on the efficiency and reliability of high-speed drug mass production, and, simultaneously, it also emerges as a big difficult problem and targeted focus during production monitoring in recent years, due to the high similarity shape and random position distribution of those objectives to be searched for. For the purpose of tracking tablets accurately in random distribution, through using surface fitting approach and transitional vector determination, the calibrated surface of light intensity reflective energy can be established, describing the shape topology and topography details of objective tablet. On this basis, the mathematical properties of these established surfaces have been proposed, and thereafter artificial neural network (ANN) has been employed for classifying those moving targeted tablets by recognizing their different surface properties; therefore, the instantaneous coordinate positions of those drug tablets on one image frame can then be determined. By repeating identical pattern recognition on the next image frame, the real-time movements of objective tablet templates were successfully tracked in sequence. This paper provides reliable references and new research ideas for the real-time objective tracking in the case of drug production practices. PMID:25143781

  15. Is Intensive Measurement of Body Image Reactive? A Two-Study Evaluation Using Ecological Momentary Assessment Suggests Not

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Kristin E.; Smyth, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    Intensive assessment methods (e.g., Ecological Momentary Assessment [EMA]) are increasingly used to capture body image experiences in daily life. One concern with EMA is multiple assessments may increase reactivity to internal or external cues, potentially biasing measurement. Reactivity to EMA was evaluated in two studies (Study 1: N = 63 female undergraduates, Study 2: N = 131 women with high body dissatisfaction/disordered eating). Participants completed five daily surveys on handheld computers for 1–2 weeks and body image-related questionnaires at the start and end of each study. Results showed no systematic changes in pre- and post-EMA measures or momentary EMA reports, suggesting women were not reactive to the EMA protocols. Completing 1–2 weeks of EMA does not appear to affect body dissatisfaction, mood, or attitudes in non-clinical or at-risk samples of women. These studies provide evidence that EMA methods can be used to assess real-world body image experiences without undue concern about measurement reactivity. PMID:22999225

  16. Yellow River Icicle Hazard Dynamic Monitoring Using UAV Aerial Remote Sensing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Wang, G. H.; Tang, X. M.; Li, C. H.

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring the response of Yellow River icicle hazard change requires accurate and repeatable topographic surveys. A new method based on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) aerial remote sensing technology is proposed for real-time data processing in Yellow River icicle hazard dynamic monitoring. The monitoring area is located in the Yellow River ice intensive care area in southern BaoTou of Inner Mongolia autonomous region. Monitoring time is from the 20th February to 30th March in 2013. Using the proposed video data processing method, automatic extraction covering area of 7.8 km2 of video key frame image 1832 frames took 34.786 seconds. The stitching and correcting time was 122.34 seconds and the accuracy was better than 0.5 m. Through the comparison of precise processing of sequence video stitching image, the method determines the change of the Yellow River ice and locates accurate positioning of ice bar, improving the traditional visual method by more than 100 times. The results provide accurate aid decision information for the Yellow River ice prevention headquarters. Finally, the effect of dam break is repeatedly monitored and ice break five meter accuracy is calculated through accurate monitoring and evaluation analysis.

  17. Solar Intensity Distributing and Convolving Optic (SIDCO) Concept for the CLARREO Reflected Solar Imaging Spectrometer (RSIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G.; Itt Geospatial Systems Climate Calibration Group

    2010-12-01

    The CLARREO mission has outlined some preliminary requirements for a space based spectrometer to measure visible to near infra-red Earth albedo with a 0.3% absolute accuracy, 0.1%/decade calibration stability and a 10km footprint size at nadir. It is well known that some Earth viewing optics undergo significant degradation at solar wavelengths when in orbit which is not directly detectable using onboard calibration sources. This makes the requirements for CLARREO very challenging, requiring the development of new instrumental concepts in order to meet the goals required. A new type of telescope system is hence proposed that uses raster scan data from the Sun as its primary calibration metric. The 10-5 attenuation necessary for Earth viewing optics to view the Sun directly is achieved using the new concept of a Solar Intensity Distributing and Convolving Optic (SIDCO), whose degradation itself is monitored to very high accuracy and precision. The proposed instrument requires no more moving parts or gimbals than those used on the long running CERES instruments. It also provides redundancy in order to continue benchmark albedo measurements even during the instruments solar calibration periods. Such redundancy also allows continual monitoring of the incoming solar spectrum.

  18. Atomistic Simulations of High-intensity XFEL Pulses on Diffractive Imaging of Nano-sized Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Phay; Knight, Christopher; Young, Linda; Tegze, Miklos; Faigel, Gyula

    We have developed a large-scale atomistic computational method based on a combined Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics (MC/MD) method to simulate XFEL-induced radiation damage dynamics of complex materials. The MD algorithm is used to propagate the trajectories of electrons, ions and atoms forward in time and the quantum nature of interactions with an XFEL pulse is accounted for by a MC method to calculate probabilities of electronic transitions. Our code has good scalability with MPI/OpenMP parallelization, and it has been run on Mira, a petascale system at the Argonne Leardership Computing Facility, with particle number >50 million. Using this code, we have examined the impact of high-intensity 8-keV XFEL pulses on the x-ray diffraction patterns of argon clusters. The obtained patterns show strong pulse parameter dependence, providing evidence of significant lattice rearrangement and diffuse scattering. Real-space electronic reconstruction was performed using phase retrieval methods. We found that the structure of the argon cluster can be recovered with atomic resolution even in the presence of considerable radiation damage. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  19. Signal intensity ratio on magnetic resonance imaging as a prognostic factor in patients with cervical compressive myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Ha, Yoon; Shin, Jun Jae; Cho, Yong Eun; Lee, Ji Hae; Cho, Woo Ho

    2016-09-01

    Patients with intramedullary signal intensity (SI) changes have a poor prognosis after surgical decompression in cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM); however, some patients show no clear relationship between the SI and postsurgical prognosis. This discrepancy may be because no comprehensive and proper quantitative evaluation exists to assess SI on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was prospectively to evaluate the correlation between the clinical features, neurological outcome of patients with CCM, and the quantitative assessment of SI changes preoperatively and postoperatively, and the correlation with SI severity.A total of 112 patients with CCM at 1 or 2 levels underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. We quantitatively analyzed MR signal changes on T1-weighted MR images (T1WI), gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced T1WI, and T2-weighted MR images (T2WI) using the signal intensity ratio (SIR). We evaluated the correlations between various variables and neurological outcome using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scale, and the severity of SI change by grade (i.e., grade 0 ["none"], grade 1 ["light"], and grade 2 ["bright on T2WI"]).Significant differences between the 3 grades existed in symptom duration, preoperative JOA score, SIR on T2WI, and JOA recovery ratio. The JOA recovery ratio was negatively correlated with symptom duration and the SIR on T2WI, and positively correlated with the preoperative JOA score and cord compression ratio, but not with the SIR on T1WI and contrast-enhanced T1WI. On the postoperative 12-month follow-up MRI, the JOA recovery ratio and SIR on T2WI of the SI reversal patients were better than those of the nonreversal patients. On multiple regression analysis, the SIR on T2WI was the main significant prognostic factor of surgical outcome.The grading system on T2WI provided reliable predictive information for neurological outcome. Quantitative alterations

  20. Vehicle detection in aerial surveillance using dynamic Bayesian networks.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsu-Yung; Weng, Chih-Chia; Chen, Yi-Ying

    2012-04-01

    We present an automatic vehicle detection system for aerial surveillance in this paper. In this system, we escape from the stereotype and existing frameworks of vehicle detection in aerial surveillance, which are either region based or sliding window based. We design a pixelwise classification method for vehicle detection. The novelty lies in the fact that, in spite of performing pixelwise classification, relations among neighboring pixels in a region are preserved in the feature extraction process. We consider features including vehicle colors and local features. For vehicle color extraction, we utilize a color transform to separate vehicle colors and nonvehicle colors effectively. For edge detection, we apply moment preserving to adjust the thresholds of the Canny edge detector automatically, which increases the adaptability and the accuracy for detection in various aerial images. Afterward, a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) is constructed for the classification purpose. We convert regional local features into quantitative observations that can be referenced when applying pixelwise classification via DBN. Experiments were conducted on a wide variety of aerial videos. The results demonstrate flexibility and good generalization abilities of the proposed method on a challenging data set with aerial surveillance images taken at different heights and under different camera angles.

  1. Wavelet-based detection of bush encroachment in a savanna using multi-temporal aerial photographs and satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekede, Munyaradzi D.; Murwira, Amon; Masocha, Mhosisi

    2015-03-01

    Although increased woody plant abundance has been reported in tropical savannas worldwide, techniques for detecting the direction and magnitude of change are mostly based on visual interpretation of historical aerial photography or textural analysis of multi-temporal satellite images. These techniques are prone to human error and do not permit integration of remotely sensed data from diverse sources. Here, we integrate aerial photographs with high spatial resolution satellite imagery and use a discrete wavelet transform to objectively detect the dynamics in bush encroachment at two protected Zimbabwean savanna sites. Based on the recently introduced intensity-dominant scale approach, we test the hypotheses that: (1) the encroachment of woody patches into the surrounding grassland matrix causes a shift in the dominant scale. This shift in the dominant scale can be detected using a discrete wavelet transform regardless of whether aerial photography and satellite data are used; and (2) as the woody patch size stabilises, woody cover tends to increase thereby triggering changes in intensity. The results show that at the first site where tree patches were already established (Lake Chivero Game Reserve), between 1972 and 1984 the dominant scale of woody patches initially increased from 8 m before stabilising at 16 m and 32 m between 1984 and 2012 while the intensity fluctuated during the same period. In contrast, at the second site, which was formely grass-dominated site (Kyle Game Reserve), we observed an unclear dominant scale (1972) which later becomes distinct in 1985, 1996 and 2012. Over the same period, the intensity increased. Our results imply that using our approach we can detect and quantify woody/bush patch dynamics in savanna landscapes.

  2. Modeling aerial refueling operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Allen B., III

    Aerial Refueling (AR) is the act of offloading fuel from one aircraft (the tanker) to another aircraft (the receiver) in mid flight. Meetings between tanker and receiver aircraft are referred to as AR events and are scheduled to: escort one or more receivers across a large body of water; refuel one or more receivers; or train receiver pilots, tanker pilots, and boom operators. In order to efficiently execute the Aerial Refueling Mission, the Air Mobility Command (AMC) of the United States Air Force (USAF) depends on computer models to help it make tanker basing decisions, plan tanker sorties, schedule aircraft, develop new organizational doctrines, and influence policy. We have worked on three projects that have helped AMC improve its modeling and decision making capabilities. Optimal Flight Planning. Currently Air Mobility simulation and optimization software packages depend on algorithms which iterate over three dimensional fuel flow tables to compute aircraft fuel consumption under changing flight conditions. When a high degree of fidelity is required, these algorithms use a large amount of memory and CPU time. We have modeled the rate of aircraft fuel consumption with respect to AC GrossWeight, Altitude and Airspeed. When implemented, this formula will decrease the amount of memory and CPU time needed to compute sortie fuel costs and cargo capacity values. We have also shown how this formula can be used in optimal control problems to find minimum costs flight plans. Tanker Basing Demand Mismatch Index. Since 1992, AMC has relied on a Tanker Basing/AR Demand Mismatch Index which aggregates tanker capacity and AR demand data into six regions. This index was criticized because there were large gradients along regional boundaries. Meanwhile tankers frequently cross regional boundaries to satisfy the demand for AR support. In response we developed continuous functions to score locations with respect to their proximity to demand for AR support as well as their

  3. USING RUNNING DIFFERENCE IMAGES TO TRACK PROPER MOTIONS OF XUV CORONAL INTENSITY ON THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N. R. Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Lee, J. E-mail: harry.warren@nrl.navy.mil; Chung, S.; Katz, J.; Namkung, M

    2014-12-20

    We have developed a procedure for observing and tracking proper motions of faint XUV coronal intensity on the Sun and have applied this procedure to study the collective motions of cellular plumes and the shorter-period waves in sunspots. Our space/time maps of cellular plumes show a series of tracks with the same 5-8 minute repetition times and ∼100 km s{sup –1} sky-plane speeds found previously in active-region fans and in coronal hole plumes. By synchronizing movies and space/time maps, we find that the tracks are produced by elongated ejections from the unipolar flux concentrations at the bases of the cellular plumes and that the phases of these ejections are uncorrelated from cell to cell. Thus, the large-scale motion is not a continuous flow, but is more like a system of independent conveyor belts all moving in the same direction along the magnetic field. In contrast, the proper motions in sunspots are clearly waves resulting from periodic disturbances in the sunspot umbras. The periods are ∼2.6 minutes, but the sky-plane speeds and wavelengths depend on the heights of the waves above the sunspot. In the chromosphere, the waves decelerate from 35-45 km s{sup –1} in the umbra to 7-8 km s{sup –1} toward the outer edge of the penumbra, but in the corona, the waves accelerate to ∼60-100 km s{sup –1}. Because chromospheric and coronal tracks originate from the same space/time locations, the coronal waves must emerge from the same umbral flashes that produce the chromospheric waves.

  4. Using Running Difference Images to Track Proper Motions of XUV Coronal Intensity on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Warren, H. P.; Lee, J.; Chung, S.; Katz, J.; Namkung, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a procedure for observing and tracking proper motions of faint XUV coronal intensity on the Sun and have applied this procedure to study the collective motions of cellular plumes and the shorter-period waves in sunspots. Our space/time maps of cellular plumes show a series of tracks with the same 5-8 minute repetition times and ~100 km s-1 sky-plane speeds found previously in active-region fans and in coronal hole plumes. By synchronizing movies and space/time maps, we find that the tracks are produced by elongated ejections from the unipolar flux concentrations at the bases of the cellular plumes and that the phases of these ejections are uncorrelated from cell to cell. Thus, the large-scale motion is not a continuous flow, but is more like a system of independent conveyor belts all moving in the same direction along the magnetic field. In contrast, the proper motions in sunspots are clearly waves resulting from periodic disturbances in the sunspot umbras. The periods are ~2.6 minutes, but the sky-plane speeds and wavelengths depend on the heights of the waves above the sunspot. In the chromosphere, the waves decelerate from 35-45 km s-1 in the umbra to 7-8 km s-1 toward the outer edge of the penumbra, but in the corona, the waves accelerate to ~60-100 km s-1. Because chromospheric and coronal tracks originate from the same space/time locations, the coronal waves must emerge from the same umbral flashes that produce the chromospheric waves.

  5. Robustness analysis of an intensity modulated fiber-optic position sensor with an image sensor readout system.

    PubMed

    Jason, Johan; Nilsson, Hans-Erik; Arvidsson, Bertil; Larsson, Anders

    2013-06-01

    An intensity modulated fiber-optic position sensor, based on a fiber-to-bundle coupling and a readout system using a CMOS image camera together with fast routines for position extraction and calibration, is presented and analyzed. The proposed system eliminates alignment issues otherwise associated with coupling-based fiber-optic sensors, still keeping the sensing point free from detector electronics. In this study the robustness of the system is characterized through simulations of the system performance, and the outcome is compared with experimental results. It is shown that knowledge of the shape of the coupled power distribution is the single most important factor for high performance of the system. Further it is experimentally shown that the position extraction error can be improved down to the theoretical limit by employing a modulation function model well fitted to the real coupled power distribution.

  6. Velocity measurements and changes in position of Thwaites Glacier/iceberg tongue from aerial photography, Landsat images and NOAA AVHRR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrigno, Jane G.; Lucchitta, Baerbel K.; Mullinsallison, A. L.; Allen, Robert J.; Gould, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The Thwaites Glacier/iceberg tongue complex has been a significant feature of the Antarctic coastline for at least 50 years. In 1986, major changes began to occur in this area. Fast ice melted and several icebergs calved from the base of the iceberg tongue and the terminus of Thwaites Glacier. The iceberg tongue rotated to an east-west orientation and drifted westward. Between 1986 and 1992, a total of 140 km of drift has occurred. Remote digital velocity measurements were made on Thwaites Glacier using sequential Landsat images to try to determine if changes in velocity had occurred in conjunction with the changes in ice position. Examination of the morphology of the glacier/iceberg tongue showed no evidence of surge activity.

  7. Use of archive aerial photography for monitoring black mangrove populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted on the south Texas Gulf Coast to evaluate archive aerial color-infrared (CIR) photography combined with supervised image analysis techniques to quantify changes in black mangrove [Avicennia germinans (L.) L.] populations over a 26-year period. Archive CIR film from two study si...

  8. Correlation between uterine fibroids with various magnetic resonance imaging features and therapeutic effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hailing; Wang, Chen; Tian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of uterine fibroids (UFs) and therapeutic effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation (HIFUA), and to provide evidence for UFs diagnosis with MRI in clinical practice. Methods: Forty-three UFs patients who were treated in our hospital from April 2012 to June 2014 were selected, including 72 UFs (48 multiple and 24 single UFs). Transverse, sagittal and coronal MRI scanning was performed one week before and after HIFUA to record UF number, location, type (intramural fibroid, submucosal fibroid and subserosal fibroid), mean diameter, hemoperfusion state, volume and ablation rate. The patients were followed up in the postoperative 1st, 2nd and 3rd months. Results: HIFUA exerted the best ablative effect on fibroids on the anterior uterine wall (F=26.763, P=0.036). Various types of fibroids were ablated significantly differently (F=3.406, P<0.05) by HIFUA that was most effective for ablating the subserosal ones. Having significantly different ablative effects on UFs with different radial line lengths (F=29.94, P<0.05), HIFUA ablated those with radial line lengths of 3-5 cm most effectively. For UFs with different T2WI signal intensities, HIFUA also functioned significantly differently (F=3.179, P=0. 03). Conclusion: HIFUA exerted significantly different ablative effects on UFs with various MRI features. Therefore, these features were well correlated with the therapeutic effects of HIFUA, allowing MRI as a promising diagnostic protocol. PMID:26430420

  9. Multimodal Image Analysis in Alzheimer’s Disease via Statistical Modelling of Non-local Intensity Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Marco; Simpson, Ivor J.; Mendelson, Alex F.; Vos, Sjoerd B.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Modat, Marc; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    The joint analysis of brain atrophy measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hypometabolism measured with positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is of primary importance in developing models of pathological changes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Most of the current multimodal analyses in AD assume a local (spatially overlapping) relationship between MR and FDG-PET intensities. However, it is well known that atrophy and hypometabolism are prominent in different anatomical areas. The aim of this work is to describe the relationship between atrophy and hypometabolism by means of a data-driven statistical model of non-overlapping intensity correlations. For this purpose, FDG-PET and MRI signals are jointly analyzed through a computationally tractable formulation of partial least squares regression (PLSR). The PLSR model is estimated and validated on a large clinical cohort of 1049 individuals from the ADNI dataset. Results show that the proposed non-local analysis outperforms classical local approaches in terms of predictive accuracy while providing a plausible description of disease dynamics: early AD is characterised by non-overlapping temporal atrophy and temporo-parietal hypometabolism, while the later disease stages show overlapping brain atrophy and hypometabolism spread in temporal, parietal and cortical areas. PMID:27064442

  10. Multimodal Image Analysis in Alzheimer’s Disease via Statistical Modelling of Non-local Intensity Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, Marco; Simpson, Ivor J.; Mendelson, Alex F.; Vos, Sjoerd B.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Modat, Marc; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    The joint analysis of brain atrophy measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hypometabolism measured with positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is of primary importance in developing models of pathological changes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Most of the current multimodal analyses in AD assume a local (spatially overlapping) relationship between MR and FDG-PET intensities. However, it is well known that atrophy and hypometabolism are prominent in different anatomical areas. The aim of this work is to describe the relationship between atrophy and hypometabolism by means of a data-driven statistical model of non-overlapping intensity correlations. For this purpose, FDG-PET and MRI signals are jointly analyzed through a computationally tractable formulation of partial least squares regression (PLSR). The PLSR model is estimated and validated on a large clinical cohort of 1049 individuals from the ADNI dataset. Results show that the proposed non-local analysis outperforms classical local approaches in terms of predictive accuracy while providing a plausible description of disease dynamics: early AD is characterised by non-overlapping temporal atrophy and temporo-parietal hypometabolism, while the later disease stages show overlapping brain atrophy and hypometabolism spread in temporal, parietal and cortical areas.

  11. Dark SPOT Detection Using Intensity and the Degree of Polarization in Fully Polarimetric SAR Images for Oil Polution Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, F.; Amini, J.

    2015-12-01

    Oil spill surveillance is of great environmental and economical interest, directly contributing to improve environmental protection. Monitoring of oil spills using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has received a considerable attention over the past few years, notably because of SAR data abilities like all-weather and day-and-night capturing. The degree of polarization (DoP) is a less computationally complex quantity characterizing a partially polarized electromagnetic field. The key to the proposed approach is making use of DoP as polarimetric information besides intensity ones to improve dark patches detection as the first step of oil spill monitoring. In the proposed approach first simple intensity threshold segmentation like Otsu method is applied to the image. Pixels with intensities below the threshold are regarded as potential dark spot pixels while the others are potential background pixels. Second, the DoP of potential dark spot pixels is estimated. Pixels with DoP below a certain threshold are the real dark-spot pixels. Choosing the threshold is a critical and challenging step. In order to solve choosing the appropriate threshold, we introduce a novel but simple method based on DoP of potential dark spot pixels. Finally, an area threshold is used to eliminate any remaining false targets. The proposed approach is tested on L band NASA/JPL UAVSAR data, covering the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Comparing the obtained results from the new method with conventional approaches like Otsu, K-means and GrowCut shows better achievement of the proposed algorithm. For instance, mean square error (MSE) 65%, Overall Accuracy 20% and correlation 40% are improved.

  12. VisNAV 100: a robust, compact imaging sensor for enabling autonomous air-to-air refueling of aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katake, Anup; Choi, Heeyoul

    2010-01-01

    To enable autonomous air-to-refueling of manned and unmanned vehicles a robust high speed relative navigation sensor capable of proving high accuracy 3DOF information in diverse operating conditions is required. To help address this problem, StarVision Technologies Inc. has been developing a compact, high update rate (100Hz), wide field-of-view (90deg) direction and range estimation imaging sensor called VisNAV 100. The sensor is fully autonomous requiring no communication from the tanker aircraft and contains high reliability embedded avionics to provide range, azimuth, elevation (3 degrees of freedom solution 3DOF) and closing speed relative to the tanker aircraft. The sensor is capable of providing 3DOF with an error of 1% in range and 0.1deg in azimuth/elevation up to a range of 30m and 1 deg error in direction for ranges up to 200m at 100Hz update rates. In this paper we will discuss the algorithms that were developed in-house to enable robust beacon pattern detection, outlier rejection and 3DOF estimation in adverse conditions and present the results of several outdoor tests. Results from the long range single beacon detection tests will also be discussed.

  13. Evaluating EUV mask pattern imaging with two EUV microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Takase, Kei; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Han, Hakseung; Barty, Anton; Kinoshita, Hiroo; Hamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-02-26

    Aerial image measurement plays a key role in the development of patterned reticles for each generation of lithography. Studying the field transmitted (reflected) from EUV masks provides detailed information about potential disruptions caused by mask defects, and the performance of defect repair strategies, without the complications of photoresist imaging. Furthermore, by measuring the continuously varying intensity distribution instead of a thresholded, binary resist image, aerial image measurement can be used as feedback to improve mask and lithography system modeling methods. Interest in EUV, at-wavelength, aerial image measurement lead to the creation of several research tools worldwide. These tools are used in advanced mask development work, and in the evaluation of the need for commercial at-wavelength inspection tools. They describe performance measurements of two such tools, inspecting the same EUV mask in a series of benchmarking tests that includes brightfield and darkfield patterns. One tool is the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) operating on a bending magnet beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. The AIT features an EUV Fresnel zoneplate microscope that emulates the numerical aperture of a 0.25-NA stepper, and projects the aerial image directly onto a CCD camera, with 700x magnification. The second tool is an EUV microscope (EUVM) operating at the NewSUBARU synchrotron in Hyogo, Japan. The NewSUBARU tool projects the aerial image using a reflective, 30x Schwarzschild objective lens, followed by a 10-200x x-ray zooming tube. The illumination conditions and the imaging etendue are different for the two tools. The benchmarking measurements were used to determine many imaging and performance properties of the tools, including resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), aberration magnitude, aberration field-dependence (including focal-plane tilt), illumination uniformity, line-edge roughness, and flare

  14. High-intensity x-ray holography: an approach to high-resolution snapshot imaging of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    The crucial physical and technological issues pertaining to the holographic imaging of biological structures with a short-pulse, high-intensity, high-quantum-energy laser were examined. The limitations of x-ray optics are discussed. Alternative holographic techniques were considered, and it was concluded that far-field Fresnel transform holography (Fraunhofer holography) using a photoresist recording surface is most tractable with near term technology. The hydrodynamic expansion of inhomogeneities within the specimen is discussed. It is shown that expansion is the major source of image blurring. Analytic expressions were derived for the explosion of protein concentrations in an x-ray transparent cytoplasm, compared with numerical calculations, and corrections derived to account for the competitive transport processes by which these inhomogeneities lose energy. It is concluded that for the near term Fresnel transform holography, particularly, far-field or Fraunhofer holography, is more practical than Fourier transform holography. Of the alternative fine grain recording media for use with Fresnel transform holography, a photo-resist is most attractive. For best resolution, exposure times must be limited to a few picoseconds, and this calls for investigation of mechanisms to shutter the laser or gate the recording surface. The best contrast ratio between the nitrogen-bearing polymers (protein and the nucleic acids) and water is between the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen.

  15. Potential of Future Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Ocean Surface Wind Observations for Determining Tropical Storm Vortex Intensity and Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, Robert; Bailey, M. C.; Black, Peter; James, Mark; Johnson, James; Jones, Linwood; Miller, Timothy; Ruf, Christopher; Uhlhorn, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an innovative technology development, which offers the potential of new and unique remotely sensed observations of both extreme oceanic wind events and strong precipitation from either UAS or satellite platforms. It is based on the airborne Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a proven aircraft remote sensing technique for observing tropical cyclone ocean surface wind speeds and rain rates, including those of major hurricane intensity. The proposed HIRAD instrument advances beyond the current nadir viewing SFMR to an equivalent wide-swath SFMR imager using passive microwave synthetic thinned aperture radiometer technology. This sensor will operate over 4-7 GHz (C-band frequencies) where the required tropical cyclone remote sensing physics has been validated by both SFMR and WindSat radiometers. HIRAD incorporates a unique, technologically advanced array antenna and several other technologies successfully demonstrated by the NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. A brassboard version of the instrument is complete and has been successfully tested in an anechoic chamber, and development of the aircraft instrument is well underway. HIRAD will be a compact, lightweight, low-power instrument with no moving parts that will produce wide-swath imagery of ocean vector winds and rain during hurricane conditions when existing microwave sensors (radiometers or scatterometers) are hindered. Preliminary studies show that HIRAD will have a significant positive impact on analyses as either a new aircraft or satellite sensor.

  16. Theoretical analysis of the background intensity distribution in X-ray Birefringence Imaging using synchrotron bending-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, John P. Dolbnya, Igor P.; Collins, Stephen P.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R.; Palmer, Benjamin A.

    2015-04-28

    In the recently developed technique of X-ray Birefringence Imaging, molecular orientational order in anisotropic materials is studied by exploiting the birefringence of linearly polarized X-rays with energy close to an absorption edge of an element in the material. In the experimental setup, a vertically deflecting high-resolution double-crystal monochromator is used upstream from the sample to select the appropriate photon energy, and a horizontally deflecting X-ray polarization analyzer, consisting of a perfect single crystal with a Bragg reflection at Bragg angle of approximately 45°, is placed downstream from the sample to measure the resulting rotation of the X-ray polarization. However, if the experiment is performed on a synchrotron bending-magnet beamline, then the elliptical polarization of the X-rays out of the electron orbit plane affects the shape of the output beam. Also, because the monochromator introduces a correlation between vertical position and photon energy to the X-ray beam, the polarization analyzer does not select the entire beam, but instead selects a diagonal stripe, the slope of which depends on the Bragg angles of the monochromator and the polarization analyzer. In the present work, the final background intensity distribution is calculated analytically because the phase space sampling methods normally used in ray traces are too inefficient for this setup. X-ray Birefringence Imaging data measured at the Diamond Light Source beamline B16 agree well with the theory developed here.

  17. Dose reconstruction for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using a non-iterative method and portal dose image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Jung, Jae Won; Chew, Meng; Kim, Jong Oh; Wang, Brian; Di Biase, Steven; Zhu, Yunping; Lee, Dohyung

    2009-09-01

    A straightforward and accurate method was developed to verify the delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to reconstruct the dose in a patient. The method is based on a computational algorithm that linearly describes the physical relationship between beamlets and dose-scoring voxels in a patient and the dose image from an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The relationship is expressed in the form of dose response functions (responses) that are quantified using Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport techniques. From the dose information measured by the EPID the received patient dose is reconstructed by inversely solving the algorithm. The unique and novel non-iterative feature of this algorithm sets it apart from many existing dose reconstruction methods in the literature. This study presents the algorithm in detail and validates it experimentally for open and IMRT fields. Responses were first calculated for each beamlet of the selected fields by MC simulation. In-phantom and exit film dosimetry were performed on a flat phantom. Using the calculated responses and the algorithm, the exit film dose was used to inversely reconstruct the in-phantom dose, which was then compared with the measured in-phantom dose. The dose comparison in the phantom for all irradiated fields showed a pass rate of higher than 90% dose points given the criteria of dose difference of 3% and distance to agreement of 3 mm.

  18. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). Methods A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. Results The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. Conclusion The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction. PMID:24495815

  19. Applicability Evaluation of Object Detection Method to Satellite and Aerial Imageries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, K.; Fuse, T.; Takahashi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Since satellite and aerial imageries are recently widely spread and frequently observed, combination of them are expected to complement spatial and temporal resolution each other. One of the prospective applications is traffic monitoring, where objects of interest, or vehicles, need to be recognized automatically. Techniques that employ object detection before object recognition can save a computational time and cost, and thus take a significant role. However, there is not enough knowledge whether object detection method can perform well on satellite and aerial imageries. In addition, it also has to be studied how characteristics of satellite and aerial imageries affect the object detection performance. This study employ binarized normed gradients (BING) method that runs significantly fast and is robust to rotation and noise. For our experiments, 11-bits BGR-IR satellite imageries from WorldView-3, and BGR-color aerial imageries are used respectively, and we create thousands of ground truth samples. We conducted several experiments to compare the performances with different images, to verify whether combination of different resolution images improved the performance, and to analyze the applicability of mixing satellite and aerial imageries. The results showed that infrared band had little effect on the detection rate, that 11-bit images performed less than 8-bit images and that the better spatial resolution brought the better performance. Another result might imply that mixing higher and lower resolution images for training dataset could help detection performance. Furthermore, we found that aerial images improved the detection performance on satellite images.

  20. Non-invasive Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Through-Transmission Ultrasonic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Lilach; Azhari, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity at the site ablated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) plays an important role in the final therapeutic outcome, as it influences the temperature's spatial and temporal distribution. Moreover, as tissue thermal diffusivity is different in tumors as compared with normal tissue, it could also potentially be used as a new source of imaging contrast. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of combining through-transmission ultrasonic imaging and HIFU to estimate thermal diffusivity non-invasively. The concept was initially evaluated using a computer simulation. Then it was experimentally tested on phantoms made of agar and ex vivo porcine fat. A computerized imaging system combined with a HIFU system was used to heat the phantoms to temperatures below 42°C to avoid irreversible damage. Through-transmission scanning provided the time-of-flight values in a region of interest during its cooling process. The time-of-flight values were consequently converted into mean values of speed of sound. Using the speed-of-sound profiles along with the developed model, we estimated the changes in temperature profiles over time. These changes in temperature profiles were then used to calculate the corresponding thermal diffusivity of the studied specimen. Thermal diffusivity for porcine fat was found to be lower by one order of magnitude than that obtained for agar (0.313×10(-7)m(2)/s vs. 4.83×10(-7)m(2)/s, respectively, p < 0.041). The fact that there is a substantial difference between agar and fat implies that non-invasive all-ultrasound thermal diffusivity mapping is feasible. The suggested method may particularly be suitable for breast scanning.

  1. Non-invasive Measurement of Thermal Diffusivity Using High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Through-Transmission Ultrasonic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Lilach; Azhari, Haim

    2016-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity at the site ablated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) plays an important role in the final therapeutic outcome, as it influences the temperature's spatial and temporal distribution. Moreover, as tissue thermal diffusivity is different in tumors as compared with normal tissue, it could also potentially be used as a new source of imaging contrast. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of combining through-transmission ultrasonic imaging and HIFU to estimate thermal diffusivity non-invasively. The concept was initially evaluated using a computer simulation. Then it was experimentally tested on phantoms made of agar and ex vivo porcine fat. A computerized imaging system combined with a HIFU system was used to heat the phantoms to temperatures below 42°C to avoid irreversible damage. Through-transmission scanning provided the time-of-flight values in a region of interest during its cooling process. The time-of-flight values were consequently converted into mean values of speed of sound. Using the speed-of-sound profiles along with the developed model, we estimated the changes in temperature profiles over time. These changes in temperature profiles were then used to calculate the corresponding thermal diffusivity of the studied specimen. Thermal diffusivity for porcine fat was found to be lower by one order of magnitude than that obtained for agar (0.313×10(-7)m(2)/s vs. 4.83×10(-7)m(2)/s, respectively, p < 0.041). The fact that there is a substantial difference between agar and fat implies that non-invasive all-ultrasound thermal diffusivity mapping is feasible. The suggested method may particularly be suitable for breast scanning. PMID:26489364

  2. Moving Obstacle Avoidance for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yucong

    There has been a vast increase in applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in civilian domains. To operate in the civilian airspace, a UAV must be able to sense and avoid both static and moving obstacles for flight safety. While indoor and low-altitude environments are mainly occupied by static obstacles, risks in space of higher altitude primarily come from moving obstacles such as other aircraft or flying vehicles in the airspace. Therefore, the ability to avoid moving obstacles becomes a necessity for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Towards enabling a UAV to autonomously sense and avoid moving obstacles, this thesis makes the following contributions. Initially, an image-based reactive motion planner is developed for a quadrotor to avoid a fast approaching obstacle. Furthermore, A Dubin's curve based geometry method is developed as a global path planner for a fixed-wing UAV to avoid collisions with aircraft. The image-based method is unable to produce an optimal path and the geometry method uses a simplified UAV model. To compensate these two disadvantages, a series of algorithms built upon the Closed-Loop Rapid Exploratory Random Tree are developed as global path planners to generate collision avoidance paths in real time. The algorithms are validated in Software-In-the-Loop (SITL) and Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulations using a fixed-wing UAV model and in real flight experiments using quadrotors. It is observed that the algorithm enables a UAV to avoid moving obstacles approaching to it with different directions and speeds.

  3. Thoracic target volume delineation using various maximum-intensity projection computed tomography image sets for radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Zamora, David A.; Riegel, Adam C.; Sun Xiaojun; Balter, Peter; Starkschall, George; Mawlawi, Osama; Pan Tinsu

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) is commonly used to account for respiratory motion of target volumes in radiotherapy to the thorax. From the 4D-CT acquisition, a maximum-intensity projection (MIP) image set can be created and used to help define the tumor motion envelope or the internal gross tumor volume (iGTV). The purpose of this study was to quantify the differences in automatically contoured target volumes for usage in the delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy using MIP data sets generated from one of the four methods: (1) 4D-CT phase-binned (PB) based on retrospective phase calculations, (2) 4D-CT phase-corrected phase-binned (PC-PB) based on motion extrema, (3) 4D-CT amplitude-binned (AB), and (4) cine CT built from all available images. Methods: MIP image data sets using each of the four methods were generated for a cohort of 28 patients who had prior thoracic 4D-CT scans that exhibited lung tumor motion of at least 1 cm. Each MIP image set was automatically contoured on commercial radiation treatment planning system. Margins were added to the iGTV to observe differences in the final simulated planning target volumes (PTVs). Results: For all patients, the iGTV measured on the MIP generated from the entire cine CT data set (iGTV{sub cine}) was the largest. Expressed as a percentage of iGTV{sub cine}, 4D-CT iGTV (all sorting methods) ranged from 83.8% to 99.1%, representing differences in the absolute volume ranging from 0.02 to 4.20 cm{sup 3}; the largest average and range of 4D-CT iGTV measurements was from the PC-PB data set. Expressed as a percentage of PTV{sub cine} (expansions applied to iGTV{sub cine}), the 4D-CT PTV ranged from 87.6% to 99.6%, representing differences in the absolute volume ranging from 0.08 to 7.42 cm{sup 3}. Regions of the measured respiratory waveform corresponding to a rapid change of phase or amplitude showed an increased susceptibility to the selection of identical images for adjacent bins

  4. Application possibilities of aerial and terrain data evaluation in particulate pollution effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma-Bognar, V.; Berke, J.; Martin, G.

    2012-04-01

    Recently, remote sensing has become a widely used technology in order to acquire information about our environment. Data collected using remote sensing technology indispensible criteria to recognise and monitor environmental problems caused by contamination from various human activities. According to great technological change and development in the previous decade high spectral and geometric resolution sensors are more often used. The higher resolution technology allows getting more accurate and reliable results in the research processes of the environmental pollution impacts. At University of Pannonia, Georgikon Faculty (Hungary) plant-soil-atmosphere system analyses are carried out for detecting the potential harmful effects of heavy metal pollution originated from vehicle industry. Related to this research at the Department of Meteorology and Water Management, black carbon and cadmium pollution effects are being analysed on maize crops. Testing area is situated at Agro-meteorological Research Station in Keszthely, where the first time in 2011 aerial imaging technology was used in parallel with field analyses. The experiment aims to analyses correlation of the field data with aerial data. During aerial photography were taken in different spectral bands (Visible, Near Infrared, Far Infrared). High intensity, spectral and spatial resolution data was an important part of the multitemporal imagine sensing and evaluating technology, therefore original technical solutions were applied. These resolutions served accurate plot-level evaluation. Fractal structure and intensity measurement evaluation methods were applied to examine black carbon and cadmium polluted and control maize canopy after data pre-processing. Research also focused on the examination of potential negative or positive effects of irrigation so that differences between irrigated and non-irrigated maize was investigated. For the period of growing season of 2011 time-series analyses were carried out in

  5. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-10-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was

  6. Multi-temporal intensity and coherence analysis of SAR images for land cover change detection on the Island of Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, E.; Sykioti, O.; Elias, P.; Kontoes, C.

    2015-10-01

    This study presents the use of multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images for detection of land cover changes in the eastern part of the Island of Crete (Greece). For this purpose, fourteen Envisat ASAR acquisitions from July 2004 to December 2006 were calibrated and registered. We applied a temporal filter and spatial averaging to the backscatter intensity to reduce the noise. Furthermore, we used the concept that the changes between different backscatter intensity observations can show changes on the target dielectric properties. In order to detect changes due to geometrical characteristics of land cover types, we created coherence maps using twenty-seven interferometric pairs with proper spatial and temporal baselines. In all calculations, layover and shadow effects, as well as the sea, were masked by using information from the digital elevation model of the area. The observed changes in the coherence values were analyzed with respect to different decorrelation factors that can contribute to the loss of coherence. Our results present the different backscatter values for several land cover types (farmland, olive groves, forests, etc.). In addition, some land cover types such as olive groves show variations of backscatter signal due to the density and height of trees. Furthermore, olive groves show good coherence in interferograms with short time intervals. All interferometric pairs have low coherence in farmland because of the rapid growth of plants. Finally, the maps of backscatter temporal changes and coherence changes were superimposed and compared to auxiliary data such as multi-temporal optical satellite imagery (i.e. Landsat/ETM, Terra/Aqua MODIS) and thematic land cover maps (Corinne 2000). We found that changes are mostly due to plant growth and man-made activity. This ongoing study shows the potential of SAR in providing complementary information such as changes in dielectric and geometric properties to optical data in land cover dynamics

  7. One-step fabrication of intense red fluorescent gold nanoclusters and their application in cancer cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Pingping; Zhou, Jing; Liu, Yueying; Ma, Zhanfang

    2013-06-01

    A one-step method for successfully fabrication of water-soluble and alkanethiol-stabilized Au nanoclusters (NCs) was demonstrated. The novel and facile method was based on simply placing histidine (His), HAuCl4 and 11-mercaptoundcanoic acid (MUA) together at room temperature. The resulting Au NCs were exclusively composed of Au17MUA4His22 (AMH), as demonstrated by the photoluminescence, UV-Vis absorption, electrospray ionization mass and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. AMH exhibited intense red fluorescence (λem = 600 nm), a long fluorescence lifetime (7.11 μs), considerable stability, and a large Stoke's shift (320 nm). Based on the excellent properties of the AMH, cell experiments were conducted. Cytotoxicity studies showed that the Au NCs exhibited negligible effects in altering cell proliferation or triggering apoptosis. Cancer cell imaging of HeLa cell lines indicated that the obtained AMH could serve as a promising fluorescent bioprobe for bioimaging. This strategy, based on the one-step method, may offer a novel approach to fabricate other water-soluble and alkanethiol-stabilized metal nanoclusters for application in biolabelling and bioimaging.A one-step method for successfully fabrication of water-soluble and alkanethiol-stabilized Au nanoclusters (NCs) was demonstrated. The novel and facile method was based on simply placing histidine (His), HAuCl4 and 11-mercaptoundcanoic acid (MUA) together at room temperature. The resulting Au NCs were exclusively composed of Au17MUA4His22 (AMH), as demonstrated by the photoluminescence, UV-Vis absorption, electrospray ionization mass and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. AMH exhibited intense red fluorescence (λem = 600 nm), a long fluorescence lifetime (7.11 μs), considerable stability, and a large Stoke's shift (320 nm). Based on the excellent properties of the AMH, cell experiments were conducted. Cytotoxicity studies showed that the