Science.gov

Sample records for aerial image simulation

  1. Aerial Image Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Robert E.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial images produce the best stereoscopic images of the viewed world. Despite the fact that every optic in existence produces an aerial image, few persons are aware of their existence and possible uses. Constant reference to the eye and other optical systems have produced a psychosis of design that only considers "focal planes" in the design and analysis of optical systems. All objects in the field of view of the optical device are imaged by the device as an aerial image. Use of aerial images in vision and visual display systems can provide a true stereoscopic representation of the viewed world. This paper discusses aerial image systems - their applications and designs and presents designs and design concepts that utilize aerial images to obtain superior visual displays, particularly with application to visual simulation.

  2. Aerial image simulation for partial coherent system with programming development in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Nazmul; Rahman, Md. Momtazur; Udoy, Ariful Banna

    2014-10-01

    Aerial image can be calculated by either Abbe's method or sum of coherent system decomposition (SOCS) method for partial coherent system. This paper introduces a programming with Matlab code that changes the analytical representation of Abbe's method to the matrix form, which has advantages for both Abbe's method and SOCS since matrix calculation is easier than double integration over object plane or pupil plane. First a singular matrix P is derived from a pupil function and effective light source in the spatial frequency domain. By applying Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to the matrix P, eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are obtained. The aerial image can then be computed by the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions without calculation of Transmission Cross Coefficient (TCC). The aerial final image is almost identical as an original cross mask and the intensity distribution on image plane shows that it is almost uniform across the linewidth of the mask.

  3. Aerial Photographs and Satellite Images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1997-01-01

    Photographs and other images of the Earth taken from the air and from space show a great deal about the planet's landforms, vegetation, and resources. Aerial and satellite images, known as remotely sensed images, permit accurate mapping of land cover and make landscape features understandable on regional, continental, and even global scales. Transient phenomena, such as seasonal vegetation vigor and contaminant discharges, can be studied by comparing images acquired at different times. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which began using aerial photographs for mapping in the 1930's, archives photographs from its mapping projects and from those of some other Federal agencies. In addition, many images from such space programs as Landsat, begun in 1972, are held by the USGS. Most satellite scenes can be obtained only in digital form for use in computer-based image processing and geographic information systems, but in some cases are also available as photographic products.

  4. Aerial Video Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    When Michael Henry wanted to start an aerial video service, he turned to Johnson Space Center for assistance. Two NASA engineers - one had designed and developed TV systems in Apollo, Skylab, Apollo- Soyuz and Space Shuttle programs - designed a wing-mounted fiberglass camera pod. Camera head and angles are adjustable, and the pod is shaped to reduce vibration. The controls are located so a solo pilot can operate the system. A microprocessor displays latitude, longitude, and bearing, and a GPS receiver provides position data for possible legal references. The service has been successfully utilized by railroads, oil companies, real estate companies, etc.

  5. A Classroom Simulation of Aerial Photography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Simon

    1981-01-01

    Explains how a simulation of aerial photography can help students in a college level beginning course on interpretation of aerial photography understand the interrelationships of the airplane, the camera, and the earth's surface. Procedures, objectives, equipment, and scale are discussed. (DB)

  6. Design of an integrated aerial image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jing; Spanos, Costas J.

    2005-05-01

    The subject of this paper is a novel integrated aerial image sensor (IAIS) system suitable for integration within the surface of an autonomous test wafer. The IAIS could be used as a lithography processing monitor, affording a "wafer's eye view" of the process, and therefore facilitating advanced process control and diagnostics without integrating (and dedicating) the sensor to the processing equipment. The IAIS is composed of an aperture mask and an array of photo-detectors. In order to retrieve nanometer scale resolution of the aerial image with a practical photo-detector pixel size, we propose a design of an aperture mask involving a series of spatial phase "moving" aperture groups. We demonstrate a design example aimed at the 65nm technology node through TEMPEST simulation. The optimized, key design parameters include an aperture width in the range of 30nm, aperture thickness in the range of 70nm, and offer a spatial resolution of about 5nm, all with comfortable fabrication tolerances. Our preliminary simulation work indicates the possibility of the IAIS being applied to the immersion lithography. A bench-top far-field experiment verifies that our approach of the spatial frequency down-shift through forming large Moire patterns is feasible.

  7. Calculating aerial images from EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pistor, Thomas V.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1999-06-01

    Aerial images for line/space patterns, arrays of posts and an arbitrary layout pattern are calculated for EUV masks in a 4X EUV imaging system. Both mask parameters and illumination parameters are varied to investigate their effects on the aerial image. To facilitate this study, a parallel version of TEMPEST with a Fourier transform boundary condition was developed and run on a network of 24 microprocessors. Line width variations are observed when absorber thickness or sidewall angle changes. As the line/space pattern scales to smaller dimensions, the aspect ratios of the absorber features increase, introducing geometric shadowing and reducing aerial image intensity and contrast. 100nm square posts have circular images of diameter close to 100nm, but decreasing in diameter significantly when the corner round radius at the mask becomes greater than 50 nm. Exterior mask posts image slightly smaller and with higher ellipticity than interior mask posts. The aerial image of the arbitrary test pattern gives insight into the effects of the off-axis incidence employed in EUV lithography systems.

  8. Wafer weak point detection based on aerial images or WLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Philipp, Peter; Litt, Lloyd C.; Ackmann, Paul; Crell, Christian; Chen, Norman

    2015-10-01

    Aerial image measurement is a key technique for model based optical proximity correction (OPC) verification. Actual aerial images obtained by AIMS (aerial image measurement system) or WLCD (wafer level critical dimension) can detect printed wafer weak point structures in advance of wafer exposure and defect inspection. Normally, the potential wafer weak points are determined based on optical rule check (ORC) simulation in advance. However, the correlation to real wafer weak points is often not perfect due to the contribution of mask three dimension (M3D) effects, actual mask errors, and scanner lens effects. If the design weak points can accurately be detected in advance, it will reduce the wafer fab cost and improve cycle time. WLCD or AIMS tools are able to measure the aerial images CD and bossung curve through focus window. However, it is difficult to detect the wafer weak point in advance without defining selection criteria. In this study, wafer weak points sensitive to mask mean-to-nominal values are characterized for a process with very high MEEF (normally more than 4). Aerial image CD uses fixed threshold to detect the wafer weak points. By using WLCD through threshold and focus window, the efficiency of wafer weak point detection is also demonstrated. A novel method using contrast range evaluation is shown in the paper. Use of the slope of aerial images for more accurate detection of the wafer weak points using WLCD is also discussed. The contrast range can also be used to detect the wafer weak points in advance. Further, since the mean to nominal of the reticle contributes to the effective contrast range in a high MEEF area this work shows that control of the mask error is critical for high MEEF layers such as poly, active and metal layers. Wafer process based weak points that cannot be detected by wafer lithography CD or WLCD will be discussed.

  9. Aerial photographs and satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1995-01-01

    Because photographs and images taken from the air or from space are acquired without direct contact with the ground, they are referred to as remotely sensed images. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has used remote sensing from the early years of the 20th century to support earth science studies and for mapping purposes.

  10. 3D Buildings Extraction from Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikova, O.; Prandi, F.

    2011-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-automatic method for buildings extraction through multiple-view aerial image analysis. The advantage of the used semi-automatic approach is that it allows processing of each building individually finding the parameters of buildings features extraction more precisely for each area. On the early stage the presented technique uses an extraction of line segments that is done only inside of areas specified manually. The rooftop hypothesis is used further to determine a subset of quadrangles, which could form building roofs from a set of extracted lines and corners obtained on the previous stage. After collecting of all potential roof shapes in all images overlaps, the epipolar geometry is applied to find matching between images. This allows to make an accurate selection of building roofs removing false-positive ones and to identify their global 3D coordinates given camera internal parameters and coordinates. The last step of the image matching is based on geometrical constraints in contrast to traditional correlation. The correlation is applied only in some highly restricted areas in order to find coordinates more precisely, in such a way significantly reducing processing time of the algorithm. The algorithm has been tested on a set of Milan's aerial images and shows highly accurate results.

  11. Calculation and uses of the lithographic aerial image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagello, Donis G.; Smith, Daniel G.

    2012-09-01

    Beginning with the seminal Dill papers of 1975, the aerial image has been essential for understanding the process of microlithography. From the aerial image, we can predict the performance of a given lithographic process in terms of depth of focus, exposure latitude, etc. As lithographic technologies improved, reaching smaller and smaller printed features, the sophistication of aerial image calculations has had to increase from simple incoherent imaging theory, to partial coherence, polarization effects, thin film effects at the resist, thick mask effects, and so on. This tutorial provides an overview and semihistorical development of the aerial image calculation and then provides a review of some of the various ways in which the aerial image is typically used to estimate the performance of the lithographic process.

  12. An algorithm for approximate rectification of digital aerial images

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-resolution aerial photography is one of the most valuable tools available for managing extensive landscapes. With recent advances in digital camera technology, computer hardware, and software, aerial photography is easier to collect, store, and transfer than ever before. Images can be automa...

  13. Aerial image retargeting (AIR): achieving litho-friendly designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yehia Hamouda, Ayman; Word, James; Anis, Mohab; Karim, Karim S.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we present a new technique to detect non-Litho-Friendly design areas based on their Aerial Image signature. The aerial image is calculated for the litho target (pre-OPC). This is followed by the fixing (retargeting) the design to achieve a litho friendly OPC target. This technique is applied and tested on 28 nm metal layer and shows a big improvement in the process window performance. For an optimized Aerial-Image-Retargeting (AIR) recipe is very computationally efficient and its runtime doesn't consume more than 1% of the OPC flow runtime.

  14. Research of Active Contour Model in Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Wang; Li, Guo

    With the development of computer and aviation technology, the aerial image is facing an important issue is how to automate, including aerial images of the automatic extraction of the target. In this paper, the issue of aerial images to study the active contour model is introduced, that is, Snake model, to achieve the target aerial image of the semi-automatic contour extraction method. Snake model used the unique characteristic of the energy minimization, carried out on the image contour extraction, to obtain a clear, consistent and accurate image contour. The model is defined through the energy minimization of the function, given in the initial position of artificial circumstances, through the iterative calculation of Snake model will eventually form the minimum energy function has been described in the outline of the target partition. The results indicate that Snake model for aerial images of the edge contour extraction, verification, concluded that the Snake-based edge detection methods could be more objectively and accurately extract the edge of the outline of aerial images.

  15. Historic Image: Aerial view of cemetery and its environs. Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic Image: Aerial view of cemetery and its environs. Photograph 2 November 1961. NCA History Collection - Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Jamaica Avenue Unit, 625 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  16. HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH 15 SEPTEMBER 1950. NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - San Francisco National Cemetery, 1 Lincoln Boulevard, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. Historic Image: Aerial view of Mount of Victory Plot. Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic Image: Aerial view of Mount of Victory Plot. Photograph 1961. NCA History Collection - Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Mount of Victory Plot Unit, 625 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  18. Application of genetic algorithms to autopiloting in aerial combat simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dai Hyun; Erwin, Daniel A.; Kostrzewski, Andrew A.; Kim, Jeongdal; Savant, Gajendra D.

    1998-10-01

    An autopilot algorithm that controls a fighter aircraft in simulated aerial combat is presented. A fitness function, whose arguments are the control settings of the simulated fighter, is continuously maximized by a fuzzied genetic algorithm. Results are presented for one-to-one combat simulated on a personal computer. Generalization to many-to-many combat is discussed.

  19. Advanced Image Processing of Aerial Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glenn; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Aerial imagery of the Earth is an invaluable tool for the assessment of ground features, especially during times of disaster. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have developed techniques which have proven to be useful for such imagery. Aerial imagery from various sources, including Langley's Boeing 757 Aries aircraft, has been studied extensively. This paper discusses these studies and demonstrates that better-than-observer imagery can be obtained even when visibility is severely compromised. A real-time, multi-spectral experimental system will be described and numerous examples will be shown.

  20. Radiological Disaster Simulators for Field and Aerial Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr

    2002-11-01

    Simulators have been developed to dramatically improve the fidelity of play for field monitors and aircraft participating in radiological disaster drills and exercises. Simulated radiological measurements for the current Global Positioning System (GPS) location are derived from realistic models of radiological consequences for accidents and malicious acts. The aerial version outputs analog pulses corresponding to the signal that would be produced by various NaI (Tl) detectors at that location. The field monitor version reports the reading for any make/model of survey instrument selected. Position simulation modes are included in the aerial and field versions. The aerial version can generate a flight path based on input parameters or import an externally generated sequence of latitude and longitude coordinates. The field version utilizes a map-based point and click/drag interface to generate individual or a sequence of evenly spaced instrument measurements.

  1. HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF THE CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HISTORIC IMAGE: AERIAL VIEW OF THE CEMETERY AND ITS ENVIRONS. PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN ON 6 APRIL 1968. NCA HISTORY COLLECTION. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  2. A Low-Cost Imaging System for Aerial Applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available and versatile platform for airborne remote sensing. Although various airborne imaging systems are being used for research and commercial applications, most of these systems are either too expensive or too complex to be of practical use for aerial app...

  3. An improved dehazing algorithm of aerial high-definition image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wentao; Ji, Ming; Huang, Xiying; Wang, Chao; Yang, Yizhou; Li, Tao; Wang, Jiaoying; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    For unmanned aerial vehicle(UAV) images, the sensor can not get high quality images due to fog and haze weather. To solve this problem, An improved dehazing algorithm of aerial high-definition image is proposed. Based on the model of dark channel prior, the new algorithm firstly extracts the edges from crude estimated transmission map and expands the extracted edges. Then according to the expended edges, the algorithm sets a threshold value to divide the crude estimated transmission map into different areas and makes different guided filter on the different areas compute the optimized transmission map. The experimental results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed algorithm is substantially the same as the one based on dark channel prior and guided filter. The average computation time of the new algorithm is around 40% of the one as well as the detection ability of UAV image is improved effectively in fog and haze weather.

  4. CMOS Imaging Sensor Technology for Aerial Mapping Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Klaus; Welzenbach, Martin; Timm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June 2015 Leica Geosystems launched the first large format aerial mapping camera using CMOS sensor technology, the Leica DMC III. This paper describes the motivation to change from CCD sensor technology to CMOS for the development of this new aerial mapping camera. In 2002 the DMC first generation was developed by Z/I Imaging. It was the first large format digital frame sensor designed for mapping applications. In 2009 Z/I Imaging designed the DMC II which was the first digital aerial mapping camera using a single ultra large CCD sensor to avoid stitching of smaller CCDs. The DMC III is now the third generation of large format frame sensor developed by Z/I Imaging and Leica Geosystems for the DMC camera family. It is an evolution of the DMC II using the same system design with one large monolithic PAN sensor and four multi spectral camera heads for R,G, B and NIR. For the first time a 391 Megapixel large CMOS sensor had been used as PAN chromatic sensor, which is an industry record. Along with CMOS technology goes a range of technical benefits. The dynamic range of the CMOS sensor is approx. twice the range of a comparable CCD sensor and the signal to noise ratio is significantly better than with CCDs. Finally results from the first DMC III customer installations and test flights will be presented and compared with other CCD based aerial sensors.

  5. Improved land cover mapping using aerial photographs and satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Katalin; Szabó, Szilárd; Szabó, Gergely; Dévai, György; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2014-10-01

    Manual Land Cover Mapping using aerial photographs provides sufficient level of resolution for detailed vegetation or land cover maps. However, in some cases it is not possible to achieve the desired information over large areas, for example from historical data where the quality and amount of available images is definitely lower than from modern data. The use of automated and semiautomated methods offers the means to identify the vegetation cover using remotely sensed data. In this paper automated methods were tested on aerial photographs and satellite images to extract better and more reliable information about vegetation cover. These testswere performed by using automated analysis of LANDSAT7 images (with and without the surface model of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM)) and two temporally similar aerial photographs. The spectral bands were analyzed with supervised (maximum likelihood) methods. In conclusion, the SRTM and the combination of two temporally similar aerial photographs from earlier years were useful in separating the vegetation cover on a floodplain area. In addition the different date of the vegetation season also gave reliable information about the land cover. High quality information about old and present vegetation on a large area is an essential prerequisites ensuring the conservation of ecosystems

  6. D City Transformations by Time Series of Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, A.

    2015-02-01

    Recent photogrammetric applications, based on dense image matching algorithms, allow to use not only images acquired by digital cameras, amateur or not, but also to recover the vast heritage of analogue photographs. This possibility opens up many possibilities in the use and enhancement of existing photos heritage. The research of the original figuration of old buildings, the virtual reconstruction of disappeared architectures and the study of urban development are some of the application areas that exploit the great cultural heritage of photography. Nevertheless there are some restrictions in the use of historical images for automatic reconstruction of buildings such as image quality, availability of camera parameters and ineffective geometry of image acquisition. These constrains are very hard to solve and it is difficult to discover good dataset in the case of terrestrial close range photogrammetry for the above reasons. Even the photographic archives of museums and superintendence, while retaining a wealth of documentation, have no dataset for a dense image matching approach. Compared to the vast collection of historical photos, the class of aerial photos meets both criteria stated above. In this paper historical aerial photographs are used with dense image matching algorithms to realize 3d models of a city in different years. The models can be used to study the urban development of the city and its changes through time. The application relates to the city centre of Verona, for which some time series of aerial photographs have been retrieved. The models obtained in this way allowed, right away, to observe the urban development of the city, the places of expansion and new urban areas. But a more interesting aspect emerged from the analytical comparison between models. The difference, as the Euclidean distance, between two models gives information about new buildings or demolitions. As considering accuracy it is necessary point out that the quality of final

  7. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Säynäjoki, Raita; Packalén, Petteri; Maltamo, Matti; Vehmas, Mikko; Eerikäinen, Kalle

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L.) from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM) was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF) and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  8. a Fast Approach for Stitching of Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2016-06-01

    The last few years have witnessed an increasing volume of aerial image data because of the extensive improvements of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). These newly developed UAVs have led to a wide variety of applications. A fast assessment of the achieved coverage and overlap of the acquired images of a UAV flight mission is of great help to save the time and cost of the further steps. A fast automatic stitching of the acquired images can help to visually assess the achieved coverage and overlap during the flight mission. This paper proposes an automatic image stitching approach that creates a single overview stitched image using the acquired images during a UAV flight mission along with a coverage image that represents the count of overlaps between the acquired images. The main challenge of such task is the huge number of images that are typically involved in such scenarios. A short flight mission with image acquisition frequency of one second can capture hundreds to thousands of images. The main focus of the proposed approach is to reduce the processing time of the image stitching procedure by exploiting the initial knowledge about the images positions provided by the navigation sensors. The proposed approach also avoids solving for all the transformation parameters of all the photos together to save the expected long computation time if all the parameters were considered simultaneously. After extracting the points of interest of all the involved images using Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm, the proposed approach uses the initial image's coordinates to build an incremental constrained Delaunay triangulation that represents the neighborhood of each image. This triangulation helps to match only the neighbor images and therefore reduces the time-consuming features matching step. The estimated relative orientation between the matched images is used to find a candidate seed image for the stitching process. The pre-estimated transformation

  9. Orientation-selective building detection in aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno-Kovacs, Andrea; Sziranyi, Tamas

    2015-10-01

    This paper introduces a novel aerial building detection method based on region orientation as a new feature, which is used in various steps throughout the presented framework. As building objects are expected to be connected with each other on a regional level, exploiting the main orientation obtained from the local gradient analysis provides further information for detection purposes. The orientation information is applied for an improved edge map design, which is integrated with classical features like shadow and color. Moreover, an orthogonality check is introduced for finding building candidates, and their final shapes defined by the Chan-Vese active contour algorithm are refined based on the orientation information, resulting in smooth and accurate building outlines. The proposed framework is evaluated on multiple data sets, including aerial and high resolution optical satellite images, and compared to six state-of-the-art methods in both object and pixel level evaluation, proving the algorithm's efficiency.

  10. Evaluation of Selected Features for CAR Detection in Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuermer, S.; Leitloff, J.; Reinartz, P.; Stilla, U.

    2011-09-01

    The extraction of vehicles from aerial images provides a wide area traffic situation within a short time. Applications for the gathered data are various and reach from smart routing in the case of congestions to usability validation of roads in the case of disasters. The challenge of the vehicle detection task is finding adequate features which are capable to separate cars from other objects; especially those that look similar. We present an experiment where selected features show their ability of car detection. Precisely, Haar-like and HoG features are utilized and passed to the AdaBoost algorithm for calculating the final detector. Afterwards the classifying power of the features is accurately analyzed and evaluated. The tests a carried out on aerial data from the inner city of Munich, Germany and include small inner city roads with rooftops close by which raise the complexity factor.

  11. An automatic high precision registration method between large area aerial images and aerial light detection and ranging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Q.; Xie, D.; Sun, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The integration of digital aerial photogrammetry and Light Detetion And Ranging (LiDAR) is an inevitable trend in Surveying and Mapping field. We calculate the external orientation elements of images which identical with LiDAR coordinate to realize automatic high precision registration between aerial images and LiDAR data. There are two ways to calculate orientation elements. One is single image spatial resection using image matching 3D points that registered to LiDAR. The other one is Position and Orientation System (POS) data supported aerotriangulation. The high precision registration points are selected as Ground Control Points (GCPs) instead of measuring GCPs manually during aerotriangulation. The registration experiments indicate that the method which registering aerial images and LiDAR points has a great advantage in higher automation and precision compare with manual registration.

  12. A system for simulating aerial or orbital TV observations of geographic patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A system which simulates observation of the earth surface by aerial or orbiting television devices has been developed. By projecting color slides of photographs taken by aircraft and orbiting sensors upon a rear screen system, and altering scale of projected image, screen position, or TV camera position, it is possible to simulate alternatives of altitude, or optical systems. By altering scan line patterns in COHU 3200 series camera from 525 to 945 scan lines, it is possible to study implications of scan line resolution upon the detection and analysis of geographic patterns observed by orbiting TV systems.

  13. Fitting of Parametric Building Models to Oblique Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, U. S.; Gerke, M.

    2011-09-01

    In literature and in photogrammetric workstations many approaches and systems to automatically reconstruct buildings from remote sensing data are described and available. Those building models are being used for instance in city modeling or in cadastre context. If a roof overhang is present, the building walls cannot be estimated correctly from nadir-view aerial images or airborne laser scanning (ALS) data. This leads to inconsistent building outlines, which has a negative influence on visual impression, but more seriously also represents a wrong legal boundary in the cadaster. Oblique aerial images as opposed to nadir-view images reveal greater detail, enabling to see different views of an object taken from different directions. Building walls are visible from oblique images directly and those images are used for automated roof overhang estimation in this research. A fitting algorithm is employed to find roof parameters of simple buildings. It uses a least squares algorithm to fit projected wire frames to their corresponding edge lines extracted from the images. Self-occlusion is detected based on intersection result of viewing ray and the planes formed by the building whereas occlusion from other objects is detected using an ALS point cloud. Overhang and ground height are obtained by sweeping vertical and horizontal planes respectively. Experimental results are verified with high resolution ortho-images, field survey, and ALS data. Planimetric accuracy of 1cm mean and 5cm standard deviation was obtained, while buildings' orientation were accurate to mean of 0.23° and standard deviation of 0.96° with ortho-image. Overhang parameters were aligned to approximately 10cm with field survey. The ground and roof heights were accurate to mean of - 9cm and 8cm with standard deviations of 16cm and 8cm with ALS respectively. The developed approach reconstructs 3D building models well in cases of sufficient texture. More images should be acquired for completeness of

  14. Shoreline extraction from light detection and ranging digital elevation model data and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Karim, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased demand for understanding the accurate position of the shorelines. The automatic extraction of shorelines utilizing the digital elevation models (DEMs) obtained from light detection and ranging (LiDAR), aerial images, and multispectral images has become very promising. In this article, we develop two innovative algorithms that can effectively extract shorelines depending on the available data sources. The first is a multistep morphological technique that works on LiDAR DEM with respect to a tidal datum, whereas the second depends on the availability of training data to extract shorelines from LiDAR DEM fused with aerial images. Unlike similar techniques, the morphological approach detects and eliminates the outliers that result from waves, etc., by means of an anomaly test with neighborhood constraints. Additionally, it eliminates docks, bridges, and fishing piers along the extracted shorelines by means of Hough transform. The second approach extracts the shoreline by means of color space conversion of the aerial images and the support vector machines classifier to segment the fused data into water and land. We perform Monte-Carlo simulations to estimate the confidence interval for the error in shoreline position. Compared with other relevant techniques in literature, the proposed methods offer better accuracy in shoreline extraction.

  15. Using aberration test patterns to optimize the performance of EUV aerial imaging microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Miyakawa, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick; Han, Hak-Seung; Huh, Sungmin

    2009-06-16

    The SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) is a prototype EUV-wavelength zoneplate microscope that provides high quality aerial image measurements of EUV reticles. To simplify and improve the alignment procedure we have created and tested arrays of aberration-sensitive patterns on EUV reticles and we have compared their images collected with the AIT to the expected shapes obtained by simulating the theoretical wavefront of the system. We obtained a consistent measure of coma and astigmatism in the center of the field of view using two different patterns, revealing a misalignment condition in the optics.

  16. a New Paradigm for Matching - and Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, T.; Zhuo, X.; Reinartz, P.; Fraundorfer, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigates the performance of SIFT-based image matching regarding large differences in image scaling and rotation, as this is usually the case when trying to match images captured from UAVs and airplanes. This task represents an essential step for image registration and 3d-reconstruction applications. Various real world examples presented in this paper show that SIFT, as well as A-SIFT perform poorly or even fail in this matching scenario. Even if the scale difference in the images is known and eliminated beforehand, the matching performance suffers from too few feature point detections, ambiguous feature point orientations and rejection of many correct matches when applying the ratio-test afterwards. Therefore, a new feature matching method is provided that overcomes these problems and offers thousands of matches by a novel feature point detection strategy, applying a one-to-many matching scheme and substitute the ratio-test by adding geometric constraints to achieve geometric correct matches at repetitive image regions. This method is designed for matching almost nadir-directed images with low scene depth, as this is typical in UAV and aerial image matching scenarios. We tested the proposed method on different real world image pairs. While standard SIFT failed for most of the datasets, plenty of geometrical correct matches could be found using our approach. Comparing the estimated fundamental matrices and homographies with ground-truth solutions, mean errors of few pixels can be achieved.

  17. Error Estimation Techniques to Refine Overlapping Aerial Image Mosaic Processes via Detected Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, William Glenn

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I propose to demonstrate a means of error estimation preprocessing in the assembly of overlapping aerial image mosaics. The mosaic program automatically assembles several hundred aerial images from a data set by aligning them, via image registration using a pattern search method, onto a GIS grid. The method presented first locates…

  18. a Robust Matching Method for Unmmaned Aerial Vehicle Images with Different Viewpoint Angles Based on Regional Coherency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Z.; Li, C.; Yang, N.

    2015-08-01

    One of the main challenges confronting high-resolution remote sensing image matching is how to address the issue of geometric deformation between images, especially when the images are obtained from different viewpoints. In this paper, a robust matching method for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle images of different viewpoint angles based on regional coherency is proposed. The literature on the geometric transform analysis reveals that if transformations between different pixel pairs are different, they can't be expressed by a uniform affine transform. While for the same real scene, if the instantaneous field of view or the target depth changes is small, transformation between pixels in the whole image can be approximated by an affine transform. On the basis of this analysis, a region coherency matching method for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle images is proposed. In the proposed method, the simplified mapping from image view change to scale change and rotation change has been derived. Through this processing, the matching between view change images can be converted into the matching between rotation and scale changed images. In the method, firstly local image regions are detected and view changes between these local regions are mapped to rotation and scale change by performing local region simulation. And then, point feature detection and matching are implemented in the simulated image regions. Finally, a group of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle images are adopted to verify the performance of proposed matching method respectively, and a comparative analysis with other methods demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Direct Penguin Counting Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, C. U.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Hong, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents an application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images to monitor penguin colony in Baton Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica. The area around Narębski Point located on the southeast coast of Barton Peninsula was designated as Antarctic Specially Protected Area No. 171 (ASPA 171), and Chinstrap and Gentoo penguins inhabit in this area. The UAV images were acquired in a part of ASPA 171 from four flights in a single day, Jan 18, 2014. About 360 images were mosaicked as an image of about 3 cm spatial resolution and then a subset including representative penguin rookeries was selected. The subset image was segmented based on gradient map of pixel values, and spectral and spatial attributes were assigned to each segment. The object based image analysis (OBIA) was conducted with consideration of spectral attributes including mean and minimum values of each segment and various shape attributes such as area, length, compactness and roundness to detect individual penguin. The segments indicating individual penguin were effectively detected on rookeries with high contrasts in the spectral and shape attributes. The importance of periodic and precise monitoring of penguins has been recognized because variations of their populations reflect environmental changes and disturbance from human activities. Utilization of very high resolution imaging method shown in this study can be applied to other penguin habitats in Antarctica, and the results will be able to support establishing effective environmental management plans.

  20. Multi-Scale Matching for the Automatic Location of Control Points in Large Scale Aerial Images Using Terrestrial Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berveglieri, A.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.

    2014-03-01

    A technique to automatically locate Ground Control Points (GCPs) in large aerial images is presented considering the availability of low accuracy direct georeferencing data. The approach is based on image chips of GCPs extracted from vertical terrestrial images. A strategy combining image matching techniques was implemented to select correct matches. These matches were used to define a 2D transformation with which the GCP is projected close to its correct position, reducing the search space in the aerial image. Area-based matching with some refinements is used to locate GCPs with sub-pixel precision. Experiments were performed with multi-scale images and assessed with a bundle block adjustment simulating an indirect sensor orientation. The accuracy analysis was accomplished based on discrepancies obtained from GCPs and check points. The results were better than interactive measurements and a planimetric accuracy of 1/5 of the Ground Sample Distance (GSD) for the check points was achieved.

  1. Oblique Aerial Images and Their Use in Cultural Heritage Documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhle, J.

    2013-07-01

    Oblique images enable three-dimensional (3d) modelling of objects with vertical dimensions. Such imagery is nowadays systematically taken of cities and may easily become available. The documentation of cultural heritage can take advantage of these sources of information. Two new oblique camera systems are presented and characteristics of such images are summarized. A first example uses images of a new multi-camera system for the derivation of orthoimages, façade plots with photo texture, 3d scatter plots, and dynamic 3d models of a historic church. The applied methodology is based on automatically derived point clouds of high density. Each point will be supplemented with colour and other attributes. The problems experienced in these processes and the solutions to these problems are presented. The applied tools are a combination of professional tools, free software, and of own software developments. Special attention is given to the quality of input images. Investigations are carried out on edges in the images. The combination of oblique and nadir images enables new possibilities in the processing. The use of the near-infrared channel besides the red, green, and blue channel of the applied multispectral imagery is also of advantage. Vegetation close to the object of interest can easily be removed. A second example describes the modelling of a monument by means of a non-metric camera and a standard software package. The presented results regard achieved geometric accuracy and image quality. It is concluded that the use of oblique aerial images together with image-based processing methods yield new possibilities of economic and accurate documentation of tall monuments.

  2. Initial Efforts toward Mission-Representative Imaging Surveys from Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanich, Greg; Plice, Laura; Ippolito, Corey; Young, Larry A.; Lau, Benton; Lee, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    Numerous researchers have proposed the use of robotic aerial explorers to perform scientific investigation of planetary bodies in our solar system. One of the essential tasks for any aerial explorer is to be able to perform scientifically valuable imaging surveys. The focus of this paper is to discuss the challenges implicit in, and recent observations related to, acquiring mission-representative imaging data from a small fixed-wing UAV, acting as a surrogate planetary aerial explorer. This question of successfully performing aerial explorer surveys is also tied to other topics of technical investigation, including the development of unique bio-inspired technologies.

  3. Application of Digital Image Correlation Method to Improve the Accuracy of Aerial Photo Stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shih-Heng; Jhou, You-Liang; Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Hsiao, Han-Wei; Sung, Wen-Pei

    2016-04-01

    Satellite images and traditional aerial photos have been used in remote sensing for a long time. However, there are some problems with these images. For example, the resolution of satellite image is insufficient, the cost to obtain traditional images is relatively high and there is also human safety risk in traditional flight. These result in the application limitation of these images. In recent years, the control technology of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is rapidly developed. This makes unmanned aerial vehicle widely used in obtaining aerial photos. Compared to satellite images and traditional aerial photos, these aerial photos obtained using UAV have the advantages of higher resolution, low cost. Because there is no crew in UAV, it is still possible to take aerial photos using UAV under unstable weather conditions. Images have to be orthorectified and their distortion must be corrected at first. Then, with the help of image matching technique and control points, these images can be stitched or used to establish DEM of ground surface. These images or DEM data can be used to monitor the landslide or estimate the volume of landslide. For the image matching, we can use such as Harris corner method, SIFT or SURF to extract and match feature points. However, the accuracy of these methods for matching is about pixel or sub-pixel level. The accuracy of digital image correlation method (DIC) during image matching can reach about 0.01pixel. Therefore, this study applies digital image correlation method to match extracted feature points. Then the stitched images are observed to judge the improvement situation. This study takes the aerial photos of a reservoir area. These images are stitched under the situations with and without the help of DIC. The results show that the misplacement situation in the stitched image using DIC to match feature points has been significantly improved. This shows that the use of DIC to match feature points can actually improve the accuracy of

  4. High-resolution EUV imaging tools for resist exposure and aerial image monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Brisco, O.; Brunton, A.; Cashmore, J.; Elbourn, P.; Elliner, G.; Gower, M.; Greuters, J.; Grunewald, P.; Gutierrez, R.; Hill, T.; Hirsch, J.; Kling, L.; McEntee, N.; Mundair, S.; Richards, P.; Truffert, V.; Wallhead, I.; Whitfield, M.; Hudyma, R.

    2005-05-01

    Key features are presented of two high-resolution EUV imaging tools: the MS-13 Microstepper wafer exposure and the RIM-13 reticle imaging microscope. The MS-13 has been developed for EUV resist testing and technology evaluation at the 32nm node and beyond, while the RIM-13 is designed for actinic aerial image monitoring of blank and patterned EUV reticles. Details of the design architecture, module layout, major subsystems and performance are presented for both tools.

  5. Semantic Segmentation of Aerial Images with AN Ensemble of Cnns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmanis, D.; Wegner, J. D.; Galliani, S.; Schindler, K.; Datcu, M.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes a deep learning approach to semantic segmentation of very high resolution (aerial) images. Deep neural architectures hold the promise of end-to-end learning from raw images, making heuristic feature design obsolete. Over the last decade this idea has seen a revival, and in recent years deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have emerged as the method of choice for a range of image interpretation tasks like visual recognition and object detection. Still, standard CNNs do not lend themselves to per-pixel semantic segmentation, mainly because one of their fundamental principles is to gradually aggregate information over larger and larger image regions, making it hard to disentangle contributions from different pixels. Very recently two extensions of the CNN framework have made it possible to trace the semantic information back to a precise pixel position: deconvolutional network layers undo the spatial downsampling, and Fully Convolution Networks (FCNs) modify the fully connected classification layers of the network in such a way that the location of individual activations remains explicit. We design a FCN which takes as input intensity and range data and, with the help of aggressive deconvolution and recycling of early network layers, converts them into a pixelwise classification at full resolution. We discuss design choices and intricacies of such a network, and demonstrate that an ensemble of several networks achieves excellent results on challenging data such as the ISPRS semantic labeling benchmark, using only the raw data as input.

  6. Grab a coffee: your aerial images are already analyzed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Anthony; Rademacher, Thomas; Schulz, Kristian

    2015-07-01

    For over 2 decades the AIMTM platform has been utilized in mask shops as the standard for actinic review of photomask sites in order to perform defect disposition and repair review. Throughout this time the measurement throughput of the systems has been improved in order to keep pace with the requirements demanded by a manufacturing environment, however the analysis of the sites captured has seen little improvement and remained a manual process. This manual analysis of aerial images is time consuming, subject to error and unreliability and contributes to holding up turn-around time (TAT) and slowing process flow in a manufacturing environment. AutoAnalysis, the first application available for the FAVOR® platform, offers a solution to these problems by providing fully automated data transfer and analysis of AIMTM aerial images. The data is automatically output in a customizable format that can be tailored to your internal needs and the requests of your customers. Savings in terms of operator time arise from the automated analysis which no longer needs to be performed. Reliability is improved as human error is eliminated making sure the most defective region is always and consistently captured. Finally the TAT is shortened and process flow for the back end of the line improved as the analysis is fast and runs in parallel to the measurements. In this paper the concept and approach of AutoAnalysis will be presented as well as an update to the status of the project. A look at the benefits arising from the automation and the customizable approach of the solution will be shown.

  7. Computational inspection applied to a mask inspection system with advanced aerial imaging capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linyong; Peng, Danping; He, Lin; Chen, Dongxue; Dam, Thuc; Tolani, Vikram; Tam, Aviram; Staud, Wolf

    2010-03-01

    At the most advanced technology nodes, such as 32nm and 22nm, aggressive OPC and Sub-Resolution Assist Features (SRAFs) are required. However, their use results in significantly increased mask complexity, challenging mask defect dispositioning more than ever. To address these challenges in mask inspection and defect dispositioning, new mask inspection technologies have been developed that not only provide high resolution masks imaged at the same wavelength as the scanner, but that also provide aerial images by using both: software simulation and hardware emulation. The original mask patterns stored by the optics of mask inspection systems can be recovered using a patented algorithm based on the Level Set Method. More accurate lithography simulation models can be used to further evaluate defects on simulated resist patterns using the recovered mask pattern in high resolution and aerial mode. An automated defect classification based on lithography significance and local CD changes is also developed to disposition tens of thousands of potential defects in minutes, so that inspection throughput is not impacted.

  8. Research on Virtual Simulation of the Aerial Passenger Device Based on Three-Dimensional Visualization and Virtual Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingchong; Wang, Dahu; Liu, Haiyang

    Analyzing the key design for Aerial Passenger Device, 3DMAX is applied for creating models which is the key technology and corresponding safety protection device. Combined with Quest3D engine for setting, such as roadway and safety devices are displayed in virtual. Finally Aerial Passenger Device is in the virtual scene. Then simulation results examine the Aerial Passenger Device's rationality and safety reducing the cycle of system optimization and technology improvement.

  9. An improved algorithm of mask image dodging for aerial image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zuxun; Zou, Songbai; Zuo, Zhiqi

    2011-12-01

    The technology of Mask image dodging based on Fourier transform is a good algorithm in removing the uneven luminance within a single image. At present, the difference method and the ratio method are the methods in common use, but they both have their own defects .For example, the difference method can keep the brightness uniformity of the whole image, but it is deficient in local contrast; meanwhile the ratio method can work better in local contrast, but sometimes it makes the dark areas of the original image too bright. In order to remove the defects of the two methods effectively, this paper on the basis of research of the two methods proposes a balance solution. Experiments show that the scheme not only can combine the advantages of the difference method and the ratio method, but also can avoid the deficiencies of the two algorithms.

  10. Coastline Extraction from Aerial Images Based on Edge Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paravolidakis, V.; Moirogiorgou, K.; Ragia, L.; Zervakis, M.; Synolakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays coastline extraction and tracking of its changes become of high importance because of the climate change, global warming and rapid growth of human population. Coastal areas play a significant role for the economy of the entire region. In this paper we propose a new methodology for automatic extraction of the coastline using aerial images. A combination of a four step algorithm is used to extract the coastline in a robust and generalizable way. First, noise distortion is reduced in order to ameliorate the input data for the next processing steps. Then, the image is segmented into two regions, land and sea, through the application of a local threshold to create the binary image. The result is further processed by morphological operators with the aim that small objects are being eliminated and only the objects of interest are preserved. Finally, we perform edge detection and active contours fitting in order to extract and model the coastline. These algorithmic steps are illustrated through examples, which demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology.

  11. Using aerial photography and image analysis to measure changes in giant reed populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted along the Rio Grande in southwest Texas to evaluate color-infrared aerial photography combined with supervised image analysis to quantify changes in giant reed (Arundo donax L.) populations over a 6-year period. Aerial photographs from 2002 and 2008 of the same seven study site...

  12. Vehicle detection from high-resolution aerial images based on superpixel and color name features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ziyi; Cao, Liujuan; Yu, Zang; Chen, Yiping; Wang, Cheng; Li, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Automatic vehicle detection from aerial images is emerging due to the strong demand of large-area traffic monitoring. In this paper, we present a novel framework for automatic vehicle detection from the aerial images. Through superpixel segmentation, we first segment the aerial images into homogeneous patches, which consist of the basic units during the detection to improve efficiency. By introducing the sparse representation into our method, powerful classification ability is achieved after the dictionary training. To effectively describe a patch, the Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) is used. We further propose to integrate color information to enrich the feature representation by using the color name feature. The final feature consists of both HOG and color name based histogram, by which we get a strong descriptor of a patch. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robust performance of the proposed algorithm for vehicle detection from aerial images.

  13. Aerial Image Microscopes for the Inspection of Defects in EUV Masks

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Taylor, J S; Hudyma, R; Spiller, E; Sweeney, D W; Shelden, G; Urbach, J-P

    2002-10-22

    The high volume inspection equipment currently available to support development of EUV blanks is non-actinic. The same is anticipated for patterned EUV mask inspection. Once potential defects are identified and located by such non-actinic inspection techniques, it is essential to have instrumentation to perform detailed characterization, and if repairs are performed, re-evaluation. The ultimate metric for the acceptance or rejection of a mask due to a defect, is the wafer level impact. Thus measuring the aerial image for the site under question is required. An EUV Aerial Image Microscope (''AIM'') similar to the current AIM tools for 248nm and 193nm exposure wavelength is the natural solution for this task. Due to the complicated manufacturing process of EUV blanks, AIM measurements might also be beneficial to accurately assessing the severity of a blank defect. This is an additional application for an EUV AIM as compared to today's use In recognition of the critical role of an EUV AIM for the successful implementation of EUV blank and mask supply, International SEMATECH initiated this design study with the purpose to define the technical requirements for accurately simulating EUV scanner performance, demonstrating the feasibility to meet these requirements and to explore various technical approaches to building an EUV AIM tool.

  14. Steering a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle using a head-slaved camera and HMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Sjoerd C.; Padmos, Pieter

    1997-06-01

    Military use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is gaining importance. Video cameras in these devices are often operated with joysticks and their image is displayed on a CRT. In this experiment, the simulated camera of a simulated UAV was slaved to the operator's head movements and displayed using a helmet mounted display (HMD). The task involved maneuvering a UAV along a winding course marked by tress. The influence of several parameters of the set-up on a set of flight handling characteristics was assessed. To enable variation of FOV and to study the effect of the HMD optics, a simulated HMD consisting of a head slaved window, was projected on a screen. One of the FOVs, generated in this way, corresponded with the FOV of the real HMD, enabling a comparison. The results show that the simulated HMD yields a significantly better performance that the real HMD. Performance with a FOV of 17 degrees is significantly lower than with 34 or 57 degrees. An image lag of 50 ms, typical of pan-and-tilt servo motor systems, has a small but significant influence on steering accuracy. Monocular and stereoscopic presentation did not result in significant performance differences.

  15. Study of Automatic Image Rectification and Registration of Scanned Historical Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. R.; Tseng, Y. H.

    2016-06-01

    Historical aerial photographs directly provide good evidences of past times. The Research Center for Humanities and Social Sciences (RCHSS) of Taiwan Academia Sinica has collected and scanned numerous historical maps and aerial images of Taiwan and China. Some maps or images have been geo-referenced manually, but most of historical aerial images have not been registered since there are no GPS or IMU data for orientation assisting in the past. In our research, we developed an automatic process of matching historical aerial images by SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform) for handling the great quantity of images by computer vision. SIFT is one of the most popular method of image feature extracting and matching. This algorithm extracts extreme values in scale space into invariant image features, which are robust to changing in rotation scale, noise, and illumination. We also use RANSAC (Random sample consensus) to remove outliers, and obtain good conjugated points between photographs. Finally, we manually add control points for registration through least square adjustment based on collinear equation. In the future, we can use image feature points of more photographs to build control image database. Every new image will be treated as query image. If feature points of query image match the features in database, it means that the query image probably is overlapped with control images.With the updating of database, more and more query image can be matched and aligned automatically. Other research about multi-time period environmental changes can be investigated with those geo-referenced temporal spatial data.

  16. A featureless approach to 3D polyhedral building modeling from aerial images.

    PubMed

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. PMID:22346575

  17. A Featureless Approach to 3D Polyhedral Building Modeling from Aerial Images

    PubMed Central

    Hammoudi, Karim; Dornaika, Fadi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach for reconstructing 3D polyhedral building models from aerial images. The proposed approach exploits some geometric and photometric properties resulting from the perspective projection of planar structures. Data are provided by calibrated aerial images. The novelty of the approach lies in its featurelessness and in its use of direct optimization based on image rawbrightness. The proposed framework avoids feature extraction and matching. The 3D polyhedral model is directly estimated by optimizing an objective function that combines an image-based dissimilarity measure and a gradient score over several aerial images. The optimization process is carried out by the Differential Evolution algorithm. The proposed approach is intended to provide more accurate 3D reconstruction than feature-based approaches. Fast 3D model rectification and updating can take advantage of the proposed method. Several results and evaluations of performance from real and synthetic images show the feasibility and robustness of the proposed approach. PMID:22346575

  18. Line Matching Algorithm for Aerial Image Combining image and object space similarity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxue; Wang, Weixi; Li, Xiaoming; Cao, Zhenyu; Zhu, Hong; Li, Miao; He, Biao; Zhao, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    A new straight line matching method for aerial images is proposed in this paper. Compared to previous works, similarity constraints combining radiometric information in image and geometry attributes in object plane are employed in these methods. Firstly, initial candidate lines and the elevation values of lines projection plane are determined by corresponding points in neighborhoods of reference lines. Secondly, project reference line and candidate lines back forward onto the plane, and then similarity measure constraints are enforced to reduce the number of candidates and to determine the finial corresponding lines in a hierarchical way. Thirdly, "one-to-many" and "many-to-one" matching results are transformed into "one-to-one" by merging many lines into the new one, and the errors are eliminated simultaneously. Finally, endpoints of corresponding lines are detected by line expansion process combing with "image-object-image" mapping mode. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can be able to obtain reliable line matching results for aerial images.

  19. Aerial imaging study of the mask-induced line-width roughness of EUV lithography masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojdyla, Antoine; Donoghue, Alexander; Benk, Markus P.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2016-03-01

    EUV lithography uses reflective photomasks to print features on a wafer through the formation of an aerial image. The aerial image is influenced by the mask's substrate and pattern roughness and by photon shot noise, which collectively affect the line-width on wafer prints, with an impact on local critical dimension uniformity (LCDU). We have used SHARP, an actinic mask-imaging microscope, to study line-width roughness (LWR) in aerial images at sub-nanometer resolution. We studied the impact of photon density and the illumination partial coherence on recorded images, and found that at low coherence settings, the line-width roughness is dominated by photon noise, while at high coherence setting, the effect of speckle becomes more prominent, dominating photon noise for exposure levels of 4 photons/nm2 at threshold on the mask size.

  20. Critical Assessment of Object Segmentation in Aerial Image Using Geo-Hausdorff Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Ding, Y.; Huang, Y.; Wang, G.

    2016-06-01

    Aerial Image records the large-range earth objects with the ever-improving spatial and radiometric resolution. It becomes a powerful tool for earth observation, land-coverage survey, geographical census, etc., and helps delineating the boundary of different kinds of objects on the earth both manually and automatically. In light of the geo-spatial correspondence between the pixel locations of aerial image and the spatial coordinates of ground objects, there is an increasing need of super-pixel segmentation and high-accuracy positioning of objects in aerial image. Besides the commercial software package of eCognition and ENVI, many algorithms have also been developed in the literature to segment objects of aerial images. But how to evaluate the segmentation results remains a challenge, especially in the context of the geo-spatial correspondence. The Geo-Hausdorff Distance (GHD) is proposed to measure the geo-spatial distance between the results of various object segmentation that can be done with the manual ground truth or with the automatic algorithms.Based on the early-breaking and random-sampling design, the GHD calculates the geographical Hausdorff distance with nearly-linear complexity. Segmentation results of several state-of-the-art algorithms, including those of the commercial packages, are evaluated with a diverse set of aerial images. They have different signal-to-noise ratio around the object boundaries and are hard to trace correctly even for human operators. The GHD value is analyzed to comprehensively measure the suitability of different object segmentation methods for aerial images of different spatial resolution. By critically assessing the strengths and limitations of the existing algorithms, the paper provides valuable insight and guideline for extensive research in automating object detection and classification of aerial image in the nation-wide geographic census. It is also promising for the optimal design of operational specification of remote

  1. Aerial Photography: Use in Detecting Simulated Insect Defoliation in Corn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, H. C.; Latham, R.; Meyer, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial defoliation in corn was used to explore the usefulness of aerial photography in detecting crop insect infestations. Defoliation on the top of plants was easily detected, while that on the base was less so. Aero infrared film with Wratten 89B filter gave the best results, and morning flights at the scale of 1:15840 are recommended. Row direction, plant growth stage, and time elapse since defoliation were not important factors.

  2. Wavefront aberration measurement method for a hyper-NA lithographic projection lens based on principal component analysis of an aerial image.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Boer; Wang, Xiangzhao; Li, Sikun; Yan, Guanyong; Shen, Lina; Duan, Lifeng

    2016-04-20

    A wavefront aberration measurement method for a hyper-NA lithographic projection lens by use of an aerial image based on principal component analysis is proposed. Aerial images of the hyper-NA lithographic projection lens are expressed accurately by using polarized light and a vector imaging model, as well as by considering the polarization properties. As a result, the wavefront aberrations of the hyper-NA lithographic projection lens are measured accurately. The lithographic simulator PROLITH is used to validate the accuracies of the wavefront aberration measurement and analyze the impact of the polarization rotation of illumination on the accuracy of the wavefront aberration measurement, as well as the degree of polarized light and the sample interval of aerial images. The result shows that the proposed method can retrieve 33 terms of Zernike coefficients (Z5-Z37) with a maximum error of less than 0.00085λ. PMID:27140087

  3. Object-based Image Classification of Arctic Sea Ice and Melt Ponds through Aerial Photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X.; Xie, H.; Li, Z.; Lei, R.

    2013-12-01

    The last six years have marked the lowest Arctic summer sea ice extents in the modern era, with a new record summer minimum (3.4 million km2) set on 13 September 2012. It has been predicted that the Arctic could be free of summer ice within the next 25-30. The loss of Arctic summer ice could have serious consequences, such as higher water temperature due to the positive feedback of albedo, more powerful and frequent storms, rising sea levels, diminished habitats for polar animals, and more pollution due to fossil fuel exploitation and/ or increased traffic through the Northwest/ Northeast Passage. In these processes, melt ponds play an important role in Earth's radiation balance since they strongly absorb solar radiation rather than reflecting it as snow and ice do. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the ability of predicting the sea ice/ melt pond extents and space-time evolution, which is pivotal to prepare for the variation and uncertainty of the future environment, political, economic, and military needs. A lot of efforts have been put into Arctic sea ice modeling to simulate sea ice processes. However, these sea ice models were initiated and developed based on limited field surveys, aircraft or satellite image data. Therefore, it is necessary to collect high resolution sea ice aerial photo in a systematic way to tune up, validate, and improve models. Currently there are many sea ice aerial photos available, such as Chinese Arctic Exploration (CHINARE 2008, 2010, 2012), SHEBA 1998 and HOTRAX 2005. However, manually delineating of sea ice and melt pond from these images is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, we use the object-based remote sensing classification scheme to extract sea ice and melt ponds efficiently from 1,727 aerial photos taken during the CHINARE 2010. The algorithm includes three major steps as follows. (1) Image segmentation groups the neighboring pixels into objects according to the similarity of spectral and texture

  4. Design and realization of an image mosaic system on the CCD aerial camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai ying; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Hai bin; Li, Yan; Zhang, Shao jun

    2015-08-01

    It has long been difficulties in aerial photograph to stitch multi-route images into a panoramic image in real time for multi-route flight framing CCD camera with very large amount of data, and high accuracy requirements. An automatic aerial image mosaic system based on GPU development platform is described in this paper. Parallel computing of SIFT feature extraction and matching algorithm module is achieved by using CUDA technology for motion model parameter estimation on the platform, which makes it's possible to stitch multiple CCD images in real-time. Aerial tests proved that the mosaic system meets the user's requirements with 99% accuracy and 30 to 50 times' speed improvement of the normal mosaic system.

  5. High Density Aerial Image Matching: State-Of and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haala, N.; Cavegn, S.

    2016-06-01

    Ongoing innovations in matching algorithms are continuously improving the quality of geometric surface representations generated automatically from aerial images. This development motivated the launch of the joint ISPRS/EuroSDR project "Benchmark on High Density Aerial Image Matching", which aims on the evaluation of photogrammetric 3D data capture in view of the current developments in dense multi-view stereo-image matching. Originally, the test aimed on image based DSM computation from conventional aerial image flights for different landuse and image block configurations. The second phase then put an additional focus on high quality, high resolution 3D geometric data capture in complex urban areas. This includes both the extension of the test scenario to oblique aerial image flights as well as the generation of filtered point clouds as additional output of the respective multi-view reconstruction. The paper uses the preliminary outcomes of the benchmark to demonstrate the state-of-the-art in airborne image matching with a special focus of high quality geometric data capture in urban scenarios.

  6. A two-camera imaging system for pest detection and aerial application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This presentation reports on the design and testing of an airborne two-camera imaging system for pest detection and aerial application assessment. The system consists of two digital cameras with 5616 x 3744 effective pixels. One camera captures normal color images with blue, green and red bands, whi...

  7. A low-cost dual-camera imaging system for aerial applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft provide a readily available remote sensing platform as low-cost and easy-to-use consumer-grade cameras are being increasingly used for aerial imaging. In this article, we report on a dual-camera imaging system we recently assembled that can capture RGB and near-infrared (NIR) i...

  8. Automatic geolocation of targets tracked by aerial imaging platforms using satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Goel, S.; Singh, P.; Lohani, B.

    2014-11-01

    Tracking of targets from aerial platforms is an important activity in several applications, especially surveillance. Knowled ge of geolocation of these targets adds additional significant and useful information to the application. This paper determines the geolocation of a target being tracked from an aerial platform using the technique of image registration. Current approaches utilize a POS to determine the location of the aerial platform and then use the same for geolocation of the targets using the principle of photogrammetry. The constraints of cost and low-payload restrict the applicability of this approach using UAV platforms. This paper proposes a methodology for determining the geolocation of a target tracked from an aerial platform in a partially GPS devoid environment. The method utilises automatic feature based registration technique of a georeferenced satellite image with an ae rial image which is already stored in UAV's database to retrieve the geolocation of the target. Since it is easier to register subsequent aerial images due to similar viewing parameters, the subsequent overlapping images are registered together sequentially thus resulting in the registration of each of the images with georeferenced satellite image thus leading to geolocation of the target under interest. Using the proposed approach, the target can be tracked in all the frames in which it is visible. The proposed concept is verified experimentally and the results are found satisfactory. Using the proposed method, a user can obtain location of target of interest as well features on ground without requiring any POS on-board the aerial platform. The proposed approach has applications in surveillance for target tracking, target geolocation as well as in disaster management projects like search and rescue operations.

  9. A Comparison of Visual Statistics for the Image Enhancement of FORESITE Aerial Images with Those of Major Image Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Woodell, Glenn A.; Hines, Glenn D.

    2006-01-01

    Aerial images from the Follow-On Radar, Enhanced and Synthetic Vision Systems Integration Technology Evaluation (FORESITE) flight tests with the NASA Langley Research Center's research Boeing 757 were acquired during severe haze and haze/mixed clouds visibility conditions. These images were enhanced using the Visual Servo (VS) process that makes use of the Multiscale Retinex. The images were then quantified with visual quality metrics used internally with the VS. One of these metrics, the Visual Contrast Measure, has been computed for hundreds of FORESITE images, and for major classes of imaging--terrestrial (consumer), orbital Earth observations, orbital Mars surface imaging, NOAA aerial photographs, and underwater imaging. The metric quantifies both the degree of visual impairment of the original, un-enhanced images as well as the degree of visibility improvement achieved by the enhancement process. The large aggregate data exhibits trends relating to degree of atmospheric visibility attenuation, and its impact on limits of enhancement performance for the various image classes. Overall results support the idea that in most cases that do not involve extreme reduction in visibility, large gains in visual contrast are routinely achieved by VS processing. Additionally, for very poor visibility imaging, lesser, but still substantial, gains in visual contrast are also routinely achieved. Further, the data suggest that these visual quality metrics can be used as external standalone metrics for establishing performance parameters.

  10. Estimating growth status of winter wheat based on aerial images and hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yunxia; Li, Minzan; Jia, Liangliang; Zhang, Xijie; Zhang, Fusuo

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to estimate the growth status and yield of winter wheat using aerial images and hyperspectral data obtained by unmanned aircraft, and then to perform precision management to the crop. The test farm was divided into 48 cells. Twenty-four cells were selected as variable rate fertilization area, and the other 24 cells were used as contrast area with low fertilization in growth season. In 2004, the aerial images of winter wheat canopy were measured from an unmanned aircraft. The SPAD value of crop leaf was acquired using a SPAD-502 chlorophyll meter, and then the hyperspectral reflectance of the crop canopy was measured by a handheld spectroradiometer. The vegetation indices, NDVI and DVI, were calculated from the hyperspectral data. The characteristics of the aerial images were used to evaluate the growth status. The RGB values of all cells were calculated from aerial images. The result showed that total nitrogen had better correlation with SPAD, NDVI, DVI, and RGB. NDVI and DVI had high correlation with the growth condition, and R/(R+G+B) and G/(R+G+B) had good correlation with the growth status and yield. The variable rate fertilization based on aerial images and NDVI was executed in the experimental cells. The yield map showed that the spatial variation of the yield was reduced and the total yield was increased. While in contrast cells, the spatial variation of the yield is greater than in experimental cells because of the spatial variation of the field nutrition. Therefore, it is practical to use aerial images and hyperspectral data of the crop canopy in estimation of the crop growth status.

  11. An Interactive Technique for Cartographic Feature Extraction from Aerial and Satellite Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kicherer, Stefan; Malpica, Jose A.; Alonso, Maria C.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an interactive technique for extracting cartographic features from aerial and spatial images is presented. The method is essentially an interactive method of image region segmentation based on pixel grey level and texture information. The underlying segmentation method is seeded region growing. The criterion for growing regions is based on both texture and grey level, where texture is quantified using co-occurrence matrices. The Kullback distance is utilised with co-occurrence matrices in order to describe the image texture, then the Theory of Evidence is applied to merge the information coming from texture and grey level image from the RGB bands. Several results from aerial and spatial images that support the technique are presented

  12. Vehicle Detection of Aerial Image Using TV-L1 Texture Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Li, Y.; Huang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Vehicle detection from high-resolution aerial image facilitates the study of the public traveling behavior on a large scale. In the context of road, a simple and effective algorithm is proposed to extract the texture-salient vehicle among the pavement surface. Texturally speaking, the majority of pavement surface changes a little except for the neighborhood of vehicles and edges. Within a certain distance away from the given vector of the road network, the aerial image is decomposed into a smoothly-varying cartoon part and an oscillatory details of textural part. The variational model of Total Variation regularization term and L1 fidelity term (TV-L1) is adopted to obtain the salient texture of vehicles and the cartoon surface of pavement. To eliminate the noise of texture decomposition, regions of pavement surface are refined by seed growing and morphological operation. Based on the shape saliency analysis of the central objects in those regions, vehicles are detected as the objects of rectangular shape saliency. The proposed algorithm is tested with a diverse set of aerial images that are acquired at various resolution and scenarios around China. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can detect vehicles at the rate of 71.5% and the false alarm rate of 21.5%, and that the speed is 39.13 seconds for a 4656 x 3496 aerial image. It is promising for large-scale transportation management and planning.

  13. Aerial-image enables diagrams and animation to be inserted in motion pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, S. J., Jr.; Tressel, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Aerial-image unit makes it possible to insert diagrams and animation into live motion pictures, and also lift an element from a confusing background by suppressing general details. The unit includes a combination of two separate lens systems, the camera-projector system and the field lens system.

  14. Application of high resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles for hydrology and range science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A common problem in many natural resource disciplines is the lack of high-enough spatial resolution images that can be used for monitoring and modeling purposes. Advances have been made in the utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in hydrology and rangeland science. By utilizing low fligh...

  15. Crop Status Monitoring using Multispectral and Thermal Imaging systems for Accessible Aerial Platforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural aircraft and unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are easily scheduled and accessible remote sensing platforms. Canopy temperature data were taken with an Electrophysics PV-320T thermal imaging camera mounted in agricultural aircraft. Weather data and soil water potential were monitored and th...

  16. Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg; Ippolito, Corey

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results from a mission architecture study of planetary aerial explorers. In this study, several mission scenarios were developed in simulation and evaluated on success in meeting mission goals. This aerial explorer mission architecture study is unique in comparison with previous Mars airplane research activities. The study examines how aerial vehicles can find and gain access to otherwise inaccessible terrain features of interest. The aerial explorer also engages in a high-level of (indirect) surface interaction, despite not typically being able to takeoff and land or to engage in multiple flights/sorties. To achieve this goal, a new mission paradigm is proposed: aerial explorers should be considered as an additional element in the overall Entry, Descent, Landing System (EDLS) process. Further, aerial vehicles should be considered primarily as carrier/utility platforms whose purpose is to deliver air-deployed sensors and robotic devices, or symbiotes, to those high-value terrain features of interest.

  17. Semi-automatic detection of linear archaeological traces from orthorectified aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figorito, Benedetto; Tarantino, Eufemia

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a semi-automatic approach for archaeological traces detection from aerial images. The method developed was based on the multiphase active contour model (ACM). The image was segmented into three competing regions to improve the visibility of buried remains showing in the image as crop marks (i.e. centuriations, agricultural allocations, ancient roads, etc.). An initial determination of relevant traces can be quickly carried out by the operator by sketching straight lines close to the traces. Subsequently, tuning parameters (i.e. eccentricity, orientation, minimum area and distance from input line) are used to remove non-target objects and parameterize the detected traces. The algorithm and graphical user interface for this method were developed in a MATLAB environment and tested on high resolution orthorectified aerial images. A qualitative analysis of the method was lastly performed by comparing the traces extracted with ancient traces verified by archaeologists.

  18. Aerial Vehicle Surveys of other Planetary Atmospheres and Surfaces: Imaging, Remote-sensing, and Autonomy Technology Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Gregory; Ippolito, Corey; Alena, Rick

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the anticipated imaging and remote-sensing technology requirements for aerial vehicle survey missions to other planetary bodies in our Solar system that can support in-atmosphere flight. In the not too distant future such planetary aerial vehicle (a.k.a. aerial explorers) exploration missions will become feasible. Imaging and remote-sensing observations will be a key objective for these missions. Accordingly, it is imperative that optimal solutions in terms of imaging acquisition and real-time autonomous analysis of image data sets be developed for such vehicles.

  19. Software thermal imager simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Noc, Loic; Pancrati, Ovidiu; Doucet, Michel; Dufour, Denis; Debaque, Benoit; Turbide, Simon; Berthiaume, Francois; Saint-Laurent, Louis; Marchese, Linda; Bolduc, Martin; Bergeron, Alain

    2014-10-01

    A software application, SIST, has been developed for the simulation of the video at the output of a thermal imager. The approach offers a more suitable representation than current identification (ID) range predictors do: the end user can evaluate the adequacy of a virtual camera as if he was using it in real operating conditions. In particular, the ambiguity in the interpretation of ID range is cancelled. The application also allows for a cost-efficient determination of the optimal design of an imager and of its subsystems without over- or under-specification: the performances are known early in the development cycle, for targets, scene and environmental conditions of interest. The simulated image is also a powerful method for testing processing algorithms. Finally, the display, which can be a severe system limitation, is also fully considered in the system by the use of real hardware components. The application consists in Matlabtm routines that simulate the effect of the subsystems atmosphere, optical lens, detector, and image processing algorithms. Calls to MODTRAN® for the atmosphere modeling and to Zemax for the optical modeling have been implemented. The realism of the simulation depends on the adequacy of the input scene for the application and on the accuracy of the subsystem parameters. For high accuracy results, measured imager characteristics such as noise can be used with SIST instead of less accurate models. The ID ranges of potential imagers were assessed for various targets, backgrounds and atmospheric conditions. The optimal specifications for an optical design were determined by varying the Seidel aberration coefficients to find the worst MTF that still respects the desired ID range.

  20. Registration of multitemporal aerial optical images using line features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenyang; Goshtasby, A. Ardeshir

    2016-07-01

    Registration of multitemporal images is generally considered difficult because scene changes can occur between the times the images are obtained. Since the changes are mostly radiometric in nature, features are needed that are insensitive to radiometric differences between the images. Lines are geometric features that represent straight edges of rigid man-made structures. Because such structures rarely change over time, lines represent stable geometric features that can be used to register multitemporal remote sensing images. An algorithm to establish correspondence between lines in two images of a planar scene is introduced and formulas to relate the parameters of a homography transformation to the parameters of corresponding lines in images are derived. Results of the proposed image registration on various multitemporal images are presented and discussed.

  1. RIM-13: A high-resolution imaging tool for aerial image monitoring of patterned and blank EUV reticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Brunton, A.; Cashmore, J.; Elbourn, P.; Elliner, G.; Gower, M.; Greuters, J.; Hirsch, J.; Kling, L.; McEntee, N.; Richards, P.; Truffert, V.; Wallhead, I.; Whitfield, M.

    2006-03-01

    Key features of the RIM-13 EUV actinic reticle imaging microscope are summarised. This is a tool which generates aerial images from blank or patterned EUV masks, emulating the illumination and projection optics of an exposure tool. Such images of mask defects, acquired by a CCD camera, are analysed using the tool software to predict their effect on resist exposure. Optical, mechanical and software performance of the tool are reported.

  2. Increased productivity of repair verification by offline analysis of aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Ernesto; Sartelli, Luca; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Scheruebl, Thomas; Richter, Rigo; Thaler, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Using AIMSTM to qualify repairs of defects on photomasks is the industry standard. AIMSTM provides a reasonable matching of lithographic imaging performances without the need of wafer prints. The need of utilisation of this capability by photomask manufacturers has risen due to the increased complexity of layouts incorporating aggressive RET and phase shift technologies as well as tighter specifications have pushed aerial image metrology to consider CD performance results in addition to the traditional intensity verification. The content of the paper describes the utilisation of the AIMSTM Repair Verification (RV) software for the verification of aerial images in a mask shop production environment. The software is used to analyze images from various AIMSTM tool generations and the two main routines, Multi Slice Analysis (MSA) and Image Compare (IC), are used to compare defective and non-defective areas of aerial images. It is detailed how the RV software cleans "non real" errors potentially induced by operator misjudgements, thus providing accurate and repeatable analyses all proven against the results achieved manually. A user friendly GUI drives the user through few simple, fast and safe operations and automatically provides summary tables containing all the relevant results of the analysis that can be easily exported in a proper format and sent out to the customer as a technical documentation. This results in a sensible improvement of the throughput of the printability evaluation process in a mask manufacturing environment, providing reliable analyses at a higher productivity.

  3. Evaluation of Color Settings in Aerial Images with the Use of Eye-Tracking User Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirijovsky, J.; Popelka, S.

    2016-06-01

    The main aim of presented paper is to find the most realistic and preferred color settings for four different types of surfaces on the aerial images. This will be achieved through user study with the use of eye-movement recording. Aerial images taken by the unmanned aerial system were used as stimuli. From each image, squared crop area containing one of the studied types of surfaces (asphalt, concrete, water, soil, and grass) was selected. For each type of surface, the real value of reflectance was found with the use of precise spectroradiometer ASD HandHeld 2 which measures the reflectance. The device was used at the same time as aerial images were captured, so lighting conditions and state of vegetation were equal. The spectral resolution of the ASD device is better than 3.0 nm. For defining the RGB values of selected type of surface, the spectral reflectance values recorded by the device were merged into wider groups. Finally, we get three groups corresponding to RGB color system. Captured images were edited with the graphic editor Photoshop CS6. Contrast, clarity, and brightness were edited for all surface types on images. Finally, we get a set of 12 images of the same area with different color settings. These images were put into the grid and used as stimuli for the eye-tracking experiment. Eye-tracking is one of the methods of usability studies and it is considered as relatively objective. Eye-tracker SMI RED 250 with the sampling frequency 250 Hz was used in the study. As respondents, a group of 24 students of Geoinformatics and Geography was used. Their task was to select which image in the grid has the best color settings. The next task was to select which color settings they prefer. Respondents' answers were evaluated and the most realistic and most preferable color settings were found. The advantage of the eye-tracking evaluation was that also the process of the selection of the answers was analyzed. Areas of Interest were marked around each image in the

  4. First results for an image processing workflow for hyperspatial imagery acquired with a low-cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Very high-resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have great potential for use in rangeland monitoring and assessment, because the imagery fills the gap between ground-based observations and remotely sensed imagery from aerial or satellite sensors. However, because UAV imagery is ofte...

  5. Observation of coral reefs on Ishigaki Island, Japan, using Landsat TM images and aerial photographs

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Kayanne, Hajime

    1997-06-01

    Ishigaki Island is located at the southwestern end of Japanese Islands and famous for its fringing coral reefs. More than twenty LANDSAT TM images in twelve years and aerial photographs taken on 1977 and 1994 were used to survey two shallow reefs on this island, Shiraho and Kabira. Intensive field surveys were also conducted in 1995. All satellite images of Shiraho were geometrically corrected and overlaid to construct a multi-date satellite data set. The effects of solar elevation and tide on satellite imagery were studied with this data set. The comparison of aerial and satellite images indicated that significant changes occurred between 1977 and 1984 in Kabira: rapid formation in the western part and decrease in the eastern part of dark patches. The field surveys revealed that newly formed dark patches in the west contain young corals. These results suggest that remote sensing is useful for not only mapping but also monitoring of shallow coral reefs.

  6. Application of machine learning for the evaluation of turfgrass plots using aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Ke; Raheja, Amar; Bhandari, Subodh; Green, Robert L.

    2016-05-01

    Historically, investigation of turfgrass characteristics have been limited to visual ratings. Although relevant information may result from such evaluations, final inferences may be questionable because of the subjective nature in which the data is collected. Recent advances in computer vision techniques allow researchers to objectively measure turfgrass characteristics such as percent ground cover, turf color, and turf quality from the digital images. This paper focuses on developing a methodology for automated assessment of turfgrass quality from aerial images. Images of several turfgrass plots of varying quality were gathered using a camera mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. The quality of these plots were also evaluated based on visual ratings. The goal was to use the aerial images to generate quality evaluations on a regular basis for the optimization of water treatment. Aerial images are used to train a neural network so that appropriate features such as intensity, color, and texture of the turfgrass are extracted from these images. Neural network is a nonlinear classifier commonly used in machine learning. The output of the neural network trained model is the ratings of the grass, which is compared to the visual ratings. Currently, the quality and the color of turfgrass, measured as the greenness of the grass, are evaluated. The textures are calculated using the Gabor filter and co-occurrence matrix. Other classifiers such as support vector machines and simpler linear regression models such as Ridge regression and LARS regression are also used. The performance of each model is compared. The results show encouraging potential for using machine learning techniques for the evaluation of turfgrass quality and color.

  7. Satellite Hyperspectral Imaging Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanoni, Vicki; Stanley, Tom; Blonski, Slawomir; Cao, Changyong; Gasser, Jerry; Ryan, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Simulation of generic pushbroom satellite hyperspectral sensors have been performed to evaluate the potential performance and validation techniques for satellite systems such as COIS(NEMO), Warfighter-1(OrbView-4) and Hyperion(EO-1). The simulations start with a generation of synthetic scenes from material maps of studied terrain. Scene-reflected radiance is corrected for atmospheric effects and convolved with sensor spectral response using MODTRAN 4 radiance and transmissions calculations. Scene images are further convolved with point spread functions derived from Optical Transfer Functions (OTF's) of the sensor system. Photon noise and etectorr/electronics noise are added to the simulated images, which are also finally quantized to the sensor bit resolution. Studied scenes include bridges and straight roads used for evaluation of sensor spatial resolution, as well as fields of minerals, vegetation and manmade materials used for evaluation of sensor radiometric response and sensitivity. The scenes are simulated with various seasons and weather conditions. Signal-to-noise ratios and expected performance are estimated for typical satellite system specifications and are discussed for all the scenes.

  8. Detection and clustering of features in aerial images by neuron network-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozenilek, Vit

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the algorithm for detection and clustering of feature in aerial photographs based on artificial neural networks. The presented approach is not focused on the detection of specific topographic features, but on the combination of general features analysis and their use for clustering and backward projection of clusters to aerial image. The basis of the algorithm is a calculation of the total error of the network and a change of weights of the network to minimize the error. A classic bipolar sigmoid was used for the activation function of the neurons and the basic method of backpropagation was used for learning. To verify that a set of features is able to represent the image content from the user's perspective, the web application was compiled (ASP.NET on the Microsoft .NET platform). The main achievements include the knowledge that man-made objects in aerial images can be successfully identified by detection of shapes and anomalies. It was also found that the appropriate combination of comprehensive features that describe the colors and selected shapes of individual areas can be useful for image analysis.

  9. Mobile Aerial Tracking and Imaging System (MATRIS) for Aeronautical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Blanchard, R. C.; Miller, G. M.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile, rapidly deployable ground-based system to track and image targets of aeronautical interest has been developed. Targets include reentering reusable launch vehicles (RLVs) as well as atmospheric and transatmospheric vehicles. The optics were designed to image targets in the visible and infrared wavelengths. To minimize acquisition cost and development time, the system uses commercially available hardware and software where possible. The conception and initial funding of this system originated with a study of ground-based imaging of global aerothermal characteristics of RLV configurations. During that study NASA teamed with the Missile Defense Agency/Innovative Science and Technology Experimentation Facility (MDA/ISTEF) to test techniques and analysis on two Space Shuttle flights.

  10. EROS main image file - A picture perfect database for Landsat imagery and aerial photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation System (EROS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of the Interior in 1966 under the administration of the Geological Survey. It is primarily concerned with the application of remote sensing techniques for the management of natural resources. The retrieval system employed to search the EROS database is called INORAC (Inquiry, Ordering, and Accounting). A description is given of the types of images identified in EROS, taking into account Landsat imagery, Skylab images, Gemini/Apollo photography, and NASA aerial photography. Attention is given to retrieval commands, geographic coordinate searching, refinement techniques, various online functions, and questions regarding the access to the EROS Main Image File.

  11. Orientation and Dense Reconstruction of Unordered Terrestrial and Aerial Wide Baseline Image Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelsen, J.; Mayer, H.; Hirschmüller, H.; Kuhn, A.; Michelini, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present an approach for detailed and precise automatic dense 3D reconstruction using images from consumer cameras. The major difference between our approach and many others is that we focus on wide-baseline image sets. We have combined and improved several methods, particularly, least squares matching, RANSAC, scale-space maxima and bundle adjustment, for robust matching and parameter estimation. Point correspondences and the five-point algorithm lead to relative orientation. Due to our robust matching method it is possible to orient images under much more unfavorable conditions, for instance concerning illumination changes or scale differences, than for often used operators such as SIFT. For dense reconstruction, we use our orientation as input for Semiglobal Matching (SGM) resulting into dense depth images. The latter can be fused into a 2.5D model for eliminating the redundancy of the highly overlapping depth images. However, some applications require full 3D models. A solution to this problem is part of our current work, for which preliminary results are presented in this paper. With very small unmanned aerial systems (Micro UAS) it is possible to acquire images which have a perspective similar to terrestrial images and can thus be combined with them. Such a combination is useful for an almost complete 3D reconstruction of urban scenes. We have applied our approach to several hundred aerial and terrestrial images and have generated detailed 2.5D and 3D models of urban areas.

  12. Satellite Hyperspectral Imaging Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanoni, Vicki; Stanley, Tom; Blonski, Slawomir; Cao, Changyong; Gasser, Jerry; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki; Stanley, Tom

    1999-01-01

    Simulations of generic pushbroom satellite hyperspetral sensors have been performed to evaluate the potential performance and validation techniques for satellite systems such as COIS (NEMO), Warfighter-1 (OrbView-4), and Hyperion (EO-1). The simulaitons start with a generation of synthetic scenes form material maps of studied terrain. Scene-reflected radiance is corrected for atmospheric effects and convolved with sensor spectral response uwing MODTRAN 4 radiance and transmission calculations. Scene images are further convolved with point spread functions derived from Optical Transfer Functions (OTF's) of the sensor system. Photon noise and detector/electronics noise are added to the simulated images, which are also finally quantized to the sensor bit resolution. Studied scenes include bridges and straight roads used for evaluation of sensor spatial resolution, as well as fields of minerals, vegetation, and manmade materials used for evaluation of sensor radiometric response and sensitivity. The scenes are simulated with various seasons and weather conditions. Signal-to-noise ratos and expected performance are estimated for typica satellite system specifications and are discussed for all the scenes.

  13. Performance Validation of High Resolution Digital Surface Models Generated by Dense Image Matching with the Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastikli, N.; Bayraktar, H.; Erisir, Z.

    2014-11-01

    The digital surface models (DSM) are the most popular products to determine visible surface of Earth which includes all non-terrain objects such as vegetation, forest, and man-made constructions. The airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) is the preferred technique for high resolution DSM generation in local coverage. The automatic generation of the high resolution DSM is also possible with stereo image matching using the aerial images. The image matching algorithms usually rely on the feature based matching for DSM generation. First, feature points are extracted and then corresponding features are searched in the overlapping images. These image matching algorithms face with the problems in the areas which have repetitive pattern such as urban structure and forest. The recent innovation in camera technology and image matching algorithm enabled the automatic dense DSM generation for large scale city and environment modelling. The new pixel-wise matching approaches are generates very high resolution DSMs which corresponds to the ground sample distance (GSD) of the original images. The numbers of the research institutes and photogrammetric software vendors are currently developed software tools for dense DSM generation using the aerial images. This new approach can be used high resolution DSM generation for the larger cities, rural areas and forest even Nation-wide applications. In this study, the performance validation of high resolution DSM generated by pixel-wise dense image matching in part of Istanbul was aimed. The study area in Istanbul is including different land classes such as open areas, forest and built-up areas to test performance of dense image matching in different land classes. The obtained result from this performance validation in Istanbul test area showed that, high resolution DSM which corresponds to the ground sample distance (GSD) of original aerial image can be generated successfully by pixel-wise dense image matching using commercial and

  14. Semi-auto assessment system on building damage caused by landslide disaster with high-resolution satellite and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Xu, Qihua; He, Jun; Ge, Fengxiang; Wang, Ying

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, earthquake and heavy rain have triggered more and more landslides, which have caused serious economic losses. The timely detection of the disaster area and the assessment of the hazard are necessary and primary for disaster mitigation and relief. As high-resolution satellite and aerial images have been widely used in the field of environmental monitoring and disaster management, the damage assessment by processing satellite and aerial images has become a hot spot of research work. The rapid assessment of building damage caused by landslides with high-resolution satellite or aerial images is the focus of this article. In this paper, after analyzing the morphological characteristics of the landslide disaster, we proposed a set of criteria for rating building damage, and designed a semi-automatic evaluation system. The system is applied to the satellite and aerial images processing. The performance of the experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of our system.

  15. Transition Flight Simulation of Flapping-Wing Micro-Aerial Vehicle Using Aerodynamic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isogai, Koji; Kawabe, Hiroyasu

    The paper describes how to simulate the flight of a flapping-wing micro-aerial vehicle (MAV). It uses an aerodynamic database generated using three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code. The database is composed of the time mean aerodynamic forces and moments generated at various flapping wing motions in various flight modes. Flight is simulated utilizing the database by interpolation. The procedure is applied to transition flight of a dragonfly-type MAV with two-pairs of resonance-type flapping wings. The present MAV attains the mission of hovering, transition and cruising flights successfully with stable attitude.

  16. Moving object detection using dynamic motion modelling from UAV aerial images.

    PubMed

    Saif, A F M Saifuddin; Prabuwono, Anton Satria; Mahayuddin, Zainal Rasyid

    2014-01-01

    Motion analysis based moving object detection from UAV aerial image is still an unsolved issue due to inconsideration of proper motion estimation. Existing moving object detection approaches from UAV aerial images did not deal with motion based pixel intensity measurement to detect moving object robustly. Besides current research on moving object detection from UAV aerial images mostly depends on either frame difference or segmentation approach separately. There are two main purposes for this research: firstly to develop a new motion model called DMM (dynamic motion model) and secondly to apply the proposed segmentation approach SUED (segmentation using edge based dilation) using frame difference embedded together with DMM model. The proposed DMM model provides effective search windows based on the highest pixel intensity to segment only specific area for moving object rather than searching the whole area of the frame using SUED. At each stage of the proposed scheme, experimental fusion of the DMM and SUED produces extracted moving objects faithfully. Experimental result reveals that the proposed DMM and SUED have successfully demonstrated the validity of the proposed methodology. PMID:24892103

  17. Integrating aerial geophysical data in multiple-point statistics simulations to assist groundwater flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Neil E. M.; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Renard, Philippe; Straubhaar, Julien A.; McKinley, Jennifer M.; Ofterdinger, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    The process of accounting for heterogeneity has made significant advances in statistical research, primarily in the framework of stochastic analysis and the development of multiple-point statistics (MPS). Among MPS techniques, the direct sampling (DS) method is tested to determine its ability to delineate heterogeneity from aerial magnetics data in a regional sandstone aquifer intruded by low-permeability volcanic dykes in Northern Ireland, UK. The use of two two-dimensional bivariate training images aids in creating spatial probability distributions of heterogeneities of hydrogeological interest, despite relatively `noisy' magnetics data (i.e. including hydrogeologically irrelevant urban noise and regional geologic effects). These distributions are incorporated into a hierarchy system where previously published density function and upscaling methods are applied to derive regional distributions of equivalent hydraulic conductivity tensor K. Several K models, as determined by several stochastic realisations of MPS dyke locations, are computed within groundwater flow models and evaluated by comparing modelled heads with field observations. Results show a significant improvement in model calibration when compared to a simplistic homogeneous and isotropic aquifer model that does not account for the dyke occurrence evidenced by airborne magnetic data. The best model is obtained when normal and reverse polarity dykes are computed separately within MPS simulations and when a probability threshold of 0.7 is applied. The presented stochastic approach also provides improvement when compared to a previously published deterministic anisotropic model based on the unprocessed (i.e. noisy) airborne magnetics. This demonstrates the potential of coupling MPS to airborne geophysical data for regional groundwater modelling.

  18. Simulation of Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richsmeier, Steven C.; Singer-Berk, Alexander; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    2004-01-01

    A software package generates simulated hyperspectral imagery for use in validating algorithms that generate estimates of Earth-surface spectral reflectance from hyperspectral images acquired by airborne and spaceborne instruments. This software is based on a direct simulation Monte Carlo approach for modeling three-dimensional atmospheric radiative transport, as well as reflections from surfaces characterized by spatially inhomogeneous bidirectional reflectance distribution functions. In this approach, "ground truth" is accurately known through input specification of surface and atmospheric properties, and it is practical to consider wide variations of these properties. The software can treat both land and ocean surfaces, as well as the effects of finite clouds with surface shadowing. The spectral/spatial data cubes computed by use of this software can serve both as a substitute for, and a supplement to, field validation data.

  19. A Semi-Automated Single Day Image Differencing Technique to Identify Animals in Aerial Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Terletzky, Pat; Ramsey, Robert Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Our research presents a proof-of-concept that explores a new and innovative method to identify large animals in aerial imagery with single day image differencing. We acquired two aerial images of eight fenced pastures and conducted a principal component analysis of each image. We then subtracted the first principal component of the two pasture images followed by heuristic thresholding to generate polygons. The number of polygons represented the number of potential cattle (Bos taurus) and horses (Equus caballus) in the pasture. The process was considered semi-automated because we were not able to automate the identification of spatial or spectral thresholding values. Imagery was acquired concurrently with ground counts of animal numbers. Across the eight pastures, 82% of the animals were correctly identified, mean percent commission was 53%, and mean percent omission was 18%. The high commission error was due to small mis-alignments generated from image-to-image registration, misidentified shadows, and grouping behavior of animals. The high probability of correctly identifying animals suggests short time interval image differencing could provide a new technique to enumerate wild ungulates occupying grassland ecosystems, especially in isolated or difficult to access areas. To our knowledge, this was the first attempt to use standard change detection techniques to identify and enumerate large ungulates. PMID:24454827

  20. Parameter-Based Performance Analysis of Object-Based Image Analysis Using Aerial and Quikbird-2 Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavzoglu, T.; Yildiz, M.

    2014-09-01

    Opening new possibilities for research, very high resolution (VHR) imagery acquired by recent commercial satellites and aerial systems requires advanced approaches and techniques that can handle large volume of data with high local variance. Delineation of land use/cover information from VHR images is a hot research topic in remote sensing. In recent years, object-based image analysis (OBIA) has become a popular solution for image analysis tasks as it considers shape, texture and content information associated with the image objects. The most important stage of OBIA is the image segmentation process applied prior to classification. Determination of optimal segmentation parameters is of crucial importance for the performance of the selected classifier. In this study, effectiveness and applicability of the segmentation method in relation to its parameters was analysed using two VHR images, an aerial photo and a Quickbird-2 image. Multi-resolution segmentation technique was employed with its optimal parameters of scale, shape and compactness that were defined after an extensive trail process on the data sets. Nearest neighbour classifier was applied on the segmented images, and then the accuracy assessment was applied. Results show that segmentation parameters have a direct effect on the classification accuracy, and low values of scale-shape combinations produce the highest classification accuracies. Also, compactness parameter was found to be having minimal effect on the construction of image objects, hence it can be set to a constant value in image classification.

  1. Contact area as the intuitive definition of contact CD based on aerial image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonsky, Netanel; Sagiv, Amir; Mangan, Shmoolik

    2009-03-01

    As feature sizes continue to diminish, optical lithography is driven into the extreme low-k1 regime, where the high MEEF increasingly complicates the relationship between the mask pattern and the aerial image. This is true in particular for twodimensional mask patterns, which are by nature much more complicated than patterns possessing one-dimensional symmetry. Thus, the intricacy of 2D image formation typically requires a much broader arsenal of resolution enhancement techniques over complex phase shift masks, including SRAFs and OPC, as well as exotic off-axis illumination geometries. This complexity on the mask side makes the printability effect of a random defect on a 2D pattern a field of rich and delicate phenomenology. This complexity is reflected in the dispute over the CD definition of 2D patterns: some sources use the X and Y values, while others use the contact area. Here, we argue that for compact features, for which the largest dimension is not wider than the PSF of the stepper optics, the area definition is the natural one. We study the response of the aerial image to small perturbations in mask pattern. We show that any perturbation creates an effect extending in all directions, thus affecting the area and not the size in a single direction. We also show that, irrespective of the source of perturbation, the aerial signal is proportional to the variation in the area of the printed feature. The consequence of this effect is that aerial inspection signal scales linearly with the variation of printed area of the tested feature.

  2. U.S. DOE, Kazakhstan government launch aerial imaging project

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, J.

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Kazakhstan government have launched a breakthrough science and technology mission to use DOE technology developed to detect weapons proliferation to search for oil and mineral reserves in Kazakhstan. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is leading the research effort, which began in June. This mission to conduct airborne imaging flights over Kazakhstan is the result of a recently signed agreement between Pacific Northwest and Earth Search Sciences Inc., a remote sensing firm based in Idaho, to look for oil and mineral deposits in the Republic of Kazakhstan in central Asia. It is the first time this technology will be used outside the United States.

  3. Seasonal landslide mapping and estimation of landslide mobilization rates using aerial and satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, F.; Cardinali, M.; Carlà, R.; Rossi, M.; Mondini, A. C.; Santurri, L.; Ardizzone, F.; Guzzetti, F.

    2011-06-01

    We tested the possibility of using digital, color aerial ortho-photographs and monoscopic, panchromatic satellite images of comparable spatial and radiometric resolution, to map recent landslides in Italy and to update existing measures of landslide mobilization. In a 90-km 2 area in Umbria, central Apennines, rainfall resulted in abundant landslides in the period from September 2004 to June 2005. Analysis of the rainfall record determined the approximate dates of landslide occurrence and revealed that the slope failures occurred in response to moderately wet rainfall periods. The slope failures occurred primarily in cultivated terrain and left subtle morphological and land cover signatures, making the recognition and mapping of the individual landslides problematic. Despite the difficulty with the identification of the landslides without the use of stereoscopic visualization, visual analysis of the aerial and satellite images allowed mapping 457 new landslides, ranging in area 3.0 × 10 1 < AL < 2.5 × 10 4 m 2, for a total landslide area ALT = 6.92 × 10 5 m 2. To identify the landslides, the investigators adopted the interpretation criteria commonly used to identify and map landslides on aerial photography. The result confirms that monoscopic, very high resolution images taken by airborne and satellite sensors can be used to prepare landslide maps even where slope failures are difficult to detect, provided the imagery has sufficient geometric and radiometric resolutions. The different dates of the aerial (March 2005) and the satellite (June-July 2005) images allowed the temporal segmentation of the landslide information, and studying the statistics of landslide area and volume for different periods. Compared to pre-existing information on the abundance and size of the landslides in the area, the inventory obtained by studying the aerial and satellite images proved more complete. The new mapping showed 145% more landslides and 85% more landslide area than a pre

  4. Two matrix approaches for aerial image formation obtained by extending and modifying the transmission cross coefficients.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    This paper physically compares two different matrix representations of partially coherent imaging with the introduction of matrices E and Z, containing the source, object, and pupil. The matrix E is obtained by extending the Hopkins transmission cross coefficient (TCC) approach such that the pupil function is shifted while the matrix Z is obtained by shifting the object spectrum. The aerial image I can be written as a convex quadratic form I = = , where |phi> is a column vector representing plane waves. It is shown that rank(Z) < or = rank(E) = rank(T) = N, where T is the TCC matrix and N is the number of the point sources for a given unpolarized illumination. Therefore, the matrix Z requires fewer than N eigenfunctions for a complete aerial image formation, while the matrix E or T always requires N eigenfunctions. More importantly, rank(Z) varies depending on the degree of coherence determined by the von Neumann entropy, which is shown to relate to the mutual intensity. For an ideal pinhole as an object, emitting spatially coherent light, only one eigenfunction--i.e., the pupil function--is enough to describe the coherent imaging. In this case, we obtain rank(Z) = 1 and the pupil function as the only eigenfunction regardless of the illumination. However, rank(E) = rank(T) = N even when the object is an ideal pinhole. In this sense, aerial image formation with the matrix Z is physically more meaningful than with the matrix E. The matrix Z is decomposed as B(dagger)B, where B is a singular matrix, suggesting that the matrix B as well as Z is a principal operator characterizing the degree of coherence of the partially coherent imaging. PMID:20508699

  5. Land Use Classification from Vhr Aerial Images Using Invariant Colour Components and Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movia, A.; Beinat, A.; Sandri, T.

    2016-06-01

    Very high resolution (VHR) aerial images can provide detailed analysis about landscape and environment; nowadays, thanks to the rapid growing airborne data acquisition technology an increasing number of high resolution datasets are freely available. In a VHR image the essential information is contained in the red-green-blue colour components (RGB) and in the texture, therefore a preliminary step in image analysis concerns the classification in order to detect pixels having similar characteristics and to group them in distinct classes. Common land use classification approaches use colour at a first stage, followed by texture analysis, particularly for the evaluation of landscape patterns. Unfortunately RGB-based classifications are significantly influenced by image setting, as contrast, saturation, and brightness, and by the presence of shadows in the scene. The classification methods analysed in this work aim to mitigate these effects. The procedures developed considered the use of invariant colour components, image resampling, and the evaluation of a RGB texture parameter for various increasing sizes of a structuring element. To identify the most efficient solution, the classification vectors obtained were then processed by a K-means unsupervised classifier using different metrics, and the results were compared with respect to corresponding user supervised classifications. The experiments performed and discussed in the paper let us evaluate the effective contribution of texture information, and compare the most suitable vector components and metrics for automatic classification of very high resolution RGB aerial images.

  6. Real-time aerial multispectral imaging solutions using dichroic filter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Eric V.; Fish, David E.

    2014-06-01

    The next generation of multispectral sensors and cameras needs to deliver significant improvements in size, weight, portability, and spectral band customization to support widespread commercial deployment for a variety of purposebuilt aerial, unmanned, and scientific applications. The benefits of multispectral imaging are well established for applications including machine vision, biomedical, authentication, and remote sensing environments - but many aerial and OEM solutions require more compact, robust, and cost-effective production cameras to realize these benefits. A novel implementation uses micropatterning of dichroic filters into Bayer and custom mosaics, enabling true real-time multispectral imaging with simultaneous multi-band image acquisition. Consistent with color camera image processing, individual spectral channels are de-mosaiced with each channel providing an image of the field of view. We demonstrate recent results of 4-9 band dichroic filter arrays in multispectral cameras using a variety of sensors including linear, area, silicon, and InGaAs. Specific implementations range from hybrid RGB + NIR sensors to custom sensors with applicationspecific VIS, NIR, and SWIR spectral bands. Benefits and tradeoffs of multispectral sensors using dichroic filter arrays are compared with alternative approaches - including their passivity, spectral range, customization options, and development path. Finally, we report on the wafer-level fabrication of dichroic filter arrays on imaging sensors for scalable production of multispectral sensors and cameras.

  7. Film cameras or digital sensors? The challenge ahead for aerial imaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    Cartographic aerial cameras continue to play the key role in producing quality products for the aerial photography business, and specifically for the National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP). One NAPP photograph taken with cameras capable of 39 lp/mm system resolution can contain the equivalent of 432 million pixels at 11 ??m spot size, and the cost is less than $75 per photograph to scan and output the pixels on a magnetic storage medium. On the digital side, solid state charge coupled device linear and area arrays can yield quality resolution (7 to 12 ??m detector size) and a broader dynamic range. If linear arrays are to compete with film cameras, they will require precise attitude and positioning of the aircraft so that the lines of pixels can be unscrambled and put into a suitable homogeneous scene that is acceptable to an interpreter. Area arrays need to be much larger than currently available to image scenes competitive in size with film cameras. Analysis of the relative advantages and disadvantages of the two systems show that the analog approach is more economical at present. However, as arrays become larger, attitude sensors become more refined, global positioning system coordinate readouts become commonplace, and storage capacity becomes more affordable, the digital camera may emerge as the imaging system for the future. Several technical challenges must be overcome if digital sensors are to advance to where they can support mapping, charting, and geographic information system applications.

  8. Looking into the water with oblique head tilting: revision of the aerial binocular imaging of underwater objects.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Gábor; Buchta, Krisztián; Varjú, Dezsö

    2003-06-01

    It is a well-known phenomenon that when we look into the water with two aerial eyes, both the apparent position and the apparent shape of underwater objects are different from the real ones because of refraction at the water surface. Earlier studies of the refraction-distorted structure of the underwater binocular visual field of aerial observers were restricted to either vertically or horizontally oriented eyes. We investigate a generalized version of this problem: We calculate the position of the binocular image point of an underwater object point viewed by two arbitrarily positioned aerial eyes, including oblique orientations of the eyes relative to the flat water surface. Assuming that binocular image fusion is performed by appropriate vergent eye movements to bring the object's image onto the foveas, the structure of the underwater binocular visual field is computed and visualized in different ways as a function of the relative positions of the eyes. We show that a revision of certain earlier treatments of the aerial imaging of underwater objects is necessary. We analyze and correct some widespread erroneous or incomplete representations of this classical geometric optical problem that occur in different textbooks. Improving the theory of aerial binocular imaging of underwater objects, we demonstrate that the structure of the underwater binocular visual field of aerial observers distorted by refraction is more complex than has been thought previously. PMID:12801180

  9. Image degradation in aerial imagery duplicates. [photographic processing of photographic film and reproduction (copying)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    A series of Earth Resources Aircraft Program data flights were made over an aerial test range in Arizona for the evaluation of large cameras. Specifically, both medium altitude and high altitude flights were made to test and evaluate a series of color as well as black-and-white films. Image degradation, inherent in duplication processing, was studied. Resolution losses resulting from resolution characteristics of the film types are given. Color duplicates, in general, are shown to be degraded more than black-and-white films because of the limitations imposed by available aerial color duplicating stock. Results indicate that a greater resolution loss may be expected when the original has higher resolution. Photographs of the duplications are shown.

  10. Simulation study of unmanned aerial vehicle communication networks addressing bandwidth disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Sixiao; Ge, Linqiang; Yu, Wei; Chen, Genshe; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Shen, Dan; Lu, Chao

    2014-06-01

    To date, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have been widely used for numerous applications. UAVs can directly connect to ground stations or satellites to transfer data. Multiple UAVs can communicate and cooperate with each other and then construct an ad-hoc network. Multi-UAV systems have the potential to provide reliable and timely services for end users in addition to satellite networks. In this paper, we conduct a simulation study for evaluating the network performance of multi-UAV systems and satellite networks using the ns-2 networking simulation tool. Our simulation results show that UAV communication networks can achieve better network performance than satellite networks and with a lower cost and increased timeliness. We also investigate security resiliency of UAV networks. As a case study, we simulate false data injection attacks against UAV communication networks in ns-2 and demonstrate the impact of false data injection attacks on network performance.

  11. Underwater binocular imaging of aerial objects versus the position of eyes relative to the flat water surface.

    PubMed

    Barta, András; Horváth, Gábor

    2003-12-01

    The apparent position, size, and shape of aerial objects viewed binocularly from water change as a result of the refraction of light at the water surface. Earlier studies of the refraction-distorted structure of the aerial binocular visual field of underwater observers were restricted to either vertically or horizontally oriented eyes. Here we calculate the position of the binocular image point of an aerial object point viewed by two arbitrarily positioned underwater eyes when the water surface is flat. Assuming that binocular image fusion is performed by appropriate vergent eye movements to bring the object's image onto the foveae, the structure of the aerial binocular visual field is computed and visualized as a function of the relative positions of the eyes. We also analyze two erroneous representations of the underwater imaging of aerial objects that have occurred in the literature. It is demonstrated that the structure of the aerial binocular visual field of underwater observers distorted by refraction is more complex than has been thought previously. PMID:14686517

  12. Damaged road extracting with high-resolution aerial image of post-earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zezhong; Pu, Chengjun; Zhu, Mingcang; Xia, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Yalan; Li, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of earth observation technology, remote sensing images have played more important roles, because the high resolution images can provide the original data for object recognition, disaster investigation, and so on. When a disastrous earthquake breaks out, a large number of roads could be damaged instantly. There are a lot of approaches about road extraction, such as region growing, gray threshold, and k-means clustering algorithm. We could not obtain the undamaged roads with these approaches, if the trees or their shadows along the roads are difficult to be distinguished from the damaged road. In the paper, a method is presented to extract the damaged road with high resolution aerial image of post-earthquake. Our job is to extract the damaged road and the undamaged with the aerial image. We utilized the mathematical morphology approach and the k-means clustering algorithm to extract the road. Our method was composed of four ingredients. Firstly, the mathematical morphology filter operators were employed to remove the interferences from the trees or their shadows. Secondly, the k-means algorithm was employed to derive the damaged segments. Thirdly, the mathematical morphology approach was used to extract the undamaged road; Finally, we could derive the damaged segments by overlaying the road networks of pre-earthquake. Our results showed that the earthquake, broken in Yaan, was disastrous for the road, Therefore, we could take more measures to keep it clear.

  13. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  14. Point Cloud Generation from Aerial Image Data Acquired by a Quadrocopter Type Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Digital Still Camera

    PubMed Central

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems’ SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft®’s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  15. Simulation and Flight Control of an Aeroelastic Fixed Wing Micro Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin; Davidson, John B.; Ifju, Peter G.

    2002-01-01

    Micro aerial vehicles have been the subject of continued interest and development over the last several years. The majority of current vehicle concepts rely on rigid fixed wings or rotors. An alternate design based on an aeroelastic membrane wing has also been developed that exhibits desired characteristics in flight test demonstrations, competition, and in prior aerodynamics studies. This paper presents a simulation model and an assessment of flight control characteristics of the vehicle. Linear state space models of the vehicle associated with typical trimmed level flight conditions and which are suitable for control system design are presented as well. The simulation is used as the basis for the design of a measurement based nonlinear dynamic inversion control system and outer loop guidance system. The vehicle/controller system is the subject of ongoing investigations of autonomous and collaborative control schemes. The results indicate that the design represents a good basis for further development of the micro aerial vehicle for autonomous and collaborative controls research.

  16. A multi-scale registration of urban aerial image with airborne lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuo; Chen, Siying; Zhang, Yinchao; Guo, Pan; Chen, He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presented a multi-scale progressive registration method of airborne LiDAR data with aerial image. The cores of the proposed method lie in the coarse registration with road networks and the fine registration method using regularized building corners. During the two-stage registration, the exterior orientation parameters (EOP) are continually refined. By validation of the actual flight data of Dunhuang, the experimental result shows that the proposed method can obtain accurate results with low-precision initial EOP, also improve the automatic degree of registration.

  17. Density estimation in aerial images of large crowds for automatic people counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Christian; Metzler, Juergen

    2013-05-01

    Counting people is a common topic in the area of visual surveillance and crowd analysis. While many image-based solutions are designed to count only a few persons at the same time, like pedestrians entering a shop or watching an advertisement, there is hardly any solution for counting large crowds of several hundred persons or more. We addressed this problem previously by designing a semi-automatic system being able to count crowds consisting of hundreds or thousands of people based on aerial images of demonstrations or similar events. This system requires major user interaction to segment the image. Our principle aim is to reduce this manual interaction. To achieve this, we propose a new and automatic system. Besides counting the people in large crowds, the system yields the positions of people allowing a plausibility check by a human operator. In order to automatize the people counting system, we use crowd density estimation. The determination of crowd density is based on several features like edge intensity or spatial frequency. They indicate the density and discriminate between a crowd and other image regions like buildings, bushes or trees. We compare the performance of our automatic system to the previous semi-automatic system and to manual counting in images. By counting a test set of aerial images showing large crowds containing up to 12,000 people, the performance gain of our new system will be measured. By improving our previous system, we will increase the benefit of an image-based solution for counting people in large crowds.

  18. Analyzing Spectral Characteristics of Shadow Area from ADS-40 High Radiometric Resolution Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ta; Wu, Shou-Tsung; Chen, Chaur-Tzuhn; Chen, Jan-Chang

    2016-06-01

    The shadows in optical remote sensing images are regarded as image nuisances in numerous applications. The classification and interpretation of shadow area in a remote sensing image are a challenge, because of the reduction or total loss of spectral information in those areas. In recent years, airborne multispectral aerial image devices have been developed 12-bit or higher radiometric resolution data, including Leica ADS-40, Intergraph DMC. The increased radiometric resolution of digital imagery provides more radiometric details of potential use in classification or interpretation of land cover of shadow areas. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to analyze the spectral properties of the land cover in the shadow areas by ADS-40 high radiometric resolution aerial images, and to investigate the spectral and vegetation index differences between the various shadow and non-shadow land covers. According to research findings of spectral analysis of ADS-40 image: (i) The DN values in shadow area are much lower than in nonshadow area; (ii) DN values received from shadowed areas that will also be affected by different land cover, and it shows the possibility of land cover property retrieval as in nonshadow area; (iii) The DN values received from shadowed regions decrease in the visible band from short to long wavelengths due to scattering; (iv) The shadow area NIR of vegetation category also shows a strong reflection; (v) Generally, vegetation indexes (NDVI) still have utility to classify the vegetation and non-vegetation in shadow area. The spectral data of high radiometric resolution images (ADS-40) is potential for the extract land cover information of shadow areas.

  19. New Approach for Segmentation and Extraction of Single Tree from Point Clouds Data and Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homainejad, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses a new approach for reconstructing a 3D model from single trees via Airborne Laser Scanners (ALS) data and aerial images. The approach detects and extracts single tree from ALS data and aerial images. The existing approaches are able to provide bulk segmentation from a group of trees; however, some methods focused on detection and extraction of a particular tree from ALS and images. Segmentation of a single tree within a group of trees is mostly a mission impossible since the detection of boundary lines between the trees is a tedious job and basically it is not feasible. In this approach an experimental formula based on the height of the trees was developed and applied in order to define the boundary lines between the trees. As a result, each single tree was segmented and extracted and later a 3D model was created. Extracted trees from this approach have a unique identification and attribute. The output has application in various fields of science and engineering such as forestry, urban planning, and agriculture. For example in forestry, the result can be used for study in ecologically diverse, biodiversity and ecosystem.

  20. D Classification of Crossroads from Multiple Aerial Images Using Markov Random Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosov, S.; Rottensteiner, F.; Heipke, C.; Leitloff, J.; Hinz, S.

    2012-08-01

    The precise classification and reconstruction of crossroads from multiple aerial images is a challenging problem in remote sensing. We apply the Markov Random Fields (MRF) approach to this problem, a probabilistic model that can be used to consider context in classification. A simple appearance-based model is combined with a probabilistic model of the co-occurrence of class label at neighbouring image sites to distinguish up to 14 different classes that are relevant for scenes containing crossroads. The parameters of these models are learnt from training data. We use multiple overlap aerial images to derive a digital surface model (DSM) and a true orthophoto without moving cars. From the DSM and the orthophoto we derive feature vectors that are used in the classification. One of the features is a car confidence value that is supposed to support the classification when the road surface is occluded by static cars. Our approach is evaluated on a dataset of airborne photos of an urban area by a comparison of the results to reference data. Whereas the method has problems in distinguishing classes having a similar appearance, it is shown to produce promising results if a reduced set of classes is considered, yielding an overall classification accuracy of 74.8%.

  1. Fractal methods for extracting artificial objects from the unmanned aerial vehicle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have become used increasingly in earth surface observations, with a special interest put into automatic modes of environmental control and recognition of artificial objects. Fractal methods for image processing well detect the artificial objects in digital space images but were not applied previously to the UAV-produced imagery. Parameters of photography, on-board equipment, and image characteristics differ considerably for spacecrafts and UAVs. Therefore, methods that work properly with space images can produce different results for the UAVs. In this regard, testing the applicability of fractal methods for the UAV-produced images and determining the optimal range of parameters for these methods represent great interest. This research is dedicated to the solution of this problem. Specific features of the earth's surface images produced with UAVs are described in the context of their interpretation and recognition. Fractal image processing methods for extracting artificial objects are described. The results of applying these methods to the UAV images are presented.

  2. Nonlinear Estimation Approach to Real-Time Georegistration from Aerial Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Padgett, Curtis W.

    2012-01-01

    When taking aerial images, it is important to know locations of specific points of interest in an Earth-centered coordinate system (latitude, longitude, height). The correspondence between a pixel location in the image and its Earth coordinate is known as georegistration. There are two main technical challenges arising in the intended application. The first is that no known features are assumed to be available in any of the images. The second is that the intended applications are real time. Here, images are taken at regular intervals (i.e. once per second), and it is desired to make decisions in real time based on the geolocation of specific objects seen in the images as they arrive. This is in sharp contrast to most current methods for geolocation that operate "after-the-fact" by processing, on the ground, a database of stored images using computationally intensive methods. The solution is a nonlinear estimation algorithm that combines processed realtime camera images with vehicle position and attitude information ob tained from an onboard GPS receiver. This approach provides accurate georegistration estimates (latitude, longitude, height) of arbitrary features and/or points of interest seen in the camera images. This solves the georegistration problem at the modest cost of augmenting the camera information with a GPS receiver carried onboard the vehicle.

  3. Methods for Evaluating the Temperature Structure-Function Parameter Using Unmanned Aerial Systems and Large-Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, Charlotte E.; Bonin, Timothy A.; Chilson, Phillip B.; Gibbs, Jeremy A.; Fedorovich, Evgeni; Palmer, Robert D.

    2015-05-01

    Small-scale turbulent fluctuations of temperature are known to affect the propagation of both electromagnetic and acoustic waves. Within the inertial-subrange scale, where the turbulence is locally homogeneous and isotropic, these temperature perturbations can be described, in a statistical sense, using the structure-function parameter for temperature, . Here we investigate different methods of evaluating , using data from a numerical large-eddy simulation together with atmospheric observations collected by an unmanned aerial system and a sodar. An example case using data from a late afternoon unmanned aerial system flight on April 24 2013 and corresponding large-eddy simulation data is presented and discussed.

  4. Aerial imaging technology for photomask qualification: from a microscope to a metrology tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Anthony; Scherübl, Thomas; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2012-09-01

    Photomasks carry the structured information of the chip designs printed with lithography scanners onto wafers. These structures, for the most modern technologies, are enlarged by a factor of 4 with respect to the final circuit design, and 20-60 of these photomasks are needed for the production of a single completed chip used, for example, in computers or cell phones. Lately, designs have been reported to be on the drawing board with close to 100 of these layers. Each of these photomasks will be reproduced onto the wafer several hundred times and typically 5000-50 000 wafers will be produced with each of them. Hence, the photomasks need to be absolutely defect-free to avoid any fatal electrical shortcut in the design or drastic performance degradation. One well-known method in the semiconductor industry is to analyze the aerial image of the photomask in a dedicated tool referred to as Aerial Imaging Measurement System, which emulates the behavior of the respective lithography scanner used for the imaging of the mask. High-end lithography scanners use light with a wavelength of 193 nm and high numerical apertures (NAs) of 1.35 utilizing a water film between the last lens and the resist to be illuminated (immersion scanners). Complex illumination shapes enable the imaging of structures well below the wavelength used. Future lithography scanners will work at a wavelength of 13.5 nm [extreme ultraviolet (EUV)] and require the optical system to work with mirrors in vacuum instead of the classical lenses used in current systems. The exact behavior of these systems is emulated by the Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS™; a Trademark of Carl Zeiss). With these systems, any position of the photomask can be imaged under the same illumination condition used by the scanners, and hence, a prediction of the printing behavior of any structure can be derived. This system is used by mask manufacturers in their process flow to review critical defects or verify defect repair

  5. Automatic aerial image shadow detection through the hybrid analysis of RGB and HIS color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Li, Huilin; Peng, Zhiyong

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents our research on automatic shadow detection from high-resolution aerial image through the hybrid analysis of RGB and HIS color space. To this end, the spectral characteristics of shadow are firstly discussed and three kinds of spectral components including the difference between normalized blue and normalized red component - BR, intensity and saturation components are selected as criterions to obtain initial segmentation of shadow region (called primary segmentation). After that, within the normalized RGB color space and HIS color space, the shadow region is extracted again (called auxiliary segmentation) using the OTSU operation, respectively. Finally, the primary segmentation and auxiliary segmentation are combined through a logical AND-connection operation to obtain reliable shadow region. In this step, small shadow areas are removed from combined shadow region and morphological algorithms are apply to fill small holes as well. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can effectively detect the shadow region from high-resolution aerial image and in high degree of automaton.

  6. Feature-based registration of historical aerial images by Area Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Sudhagar; Schenk, Toni

    2016-06-01

    The registration of historical images plays a significant role in assessing changes in land topography over time. By comparing historical aerial images with recent data, geometric changes that have taken place over the years can be quantified. However, the lack of ground control information and precise camera parameters has limited scientists' ability to reliably incorporate historical images into change detection studies. Other limitations include the methods of determining identical points between recent and historical images, which has proven to be a cumbersome task due to continuous land cover changes. Our research demonstrates a method of registering historical images using Time Invariant Line (TIL) features. TIL features are different representations of the same line features in multi-temporal data without explicit point-to-point or straight line-to-straight line correspondence. We successfully determined the exterior orientation of historical images by minimizing the area formed between corresponding TIL features in recent and historical images. We then tested the feasibility of the approach with synthetic and real data and analyzed the results. Based on our analysis, this method shows promise for long-term 3D change detection studies.

  7. An aerial remote sensing image's mosaic approach using multi-layer wavelet fusion based on structure similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Li; Shi, Junsheng; Huang, Xiaoqiao; Ding, Huimei

    2015-12-01

    In order to solve the problems that image's entropy of information decline obviously and boundary line phenomenon appear obviously in the processing of aerial remote sensing image's mosaic, an image mosaic approach is presented in this paper, which uses wavelet image fusion based on structure similarity and is capable of creating seamless mosaics in real-time. The approach consists of three steps. First, the overlapping area of two aerial images is extracted. Then, the two overlapping area images are fused adaptively by the method of multi-layer wavelet decomposition based on the structure similarity and appointed regulation. Finally, weighted average fusion is used again to avoid the visible boundary line for the both sides of the boundary of the above fusion image. Experimental results show the entropy of information, sharpness and standard deviation have been improved significantly, and the boundary line has been eliminated observably.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of mask phase defects from through-focus EUV aerial images

    SciTech Connect

    Mochi, Iacopo; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-02-21

    Mask defects inspection and imaging is one of the most important issues for any pattern transfer lithography technology. This is especially true for EUV lithography where the wavelength-specific properties of masks and defects necessitate actinic inspection for a faithful prediction of defect printability and repair performance. In this paper we will present a technique to obtain a quantitative characterization of mask phase defects from EUV aerial images. We apply this technique to measure the aerial image phase of native defects on a blank mask, measured with the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) an EUV zoneplate microscope that operates at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measured phase is compared with predictions made from AFM top-surface measurements of those defects. While amplitude defects are usually easy to recognize and quantify with standard inspection techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), defects or structures that have a phase component can be much more challenging to inspect. A phase defect can originate from the substrate or from any level of the multilayer. In both cases its effect on the reflected field is not directly related to the local topography of the mask surface, but depends on the deformation of the multilayer structure. Using the AIT, we have previously showed that EUV inspection provides a faithful and reliable way to predict the appearance of mask defect on the printed wafer; but to obtain a complete characterization of the defect we need to evaluate quantitatively its phase component. While aerial imaging doesn't provide a direct measurement of the phase of the object, this information is encoded in the through focus evolution of the image intensity distribution. Recently we developed a technique that allows us to extract the complex amplitude of EUV mask defects using two aerial images from different focal planes. The method for the phase reconstruction is derived from the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS

  9. Demonstration of a multimode longwave infrared imaging system on an unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Terry L.; Romanski, John G.; Buckley, John J.; Girata, Anthony J.

    1999-07-01

    The RISTA II sensor was integrated into the Altus Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and flown over Camp Roberts and Ft. Hunter Ligget, CA in July 1998. The RISTA II demonstration system consisted of a long-wave IR imager, a digital data link, and a ground processing facility (GPF) containing an aided target recognizer, data storage devices, and operator workstations. Imagery was compressed on the UAV and sent on the GPF over a 10.71 Mbit per second digital data link. Selected image frames from the GPF were sent near real-time over a T1 link to observers in Rosslyn, VA. The sensor operated in a variety of scanning and framing modes. Both manual and automatic sensor pointing were demonstrated. Seven flights were performed at altitudes up to 7500m and range sup to 60 km from the GPF. Applicability to numerous military and civilian scenarios was demonstrated.

  10. Modelling and representation issues in automated feature extraction from aerial and satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowmya, Arcot; Trinder, John

    New digital systems for the processing of photogrammetric and remote sensing images have led to new approaches to information extraction for mapping and Geographic Information System (GIS) applications, with the expectation that data can become more readily available at a lower cost and with greater currency. Demands for mapping and GIS data are increasing as well for environmental assessment and monitoring. Hence, researchers from the fields of photogrammetry and remote sensing, as well as computer vision and artificial intelligence, are bringing together their particular skills for automating these tasks of information extraction. The paper will review some of the approaches used in knowledge representation and modelling for machine vision, and give examples of their applications in research for image understanding of aerial and satellite imagery.

  11. Three-dimensional building roof boundary extraction using high-resolution aerial image and LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Poz, A. P.; Fazan, Antonio J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a semiautomatic method for rectilinear building roof boundary extraction, based on the integration of high-resolution aerial image and LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data. The proposed method is formulated as an optimization problem, in which a snakes-based objective function is developed to represent the building roof boundaries in an object-space coordinate system. Three-dimensional polylines representing building roof boundaries are obtained by optimizing the objective function using the dynamic programming optimization technique. The results of our experiments showed that the proposed method satisfactorily performed the task of extracting different building roof boundaries from aerial image and LiDAR data.

  12. Development and testing of a laboratory spray table methodology to bioassay simulated levels of aerial spray drift

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to develop a repeatable methodology for bioassaying simulated levels of aerially applied glyphosate at deposition levels ranging from 1/3 to 1/100 of labeled rate at droplet sizes of 100 µm in a spray table environment. These drift deposition levels are consistent wit...

  13. Semi-automated analysis of high-resolution aerial images to quantify docks in glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Marcus W.; Vondracek, Bruce; Hatch, Lorin K.; Vinje, Jason

    2013-07-01

    Lake resources can be negatively affected by environmental stressors originating from multiple sources and different spatial scales. Shoreline development, in particular, can negatively affect lake resources through decline in habitat quality, physical disturbance, and impacts on fisheries. The development of remote sensing techniques that efficiently characterize shoreline development in a regional context could greatly improve management approaches for protecting and restoring lake resources. The goal of this study was to develop an approach using high-resolution aerial photographs to quantify and assess docks as indicators of shoreline development. First, we describe a dock analysis workflow that can be used to quantify the spatial extent of docks using aerial images. Our approach incorporates pixel-based classifiers with object-based techniques to effectively analyze high-resolution digital imagery. Second, we apply the analysis workflow to quantify docks for 4261 lakes managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Overall accuracy of the analysis results was 98.4% (87.7% based on K^) after manual post-processing. The analysis workflow was also 74% more efficient than the time required for manual digitization of docks. These analyses have immediate relevance for resource planning in Minnesota, whereas the dock analysis workflow could be used to quantify shoreline development in other regions with comparable imagery. These data can also be used to better understand the effects of shoreline development on aquatic resources and to evaluate the effects of shoreline development relative to other stressors.

  14. Aerial image measurement technique for automated reticle defect disposition (ARDD) in wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Schmid, Rainer M.; Stegemann, B.; Scheruebl, Thomas; Harnisch, Wolfgang; Kobiyama, Yuji

    2004-08-01

    The Aerial Image Measurement System (AIMS)* for 193 nm lithography emulation has been brought into operation successfully worldwide. A second generation system comprising 193 nm AIMS capability, mini-environment and SMIF, the AIMS fab 193 plus is currently introduced into the market. By adjustment of numerical aperture (NA), illumination type and partial illumination coherence to match the conditions in 193 nm steppers or scanners, it can emulate the exposure tool for any type of reticles like binary, OPC and PSM down to the 65 nm node. The system allows a rapid prediction of wafer printability of defects or defect repairs, and critical features, like dense patterns or contacts on the masks without the need to perform expensive image qualification consisting of test wafer exposures followed by SEM measurements. Therefore, AIMS is a mask quality verification standard for high-end photo masks and established in mask shops worldwide. The progress on the AIMS technology described in this paper will highlight that besides mask shops there will be a very beneficial use of the AIMS in the wafer fab and we propose an Automated Reticle Defect Disposition (ARDD) process. With smaller nodes, where design rules are 65 nm or less, it is expected that smaller defects on reticles will occur in increasing numbers in the wafer fab. These smaller mask defects will matter more and more and become a serious yield limiting factor. With increasing mask prices and increasing number of defects and severability on reticles it will become cost beneficial to perform defect disposition on the reticles in wafer production. Currently ongoing studies demonstrate AIMS benefits for wafer fab applications. An outlook will be given for extension of 193 nm aerial imaging down to the 45 nm node based on emulation of immersion scanners.

  15. Three-Dimensional Building Reconstruction Using Images Obtained by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wefelscheid, C.; Hänsch, R.; Hellwich, O.

    2011-09-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) offer several new possibilities in a wide range of applications. One example is the 3D reconstruction of buildings. In former times this was either restricted by earthbound vehicles to the reconstruction of facades or by air-borne sensors to generate only very coarse building models. This paper describes an approach for fully automatic image-based 3D reconstruction of buildings using UAVs. UAVs are able to observe the whole 3D scene and to capture images of the object of interest from completely different perspectives. The platform used by this work is a Falcon 8 octocopter from Ascending Technologies. A slightly modified high-resolution consumer camera serves as sensor for data acquisition. The final 3D reconstruction is computed offline after image acquisition and follows a reconstruction process originally developed for image sequences obtained by earthbound vehicles. The per- formance of the described method is evaluated on benchmark datasets showing that the achieved accuracy is high and even comparable with Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR). Additionally, the results of the application of the complete processing-chain starting at image acquisition and ending in a dense surface-mesh are presented and discussed.

  16. Detection of Laurel Wilt Disease in Avocado Using Low Altitude Aerial Imaging

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana I.; Ehsani, Reza; Ploetz, Randy C.; Crane, Jonathan H.; Buchanon, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a lethal disease of plants in the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). This devastating disease has spread rapidly along the southeastern seaboard of the United States and has begun to affect commercial avocado production in Florida. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the potential to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees using aerial images taken with a modified camera during helicopter surveys at low-altitude in the commercial avocado production area. The ability to distinguish laurel wilt-affected trees from other factors that produce similar external symptoms was also studied. RmodGB digital values of healthy trees and laurel wilt-affected trees, as well as fruit stress and vines covering trees were used to calculate several vegetation indices (VIs), band ratios, and VI combinations. These indices were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an M-statistic was performed in order to quantify the separability of those classes. Significant differences in spectral values among laurel wilt affected and healthy trees were observed in all vegetation indices calculated, although the best results were achieved with Excess Red (ExR), (Red–Green) and Combination 1 (COMB1) in all locations. B/G showed a very good potential for separate the other factors with symptoms similar to laurel wilt-affected trees, such as fruit stress and vines covering trees, from laurel wilt-affected trees. These consistent results prove the usefulness of using a modified camera (RmodGB) to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees from healthy trees, as well as from other factors that cause the same symptoms and suggest performing the classification in further research. According to our results, ExR and B/G should be utilized to develop an algorithm or decision rules to classify aerial images, since they showed the highest capacity to discriminate laurel wilt-affected trees. This methodology may allow the rapid

  17. Detection of laurel wilt disease in avocado using low altitude aerial imaging.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana I; Ehsani, Reza; Ploetz, Randy C; Crane, Jonathan H; Buchanon, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    Laurel wilt is a lethal disease of plants in the Lauraceae plant family, including avocado (Persea americana). This devastating disease has spread rapidly along the southeastern seaboard of the United States and has begun to affect commercial avocado production in Florida. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the potential to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees using aerial images taken with a modified camera during helicopter surveys at low-altitude in the commercial avocado production area. The ability to distinguish laurel wilt-affected trees from other factors that produce similar external symptoms was also studied. RmodGB digital values of healthy trees and laurel wilt-affected trees, as well as fruit stress and vines covering trees were used to calculate several vegetation indices (VIs), band ratios, and VI combinations. These indices were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and an M-statistic was performed in order to quantify the separability of those classes. Significant differences in spectral values among laurel wilt affected and healthy trees were observed in all vegetation indices calculated, although the best results were achieved with Excess Red (ExR), (Red-Green) and Combination 1 (COMB1) in all locations. B/G showed a very good potential for separate the other factors with symptoms similar to laurel wilt-affected trees, such as fruit stress and vines covering trees, from laurel wilt-affected trees. These consistent results prove the usefulness of using a modified camera (RmodGB) to discriminate laurel wilt-affected avocado trees from healthy trees, as well as from other factors that cause the same symptoms and suggest performing the classification in further research. According to our results, ExR and B/G should be utilized to develop an algorithm or decision rules to classify aerial images, since they showed the highest capacity to discriminate laurel wilt-affected trees. This methodology may allow the rapid detection

  18. Comparison of event-based landslide inventory maps obtained interpreting satellite images and aerial photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Cardinali, Mauro; Carlà Roberto; Mondini, Alessandro; Santurri, Leonardo; Guzzetti, Fausto

    2010-05-01

    Landslide inventory maps are a common type of map used for geomorphological investigations, land planning, and hazard and risk assessment. Landslide inventory maps covering medium to large areas are obtained primarily exploiting traditional geomorphological techniques. These techniques combine the visual and heuristic interpretation of stereoscopic aerial photographs with more or less extensive field investigations. Aerial photographs most commonly used to prepare landslide inventory maps range in scale from about 1:10,000 to about 1:40,000. Interpretation of satellite images is a relatively recent, powerful tool to obtain information of the Earth surface potentially useful for the production of landslide inventory maps. The usefulness of satellite information - and the associated technology - for the identification of landslides and the production of landslide inventory maps, remains largely unexplored. In this context, it is of interest to investigate the type, quantity, and quality of the information that can be retrieved analyzing images taken by the last generation of high and very-high resolution satellite sensors, and to compare this information with the information obtained from the analysis of traditional stereoscopic aerial photographs, or in the field. In the framework of the MORFEO project for the exploitation of Earth Observation data and technology for landslide identification and risk assessment, of the Italian Space Agency, we have compared two event-based landslide inventory maps prepared exploiting two different techniques. The two maps portray the geographical distribution and types of landslides triggered by rainfall in the period from November 2004 to May 2005 in the Collazzone area, Umbria, central Italy. The first map was prepared through reconnaissance field surveys carried out mostly along roads. The second map was obtained through the combined visual interpretation of 1:10,000 scale, colour ortho-photo maps, and images taken by the IKONOS

  19. Semantic Segmentation of Aerial Images in Urban Areas with Class-Specific Higher-Order Cliques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya-Zegarra, J. A.; Wegner, J. D.; Ladický, L.; Schindler, K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we propose an approach to multi-class semantic segmentation of urban areas in high-resolution aerial images with classspecific object priors for buildings and roads. What makes model design challenging are highly heterogeneous object appearances and shapes that call for priors beyond standard smoothness or co-occurrence assumptions. The data term of our energy function consists of a pixel-wise classifier that learns local co-occurrence patterns in urban environments. To specifically model the structure of roads and buildings, we add high-level shape representations for both classes by sampling large sets of putative object candidates. Buildings are represented by sets of compact polygons, while roads are modeled as a collection of long, narrow segments. To obtain the final pixel-wise labeling, we use a CRF with higher-order potentials that balances the data term with the object candidates. We achieve overall labeling accuracies of > 80%.

  20. Integrating Spray Plane-Based Remote Sensing and Rapid Image Processing with Variable-Rate Aerial Application.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A remote sensing and variable rate application system was configured for agricultural aircraft. This combination system has the potential of providing a completely integrated solution for all aspects of aerial site-specific application and includes remote sensing, image processing and georegistratio...

  1. Building roof segmentation from aerial images using a lineand region-based watershed segmentation technique.

    PubMed

    El Merabet, Youssef; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  2. An asymmetric re-weighting method for the precision combined bundle adjustment of aerial oblique images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Linfu; Hu, Han; Wang, Jingxue; Zhu, Qing; Chen, Min

    2016-07-01

    Combined bundle adjustment is a fundamental step in the processing of massive oblique images. Traditional bundle adjustment designed for nadir images gives identical weights to different parts of image point observations made from different directions, due to the assumption that the errors in the observations follow the same Gaussian distribution. However, because of their large tilt angles, aerial oblique images have trapezoidal footprints on the ground, and their areas correspond to conspicuously different ground sample distances. The errors in different observations no longer conform to the above assumption, which leads to suboptimal bundle adjustment accuracy and restricts subsequent 3D applications. To model the distribution of the errors correctly for the combined bundle adjustment of oblique images, this paper proposes an asymmetric re-weighting method. The scale of each pixel is used to determine a re-weighting factor, and each pixel is subsequently projected onto the ground to identify another anisotropic re-weighting factor using the shape of its quadrangle. Next, these two factors are integrated into the combined bundle adjustment using asymmetric weights for the image point observations; greater weights are assigned to observations with fine resolutions, and those with coarse resolutions are penalized. This paper analyzes urban and rural images captured by three different five-angle camera systems, from both proprietary datasets and the ISPRS/EuroSDR benchmark. The results reveal that the proposed method outperforms the traditional method in both back-projected and triangulated precision by approximately 5-10% in most cases. Furthermore, the misalignments of point clouds generated by the different cameras are significantly alleviated after combined bundle adjustment.

  3. TERAPIXEL IMAGING OF COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Yu; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Khandai, Nishikanta; Sargent, Randy; Nourbakhsh, Illah; Dille, Paul; Bartley, Chris; Springel, Volker; Jana, Anirban; Gardner, Jeffrey

    2011-12-01

    The increasing size of cosmological simulations has led to the need for new visualization techniques. We focus on smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations run with the GADGET code and describe methods for visually accessing the entire simulation at full resolution. The simulation snapshots are rastered and processed on supercomputers into images that are ready to be accessed through a Web interface (GigaPan). This allows any scientist with a Web browser to interactively explore simulation data sets in both spatial and temporal dimensions and data sets which in their native format can be hundreds of terabytes in size or more. We present two examples, the first a static terapixel image of the MassiveBlack simulation, a P-GADGET SPH simulation with 65 billion particles, and the second an interactively zoomable animation of a different simulation with more than 1000 frames, each a gigapixel in size. Both are available for public access through the GigaPan Web interface. We also make our imaging software publicly available.

  4. Extracting roads based on Retinex and improved Canny operator with shape criteria in vague and unevenly illuminated aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronggui, Ma; Weixing, Wang; Sheng, Liu

    2012-01-01

    An automatic road extraction method for vague aerial images is proposed in this paper. First, a high-resolution but low-contrast image is enhanced by using a Retinex-based algorithm. Then, the enhanced image is segmented with an improved Canny edge detection operator that can automatically threshold the image into a binary edge image. Subsequently, the linear and curved road segments are regulated by the Hough line transform and extracted based on several thresholds of road size and shapes, in which a number of morphological operators are used such as thinning (skeleton), junction detection, and endpoint detection. In experiments, a number of vague aerial images with bad uniformity are selected for testing. Similarity and discontinuation-based algorithms, such as Otsu thresholding, merge and split, edge detection-based algorithms, and the graph-based algorithm are compared with the new method. The experiment and comparison results show that the studied method can enhance vague, low-contrast, and unevenly illuminated color aerial road images; it can detect most road edges with fewer disturb elements and trace roads with good quality. The method in this study is promising.

  5. An Aerial-Image Dense Matching Approach Based on Optical Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Wei; Chen, Shiyu; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Jianya; Shibasaki, Ryosuke

    2016-06-01

    Dense matching plays an important role in many fields, such as DEM (digital evaluation model) producing, robot navigation and 3D environment reconstruction. Traditional approaches may meet the demand of accuracy. But the calculation time and out puts density is hardly be accepted. Focus on the matching efficiency and complex terrain surface matching feasibility an aerial image dense matching method based on optical flow field is proposed in this paper. First, some high accurate and uniformed control points are extracted by using the feature based matching method. Then the optical flow is calculated by using these control points, so as to determine the similar region between two images. Second, the optical flow field is interpolated by using the multi-level B-spline interpolation in the similar region and accomplished the pixel by pixel coarse matching. Final, the results related to the coarse matching refinement based on the combined constraint, which recognizes the same points between images. The experimental results have shown that our method can achieve per-pixel dense matching points, the matching accuracy achieves sub-pixel level, and fully meet the three-dimensional reconstruction and automatic generation of DSM-intensive matching's requirements. The comparison experiments demonstrated that our approach's matching efficiency is higher than semi-global matching (SGM) and Patch-based multi-view stereo matching (PMVS) which verifies the feasibility and effectiveness of the algorithm.

  6. Stereoscopic Imaging for Obstacle Detection Onboard Low-Flying Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Emad

    Obstacle detection for low-flying unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) poses unique engineering challenges in terms of real-time implementation as well as system accuracy. Of all the available techniques for carrying out this task, optical sensors stand out as an inexpensive, lightweight and reliable solution. Image processing methods are used to analyze the images captured by the UAV camera(s) and to generate information pertaining to the location and motion of the obstacles in the field of view. These methods, however, can be computationally intensive and must be optimized if they are to be implemented in a moving vehicle. Additionally, the measurement of distance usually requires a high level of calibration before the results are useful. This thesis proposes a calibration method rooted in image data analysis and shows how this can be used to accurately predict the distance to obstacles. An algorithm tailored specifically to low-flying UAVs (Sparse Edge Reconstruction) is presented. Both the calibration method and the algorithm were used to analyze video gathered on a low-altitude test flight.

  7. Advanced Tie Feature Matching for the Registration of Mobile Mapping Imaging Data and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jende, P.; Peter, M.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping's ability to acquire high-resolution ground data is opposing unreliable localisation capabilities of satellite-based positioning systems in urban areas. Buildings shape canyons impeding a direct line-of-sight to navigation satellites resulting in a deficiency to accurately estimate the mobile platform's position. Consequently, acquired data products' positioning quality is considerably diminished. This issue has been widely addressed in the literature and research projects. However, a consistent compliance of sub-decimetre accuracy as well as a correction of errors in height remain unsolved. We propose a novel approach to enhance Mobile Mapping (MM) image orientation based on the utilisation of highly accurate orientation parameters derived from aerial imagery. In addition to that, the diminished exterior orientation parameters of the MM platform will be utilised as they enable the application of accurate matching techniques needed to derive reliable tie information. This tie information will then be used within an adjustment solution to correct affected MM data. This paper presents an advanced feature matching procedure as a prerequisite to the aforementioned orientation update. MM data is ortho-projected to gain a higher resemblance to aerial nadir data simplifying the images' geometry for matching. By utilising MM exterior orientation parameters, search windows may be used in conjunction with a selective keypoint detection and template matching. Originating from different sensor systems, however, difficulties arise with respect to changes in illumination, radiometry and a different original perspective. To respond to these challenges for feature detection, the procedure relies on detecting keypoints in only one image. Initial tests indicate a considerable improvement in comparison to classic detector/descriptor approaches in this particular matching scenario. This method leads to a significant reduction of outliers due to the limited availability

  8. Mapping temporal changes in connectivity using high-resolution aerial data and object based image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselink, Rens; Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia; Seeger, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Within the field of geomorphology mapping has always been an important tool to interpret spatial and temporal distributions of phenomena and processes at the surface. In the field of connectivity however, although throughout the past decade many articles have been published, there are only very few that go into the mapping of connectivity. This study aimed at developing a new, automated method for mapping connectivity within agricultural catchments. The method, which is a combination of Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) and traditional geomorphological field mapping, was applied to two agricultural catchments in Navarre, Spain, both with an area of approximately 2 sq.km. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was used to take aerial photographs with a resolution of 6 cm, of which a DEM with a 12 cm resolution was created using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. Connectivity was mapped within the study areas using OBIA using a top down method, meaning that connectivity was mapped at different scale levels, starting at the largest scale. Firstly sub-catchments were automatically delineated, after which several characteristics and features that affect connectivity within the sub-catchments were classified, e.g. landuse, landslides, rills, gullies, riparian vegetation, changes in slope, ploughing direction etc. In two consecutive years (2013-2014) photographs were taken and connectivity of both catchments of both years will be compared. Future work will include a quantification of the mapped connectivity (highly connected years vs. low connected years), causes and consequences of these differences in connectivity, comparison to existing connectivity indices and comparison of mapped connectivity in sub-catchments and measured discharge.

  9. Mass image data storage system for high resolution aerial photographic survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Luan; Tan, Jiubin; Zhao, Zhongwen

    2008-10-01

    In order to make it possible for an image data acquisition and storage system used for aerial photographic survey to have a continuous storage speed of 144 MB/s and data storage capacity of 260GB, three main problems have been solved in this paper. First, with multi-channel synchronous DMA transfer, parallel data storage of four SCSI hard disks is realized. It solved the problem of the data transfer rate too high for direct storage. Then, to increase the data transfer rate, a high speed BUS based on LVDS and a SCSI control circuit based on FAS368M were designed. It solved the problem of PCI BUS limiting the storage speed. Finally, the problem of the SCSI hard disk continuous storage speed declining led by much time interval between two DMA transfers is solved by optimizing DMA channel. The practical system test shows that the acquisition and storage system has a continuous storage speed of 150 MB/s and a data storage capacity of 280GB. Therefore, it is a new storage method for high speed and mass image data.

  10. The Need of Nested Grids for Aerial and Satellite Images and Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, G.; Mas, S.; Fernández-Villarino, X.; Martínez-Luceño, J.; Ojeda, J. C.; Pérez-Martín, B.; Tejeiro, J. A.; García-González, C.; López-Romero, E.; Soteres, C.

    2016-06-01

    Usual workflows for production, archiving, dissemination and use of Earth observation images (both aerial and from remote sensing satellites) pose big interoperability problems, as for example: non-alignment of pixels at the different levels of the pyramids that makes it impossible to overlay, compare and mosaic different orthoimages, without resampling them and the need to apply multiple resamplings and compression-decompression cycles. These problems cause great inefficiencies in production, dissemination through web services and processing in "Big Data" environments. Most of them can be avoided, or at least greatly reduced, with the use of a common "nested grid" for mutiresolution production, archiving, dissemination and exploitation of orthoimagery, digital elevation models and other raster data. "Nested grids" are space allocation schemas that organize image footprints, pixel sizes and pixel positions at all pyramid levels, in order to achieve coherent and consistent multiresolution coverage of a whole working area. A "nested grid" must be complemented by an appropriate "tiling schema", ideally based on the "quad-tree" concept. In the last years a "de facto standard" grid and Tiling Schema has emerged and has been adopted by virtually all major geospatial data providers. It has also been adopted by OGC in its "WMTS Simple Profile" standard. In this paper we explain how the adequate use of this tiling schema as common nested grid for orthoimagery, DEMs and other types of raster data constitutes the most practical solution to most of the interoperability problems of these types of data.

  11. Miniaturization of sub-meter resolution hyperspectral imagers on unmanned aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Samuel L.; Clemens, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Traditional airborne environmental monitoring has frequently deployed hyperspectral imaging as a leading tool for characterizing and analyzing a scene's critical spectrum-based signatures for applications in agriculture genomics and crop health, vegetation and mineral monitoring, and hazardous material detection. As the acceptance of hyperspectral evaluation grows in the airborne community, there has been a dramatic trend in moving the technology from use on midsize aircraft to Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). The use of UAS accomplishes a number of goals including the reduction in cost to run multiple seasonal evaluations over smaller but highly valuable land-areas, the ability to use frequent data collections to make rapid decisions on land management, and the improvement of spatial resolution by flying at lower altitudes (< 150 m). Despite this trend, there are several key parameters affecting the use of traditional hyperspectral instruments in UAS with payloads less than 0.5 kg (~1lb) where size, weight and power (SWaP) are critical to how high and how far a given UAS can fly. Additionally, on many of the light-weight UAS, users are frequently trying to capture data from one or more instruments to augment the hyperspectral data collection, thus reducing the amount of SWaP available to the hyperspectral instrumentation. The following manuscript will provide an analysis on a newly-developed miniaturized hyperspectral imaging platform that provides full hyperspectral resolution and traditional hyperspectral capabilities without sacrificing performance to accommodate the decreasing SWaP of smaller and smaller UAS platforms.

  12. Color image simulation for underwater optics.

    PubMed

    Boffety, Matthieu; Galland, Frédéric; Allais, Anne-Gaëlle

    2012-08-10

    Underwater optical image simulation is a valuable tool for oceanic science, especially for the characterization of image processing techniques such as color restoration. In this context, simulating images with a correct color rendering is crucial. This paper presents an extension of existing image simulation models to RGB imaging. The influence of the spectral discretization of the model parameters on the color rendering of the simulated images is studied. It is especially shown that, if only RGB data of the scene chosen for simulations are available, a spectral reconstruction step prior to the simulations improves the image color rendering. PMID:22885575

  13. Aerodynamic analysis and simulation of a twin-tail tilt-duct unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahi, Cyrus

    The tilt-duct vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) concept has been around since the early 1960s; however, to date the design has never passed the research phase and development phase. Nearly 50 years later, American Dynamics Flight Systems (ADFS) is developing the AD-150, a 2,250lb weight class unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) configured with rotating ducts on each wingtip. Unlike its predecessor, the Doak VZ-4, the AD-150 features a V tail and wing sweep -- both of which affect the aerodynamic behavior of the aircraft. Because no aircraft of this type has been built and tested, vital aerodynamic research was conducted on the bare airframe behavior (without wingtip ducts). Two weeks of static and dynamic testing were performed on a 3/10th scale model at the University of Maryland's 7' x 10' low speed wind tunnel to facilitate the construction of a nonlinear flight simulator. A total of 70 dynamic tests were performed to obtain damping parameter estimates using the ordinary least squares methodology. Validation, based on agreement between static and dynamic estimates of the pitch and yaw stiffness terms, showed an average percent error of 14.0% and 39.6%, respectively. These inconsistencies were attributed to: large dynamic displacements not encountered during static testing, regressor collinearity, and, while not conclusively proven, differences in static and dynamic boundary layer development. Overall, the damping estimates were consistent and repeatable, with low scatter over a 95% confidence interval. Finally, a basic open loop simulation was executed to demonstrate the instability of the aircraft. As a result, it is recommended that future work be performed to determine trim points and linear models for controls development.

  14. Low-Level Tie Feature Extraction of Mobile Mapping Data (mls/images) and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jende, P.; Hussnain, Z.; Peter, M.; Oude Elberink, S.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-03-01

    Mobile Mapping (MM) is a technique to obtain geo-information using sensors mounted on a mobile platform or vehicle. The mobile platform's position is provided by the integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). However, especially in urban areas, building structures can obstruct a direct line-of-sight between the GNSS receiver and navigation satellites resulting in an erroneous position estimation. Therefore, derived MM data products, such as laser point clouds or images, lack the expected positioning reliability and accuracy. This issue has been addressed by many researchers, whose aim to mitigate these effects mainly concentrates on utilising tertiary reference data. However, current approaches do not consider errors in height, cannot achieve sub-decimetre accuracy and are often not designed to work in a fully automatic fashion. We propose an automatic pipeline to rectify MM data products by employing high resolution aerial nadir and oblique imagery as horizontal and vertical reference, respectively. By exploiting the MM platform's defective, and therefore imprecise but approximate orientation parameters, accurate feature matching techniques can be realised as a pre-processing step to minimise the MM platform's three-dimensional positioning error. Subsequently, identified correspondences serve as constraints for an orientation update, which is conducted by an estimation or adjustment technique. Since not all MM systems employ laser scanners and imaging sensors simultaneously, and each system and data demands different approaches, two independent workflows are developed in parallel. Still under development, both workflows will be presented and preliminary results will be shown. The workflows comprise of three steps; feature extraction, feature matching and the orientation update. In this paper, initial results of low-level image and point cloud feature extraction methods will be discussed as well as an outline of

  15. Three-dimensional imaging applications in Earth Sciences using video data acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Tara

    For three dimensional (3D) aerial images, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are cheaper to operate and easier to fly than the typical manned craft mounted with a laser scanner. This project explores the feasibility of using 2D video images acquired with a UAV and transforming them into 3D point clouds. The Aeryon Scout -- a quad-copter micro UAV -- flew two missions: the first at York University Keele campus and the second at the Canadian Wollastonite Mine Property. Neptec's ViDAR software was used to extract 3D information from the 2D video using structure from motion. The resulting point clouds were sparsely populated, yet captured vegetation well. They were used successfully to measure fracture orientation in rock walls. Any improvement in the video resolution would cascade through the processing and improve the overall results.

  16. A supervised method for object-based 3D building change detection on aerial stereo images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, R.; Gruen, A.

    2014-08-01

    There is a great demand for studying the changes of buildings over time. The current trend for building change detection combines the orthophoto and DSM (Digital Surface Models). The pixel-based change detection methods are very sensitive to the quality of the images and DSMs, while the object-based methods are more robust towards these problems. In this paper, we propose a supervised method for building change detection. After a segment-based SVM (Support Vector Machine) classification with features extracted from the orthophoto and DSM, we focus on the detection of the building changes of different periods by measuring their height and texture differences, as well as their shapes. A decision tree analysis is used to assess the probability of change for each building segment and the traffic lighting system is used to indicate the status "change", "non-change" and "uncertain change" for building segments. The proposed method is applied to scanned aerial photos of the city of Zurich in 2002 and 2007, and the results have demonstrated that our method is able to achieve high detection accuracy.

  17. Development of test methods for scale model simulation of aerial applications in the NASA Langley Vortex Research Facility. [agricultural aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, F. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    As part of basic research to improve aerial applications technology, methods were developed at the Langley Vortex Research Facility to simulate and measure deposition patterns of aerially-applied sprays and granular materials by means of tests with small-scale models of agricultural aircraft and dynamically-scaled test particles. Interactions between the aircraft wake and the dispersed particles are being studied with the objective of modifying wake characteristics and dispersal techniques to increase swath width, improve deposition pattern uniformity, and minimize drift. The particle scaling analysis, test methods for particle dispersal from the model aircraft, visualization of particle trajectories, and measurement and computer analysis of test deposition patterns are described. An experimental validation of the scaling analysis and test results that indicate improved control of chemical drift by use of winglets are presented to demonstrate test methods.

  18. Miniaturization of high spectral spatial resolution hyperspectral imagers on unmanned aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Samuel L.; Clemens, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Traditional airborne environmental monitoring has frequently deployed hyperspectral imaging as a leading tool for characterizing and analyzing a scene's critical spectrum-based signatures for applications in agriculture genomics and crop health, vegetation and mineral monitoring, and hazardous material detection. As the acceptance of hyperspectral evaluation grows in the airborne community, there has been a dramatic trend in moving the technology from use on midsize aircraft to Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS). The use of UAS accomplishes a number of goals including the reduction in cost to run multiple seasonal evaluations over smaller but highly valuable land-areas, the ability to use frequent data collections to make rapid decisions on land management, and the improvement of spatial resolution by flying at lower altitudes (<500 ft.). Despite this trend, there are several key parameters affecting the use of traditional hyperspectral instruments in UAS with payloads less than 10 lbs. where size, weight and power (SWAP) are critical to how high and how far a given UAS can fly. Additionally, on many of the light-weight UAS, users are frequently trying to capture data from one or more instruments to augment the hyperspectral data collection, thus reducing the amount of SWAP available to the hyperspectral instrumentation. The following manuscript will provide an analysis on a newly-developed miniaturized hyperspectral imaging platform, the Nano-Hyperspec®, which provides full hyperspectral resolution and traditional hyperspectral capabilities without sacrificing performance to accommodate the decreasing SWAP of smaller and smaller UAS platforms. The analysis will examine the Nano-Hyperspec flown in several UAS airborne environments and the correlation of the systems data with LiDAR and other GIS datasets.

  19. Registration of Laser Scanning Point Clouds and Aerial Images Using either Artificial or Natural Tie Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rönnholm, P.; Haggrén, H.

    2012-07-01

    Integration of laser scanning data and photographs is an excellent combination regarding both redundancy and complementary. Applications of integration vary from sensor and data calibration to advanced classification and scene understanding. In this research, only airborne laser scanning and aerial images are considered. Currently, the initial registration is solved using direct orientation sensors GPS and inertial measurements. However, the accuracy is not usually sufficient for reliable integration of data sets, and thus the initial registration needs to be improved. A registration of data from different sources requires searching and measuring of accurate tie features. Usually, points, lines or planes are preferred as tie features. Therefore, the majority of resent methods rely highly on artificial objects, such as buildings, targets or road paintings. However, in many areas no such objects are available. For example in forestry areas, it would be advantageous to be able to improve registration between laser data and images without making additional ground measurements. Therefore, there is a need to solve registration using only natural features, such as vegetation and ground surfaces. Using vegetation as tie features is challenging, because the shape and even location of vegetation can change because of wind, for example. The aim of this article was to compare registration accuracies derived by using either artificial or natural tie features. The test area included urban objects as well as trees and other vegetation. In this area, two registrations were performed, firstly, using mainly built objects and, secondly, using only vegetation and ground surface. The registrations were solved applying the interactive orientation method. As a result, using artificial tie features leaded to a successful registration in all directions of the coordinate system axes. In the case of using natural tie features, however, the detection of correct heights was difficult causing

  20. Low-Altitude Coastal Aerial Photogrammetry for High-Resolution Seabed Imaging and Habitat Mapping of Shallow Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alevizos, E.

    2012-04-01

    This paper explores the application of Kite Aerial Photography at the coastal environment along with digital photogrammetry for seabed geomorphological mapping. This method takes advantage of sea-water clearance that allows the transmission of sunlight through the water column and backscatter of seabed reflection under certain conditions of sunlight, weather and sea state. We analyze the procedure of acquisition, processing and interpretation of kite aerial imagery from the sub-littoral zone up to 5 meters depth. Using a calibrated non-metric digital compact camera we managed to acquire several vertical aerial images from two coastal sites in the Attica Peninsula (Greece) covering an area of approximately 200x100 meters. Both sites express significant geomorphological variability and they have a relatively smooth slope profile. For the photogrammetric processing we acquired topographic and bathymetric survey simultaneously with Kite Aerial Photography using a portable GPS of sub-meter accuracy. In order to deal with bottom control measurements we developed Bottom Control Points which were placed on the seabed. These act like the Ground Control Points and they can be easily deployed in the marine environment. The processing included interior and exterior orientation as well as ortho-rectification of images. This produced final orthomosaics for each site at scales 1:500 - 1:1500 with a resolution of a few centimeters. Interpretation of the seabed was based on color and texture features of certain areas with explicit seabed reflectivity and was supported by underwater photographs for ground truthing. At the final stage of image analysis, we recognized the boundaries (contrasting reflectivity) between different bottom types and digitized them as 2D objects using GIS. Concluding, this project emphasizes on the advantages and physical restrictions of Kite Aerial Photography in mapping small-scale geomorphological features in coastal, estuarine and lagoonal environments

  1. Learning Scene Categories from High Resolution Satellite Image for Aerial Video Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2011-01-01

    Automatic scene categorization can benefit various aerial video processing applications. This paper addresses the problem of predicting the scene category from aerial video frames using a prior model learned from satellite imagery. We show that local and global features in the form of line statistics and 2-D power spectrum parameters respectively can characterize the aerial scene well. The line feature statistics and spatial frequency parameters are useful cues to distinguish between different urban scene categories. We learn the scene prediction model from highresolution satellite imagery to test the model on the Columbus Surrogate Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (CSUAV) dataset ollected by high-altitude wide area UAV sensor platform. e compare the proposed features with the popular Scale nvariant Feature Transform (SIFT) features. Our experimental results show that proposed approach outperforms te SIFT model when the training and testing are conducted n disparate data sources.

  2. Aerial Images from AN Uav System: 3d Modeling and Tree Species Classification in a Park Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, R.; Passoni, D.; Pinto, L.; Sona, G.

    2012-07-01

    The use of aerial imagery acquired by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is scheduled within the FoGLIE project (Fruition of Goods Landscape in Interactive Environment): it starts from the need to enhance the natural, artistic and cultural heritage, to produce a better usability of it by employing audiovisual movable systems of 3D reconstruction and to improve monitoring procedures, by using new media for integrating the fruition phase with the preservation ones. The pilot project focus on a test area, Parco Adda Nord, which encloses various goods' types (small buildings, agricultural fields and different tree species and bushes). Multispectral high resolution images were taken by two digital compact cameras: a Pentax Optio A40 for RGB photos and a Sigma DP1 modified to acquire the NIR band. Then, some tests were performed in order to analyze the UAV images' quality with both photogrammetric and photo-interpretation purposes, to validate the vector-sensor system, the image block geometry and to study the feasibility of tree species classification. Many pre-signalized Control Points were surveyed through GPS to allow accuracy analysis. Aerial Triangulations (ATs) were carried out with photogrammetric commercial software, Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) and PhotoModeler, with manual or automatic selection of Tie Points, to pick out pros and cons of each package in managing non conventional aerial imagery as well as the differences in the modeling approach. Further analysis were done on the differences between the EO parameters and the corresponding data coming from the on board UAV navigation system.

  3. Satellite Images and Aerial Photographs of the Effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on Coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barras, John A.

    2007-01-01

    -water datasets derived from the Landsat TM satellite imagery were combined with 2001 marsh vegetative communities (Chabreck and others, unpub. data, 2001) to identify land-water configurations by marsh community before and after the hurricanes. Links to the Landsat TM images and aerial photographs are given below (figs. 1-29). Comparison of land area before the storms to land area after the storms is made possible by the inclusion of Landsat TM images and aerial photographs taken in the years and months before the storms. The figures are arranged geographically from east to west to follow the chronology of the effects of the storms. For a more detailed analysis of the changes wrought by these storms, see 'Land Area Changes in Coastal Louisiana After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita' (Barras, in press).

  4. Semi-Automated Classification of Gray Scale Aerial Photographs using Geographic Object Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harb Rabia, Ahmed; Terribile, Fabio

    2013-04-01

    Aerial photography is an important source of high resolution remotely sensed data. Before 1970, aerial photographs were the only remote sensing data source for land use and land cover classification. Using these old aerial photographs improve the final output of land use and land cover change detection. However, classic techniques of aerial photographs classification like manual interpretation or screen digitization require great experience, long processing time and vast effort. A new technique needs to be developed in order to reduce processing time and effort and to give better results. Geographic object based image analysis (GEOBIA) is a newly developed area of Geographic Information Science and remote sensing in which automatic segmentation of images into objects of similar spectral, temporal and spatial characteristics is undertaken. Unlike pixel-based technique, GEOBIA deals with the object properties such as texture, square fit, roundness and many other properties that can improve classification results. GEOBIA technique can be divided into two main steps; segmentation and classification. Segmentation process is grouping adjacent pixels into objects of similar spectral and spatial characteristics. Classification process is assigning classes to the generated objects based on the characteristics of the individual objects. This study aimed to use GEOBIA technique to develop a novel approach for land use and land cover classification of aerial photographs that saves time and effort and gives improved results. Aerial photographs from 1954 of Valle Telesina in Italy were used in this study. Images were rectified and georeferenced in Arcmap using topographic maps. Images were then processed in eCognition software to generate land use and land cover map of 1954. A decision tree rule set was developed in eCognition to classify images and finally nine classes of general land use and land cover in the study area were recognized (forest, trees stripes, agricultural

  5. Digital Camera Calibration Using Images Taken from AN Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M.; Agüera, F.; Carvajal, F.

    2011-09-01

    For calibrating the camera, an accurate determination of the interior orientation parameters is needed. For more accurate results, the calibration images should be taken under conditions that are similar to the field samples. The aim of this work is the establishment of an efficient and accurate digital camera calibration method to be used in particular working conditions, as it can be found with our UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetric projects. The UAV used in this work was md4-200 modelled by Microdrones. The microdrone is also equipped with a standard digital non- metric camera, the Pentax Optio A40 camera. To find out the interior orientation parameters of the digital camera, two calibration methods were done. A lab calibration based on a flat pattern and a field calibration were fulfilled. To carry out the calibration, Photomodeler Scanner software was used in both cases. The lab calibration process was completely automatic using a calibration grid. The focal length was fixed at widest angle and the network included a total of twelve images with± 90º roll angles. In order to develop the field calibration, a flight plan was programmed including a total of twelve images. In the same way as in the lab calibration, the focal length was fixed at widest angle. The field test used in the study was a flat surface located on the University of Almería campus and a set of 67 target points were placed. The calibration field area was 25 × 25 m approximately and the altitude flight over ground was 50 m. After the software processing, the camera calibration parameter values were obtained. The paper presents the process, the results and the accuracy of these calibration methods. The field calibration method reduced the final total error obtained in the previous lab calibration. Furthermore the overall RMSs obtained from both methods are similar. Therefore we will apply the field calibration results to all our photogrammetric projects in which the flight high

  6. Application of high resolution images from unmanned aerial vehicles for hydrology and rangeland science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C. A.; Perini, N. A.; Saripalli, S.; Laliberte, A.

    2012-12-01

    A common problem in many natural resource disciplines is the lack of high-enough spatial resolution images that can be used for monitoring and modeling purposes. Advances have been made in the utilization of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in hydrology and rangeland science. By utilizing low flight altitudes and velocities, UAVs are able to produce high resolution (5 cm) images as well as stereo coverage (with 75% forward overlap and 40% sidelap) to extract digital elevation models (DEM). Another advantage of flying at low altitude is that the potential problems of atmospheric haze obscuration are eliminated. Both small fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft have been used in our experiments over two rangeland areas in the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico and the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. The fixed-wing UAV has a digital camera in the wing and six-band multispectral camera in the nose, while the rotary-wing UAV carries a digital camera as payload. Because we have been acquiring imagery for several years, there are now > 31,000 photos at one of the study sites, and 177 mosaics over rangeland areas have been constructed. Using the DEM obtained from the imagery we have determined the actual catchment areas of three watersheds and compared these to previous estimates. At one site, the UAV-derived watershed area is 4.67 ha which is 22% smaller compared to a manual survey using a GPS unit obtained several years ago. This difference can be significant in constructing a watershed model of the site. From a vegetation species classification, we also determined that two of the shrub types in this small watershed(mesquite and creosote with 6.47 % and 5.82% cover, respectively) grow in similar locations(flat upland areas with deep soils), whereas the most predominant shrub(mariola with 11.9% cover) inhabits hillslopes near stream channels(with steep shallow soils). The positioning of these individual shrubs throughout the catchment using

  7. Estimating Mixed Broadleaves Forest Stand Volume Using Dsm Extracted from Digital Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, H.

    2012-07-01

    In mixed old growth broadleaves of Hyrcanian forests, it is difficult to estimate stand volume at plot level by remotely sensed data while LiDar data is absent. In this paper, a new approach has been proposed and tested for estimating stand forest volume. The approach is based on this idea that forest volume can be estimated by variation of trees height at plots. In the other word, the more the height variation in plot, the more the stand volume would be expected. For testing this idea, 120 circular 0.1 ha sample plots with systematic random design has been collected in Tonekaon forest located in Hyrcanian zone. Digital surface model (DSM) measure the height values of the first surface on the ground including terrain features, trees, building etc, which provides a topographic model of the earth's surface. The DSMs have been extracted automatically from aerial UltraCamD images so that ground pixel size for extracted DSM varied from 1 to 10 m size by 1m span. DSMs were checked manually for probable errors. Corresponded to ground samples, standard deviation and range of DSM pixels have been calculated. For modeling, non-linear regression method was used. The results showed that standard deviation of plot pixels with 5 m resolution was the most appropriate data for modeling. Relative bias and RMSE of estimation was 5.8 and 49.8 percent, respectively. Comparing to other approaches for estimating stand volume based on passive remote sensing data in mixed broadleaves forests, these results are more encouraging. One big problem in this method occurs when trees canopy cover is totally closed. In this situation, the standard deviation of height is low while stand volume is high. In future studies, applying forest stratification could be studied.

  8. Automated hotspot analysis with aerial image CD metrology for advanced logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttgereit, Ute; Trautzsch, Thomas; Kim, Min-ho; Seo, Jung-Uk; Yoon, Young-Keun; Han, Hak-Seung; Chung, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Chan-Uk; Meyers, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Continuously shrinking designs by further extension of 193nm technology lead to a much higher probability of hotspots especially for the manufacturing of advanced logic devices. The CD of these potential hotspots needs to be precisely controlled and measured on the mask. On top of that, the feature complexity increases due to high OPC load in the logic mask design which is an additional challenge for CD metrology. Therefore the hotspot measurements have been performed on WLCD from ZEISS, which provides the benefit of reduced complexity by measuring the CD in the aerial image and qualifying the printing relevant CD. This is especially of advantage for complex 2D feature measurements. Additionally, the data preparation for CD measurement becomes more critical due to the larger amount of CD measurements and the increasing feature diversity. For the data preparation this means to identify these hotspots and mark them automatically with the correct marker required to make the feature specific CD measurement successful. Currently available methods can address generic pattern but cannot deal with the pattern diversity of the hotspots. The paper will explore a method how to overcome those limitations and to enhance the time-to-result in the marking process dramatically. For the marking process the Synopsys WLCD Output Module was utilized, which is an interface between the CATS mask data prep software and the WLCD metrology tool. It translates the CATS marking directly into an executable WLCD measurement job including CD analysis. The paper will describe the utilized method and flow for the hotspot measurement. Additionally, the achieved results on hotspot measurements utilizing this method will be presented.

  9. Aerial ULV application of Dibrom against Aedes aegypti in simulated urban and rural residences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reaching endophilic Aedes aegypti mosquito vectors of dengue located in human residences with aerial ULV pesticide applications is a prominent complication in operational wide area public health mosquito control activities. We conducted separate trials with a military C-130 fixed wing aircraft fitte...

  10. Large-scale aerial images capture details of invasive plant populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Satellite and aerial remote sensing have been successfully used to measure invasive weed infestations over very large areas, but have limited resolution. Ground-based methods have provided detailed measurements of invasive weeds, but can measure only limited areas. Here we test a novel approach th...

  11. ISSUES IN DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING OF AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR MAPPING SUBMERSED AQUATIC VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the numerous issues that needed to be addressed when developing a methodology for mapping Submersed Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) from digital aerial photography. Specifically, we discuss 1) choice of film; 2) consideration of tide and weather constraints; 3) in-s...

  12. Lensless ghost imaging based on mathematical simulation and experimental simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanyan; Wang, Biyi; Zhao, Yingchao; Dong, Junzhang

    2014-02-01

    The differences of conventional imaging and correlated imaging are discussed in this paper. The mathematical model of lensless ghost imaging system is set up and the image of double slits is computed by mathematical simulation. The results are also testified by the experimental verification. Both the theory simulation and experimental verifications results shows that the mathematical model based on statistical optical principle are keeping consistent with real experimental results.

  13. Image based SAR product simulation for analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.

    1987-01-01

    SAR product simulation serves to predict SAR image gray values for various flight paths. Input typically consists of a digital elevation model and backscatter curves. A new method is described of product simulation that employs also a real SAR input image for image simulation. This can be denoted as 'image-based simulation'. Different methods to perform this SAR prediction are presented and advantages and disadvantages discussed. Ascending and descending orbit images from NASA's SIR-B experiment were used for verification of the concept: input images from ascending orbits were converted into images from a descending orbit; the results are compared to the available real imagery to verify that the prediction technique produces meaningful image data.

  14. [Building Change Detection Based on Multi-Level Rules Classification with Airborne LiDAR Data and Aerial Images].

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi-long; Yan, Li

    2015-05-01

    The present paper proposes a new building change detection method combining Lidar point cloud with aerial image, using multi-level rules classification algorithm, to solve building change detection problem between these two kinds of heterogeneous data. Then, a morphological post-processing method combined with area threshold is proposed. Thus, a complete building change detection processing flow that can be applied to actual production is proposed. Finally, the effectiveness of the building change detection method is evaluated, processing the 2010 airborne LiDAR point cloud data and 2009 high resolution aerial image of Changchun City, Jilin province, China; in addition, compared with the object-oriented building change detection method based on support vector machine (SVM) classification, more analysis and evaluation of the suggested method is given. Experiment results show that the performance of the proposed building change detection method is ideal. Its Kappa index is 0. 90, and correctness is 0. 87, which is higher than the object-oriented building change detection method based on SVM classification. PMID:26415454

  15. Using GPS/INS data to enhance image matching for real-time aerial triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanathong, Supannee; Lee, Impyeong

    2014-11-01

    Direct georeferencing is a promising technique for determining the exterior orientation parameters (EO) of a camera in real-time through the integration of GPS/INS sensors. Instead of using expensive devices, we improve the accuracy of the directly measured EOs through aerial triangulation (AT) and rely on tie-points. In this work, using GPS/INS data, we enhance the KLT tracker to achieve accuracy and speed that is compatible with real-time aerial triangulation. Given GPS/INS data from medium-grade sensors, the proposed system is 48% faster than the original work and tie-points extracted by our system are 6.33% more accurate and more evenly distributed than tie-points extracted by the original work. The AT processing results show that tie-points from the proposed work can reduce the RMSE of the directly measured EOs by 17.87% for position and 23.37% for attitude. Thus, we conclude that our proposed system can be integrated with real-time aerial triangulation.

  16. Analysis and simulation of the infrared characteristics of the aerial target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sen; Li, Xiao-xia; Zhao, Nan

    2011-08-01

    This paper consults and improves the on hand computational methods and circuits, which comprehensively utilizes the knowledge of the Aerodynamics, the heat transfer theory, the radio optics, ANSYS and so on. In the analysis of the IR characteristics of aerial targets, taking it into account that most of the computing methods on hand are empirical or semi-empirical, which are more simple, but more limited, less sufficient and scientific and have more human factors, so we begin with the determination of the thermal field, adopt the numerical method to realize the calculation and modeling of the IR radiation with ANSYS, analysis how the spectral coverage and the observed bearing affect the IR radiation, and then get the credible and all-side numerical calculation results. Then, this paper introduces a method utilizing 3DS MAX and OpenGL to generate the IR picture of the target, which divides the grey level of the IR radiation reasonably according to the final numeric calculating results and the principle of the grey level division, and then we generate the IR pictures of the aerial targets.

  17. MaNIAC-UAV - a methodology for automatic pavement defects detection using images obtained by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrique Castelo Branco, Luiz; César Lima Segantine, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems - ITS is a set of integrated technologies (Remote Sensing, Image Processing, Communications Systems and others) that aim to offer services and advanced traffic management for the several transportation modes (road, air and rail). Collect data on the characteristics and conditions of the road surface and keep them update is an important and difficult task that needs to be currently managed in order to reduce accidents and vehicle maintenance costs. Nowadays several roads and highways are paved, but usually there is insufficient updated data about current condition and status. There are different types of pavement defects on the roads and to keep them in good condition they should be constantly monitored and maintained according to pavement management strategy. This paper presents a methodology to obtain, automatically, information about the conditions of the highway asphalt pavement. Data collection was done through remote sensing using an UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) and the image processing and pattern recognition techniques through Geographic Information System.

  18. A methodology for near real-time change detection between Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and wide area satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fytsilis, Anastasios L.; Prokos, Anthony; Koutroumbas, Konstantinos D.; Michail, Dimitrios; Kontoes, Charalambos C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper a novel integrated hybrid methodology for unsupervised change detection between Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and satellite images, which can be utilized in various fields like security applications (e.g. border surveillance) and damage assessment, is proposed. This is a challenging problem mainly due to the difference in geographic coverage and the spatial resolution of the two images, as well as to the acquisition modes which lead to misregistration errors. The methodology consists of the following steps: (a) pre-processing, where the part of the satellite image that corresponds to the UAV image is determined and the UAV image is ortho-rectified using information provided by a Digital Terrain Model, (b) the detection of potential changes, which is based exclusively on intensity and image gradient information, (c) the generation of the region map, where homogeneous regions are produced by the previous potential changes via a seeded region growing algorithm and placed on the region map, and (d) the evaluation of the above regions, in order to characterize them as true changes or not. The methodology has been applied on demanding real datasets with very encouraging results. Finally, its robustness to the misregistration errors is assessed via extensive experimentation.

  19. Detection of Tree Crowns Based on Reclassification Using Aerial Images and LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, S.; Zarea, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Arefi, H.

    2013-09-01

    Tree detection using aerial sensors in early decades was focused by many researchers in different fields including Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry. This paper is intended to detect trees in complex city areas using aerial imagery and laser scanning data. Our methodology is a hierarchal unsupervised method consists of some primitive operations. This method could be divided into three sections, in which, first section uses aerial imagery and both second and third sections use laser scanners data. In the first section a vegetation cover mask is created in both sunny and shadowed areas. In the second section Rate of Slope Change (RSC) is used to eliminate grasses. In the third section a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) is obtained from LiDAR data. By using DTM and Digital Surface Model (DSM) we would get to Normalized Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Then objects which are lower than a specific height are eliminated. Now there are three result layers from three sections. At the end multiplication operation is used to get final result layer. This layer will be smoothed by morphological operations. The result layer is sent to WG III/4 to evaluate. The evaluation result shows that our method has a good rank in comparing to other participants' methods in ISPRS WG III/4, when assessed in terms of 5 indices including area base completeness, area base correctness, object base completeness, object base correctness and boundary RMS. With regarding of being unsupervised and automatic, this method is improvable and could be integrate with other methods to get best results.

  20. Quantitative analysis of drainage obtained from aerial photographs and RBV/LANDSAT images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Formaggio, A. R.; Epiphanio, J. C. N.; Filho, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained from aerial photographs (1:60,000) and LANDSAT return beam vidicon imagery (1:100,000) concerning drainage density, drainage texture, hydrography density, and the average length of channels were compared. Statistical analysis shows that significant differences exist in data from the two sources. The highly drained area lost more information than the less drained area. In addition, it was observed that the loss of information about the number of rivers was higher than that about the length of the channels.

  1. Semi-automted analysis of high-resolution aerial images to quantify docks in Upper Midwest glacial lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beck, Marcus W.; Vondracek, Bruce C.; Hatch, Lorin K.; Vinje, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Lake resources can be negatively affected by environmental stressors originating from multiple sources and different spatial scales. Shoreline development, in particular, can negatively affect lake resources through decline in habitat quality, physical disturbance, and impacts on fisheries. The development of remote sensing techniques that efficiently characterize shoreline development in a regional context could greatly improve management approaches for protecting and restoring lake resources. The goal of this study was to develop an approach using high-resolution aerial photographs to quantify and assess docks as indicators of shoreline development. First, we describe a dock analysis workflow that can be used to quantify the spatial extent of docks using aerial images. Our approach incorporates pixel-based classifiers with object-based techniques to effectively analyze high-resolution digital imagery. Second, we apply the analysis workflow to quantify docks for 4261 lakes managed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Overall accuracy of the analysis results was 98.4% (87.7% based on ) after manual post-processing. The analysis workflow was also 74% more efficient than the time required for manual digitization of docks. These analyses have immediate relevance for resource planning in Minnesota, whereas the dock analysis workflow could be used to quantify shoreline development in other regions with comparable imagery. These data can also be used to better understand the effects of shoreline development on aquatic resources and to evaluate the effects of shoreline development relative to other stressors.

  2. Simulated aerial sprays for field cage evaluation of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum (Ascomycetes: Hypocreales) against Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) in Montana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field efficacy of the entomopathogenic Ascomycete Beauveria bassiana strain GHA and Metarhizium brunneum strain F52 was evaluated against nymphs of the Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex. Fungi were applied with a new apparatus that allows simulated aerial sprays to 0.1m2 areas in the field. The Mormon...

  3. Fusion of aerial images with mean shift-based upsampled elevation data for improved building block classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyftakis, S.; Tsenoglou, T.; Bratsolis, E.; Charou, Eleni; Vassilas, N.

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays there is an increasing demand for detailed 3D modeling of buildings using elevation data such as those acquired from LiDAR airborne scanners. The various techniques that have been developed for this purpose typically perform segmentation into homogeneous regions followed by boundary extraction and are based on some combination of LiDAR data, digital maps, satellite images and aerial orthophotographs. In the present work, our dataset includes an aerial RGB orthophoto, a DSM and a DTM with spatial resolutions of 20cm, 1m and 2m respectively. Next, a normalized DSM (nDSM) is generated and fused with the optical data in order to increase its resolution to 20cm. The proposed methodology can be described as a two-step approach. First, a nearest neighbor interpolation is applied on the low resolution nDSM to obtain a low quality, ragged, elevation image. Next, we performed a mean shift-based discontinuity preserving smoothing on the fused data. The outcome is on the one hand a more homogeneous RGB image, with smoothed terrace coloring while at the same time preserving the optical edges and on the other hand an upsampled elevation data with considerable improvement regarding region filling and "straightness" of elevation discontinuities. Besides the apparent visual assessment of the increased accuracy of building boundaries, the effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated using the processed dataset as input to five supervised classification methods. The performance of each method is evaluated using a subset of the test area as ground truth. Comparisons with classification results obtained with the original data demonstrate that preprocessing the input dataset using the mean shift algorithm improves significantly the performance of all tested classifiers for building block extraction.

  4. Object Based Agricultural Land Cover Classification Map of Shadowed Areas from Aerial Image and LIDAR Data Using Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R. T.; Serrano, S. C.; Damian, G. B.; Camaso, E. E.; Celestino, A. B.; Hernando, P. J. C.; Isip, M. F.; Orge, K. M.; Quinto, M. J. C.; Tagaca, R. C.

    2016-06-01

    Aerial image and LiDAR data offers a great possibility for agricultural land cover mapping. Unfortunately, these images leads to shadowy pixels. Management of shadowed areas for classification without image enhancement were investigated. Image segmentation approach using three different segmentation scales were used and tested to segment the image for ground features since only the ground features are affected by shadow caused by tall features. The RGB band and intensity were the layers used for the segmentation having an equal weights. A segmentation scale of 25 was found to be the optimal scale that will best fit for the shadowed and non-shadowed area classification. The SVM using Radial Basis Function kernel was then applied to extract classes based on properties extracted from the Lidar data and orthophoto. Training points for different classes including shadowed areas were selected homogeneously from the orthophoto. Separate training points for shadowed areas were made to create additional classes to reduced misclassification. Texture classification and object-oriented classifiers have been examined to reduced heterogeneity problem. The accuracy of the land cover classification using 25 scale segmentation after accounting for the shadow detection and classification was significantly higher compared to higher scale of segmentation.

  5. Building Roof Segmentation from Aerial Images Using a Line-and Region-Based Watershed Segmentation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Merabet, Youssef El; Meurie, Cyril; Ruichek, Yassine; Sbihi, Abderrahmane; Touahni, Raja

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel strategy for roof segmentation from aerial images (orthophotoplans) based on the cooperation of edge- and region-based segmentation methods. The proposed strategy is composed of three major steps. The first one, called the pre-processing step, consists of simplifying the acquired image with an appropriate couple of invariant and gradient, optimized for the application, in order to limit illumination changes (shadows, brightness, etc.) affecting the images. The second step is composed of two main parallel treatments: on the one hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed regions. Even if the first segmentation of this step provides good results in general, the image is often over-segmented. To alleviate this problem, an efficient region merging strategy adapted to the orthophotoplan particularities, with a 2D modeling of roof ridges technique, is applied. On the other hand, the simplified image is segmented by watershed lines. The third step consists of integrating both watershed segmentation strategies into a single cooperative segmentation scheme in order to achieve satisfactory segmentation results. Tests have been performed on orthophotoplans containing 100 roofs with varying complexity, and the results are evaluated with the VINETcriterion using ground-truth image segmentation. A comparison with five popular segmentation techniques of the literature demonstrates the effectiveness and the reliability of the proposed approach. Indeed, we obtain a good segmentation rate of 96% with the proposed method compared to 87.5% with statistical region merging (SRM), 84% with mean shift, 82% with color structure code (CSC), 80% with efficient graph-based segmentation algorithm (EGBIS) and 71% with JSEG. PMID:25648706

  6. A Mobile System for Measuring Water Surface Velocities Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement technologies for velocity of river flow are divided into intrusive and nonintrusive methods. Intrusive method requires infield operations. The measuring process of intrusive methods are time consuming, and likely to cause damages of operator and instrument. Nonintrusive methods require fewer operators and can reduce instrument damages from directly attaching to the flow. Nonintrusive measurements may use radar or image velocimetry to measure the velocities at the surface of water flow. The image velocimetry, such as large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) accesses not only the point velocity but the flow velocities in an area simultaneously. Flow properties of an area hold the promise of providing spatially information of flow fields. This study attempts to construct a mobile system UAV-LSPIV by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with LSPIV to measure flows in fields. The mobile system consists of a six-rotor UAV helicopter, a Sony nex5T camera, a gimbal, an image transfer device, a ground station and a remote control device. The activate gimbal helps maintain the camera lens orthogonal to the water surface and reduce the extent of images being distorted. The image transfer device can monitor the captured image instantly. The operator controls the UAV by remote control device through ground station and can achieve the flying data such as flying height and GPS coordinate of UAV. The mobile system was then applied to field experiments. The deviation of velocities measured by UAV-LSPIV of field experiments and handhold Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is under 8%. The results of the field experiments suggests that the application of UAV-LSPIV can be effectively applied to surface flow studies.

  7. Research on the processing technology of low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shihua; Liu, Yintao; Li, Feida; Zhou, Conglin; Huang, Qing; Xu, Hongwei

    2015-12-01

    The UAV system acts as one of the infrastructure of earth observation, with its mobility, high speed, flexibility, economy and other remarkable technical advantages, has been widely used in various fields of the national economic construction, such as agricultural monitoring, resource development, disaster emergency treatment. Taking an actual engineering as a case study in this paper, the method and the skill of making digital orthophoto map was stated by using the UASMaster, the professional UAV data processing software, based on the eBee unmanned aerial vehicle. Finally, the precision of the DOM was analyzed in detail through two methods, overlapping the DOM with the existing DLG of the region and contrasting the points of the existing DLG of 1:1000 scale with the corresponding checkpoints of the stereomodel.

  8. Unsupervised and stable LBG algorithm for data classification: application to aerial multicomponent images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, A.; Chehdi, K.; Cariou, C.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a stable and unsupervised Linde-Buzo-Gray (LBG) algorithm named LBGO is presented. The originality of the proposed algorithm relies: i) on the utilization of an adaptive incremental technique to initialize the class centres that calls into question the intermediate initializations; this technique makes the algorithm stable and deterministic, and the classification results do not vary from a run to another, and ii) on the unsupervised evaluation criteria of the intermediate classification result to estimate the optimal number of classes; this makes the algorithm unsupervised. The efficiency of this optimized version of LBG is shown through some experimental results on synthetic and real aerial hyperspectral data. More precisely we have tested our proposed classification approach regarding three aspects: firstly for its stability, secondly for its correct classification rate, and thirdly for the correct estimation of number of classes.

  9. Simulation of infrared imaging seeking missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Andre

    2001-08-01

    This paper will describe a digital simulation model to assess the effectiveness of infrared imaging seeking missiles in presence of background and countermeasures. The model reproduces the infrared (IR) scene observed by the imaging seeker and generates the images at the detector output. The model replicates the image processing for automatic detection of potential targets in the seeker's field of view (FOV), and the target selection by the tracking algorithm. A model of a two-degree-of-freedom gyro stabilized seeker platform is also presented. The seeker platform is driven by the tracking algorithm to reduce the error between the seeker axis and the line of sight. The simulation also includes models for the missile aerodynamics in six degrees of freedom, the missile guidance and control system and the target and missile trajectories. As an illustration of the model, some results of simulation are shown for a target engaged by an infrared seeking missile using an imaging sensor.

  10. Image simulation for biological microscopy: microlith

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shalin B.; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Image simulation remains under-exploited for the most widely used biological phase microscopy methods, because of difficulties in simulating partially coherent illumination. We describe an open-source toolbox, microlith (https://code.google.com/p/microlith), which accurately predicts three-dimensional images of a thin specimen observed with any partially coherent imaging system, as well as images of coherently illuminated and self-luminous incoherent specimens. Its accuracy is demonstrated by comparing simulated and experimental bright-field and dark-field images of well-characterized amplitude and phase targets, respectively. The comparison provides new insights about the sensitivity of the dark-field microscope to mass distributions in isolated or periodic specimens at the length-scale of 10nm. Based on predictions using microlith, we propose a novel approach for detecting nanoscale structural changes in a beating axoneme using a dark-field microscope. PMID:24940543

  11. Region-Based 3d Surface Reconstruction Using Images Acquired by Low-Cost Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; Al-Rawabdeh, A.; He, F.; Habib, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate 3D surface reconstruction of our environment has become essential for an unlimited number of emerging applications. In the past few years, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are evolving as low-cost and flexible platforms for geospatial data collection that could meet the needs of aforementioned application and overcome limitations of traditional airborne and terrestrial mobile mapping systems. Due to their payload restrictions, these systems usually include consumer-grade imaging and positioning sensor which will negatively impact the quality of the collected geospatial data and reconstructed surfaces. Therefore, new surface reconstruction surfaces are needed to mitigate the impact of using low-cost sensors on the final products. To date, different approaches have been proposed to for 3D surface construction using overlapping images collected by imaging sensor mounted on moving platforms. In these approaches, 3D surfaces are mainly reconstructed based on dense matching techniques. However, generated 3D point clouds might not accurately represent the scanned surfaces due to point density variations and edge preservation problems. In order to resolve these problems, a new region-based 3D surface renostruction trchnique is introduced in this paper. This approach aims to generate a 3D photo-realistic model of individually scanned surfaces within the captured images. This approach is initiated by a Semi-Global dense Matching procedure is carried out to generate a 3D point cloud from the scanned area within the collected images. The generated point cloud is then segmented to extract individual planar surfaces. Finally, a novel region-based texturing technique is implemented for photorealistic reconstruction of the extracted planar surfaces. Experimental results using images collected by a camera mounted on a low-cost UAS demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach for photorealistic 3D surface reconstruction.

  12. Validation of Vehicle Candidate Areas in Aerial Images Using Color Co-Occurrence Histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leister, W.; Tuermer, S.; Reinartz, P.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Stilla, U.

    2013-10-01

    Traffic monitoring plays an important role in transportation management. In addition, airborne acquisition enables a flexible and realtime mapping for special traffic situations e.g. mass events and disasters. Also the automatic extraction of vehicles from aerial imagery is a common application. However, many approaches focus on the target object only. As an extension to previously developed car detection techniques, a validation scheme is presented. The focus is on exploiting the background of the vehicle candidates as well as their color properties in the HSV color space. Therefore, texture of the vehicle background is described by color co-occurrence histograms. From all resulting histograms a likelihood function is calculated giving a quantity value to indicate whether the vehicle candidate is correctly classified. Only a few robust parameters have to be determined. Finally, the strategy is tested with a dataset of dense urban areas from the inner city of Munich, Germany. First results show that certain regions which are often responsible for false positive detections, such as vegetation or road markings, can be excluded successfully.

  13. Mapping potential of digitized aerial photographs and space images for site-specific crop management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Gerald A.; Long, Daniel S.; Queen, Lloyd P.

    1996-11-01

    In site-specific crop management, treatments (e.g., fertilizer and herbicides) are applied precisely where they are needed. Global positioning system receivers allow accurate navigation of field implements and creation of crop yield maps. Remote sensing products help producers explain the wide range of yields shown on these maps and become the basis for digitized field management maps. Previous sources of remote sensing products for agriculture did not provide services that generated a sustained demand by crop producers, often because data were not delivered quickly enough. Public Access Resource Centers could provide a nearly uninterrupted electronic flow of data from NASA's MODIS and other sensors that could help producers and their advisors monitor crop conditions. This early warning/opportunity system would provide a low-cost way to discover conditions that merit examination on the ground. High-spatial-resolution digital aerial photographs or data from new commercial satellite companies would provide the basis for site-specific treatments. These detailed data are too expensive to acquire often and must be timed so as to represent differences in water supply characteristics and crop yield potentials. Remote sensing products must be linked to specific prescriptions that crop produces use to control operations and improve outcomes.

  14. A Study of Imaging Interferometer Simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Ronald J.

    2002-01-01

    Several new space science mission concepts under development at NASA-GSFC for astronomy are intended to carry out synthetic imaging using Michelson interferometers or direct (Fizeau) imaging with sparse apertures. Examples of these mission concepts include the Stellar Imager (SI), the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT), the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI). We have been developing computer-based simulators for these missions. These simulators are aimed at providing a quantitative evaluation of the imaging capabilities of the mission by modelling the performance on different realistic targets in terms of sensitivity, angular resolution, and dynamic range. Both Fizeau and Michelson modes of operation can be considered. Our work is based on adapting a computer simulator called imSIM, which was initially written for the Space Interferometer Mission in order to simulate the imaging mode of new missions such as those listed. In a recent GSFC-funded study we have successfully written a preliminary version of a simulator SISIM for the Stellar Imager and carried out some preliminary studies with it. In a separately funded study we have also been applying these methods to SPECS/SPIRIT.

  15. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lundgren, Bo; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pedersen, Tina Bock; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fish to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fish species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments, a cod (Gadus morhua) was scanned with both a BK Medical ProFocus 2202 ultrasound scanner and a Toshiba Aquilion ONE computed tomography (CT) scanner. The US images of the fish were compared with US images created using the ultrasound simulation program Field II. The center frequency of the transducer is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fish converted to simulated scatter maps. The positions of the point scatterers were assumed to be uniformly distributed. The scatter amplitudes were generated with a new method based on the segmented CT data in Hounsfield Units and backscatter data for the different types of tissues from the literature. The simulated US images reproduce most of the important characteristics of the measured US image.

  16. Simulation of High-Redshift Galactic Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Robert J.; Scannapieco, E.; Windhorst, R. A.; Thacker, R.

    2009-12-01

    We construct an observational model of galaxies at high redshifts (z 3 - 13) from numerical N-body and SPH simulations of galaxy formation using the computing cluster "Saguaro” at Arizona State University. The model uses a concordance Lambda-CDM model including baryonic components with gas heating and cooling and star formation using Gadget-2 simulations. Snapshots at various redshifts yield star "particles” (populations) with a modeled metallicity and age of formation. The Bruzual-Charlot '03 stellar population models are used to compute a red-shifted flux for various filters for each simulated star population. The flux and spatial coordinates are then used to create a pixel image in a fits file format. The different redshift "slices” are shifted randomly in the simulation periodic box, and resized according to the comoving distance to correct for the angular pixel mapping. The various redshift corrected fits images are then combined into a single image for each filter to produce simulated observational images. This is to enable the use of observational imaging tools to detect galaxies and to aid observational proposals at high redshifts including the new WFC3 camera to be installed on the HST. This method also permits estimates of the luminosity function at z >6 directly from the simulated stellar populations rather than just the size of the Dark Matter haloes. With runs of higher resolution, this will permit exploration of the faint end of the luminosity function. The computing time was supplied by the ASU Fulton HPC center.

  17. Exploration of mineral resource deposits based on analysis of aerial and satellite image data employing artificial intelligence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Gennady

    2013-04-01

    includes noncontact registration of eye motion, reconstruction of "attention landscape" fixed by the expert, recording the comments of the expert who is a specialist in the field of images` interpretation, and transfer this information into knowledge base.Creation of base of ophthalmologic images (OI) includes making semantic contacts from great number of OI based on analysis of OI and expert's comments.Processing of OI and making generalized OI (GOI) is realized by inductive logic algorithms and consists in synthesis of structural invariants of OI. The mode of recognition and interpretation of unknown images consists of several stages, which include: comparison of unknown image with the base of structural invariants of OI; revealing of structural invariants in unknown images; ynthesis of interpretive message of the structural invariants base and OI base (the experts` comments stored in it). We want to emphasize that the training mode does not assume special involvement of experts to teach the system - it is realized in the process of regular experts` work on image interpretation and it becomes possible after installation of a special apparatus for non contact registration of experts` attention. Consequently, the technology, which principles is described there, provides fundamentally new effective solution to the problem of exploration of mineral resource deposits based on computer analysis of aerial and satellite image data.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of medical imaging modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.

    1998-09-01

    Because continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations can be nearly exact simulations of physical reality (within data limitations, geometric approximations, transport algorithms, etc.), it follows that one should be able to closely approximate the results of many experiments from first-principles computations. This line of reasoning has led to various MCNP studies that involve simulations of medical imaging modalities and other visualization methods such as radiography, Anger camera, computerized tomography (CT) scans, and SABRINA particle track visualization. It is the intent of this paper to summarize some of these imaging simulations in the hope of stimulating further work, especially as computer power increases. Improved interpretation and prediction of medical images should ultimately lead to enhanced medical treatments. It is also reasonable to assume that such computations could be used to design new or more effective imaging instruments.

  19. EROS Main Image File: A Picture Perfect Database for Landsat Imagery and Aerial Photography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Robert F.

    1984-01-01

    Describes Earth Resources Observation System online database, which provides access to computerized images of Earth obtained via satellite. Highlights include retrieval system and commands, types of images, search strategies, other online functions, and interpretation of accessions. Satellite information, sources and samples of accessions, and…

  20. A Method for Georeferencing Very-Large-Scale-Aerial (VLSA) Images in Sagebrush Steppe Communities.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    VLSA imagery is captured with a digital camera, mounted on a light, piloted aircraft. VLSA images are high quality and have been used to measure cover of plant functional groups and some species, bare ground, litter, and rock, but the actual image location is known imprecisely (± 30 m). This impreci...

  1. Matching Aerial Images to 3d Building Models Based on Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Bang, K.; Sohn, G.; Armenakis, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a new model-to-image framework to automatically align a single airborne image with existing 3D building models using geometric hashing is proposed. As a prerequisite process for various applications such as data fusion, object tracking, change detection and texture mapping, the proposed registration method is used for determining accurate exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. This model-to-image matching process consists of three steps: 1) feature extraction, 2) similarity measure and matching, and 3) adjustment of EOPs of a single image. For feature extraction, we proposed two types of matching cues, edged corner points representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges and contextual relations among the edged corner points within an individual roof. These matching features are extracted from both 3D building and a single airborne image. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on co-linearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of single image's EOP can be achievable by the proposed registration approach as an alternative to labour-intensive manual registration process.

  2. Weed Mapping in Early-Season Maize Fields Using Object-Based Analysis of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Images

    PubMed Central

    Peña, José Manuel; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; de Castro, Ana Isabel; Kelly, Maggi; López-Granados, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    The use of remote imagery captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has tremendous potential for designing detailed site-specific weed control treatments in early post-emergence, which have not possible previously with conventional airborne or satellite images. A robust and entirely automatic object-based image analysis (OBIA) procedure was developed on a series of UAV images using a six-band multispectral camera (visible and near-infrared range) with the ultimate objective of generating a weed map in an experimental maize field in Spain. The OBIA procedure combines several contextual, hierarchical and object-based features and consists of three consecutive phases: 1) classification of crop rows by application of a dynamic and auto-adaptive classification approach, 2) discrimination of crops and weeds on the basis of their relative positions with reference to the crop rows, and 3) generation of a weed infestation map in a grid structure. The estimation of weed coverage from the image analysis yielded satisfactory results. The relationship of estimated versus observed weed densities had a coefficient of determination of r2=0.89 and a root mean square error of 0.02. A map of three categories of weed coverage was produced with 86% of overall accuracy. In the experimental field, the area free of weeds was 23%, and the area with low weed coverage (<5% weeds) was 47%, which indicated a high potential for reducing herbicide application or other weed operations. The OBIA procedure computes multiple data and statistics derived from the classification outputs, which permits calculation of herbicide requirements and estimation of the overall cost of weed management operations in advance. PMID:24146963

  3. Weed mapping in early-season maize fields using object-based analysis of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images.

    PubMed

    Peña, José Manuel; Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; de Castro, Ana Isabel; Kelly, Maggi; López-Granados, Francisca

    2013-01-01

    The use of remote imagery captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has tremendous potential for designing detailed site-specific weed control treatments in early post-emergence, which have not possible previously with conventional airborne or satellite images. A robust and entirely automatic object-based image analysis (OBIA) procedure was developed on a series of UAV images using a six-band multispectral camera (visible and near-infrared range) with the ultimate objective of generating a weed map in an experimental maize field in Spain. The OBIA procedure combines several contextual, hierarchical and object-based features and consists of three consecutive phases: 1) classification of crop rows by application of a dynamic and auto-adaptive classification approach, 2) discrimination of crops and weeds on the basis of their relative positions with reference to the crop rows, and 3) generation of a weed infestation map in a grid structure. The estimation of weed coverage from the image analysis yielded satisfactory results. The relationship of estimated versus observed weed densities had a coefficient of determination of r(2)=0.89 and a root mean square error of 0.02. A map of three categories of weed coverage was produced with 86% of overall accuracy. In the experimental field, the area free of weeds was 23%, and the area with low weed coverage (<5% weeds) was 47%, which indicated a high potential for reducing herbicide application or other weed operations. The OBIA procedure computes multiple data and statistics derived from the classification outputs, which permits calculation of herbicide requirements and estimation of the overall cost of weed management operations in advance. PMID:24146963

  4. Use of Aerial Images for Regular Updates of Buildings in the Fundamental Base of Geographic Data of the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hron, V.; Halounova, L.

    2015-03-01

    Digital aerial images (DAI) include position, elevation and also spectral information (visible bands and near-infrared band) about the captured area. The aim of this paper is to present the possibilities of automatic analysis of DAI for updating of the Fundamental Base of Geographic Data of the Czech Republic with a focus on buildings. Regular updates of buildings (automatic detection of new and demolished buildings) are based on the analysis of coloured point clouds created by an automatic image matching technique from each time period. The created approach compares point clouds from different time periods to each other. The advantage of this solution is that it is independent of the manner of keeping the buildings in the database. It does not matter whether the buildings in the database have correct positions and their footprints correspond to the roof shapes or external walls. The involved method is robust because a digital surface model generated by image matching techniques can contain numerous errors. Shaded areas and objects with blurred textures are problematic for automatic image correlation algorithms and lead to false results. For this reason, derived layers containing additional information are used. Shadow masks (layers with modelled shadows) are used for the verification of indications and to filter out errors in the shaded areas using a contextual evaluation. Furthermore, additional information about the road and railway networks and morphological operations of opening and closing were used to achieve more accurate results. All these information sources are then evaluated using decision logic, which uses the generally applicable rules that are available for different datasets without the need for modification. The method was tested on different datasets with various types of buildings (villages, suburbs and city centres) which cover more than 20 square kilometres. The developed solution leads to very promising results without the need of acquiring

  5. Detection of building changes from aerial images and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Chien; Lin, Li-Jer

    2010-11-01

    Building models are built to provide three-dimensional (3-D) spatial information, which is needed in a variety of applications including city planning, construction management, location-based services of urban infrastructures, and the like. However, 3-D building models have to be updated on a timely manner to meet the changing demand. Rather than reconstructing building models for the entire area, it would be more convenient and effective to only update parts of the areas where there were changes. This paper aims at developing a new method, namely double-threshold strategy, to find such changes within 3-D building models in the region of interest with the aid of light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. The proposed modeling scheme comprises three steps, namely, data pre-processing, change detection in building areas, and validation. In the first step for data pre-processing, data registration was carried out based on multi-source data. The second step for data pre-processing requires using the triangulation of an irregular network of data points collected by Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR), focusing on those locations containing walls or other above-ground objects that were ever removed. Then, change detection in the building models can be made possible for finding differences in height by comparing the LIDAR point measurements and the estimates of the building models. The results may be further refined using spectral and feature information collected from aerial imagery. A double-threshold strategy was applied to cope with the highly sensitive thresholding often encountered when using the rule-based approach. Finally, ground truth data were used for model validation. Research findings clearly indicate that the double-threshold strategy improves the overall accuracy from 93.1% to 95.9%.

  6. Design of a bio-inspired controller for dynamic soaring in a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle.

    PubMed

    Barate, Renaud; Doncieux, Stéphane; Meyer, Jean-Arcady

    2006-09-01

    This paper is inspired by the way birds such as albatrosses are able to exploit wind gradients at the surface of the ocean for staying aloft for very long periods while minimizing their energy expenditure. The corresponding behaviour has been partially reproduced here via a set of Takagi-Sugeno-Kang fuzzy rules controlling a simulated glider. First, the rules were hand-designed. Then, they were optimized with an evolutionary algorithm that improved their efficiency at coping with challenging conditions. Finally, the robustness properties of the controller generated were assessed with a view to its applicability to a real platform. PMID:17671309

  7. Simulating aerial gravitropism and posture control in plants: what has been done, what is missing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutand, Catherine; Pot, Guillaume; Bastien, R.; Badel, Eric; Moulia, Bruno

    The gravitropic response requires a process of perception of the signal and a motor process to actuate the movements. Different models have been developed, some focuses on the perception process and some focuses on the motor process. The kinematics of the gravitropic response will be first detailed to set the phenomenology of gravi- and auto-tropism. A model of perception (AC model) will be first presented to demonstrate that sensing inclination is not sufficient to control the gravitropic movement, and that proprioception is also involved. Then, “motor models” will be reviewed. In herbaceous plants, differential growth is the main motor. Modelling tropic movements with simulating elongation raises some difficulties that will be explained. In woody structures the main motor process is the differentiation of reaction wood via cambial growth. We will first present the simplest biomechanical model developed to simulate gravitropism and its limits will be pointed out. Then a more sophisticated model (TWIG) will be presented with a special focus on the importance of wood viscoelasticity and the wood maturation process and its regulation by a mechanosensing process. The presentation will end by a balance sheet of what is done and what is missing for a complete modelling of gravitropism and will present first results of a running project dedicating to get the data required to include phototropism in the actual models.

  8. Coherent scatter imaging Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Laila; MacDonald, Carolyn A

    2016-07-01

    Conventional mammography can suffer from poor contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues due to the small difference in attenuation properties. Coherent scatter slot scan imaging is an imaging technique which provides additional information and is compatible with conventional mammography. A Monte Carlo simulation of coherent scatter slot scan imaging was performed to assess its performance and provide system optimization. Coherent scatter could be exploited using a system similar to conventional slot scan mammography system with antiscatter grids tilted at the characteristic angle of cancerous tissues. System optimization was performed across several parameters, including source voltage, tilt angle, grid distances, grid ratio, and shielding geometry. The simulated carcinomas were detectable for tumors as small as 5 mm in diameter, so coherent scatter analysis using a wide-slot setup could be promising as an enhancement for screening mammography. Employing coherent scatter information simultaneously with conventional mammography could yield a conventional high spatial resolution image with additional coherent scatter information. PMID:27610397

  9. Mobile Aerial Tracking and Imaging System (MATrIS) for Aeronautical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Blanchard, Robert C.; Miller, Geoffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    A mobile, rapidly deployable ground-based system to track and image targets of aeronautical interest has been developed. Targets include reentering reusable launch vehicles as well as atmospheric and transatmospheric vehicles. The optics were designed to image targets in the visible and infrared wavelengths. To minimize acquisition cost and development time, the system uses commercially available hardware and software where possible. The conception and initial funding of this system originated with a study of ground-based imaging of global aerothermal characteristics of reusable launch vehicle configurations. During that study the National Aeronautics and Space Administration teamed with the Missile Defense Agency/Innovative Science and Technology Experimentation Facility to test techniques and analysis on two Space Shuttle flights.

  10. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process. PMID:27338410

  11. Matching Aerial Images to 3D Building Models Using Context-Based Geometric Hashing.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaewook; Sohn, Gunho; Bang, Kiin; Wichmann, Andreas; Armenakis, Costas; Kada, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A city is a dynamic entity, which environment is continuously changing over time. Accordingly, its virtual city models also need to be regularly updated to support accurate model-based decisions for various applications, including urban planning, emergency response and autonomous navigation. A concept of continuous city modeling is to progressively reconstruct city models by accommodating their changes recognized in spatio-temporal domain, while preserving unchanged structures. A first critical step for continuous city modeling is to coherently register remotely sensed data taken at different epochs with existing building models. This paper presents a new model-to-image registration method using a context-based geometric hashing (CGH) method to align a single image with existing 3D building models. This model-to-image registration process consists of three steps: (1) feature extraction; (2) similarity measure; and matching, and (3) estimating exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of a single image. For feature extraction, we propose two types of matching cues: edged corner features representing the saliency of building corner points with associated edges, and contextual relations among the edged corner features within an individual roof. A set of matched corners are found with given proximity measure through geometric hashing, and optimal matches are then finally determined by maximizing the matching cost encoding contextual similarity between matching candidates. Final matched corners are used for adjusting EOPs of the single airborne image by the least square method based on collinearity equations. The result shows that acceptable accuracy of EOPs of a single image can be achievable using the proposed registration approach as an alternative to a labor-intensive manual registration process. PMID:27338410

  12. An Integrated Photogrammetric and Spatial Database Management System for Producing Fully Structured Data Using Aerial and Remote Sensing Images

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Farshid Farnood; Ebadi, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    3D spatial data acquired from aerial and remote sensing images by photogrammetric techniques is one of the most accurate and economic data sources for GIS, map production, and spatial data updating. However, there are still many problems concerning storage, structuring and appropriate management of spatial data obtained using these techniques. According to the capabilities of spatial database management systems (SDBMSs); direct integration of photogrammetric and spatial database management systems can save time and cost of producing and updating digital maps. This integration is accomplished by replacing digital maps with a single spatial database. Applying spatial databases overcomes the problem of managing spatial and attributes data in a coupled approach. This management approach is one of the main problems in GISs for using map products of photogrammetric workstations. Also by the means of these integrated systems, providing structured spatial data, based on OGC (Open GIS Consortium) standards and topological relations between different feature classes, is possible at the time of feature digitizing process. In this paper, the integration of photogrammetric systems and SDBMSs is evaluated. Then, different levels of integration are described. Finally design, implementation and test of a software package called Integrated Photogrammetric and Oracle Spatial Systems (IPOSS) is presented. PMID:22574014

  13. An integrated photogrammetric and spatial database management system for producing fully structured data using aerial and remote sensing images.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Farshid Farnood; Ebadi, Hamid

    2009-01-01

    3D spatial data acquired from aerial and remote sensing images by photogrammetric techniques is one of the most accurate and economic data sources for GIS, map production, and spatial data updating. However, there are still many problems concerning storage, structuring and appropriate management of spatial data obtained using these techniques. According to the capabilities of spatial database management systems (SDBMSs); direct integration of photogrammetric and spatial database management systems can save time and cost of producing and updating digital maps. This integration is accomplished by replacing digital maps with a single spatial database. Applying spatial databases overcomes the problem of managing spatial and attributes data in a coupled approach. This management approach is one of the main problems in GISs for using map products of photogrammetric workstations. Also by the means of these integrated systems, providing structured spatial data, based on OGC (Open GIS Consortium) standards and topological relations between different feature classes, is possible at the time of feature digitizing process. In this paper, the integration of photogrammetric systems and SDBMSs is evaluated. Then, different levels of integration are described. Finally design, implementation and test of a software package called Integrated Photogrammetric and Oracle Spatial Systems (IPOSS) is presented. PMID:22574014

  14. Infrared Surveys of Hawaiian Volcanoes: Aerial surveys with infrared imaging radiometer depict volcanic thermal patterns and structural features.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W A; Moxham, R M; Polcyn, F; Landis, G H

    1964-11-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs issuing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets. PMID:17729994

  15. Application of Technical Measures and Software in Constructing Photorealistic 3D Models of Historical Building Using Ground-Based and Aerial (UAV) Digital Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnowski, Aleksander; Banaszek, Anna; Banaszek, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Preparing digital documentation of historical buildings is a form of protecting cultural heritage. Recently there have been several intensive studies using non-metric digital images to construct realistic 3D models of historical buildings. Increasingly often, non-metric digital images are obtained with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Technologies and methods of UAV flights are quite different from traditional photogrammetric approaches. The lack of technical guidelines for using drones inhibits the process of implementing new methods of data acquisition. This paper presents the results of experiments in the use of digital images in the construction of photo-realistic 3D model of a historical building (Raphaelsohns' Sawmill in Olsztyn). The aim of the study at the first stage was to determine the meteorological and technical conditions for the acquisition of aerial and ground-based photographs. At the next stage, the technology of 3D modelling was developed using only ground-based or only aerial non-metric digital images. At the last stage of the study, an experiment was conducted to assess the possibility of 3D modelling with the comprehensive use of aerial (UAV) and ground-based digital photographs in terms of their labour intensity and precision of development. Data integration and automatic photo-realistic 3D construction of the models was done with Pix4Dmapper and Agisoft PhotoScan software Analyses have shown that when certain parameters established in an experiment are kept, the process of developing the stock-taking documentation for a historical building moves from the standards of analogue to digital technology with considerably reduced cost.

  16. Aerial multispectral imaging for cotton yield estimation under different irrigation and nitrogen treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton yield varied spatially within a field. The variability can be caused by various production inputs such as soil property, water management, and fertilizer application. Airborne multispectral imaging is capable of providing data and information to study effects of the inputs on the yield qualit...

  17. Assessing the Accuracy of Ortho-image using Photogrammetric Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, H. H.; Park, J. W.; Kim, J. S.; Choi, C. U.

    2016-06-01

    Smart-camera can not only be operated under network environment anytime and any place but also cost less than the existing photogrammetric UAV since it provides high-resolution image, 3D location and attitude data on a real-time basis from a variety of built-in sensors. This study's proposed UAV photogrammetric method, low-cost UAV and smart camera were used. The elements of interior orientation were acquired through camera calibration. The image triangulation was conducted in accordance with presence or absence of consideration of the interior orientation (IO) parameters determined by camera calibration, The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) was constructed using the image data photographed at the target area and the results of the ground control point survey. This study also analyzes the proposed method's application possibility by comparing a Ortho-image the results of the ground control point survey. Considering these study findings, it is suggested that smartphone is very feasible as a payload for UAV system. It is also expected that smartphone may be loaded onto existing UAV playing direct or indirect roles significantly.

  18. Advances in hardware, software, and automation for 193nm aerial image measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibold, Axel M.; Schmid, R.; Seyfarth, A.; Waechter, M.; Harnisch, W.; Doornmalen, H. v.

    2005-05-01

    A new, second generation AIMS fab 193 system has been developed which is capable of emulating lithographic imaging of any type of reticles such as binary and phase shift masks (PSM) including resolution enhancement technologies (RET) such as optical proximity correction (OPC) or scatter bars. The system emulates the imaging process by adjustment of the lithography equivalent illumination and imaging conditions of 193nm wafer steppers including circular, annular, dipole and quadrupole type illumination modes. The AIMS fab 193 allows a rapid prediction of wafer printability of critical mask features, including dense patterns and contacts, defects or repairs by acquiring through-focus image stacks by means of a CCD camera followed by quantitative image analysis. Moreover the technology can be readily applied to directly determine the process window of a given mask under stepper imaging conditions. Since data acquisition is performed electronically, AIMS in many applications replaces the need for costly and time consuming wafer prints using a wafer stepper/ scanner followed by CD SEM resist or wafer analysis. The AIMS fab 193 second generation system is designed for 193nm lithography mask printing predictability down to the 65nm node. In addition to hardware improvements a new modular AIMS software is introduced allowing for a fully automated operation mode. Multiple pre-defined points can be visited and through-focus AIMS measurements can be executed automatically in a recipe based mode. To increase the effectiveness of the automated operation mode, the throughput of the system to locate the area of interest, and to acquire the through-focus images is increased by almost a factor of two in comparison with the first generation AIMS systems. In addition a new software plug-in concept is realised for the tools. One new feature has been successfully introduced as "Global CD Map", enabling automated investigation of global mask quality based on the local determination of

  19. The simulation of aerial movement--I. The determination of orientation angles from film data.

    PubMed

    Yeadon, M R

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative mechanical analyses of human movement require the time histories of the angles which specify body configuration and orientation. When these angles are obtained from a filmed performance they may be used to evaluate the accuracy of a simulation model. This paper presents a method of determining orientation angles and their rates of change from film data. The stages used comprise the synchronization of data obtained from two camera views, the determination of three-dimensional coordinates of joint centres, the calculation of an angle from a sequence of sine and cosine values and the curve fitting of angles using quintic splines. For each stage, other possible approaches are discussed. Original procedures are presented for obtaining individual error estimates of both the film data and the calculated angles to permit the automatic fitting of quintic splines for interpolation and differentiation and for deriving the time history of an angle as a continuous function from a sequence of sine and cosine values. The method is applied to a forward somersault with 1 1/2 twists and the average error estimate of 17 orientation angles is obtained as 2.1 degrees. PMID:2307692

  20. Comparison of DSMs acquired by terrestrial laser scanning, UAV-based aerial images and ground-based optical images at the Super-Sauze landslide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothmund, Sabrina; Niethammer, Uwe; Walter, Marco; Joswig, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, the high-resolution and multi-temporal 3D mapping of the Earth's surface using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), ground-based optical images and especially low-cost UAV-based aerial images (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) has grown in importance. This development resulted from the progressive technical improvement of the imaging systems and the freely available multi-view stereo (MVS) software packages. These different methods of data acquisition for the generation of accurate, high-resolution digital surface models (DSMs) were applied as part of an eight-week field campaign at the Super-Sauze landslide (South French Alps). An area of approximately 10,000 m² with long-term average displacement rates greater than 0.01 m/day has been investigated. The TLS-based point clouds were acquired at different viewpoints with an average point spacing between 10 to 40 mm and at different dates. On these days, more than 50 optical images were taken on points along a predefined line on the side part of the landslide by a low-cost digital compact camera. Additionally, aerial images were taken by a radio-controlled mini quad-rotor UAV equipped with another low-cost digital compact camera. The flight altitude ranged between 20 m and 250 m and produced a corresponding ground resolution between 0.6 cm and 7 cm. DGPS measurements were carried out as well in order to geo-reference and validate the point cloud data. To generate unscaled photogrammetric 3D point clouds from a disordered and tilted image set, we use the widespread open-source software package Bundler and PMVS2 (University of Washington). These multi-temporal DSMs are required on the one hand to determine the three-dimensional surface deformations and on the other hand it will be required for differential correction for orthophoto production. Drawing on the example of the acquired data at the Super-Sauze landslide, we demonstrate the potential but also the limitations of the photogrammetric point clouds. To

  1. Urban 3D GIS From LiDAR and digital aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Song, C.; Simmers, J.; Cheng, P.

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a method, which integrates image knowledge and Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) point cloud data for urban digital terrain model (DTM) and digital building model (DBM) generation. The DBM is an Object-Oriented data structure, in which each building is considered as a building object, i.e., an entity of the building class. The attributes of each building include roof types, polygons of the roof surfaces, height, parameters describing the roof surfaces, and the LiDAR point array within the roof surfaces. Each polygon represents a roof surface of building. This type of data structure is flexible for adding other building attributes in future, such as texture information and wall information. Using image knowledge extracted, we developed a new method of interpolating LiDAR raw data into grid digital surface model (DSM) with considering the steep discontinuities of buildings. In this interpolation method, the LiDAR data points, which are located in the polygon of roof surfaces, first are determined, and then interpolation via planar equation is employed for grid DSM generation. The basic steps of our research are: (1) edge detection by digital image processing algorithms; (2) complete extraction of the building roof edges by digital image processing and human-computer interactive operation; (3) establishment of DBM; (4) generation of DTM by removing surface objects. Finally, we implement the above functions by MS VC++ programming. The outcome of urban 3D DSM, DTM and DBM is exported into urban database for urban 3D GIS.

  2. Theoretical study for aerial image intensity in resist in high numerical aperture projection optics and experimental verification with one-dimensional patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Masato; Takada, Akira; Nakashima, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    In optical lithography, high-performance exposure tools are indispensable to obtain not only fine patterns but also preciseness in pattern width. Since an accurate theoretical method is necessary to predict these values, some pioneer and valuable studies have been proposed. However, there might be some ambiguity or lack of consensus regarding the treatment of diffraction by object, incoming inclination factor onto image plane in scalar imaging theory, and paradoxical phenomenon of the inclined entrance plane wave onto image in vector imaging theory. We have reconsidered imaging theory in detail and also phenomenologically resolved the paradox. By comparing theoretical aerial image intensity with experimental pattern width for one-dimensional pattern, we have validated our theoretical consideration.

  3. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient's response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper's main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques--including Jackson's Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)--relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software's usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  4. Retinal Image Simulation of Subjective Refraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M. Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Refraction techniques make it possible to determine the most appropriate sphero-cylindrical lens prescription to achieve the best possible visual quality. Among these techniques, subjective refraction (i.e., patient’s response-guided refraction) is the most commonly used approach. In this context, this paper’s main goal is to present a simulation software that implements in a virtual manner various subjective-refraction techniques—including Jackson’s Cross-Cylinder test (JCC)—relying all on the observation of computer-generated retinal images. This software has also been used to evaluate visual quality when the JCC test is performed in multifocal-contact-lens wearers. The results reveal this software’s usefulness to simulate the retinal image quality that a particular visual compensation provides. Moreover, it can help to gain a deeper insight and to improve existing refraction techniques and it can be used for simulated training. PMID:26938648

  5. Remote sensing for precision agriculture: Within-field spatial variability analysis and mapping with aerial digital multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalapillai, Sreekala

    2000-10-01

    Advances in remote sensing technology and biological sensors provided the motivation for this study on the applications of aerial multispectral remote sensing in precision agriculture. The feasibility of using high-resolution multispectral remote sensing for precision farming applications such as soil type delineation, identification of crop nitrogen levels, and modeling and mapping of weed density distribution and yield potential within a crop field was explored in this study. Some of the issues such as image calibration for variable lighting conditions and soil background influence were also addressed. Intensity normalization and band ratio methods were found to be adequate image calibration methods to compensate for variable illumination and soil background influence. Several within-field variability factors such as growth stage, field conditions, nutrient availability, crop cultivar, and plant population were found to be dominant in different periods. Unsupervised clustering of color infrared (CIR) image of a field soil was able to identify soil mapping units with an average accuracy of 76%. Spectral reflectance from a crop field was highly correlated to the chlorophyll reading. A regression model developed to predict nitrogen stress in corn identified nitrogen-stressed areas from nitrogen-sufficient areas with a high accuracy (R2 = 0.93). Weed density was highly correlated to the spectral reflectance from a field. One month after planting was found to be a good time to map spatial weed density. The optimum range of resolution for weed mapping was 4 m to 4.5 m for the remote sensing system and the experimental field used in this study. Analysis of spatial yield with respect to spectral reflectance showed that the visible and NIR reflectance were negatively correlated to yield and crop population in heavily weed-infested areas. The yield potential was highly correlated to image indices, especially to normalized brightness. The ANN model developed for one of the

  6. Crop/weed discrimination in simulated images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G.; Gée, C.; Truchetet, F.

    2007-02-01

    In the context of site-specific weed management by vision systems, an efficient image processing for a crop/weed discrimination is required in order to quantify the Weed Infestation Rate (WIR) in an image. This paper presents a modeling of crop field in presence of different Weed Infestation Rates and a set of simulated agronomic images is used to test and validate the effectiveness of a crop/weed discrimination algorithm. For instance, an algorithm has been implemented to firstly detect the crop rows in the field by the use of a Hough Transform and secondly to detect plant areas by a region based-segmentation on binary images. This image processing has been tested on virtual cereal fields of a large field of view with perspective effects. The vegetation in the virtual field is modeled by a sowing pattern for crop plants and the weed spatial distribution is modeled by either a Poisson process or a Neyman-Scott cluster process. For each simulated image, a comparison between the initial and the detected weed infestation rate allows us to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. This comparison demonstrates an accuracy of better than 80% is possible, despite that intrarow weeds can not be detected from this spatial method.

  7. GALSIM: The modular galaxy image simulation toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, B. T. P.; Jarvis, M.; Mandelbaum, R.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bosch, J.; Simet, M.; Meyers, J. E.; Kacprzak, T.; Nakajima, R.; Zuntz, J.; Miyatake, H.; Dietrich, J. P.; Armstrong, R.; Melchior, P.; Gill, M. S. S.

    2015-04-01

    GALSIM is a collaborative, open-source project aimed at providing an image simulation tool of enduring benefit to the astronomical community. It provides a software library for generating images of astronomical objects such as stars and galaxies in a variety of ways, efficiently handling image transformations and operations such as convolution and rendering at high precision. We describe the GALSIM software and its capabilities, including necessary theoretical background. We demonstrate that the performance of GALSIM meets the stringent requirements of high precision image analysis applications such as weak gravitational lensing, for current datasets and for the Stage IV dark energy surveys of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, ESA's Euclid mission, and NASA's WFIRST-AFTA mission. The GALSIM project repository is public and includes the full code history, all open and closed issues, installation instructions, documentation, and wiki pages (including a Frequently Asked Questions section). The GALSIM repository can be found at https://github.com/GalSim-developers/GalSim.

  8. Integration of historical aerial and satellite photos, recent satellite images and geophysical surveys for the knowledge of the ancient Dyrrachium (Durres, Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfitana, Daniele; Shehi, Eduard; Masini, Nicola; Scardozzi, Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    The paper presents the preliminary results of an integrated multidiscipliary research project concerning the urban area of the modern Durres (ancient Dyrrachium). Here a joint Italian and Albanian researcher are starting preliminary investigations on the place of an ancient roman villa placed in the urban centre of the modern town. In a initial phase are offering interesting results the use of a rich multitemporal remote sensing data-set, historical aerial photos of 1920s and 1930s, photos of USA spy satellites of 1960s and 1970s (Corona KH-4A and KH-4B), and very high resolution satellite imagery. The historical aerial documentation is very rich and includes aerial photogrammetrich flights of two Italian Institutions: the private company SARA - Società Anonima Rilevamenti Aerofotogrammetrici in Rome (1928) and the IGM - Istituto Geografico Militare (1936, 1937 e 1941), which flew on Durres for purposes of cartographic production and military. These photos offer an image of the city before the urban expansion after the Second World War and in recent decades, progressively documented by satellite images of the 1960s-1970s and recent years. They enable a reconstruction of the ancient topography of the urban area, even with the possibility of detailed analysis, as in the case of the the Roman villa, nowadays buried under a modern garden, but also investigated with a GPR survey, in order to rebuild its plan and contextualize the villa in relation to the urban area of the ancient Dyrrachium.

  9. Image-Based Airborne Sensors: A Combined Approach for Spectral Signatures Classification through Deterministic Simulated Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Guijarro, María; Pajares, Gonzalo; Herrera, P. Javier

    2009-01-01

    The increasing technology of high-resolution image airborne sensors, including those on board Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, demands automatic solutions for processing, either on-line or off-line, the huge amountds of image data sensed during the flights. The classification of natural spectral signatures in images is one potential application. The actual tendency in classification is oriented towards the combination of simple classifiers. In this paper we propose a combined strategy based on the Deterministic Simulated Annealing (DSA) framework. The simple classifiers used are the well tested supervised parametric Bayesian estimator and the Fuzzy Clustering. The DSA is an optimization approach, which minimizes an energy function. The main contribution of DSA is its ability to avoid local minima during the optimization process thanks to the annealing scheme. It outperforms simple classifiers used for the combination and some combined strategies, including a scheme based on the fuzzy cognitive maps and an optimization approach based on the Hopfield neural network paradigm. PMID:22399989

  10. Geomatics techniques applied to time series of aerial images for multitemporal geomorphological analysis of the Miage Glacier (Mont Blanc).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perotti, Luigi; Carletti, Roberto; Giardino, Marco; Mortara, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The Miage glacier is the major one in the Italian side of the Mont Blanc Massif, the third by area and the first by longitudinal extent among Italian glaciers. It is a typical debris covered glacier, since the end of the L.I.A. The debris coverage reduces ablation, allowing a relative stability of the glacier terminus, which is characterized by a wide and articulated moraine apparatus. For its conservative landforms, the Miage Glacier has a great importance for the analysis of the geomorphological response to recent climatic changes. Thanks to an organized existing archive of multitemporal aerial images (1935 to present) a photogrammetric approach has been applied to detect recent geomorphological changes in the Miage glacial basin. The research team provided: a) to digitize all the available images (still in analogic form) through photogrammetric scanners (very low image distortions devices) taking care of correctly defining the resolution of the acquisition compared to the scale mapping images are suitable for; b) to import digitized images into an appropriate digital photogrammetry software environment; c) to manage images in order, where possible, to carried out the stereo models orientation necessary for 3D navigation and plotting of critical geometric features of the glacier. Recognized geometric feature, referring to different periods, can be transferred to vector layers and imported in a GIS for further comparisons and investigations; d) to produce multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models for glacier volume changes; e) to perform orthoprojection of such images to obtain multitemporal orthoimages useful for areal an planar terrain evaluation and thematic analysis; f) to evaluate both planimetric positioning and height determination accuracies reachable through the photogrammetric process. Users have to known reliability of the measures they can do over such products. This can drive them to define the applicable field of this approach and this can help them to

  11. Uncertainty in 2D hydrodynamic models from errors in roughness parameterization based on aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, Menno; Huthoff, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    In The Netherlands, 2D-hydrodynamic simulations are used to evaluate the effect of potential safety measures against river floods. In the investigated scenarios, the floodplains are completely inundated, thus requiring realistic representations of hydraulic roughness of floodplain vegetation. The current study aims at providing better insight into the uncertainty of flood water levels due to uncertain floodplain roughness parameterization. The study focuses on three key elements in the uncertainty of floodplain roughness: (1) classification error of the landcover map, (2), within class variation of vegetation structural characteristics, and (3) mapping scale. To assess the effect of the first error source, new realizations of ecotope maps were made based on the current floodplain ecotope map and an error matrix of the classification. For the second error source, field measurements of vegetation structure were used to obtain uncertainty ranges for each vegetation structural type. The scale error was investigated by reassigning roughness codes on a smaller spatial scale. It is shown that classification accuracy of 69% leads to an uncertainty range of predicted water levels in the order of decimeters. The other error sources are less relevant. The quantification of the uncertainty in water levels can help to make better decisions on suitable flood protection measures. Moreover, the relation between uncertain floodplain roughness and the error bands in water levels may serve as a guideline for the desired accuracy of floodplain characteristics in hydrodynamic models.

  12. An Improved Snake Model for Refinement of Lidar-Derived Building Roof Contours Using Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Shugen; Liu, Xiuguo

    2016-06-01

    Building roof contours are considered as very important geometric data, which have been widely applied in many fields, including but not limited to urban planning, land investigation, change detection and military reconnaissance. Currently, the demand on building contours at a finer scale (especially in urban areas) has been raised in a growing number of studies such as urban environment quality assessment, urban sprawl monitoring and urban air pollution modelling. LiDAR is known as an effective means of acquiring 3D roof points with high elevation accuracy. However, the precision of the building contour obtained from LiDAR data is restricted by its relatively low scanning resolution. With the use of the texture information from high-resolution imagery, the precision can be improved. In this study, an improved snake model is proposed to refine the initial building contours extracted from LiDAR. First, an improved snake model is constructed with the constraints of the deviation angle, image gradient, and area. Then, the nodes of the contour are moved in a certain range to find the best optimized result using greedy algorithm. Considering both precision and efficiency, the candidate shift positions of the contour nodes are constrained, and the searching strategy for the candidate nodes is explicitly designed. The experiments on three datasets indicate that the proposed method for building contour refinement is effective and feasible. The average quality index is improved from 91.66% to 93.34%. The statistics of the evaluation results for every single building demonstrated that 77.0% of the total number of contours is updated with higher quality index.

  13. Software for Simulation of Hyperspectral Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richtsmeier, Steven C.; Singer-Berk, Alexander; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    2002-01-01

    A package of software generates simulated hyperspectral images for use in validating algorithms that generate estimates of Earth-surface spectral reflectance from hyperspectral images acquired by airborne and spaceborne instruments. This software is based on a direct simulation Monte Carlo approach for modeling three-dimensional atmospheric radiative transport as well as surfaces characterized by spatially inhomogeneous bidirectional reflectance distribution functions. In this approach, 'ground truth' is accurately known through input specification of surface and atmospheric properties, and it is practical to consider wide variations of these properties. The software can treat both land and ocean surfaces and the effects of finite clouds with surface shadowing. The spectral/spatial data cubes computed by use of this software can serve both as a substitute for and a supplement to field validation data.

  14. Dynamic modeling, simulation and control design of a parafoil-payload system for ship launched aerial delivery system (SLADS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranik, Anand S.

    The objective of this research was to develop a high-fidelity dynamic model of a parafoil-payload system with respect to its application for the Ship Launched Aerial Delivery System (SLADS). SLADS is a concept in which cargo can be transfered from ship to shore using a parafoil-payload system. It is accomplished in two phases: An initial towing phase when the glider follows the towing vessel in a passive lift mode and an autonomous gliding phase when the system is guided to the desired point. While many previous researchers have analyzed the parafoil-payload system when it is released from another airborne vehicle, limited work has been done in the area of towing up the system from ground or sea. One of the main contributions of this research was the development of a nonlinear dynamic model of a towed parafoil-payload system. After performing an extensive literature review of the existing methods of modeling a parafoil-payload system, a five degree-of-freedom model was developed. The inertial and geometric properties of the system were investigated to predict accurate results in the simulation environment. Since extensive research has been done in determining the aerodynamic characteristics of a paraglider, an existing aerodynamic model was chosen to incorporate the effects of air flow around the flexible paraglider wing. During the towing phase, it is essential that the parafoil-payload system follow the line of the towing vessel path to prevent an unstable flight condition called 'lockout'. A detailed study of the causes of lockout, its mathematical representation and the flight conditions and the parameters related to lockout, constitute another contribution of this work. A linearized model of the parafoil-payload system was developed and used to analyze the stability of the system about equilibrium conditions. The relationship between the control surface inputs and the stability was investigated. In addition to stability of flight, one more important objective

  15. Application of High-resolution Aerial LiDAR Data in Calibration of a Two-dimensional Urban Flood Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, J.; Goska, R.; Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.; Young, N.; Weber, L.

    2009-12-01

    In June 2008, the state of Iowa experienced an unprecedented flood event which resulted in an economic loss of approximately $2.88 billion. Flooding in the Iowa River corridor, which exceeded the previous flood of record by 3 feet, devastated several communities, including Coralville and Iowa City, home to the University of Iowa. Recognizing an opportunity to capture a unique dataset detailing the impacts of the historic flood, the investigators contacted the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM), which performed an aerial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) survey along the Iowa River. The survey, conducted immediately following the flood peak, provided coverage of a 60-mile reach. The goal of the present research is to develop a process by which flood extents and water surface elevations can be accurately extracted from the LiDAR data set and to evaluate the benefit of such data in calibrating one- and two-dimensional hydraulic models. Whereas data typically available for model calibration include sparsely distributed point observations and high water marks, the LiDAR data used in the present study provide broad-scale, detailed, and continuous information describing the spatial extent and depth of flooding. Initial efforts were focused on a 10-mile, primarily urban reach of the Iowa River extending from Coralville Reservoir, a United States Army Corps of Engineers flood control project, downstream through the Coralville and Iowa City. Spatial extent and depth of flooding were estimated from the LiDAR data. At a given cross-sectional location, river channel and floodplain measurements were compared. When differences between floodplain and river channel measurements were less than a standard deviation of the vertical uncertainty in the LiDAR survey, floodplain measurements were classified as flooded. A flood water surface DEM was created using measurements classified as flooded. A two-dimensional, depth-averaged numerical model of a 10-mile reach of

  16. Image simulation for automatic license plate recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bala, Raja; Zhao, Yonghui; Burry, Aaron; Kozitsky, Vladimir; Fillion, Claude; Saunders, Craig; Rodríguez-Serrano, José

    2012-01-01

    Automatic license plate recognition (ALPR) is an important capability for traffic surveillance applications, including toll monitoring and detection of different types of traffic violations. ALPR is a multi-stage process comprising plate localization, character segmentation, optical character recognition (OCR), and identification of originating jurisdiction (i.e. state or province). Training of an ALPR system for a new jurisdiction typically involves gathering vast amounts of license plate images and associated ground truth data, followed by iterative tuning and optimization of the ALPR algorithms. The substantial time and effort required to train and optimize the ALPR system can result in excessive operational cost and overhead. In this paper we propose a framework to create an artificial set of license plate images for accelerated training and optimization of ALPR algorithms. The framework comprises two steps: the synthesis of license plate images according to the design and layout for a jurisdiction of interest; and the modeling of imaging transformations and distortions typically encountered in the image capture process. Distortion parameters are estimated by measurements of real plate images. The simulation methodology is successfully demonstrated for training of OCR.

  17. [Vernier Anode Design and Image Simulation].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ai-rong; Ni, Qi-liang; Song, Ke-fei

    2015-12-01

    Based-MCP position-sensitive anode photon-counting imaging detector is good at detecting extremely faint light, which includes micro-channel plate (MCP), position-sensitive anode and readout, and the performances of these detectors are mainly decided by the position-sensitive anode. As a charge division anode, Vernier anode using cyclically varying electrode areas which replaces the linearly varying electrodes of wedge-strip anode can get better resolution and greater electrode dynamic range. Simulation and design of the Vernier anode based on Vernier's decode principle are given here. Firstly, we introduce the decode and design principle of Vernier anode with nine electrodes in vector way, and get the design parameters which are the pitch, amplitude and the coarse wavelength of electrode. Secondly, we analyze the effect of every design parameters to the imaging of the detector. We simulate the electron cloud, the Vernier anode and the detector imaging using Labview software and get the relationship between the pitch and the coarse wavelength of the anode. Simultaneously, we get the corresponding electron cloud for the designing parameters. Based on the result of the simulation and the practical machining demand, a nine electrodes Vernier anode was designed and fabricated which has a pitch of 891 µm, insulation width of 25 µm, amplitude of 50 µm, coarse pixel numbers of 5. PMID:26964205

  18. Roughness Estimation from Point Clouds - A Comparison of Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Image Matching by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutzinger, Martin; Bremer, Magnus; Ragg, Hansjörg

    2013-04-01

    Recently, terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and matching of images acquired by unmanned arial vehicles (UAV) are operationally used for 3D geodata acquisition in Geoscience applications. However, the two systems cover different application domains in terms of acquisition conditions and data properties i.e. accuracy and line of sight. In this study we investigate the major differences between the two platforms for terrain roughness estimation. Terrain roughness is an important input for various applications such as morphometry studies, geomorphologic mapping, and natural process modeling (e.g. rockfall, avalanche, and hydraulic modeling). Data has been collected simultaneously by TLS using an Optech ILRIS3D and a rotary UAV using an octocopter from twins.nrn for a 900 m² test site located in a riverbed in Tyrol, Austria (Judenbach, Mieming). The TLS point cloud has been acquired from three scan positions. These have been registered using iterative closest point algorithm and a target-based referencing approach. For registration geometric targets (spheres) with a diameter of 20 cm were used. These targets were measured with dGPS for absolute georeferencing. The TLS point cloud has an average point density of 19,000 pts/m², which represents a point spacing of about 5 mm. 15 images where acquired by UAV in a height of 20 m using a calibrated camera with focal length of 18.3 mm. A 3D point cloud containing RGB attributes was derived using APERO/MICMAC software, by a direct georeferencing approach based on the aircraft IMU data. The point cloud is finally co-registered with the TLS data to guarantee an optimal preparation in order to perform the analysis. The UAV point cloud has an average point density of 17,500 pts/m², which represents a point spacing of 7.5 mm. After registration and georeferencing the level of detail of roughness representation in both point clouds have been compared considering elevation differences, roughness and representation of different grain

  19. A fast and mobile system for registration of low-altitude visual and thermal aerial images using multiple small-scale UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahyanejad, Saeed; Rinner, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    The use of multiple small-scale UAVs to support first responders in disaster management has become popular because of their speed and low deployment costs. We exploit such UAVs to perform real-time monitoring of target areas by fusing individual images captured from heterogeneous aerial sensors. Many approaches have already been presented to register images from homogeneous sensors. These methods have demonstrated robustness against scale, rotation and illumination variations and can also cope with limited overlap among individual images. In this paper we focus on thermal and visual image registration and propose different methods to improve the quality of interspectral registration for the purpose of real-time monitoring and mobile mapping. Images captured by low-altitude UAVs represent a very challenging scenario for interspectral registration due to the strong variations in overlap, scale, rotation, point of view and structure of such scenes. Furthermore, these small-scale UAVs have limited processing and communication power. The contributions of this paper include (i) the introduction of a feature descriptor for robustly identifying corresponding regions of images in different spectrums, (ii) the registration of image mosaics, and (iii) the registration of depth maps. We evaluated the first method using a test data set consisting of 84 image pairs. In all instances our approach combined with SIFT or SURF feature-based registration was superior to the standard versions. Although we focus mainly on aerial imagery, our evaluation shows that the presented approach would also be beneficial in other scenarios such as surveillance and human detection. Furthermore, we demonstrated the advantages of the other two methods in case of multiple image pairs.

  20. Biomechanical simulation of atrophy in MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano Smith, Andrew D.; Crum, William R.; Hill, Derek L. G.; Thacker, Neil A.; Bromiley, Paul A.

    2003-05-01

    Progressive cerebral atrophy is a physical component of the most common forms of dementia - Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, Lewy-Body disease and fronto-temporal dementia. We propose a phenomenological simulation of atrophy in MR images that provides gold-standard data; the origin and rate of progression of atrophy can be controlled and the resultant remodelling of brain structures is known. We simulate diffuse global atrophic change by generating global volumetric change in a physically realistic biomechanical model of the human brain. Thermal loads are applied to either single, or multiple, tissue types within the brain to drive tissue expansion or contraction. Mechanical readjustment is modelled using finite element methods (FEM). In this preliminary work we apply these techniques to the MNI brainweb phantom to produce new images exhibiting global diffuse atrophy. We compare the applied atrophy with that measured from the images using an established quantitative technique. Early results are encouraging and suggest that the model can be extended and used for validation of atrophy measurement techniques and non-rigid image registration, and for understanding the effect of atrophy on brain shape.

  1. Medical image archive node simulation and architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Ted T.; Tang, Yau-Kuo

    1996-05-01

    It is a well known fact that managed care and new treatment technologies are revolutionizing the health care provider world. Community Health Information Network and Computer-based Patient Record projects are underway throughout the United States. More and more hospitals are installing digital, `filmless' radiology (and other imagery) systems. They generate a staggering amount of information around the clock. For example, a typical 500-bed hospital might accumulate more than 5 terabytes of image data in a period of 30 years for conventional x-ray images and digital images such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computer Tomography images. With several hospitals contributing to the archive, the storage required will be in the hundreds of terabytes. Systems for reliable, secure, and inexpensive storage and retrieval of digital medical information do not exist today. In this paper, we present a Medical Image Archive and Distribution Service (MIADS) concept. MIADS is a system shared by individual and community hospitals, laboratories, and doctors' offices that need to store and retrieve medical images. Due to the large volume and complexity of the data, as well as the diversified user access requirement, implementation of the MIADS will be a complex procedure. One of the key challenges to implementing a MIADS is to select a cost-effective, scalable system architecture to meet the ingest/retrieval performance requirements. We have performed an in-depth system engineering study, and developed a sophisticated simulation model to address this key challenge. This paper describes the overall system architecture based on our system engineering study and simulation results. In particular, we will emphasize system scalability and upgradability issues. Furthermore, we will discuss our simulation results in detail. The simulations study the ingest/retrieval performance requirements based on different system configurations and architectures for variables such as workload, tape

  2. Coherent Scattering Imaging Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Laila Abdulgalil Rafik

    Conventional mammography has poor contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues due to the small difference in attenuation properties. Coherent scatter potentially provides more information because interference of coherently scattered radiation depends on the average intermolecular spacing, and can be used to characterize tissue types. However, typical coherent scatter analysis techniques are not compatible with rapid low dose screening techniques. Coherent scatter slot scan imaging is a novel imaging technique which provides new information with higher contrast. In this work a simulation of coherent scatter was performed for slot scan imaging to assess its performance and provide system optimization. In coherent scatter imaging, the coherent scatter is exploited using a conventional slot scan mammography system with anti-scatter grids tilted at the characteristic angle of cancerous tissues. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate the coherent scatter imaging. System optimization was performed across several parameters, including source voltage, tilt angle, grid distances, grid ratio, and shielding geometry. The contrast increased as the grid tilt angle increased beyond the characteristic angle for the modeled carcinoma. A grid tilt angle of 16 degrees yielded the highest contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Also, contrast increased as the source voltage increased. Increasing grid ratio improved contrast at the expense of decreasing SNR. A grid ratio of 10:1 was sufficient to give a good contrast without reducing the intensity to a noise level. The optimal source to sample distance was determined to be such that the source should be located at the focal distance of the grid. A carcinoma lump of 0.5x0.5x0.5 cm3 in size was detectable which is reasonable considering the high noise due to the usage of relatively small number of incident photons for computational reasons. A further study is needed to study the effect of breast density and breast thickness

  3. Multiresolution simulated annealing for brain image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Majcenic, Zoran

    1999-05-01

    Analysis of biomedical images is an important step in quantification of various diseases such as human spontaneous intracerebral brain hemorrhage (ICH). In particular, the study of outcome in patients having ICH requires measurements of various ICH parameters such as hemorrhage volume and their change over time. A multiresolution probabilistic approach for segmentation of CT head images is presented in this work. This method views the segmentation problem as a pixel labeling problem. In this application the labels are: background, skull, brain tissue, and ICH. The proposed method is based on the Maximum A-Posteriori (MAP) estimation of the unknown pixel labels. The MAP method maximizes the a-posterior probability of segmented image given the observed (input) image. Markov random field (MRF) model has been used for the posterior distribution. The MAP estimation of the segmented image has been determined using the simulated annealing (SA) algorithm. The SA algorithm is used to minimize the energy function associated with MRF posterior distribution function. A multiresolution SA (MSA) has been developed to speed up the annealing process. MSA is presented in detail in this work. A knowledge-based classification based on the brightness, size, shape and relative position toward other regions is performed at the end of the procedure. The regions are identified as background, skull, brain, ICH and calcifications.

  4. Tidal Flooding and Vegetation Patterns in a Salt Marsh Tidal Creek Imaged by Low-altitude Balloon Aerial Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Madsen, E.

    2013-12-01

    soil water content. These other factors are all directly affected by the hydroperiod, creating a complex system of feedbacks. Inundation frequencies show a pronounced relationship to zonation. Creek bank height and the hydroperiod have a curvilinear relationship at low bank heights such that small decreases in creek bank height can result in large increases in inundation frequency. Biological zonation is not simply a result of bank height and inundation frequency, other contributing factors include species competition, adaptability, and groundwater flow. Vegetation patterns delineated by a ground-based GPS survey and image classification from the aerial photos show that not all changes in eco-zonation are a direct function of elevation. Some asymmetry across the creek is observed in plant habitat, and eliminating topography (and thereby tidal inundation) as a factor, we attribute the remaining variability to groundwater flow.

  5. Thermal Imaging Using Small-Aerial Platforms for Assessment of Crop Water Stress in Humid Subtropical Climates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf- or canopy-to-air temperature difference (hereafter called CATD) can provide information on crop energy status. Thermal imagery from agricultural aircraft or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have the potential of providing thermal data for calculation of CATD and visual snapshots that can guide ...

  6. Thermal Imaging of Subsurface Coal Fires by means of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in the Autonomous Province Xinjiang, PRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasterling, Margarete; Schloemer, Stefan; Fischer, Christian; Ehrler, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Spontaneous combustion of coal and resulting coal fires lead to very high temperatures in the subsurface. To a large amount the heat is transferred to the surface by convective and conductive transport inducing a more or less pronounced thermal anomaly. During the past decade satellite-based infrared-imaging (ASTER, MODIS) was the method of choice for coal fire detection on a local and regional scale. However, the resolution is by far too low for a detailed analysis of single coal fires which is essential prerequisite for corrective measures (i.e. fire fighting) and calculation of carbon dioxide emission based on a complex correlation between energy release and CO2 generation. Consequently, within the framework of the Sino-German research project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in Northern China", a new concept was developed and successfully tested. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was equipped with a lightweight camera for thermografic (resolution 160 by 120 pixel, dynamic range -20 to 250°C) and for visual imaging. The UAV designed as an octocopter is able to hover at GPS controlled waypoints during predefined flight missions. The application of a UAV has several advantages. Compared to point measurements on the ground the thermal imagery quickly provides the spatial distribution of the temperature anomaly with a much better resolution. Areas otherwise not accessible (due to topography, fire induced cracks, etc.) can easily be investigated. The results of areal surveys on two coal fires in Xinjiang are presented. Georeferenced thermal and visual images were mosaicked together and analyzed. UAV-born data do well compared to temperatures measured directly on the ground and cover large areas in detail. However, measuring surface temperature alone is not sufficient. Simultaneous measurements made at the surface and in roughly 15cm depth proved substantial temperature gradients in the upper soil. Thus the temperature

  7. Simulated Thin-Film Growth and Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael

    2001-06-01

    Thin-films have become the cornerstone of the electronics, telecommunications, and broadband markets. A list of potential products includes: computer boards and chips, satellites, cell phones, fuel cells, superconductors, flat panel displays, optical waveguides, building and automotive windows, food and beverage plastic containers, metal foils, pipe plating, vision ware, manufacturing equipment and turbine engines. For all of these reasons a basic understanding of the physical processes involved in both growing and imaging thin-films can provide a wonderful research project for advanced undergraduate and first-year graduate students. After producing rudimentary two- and three-dimensional thin-film models incorporating ballsitic deposition and nearest neighbor Coulomb-type interactions, the QM tunneling equations are used to produce simulated scanning tunneling microscope (SSTM) images of the films. A discussion of computational platforms, languages, and software packages that may be used to accomplish similar results is also given.

  8. The construction of landslides achieves by using 1969 CORONA (KH-4B) image and aerial photos- A case study of the catchment of Te-chi reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Chia-Hung; Dirk, Wenske; Lin, Jiun-Chuan; Böse, Margot

    2010-05-01

    Taiwan before the construction of the Central Cross-Island Highway. The ortho-rectified CORONA image and aerial photos can be used to identify landslides and provide more information about the causes of landslides and the consequences of road construction, landform evolution and agriculture practice. The long term landslide archive can be used in the study of landscape evolution and hazard assessment. There are more than 800 landslides identified in CORONA image and 900 landslides in 1980 aerial photos, which were caused by road construction, farming practice and channel erosion.

  9. Simulation of transmission electron microscope images of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Rullgård, H; Ofverstedt, L-G; Masich, S; Daneholt, B; Oktem, O

    2011-09-01

    We present a new approach to simulate electron cryo-microscope images of biological specimens. The framework for simulation consists of two parts; the first is a phantom generator that generates a model of a specimen suitable for simulation, the second is a transmission electron microscope simulator. The phantom generator calculates the scattering potential of an atomic structure in aqueous buffer and allows the user to define the distribution of molecules in the simulated image. The simulator includes a well defined electron-specimen interaction model based on the scalar Schrödinger equation, the contrast transfer function for optics, and a noise model that includes shot noise as well as detector noise including detector blurring. To enable optimal performance, the simulation framework also includes a calibration protocol for setting simulation parameters. To test the accuracy of the new framework for simulation, we compare simulated images to experimental images recorded of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in vitreous ice. The simulated and experimental images show good agreement with respect to contrast variations depending on dose and defocus. Furthermore, random fluctuations present in experimental and simulated images exhibit similar statistical properties. The simulator has been designed to provide a platform for development of new instrumentation and image processing procedures in single particle electron microscopy, two-dimensional crystallography and electron tomography with well documented protocols and an open source code into which new improvements and extensions are easily incorporated. PMID:21631500

  10. Simulation of ASTER data using AVIRIS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) is a joint Japanese/US imaging instrument scheduled to fly on the first Earth Observing System (EOS) platform in 1998. The complement of scanners includes a visible, three channel module with forward-looking stereo capability, a six channel short wavelength infrared module, and a five channel thermal module. As part of the definition phase for the instrument design, AVIRIS data was used to simulate the short wave infrared (SWIR) bands to investigate the effects of widening two of the bands to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) versus loss of spectral separability due to uncertainty in the post-launch band positions.

  11. Aerial camera auto focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Lan, Gongpu; Gao, Xiaodong; Liang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    Before the aerial photographic task, the cameras focusing work should be performed at first to compensate the defocus caused by the changes of the temperature, pressure etc. A new method of aerial camera auto focusing is proposed through traditional photoelectric self-collimation combined with image processing method. Firstly, the basic principles of optical self-collimation and image processing are introduced. Secondly, the limitations of the two are illustrated and the benefits of the new method are detailed. Then the basic principle, the system composition and the implementation of this new method are presented. Finally, the data collection platform is set up reasonably and the focus evaluation function curve is draw. The results showed that: the method can be used in the Aerial camera focusing field, adapt to the aviation equipment trends of miniaturization and lightweight .This paper is helpful to the further work of accurate and automatic focusing.

  12. Integration of airborne Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data and digitized aerial photography via an ISH transformation. [Intensity Saturation Hue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrosia, Vincent G.; Myers, Jeffrey S.; Ekstrand, Robert E.; Fitzgerald, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple method for enhancing the spatial and spectral resolution of disparate data sets is presented. Two data sets, digitized aerial photography at a nominal spatial resolution 3,7 meters and TMS digital data at 24.6 meters, were coregistered through a bilinear interpolation to solve the problem of blocky pixel groups resulting from rectification expansion. The two data sets were then subjected to intensity-saturation-hue (ISH) transformations in order to 'blend' the high-spatial-resolution (3.7 m) digitized RC-10 photography with the high spectral (12-bands) and lower spatial (24.6 m) resolution TMS digital data. The resultant merged products make it possible to perform large-scale mapping, ease photointerpretation, and can be derived for any of the 12 available TMS spectral bands.

  13. Guiding the Search for Surface Rupture and Paleoseismic Sites using Low-Level Aerial Surveys, Geodetic Imaging, Remote Sensing and Field Mapping (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudnut, K. W.; Fletcher, J. M.; Teran, O.; Gonzalez-Garcia, J. J.; Hinojosa, A.; Rockwell, T. K.; Akciz, S. O.; Leprince, S.; Fielding, E. J.; Briggs, R. W.; Crone, A. J.; Gold, R. D.; Prentice, C. S.; Stock, J.; Avouac, J.; Simons, M.; Galetzka, J. E.; Lynch, D. K.; Cowgill, E.; Oskin, M. E.; Morelan, A.; Aslaksen, M.; Sellars, J.; Woolard, J.

    2010-12-01

    The significant earthquakes of 2010 produced surficial expressions ranging from blind faulting and coastal uplift in Leogane, Haiti and Maule, Chile to surface faulting in Baja California, Mexico and Yushu, China. In Haiti and Baja California geodetic imaging methods strongly guided field reconnaissance and surface rupture mapping efforts, yet in quite different ways. In these challenging examples, InSAR, UAVSAR and optical image differencing, as well as SAR pixel tracking methods, were used to locate and quantify ground deformation and ruptures. In Baja California prominent rupture occurred in parts of the Cucapah mountains, yet along an 11 km-long stepover section, the zone of faulting was discontinuous and obscured by rockfalls. Optical image differencing helped identify surface rupture, especially through this stepover. SAR pixel tracking confirmed that rupture occurred along the newly identified Indiviso fault in Baja California, though masked by ground failure in the Colorado River Delta. Also in Baja California (and extending north of the US-MX border), a complex set of NE-SW cross-faults and N-S breaks were imaged with UAVSAR, InSAR, and aerial photography allowing the intricate pattern of faulting to be scrutinized. In Haiti, surface rupture along the inferred source fault was not observed during initial reconnaissance. This led to extensive imagery- and field-based searches for surface deformation, aided by InSAR, which revealed that surface deformation was caused primarily by off-fault blind thrusting. In Baja California, high resolution (up to 3-5 cm GSD) aerial imaging by low-altitude aerial stereo photography was then used to identify promising locations for measuring slip vectors on the fault, and to aid in mapping the surface rupture in detail (at 1:500 scale). Digital aerial photography with 0.1 m GSD by NOAA using their DSS 439 camera was rapidly reduced to orthomosaics (at 0.25 m GSD) and then used as uniform base imagery for rupture mapping. In

  14. Simulated annealing and metaheuristic for randomized priority search algorithms for the aerial refuelling parallel machine scheduling problem with due date-to-deadline windows and release times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Sezgin; Rabadi, Ghaith

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the aerial refuelling scheduling problem (ARSP), where a set of fighter jets (jobs) with certain ready times must be refuelled from tankers (machines) by their due dates; otherwise, they reach a low fuel level (deadline) incurring a high cost. ARSP is an identical parallel machine scheduling problem with release times and due date-to-deadline windows to minimize the total weighted tardiness. A simulated annealing (SA) and metaheuristic for randomized priority search (Meta-RaPS) with the newly introduced composite dispatching rule, apparent piecewise tardiness cost with ready times (APTCR), are applied to the problem. Computational experiments compared the algorithms' solutions to optimal solutions for small problems and to each other for larger problems. To obtain optimal solutions, a mixed integer program with a piecewise weighted tardiness objective function was solved for up to 12 jobs. The results show that Meta-RaPS performs better in terms of average relative error but SA is more efficient.

  15. Identification of disrupted surfaces due to military activity at the Ft. Irwin National Training Center: An aerial photograph and satellite image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, L.E.; Marsh, S.E.; Lee, C.

    1996-07-01

    Concern for environmental management of our natural resources is most often focused on the anthropogenic impacts placed upon these resources. Desert landscapes, in particular, are fragile environments, and minimal stresses on surficial materials can greatly increase the rate and character of erosional responses. The National Training Center, Ft. Irwin, located in the middle of the Mojave Desert, California, provides an isolated study area of intense ORV activity occurring over a 50-year period. Geomorphic surfaces, and surficial disruption from two study sites within the Ft. Irwin area were mapped from 1947, 1:28,400, and 1993 1:12,000 black and white aerial photographs. Several field checks were conducted to verify this mapping. However, mapping from black and white aerial photography relies heavily on tonal differences, patterns, and morphological criteria. Satellite imagery, sensitive to changes in mineralogy, can help improve the ability to distinguish geomorphic units in desert regions. In order to assess both the extent of disrupted surfaces and the surficial geomorphology discemable from satellite imagery, analysis was done on SPOT panchromatic and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral imagery acquired during the spring of 1987 and 1993. The resulting classified images provide a clear indication of the capabilities of the satellite data to aid in the delineation of disrupted geomorphic surfaces.

  16. Preliminary applications of Landsat images and aerial photography for determining land-use, geologic, and hydrologic characteristics, Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimes, F.J.; Moore, G.K.; Steele, T.D.

    1978-01-01

    Expanded energy- and recreation-related activities in the Yampa River basin, Colorado and Wyoming, have caused a rapid increase in economic development which will result in increased demand and competition for natural resources. In planning for efficient allocation of the basin 's natural resources, Landsat images and small-scale color and color-infrared photographs were used for selected geologic, hydrologic and land-use applications within the Yampa River basin. Applications of Landsat data included: (1) regional land-use classification and mapping, (2) lineament mapping, and (3) areal snow-cover mapping. Results from the Landsat investigations indicated that: (1) Landsat land-use classification maps, at a regional level, compared favorably with areal land-use patterns that were defined from available ground information, (2) lineaments were mapped in sufficient detail using recently developed techniques for interpreting aerial photographs, (3) snow cover generally could be mapped for large areas with the exception of some densely forested areas of the basin and areas having a large percentage of winter-season cloud cover. Aerial photographs were used for estimation of turbidity for eight stream locations in the basin. Spectral reflectance values obtained by digitizing photographs were compared with measured turbidity values. Results showed strong correlations (variances explained of greater than 90 percent) between spectral reflectance obtained from color photographs and measured turbidity values. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Image analysis for Validation of Simulations of Fluid Mix Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Miller, P

    2007-01-10

    As computer simulations gain acceptance for the modeling of complex physical phenomena, there is an increasing need to validate these simulation codes by comparing them to experiments. Currently, this is done qualitatively, using a visual approach. This is obviously very subjective and more quantitative metrics are needed, especially to identify simulations which are closer to experiments than other simulations. In this paper, we show how image processing techniques can be effectively used in such comparisons. Using an example from the problem of mixing of two fluids, we show that we can quantitatively compare experimental and simulation images by extracting higher level features to characterize the objects in the images.

  18. The Potential of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for Large Scale Mapping of Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwin, N.; Ahmad, A.; Zainon, O.

    2014-02-01

    Many countries in the tropical region are covered with cloud for most of the time, hence, it is difficult to get clear images especially from high resolution satellite imagery. Aerial photogrammetry can be used but most of the time the cloud problem still exists. Today, this problem could be solved using a system known as unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) where the aerial images can be acquired at low altitude and the system can fly under the cloud. The UAV system could be used in various applications including mapping coastal area. The UAV system is equipped with an autopilot system and automatic method known as autonomous flying that can be utilized for data acquisition. To achieve high resolution imagery, a compact digital camera of high resolution was used to acquire the aerial images at an altitude. In this study, the UAV system was employed to acquire aerial images of a coastal simulation model at low altitude. From the aerial images, photogrammetric image processing was executed to produce photogrammetric outputs such a digital elevation model (DEM), contour line and orthophoto. In this study, ground control point (GCP) and check point (CP) were established using conventional ground surveying method (i.e total station). The GCP is used for exterior orientation in photogrammetric processes and CP for accuracy assessment based on Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). From this study, it was found that the UAV system can be used for large scale mapping of coastal simulation model with accuracy at millimeter level. It is anticipated that the same system could be used for large scale mapping of real coastal area and produces good accuracy. Finally, the UAV system has great potential to be used for various applications that require accurate results or products at limited time and less man power.

  19. Multi-temporal analysis of aerial images for the investigation of spatial-temporal dynamics of shallow erosion - a case study from the Tyrolean Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, C.; Geitner, C.; Heinrich, K.; Rutzinger, M.

    2012-04-01

    Small and shallow eroded areas characterize the landscape of many pastures and meadows in the Alps. The extent of such erosion phenomena varies between 2 m2 and 200 m2. These patches tend to be only a few decimetres thick, with a maximum depth of 2 m. The processes involved are shallow landslides, superficial erosion by snow and livestock trampling. Key parameters that influence the emergence of shallow erosion are the geological, topographical and climatic circumstances in an area as well as its soils, vegetation and land use. The negative impact of this phenomenon includes not only the loss of soil but also the reduced attractiveness of the landscape, especially in tourist regions. One approach identifying and mapping geomorphological elements is remote sensing. The analysis of aerial images is a suitable method for identifying the multi-temporal dynamics of shallow eroded areas because of the good spatial and temporal resolution. For this purpose, we used a pixel-based approach to detect these areas semi-automatically in an orthophoto. In a first step, each aerial image was classified using dynamic thresholds derived from the histogram of the orthophoto. In a second step, the identified areas of erosion were filtered and visually in-terpreted. Based on this procedure, eroded areas with a minimum size of 5 m2 were detected in a test site located in the Inner Schmirn Valley (Tyrol, Austria). The altitude of the test site ranges between 1,980 m and 2,370 m, with a mean inclination of 36°, facing E to SE. Geologically, the slope is part of the "Hohe Tauern Window", characterized by "Bündner schists" deficient in lime and regolith. Until the 1960s, the slope was used as a hay meadow. Orthophotos from 2000, 2003, 2007 and 2010 were used for this investigation. Older aerial images were not suitable because of their lower resolution and poor ortho-rectification. However, they are useful for relating the results of the ten-year time-span to a larger temporal context

  20. The Kilauea 1974 Flow: Quantitative Morphometry of Lava Flows using Low Altitude Aerial Image Data using a Kite-based Platform in the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidt, S. P.; Whelley, P.; Hamilton, C.; Bleacher, J. E.; Garry, W. B.

    2015-12-01

    The December 31, 1974 lava flow from Kilauea Caldera, Hawaii within the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park was selected for field campaigns as a terrestrial analog for Mars in support of NASA Planetary Geology and Geophysics (PGG) research and the Remote, In Situ and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration (RIS4E) node of the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) program). The lava flow was a rapidly emplaced unit that was strongly influenced by existing topography, which favored the formation of a tributary lava flow system. The unit includes a diverse range of surface textures (e.g., pāhoehoe, ´áā, and transitional lavas), and structural features (e.g., streamlined islands, pits, and interactions with older tumuli). However, these features are generally below the threshold of visibility within previously acquired airborne and spacecraft data. In this study, we have generated unique, high-resolution digital images using low-altitude Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) system during field campaigns in 2014 and 2015 (National Park Service permit #HAVO-2012-SCI-0025). The kite-based mapping platform (nadir-viewing) and a radio-controlled gimbal (allowing pointing) provided similar data as from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), but with longer flight time, larger total data volumes per sortie, and fewer regulatory challenges and cost. Images acquired from KAP and UAVs are used to create orthomosaics and DEMs using Multi-View Stereo-Photogrammetry (MVSP) software. The 3-Dimensional point clouds are extremely dense, resulting in a grid resolution of < 2 cm. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) / Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) data have been collected for these areas and provide a basis of comparison or "ground truth" for the photogrammetric data. Our results show a good comparison with LiDAR/TLS data, each offering their own unique advantages and potential for data fusion.

  1. An online interactive simulation system for medical imaging education.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Aditya; Wu, Dawei; Wu, Chunyan; Zhao, Weizhao

    2005-09-01

    This report presents a recently developed web-based medical imaging simulation system for teaching students or other trainees who plan to work in the medical imaging field. The increased importance of computer and information technology widely applied to different imaging techniques in clinics and medical research necessitates a comprehensive medical imaging education program. A complete tutorial of simulations introducing popular imaging modalities, such as X-ray, MRI, CT, ultrasound and PET, forms an essential component of such an education. Internet technologies provide a vehicle to carry medical imaging education online. There exist a number of internet-based medical imaging hyper-books or online documentations. However, there are few providing interactive computational simulations. We focus on delivering knowledge of the physical principles and engineering implementation of medical imaging techniques through an interactive website environment. The online medical imaging simulation system presented in this report outlines basic principles underlying different imaging techniques and image processing algorithms and offers trainees an interactive virtual laboratory. For education purposes, this system aims to provide general understanding of each imaging modality with comprehensive explanations, ample illustrations and copious references as its thrust, rather than complex physics or detailed math. This report specifically describes the development of the tutorial for commonly used medical imaging modalities. An internet-accessible interface is used to simulate various imaging algorithms with user-adjustable parameters. The tutorial is under the MATLAB Web Server environment. Macromedia Director MX is used to develop interactive animations integrating theory with graphic-oriented simulations. HTML and JavaScript are used to enable a user to explore these modules online in a web browser. Numerous multiple choice questions, links and references for advanced study are

  2. Numerical simulations of the thermoacoustic computed tomography breast imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiser, William Lester, Jr.

    A thermoacoustic wave is produced when an object absorbs energy and experiences a subsequent thermal expansion. We have developed a Thermoacoustic Computed Tomography (TACT) breast imaging system to exploit the thermoacoustic phenomena as a method of soft tissue imaging. By exposing the breast to short pulses of 434 MHz microwaves, ultrasonic pulses are generated and detected with a hemispherical transducer array submersed in a water bath. Filtering and back projecting the transducer signals generates a 3-D image that maps the localized microwave absorption properties of the breast. In an effort to understand the factors limiting image quality, the TACT system was numerically simulated. The simulations were used to generate the transducer signals that would be collected by the TACT system during a scan of an object. These simulated data streams were then fed into the system image reconstruction software to provide images of simulated phantoms. The effects of transducer diameter, transducer response, transducer array geometry and stimulating pulse width on the spatial and contrast resolution of the system were quantified using the simulations. The spatial resolution was highly dependent upon location in the imaging volume. This was due to the off axis response of transducers of finite aperture. Simulated data were compared with experimental data, obtained by imaging a parallel-piped resolution phantom, to verify the accuracy of the simulation code. A contrast-detail phantom was numerically simulated to determine the ability of the system to image spheres of diameters <1 cm with absorption values on the order of physiologic saline, when located in a background of noise. The results of the contrast-detail analysis were dependent on the location of the spheres in the imaging volume and the diameter of the simulated transducers. This work sets the foundation for the initial image quality studies of the TACT system. Improvements to the current imaging system, based on

  3. An Automated Approach to Agricultural Tile Drain Detection and Extraction Utilizing High Resolution Aerial Imagery and Object-Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansen, Richard A.

    Subsurface drainage from agricultural fields in the Maumee River watershed is suspected to adversely impact the water quality and contribute to the formation of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in Lake Erie. In early August of 2014, a HAB developed in the western Lake Erie Basin that resulted in over 400,000 people being unable to drink their tap water due to the presence of a toxin from the bloom. HAB development in Lake Erie is aided by excess nutrients from agricultural fields, which are transported through subsurface tile and enter the watershed. Compounding the issue within the Maumee watershed, the trend within the watershed has been to increase the installation of tile drains in both total extent and density. Due to the immense area of drained fields, there is a need to establish an accurate and effective technique to monitor subsurface farmland tile installations and their associated impacts. This thesis aimed at developing an automated method in order to identify subsurface tile locations from high resolution aerial imagery by applying an object-based image analysis (OBIA) approach utilizing eCognition. This process was accomplished through a set of algorithms and image filters, which segment and classify image objects by their spectral and geometric characteristics. The algorithms utilized were based on the relative location of image objects and pixels, in order to maximize the robustness and transferability of the final rule-set. These algorithms were coupled with convolution and histogram image filters to generate results for a 10km2 study area located within Clay Township in Ottawa County, Ohio. The eCognition results were compared to previously collected tile locations from an associated project that applied heads-up digitizing of aerial photography to map field tile. The heads-up digitized locations were used as a baseline for the accuracy assessment. The accuracy assessment generated a range of agreement values from 67.20% - 71.20%, and an average

  4. Locating buildings in aerial photos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Algorithms and techniques for use in the identification and location of large buildings in digitized copies of aerial photographs are developed and tested. The building data would be used in the simulation of objects located in the vicinity of an airport that may be detected by aircraft radar. Two distinct approaches are considered. Most building footprints are rectangular in form. The first approach studied is to search for right-angled corners that characterize rectangular objects and then to connect these corners to complete the building. This problem is difficult because many nonbuilding objects, such as street corners, parking lots, and ballparks often have well defined corners which are often difficult to distinguish from rooftops. Furthermore, rooftops come in a number of shapes, sizes, shadings, and textures which also limit the discrimination task. The strategy used linear sequences of different samples to detect straight edge segments at multiple angles and to determine when these segments meet at approximately right-angles with respect to each other. This technique is effective in locating corners. The test image used has a fairly rectangular block pattern oriented about thirty degrees clockwise from a vertical alignment, and the overall measurement data reflect this. However, this technique does not discriminate between buildings and other objects at an operationally suitable rate. In addition, since multiple paths are tested for each image pixel, this is a time consuming task. The process can be speeded up by preprocessing the image to locate the more optimal sampling paths. The second approach is to rely on a human operator to identify and select the building objects and then to have the computer determine the outline and location of the selected structures. When presented with a copy of a digitized aerial photograph, the operator uses a mouse and cursor to select a target building. After a button on the mouse is pressed, with the cursor fully within

  5. Moving Obstacle Avoidance for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yucong

    There has been a vast increase in applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in civilian domains. To operate in the civilian airspace, a UAV must be able to sense and avoid both static and moving obstacles for flight safety. While indoor and low-altitude environments are mainly occupied by static obstacles, risks in space of higher altitude primarily come from moving obstacles such as other aircraft or flying vehicles in the airspace. Therefore, the ability to avoid moving obstacles becomes a necessity for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Towards enabling a UAV to autonomously sense and avoid moving obstacles, this thesis makes the following contributions. Initially, an image-based reactive motion planner is developed for a quadrotor to avoid a fast approaching obstacle. Furthermore, A Dubin's curve based geometry method is developed as a global path planner for a fixed-wing UAV to avoid collisions with aircraft. The image-based method is unable to produce an optimal path and the geometry method uses a simplified UAV model. To compensate these two disadvantages, a series of algorithms built upon the Closed-Loop Rapid Exploratory Random Tree are developed as global path planners to generate collision avoidance paths in real time. The algorithms are validated in Software-In-the-Loop (SITL) and Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulations using a fixed-wing UAV model and in real flight experiments using quadrotors. It is observed that the algorithm enables a UAV to avoid moving obstacles approaching to it with different directions and speeds.

  6. Infrared imagery acquisition process supporting simulation and real image training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, John

    2012-05-01

    The increasing use of infrared sensors requires development of advanced infrared training and simulation tools to meet current Warfighter needs. In order to prepare the force, a challenge exists for training and simulation images to be both realistic and consistent with each other to be effective and avoid negative training. The US Army Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate has corrected this deficiency by developing and implementing infrared image collection methods that meet the needs of both real image trainers and real-time simulations. The author presents innovative methods for collection of high-fidelity digital infrared images and the associated equipment and environmental standards. The collected images are the foundation for US Army, and USMC Recognition of Combat Vehicles (ROC-V) real image combat ID training and also support simulations including the Night Vision Image Generator and Synthetic Environment Core. The characteristics, consistency, and quality of these images have contributed to the success of these and other programs. To date, this method has been employed to generate signature sets for over 350 vehicles. The needs of future physics-based simulations will also be met by this data. NVESD's ROC-V image database will support the development of training and simulation capabilities as Warfighter needs evolve.

  7. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  8. The method of infrared image simulation based on the measured image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shuli; Liu, Liang; Ren, Jiancun

    2015-10-01

    The development of infrared imaging guidance technology has promoted the research of infrared imaging simulation technology and the key of infrared imaging simulation is the generation of IR image. The generation of IR image is worthful in military and economy. In order to solve the problem of credibility and economy of infrared scene generation, a method of infrared scene generation based on the measured image is proposed. Through researching on optical properties of ship-target and sea background, ship-target images with various gestures are extracted from recorded images based on digital image processing technology. The ship-target image is zoomed in and out to simulate the relative motion between the viewpoint and the target according to field of view and the distance between the target and the sensor. The gray scale of ship-target image is adjusted to simulate the radiation change of the ship-target according to the distance between the viewpoint and the target and the atmospheric transmission. Frames of recorded infrared images without target are interpolated to simulate high frame rate of missile. Processed ship-target images and sea-background infrared images are synthetized to obtain infrared scenes according to different viewpoints. Experiments proved that this method is flexible and applicable, and the fidelity and the reliability of synthesis infrared images can be guaranteed.

  9. Converging Lens Simulation Design and Image Predictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, J. A.; Slough, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    While computer technology continues to enhance the teaching and learning of all science disciplines, computer simulations, in particular, have become exceptionally beneficial in physics education. In addition to the manner in which physics instructors integrate computer simulations into their instructional practices, the design of a simulation may…

  10. Study on simulation of low light level images and photon images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Yu, Xin; Chen, Yi-nan

    2008-03-01

    This paper concentrates on images formation simulation under low light level condition (10 -6images and system entire noise and simulate a deblurred image intensified by photon imaging system recently constructed under low light level condition. The influence of scene luminance and photon imaging system optical errors on the simulation is introduced. Then the system entire noise is appended to low light level images by a novel noise analysis and generation method based on experimental study method. The second part of this paper deals with simulation of photon images. Because of randomicity of photon images, roulette wheel selection is utilized to confirm the grey level of stochastic signal photon image and noise photon image is generated by poissson stochastic process pixel by pixel. The final photon image is acquired by synthesizing the two images. The simulation presented in this paper provides an economical and convenient method to investigate the detection ability of photon imaging system and image reconstruction algorithm under low light level condition and photon limited condition.

  11. #7 Comparing STEREO, Simulated Helioseismic Images

    NASA Video Gallery

    Farside direct observations from STEREO (left) and simultaneous helioseismic reconstructions (right). Medium to large size active regions clearly appear on the helioseismic images, however the smal...

  12. Validation of an image simulation technique for two computed radiography systems: An application to neonatal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smans, Kristien; Vandenbroucke, Dirk; Pauwels, Herman; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Bosmans, Hilde

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a computer model to simulate the image acquisition for two computed radiography (CR) imaging systems used for neonatal chest imaging: (1) The Agfa ADC Compact, a flying spot reader with powder phosphor image plates (MD 40.0); and (2) the Agfa DX-S, a line-scanning CR reader with needle crystal phosphor image plates (HD 5.0). The model was then applied to compare the image quality of the two CR imaging systems. Methods: Monte Carlo techniques were used to simulate the transport of primary and scattered x rays in digital x-ray systems. The output of the Monte Carlo program was an image representing the energy absorbed in the detector material. This image was then modified using physical characteristics of the CR imaging systems to account for the signal intensity variations due to the heel effect along the anode-cathode axis, the spatial resolution characteristics of the imaging system, and the various sources of image noise. The simulation was performed for typical acquisition parameters of neonatal chest x-ray examinations. To evaluate the computer model, the authors compared the threshold-contrast detectability in simulated and experimentally acquired images of a contrast-detail phantom. Threshold-contrast curves were computed using a commercially available scoring program. Results: The threshold-contrast curves of the simulated and experimentally acquired images show good agreement; for the two CR systems, 93% of the threshold diameters calculated from the simulated images fell within the confidence intervals of the threshold diameter calculated from the experimentally assessed images. Moreover, the superiority of needle based CR plates for neonatal imaging was confirmed. Conclusions: The good agreement between simulated and experimental acquired results indicates that the computer model is accurate.

  13. Training set size, scale, and features in Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis of very high resolution unmanned aerial vehicle imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lei; Cheng, Liang; Li, Manchun; Liu, Yongxue; Ma, Xiaoxue

    2015-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) has been used increasingly for natural resource applications in recent years due to their greater availability and the miniaturization of sensors. In addition, Geographic Object-Based Image Analysis (GEOBIA) has received more attention as a novel paradigm for remote sensing earth observation data. However, GEOBIA generates some new problems compared with pixel-based methods. In this study, we developed a strategy for the semi-automatic optimization of object-based classification, which involves an area-based accuracy assessment that analyzes the relationship between scale and the training set size. We found that the Overall Accuracy (OA) increased as the training set ratio (proportion of the segmented objects used for training) increased when the Segmentation Scale Parameter (SSP) was fixed. The OA increased more slowly as the training set ratio became larger and a similar rule was obtained according to the pixel-based image analysis. The OA decreased as the SSP increased when the training set ratio was fixed. Consequently, the SSP should not be too large during classification using a small training set ratio. By contrast, a large training set ratio is required if classification is performed using a high SSP. In addition, we suggest that the optimal SSP for each class has a high positive correlation with the mean area obtained by manual interpretation, which can be summarized by a linear correlation equation. We expect that these results will be applicable to UAV imagery classification to determine the optimal SSP for each class.

  14. Numerical simulation scattered imaging in deep mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Shun; Pan, Dong-Ming; Li, Juan-Juan

    2010-09-01

    Conventional seismic exploration, mostly based on reflection theory, hardly has accurate imaging results for disaster geologic bodies which have small scale, steep dip, or complex structure. In this paper, we design two typical geologic models for analyzing the characteristics of scattered waves in mines for forward modeling by finite difference and apply the equivalent offset migration (EOM) and EOM-based interference stack migration methods to mine prospecting. We focus on the analysis of scatted imaging’s technological superiority to reflection imaging. Research shows: 1) scattered imaging can improve fold and make the best of weak scattered information, so it shows better results than post-stack migration imaging and 2) it can utilize the diffraction stack migration method-based ray path theory for mine seismic advanced prediction, so it provides an new efficient imaging method for improving resolution of mine seismic exploration.

  15. Simulation of Optical and Synthetic Imaging using Microwave Reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Kramer; R. Nazikian; E. Valeo

    2004-01-16

    Two-dimensional full-wave time-dependent simulations in full plasma geometry are presented which show that conventional reflectometry (without a lens) can be used to synthetically image density fluctuations in fusion plasmas under conditions where the parallel correlation length greatly exceeds the poloidal correlation length of the turbulence. The advantage of synthetic imaging is that the image can be produced without the need for a large lens of high optical quality, and each frequency that is launched can be independently imaged. A particularly simple arrangement, consisting of a single receiver located at the midpoint of a microwave beam propagating along the plasma midplane is shown to suffice for imaging purposes. However, as the ratio of the parallel to poloidal correlation length decreases, a poloidal array of receivers needs to be used to synthesize the image with high accuracy. Simulations using DIII-D relevant parameters show the similarity of synthetic and optical imaging in present-day experiments.

  16. Infrared Image Simulation Based On Statistical Learning Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaochao, Huang; Xiaodi, Wu; Wuqin, Tong

    2007-12-01

    A real-time simulation algorithm of infrared image based on statistical learning theory is presented. The method includes three contents to achieve real-time simulation of infrared image, such as acquiring the training sample, forecasting the scene temperature field value by statistical learning machine, data processing and data analysis of temperature field. The simulation result shows this algorithm based on ν - support vector regression have better maneuverability and generalization than the other method, and the simulation precision and real-time quality are satisfying.

  17. Efficiency of ultrasound training simulators: method for assessing image realism.

    PubMed

    Bø, Lars Eirik; Gjerald, Sjur Urdson; Brekken, Reidar; Tangen, Geir Arne; Hernes, Toril A Nagelhus

    2010-04-01

    Although ultrasound has become an important imaging modality within several medical professions, the benefit of ultrasound depends to some degree on the skills of the person operating the probe and interpreting the image. For some applications, the possibility to educate operators in a clinical setting is limited, and the use of training simulators is considered an alternative approach for learning basic skills. To ensure the quality of simulator-based training, it is important to produce simulated ultrasound images that resemble true images to a sufficient degree. This article describes a method that allows corresponding true and simulated ultrasound images to be generated and displayed side by side in real time, thus facilitating an interactive evaluation of ultrasound simulators in terms of image resemblance, real-time characteristics and man-machine interaction. The proposed method could be used to study the realism of ultrasound simulators and how this realism affects the quality of training, as well as being a valuable tool in the development of simulation algorithms. PMID:20337541

  18. Using enlarged stereo aerial images acquired by small-format nonmetric camera for large-scale ocean floor mapping at low tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamos, Christos; Faig, Wolfgang

    1993-10-01

    HY-GRO '92 is a project currently carried out by the Ocean Mapping Group at the University of New Brunswick. One of the purposes of this project is the investigation of the relationship between acoustic mapping data and the actual ocean seabed bathymetry. In order to facilitate the comparison, ground truthing information (Digital Elevation Model) has been collected using stereo aerial photography of tidal areas at low tide. The required DEM accuracy is in the magnitude of a few centimeters. A reasonable photoscale for providing the required DEM accuracy would be 1:3750. With a focal length of 80 mm the flying height has to be 300 m. In that case the ground coverage of the 57 X 57 mm2 image format is 214 X 214 m2. It is clear that for large areas of interest (in our case: 2.5 X 2.5 km2) while maintaining the necessary overlap (60%) and sidelap (30%), the number of photographs and control points becomes unreasonably high, thus making the use of the small format camera not attractive anymore. The above encountered problem was solved with the acquisition of the original images in a four times smaller scale (1:15,000, flying height 1200 m, ground coverage 857 X 857 m2). Using a quality enlarger, the original images are enlarged by the same factor, so that the final image product is at the desired scale. The enlargement introduces effects of lens distortions and film deformations but they are again taken care of by the self calibrating bundle adjustment.

  19. Development of a simulator for radiographic image optimization.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Mark; Xu, X George; Yazici, Birsen

    2005-06-01

    A software package, incorporating two computational patient phantoms, has been developed for optimizing X-ray radiographic imaging. A tomographic phantom, visible photographic Man tomographic phantom (VIP-Man), constructed from Visible Human anatomical color images is used to simulate the scattered portion of an X-ray system using the Electron Gamma Shower National Research Council (EGSnrc) Monte Carlo code. The primary portion of an X-ray image is simulated using the projection ray-tracing method through the Visible Human CT data set. To produce a realistic image, the software simulates quantum noise, blurring effects, lesions, detector absorption efficiency, and other imaging artifacts. The primary and scattered portions of an X-ray chest image are combined to form a final image for future observer studies and image quality analysis. Absorbed doses in organs and tissues of the segmented VIP-Man phantom were also obtained from the Monte Carlo simulations. This paper presents methods of the simulator and preliminary results. PMID:15899304

  20. Mass and heat flux balance of La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe) from aerial infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Beauducel, François; Coutant, Olivier; Delacourt, Christophe; Richon, Patrick; de Chabalier, Jean-Bernard; Hammouya, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    La Soufrière of Guadeloupe is an active volcano of Lesser Antilles that is closely monitored due to a high eruptive hazard potential. Since 1992 it exhibits a medium-level but sustained background hydrothermal activity with low-energy and shallow seismicity, hot springs temperature increase and high flux acidic gas fumaroles at the summit. The problem of estimating the heat balance and quantifying the evolution of hydrothermal activity has become a key challenge for surveillance. This work is the first attempt of a global mapping and quantification of La Soufrière thermal activity performed in February 2010 using aerial thermal infrared imagery. After instrument calibration and data processing, we present a global map of thermal anomalies allowing to spot the main active sites: the summit area (including the fumaroles of Tarissan Pit and South Crater), the Ty Fault fumarolic zone, and the hot springs located at the vicinity of the dome. In a second step, we deduce the mass and the energy fluxes released by the volcano. In particular, we propose a simple model of energy balance to estimate the mass flux of the summit fumaroles from their brightness temperature and size. In February 2010, Tarissan Pit had a 22.8 ± 8.1 kg s -1 flux (1970 ± 704 tons day -1), while South Crater vents had a total of 19.5 ± 4.0 kg s -1 (1687 ± 348 tons day -1). Once converted into energy flux, summit fumaroles represent 98% of the 106 ± 30 MW released by the volcano, the 2% remaining being split between the hot springs and the thermal anomalies at the summit and at the Ty Fault fumarolic zone. These values are in the high range of the previous estimations, highlighting the short-term variability of the expelled fluxes. Such a heat flux requires the cooling of 1500 m 3 of magma per day, in good agreement with previous geochemical studies.

  1. Simulation of Medical Imaging Systems: Emission and Transmission Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Robert L.

    Simulation is an important tool in medical imaging research. In patient scans the true underlying anatomy and physiology is unknown. We have no way of knowing in a given scan how various factors are confounding the data: statistical noise; biological variability; patient motion; scattered radiation, dead time, and other data contaminants. Simulation allows us to isolate a single factor of interest, for instance when researchers perform multiple simulations of the same imaging situation to determine the effect of statistical noise or biological variability. Simulations are also increasingly used as a design optimization tool for tomographic scanners. This article gives an overview of the mechanics of emission and transmission tomography simulation, reviews some of the publicly available simulation tools, and discusses trade-offs between the accuracy and efficiency of simulations.

  2. Aerial radiation surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Jobst, J.

    1980-01-01

    A recent aerial radiation survey of the surroundings of the Vitro mill in Salt Lake City shows that uranium mill tailings have been removed to many locations outside their original boundary. To date, 52 remote sites have been discovered within a 100 square kilometer aerial survey perimeter surrounding the mill; 9 of these were discovered with the recent aerial survey map. Five additional sites, also discovered by aerial survey, contained uranium ore, milling equipment, or radioactive slag. Because of the success of this survey, plans are being made to extend the aerial survey program to other parts of the Salt Lake valley where diversions of Vitro tailings are also known to exist.

  3. A study of local turbulence and anisotropy during the afternoon and evening transition with an unmanned aerial system and mesoscale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Astrid; Pätzold, Falk; Jiménez, Maria Antonia; Lobitz, Lennart; Martin, Sabrina; Lohmann, Gerald; Canut, Guylaine; Legain, Dominique; Bange, Jens; Martínez-Villagrasa, Dani; Cuxart, Joan

    2016-07-01

    Observations of turbulence are analysed for the afternoon and evening transition (AET) during the Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) experimental field campaign that took place in Lannemezan (foothills of the Pyrenees) in summer 2011. The case of 2 July is further studied because the turbulence properties of the lower atmosphere (up to 300 m above ground level) were sampled with the Meteorological Mini Aerial Vehicle (M2AV) from turbulently mixed to stably stratified atmospheric conditions. Additionally, data from radiosoundings, 60 m tower and UHF wind profiler were taken together with the model results from a high-resolution mesoscale simulation of this case. Weak large-scale winds and clear-sky conditions were present on the studied AET case favouring the development of slope winds and mountain-plain circulations. It is found that during the AET the anisotropy of the turbulent eddies increases as the vertical motions are damped due to the stably stratified conditions. This effect is enhanced by the formation of a low-level jet after sunset. Finally, the comparison of the anisotropy ratio computed from the different sources of observations allow us to determine the most relevant scales of the motion during the AET in such a complex terrain region.

  4. Coded source imaging simulation with visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Zou, Yubin; Zhang, Xueshuang; Lu, Yuanrong; Guo, Zhiyu

    2011-09-01

    A coded source could increase the neutron flux with high L/ D ratio. It may benefit a neutron imaging system with low yield neutron source. Visible light CSI experiments were carried out to test the physical design and reconstruction algorithm. We used a non-mosaic Modified Uniformly Redundant Array (MURA) mask to project the shadow of black/white samples on a screen. A cooled-CCD camera was used to record the image on the screen. Different mask sizes and amplification factors were tested. The correlation, Wiener filter deconvolution and Richardson-Lucy maximum likelihood iteration algorithm were employed to reconstruct the object imaging from the original projection. The results show that CSI can benefit the low flux neutron imaging with high background noise.

  5. Modeling and simulation of biological systems from image data

    PubMed Central

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F

    2013-01-01

    This essay provides an introduction to the terminology, concepts, methods, and challenges of image-based modeling in biology. Image-based modeling and simulation aims at using systematic, quantitative image data to build predictive models of biological systems that can be simulated with a computer. This allows one to disentangle molecular mechanisms from effects of shape and geometry. Questions like “what is the functional role of shape” or “how are biological shapes generated and regulated” can be addressed in the framework of image-based systems biology. The combination of image quantification, model building, and computer simulation is illustrated here using the example of diffusion in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:23533152

  6. Galvanometer control system design of aerial camera motion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Mingrui; Cao, Jianzhong; Wang, Huawei; Guo, Yunzeng; Hu, Changchang; Tang, Hong; Niu, Yuefeng

    2015-10-01

    Aerial cameras exist the image motion on the flight. The image motion has seriously affected the image quality, making the image edge blurred and gray scale loss. According to the actual application situation, when high quality and high precision are required, the image motion compensation (IMC) should be adopted. This paper designs galvanometer control system of IMC. The voice coil motor as the actuator has a simple structure, fast dynamic response and high positioning accuracy. Double-loop feedback is also used. PI arithmetic and Hall sensors are used at the current feedback. Fuzzy-PID arithmetic and optical encoder are used at the speed feedback. Compared to conventional PID control arithmetic, the simulation results show that the control system has fast response and high control accuracy.

  7. A design of camera simulator for photoelectric image acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Guanghui; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    In the process of developing the photoelectric image acquisition equipment, it needs to verify the function and performance. In order to make the photoelectric device recall the image data formerly in the process of debugging and testing, a design scheme of the camera simulator is presented. In this system, with FPGA as the control core, the image data is saved in NAND flash trough USB2.0 bus. Due to the access rate of the NAND, flash is too slow to meet the requirement of the sytsem, to fix the problem, the pipeline technique and the High-Band-Buses technique are applied in the design to improve the storage rate. It reads image data out from flash in the control logic of FPGA and output separately from three different interface of Camera Link, LVDS and PAL, which can provide image data for photoelectric image acquisition equipment's debugging and algorithm validation. However, because the standard of PAL image resolution is 720*576, the resolution is different between PAL image and input image, so the image can be output after the resolution conversion. The experimental results demonstrate that the camera simulator outputs three format image sequence correctly, which can be captured and displayed by frame gather. And the three-format image data can meet test requirements of the most equipment, shorten debugging time and improve the test efficiency.

  8. Computer Simulation Of Radiographic Screen-Film Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metter, Richard V.; Dillon, Peter L.; Huff, Kenneth E.; Rabbani, Majid

    1986-06-01

    A method is described for computer simulation of radiographic screen-film images. This method is based on a previously published model of the screen-film imaging process.l The x-ray transmittance of a test object is sampled at a pitch of 50 μm by scanning a high-resolution, low-noise direct-exposure radiograph. This transmittance is then used, along with the x-ray exposure incident upon the object, to determine the expected number of quanta per pixel incident upon the screen. The random nature of x-ray arrival and absorption, x-ray quantum to light photon conversion, and photon absorption by the film is simulated by appropriate random number generation. Standard FFT techniques are used for computing the effects of scattering. Finally, the computed film density for each pixel is produced on a high-resolution, low-noise output film by a scanning printer. The simulation allows independent specification of x-ray exposure, x-ray quantum absorption, light conversion statistics, light scattering, and film characteristics (sensitometry and gran-ularity). Each of these parameters is independently measured for radiographic systems of interest. The simulator is tested by comparing actual radiographic images with simulated images resulting from the independently measured parameters. Images are also shown illustrating the effects of changes in these parameters on image quality. Finally, comparison is made with a "perfect" imaging system where information content is only limited by the finite number of x-rays.

  9. Optical simulation of large aperture spatial heterodyne imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qisheng; Xiangli, Bin; Fang, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Large aperture spatial heterodyne imaging spectrometer (LASHIS) is a new pushbroom Fourier transform ultraspectral imager with no moving parts. It is based on a Sagnac interferometer combined with a pair of gratings. In this paper, the basic principle of LASHIS is reviewed and an optical LASHIS model is set up in ZEMAX. Three interference images are presented, one is calculated according to the basic theory, one is simulated using the optical model in ZEMAX, and the other is generated by the experimental device set up in our laboratory. These three interference images show a good agreement with each other that demonstrate the correctness of the optical model. Using this model, we can simulate the interference image quickly. This image gives a visualized evaluation of the system performance, and it will be more convenient for system design or tolerance analysis of LASHIS.

  10. Classification of Urban Feature from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Images Using Gasvm Integration and Multi-Scale Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modiri, M.; Salehabadi, A.; Mohebbi, M.; Hashemi, A. M.; Masumi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The use of UAV in the application of photogrammetry to obtain cover images and achieve the main objectives of the photogrammetric mapping has been a boom in the region. The images taken from REGGIOLO region in the province of, Italy Reggio -Emilia by UAV with non-metric camera Canon Ixus and with an average height of 139.42 meters were used to classify urban feature. Using the software provided SURE and cover images of the study area, to produce dense point cloud, DSM and Artvqvtv spatial resolution of 10 cm was prepared. DTM area using Adaptive TIN filtering algorithm was developed. NDSM area was prepared with using the difference between DSM and DTM and a separate features in the image stack. In order to extract features, using simultaneous occurrence matrix features mean, variance, homogeneity, contrast, dissimilarity, entropy, second moment, and correlation for each of the RGB band image was used Orthophoto area. Classes used to classify urban problems, including buildings, trees and tall vegetation, grass and vegetation short, paved road and is impervious surfaces. Class consists of impervious surfaces such as pavement conditions, the cement, the car, the roof is stored. In order to pixel-based classification and selection of optimal features of classification was GASVM pixel basis. In order to achieve the classification results with higher accuracy and spectral composition informations, texture, and shape conceptual image featureOrthophoto area was fencing. The segmentation of multi-scale segmentation method was used.it belonged class. Search results using the proposed classification of urban feature, suggests the suitability of this method of classification complications UAV is a city using images. The overall accuracy and kappa coefficient method proposed in this study, respectively, 47/93% and 84/91% was.

  11. Target model and simulation for laser imaging fuze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiheng; Song, Chengtian

    2013-09-01

    Image detection is an important direction of fuze development nowadays, and laser imaging fuze is one of the main technologies. This paper carries out the research in simulation technology of the process with detection, scan and imaging, which is used in laser imaging fuze for tank target, and get the simulation images information of different intersection conditions, including tank spot information,distance information and power information. The target coordinate system is established with the movement characteristics,physical characteristics and existing coordinate system of tank target. And through transferring missile coordinates to the target coordinate system as well as the relative movement between the different time intervals, the model of missile-target in time and space is build up. The model is build up according to the tank target and diffusion properties of different background, including desert, soil, vegetation, and buildings. The relations of scattering power and bidirectional reflectance distribution function deduced the laser echo power calculation formula, which can calculate the echoes incidence to each surface of the laser.The design of laser imaging fuze simulation system is complicated ,which contains the technology of the process with detection, scan and imaging used in laser imaging fuze for tank target. The simulation system products the tank spot picture, the distance gradation picture, and the power gradation picture. The latter two contains two-dimensional information, the scanning distance as well as the value of echo power to meet the expected design effects.

  12. Analysis of material entrainment with an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and simulation of the debris-flow event at the Sattelbach torrent - Austria, 2013.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidl, Christian; Schraml, Klaus; Moser, Markus; Hübl, Johannes

    2014-05-01

    In summer 2013, a disastrous debris-flow destroyed several houses and infrastructure facilities on the fan of the Sattelbach catchment located in the district of St. Johann im Pongau, Salzburg (Austria). Fortunately, no damage to persons could be registered. The debris flow was triggered by shallow landslides within the upper catchment, mobilizing in total approximately 4,000 m3 of debris. However, the volume of the debris-flow event at the fan was documented with 12,000 m3, whereas a maximum discharge of 380 m3/s was estimated near the fan apex. Witnesses reported only one big wave passing the fan area, which seems to be out of character for a typical Alpine debris-flow event showing such high discharge. For the later, one would suppose multiple smaller waves. Due to the fact of evolving material entrainment resulted in one big wave, the debris-flow event at the Sattelbach catchment was chosen as case study to analyze mass bulking. For this reason, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was used to establish a digital terrain model (DTM) of the whole reach after the event. This terrain model was then compared to a LiDAR DTM, showing the topographical situation before the event. Based on the analyzed mass bulking along the whole reach, numerical simulations were performed using the DAN3D (Dynamic Analysis of Landslides in Three Dimensions) code. The DAN3D model allows selection between different rheologies as well as the implementation of entrainment. The study will show the applicability of UAV's in small and steep catchments and will test DAN 3D a debris-flow simulation tool with an implemented mass-bulking model.

  13. Motion artefacts simulation in the imaging of the ocular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, P.; Talary, M. S.; Boss, D.; Mrochen, M.

    2015-07-01

    A general simulation framework has been developed for characterising eye motion artefacts in the ophthalmic imaging of ocular media. The optimisation of the scanning strategy for an optical coherence tomography of the anterior eye chamber has been presented as the first example of an application for the simulator.

  14. Comparison of image deconvolution algorithms on simulated and laboratory infrared images

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, D.

    1994-11-15

    We compare Maximum Likelihood, Maximum Entropy, Accelerated Lucy-Richardson, Weighted Goodness of Fit, and Pixon reconstructions of simple scenes as a function of signal-to-noise ratio for simulated images with randomly generated noise. Reconstruction results of infrared images taken with the TAISIR (Temperature and Imaging System InfraRed) are also discussed.

  15. Simulation evaluation of combined 4D RNAV and airborne traffic situation displays and procedures applied to terminal aerial maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Connelly, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simulation scenarios were developed in which subject pilots must simultaneously follow a 3D terminal airspace structure and arrive at fixed waypoints within the structure precisely at pre-scheduled times in the presence of a full range of wind conditions aloft, and monitor nearby traffic on an airborne traffic situation display, especially during merging and spacing operations, and detect blunders and resolve conflicts in a safe manner. Open-loop simulator tests of the single-stage 4D RNAV algorithm indicate that a descending pilot can comply quite closely with an assigned time of arrival at a 3D waypoint simply by tracking a pre-calculated speed profile. Initial experiments show that the aircraft arrives at the 3D waypoint within a few seconds of the anticipated time. The presence of headwinds or tailwinds does not affect the arrival time error as long as the wind is accurately modeled in the descent algorithm. Results all but quarantee that a 5 second standard deviation in arrival time error can be realized in closed-loop descents at very moderate pilot workload levels.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging simulator: a teaching tool for radiology.

    PubMed

    Rundle, D; Kishore, S; Seshadri, S; Wehrli, F

    1990-11-01

    The increasing use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a clinical modality has put an enormous burden on medical institutions to cost effectively teach MRI scanning techniques to technologists and physicians. Since MRI scanner time is a scarce resource, it would be ideal if the teaching could be effectively performed off-line. In order to meet this goal, the radiology Department at the University of Pennsylvania has designed and developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Simulator. The simulator in its current implementation mimics the General Electric Signa (General Electric Magnetic Resonance Imaging System, Milwaukee, WI) scanner's user interface for image acquisition. The design is general enough to be applied to other MRI scanners. One unique feature of the simulator is its incorporation of an image-synthesis module that permits the user to derive images for any arbitrary combination of pulsing parameters for spin-echo, gradient-echo, and inversion recovery pulse sequences. These images are computed in 5 seconds. The development platform chosen is a standard Apple Macintosh II (Apple Computer, Inc, Cupertino, CA) computer with no specialized hardware peripherals. The user interface is implemented in HyperCard (Apple Computer Inc, Cupertino, CA). All other software development including synthesis and display functions are implemented under the Macintosh Programmer's Workshop 'C' environment. The scan parameters, demographics, and images are tracked using an Oracle (Oracle Corp, Redwood Shores, CA) data base. Images are currently stored on magnetic disk but could be stored on optical media with minimal effort. PMID:2085559

  17. Clutter discrimination algorithm simulation in pulse laser radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Su, Xuan; Zhu, Fule

    2015-10-01

    Pulse laser radar imaging performance is greatly influenced by different kinds of clutter. Various algorithms are developed to mitigate clutter. However, estimating performance of a new algorithm is difficult. Here, a simulation model for estimating clutter discrimination algorithms is presented. This model consists of laser pulse emission, clutter jamming, laser pulse reception and target image producing. Additionally, a hardware platform is set up gathering clutter data reflected by ground and trees. The data logging is as clutter jamming input in the simulation model. The hardware platform includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The laser diode transmits short laser pulses (40ns FWHM) at 12.5 kilohertz pulse rate and at 905nm wavelength. An analog-to-digital converter chip integrated in the sample circuit works at 250 mega samples per second. The simulation model and the hardware platform contribute to a clutter discrimination algorithm simulation system. Using this system, after analyzing clutter data logging, a new compound pulse detection algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines matched filter algorithm and constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. Firstly, laser echo pulse signal is processed by matched filter algorithm. After the first step, CFD algorithm comes next. Finally, clutter jamming from ground and trees is discriminated and target image is produced. Laser radar images are simulated using CFD algorithm, matched filter algorithm and the new algorithm respectively. Simulation result demonstrates that the new algorithm achieves the best target imaging effect of mitigating clutter reflected by ground and trees.

  18. Cooperative Surveillance and Pursuit Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Unattended Ground Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Las Fargeas, Jonathan; Kabamba, Pierre; Girard, Anouck

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of path planning for a team of unmanned aerial vehicles performing surveillance near a friendly base. The unmanned aerial vehicles do not possess sensors with automated target recognition capability and, thus, rely on communicating with unattended ground sensors placed on roads to detect and image potential intruders. The problem is motivated by persistent intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance and base defense missions. The problem is formulated and shown to be intractable. A heuristic algorithm to coordinate the unmanned aerial vehicles during surveillance and pursuit is presented. Revisit deadlines are used to schedule the vehicles' paths nominally. The algorithm uses detections from the sensors to predict intruders' locations and selects the vehicles' paths by minimizing a linear combination of missed deadlines and the probability of not intercepting intruders. An analysis of the algorithm's completeness and complexity is then provided. The effectiveness of the heuristic is illustrated through simulations in a variety of scenarios. PMID:25591168

  19. Simulating Realistic Imaging Conditions For In-Situ Liquid Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Welch, David A.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy enables the imaging of biological cells, macromolecular protein complexes, nanoparticles, and other systems in a near-native environment. In order to improve interpretation of image contrast features and also predict ideal imaging conditions ahead of time, new virtual electron microscopic techniques are needed. A technique for virtual fluid-stage high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with the multislice method is presented that enables the virtual imaging of model fluid-stage systems composed of millions of atoms. The virtual technique is exemplified by simulating images of PbS nanoparticles under different imaging conditions and the results agree with previous experimental findings. General insight is obtained on the influence of the effects of fluid path length, membrane thickness, nanoparticle position, defocus and other microscope parameters on attainable image quality. PMID:23872040

  20. Simulating realistic imaging conditions for in situ liquid microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, David A.; Faller, Roland; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-12-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy enables the imaging of biological cells, macromolecular protein complexes, nanoparticles, and other systems in a near-native environment. In order to improve interpretation of image contrast features and also predict ideal imaging conditions ahead of time, new virtual electron microscopic techniques are needed. A technique for virtual fluid-stage high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy with the multislice method is presented that enables the virtual imaging of model fluid-stage systems composed of millions of atoms. The virtual technique is exemplified by simulating images of PbS nanoparticles under different imaging conditions and the results agree with previous experimental findings. General insight is obtained on the influence of the effects of fluid path length, membrane thickness, nanoparticle position, defocus and other microscope parameters on attainable image quality.

  1. Calibrated Ultra Fast Image Simulations for the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruderer, Claudio; Chang, Chihway; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Bergé, Joel; Gamper, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Image simulations are becoming increasingly important in understanding the measurement process of the shapes of galaxies for weak lensing and the associated systematic effects. For this purpose we present the first implementation of the Monte Carlo Control Loops (MCCL), a coherent framework for studying systematic effects in weak lensing. It allows us to model and calibrate the shear measurement process using image simulations from the Ultra Fast Image Generator (UFig) and the image analysis software SExtractor. We apply this framework to a subset of the data taken during the Science Verification period (SV) of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We calibrate the UFig simulations to be statistically consistent with one of the SV images, which covers ∼0.5 square degrees. We then perform tolerance analyses by perturbing six simulation parameters and study their impact on the shear measurement at the one-point level. This allows us to determine the relative importance of different parameters. For spatially constant systematic errors and point-spread function, the calibration of the simulation reaches the weak lensing precision needed for the DES SV survey area. Furthermore, we find a sensitivity of the shear measurement to the intrinsic ellipticity distribution, and an interplay between the magnitude-size and the pixel value diagnostics in constraining the noise model. This work is the first application of the MCCL framework to data and shows how it can be used to methodically study the impact of systematics on the cosmic shear measurement.

  2. Restoration of cloud contaminated ocean color images using numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuefei; Mao, Zhihua; Chen, Jianyu; Huang, Haiqing

    2015-10-01

    It is very hard to access cloud-free remote sensing data, especially for the ocean color images. A cloud removal approach from ocean color satellite images based on numerical modeling is introduced. The approach removes cloud-contaminated portions and then reconstructs the missing data utilizing model simulated values. The basic idea is to create the relationship between cloud-free patches and cloud-contaminated patches under the assumption that both of them are influenced by the same marine hydrodynamic conditions. Firstly, we find cloud-free GOCI (the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager) retrieved suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) in the East China Sea before and after the time of cloudy images, which are set as initial field and validation data for numerical model, respectively. Secondly, a sediment transport model based on COHERENS, a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological ocean model for regional and shelf seas, is configured. The comparison between simulated results and validation images show that the sediment transport model can be used to simulate actual sediment distribution and transport in the East China Sea. Then, the simulated SSCs corresponding to the cloudy portions are used to remove the cloud and replace the missing values. Finally, the accuracy assessments of the results are carried out by visual and statistical analysis. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can effectively remove cloud from GOCI images and reconstruct the missing data, which is a new way to enhance the effectiveness and availability of ocean color data, and is of great practical significance.

  3. Evaluation of color error and noise on simulated images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mornet, Clémence; Vaillant, Jérôme; Decroux, Thomas; Hérault, Didier; Schanen, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of CMOS sensors performance in terms of color accuracy and noise is a big challenge for camera phone manufacturers. On this paper, we present a tool developed with Matlab at STMicroelectronics which allows quality parameters to be evaluated on simulated images. These images are computed based on measured or predicted Quantum Efficiency (QE) curves and noise model. By setting the parameters of integration time and illumination, the tool optimizes the color correction matrix (CCM) and calculates the color error, color saturation and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). After this color correction optimization step, a Graphics User Interface (GUI) has been designed to display a simulated image at a chosen illumination level, with all the characteristics of a real image taken by the sensor with the previous color correction. Simulated images can be a synthetic Macbeth ColorChecker, for which reflectance of each patch is known, or a multi-spectral image, described by the reflectance spectrum of each pixel or an image taken at high-light level. A validation of the results has been performed with ST under development sensors. Finally we present two applications one based on the trade-offs between color saturation and noise by optimizing the CCM and the other based on demosaicking SNR trade-offs.

  4. Draper Laboratory small autonomous aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBitetto, Paul A.; Johnson, Eric N.; Bosse, Michael C.; Trott, Christian A.

    1997-06-01

    The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. and students from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Boston University have cooperated to develop an autonomous aerial vehicle that won the 1996 International Aerial Robotics Competition. This paper describes the approach, system architecture and subsystem designs for the entry. This entry represents a combination of many technology areas: navigation, guidance, control, vision processing, human factors, packaging, power, real-time software, and others. The aerial vehicle, an autonomous helicopter, performs navigation and control functions using multiple sensors: differential GPS, inertial measurement unit, sonar altimeter, and a flux compass. The aerial transmits video imagery to the ground. A ground based vision processor converts the image data into target position and classification estimates. The system was designed, built, and flown in less than one year and has provided many lessons about autonomous vehicle systems, several of which are discussed. In an appendix, our current research in augmenting the navigation system with vision- based estimates is presented.

  5. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations. Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.

  6. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations.more » Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.« less

  7. PICASSO: an end-to-end image simulation tool for space and airborne imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Stephen A.; Bell, Jabin T.; Boucher, Richard H.; Dutton, Tracy E.; Florio, Christopher J.; Franz, Geoffrey A.; Grycewicz, Thomas J.; Kalman, Linda S.; Keller, Robert A.; Lomheim, Terrence S.; Paulson, Diane B.; Wilkinson, Timothy S.

    2010-06-01

    The design of any modern imaging system is the end result of many trade studies, each seeking to optimize image quality within real world constraints such as cost, schedule and overall risk. Image chain analysis - the prediction of image quality from fundamental design parameters - is an important part of this design process. At The Aerospace Corporation we have been using a variety of image chain analysis tools for many years, the Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation SOftware (PICASSO) among them. In this paper we describe our PICASSO tool, showing how, starting with a high quality input image and hypothetical design descriptions representative of the current state of the art in commercial imaging satellites, PICASSO can generate standard metrics of image quality in support of the decision processes of designers and program managers alike.

  8. Simulation of bit-quantization influence on SAR-images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolframm, A. P.; Pike, T. K.

    The first European Remote Sensing satellite ERS-1 has two imaging modes, the conventional Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode and the wave mode. Two quantization schemes, 2-bit and 4-bit, have been proposed for the analogue-to-digital conversion of the video signal of the ERS-1 wave mode. This paper analyzes the influence of these two quantization schemes on ocean-wave spectra. The SAR-images were obtained through simulation using a static oceanwave radar model and a comprehensive software SAR-system simulation model (SARSIM) on the DFVLR computing system. The results indicate that spectra produced by the 4-bit quantization are not significantly degraded from the optimum, but that the 2-bit quantization requires some gain adjustment for optimal spectral reproduction. The conclusions are supported by images and spectral plots covering the various options simulated.

  9. Simulating imaging with the scanning ion-conductance microscope.

    PubMed

    Adenle, Omolabake; Fitzgerald, William

    2005-01-01

    The Scanning Ion-Conductance Microscope (SICM) is a member of the family of Scanned Probe Microscopes (SPM). Examples include the Scanning Electrochemical Microscope (SECM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). SICM uses the ion-concentration field at the tip of a micropipette filled with an electrolyte solution as a probe to generate images of sample topography. As with other members of the SPM family, the probe geometry determines the observed image. This paper presents mathematical models for simulating the SICM in its different operating modes with the intent of creating a framework within which the effect of probe-geometry can be studied. We validate our model by comparing simulated approach-curves with empirical data. Finally, we show simulated images of a Gaussian-bump substrate under the different operating modes of the SICM. PMID:17280955

  10. Targeting Error Simulator for Image-guided Prostate Needle Placement

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, Andras; Avni, Shachar; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2010-01-01

    Motivation Needle-based biopsy and local therapy of prostate cancer depend multimodal imaging for both target planning and needle guidance. The clinical process involves selection of target locations in a pre-operative image volume and registering these to an intra-operative volume. Registration inaccuracies inevitably lead to targeting error, a major clinical concern. The analysis of targeting error requires a large number of images with known ground truth, which has been infeasible even for the largest research centers. Methods We propose to generate realistic prostate imaging data in a controllable way, with known ground truth, by simulation of prostate size, shape, motion and deformation typically encountered in prostatic needle placement. This data is then used to evaluate a given registration algorithm, by testing its ability to reproduce ground truth contours, motions and deformations. The method builds on statistical shape atlas to generate large number of realistic prostate shapes and finite element modeling to generate high-fidelity deformations, while segmentation error is simulated by warping the ground truth data in specific prostate regions. Expected target registration error (TRE) is computed as a vector field. Results The simulator was configured to evaluate the TRE when using a surface-based rigid registration algorithm in a typical prostate biopsy targeting scenario. Simulator parameters, such as segmentation error and deformation, were determined by measurements in clinical images. Turnaround time for the full simulation of one test case was below 3 minutes. The simulator is customizable for testing, comparing, optimizing segmentation and registration methods and is independent of the imaging modalities used. PMID:21096275

  11. Simulation of computed radiography with imaging plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Mathy, F.; Schumm, A.

    2014-02-18

    Computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plate detectors is taking an increasing place in Radiography Testing. CR uses similar equipment as conventional radiography except that the classical X-ray film is replaced by a numerical detector, called image plate (IP), which is made of a photostimulable layer and which is read by a scanning device through photostimulated luminescence. Such digital radiography has already demonstrated important benefits in terms of exposure time, decrease of source energies and thus reduction of radioprotection area besides being a solution without effluents. This paper presents a model for the simulation of radiography with image plate detectors in CIVA together with examples of validation of the model. The study consists in a cross comparison between experimental and simulation results obtained on a step wedge with a classical X-ray tube. Results are proposed in particular with wire Image quality Indicator (IQI) and duplex IQI.

  12. Simulation of Earth textures by conditional image quilting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud, K.; Mariethoz, G.; Caers, J.; Tahmasebi, P.; Baker, A.

    2014-04-01

    Training image-based approaches for stochastic simulations have recently gained attention in surface and subsurface hydrology. This family of methods allows the creation of multiple realizations of a study domain, with a spatial continuity based on a training image (TI) that contains the variability, connectivity, and structural properties deemed realistic. A major drawback of these methods is their computational and/or memory cost, making certain applications challenging. It was found that similar methods, also based on training images or exemplars, have been proposed in computer graphics. One such method, image quilting (IQ), is introduced in this paper and adapted for hydrogeological applications. The main difficulty is that Image Quilting was originally not designed to produce conditional simulations and was restricted to 2-D images. In this paper, the original method developed in computer graphics has been modified to accommodate conditioning data and 3-D problems. This new conditional image quilting method (CIQ) is patch based, does not require constructing a pattern databases, and can be used with both categorical and continuous training images. The main concept is to optimally cut the patches such that they overlap with minimum discontinuity. The optimal cut is determined using a dynamic programming algorithm. Conditioning is accomplished by prior selection of patches that are compatible with the conditioning data. The performance of CIQ is tested for a variety of hydrogeological test cases. The results, when compared with previous multiple-point statistics (MPS) methods, indicate an improvement in CPU time by a factor of at least 50.

  13. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose. PMID:24348736

  14. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  15. STEM image simulation with hybrid CPU/GPU programming.

    PubMed

    Yao, Y; Ge, B H; Shen, X; Wang, Y G; Yu, R C

    2016-07-01

    STEM image simulation is achieved via hybrid CPU/GPU programming under parallel algorithm architecture to speed up calculation on a personal computer (PC). To utilize the calculation power of a PC fully, the simulation is performed using the GPU core and multi-CPU cores at the same time to significantly improve efficiency. GaSb and an artificial GaSb/InAs interface with atom diffusion have been used to verify the computation. PMID:27093687

  16. Small Whiskbroom Imager for atmospheric compositioN monitorinG (SWING) from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV): Results from the 2014 AROMAT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Tack, Frederik; Constantin, Daniel; Fayt, Caroline; Maes, Jeroen; Mingireanu, Florin; Mocanu, Ionut; Georgescu, Lucian; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The Small Whiskbroom Imager for atmospheric compositioN monitorinG (SWING) is an instrument dedicated to atmospheric trace gas retrieval from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The payload is based on a compact visible spectrometer and a scanning mirror to collect scattered sunlight. Its weight, size, and power consumption are respectively 920 g, 27x12x12 cm3, and 6 W. The custom-built 2.5 m flying wing UAV is electrically powered, has a typical airspeed of 100 km/h, and can operate at a maximum altitude of 3 km. Both the payload and the UAV were developed in the framework of a collaboration between the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BIRA-IASB) and the Dunarea de Jos University of Galati, Romania. We present here SWING-UAV test flights dedicated to NO2 measurements and performed in Romania on 10 and 11 September 2014, during the Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases (AROMAT) campaign. The UAV performed 5 flights in the vicinity of the large thermal power station of Turceni (44.67° N, 23.4° E). The UAV was operated in visual range during the campaign, up to 900 m AGL , downwind of the plant and crossing its exhaust plume. The spectra recorded on flight are analyzed with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) method. The retrieved NO2 Differential Slant Column Densities (DSCDs) are up to 1.5e17 molec/cm2 and reveal the horizontal gradients around the plant. The DSCDs are converted to vertical columns and compared with coincident car-based DOAS measurements. We also present the near-future perspective of the SWING-UAV observation system, which includes flights in 2015 above the Black Sea to quantify ship emissions, the addition of SO2 as a target species, and autopilot flights at higher altitudes to cover a typical satellite pixel extent (10x10 km2).

  17. Hyperspatial Thermal Imaging of Surface Hydrothermal Features at Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska using a small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselwimmer, C. E.; Wilson, R.; Upton, C.; Prakash, A.; Holdmann, G.; Walker, G.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal remote sensing provides a valuable tool for mapping and monitoring surface hydrothermal features associated with geothermal activity. The increasing availability of low-cost, small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS) with integrated thermal imaging sensors offers a means to undertake very high spatial resolution (hyperspatial), quantitative thermal remote sensing of surface geothermal features in support of exploration and long-term monitoring efforts. Results from the deployment of a quadcopter sUAS equipped with a thermal camera over Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska for detailed mapping and heat flux estimation for hot springs, seeps, and thermal pools are presented. Hyperspatial thermal infrared imagery (4 cm pixels) was acquired over Pilgrim Hot Springs in July 2013 using a FLIR TAU 640 camera operating from an Aeryon Scout sUAS flying at an altitude of 40m. The registered and mosaicked thermal imagery is calibrated to surface temperature values using in-situ measurements of uniform blackbody tarps and the temperatures of geothermal and other surface pools acquired with a series of water temperature loggers. Interpretation of the pre-processed thermal imagery enables the delineation of hot springs, the extents of thermal pools, and the flow and mixing of individual geothermal outflow plumes with an unprecedented level of detail. Using the surface temperatures of thermal waters derived from the FLIR data and measured in-situ meteorological parameters the hot spring heat flux and outflow rate is calculated using a heat budget model for a subset of the thermal drainage. The heat flux/outflow rate estimates derived from the FLIR data are compared against in-situ measurements of the hot spring outflow rate recorded at the time of the thermal survey.

  18. Small Whiskbroom Imager for atmospheric compositioN monitorinG (SWING) from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV): status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlaud, Alexis; Tack, Frederik; Constantin, Daniel-Eduard; Fayt, Caroline; Maes, Jeroen; Mingireanu, Florin; Mocanu, Ionut; Georgescu, Lucian; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2014-05-01

    The Small Whiskbroom Imager for atmospheric compositioN monitorinG (SWING) is a recently developed instrument dedicated to trace gas measurements from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The payload is based on a compact ultra-violet visible spectrometer and a scanning mirror. Its weight, size, and power consumption are respectively 920 g, 27x12x12 cm3, and 6 W. The custom-built UAV is an electrically powered flying wing and can reach an altitude of 3 km at a mean airspeed of 100 km/h. The whole flight can be preprogrammed and controlled by an autopilot. The spectra are analyzed using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). One major objective is the mapping of NO2 columns at high spatial resolution allowing to subsample satellite measurements within the extent of a typical ground pixel. We present the preliminary results of two test flights of the SWING-UAV observation system in the vicinity of Galati, Romania (45.45°N, 28.05°E), performed on 11 May 2013 and 20 September 2013. Several atmospheric species are identified in the spectral range covered by the spectrometer (300-600 nm): NO2, water vapor, O4, and O3. From the measurements, the detection limit for NO2 is estimated to lie around 2 ppb. We investigate: (1) the georeferencing issues and the effective spatial resolution achievable with SWING-UAV from the instantaneous field of view and the plane dynamics (2) the main parameters influencing the air mass factors, and (3) the reproducibility of NO2 measurements over the same area during the second flight which included repeated transects. We also present the near-future (2014-2015) campaigns planned for the SWING-UAV observation system.

  19. Assessment of COTS IR image simulation tools for ATR development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Heiko; Stahl, Christoph; Bjerkeli, Frode; Skaaren-Fystro, Paal

    2005-05-01

    Following the tendency of increased use of imaging sensors in military aircraft, future fighter pilots will need onboard artificial intelligence e.g. ATR for aiding them in image interpretation and target designation. The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS) in Germany has developed an advanced method for automatic target recognition (ATR) which is based on adaptive neural networks. This ATR method can assist the crew of military aircraft like the Eurofighter in sensor image monitoring and thereby reduce the workload in the cockpit and increase the mission efficiency. The EADS ATR approach can be adapted for imagery of visual, infrared and SAR sensors because of the training-based classifiers of the ATR method. For the optimal adaptation of these classifiers they have to be trained with appropriate and sufficient image data. The training images must show the target objects from different aspect angles, ranges, environmental conditions, etc. Incomplete training sets lead to a degradation of classifier performance. Additionally, ground truth information i.e. scenario conditions like class type and position of targets is necessary for the optimal adaptation of the ATR method. In Summer 2003, EADS started a cooperation with Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (KDA) from Norway. The EADS/KDA approach is to provide additional image data sets for training-based ATR through IR image simulation. The joint study aims to investigate the benefits of enhancing incomplete training sets for classifier adaptation by simulated synthetic imagery. EADS/KDA identified the requirements of a commercial-off-the-shelf IR simulation tool capable of delivering appropriate synthetic imagery for ATR development. A market study of available IR simulation tools and suppliers was performed. After that the most promising tool was benchmarked according to several criteria e.g. thermal emission model, sensor model, targets model, non-radiometric image features etc., resulting in a

  20. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1975-01-01

    The National Cartographic Information Center of the U.S. Geological Survey maintains records of aerial photographic coverage of the United States and its Territories, based on reports from other Federal agencies as well as State governmental agencies and commercial companies. From these records, the Center furnishes data to prospective purchasers on available photography and the agency holding the aerial film.

  1. Simulation of 3D MRI brain images for quantitative evaluation of image segmentation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Obladen, Thorsten; Sabri, Osama; Buell, Udalrich

    2000-06-01

    To model the true shape of MRI brain images, automatically classified T1-weighted 3D MRI images (gray matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid, scalp/bone and background) are utilized for simulation of grayscale data and imaging artifacts. For each class, Gaussian distribution of grayscale values is assumed, and mean and variance are computed from grayscale images. A random generator fills up the class images with Gauss-distributed grayscale values. Since grayscale values of neighboring voxels are not correlated, a Gaussian low-pass filtering is done, preserving class region borders. To simulate anatomical variability, a Gaussian distribution in space with user-defined mean and variance can be added at any user-defined position. Several imaging artifacts can be added: (1) to simulate partial volume effects, every voxel is averaged with neighboring voxels if they have a different class label; (2) a linear or quadratic bias field can be added with user-defined strength and orientation; (3) additional background noise can be added; and (4) artifacts left over after spoiling can be simulated by adding a band with increasing/decreasing grayscale values. With this method, realistic-looking simulated MRI images can be produced to test classification and segmentation algorithms regarding accuracy and robustness even in the presence of artifacts.

  2. SOFI Simulation Tool: A Software Package for Simulating and Testing Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Girsault, Arik; Lukes, Tomas; Sharipov, Azat; Geissbuehler, Stefan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Lasser, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) allows one to perform sub-diffraction fluorescence microscopy of living cells. By analyzing the acquired image sequence with an advanced correlation method, i.e. a high-order cross-cumulant analysis, super-resolution in all three spatial dimensions can be achieved. Here we introduce a software tool for a simple qualitative comparison of SOFI images under simulated conditions considering parameters of the microscope setup and essential properties of the biological sample. This tool incorporates SOFI and STORM algorithms, displays and describes the SOFI image processing steps in a tutorial-like fashion. Fast testing of various parameters simplifies the parameter optimization prior to experimental work. The performance of the simulation tool is demonstrated by comparing simulated results with experimentally acquired data. PMID:27583365

  3. Quantitative extraction of bedrock exposed rate based on unmanned aerial vehicle data and TM image in Karst Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wang, hongyan; li, qiangzi; du, xin; zhao, longcai

    2016-04-01

    In the karst regions of Southwest China, rocky desertification is one of the most serious problems of land degradation. The bedrock exposed rate is one of the important indexes to assess the degree of rocky desertification in the karst regions. Because of the inherent merits of macro scale, frequency, efficiency and synthesis, remote sensing is the promising method to monitor and assess karst rocky desertification on large scale. However, the actual measurement of bedrock exposed rate is difficult and existing remote sensing methods cannot directly be exploited to extract the bedrock exposed rate owing to the high complexity and heterogeneity of karst environments. Therefore, based on the UAV and TM data, the paper selected Xingren County as the research area, and the quantitative extraction of the bedrock exposed rate based on the multi scale remote sensing data was developed. Firstly, we used the object oriented method to carry out the accurate classification of UAV image and based on the results of rock extraction, the bedrock exposed rate was calculated in the 30m grid scale. Parts of the calculated samples were as training data and another samples were as the model validation data. Secondly, in each grid the band reflectivity of TM data was extracted and we also calculated a variety of rock index and vegetation index (NDVI, SAVI etc.). Finally, the network model was established to extract the bedrock exposed rate, the correlation coefficient (R) of the network model was 0.855 and the correlation coefficient (R) of the validation model was 0.677, the root mean square error (RMSE) was 0.073. Based on the quantitative inversion model, the distribution map of the bedrock exposed rate in Xingren County was obtained. Keywords: Bedrock exposed rate, quantitative extraction, UAV and TM data, Karst rocky desertification.

  4. Image and Dose Simulation in Support of New Mammography Modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruvilla Verghese

    2002-04-05

    This report summarizes the highlights of the research performed under the 2-year NEER grant from the Department of Energy. The primary outcome of the work was a new Monte Carlo code, MCMIS-DS, for Monte Carlo for Mammography Image Simulation including Differential Sampling. The code was written to generate simulated images and dose distributions from two different new digital x-ray imaging modalities, namely, synchrotron imaging (SI) and a slot geometry digital mammography system called Fisher Senoscan. A differential sampling scheme was added to the code to generate multiple images that included variations in the parameters of the measurement system and the object in a single execution of the code. The code is to serve multiple purposes; (1) to answer questions regarding the contribution of scattered photons to images, (2) for use in design optimization studies, and (3) to do up to second-order perturbation studies to assess the effects of design parameter variations and/or physical parameters of the object (the breast) without having to re-run the code for each set of varied parameters. The accuracy and fidelity of the code were validated by a large variety of benchmark studies using published data and also using experimental results from mammography phantoms on both imaging modalities.

  5. Ultrawideband imaging radar based on OFDM: system simulation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmatyuk, Dmitriy

    2006-05-01

    Orthogonal frequency division-multiplexing (OFDM) is rapidly emerging as a preferred method of UWB signaling in commercial applications aimed mainly at low-power, high data-rate communications. This paper explores the possibility of applying OFDM to use in imaging radar technology. Ultra-wideband nature of the signal provides for high resolution of the radar, whereas usage of multi-sub-carrier method of modulation allows for dynamic spectrum allocation. Robust multi-path performance of OFDM signals and heavy reliance of transceiver design on digital processors easily implemented in modern VLSI technology make a number of possible applications viable, e.g.: portable high-resolution indoor radar/movement monitoring system; through-the-wall/foliage synthetic aperture imaging radar with a capability of image transmission/broadcasting, etc. Our work is aimed to provide a proof-of-concept simulation scenario to explore numerous aspects of UWB-OFDM radar imaging through evaluating range and cross-range imaging performance of such a system with an eventual goal of software-defined radio (SDR) implementation. Stripmap SAR topology was chosen for modeling purposes. Range/cross-range profiles were obtained along with full 2-D images for multi-target in noise scenarios. Model set-up and results of UWB-OFDM radar imaging simulation study using Matlab/Simulink modeling are presented and discussed in this paper.

  6. Planar and cylindrical active microwave temperature imaging: numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Rius, J M; Pichot, C; Jofre, L; Bolomey, J C; Joachimowicz, N; Broquetas, A; Ferrando, M

    1992-01-01

    A comparative study at 2.45 GHz concerning both measurement and reconstruction parameters for planar and cylindrical configurations is presented. For the sake of comparison, a numerical model consisting of two nonconcentric cylinders is considered and reconstructed using both geometries from simulated experimental data. The scattered fields and reconstructed images permit extraction of very useful information about dynamic range, sensitivity, resolution, and quantitative image accuracy for the choice of the configuration in a particular application. Both geometries can measure forward and backward scattered fields. The backscattering measurement improves the image resolution and reconstruction in lossy mediums, but, on the other hand, has several dynamic range difficulties. This tradeoff between forward only and forward-backward field measurement is analyzed. As differential temperature imaging is a weakly scattering problem, Born approximation algorithms can be used. The simplicity of Born reconstruction algorithms and the use of FFT make them very attractive for real-time biomedical imaging systems. PMID:18222887

  7. Imaging Simulations for the Korean VLBI Network (KVN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Tae-Hyun; Rhee, Myung-Hyun; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Sohn, Bong-Won

    2005-03-01

    The Korean VLBI Network (KVN) will open a new field of research in astronomy, geodesy and earth science using the newest three 21m radio telescopes. This will expand our ability to look at the Universe in the millimeter regime. Imaging capability of radio interferometry is highly dependent upon the antenna configuration, source size, declination and the shape of target. In this paper, imaging simulations are carried out with the KVN system configuration. Five test images were used which were a point source, multi-point sources, a uniform sphere with two different sizes compared to the synthesis beam of the KVN and a Very Large Array (VLA) image of Cygnus A. The declination for the full time simulation was set as +60 degrees and the observation time range was --6 to +6 hours around transit. Simulations have been done at 22GHz, one of the KVN observation frequency. All these simulations and data reductions have been run with the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS) software package. As the KVN array has a resolution of about 6 mas (milli arcsecond) at 22GHz, in case of model source being approximately the beam size or smaller, the ratio of peak intensity over RMS shows about 10000:1 and 5000:1. The other case in which model source is larger than the beam size, this ratio shows very low range of about 115:1 and 34:1. This is due to the lack of short baselines and the small number of antenna. We compare the coordinates of the model images with those of the cleaned images. The result shows mostly perfect correspondence except in the case of the 12mas uniform sphere. Therefore, the main astronomical targets for the KVN will be the compact sources and the KVN will have an excellent performance in the astrometry for these sources.

  8. Image simulation of geometric targets for synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, J. M.

    1989-10-01

    A new technique for image simulation which comes from a synthetic aperture radar is presented. The method is based on the embedding of an artificially simulated target in a real radar image captured by an operational antenna window on a satellite (SEASAT or SIR-B). A L and C band was used for the capture. The target dimensions studied were large enough for use with long waves provided the calculation techniques used with high frequencies were for an equivalent area radar (SER). The calculation of SER allows the capture of a raw signal received from the antennas. So that the possibility of simulation is low, some restrictions are made. The results are sufficiently interesting enough to let the study of the behavior of a particular target become of use to civilians or the military, in the functional bounds of radar waves.

  9. Kinetic Simulation and Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching H.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced simulation tools and measurement techniques have been developed to study the dynamic magnetosphere and its response to drivers in the solar wind. The Comprehensive Ring Current Model (CRCM) is a kinetic code that solves the 3D distribution in space, energy and pitch-angle information of energetic ions and electrons. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) imagers have been carried in past and current satellite missions. Global morphology of energetic ions were revealed by the observed ENA images. We have combined simulation and ENA analysis techniques to study the development of ring current ions during magnetic storms and substorms. We identify the timing and location of particle injection and loss. We examine the evolution of ion energy and pitch-angle distribution during different phases of a storm. In this talk we will discuss the findings from our ring current studies and how our simulation and ENA analysis tools can be applied to the upcoming TRIO-CINAMA mission.

  10. Monitoring and Assuring the Quality of Digital Aerial Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopherson, Jon

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation explains the USGS plan for monitoring and assuring the quality of digital aerial data. The contents include: 1) History of USGS Aerial Imaging Involvement; 2) USGS Research and Results; 3) Outline of USGS Quality Assurance Plan; 4) Other areas of Interest; and 5) Summary

  11. Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) as a Tool for Field Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kite aerial photography (KAP) is proposed as a creative tool for geography field teaching and as a medium to approach the complexity of readily available geodata. The method can be integrated as field experiment, surveying technique or group activity. The acquired aerial images can instantaneously be integrated in geographic information systems…

  12. Multi-point sources and imaging compound infrared target simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Rui; Xu, Rui; Wang, Hongjie; Wang, Xin; Wu, Di; Li, Zhuo

    2014-11-01

    Infrared target simulator is an important unit in guidance hardware-in-the-loop simulation systems. It is used to simulate the radiation and motion characteristics of target, decoy and background. This paper proposed a multi-channel IR target simulator. It could generate one IR point target, two pairs of IR decoys and background respectively in the same field of view of the seeker's optical system simultaneously. An IR imaging fiber bundle as the focal plane of the projection optical system was used to compound the target, decoys and background. The compound scene was projected to the seeker by the projection optical system. In IR imaging channel, IR scene was generated by an optical film chip as a visible to thermal transducer which was placed in a vacuum cell. The simulated temperature range of IR scene could be from room temperature to 430K.The thin film transducer had 512×512 pixels. Its frame rate could reach to 100Hz. Light sources with high equivalent black body temperature were adopted in IR target and decoy channels. The size and the radiation intensity of the IR point target and decoys could be controlled by pin holes and attenuators. The point target and decoys driven by high precise motors could travel through the whole instantaneous field of view of the seeker's optical system. Two pairs of decoys could move away from the center to the edge of the instantaneous field of view. The highest simulated black body temperature of the point source was 1200K.

  13. Simulations of the STIS CCD clear imaging mode PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, R. H.; Grusczak, A.; Ftaclas, C.; Heap, S. R.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the properties of the point-spread function (PSF) of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) imaging modes is necessary to separate real effects of geometrically complex astronomical sources, such as protoplanetary disks surrounding bright stars, from instrumental effects, such as scattering and diffraction. In order to investigate STIS imaging properties we have numerically simulated broadband stellar PSFs generated by STIS in CCD clear imaging mode, including the effects of the Lyot stop and the coronagraphic wedges. The input spectrum is a stellar model atmosphere of the appropriate spectral type, convolved with the pre-flight STIS CCD response function. The PSF modeler generates broadband PSFs by co-adding weighted monochromatic PSFs across the waveband.

  14. Modeling aerial refueling operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Allen B., III

    Aerial Refueling (AR) is the act of offloading fuel from one aircraft (the tanker) to another aircraft (the receiver) in mid flight. Meetings between tanker and receiver aircraft are referred to as AR events and are scheduled to: escort one or more receivers across a large body of water; refuel one or more receivers; or train receiver pilots, tanker pilots, and boom operators. In order to efficiently execute the Aerial Refueling Mission, the Air Mobility Command (AMC) of the United States Air Force (USAF) depends on computer models to help it make tanker basing decisions, plan tanker sorties, schedule aircraft, develop new organizational doctrines, and influence policy. We have worked on three projects that have helped AMC improve its modeling and decision making capabilities. Optimal Flight Planning. Currently Air Mobility simulation and optimization software packages depend on algorithms which iterate over three dimensional fuel flow tables to compute aircraft fuel consumption under changing flight conditions. When a high degree of fidelity is required, these algorithms use a large amount of memory and CPU time. We have modeled the rate of aircraft fuel consumption with respect to AC GrossWeight, Altitude and Airspeed. When implemented, this formula will decrease the amount of memory and CPU time needed to compute sortie fuel costs and cargo capacity values. We have also shown how this formula can be used in optimal control problems to find minimum costs flight plans. Tanker Basing Demand Mismatch Index. Since 1992, AMC has relied on a Tanker Basing/AR Demand Mismatch Index which aggregates tanker capacity and AR demand data into six regions. This index was criticized because there were large gradients along regional boundaries. Meanwhile tankers frequently cross regional boundaries to satisfy the demand for AR support. In response we developed continuous functions to score locations with respect to their proximity to demand for AR support as well as their

  15. Synthetic galaxy images and spectra from the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrey, Paul; Snyder, Gregory F.; Vogelsberger, Mark; Hayward, Christopher C.; Genel, Shy; Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars; Nelson, Dylan; Kriek, Mariska; Pillepich, Annalisa; Sales, Laura V.; McBride, Cameron K.

    2015-03-01

    We present our methods for generating a catalogue of 7000 synthetic images and 40 000 integrated spectra of redshift z = 0 galaxies from the Illustris simulation. The mock data products are produced by using stellar population synthesis models to assign spectral energy distributions (SED) to each star particle in the galaxies. The resulting synthetic images and integrated SEDs therefore properly reflect the spatial distribution, stellar metallicity distribution, and star formation history of the galaxies. From the synthetic data products, it is possible to produce monochromatic or colour-composite images, perform SED fitting, classify morphology, determine galaxy structural properties, and evaluate the impacts of galaxy viewing angle. The main contribution of this paper is to describe the production, format, and composition of the image catalogue that makes up the Illustris Simulation Observatory. As a demonstration of this resource, we derive galactic stellar mass estimates by applying the SED fitting code FAST to the synthetic galaxy products, and compare the derived stellar masses against the true stellar masses from the simulation. We find from this idealized experiment that systematic biases exist in the photometrically derived stellar mass values that can be reduced by using a fixed metallicity in conjunction with a minimum galaxy age restriction.

  16. ERIS: the exoplanet high-resolution image simulator for CHARIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbach, Mary Anne; Groff, Tyler D.; Kasdin, N. J.; Brandt, Timothy; Mede, Kyle; Loomis, Craig; Hayashi, Masahiko; Takato, Naruhisa

    2014-07-01

    ERIS is an image simulator for CHARIS, the high-contrast exoplanet integral field spectrograph (IFS) being built at Princeton University for the Subaru telescope. We present here the software design and implementation of the ERIS code. ERIS simulates CHARIS FITS images and data cubes that are used for developing the data reduction pipeline and verifying the expected CHARIS performance. Components of the software include detailed models of the light source (such as a star or exoplanet), atmosphere, telescope, adaptive optics systems (AO188 and SCExAO), CHARIS IFS and the Hawaii2-RG infrared detector. Code includes novel details such as the phase errors at the lenslet array, optical wavefront error maps and pinholes for reducing crosstalk, just to list a few. The details of the code as well as several simulated images are presented in this paper. This IFS simulator is critical for the CHARIS data analysis pipeline development, minimizing troubleshooting in the lab and on-sky and the characterization of crosstalk.

  17. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  18. Synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound imaging: design, simulation, and experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haichong K; Cheng, Alexis; Bottenus, Nick; Guo, Xiaoyu; Trahey, Gregg E; Boctor, Emad M

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonography is a widely used imaging modality to visualize anatomical structures due to its low cost and ease of use; however, it is challenging to acquire acceptable image quality in deep tissue. Synthetic aperture (SA) is a technique used to increase image resolution by synthesizing information from multiple subapertures, but the resolution improvement is limited by the physical size of the array transducer. With a large F-number, it is difficult to achieve high resolution in deep regions without extending the effective aperture size. We propose a method to extend the available aperture size for SA-called synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging-by sweeping an ultrasound transducer while tracking its orientation and location. Tracking information of the ultrasound probe is used to synthesize the signals received at different positions. Considering the practical implementation, we estimated the effect of tracking and ultrasound calibration error to the quality of the final beamformed image through simulation. In addition, to experimentally validate this approach, a 6 degree-of-freedom robot arm was used as a mechanical tracker to hold an ultrasound transducer and to apply in-plane lateral translational motion. Results indicate that STRATUS imaging with robotic tracking has the potential to improve ultrasound image quality. PMID:27088108

  19. Plenoptic camera image simulation for reconstruction algorithm verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiegerling, Jim

    2014-09-01

    Plenoptic cameras have emerged in recent years as a technology for capturing light field data in a single snapshot. A conventional digital camera can be modified with the addition of a lenslet array to create a plenoptic camera. Two distinct camera forms have been proposed in the literature. The first has the camera image focused onto the lenslet array. The lenslet array is placed over the camera sensor such that each lenslet forms an image of the exit pupil onto the sensor. The second plenoptic form has the lenslet array relaying the image formed by the camera lens to the sensor. We have developed a raytracing package that can simulate images formed by a generalized version of the plenoptic camera. Several rays from each sensor pixel are traced backwards through the system to define a cone of rays emanating from the entrance pupil of the camera lens. Objects that lie within this cone are integrated to lead to a color and exposure level for that pixel. To speed processing three-dimensional objects are approximated as a series of planes at different depths. Repeating this process for each pixel in the sensor leads to a simulated plenoptic image on which different reconstruction algorithms can be tested.

  20. From Maxwell's Equations to Polarimetric SAR Images: A Simulation Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Sidnei J. S.; da S. Lacava, J. C.; Fernandes, David

    2008-01-01

    A new electromagnetic approach for the simulation of polarimetric SAR images is proposed. It starts from Maxwell's equations, employs the spectral domain full-wave technique, the moment method, and the stationary phase method to compute the far electromagnetic fields scattered by multilayer structures. A multilayer structure is located at each selected position of a regular rectangular grid of coordinates, which defines the scene area under imaging. The grid is determined taking into account the elementary scatter size and SAR operational parameters, such as spatial resolution, pixel spacing, look angle and platform altitude. A two-dimensional separable “sinc” function to represent the SAR spread point function is also considered. Multifrequency sets of single-look polarimetric SAR images are generated, in L-, C- and X-bands and the images are evaluated using several measurements commonly employed in SAR data analysis. The evaluation shows that the proposed simulation process is working properly, since the obtained results are in accordance with those presented in the literature. Therefore, this new approach becomes suitable for carrying out theoretical and practical studies using polarimetric SAR images.

  1. Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS Simulations with GEANT/FLUKA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, John; Lee, Jeongin

    2000-01-01

    Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) is a candidate of the calorimeter for the NASA's ACCESS program to be flown on the International Space Station. The ICA studies the origin and acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays by measuring the elemental composition of the cosmic rays in the energy up to 10(exp 16) eV. For the past year, Monte Carlo simulation study for the ICA has been conducted using GEANT/FLUKA to predict the detector performance and to design the system for match the scientific objectives. Simulation results will be shown for the detector response and the energy resolution for various configurations.

  2. Medical image diagnoses by artificial neural networks with image correlation, wavelet transform, simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold H.

    1993-09-01

    Classical artificial neural networks (ANN) and neurocomputing are reviewed for implementing a real time medical image diagnosis. An algorithm known as the self-reference matched filter that emulates the spatio-temporal integration ability of the human visual system might be utilized for multi-frame processing of medical imaging data. A Cauchy machine, implementing a fast simulated annealing schedule, can determine the degree of abnormality by the degree of orthogonality between the patient imagery and the class of features of healthy persons. An automatic inspection process based on multiple modality image sequences is simulated by incorporating the following new developments: (1) 1-D space-filling Peano curves to preserve the 2-D neighborhood pixels' relationship; (2) fast simulated Cauchy annealing for the global optimization of self-feature extraction; and (3) a mini-max energy function for the intra-inter cluster-segregation respectively useful for top-down ANN designs.

  3. Analysis of shock wave propagation from explosives using computational simulations and artificial schlieren imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Christopher; Hargather, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Computational simulations of explosions are performed using the hydrocode CTH and analyzed using artificial schlieren imaging. The simulations include one and three-dimensional free-air blasts and a confined geometry. Artificial schlieren images are produced from the density fields calculated via the simulations. The artificial schlieren images are used to simulate traditional and focusing schlieren images of explosions. The artificial schlieren images are compared to actual high-speed schlieren images of similar explosions. Computational streak images are produced to identify time-dependent features in the blast field. The streak images are used to study the interaction between secondary shock waves and the explosive product gas contact surface.

  4. "A" Is for Aerial Maps and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Reese H.; Delahunty, Tina

    2007-01-01

    The technology of satellite imagery and remote sensing adds a new dimension to teaching and learning about maps with elementary school children. Just a click of the mouse brings into view some images of the world that could only be imagined a generation ago. Close-up aerial pictures of the school and neighborhood quickly catch the interest of…

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF LOW ALTITUDE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most practical avenue for development of these goals is to continue to use the LAAPS system at field sites that require aerial imaging. For the sake of convenience, I believe that the local field sites can provide a convenient location to develop new applications and test enh...

  6. Aerial Scene Recognition using Efficient Sparse Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2012-01-01

    Advanced scene recognition systems for processing large volumes of high-resolution aerial image data are in great demand today. However, automated scene recognition remains a challenging problem. Efficient encoding and representation of spatial and structural patterns in the imagery are key in developing automated scene recognition algorithms. We describe an image representation approach that uses simple and computationally efficient sparse code computation to generate accurate features capable of producing excellent classification performance using linear SVM kernels. Our method exploits unlabeled low-level image feature measurements to learn a set of basis vectors. We project the low-level features onto the basis vectors and use simple soft threshold activation function to derive the sparse features. The proposed technique generates sparse features at a significantly lower computational cost than other methods~\\cite{Yang10, newsam11}, yet it produces comparable or better classification accuracy. We apply our technique to high-resolution aerial image datasets to quantify the aerial scene classification performance. We demonstrate that the dense feature extraction and representation methods are highly effective for automatic large-facility detection on wide area high-resolution aerial imagery.

  7. Unmanned Aerial Systems and Spectroscopy for Remote Sensing Applications in Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, K.; Agapiou, A.; Cuca, B.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing has open up new dimensions in archaeological research. Although there has been significant progress in increasing the resolution of space/aerial sensors and image processing, the detection of the crop (and soil marks) formations, which relate to buried archaeological remains, are difficult to detect since these marks may not be visible in the images if observed over different period or at different spatial/spectral resolution. In order to support the improvement of earth observation remote sensing technologies specifically targeting archaeological research, a better understanding of the crop/soil marks formation needs to be studied in detail. In this paper the contribution of both Unmanned Aerial Systems as well ground spectroradiometers is discussed in a variety of examples applied in the eastern Mediterranean region (Cyprus and Greece) as well in Central Europe (Hungary). In- situ spectroradiometric campaigns can be applied for the removal of atmospheric impact to simultaneous satellite overpass images. In addition, as shown in this paper, the systematic collection of ground truth data prior to the satellite/aerial acquisition can be used to detect the optimum temporal and spectral resolution for the detection of stress vegetation related to buried archaeological remains. Moreover, phenological studies of the crops from the area of interest can be simulated to the potential sensors based on their Relative Response Filters and therefore prepare better the satellite-aerial campaigns. Ground data and the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) can provide an increased insight for studying the formation of crop and soil marks. New algorithms such as vegetation indices and linear orthogonal equations for the enhancement of crop marks can be developed based on the specific spectral characteristics of the area. As well, UAS can be used for remote sensing applications in order to document, survey and model cultural heritage and archaeological sites.

  8. Meteosat third generation imager: simulation of the flexible combined imager instrument chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Just, Dieter; Gutiérrez, Rebeca; Roveda, Fausto; Steenbergen, Theo

    2014-10-01

    The Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) Programme is the next generation of European geostationary meteorological systems. The first MTG satellite, MTG-I1, which is scheduled for launch at the end of 2018, will host two imaging instruments: the Flexible Combined Imager (FCI) and the Lightning Imager. The FCI will provide continuation of the SEVIRI imager operations on the current Meteosat Second Generation satellites (MSG), but with an improved spatial, temporal and spectral resolution, not dissimilar to GOES-R (of NASA/NOAA). Unlike SEVIRI on the spinning MSG spacecraft, the FCI will be mounted on a 3-axis stabilised platform and a 2-axis tapered scan will provide a full coverage of the Earth in 10 minute repeat cycles. Alternatively, a rapid scanning mode can cover smaller areas, but with a better temporal resolution of up to 2.5 minutes. In order to assess some of the data acquisition and processing aspects which will apply to the FCI, a simplified end-to-end imaging chain prototype was set up. The simulation prototype consists of four different functional blocks: - A function for the generation of FCI-like references images - An image acquisition simulation function for the FCI Line-of-Sight calculation and swath generation - A processing function that reverses the swath generation process by rectifying the swath data - An evaluation function for assessing the quality of the processed data with respect to the reference images This paper presents an overview of the FCI instrument chain prototype, covering instrument characteristics, reference image generation, image acquisition simulation, and processing aspects. In particular, it provides in detail the description of the generation of references images, highlighting innovative features, but also limitations. This is followed by a description of the image acquisition simulation process, and the rectification and evaluation function. The latter two are described in more detail in a separate paper. Finally, results

  9. Image simulation system for flash x-ray diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kei; Sato, Eiichi; Oizumi, Teiji; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1993-10-01

    Radiographic image simulations using a spectrum simulation system SPECTRA are presented. SPECTRA calculated the x-ray spectra using the data of tube voltage and current obtained from a soft flash x-ray generator. The x-ray generator used in the present work consisted of a high-voltage power supply, an oil condenser of 10 nF, a turbo molecular pump, a thyristor pulser as a trigger device, and a cold-cathode triode. After the main condenser was charged from 60 to 80 kV, the electric charges in the condenser were discharged. We obtained the maximum tube voltage which was equivalent to the initial charged voltage in the condenser. Bremsstrahlung x-ray intensities were derived from the Kramers' empirical equation and the intensities of the characteristic x rays were approximately calculated on the basis of the experimental results by Birch and Marshall. In the present work, we used two 3-dimensional models provided by SPECTRA as radiographed objects. We saved the measured data of the tube voltage and current for the flash x rays with charged voltages of 60, 70, and 80 kV. Then, assuming that these flash x rays were applied to the above models at a distance of 1 m, we obtained simulated images with filtration of aluminum. The obtained images fairly agreed with real radiographs which were achieved with a Computed Radiography system.

  10. A Spherical Aerial Terrestrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Christopher J.

    This thesis focuses on the design of a novel, ultra-lightweight spherical aerial terrestrial robot (ATR). The ATR has the ability to fly through the air or roll on the ground, for applications that include search and rescue, mapping, surveillance, environmental sensing, and entertainment. The design centers around a micro-quadcopter encased in a lightweight spherical exoskeleton that can rotate about the quadcopter. The spherical exoskeleton offers agile ground locomotion while maintaining characteristics of a basic aerial robot in flying mode. A model of the system dynamics for both modes of locomotion is presented and utilized in simulations to generate potential trajectories for aerial and terrestrial locomotion. Details of the quadcopter and exoskeleton design and fabrication are discussed, including the robot's turning characteristic over ground and the spring-steel exoskeleton with carbon fiber axle. The capabilities of the ATR are experimentally tested and are in good agreement with model-simulated performance. An energy analysis is presented to validate the overall efficiency of the robot in both modes of locomotion. Experimentally-supported estimates show that the ATR can roll along the ground for over 12 minutes and cover the distance of 1.7 km, or it can fly for 4.82 minutes and travel 469 m, on a single 350 mAh battery. Compared to a traditional flying-only robot, the ATR traveling over the same distance in rolling mode is 2.63-times more efficient, and in flying mode the system is only 39 percent less efficient. Experimental results also demonstrate the ATR's transition from rolling to flying mode.

  11. Development of breast phantoms for use in breast imaging simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, J. Michael

    Dedicated x-ray breast computed tomography (BCT) and breast tomosynthesis (BT) using a cone-beam flat-panel detector system are modalities under investigation by a number of research teams. Several teams, including the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) Tomographic Breast Imaging Lab (TBIL), have fabricated a prototype, bench-top flat-panel CT breast imaging (CTBI) system. TBIL researchers also use computer simulation software to investigate various x-ray acquisition and reconstruction parameters. I have developed a methodology to use high resolution, low noise CT reconstructions of fresh mastectomy specimens in order to create an ensemble of three-dimensional (3D) digital breast phantoms that realistically model 3D compressed and uncompressed breast anatomy. The resulting breast phantoms can then be used to simulate realistic projection data for both BCT and BT systems thereby providing a powerful evaluation and optimization mechanism for research and development of novel breast imaging systems as well as the optimization of imaging techniques for such systems.

  12. Comprehensive simulation platform for a metamaterial imaging system.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Guy; Rose, Alec; Yurduseven, Okan; Gowda, Vinay R; Imani, Mohammadreza F; Odabasi, Hayrettin; Trofatter, Parker; Gollub, Jonah; Smith, David R

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a frequency-diverse, metamaterial-based aperture has been introduced in the context of microwave and millimeter wave imaging. The generic form of the aperture is that of a parallel plate waveguide, in which complementary metamaterial elements patterned into the upper plate couple energy from the waveguide mode to the scene. To reliably predict the imaging performance of such an aperture prior to fabrication and experiments, it is necessary to have an accurate forward model that predicts radiation from the aperture, a model for scattering from an arbitrary target in the scene, and a set of image reconstruction approaches that allow scene estimation from an arbitrary set of measurements. Here, we introduce a forward model in which the metamaterial elements are approximated as polarizable magnetic dipoles, excited by the fields propagating within the waveguide. The dipoles used in the model can have arbitrarily assigned polarizability characteristics. Alternatively, fields measured from actual metamaterial samples can be decomposed into a set of effective dipole radiators, allowing the performance of actual samples to be quantitatively modeled and compared with simulated apertures. To confirm the validity of our model, we simulate measurements and scene reconstructions with a virtual multiaperture imaging system operating in the K-band spectrum (18-26.5 GHz) and compare its performance with an experimental system. PMID:26560591

  13. Infrared imaging simulation and detection of ship wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Chen, Xuan; Chang, Shizheng; Xu, Enchi; Wang, Xingyu; Wang, Ye; Zhao, Xiaolong; Du, Yongchen; Kou, Wei; Fan, Chunli

    2015-10-01

    The thermal wake would be formed owing to the cooling water or exhaust heat discharged by ship, and the cold wake could be formed by the cool water in the lower part of sea stirred up by the ship propeller or vortexes. Owing to the difference of surface temperature and emissivity between the ship wake and the surrounding ocean the ship wake will be easily detected by the infrared detecting system. The wave of wake also could be detected by the difference of reflected radiance between the background and the Kelvin wake of ship. In this paper the simulating models of infrared imaging of ship wake are developed based on the selfradiation of wake, the reflected radiance of the sky and sun and the transmitted radiance of atmosphere, and the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake are investigated. The results show that the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake can be really simulated by the models proposed in this paper. The effects of the detecting height, the angle of view, the NETD of detector and the temperature of wake on the infrared imaging signatures of ship wake are studied. The temperature difference between the ship wake and surrounding ocean is a main fact which effects on the detecting distance. The infrared imaging signatures of ship wake in 8-14μm wave band is stronger than that in 2-5μm wave band whenever the temperature of ship wake is warmer or cooler than the surrounding ocean. Further, the infrared imaging of thermal wake is investigated in the homogenous water and temperature stratified water at different speed of a ship and different flow rate and depth of the discharged water in a water tank. The spreading and decaying laws of infrared signature of ship wake are obtained experimentally. The results obtained in this paper have an important application in the infrared remote sensing of ship wake.

  14. 3-D Imaging and Simulation for Nephron Sparing Surgical Training.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Hamed; Liu, Jen-Jane

    2016-08-01

    Minimally invasive partial nephrectomy (MIPN) is now considered the procedure of choice for small renal masses largely based on functional advantages over traditional open surgery. Lack of haptic feedback, the need for spatial understanding of tumor borders, and advanced operative techniques to minimize ischemia time or achieve zero-ischemia PN are among factors that make MIPN a technically demanding operation with a steep learning curve for inexperienced surgeons. Surgical simulation has emerged as a useful training adjunct in residency programs to facilitate the acquisition of these complex operative skills in the setting of restricted work hours and limited operating room time and autonomy. However, the majority of available surgical simulators focus on basic surgical skills, and procedure-specific simulation is needed for optimal surgical training. Advances in 3-dimensional (3-D) imaging have also enhanced the surgeon's ability to localize tumors intraoperatively. This article focuses on recent procedure-specific simulation models for laparoscopic and robotic-assisted PN and advanced 3-D imaging techniques as part of pre- and some cases, intraoperative surgical planning. PMID:27314271

  15. Spatial and spectral simulation of LANDSAT images of agricultural areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pont, W. F., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A LANDSAT scene simulation capability was developed to study the effects of small fields and misregistration on LANDSAT-based crop proportion estimation procedures. The simulation employs a pattern of ground polygons each with a crop ID, planting date, and scale factor. Historical greenness/brightness crop development profiles generate the mean signal values for each polygon. Historical within-field covariances add texture to pixels in each polygon. The planting dates and scale factors create between-field/within-crop variation. Between field and crop variation is achieved by the above and crop profile differences. The LANDSAT point spread function is used to add correlation between nearby pixels. The next effect of the point spread function is to blur the image. Mixed pixels and misregistration are also simulated.

  16. Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS Simulations with GEANT/FLUKA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeongin; Watts, John; Howell, Leonard; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Imaging Calorimeter for ACCESS (ICA) is a candidate of the calorimeter for the NASA's ACCESS program. The ICA studies the origin and acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays by measuring the elemental composition of the cosmic rays in the energy up to 10(exp 16) eV. For the past year, Monte Carlo simulation study for the ICA has been conducted to predict the detector performance and to design the system for match the scientific objectives. Simulation results show that the detector response resembles a Gaussian distribution and the energy resolution with ICA can be achieved about 40%. In addition, simulations of the detector's response to an assumed bent power law spectra in the region where the knee occurs have been conducted and clearly show that this detector can provide sufficiently accurate estimates of the spectral parameters that are a science goal of ACCESS.

  17. 1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE. - Fort Delaware, Sea Wall, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  18. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  19. Design and simulation of imaging algorithm for Fresnel telescopy imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiao-yu; Liu, Li-ren; Yan, Ai-min; Sun, Jian-feng; Dai, En-wen; Li, Bing

    2011-06-01

    Fresnel telescopy (short for Fresnel telescopy full-aperture synthesized imaging ladar) is a new high resolution active laser imaging technique. This technique is a variant of Fourier telescopy and optical scanning holography, which uses Fresnel zone plates to scan target. Compare with synthetic aperture imaging ladar(SAIL), Fresnel telescopy avoids problem of time synchronization and space synchronization, which decreasing technical difficulty. In one-dimensional (1D) scanning operational mode for moving target, after time-to-space transformation, spatial distribution of sampling data is non-uniform because of the relative motion between target and scanning beam. However, as we use fast Fourier transform (FFT) in the following imaging algorithm of matched filtering, distribution of data should be regular and uniform. We use resampling interpolation to transform the data into two-dimensional (2D) uniform distribution, and accuracy of resampling interpolation process mainly affects the reconstruction results. Imaging algorithms with different resampling interpolation algorithms have been analysis and computer simulation are also given. We get good reconstruction results of the target, which proves that the designed imaging algorithm for Fresnel telescopy imaging system is effective. This work is found to have substantial practical value and offers significant benefit for high resolution imaging system of Fresnel telescopy laser imaging ladar.

  20. Aerial Photography Summary Record System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1998-01-01

    The Aerial Photography Summary Record System (APSRS) describes aerial photography projects that meet specified criteria over a given geographic area of the United States and its territories. Aerial photographs are an important tool in cartography and a number of other professions. Land use planners, real estate developers, lawyers, environmental specialists, and many other professionals rely on detailed and timely aerial photographs. Until 1975, there was no systematic approach to locate an aerial photograph, or series of photographs, quickly and easily. In that year, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) inaugurated the APSRS, which has become a standard reference for users of aerial photographs.

  1. Aerial Terrain Mapping Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahar, K. N.

    2012-08-01

    This paper looks into the latest achievement in the low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology in their capacity to map the semi-development areas. The objectives of this study are to establish a new methodology or a new algorithm in image registration during interior orientation process and to determine the accuracy of the photogrammetric products by using UAV images. Recently, UAV technology has been used in several applications such as mapping, agriculture and surveillance. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the usage of UAV to map the semi-development areas. The performance of the low cost UAV mapping study was established on a study area with two image processing methods so that the results could be comparable. A non-metric camera was attached at the bottom of UAV and it was used to capture images at both sites after it went through several calibration steps. Calibration processes were carried out to determine focal length, principal distance, radial lens distortion, tangential lens distortion and affinity. A new method in image registration for a non-metric camera is discussed in this paper as a part of new methodology of this study. This method used the UAV Global Positioning System (GPS) onboard to register the UAV image for interior orientation process. Check points were established randomly at both sites using rapid static Global Positioning System. Ground control points are used for exterior orientation process, and check point is used for accuracy assessment of photogrammetric product. All acquired images were processed in a photogrammetric software. Two methods of image registration were applied in this study, namely, GPS onboard registration and ground control point registration. Both registrations were processed by using photogrammetric software and the result is discussed. Two results were produced in this study, which are the digital orthophoto and the digital terrain model. These results were analyzed by using the root mean square

  2. Microtomographic imaging in the process of bone modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ralph

    1999-09-01

    Micro-computed tomography ((mu) CT) is an emerging technique to nondestructively image and quantify trabecular bone in three dimensions. Where the early implementations of (mu) CT focused more on technical aspects of the systems and required equipment not normally available to the general public, a more recent development emphasized practical aspects of micro- tomographic imaging. That system is based on a compact fan- beam type of tomograph, also referred to as desktop (mu) CT. Desk-top (mu) CT has been used extensively for the investigation of osteoporosis related health problems gaining new insight into the organization of trabecular bone and the influence of osteoporotic bone loss on bone architecture and the competence of bone. Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by excessive bone loss and deterioration in bone architecture. The reduced quality of bone increases the risk of fracture. Current imaging technologies do not allow accurate in vivo measurements of bone structure over several decades or the investigation of the local remodeling stimuli at the tissue level. Therefore, computer simulations and new experimental modeling procedures are necessary for determining the long-term effects of age, menopause, and osteoporosis on bone. Microstructural bone models allow us to study not only the effects of osteoporosis on the skeleton but also to assess and monitor the effectiveness of new treatment regimens. The basis for such approaches are realistic models of bone and a sound understanding of the underlying biological and mechanical processes in bone physiology. In this article, strategies for new approaches to bone modeling and simulation in the study and treatment of osteoporosis and age-related bone loss are presented. The focus is on the bioengineering and imaging aspects of osteoporosis research. With the introduction of desk-top (mu) CT, a new generation of imaging instruments has entered the arena allowing easy and relatively inexpensive access to

  3. Simulation of ocean SAR images via phase history generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, John R.; Clinthorne, James T.; Scheffler, Albert O.; Lyden, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A method for simulating an ocean synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) image is illustrated for a simple internal wave current pattern. The method calculates both the amplitude image and the radar signal history. The simulation model used consists of six stages. In the first stage, the full wave spectrum in two spatial coordinates is calculated from the wind speed and direction using the action spectral density equation. In the second stage, the pixel size is selected and used as the basis for dividing the spectrum into large and small scale motions. Realizations for the large-scale ocean surface height and velocity are then calculated. In the third stage, the sensor wavelength and geometry are used to calculate the small scale statistics (radar cross section, coherence time, root-mean square (RMS), radial velocity and RMS slope). In the fourth stage, an autoregressive method is used to generate a realization of the surface reflectivity history that is consistent with the radial velocity and the radial velocity variance. In the fifth stage, the signal history is generated by summing the reflectivities at the proper times with the appropriate antenna weighting function for the SAR. As a consequence of this process, speckle is automatically included in the signal. In the final stage, the SAR image can be created by using any of the traditional ways to process the signal history, including variable focusing and multilook processing.

  4. Analysis of vegetation indices derived from aerial multispectral and ground hyperspectral data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerial multispectral images are a good source of crop, soil, and ground coverage information. Spectral reflectance indices provide a useful tool for monitoring crop growing status. A series of aerial images were acquired by an airborne MS4100 multispectral imaging system on the cotton and soybean f...

  5. VALIDATION OF A SIMULATION PROCEDURE FOR GENERATING BREAST TOMOSYNTHESIS PROJECTION IMAGES.

    PubMed

    Petersson, Hannie; Warren, Lucy M; Tingberg, Anders; Dustler, Magnus; Timberg, Pontus

    2016-06-01

    In order to achieve optimal diagnostic performance in breast tomosynthesis (BT) imaging, the parameters of the imaging chain should be evaluated. For the purpose of such evaluations, a simulation procedure based on the Monte Carlo code system Penelope and the geometry of a Siemens BT system has been developed to generate BT projection images. In this work, the simulation procedure is validated by comparing contrast and sharpness in simulated images with contrast and sharpness in real images acquired with the BT system. The results of the study showed a good agreement of sharpness in real and simulated reconstructed image planes, but the contrast was shown to be higher in the simulated compared with the real projection images. The developed simulation procedure could be used to generate BT images, but it is of interest to further investigate how the procedure could be modified to generate more realistic image noise and contrast. PMID:26842713

  6. A Model for Growth of a Single Fungal Hypha Based on Well-Mixed Tanks in Series: Simulation of Nutrient and Vesicle Transport in Aerial Reproductive Hyphae

    PubMed Central

    Balmant, Wellington; Sugai-Guérios, Maura Harumi; Coradin, Juliana Hey; Krieger, Nadia; Furigo Junior, Agenor; Mitchell, David Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Current models that describe the extension of fungal hyphae and development of a mycelium either do not describe the role of vesicles in hyphal extension or do not correctly describe the experimentally observed profile for distribution of vesicles along the hypha. The present work uses the n-tanks-in-series approach to develop a model for hyphal extension that describes the intracellular transport of nutrient to a sub-apical zone where vesicles are formed and then transported to the tip, where tip extension occurs. The model was calibrated using experimental data from the literature for the extension of reproductive aerial hyphae of three different fungi, and was able to describe different profiles involving acceleration and deceleration of the extension rate. A sensitivity analysis showed that the supply of nutrient to the sub-apical vesicle-producing zone is a key factor influencing the rate of extension of the hypha. Although this model was used to describe the extension of a single reproductive aerial hypha, the use of the n-tanks-in-series approach to representing the hypha means that the model has the flexibility to be extended to describe the growth of other types of hyphae and the branching of hyphae to form a complete mycelium. PMID:25785863

  7. Numerical simulations of imaging satellites with optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chaoyan; Chen, Zhendong

    2015-08-01

    Optical interferometry imaging system, which is composed of multiple sub-apertures, is a type of sensor that can break through the aperture limit and realize the high resolution imaging. This technique can be utilized to precisely measure the shapes, sizes and position of astronomical objects and satellites, it also can realize to space exploration and space debris, satellite monitoring and survey. Fizeau-Type optical aperture synthesis telescope has the advantage of short baselines, common mount and multiple sub-apertures, so it is feasible for instantaneous direct imaging through focal plane combination.Since 2002, the researchers of Shanghai Astronomical Observatory have developed the study of optical interferometry technique. For array configurations, there are two optimal array configurations proposed instead of the symmetrical circular distribution: the asymmetrical circular distribution and the Y-type distribution. On this basis, two kinds of structure were proposed based on Fizeau interferometric telescope. One is Y-type independent sub-aperture telescope, the other one is segmented mirrors telescope with common secondary mirror.In this paper, we will give the description of interferometric telescope and image acquisition. Then we will mainly concerned the simulations of image restoration based on Y-type telescope and segmented mirrors telescope. The Richardson-Lucy (RL) method, Winner method and the Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (OS-EM) method are studied in this paper. We will analyze the influence of different stop rules too. At the last of the paper, we will present the reconstruction results of images of some satellites.

  8. Algorithm design for a gun simulator based on image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Wei, Ping; Ke, Jun

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, an algorithm is designed for shooting games under strong background light. Six LEDs are uniformly distributed on the edge of a game machine screen. They are located at the four corners and in the middle of the top and the bottom edges. Three LEDs are enlightened in the odd frames, and the other three are enlightened in the even frames. A simulator is furnished with one camera, which is used to obtain the image of the LEDs by applying inter-frame difference between the even and odd frames. In the resulting images, six LED are six bright spots. To obtain the LEDs' coordinates rapidly, we proposed a method based on the area of the bright spots. After calibrating the camera based on a pinhole model, four equations can be found using the relationship between the image coordinate system and the world coordinate system with perspective transformation. The center point of the image of LEDs is supposed to be at the virtual shooting point. The perspective transformation matrix is applied to the coordinate of the center point. Then we can obtain the virtual shooting point's coordinate in the world coordinate system. When a game player shoots a target about two meters away, using the method discussed in this paper, the calculated coordinate error is less than ten mm. We can obtain 65 coordinate results per second, which meets the requirement of a real-time system. It proves the algorithm is reliable and effective.

  9. [Simulation of polarization SAR imaging of ocean surface].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ding; Gu, Xing-Fa; Yu, Tao; Fernado, N; Li, Juan; Chen, Xing-Feng

    2011-10-01

    The polarization synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging simulation is of great significance to ocean surface scattering. According to the theory of wind-wave spectrum, rough ocean surface was modeled in the present paper using the two-scale-model. This treatment takes both the large scale and small scale surface into account. By using the velocity bunching (VB) theory, Bragg scattering model and the small perturbation model (SPM), the polarization SAR system can simulate the ocean surface with various parameters and ocean states. The effects of the parameters of ocean waves and the parameters of SAR system were analyzed. Finally, some useful conclusions were drawn, which are helpful for extracting the information of ocean surface. The method is an effective way in the ocean SAR design and the ocean surface research. PMID:22250525

  10. Simulations of Non-resolved, Infrared Imaging of Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jim, K.; Kuluhiwa, K.; Scott, B. Knox, R.; Frith, J.; Gibson, B.

    Simulations of near-infrared, non-resolved imaging of earth-orbiting satellites during nighttime and daytime were created to consider the feasibility of such observations. By using the atmospheric radiative transfer code MODTRAN (MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission), we incorporate site-specific mean weather conditions for several possible locations. In general, the dominant effect to be modeled is the sky radiance, which has a strong dependence upon the solar angle and the nature of the distribution of aerosols. Other significant effects included in the model are telescope design, camera design, and detector selection. The simulations are used in turn to predict the signal to noise ratio (SNR) in standard astronomical filter bands for several test cases of satellite-sun-observer geometries. The SNR model is then used to devise a method to design an optimal filter band for these observations.

  11. Repair simulation with image processing and artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yo-Han; Sung, Moon-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hyung; Park, Jin-Hong; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Moon, Seong-Yong; Choi, Sung-Woon; Han, Woo-Sung

    2005-05-01

    Defect-free mask is a dream of mask makers. Repair technology [1] that removes defects on Att. PSM is getting more attentions than ever. Therefore the fast and precise verification of repaired results is highly required. Most confirmation methods are carried out by using the inspection system because it is faster than AIMS to verify the repaired results. However, the accuracy of the verification using the inspection system cannot be compared to it with AIMS in the view of printability. In this paper, the results of optical simulation using top-down repair image are compared with those of AIMS for rapid confirmation of repaired results with competitive accuracy. Also, neural network which can compute the complex non-linear relationships easily are used to increase the accuracy of repair simulation.

  12. FEM-based simulation of tumor growth in medical image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuqian; Nie, Ying

    2004-05-01

    Brain model has found wide applications in areas including surgical-path planning, image-guided surgery systems, and virtual medical environments. In comparison with the modeling of normal brain anatomy, the modeling of anatomical abnormalities appears to be rather weak. Particularly, there are considerable differences between abnormal brain images and normal brain images, due to the growth of brain tumor. In order to find the correspondence between abnormal brain images and normal ones, it is necessary to make an estimation or simulation of the brain deformation. In this paper, a deformable model of brain tissue with both geometric and physical nonlinear properties based on finite element method is presented. It is assumed that the brain tissue are nonlinearly elastic solids obeying the equations of an incompressible nonlinearly elastics neo-Hookean model. we incorporate the physical inhomogeneous of brain tissue into our FEM model. The non-linearity of the model needs to solve the deformation of the model using an iteration method. The Updated Lagrange for iteration is used. To assure the convergence of iteration, we adopt the fixed arc length method. This model has advantages over those linear models in its more real tissue properties and its capability of simulating more serious brain deformation. The inclusion of second order displacement items into the balance and geometry functions allows for the estimation of more serious brain deformation. We referenced the model presented by Stelios K so as to ascertain the initial position of tumor as well as our tumor model definition. Furthermore, we expend it from 2-D to 3-D and simplify the calculation process.

  13. Theory, Image Simulation, and Data Analysis of Chemical Release Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.

    1994-01-01

    The final phase of Grant NAG6-1 involved analysis of physics of chemical releases in the upper atmosphere and analysis of data obtained on previous NASA sponsored chemical release rocket experiments. Several lines of investigation of past chemical release experiments and computer simulations have been proceeding in parallel. This report summarizes the work performed and the resulting publications. The following topics are addressed: analysis of the 1987 Greenland rocket experiments; calculation of emission rates for barium, strontium, and calcium; the CRIT 1 and 2 experiments (Collisional Ionization Cross Section experiments); image calibration using background stars; rapid ray motions in ionospheric plasma clouds; and the NOONCUSP rocket experiments.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of breast imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fitousi, N. T.; Delis, H.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Synchrotron radiation (SR), being the brightest artificial source of x-rays with a very promising geometry, has raised the scientific expectations that it could be used for breast imaging with optimized results. The ''in situ'' evaluation of this technique is difficult to perform, mostly due to the limited available SR facilities worldwide. In this study, a simulation model for SR breast imaging was developed, based on Monte Carlo simulation techniques, and validated using data acquired in the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra facility in Trieste, Italy. Furthermore, primary results concerning the performance of SR were derived. Methods: The developed model includes the exact setup of the SR beamline, considering that the x-ray source is located at almost 23 m from the slit, while the photon energy was considered to originate from a very narrow Gaussian spectrum. Breast phantoms, made of Perspex and filled with air cavities, were irradiated with energies in the range of 16-28 keV. The model included a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S detector with the same characteristics as the one available in the SYRMEP beamline. Following the development and validation of the model, experiments were performed in order to evaluate the contrast resolution of SR. A phantom made of adipose tissue and filled with inhomogeneities of several compositions and sizes was designed and utilized to simulate the irradiation under conventional mammography and SR conditions. Results: The validation results of the model showed an excellent agreement with the experimental data, with the correlation for contrast being 0.996. Significant differences only appeared at the edges of the phantom, where phase effects occur. The initial evaluation experiments revealed that SR shows very good performance in terms of the image quality indices utilized, namely subject contrast and contrast to noise ratio. The response of subject contrast to energy is monotonic; however, this does not stand for contrast to noise

  15. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) - Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a US-led concept for a next-generation instrument in ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The most important design requirement for AGIS is a sensitivity of about 10 times greater than current observatories like Veritas, H.E.S.S or MAGIC. We present results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance, collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity are discussed.

  16. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.; Vassiliev, V.V.; /UCLA

    2011-06-14

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory being planned in the U.S. The anticipated sensitivity of AGIS is about one order of magnitude better than the sensitivity of current observatories, allowing it to measure gamma-ray emission from a large number of Galactic and extra-galactic sources. We present here results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance - collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity - are discussed.

  17. Aerial Explorers and Robotic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg

    2004-01-01

    A unique bio-inspired approach to autonomous aerial vehicle, a.k.a. aerial explorer technology is discussed. The work is focused on defining and studying aerial explorer mission concepts, both as an individual robotic system and as a member of a small robotic "ecosystem." Members of this robotic ecosystem include the aerial explorer, air-deployed sensors and robotic symbiotes, and other assets such as rovers, landers, and orbiters.

  18. Simulating Galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei in the LSST Image Simulation Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizagno, James; Ahmad, Z.; Bankert, J.; Bard, D.; Connolly, A.; Chang, C.; Gibson, R. R.; Gilmore, K.; Grace, E.; Hannel, M.; Jernigan, J. G.; Jones, L.; Kahn, S. M.; Krughoff, S. K.; Lorenz, S.; Marshall, S.; Shmakova, S. M.; Sylvestri, N.; Todd, N.; Young, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an extragalactic source catalog, which includes galaxies and Active Galactic Nuclei, that is used for the Large Survey Synoptic Telescope Imaging Simulation effort. The galaxies are taken from the De Lucia et. al. (2006) semi-analytic modeling (SAM) of the Millennium Simulation. The LSST Image Simulation effort requires full SED information and galaxy morphological information, which is added to the catalog by fitting Bruzual & Charlot (2003) stellar population models, with Cardelli, Clayton, Mathis (1989) dust models, to the BVRIK colors provided by the De Lucia et. al. (2006) SAM. Galaxy morphology is modeled as a double Sersic profile for the disk and bulge. Galaxy morphological information and number counts are matched to existing observations. The catalog contains galaxies with a limiting r-band magnitude of mr=28, which results in roughly 1E6 galaxies per square degree. An existing AGN catalog (MacLeod et. al. 2010) is matched to galaxy hosts in the galaxy catalog using SDSS observations. AGN are morphologically modeled as variable point sources located at the center of the host galaxy. We demonstrate how this extragalactic source catalog allows LSST to plan for extended object extraction, variable extragalactic source detection, sensitivity level determination after image stacking, and perform various other cosmological tests.

  19. Image simulation for HardWare In the Loop simulation in EO domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathala, Thierry; Latger, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Infrared camera as a weapon sub system for automatic guidance is a key component for military carrier such as missile for example. The associated Image Processing, that controls the navigation, needs to be intensively assessed. Experimentation in the real world is very expensive. This is the main reason why hybrid simulation also called HardWare In the Loop (HWIL) is more and more required nowadays. In that field, IR projectors are able to cast IR fluxes of photons directly onto the IR camera of a given weapon system, typically a missile seeker head. Though in laboratory, the missile is so stimulated exactly like in the real world, provided a realistic simulation tool enables to perform synthetic images to be displayed by the IR projectors. The key technical challenge is to render the synthetic images at the required frequency. This paper focuses on OKTAL-SE experience in this domain through its product SE-FAST-HWIL. It shows the methodology and Return of Experience from OKTAL-SE. Examples are given, in the frame of the SE-Workbench. The presentation focuses on trials on real operational complex 3D cases. In particular, three important topics, that are very sensitive with regards to IG performance, are detailed: first the 3D sea surface representation, then particle systems rendering especially to simulate flares and at last sensor effects modelling. Beyond "projection mode", some information will be given on the SE-FAST-HWIL new capabilities dedicated to "injection mode".

  20. Research on the evaluation method for modelling and simulation of infrared imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shuli; Ren, Jiancun; Liu, Liang; Li, Zhaolong

    2015-10-01

    The validity of infrared image guidance simulation is determined by the fidelity and the accuracy of modelling and simulation of infrared imaging sensor system, and the research on assessment of modelling and simulation of infrared imaging sensor is important to design and assess the IR system. A method is proposed to evaluate simulation of infrared sensor effect based on full reference quality assessment method, the evaluation index system is established to evaluate simulation fidelity of infrared imaging sensor. The accuracy of irradiance and contrast of infrared simulation image can be assessed with one-dimension histogram analysis, and the spatial correlation of image is assessed with two-dimension histogram analysis, and geometrical and gray distribution characteristics are assessed with fidelity function. With the method, modelling and simulation of infrared imaging sensor can be effectively assessed.

  1. Unmanned aerial survey of elephants.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Cédric; Lejeune, Philippe; Lisein, Jonathan; Sawadogo, Prosper; Bouché, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The use of a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) was tested to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing ×100™ equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to test animal reaction as the UAS passed, and visibility on the images. No reaction was recorded as the UAS passed at a height of 100 m. Observations, made on a set of more than 7000 images, revealed that only elephants (Loxodonta africana) were easily visible while medium and small sized mammals were not. The easy observation of elephants allows experts to enumerate them on images acquired at a height of 100 m. We, therefore, implemented an aerial strip sample count along transects used for the annual wildlife foot count. A total of 34 elephants were recorded on 4 transects, each overflown twice. The elephant density was estimated at 2.47 elephants/km(2) with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 36.10%. The main drawback of our UAS was its low autonomy (45 min). Increased endurance of small UAS is required to replace manned aircraft survey of large areas (about 1000 km of transect per day vs 40 km for our UAS). The monitoring strategy should be adapted according to the sampling plan. Also, the UAS is as expensive as a second-hand light aircraft. However the logistic and flight implementation are easier, the running costs are lower and its use is safer. Technological evolution will make civil UAS more efficient, allowing them to compete with light aircraft for aerial wildlife surveys. PMID:23405088

  2. Unmanned Aerial Survey of Elephants

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Cédric; Lejeune, Philippe; Lisein, Jonathan; Sawadogo, Prosper; Bouché, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The use of a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) was tested to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing ×100™ equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to test animal reaction as the UAS passed, and visibility on the images. No reaction was recorded as the UAS passed at a height of 100 m. Observations, made on a set of more than 7000 images, revealed that only elephants (Loxodonta africana) were easily visible while medium and small sized mammals were not. The easy observation of elephants allows experts to enumerate them on images acquired at a height of 100 m. We, therefore, implemented an aerial strip sample count along transects used for the annual wildlife foot count. A total of 34 elephants were recorded on 4 transects, each overflown twice. The elephant density was estimated at 2.47 elephants/km2 with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 36.10%. The main drawback of our UAS was its low autonomy (45 min). Increased endurance of small UAS is required to replace manned aircraft survey of large areas (about 1000 km of transect per day vs 40 km for our UAS). The monitoring strategy should be adapted according to the sampling plan. Also, the UAS is as expensive as a second-hand light aircraft. However the logistic and flight implementation are easier, the running costs are lower and its use is safer. Technological evolution will make civil UAS more efficient, allowing them to compete with light aircraft for aerial wildlife surveys. PMID:23405088

  3. Characterization of tissue-simulating polymers for photoacoustic vascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2014-05-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a maturing imaging technique which combines optical excitation and acoustic detection to enable deep tissue sensing for biomedical applications. Optical absorption provides biochemical specificity and high optical contrast while ultrasonic detection provides high spatial resolution and penetration depth. These characteristics make PAT highly suitable as an approach for vascular imaging. However, standard testing methods are needed in order to characterize and compare the performance of these systems. Tissue-mimicking phantoms are commonly used as standard test samples for imaging system development and evaluation due to their repeatable fabrication and tunable properties. The multi-domain mechanism behind PAT necessitates development of phantoms that accurately mimic both acoustic and optical properties of tissues. While a wide variety of materials have been used in the literature, from gelatin and agar hydrogels to silicone, published data indicates that poly(vinyl chloride) plastisol (PVCP) is a promising candidate material for simulating tissue optical and acoustic properties while also providing superior longevity and stability. Critical acoustic properties of PVCP phantoms, including sound velocity and attenuation, were measured using acoustic transmission measurements at multiple frequencies relevant to typical PAT systems. Optical absorption and scattering coefficients of PVCP gels with and without biologically relevant absorbers and scatterers were measured over wavelengths from 500 to 1100 nm. A custom PAT system was developed to assess image contrast in PVCP phantoms containing fluid channels filled with absorbing dye. PVCP demonstrates strong potential as the basis of high-fidelity polymer phantoms for developing and evaluating PAT systems for vascular imaging applications.

  4. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1971-01-01

    Geological Survey vertical aerial photography is obtained primarily for topographic and geologic mapping. Reproductions from this photography are usually satisfactory for general use. Because reproductions are not stocked, but are custom processed for each order, they cannot be returned for credit or refund.

  5. Aerial of the VAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Even in this aerial view at KSC, the Vehicle Assembly Building is imposing. In front of it is the Launch Control Center. In the background is the Rotation/Processing Facility, next to the Banana Creek. In the foreground is the Saturn Causeway that leads to Launch Pads 39A and 39B.

  6. Aerial Perspective Artistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a lesson centering on aerial perspective artistry of students and offers suggestions on how art teachers should carry this project out. This project serves to develop students' visual perception by studying reproductions by famous artists. This lesson allows one to imagine being lured into a landscape capable of captivating…

  7. Computer simulation of orthognathic surgery with video imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, Robert; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Horch, Hans-Henning

    1994-04-01

    Patients with extreme jaw imbalance must often undergo operative corrections. The goal of therapy is to harmonize the stomatognathic system and an aesthetical correction of the face profile. A new procedure will be presented which supports the maxillo-facial surgeon in planning the operation and which also presents the patient the result of the treatment by video images. Once an x-ray has been digitized it is possible to produce individualized cephalometric analyses. Using a ceph on screen, all current orthognathic operations can be simulated, whereby the bony segments are moved according to given parameters, and a new soft tissue profile can be calculated. The profile of the patient is fed into the computer by way of a video system and correlated to the ceph. Using the simulated operation the computer calculates a new video image of the patient which presents the expected postoperative appearance. In studies of patients treated between 1987-91, 76 out of 121 patients were able to be evaluated. The deviation in profile change varied between .0 and 1.6mm. A side effect of the practical applications was an increase in patient compliance.

  8. Satellite image time series simulation for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The performance of environmental monitoring heavily depends on the availability of consecutive observation data and it turns out an increasing demand in remote sensing community for satellite image data in the sufficient resolution with respect to both spatial and temporal requirements, which appear to be conflictive and hard to tune tradeoffs. Multiple constellations could be a solution if without concerning cost, and thus it is so far interesting but very challenging to develop a method which can simultaneously improve both spatial and temporal details. There are some research efforts to deal with the problem from various aspects, a type of approaches is to enhance the spatial resolution using techniques of super resolution, pan-sharpen etc. which can produce good visual effects, but mostly cannot preserve spectral signatures and result in losing analytical value. Another type is to fill temporal frequency gaps by adopting time interpolation, which actually doesn't increase informative context at all. In this paper we presented a novel method to generate satellite images in higher spatial and temporal details, which further enables satellite image time series simulation. Our method starts with a pair of high-low resolution data set, and then a spatial registration is done by introducing LDA model to map high and low resolution pixels correspondingly. Afterwards, temporal change information is captured through a comparison of low resolution time series data, and the temporal change is then projected onto high resolution data plane and assigned to each high resolution pixel referring the predefined temporal change patterns of each type of ground objects to generate a simulated high resolution data. A preliminary experiment shows that our method can simulate a high resolution data with a good accuracy. We consider the contribution of our method is to enable timely monitoring of temporal changes through analysis of low resolution images time series only, and usage of

  9. Geostationary Imaging FTS (GIFTS) Data Processing: Measurement Simulation and Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Hung-Lung; Revercomb, H. E.; Thom, J.; Antonelli, P. B.; Osborne, B.; Tobin, D.; Knuteson, R.; Garcia, R.; Dutcher, S.; Li, J.

    2001-01-01

    GIFTS (Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer), a forerunner of next generation geostationary satellite weather observing systems, will be built to fly on the NASA EO-3 geostationary orbit mission in 2004 to demonstrate the use of large area detector arrays and readouts. Timely high spatial resolution images and quantitative soundings of clouds, water vapor, temperature, and pollutants of the atmosphere for weather prediction and air quality monitoring will be achieved. GIFTS is novel in terms of providing many scientific returns that traditionally can only be achieved by separate advanced imaging and sounding systems. GIFTS' ability to obtain half-hourly high vertical density wind over the full earth disk is revolutionary. However, these new technologies bring forth many challenges for data transmission, archiving, and geophysical data processing. In this paper, we will focus on the aspect of data volume and downlink issues by conducting a GIFTS data compression experiment. We will discuss the scenario of using principal component analysis as a foundation for atmospheric data retrieval and compression of uncalibrated and un-normalized interferograms. The effects of compression on the degradation of the signal and noise reduction in interferogram and spectral domains will be highlighted. A simulation system developed to model the GIFTS instrument measurements is described in detail.

  10. COCOA: tracking in aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Saad; Shah, Mubarak

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming a core intelligence asset for reconnaissance, surveillance and target tracking in urban and battlefield settings. In order to achieve the goal of automated tracking of objects in UAV videos we have developed a system called COCOA. It processes the video stream through number of stages. At first stage platform motion compensation is performed. Moving object detection is performed to detect the regions of interest from which object contours are extracted by performing a level set based segmentation. Finally blob based tracking is performed for each detected object. Global tracks are generated which are used for higher level processing. COCOA is customizable to different sensor resolutions and is capable of tracking targets as small as 100 pixels. It works seamlessly for both visible and thermal imaging modes. The system is implemented in Matlab and works in a batch mode.

  11. JSC Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) visual system payload bay video image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This space shuttle orbiter payload bay (PLB) video image is used in JSC's Fixed Based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). The image is projected inside the FB-SMS crew compartment during mission simulation training. The FB-SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  12. A method to simulate synthetic aperture sonar images with parameterized autocorrelation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, J. Tory; Slatton, K. Clint; Principe, Jose

    2010-04-01

    An approach to simulate synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images with known autocorrelation functions (ACF) and single-point statistics is presented. ACF models for generating textures with and without periodicities are defined and explained. Simulated textures of these models are compared visually with real SAS image textures. Distortion and degradation of the synthetic textures are examined for various simulation parameter choices.

  13. Digital image database processing to simulate image formation in ideal lighting conditions of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castañeda-Santos, Jessica; Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; Cruz-Félix, Angel S.; Hernández-Méndez, Arturo

    2015-09-01

    The pupil size of the human eye has a large effect in the image quality due to inherent aberrations. Several studies have been performed to calculate its size relative to the luminance as well as considering other factors, i.e., age, size of the adapting field and mono and binocular vision. Moreover, ideal lighting conditions are known, but software suited to our specific requirements, low cost and low computational consumption, in order to simulate radiation adaptation and image formation in the retina with ideal lighting conditions has not yet been developed. In this work, a database is created consisting of 70 photographs corresponding to the same scene with a fixed target at different times of the day. By using this database, characteristics of the photographs are obtained by measuring the luminance average initial threshold value of each photograph by means of an image histogram. Also, we present the implementation of a digital filter for both, image processing on the threshold values of our database and generating output images with the threshold values reported for the human eye in ideal cases. Some potential applications for this kind of filters may be used in artificial vision systems.

  14. Simulated lesion, human observer performance comparison between thin-section dedicated breast CT images versus computed thick-section simulated projection images of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Boone, JM; Abbey, CK; Hargreaves, J; Bateni, C; Lindfors, KK; Yang, K; Nosratieh, A; Hernandez, A; Gazi, P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the lesion detection performance of human observers between thin-section computed tomography images of the breast, with thick-section (>40 mm) simulated projection images of the breast. Methods Three radiologists and six physicists each executed a two alterative force choice (2AFC) study involving simulated spherical lesions placed mathematically into breast images produced on a prototype dedicated breast CT scanner. The breast image data sets from 88 patients were used to create 352 pairs of image data. Spherical lesions with diameters of 1, 2, 3, 5, and 11 mm were simulated and adaptively positioned into 3D breast CT image data sets; the native thin section (0.33 mm) images were averaged to produce images with different slice thicknesses; average section thicknesses of 0.33 mm, 0.71 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.9 mm were representative of breast CT; the average 43 mm slice thickness served to simulate simulated projection images of the breast. Results The percent correct of the human observer’s responses were evaluated in the 2AFC experiments. Radiologists lesion detection performance was significantly (p<0.05) better in the case of thin-section images, compared to thick section images similar to mammography, for all but the 1 mm lesion diameter lesions. For example, the average of three radiologist’s performance for 3 mm diameter lesions was 92 % correct for thin section breast CT images while it was 67 % for the simulated projection images. A gradual reduction in observer performance was observed as the section thickness increased beyond about 1 mm. While a performance difference based on breast density was seen in both breast CT and the projection image results, the average radiologist performance using breast CT images in dense breasts outperformed the performance using simulated projection images in fatty breasts for all lesion diameters except 11 mm. The average radiologist performance outperformed that of the

  15. Sea Ice Mapping using Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbø, S.; Storvold, R.

    2011-12-01

    Mapping of sea ice extent and sea ice features is an important task in climate research. Since the arctic coastal and oceanic areas have a high probability of cloud coverage, aerial platforms are superior to satellite measurements for high-resolution optical measurements. However, routine observations of sea ice conditions present a variety of problems using conventional piloted aircrafts. Specially, the availability of suitable aircrafts for lease does not cover the demand in major parts of the arctic. With the recent advances in unmanned aerial systems (UAS), there is a high possibility of establishing routine, cost effective aerial observations of sea ice conditions in the near future. Unmanned aerial systems can carry a wide variety of sensors useful for characterizing sea-ice features. For instance, the CryoWing UAS, a system initially designed for measurements of the cryosphere, can be equipped with digital cameras, surface thermometers and laser altimeters for measuring freeboard of ice flows. In this work we will present results from recent CryoWing sea ice flights on Svalbard, Norway. The emphasis will be on data processing for stitching together images acquired with the non-stabilized camera payload, to form high-resolution mosaics covering large spatial areas. These data are being employed to map ice conditions; including ice and lead features and melt ponds. These high-resolution mosaics are also well suited for sea-ice mechanics, classification studies and for validation of satellite sea-ice products.

  16. Space-based laser active imaging simulation system based on HLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi; Sun, Huayan; Li, Yingchun

    2013-09-01

    This paper adopts the High Level Architecture to develop the space-based laser active imaging distribution simulation software system, and designs the system framework which contains three-step workflow including modeling, experimental and analysis. The paper puts forward the general needs of the simulation system first, then builds the simulation system architecture based on HLA and constructs 7 simulation federal members. The simulation system has the primary functions of space target scattering characteristic analysis, imaging simulation, image processing and target recognition, and system performance analysis and so on, and can support the whole simulation process. The results show that the distribution simulation system can meet the technical requirements of the space-based laser imaging simulation.

  17. Simulated NMIS Imaging Data for an Unknown Object

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; Mihalczo, John T

    2012-04-01

    This report presents simulated Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) imaging data for an unclassified object, whose characteristics are initially unknown to the reader. This data will be used to test various analysis capabilities and was created with a simple deterministic ray-tracing algorithm. NMIS is a time-dependent coincidence counting system that is used to characterize both fissile and non-fissile materials undergoing nondestructive assay. NMIS characterizes materials by interrogating them with neutrons, either from an associated-particle deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator, which produces a time and directionally tagged monoenergetic beam of 14.1 MeV neutrons, or a time-tagged spontaneous fission source in an ionization chamber.

  18. A study to analyze six band multispectral images and fabricate a Fourier transform detector. [optical data processing - aerial photography/forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, R. G.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An automatic Fourier transform diffraction pattern sampling system, used to investigate techniques for forestry classification of six band multispectral aerial photography is presented. Photographs and diagrams of the design, development and fabrication of a hybrid optical-digital Fourier transform detector are shown. The detector was designed around a concentric ring fiber optic array. This array was formed from many optical fibers which were sorted into concentric rings about a single fiber. All the fibers in each ring were collected into a bundle and terminated into a single photodetector. An optical/digital interface unit consisting of a high level multiplexer, and an analog-to-digital amplifier was also constructed and is described.

  19. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-06-09

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

  20. Area and Elevation Changes of a Debris-Covered Glacier and a Clean-Ice Glacier Between 1952-2013 Using Aerial Images and Structure-from-Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardeux, P.; Glasser, N. F.; Holt, T.; Irvine-Fynn, T. D.; Hubbard, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Since 1952, the clean-ice Glacier Blanc has retreated twice as fast as the adjacent debris-covered Glacier Noir. Located in the French Alps and separated by only 1 km, both glaciers experience the same climatic conditions, making them ideal to evaluate the impact of debris cover on glacier evolution. We used aerial photographs from 16 acquisitions from 1952 to 2013 to reconstruct and analyze glacier elevation changes using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) techniques. Here, we present the process of developing sub-metric resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) from these aerial photographs. By combining 16 DEMs, we produced a dataset of elevation changes of Glacier Noir and Glacier Blanc, including time-series analysis of lateral and longitudinal profiles, glacier hypsometry and mass balance variation. Our preliminary results indicate that Glacier Noir and Glacier Blanc have both thinned to a similar magnitude, ≤ 20 m, despite a 1 km retreat for Glacier Blanc and only 500 m for Glacier Noir. However, these elevation change reconstructions are hampered by large uncertainties, principally due to the lack of independent camera calibration on the historical imagery. Initial attempts using posteriori correction grids have proven to significantly increase the accuracy of these data. We will present some of the uncertainties and solutions linked to the use of SfM on such a large scale and on such an old dataset. This study demonstrates how SfM can be used to investigate long-term trends in environmental change, allowing glacier monitoring to be up-scaled. It also highlights the need for on-going validation of methods to increase the accuracy and precision of SfM in glaciology. This work is not only advancing our understanding of the role of the debris layer, but will also aid glacial geology more generally with, for example, detailed geomorphological analysis of proglacial terrain and Quaternary sciences with quick and accurate reconstruction of a glacial paleo-environment.

  1. Dual Energy Method for Breast Imaging: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Michail, C.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Fountzoula, C.; Kalyvas, N.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.; Fountos, G.

    2015-01-01

    Dual energy methods can suppress the contrast between adipose and glandular tissues in the breast and therefore enhance the visibility of calcifications. In this study, a dual energy method based on analytical modeling was developed for the detection of minimum microcalcification thickness. To this aim, a modified radiographic X-ray unit was considered, in order to overcome the limited kVp range of mammographic units used in previous DE studies, combined with a high resolution CMOS sensor (pixel size of 22.5 μm) for improved resolution. Various filter materials were examined based on their K-absorption edge. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was used to simulate microcalcifications. The contrast to noise ratio (CNRtc) of the subtracted images was calculated for both monoenergetic and polyenergetic X-ray beams. The optimum monoenergetic pair was 23/58 keV for the low and high energy, respectively, resulting in a minimum detectable microcalcification thickness of 100 μm. In the polyenergetic X-ray study, the optimal spectral combination was 40/70 kVp filtered with 100 μm cadmium and 1000 μm copper, respectively. In this case, the minimum detectable microcalcification thickness was 150 μm. The proposed dual energy method provides improved microcalcification detectability in breast imaging with mean glandular dose values within acceptable levels. PMID:26246848

  2. Dual Energy Method for Breast Imaging: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Koukou, V; Martini, N; Michail, C; Sotiropoulou, P; Fountzoula, C; Kalyvas, N; Kandarakis, I; Nikiforidis, G; Fountos, G

    2015-01-01

    Dual energy methods can suppress the contrast between adipose and glandular tissues in the breast and therefore enhance the visibility of calcifications. In this study, a dual energy method based on analytical modeling was developed for the detection of minimum microcalcification thickness. To this aim, a modified radiographic X-ray unit was considered, in order to overcome the limited kVp range of mammographic units used in previous DE studies, combined with a high resolution CMOS sensor (pixel size of 22.5 μm) for improved resolution. Various filter materials were examined based on their K-absorption edge. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was used to simulate microcalcifications. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR tc ) of the subtracted images was calculated for both monoenergetic and polyenergetic X-ray beams. The optimum monoenergetic pair was 23/58 keV for the low and high energy, respectively, resulting in a minimum detectable microcalcification thickness of 100 μm. In the polyenergetic X-ray study, the optimal spectral combination was 40/70 kVp filtered with 100 μm cadmium and 1000 μm copper, respectively. In this case, the minimum detectable microcalcification thickness was 150 μm. The proposed dual energy method provides improved microcalcification detectability in breast imaging with mean glandular dose values within acceptable levels. PMID:26246848

  3. Myocardial Perfusion Imaging with a Solid State Camera: Simulation of a Very Low Dose Imaging Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S.; Hayes, Sean W.; Fish, Mathews; Padgett, Richard; Xu, Yuan; Lemley, Mark; Baavour, Rafael; Roth, Nathaniel; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2012-01-01

    High sensitivity dedicated cardiac systems cameras provide an opportunity to lower injected doses for SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), but the exact limits for lowering doses have not been determined. List mode data acquisition allows for reconstruction of various fractions of acquired counts, allowing a simulation of gradually lower administered dose. We aimed to determine the feasibility of very low dose MPI by exploring the minimal count level in the myocardium for accurate MPI. Methods Seventy nine patients were studied (mean body mass index 30.0 ± 6.6, range 20.2–54.0 kg/m2) who underwent 1-day standard dose 99mTc-sestamibi exercise or adenosine rest/stress MPI for clinical indications employing a Cadmium Zinc Telluride dedicated cardiac camera. Imaging time was 14-min with 803 ± 200 MBq (21.7 ± 5.4mCi) of 99mTc injected at stress. To simulate clinical scans with lower dose at that imaging time, we reframed the list-mode raw data to have count fractions of the original scan. Accordingly, 6 stress equivalent datasets were reconstructed corresponding to each fraction of the original scan. Automated QPS/QGS software was used to quantify total perfusion deficit (TPD) and ejection fraction (EF) for all 553 datasets. Minimal acceptable count was determined based on previous report with repeatability of same-day same-injection Anger camera studies. Pearson correlation coefficients and SD of differences with TPD for all scans were calculated. Results The correlations of quantitative perfusion and function analysis were excellent for both global and regional analysis on all simulated low-counts scans (all r ≥0.95, p<0.0001). Minimal acceptable count was determined to be 1.0 million counts for the left ventricular region. At this count level, SD of differences was 1.7% for TPD and 4.2% for EF. This count level would correspond to a 92.5 MBq (2.5 mCi) injected dose for the 14 min acquisition. Conclusion 1.0 million myocardial count images appear to be

  4. Interactive graphic editing tools in bioluminescent imaging simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Tian, Jie; Luo, Jie; Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang

    2005-04-01

    It is a challenging task to accurately describe complicated biological tissues and bioluminescent sources in bioluminescent imaging simulation. Several graphic editing tools have been developed to efficiently model each part of the bioluminescent simulation environment and to interactively correct or improve the initial models of anatomical structures or bioluminescent sources. There are two major types of graphic editing tools: non-interactive tools and interactive tools. Geometric building blocks (i.e. regular geometric graphics and superquadrics) are applied as non-interactive tools. To a certain extent, complicated anatomical structures and bioluminescent sources can be approximately modeled by combining a sufficient large number of geometric building blocks with Boolean operators. However, those models are too simple to describe the local features and fine changes in 2D/3D irregular contours. Therefore, interactive graphic editing tools have been developed to facilitate the local modifications of any initial surface model. With initial models composed of geometric building blocks, interactive spline mode is applied to conveniently perform dragging and compressing operations on 2D/3D local surface of biological tissues and bioluminescent sources inside the region/volume of interest. Several applications of the interactive graphic editing tools will be presented in this article.

  5. Land cover/use classification of Cairns, Queensland, Australia: A remote sensing study involving the conjunctive use of the airborne imaging spectrometer, the large format camera and the thematic mapper simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heric, Matthew; Cox, William; Gordon, Daniel K.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the land cover/use classification accuracy obtainable from remotely sensed multispectral imagery, Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-1 (AIS-1) images were analyzed in conjunction with Thematic Mapper Simulator (NS001) Large Format Camera color infrared photography and black and white aerial photography. Specific portions of the combined data set were registered and used for classification. Following this procedure, the resulting derived data was tested using an overall accuracy assessment method. Precise photogrammetric 2D-3D-2D geometric modeling techniques is not the basis for this study. Instead, the discussion exposes resultant spectral findings from the image-to-image registrations. Problems associated with the AIS-1 TMS integration are considered, and useful applications of the imagery combination are presented. More advanced methodologies for imagery integration are needed if multisystem data sets are to be utilized fully. Nevertheless, research, described herein, provides a formulation for future Earth Observation Station related multisensor studies.

  6. Photogrammetric mapping using unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graça, N.; Mitishita, E.; Gonçalves, J.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology has attracted attention for aerial photogrammetric mapping. The low cost and the feasibility to automatic flight along commanded waypoints can be considered as the main advantages of this technology in photogrammetric applications. Using GNSS/INS technologies the images are taken at the planned position of the exposure station and the exterior orientation parameters (position Xo, Yo, Zo and attitude ω, φ, χ) of images can be direct determined. However, common UAVs (off-the-shelf) do not replace the traditional aircraft platform. Overall, the main shortcomings are related to: difficulties to obtain the authorization to perform the flight in urban and rural areas, platform stability, safety flight, stability of the image block configuration, high number of the images and inaccuracies of the direct determination of the exterior orientation parameters of the images. In this paper are shown the obtained results from the project photogrammetric mapping using aerial images from the SIMEPAR UAV system. The PIPER J3 UAV Hydro aircraft was used. It has a micro pilot MP2128g. The system is fully integrated with 3-axis gyros/accelerometers, GPS, pressure altimeter, pressure airspeed sensors. A Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W300 was calibrated and used to get the image block. The flight height was close to 400 m, resulting GSD near to 0.10 m. The state of the art of the used technology, methodologies and the obtained results are shown and discussed. Finally advantages/shortcomings found in the study and main conclusions are presented

  7. Geometric optical investigation of the underwater visual field of aerial animals.

    PubMed

    Horváth, G; Varjú, D

    1990-11-01

    The underwater visual field distorted by refraction for aerial animals living near the water surface is investigated by means of geometric optics. The imaging of underwater objects by one and two aerial eyes is studied. The underwater binocular image field is determined for pairs of aerial eyes placed in horizontal and vertical planes. Some possible biooptical consequences of the visual detection of underwater prey and predator by aerial animals are discussed on the basis of the structure of their distorted visual field. PMID:2134486

  8. Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm for Segmentation of Aerial Photography Data Obtained Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinin, M. V.; Akinina, N. V.; Klochkov, A. Y.; Nikiforov, M. B.; Sokolova, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The report reviewed the algorithm fuzzy c-means, performs image segmentation, give an estimate of the quality of his work on the criterion of Xie-Beni, contain the results of experimental studies of the algorithm in the context of solving the problem of drawing up detailed two-dimensional maps with the use of unmanned aerial vehicles. According to the results of the experiment concluded that the possibility of applying the algorithm in problems of decoding images obtained as a result of aerial photography. The considered algorithm can significantly break the original image into a plurality of segments (clusters) in a relatively short period of time, which is achieved by modification of the original k-means algorithm to work in a fuzzy task.

  9. Simulation studies and practical tests using multi-image shape from shading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heipke, Christian; Piechullek, Christian; Ebner, Heinrich

    Multi-image shape from shading (MI-SFS) is a surface reconstruction method, which has been studied intensively by our group over the last years. Our goal is to develop a method incorporating MI-SFS and image matching for use in planetary science. MI-SFS directly relates the grey values of one or more images to the heights of a digital terrain model (DTM) and the parameters of a radiometric surface model, which describes the surface reflectance behaviour. The DTM heights as well as the parameters of the radiometric model are estimated from the image grey values in a least squares adjustment. In this paper, we shortly review the principles of MI-SFS and analyse its characteristics using theoretical investigations and a practical example. Throughout the text, a comparison of two widely used reflectance models in planetary science, the well-known Lambert and the Lommel-Seeliger reflectance models, is given together with an investigation into the pros and cons of using more than one image and, thus, of MI-SFS compared to classical SFS. Results from a practical test using digitised aerial images are described, which demonstrate the potential of MI-SFS and its advantages over single image SFS.

  10. Estimation of the sugar cane cultivated area from LANDSAT images using the two phase sampling method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Cappelletti, C. A.; Mendonca, F. J.; Lee, D. C. L.; Shimabukuro, Y. E.

    1982-01-01

    A two phase sampling method and the optimal sampling segment dimensions for the estimation of sugar cane cultivated area were developed. This technique employs visual interpretations of LANDSAT images and panchromatic aerial photographs considered as the ground truth. The estimates, as a mean value of 100 simulated samples, represent 99.3% of the true value with a CV of approximately 1%; the relative efficiency of the two phase design was 157% when compared with a one phase aerial photographs sample.

  11. High Resolution Urban Land Cover Mapping Using NAIP Aerial Photography and Image Processing for the USEPA National Atlas of Sustainability and Ecosystem Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilant, A. N.; Baynes, J.; Dannenberg, M.

    2012-12-01

    The US EPA National Atlas for Sustainability is a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application that allows users to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services in a specific region. The Atlas provides users with a visual method for interpreting ecosystem services and understanding how they can be conserved and enhanced for a sustainable future. The Urban Atlas component of the National Atlas will provide fine-scale information linking human health and well-being to environmental conditions such as urban heat islands, near-road pollution, resource use, access to recreation, drinking water quality and other quality of life indicators. The National Land Cover Data (NLCD) derived from 30 m scale 2006 Landsat imagery provides the land cover base for the Atlas. However, urban features and phenomena occur at finer spatial scales, so higher spatial resolution and more current LC maps are required. We used 4 band USDA NAIP imagery (1 m pixel size) and various classification approaches to produce urban land cover maps with these classes: impervious surface, grass and herbaceous, trees and forest, soil and barren, and water. Here we present the remote sensing methods used and results from four pilot cities in this effort, highlighting the pros and cons of the approach, and the benefits to sustainability and ecosystem services analysis. Example of high resolution land cover map derived from USDA NAIP aerial photo. Compare 30 m and 1 m resolution land cover maps of downtown Durham, NC.

  12. Aerial views of the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.

    1988-01-01

    These aerial photographs of the San Andreas fault were taken in 1965 by Robert E. Wallace of the U.S Geological Survey. The pictures were taken with a Rolliflex camera on 20 format black and white flim; Wallace was aboard a light, fixed-wing aircraft, flying mostly at low altitudes. He photographed the fault from San Francisco near its north end where it enters by the Salton Sea. These images represent only a sampling of the more than 300 images prodcued during this project. All the photographs reside in the U.S Geological Survey Library in Menlo Park, California. 

  13. Robust crack detection strategies for aerial inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldea, Emanuel; Le Hégarat, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    In this work, we evaluate the relevance of current state of the art algorithms widely employed in the detection of cracks, for the specific context of aerial inspection, which is characterized by image quality degradation. In this study we focus on minimal cost path and on Marked Point Process algorithms, and we test their resilience to motion blur. The results show that the current strategies for defect detection are sensitive to the quality of input images; alternatively, we suggest some improvements based on a-contrario methods that are able to cope with significant motion blur.

  14. Imaging infrared: Scene simulation, modeling, and real image tracking; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triplett, Milton J. (Editor); Wolverton, James R. (Editor); Hubert, August J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on scene simulation, modeling, and real image tracking using IR imaging are presented. Individual topics addressed include: tactical IR scene generator, dynamic FLIR simulation in flight training research, high-speed dynamic scene simulation in UV to IR spectra, development of an IR sensor calibration facility, IR celestial background scene description, transmission measurement of optical components at cryogenic temperatures, diffraction model for a point-source generator, silhouette-based tracking for tactical IR systems, use of knowledge in electrooptical trackers, detection and classification of target formations in IR image sequences, SMPRAD: simplified three-dimensional cloud radiance model, IR target generator, recent advances in testing of thermal imagers, generic IR system models with dynamic image generation, modeling realistic target acquisition using IR sensors in multiple-observer scenarios, and novel concept of scene generation and comprehensive dynamic sensor test.

  15. Controller Design of Quadrotor Aerial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yali, Yu; SunFeng; Yuanxi, Wang

    This paper deduced the nonlinear dynamic model of a quadrotor aerial robot, which was a VTOL (vertical tale-off and landing) unmanned air vehicle. Since that is a complex model with the highly nonlinear multivariable strongly coupled and under-actuated property, the controller design of it was very difficult. Aimed at attaining the excellent controller, the whole system can be divided into three interconnected parts: attitude subsystem, vertical subsystem, position subsystem. Then nonlinear control strategy of them has been described, such as SDRE and Backstepping. The controller design was presented to stabilize the whole system. Through simulation result indicates, the various models have shown that the control law stabilize a quadrotor aerial robot with good tracking performance and robotness of the system.

  16. Aerial photography for sensing plant anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Cardenas, R.; Hart, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    Changes in the red tonal response of Kodak Ektrachrome Infrared Aero 8443 film (EIR) are often incorrectly attributed solely to variations in infrared light reflectance of plant leaves, when the primary influence is a difference in visible light reflectance induced by varying chlorophyll contents. Comparisons are made among aerial photographic images of high- and low-chlorophyll foliage. New growth, foot rot, and boron and chloride nutrient toxicites produce low-chlorophyll foliage, and EIR transparency images of light red or white compared with dark-red images of high-chlorophyll foliage. Deposits of the sooty mold fungus that subsists on the honeydew produced by brown soft scale insects, obscure the citrus leaves' green color. Infected trees appear as black images on EIR film transparencies compared with red images of healthy trees.

  17. D Surface Generation from Aerial Thermal Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaei, B.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadras Javan, F.; Hasani, H.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial thermal imagery has been recently applied to quantitative analysis of several scenes. For the mapping purpose based on aerial thermal imagery, high accuracy photogrammetric process is necessary. However, due to low geometric resolution and low contrast of thermal imaging sensors, there are some challenges in precise 3D measurement of objects. In this paper the potential of thermal video in 3D surface generation is evaluated. In the pre-processing step, thermal camera is geometrically calibrated using a calibration grid based on emissivity differences between the background and the targets. Then, Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation from thermal video imagery is performed in four steps. Initially, frames are extracted from video, then tie points are generated by Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm. Bundle adjustment is then applied and the camera position and orientation parameters are determined. Finally, multi-resolution dense image matching algorithm is used to create 3D point cloud of the scene. Potential of the proposed method is evaluated based on thermal imaging cover an industrial area. The thermal camera has 640×480 Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) sensor, equipped with a 25 mm lens which mounted in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The obtained results show the comparable accuracy of 3D model generated based on thermal images with respect to DSM generated from visible images, however thermal based DSM is somehow smoother with lower level of texture. Comparing the generated DSM with the 9 measured GCPs in the area shows the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) value is smaller than 5 decimetres in both X and Y directions and 1.6 meters for the Z direction.

  18. Infrared film for aerial photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, William H.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable interest has developed recently in the use of aerial photographs for agricultural management. Even the simplest hand-held aerial photographs, especially those taken with color infrared film, often provide information not ordinarily available through routine ground observation. When fields are viewed from above, patterns and variations become more apparent, often allowing problems to be spotted which otherwise may go undetected.

  19. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY AND LEGAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerial photographic interpretation is the process of examining objects on aerial photographs and determining their significance. t is often defined as both art and science because the process, and the quality of the derived information, is often a qualitative nature and much depe...

  20. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  1. A real-time infrared imaging simulation method with physical effects modeling of infrared sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ni; Huai, Wenqing; Wang, Shaodan; Ren, Lei

    2016-09-01

    Infrared imaging simulation technology can provide infrared data sources for the development, improvement and evaluation of infrared imaging systems under different environment, status and weather conditions, which is reusable and more economic than physical experiments. A real-time infrared imaging simulation process is established to reproduce a complete physical imaging process. Our emphasis is put on the modeling of infrared sensors, involving physical effects of both spatial domain and frequency domain. An improved image convolution method is proposed based on GPU parallel processing to enhance the real-time simulation ability with ensuring its simulation accuracy at the same time. Finally the effectiveness of the above methods is validated by simulation analysis and result comparison.

  2. Autonomous Aerial Refueling Ground Test Demonstration—A Sensor-in-the-Loop, Non-Tracking Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao-I; Koseluk, Robert; Buchanan, Chase; Duerner, Andrew; Jeppesen, Brian; Laux, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    An essential capability for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to extend its airborne duration without increasing the size of the aircraft is called the autonomous aerial refueling (AAR). This paper proposes a sensor-in-the-loop, non-tracking method for probe-and-drogue style autonomous aerial refueling tasks by combining sensitivity adjustments of a 3D Flash LIDAR camera with computer vision based image-processing techniques. The method overcomes the inherit ambiguity issues when reconstructing 3D information from traditional 2D images by taking advantage of ready to use 3D point cloud data from the camera, followed by well-established computer vision techniques. These techniques include curve fitting algorithms and outlier removal with the random sample consensus (RANSAC) algorithm to reliably estimate the drogue center in 3D space, as well as to establish the relative position between the probe and the drogue. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method on a real system, a ground navigation robot was designed and fabricated. Results presented in the paper show that using images acquired from a 3D Flash LIDAR camera as real time visual feedback, the ground robot is able to track a moving simulated drogue and continuously narrow the gap between the robot and the target autonomously. PMID:25970254

  3. Autonomous Aerial Refueling Ground Test Demonstration--A Sensor-in-the-Loop, Non-Tracking Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-I; Koseluk, Robert; Buchanan, Chase; Duerner, Andrew; Jeppesen, Brian; Laux, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    An essential capability for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) to extend its airborne duration without increasing the size of the aircraft is called the autonomous aerial refueling (AAR). This paper proposes a sensor-in-the-loop, non-tracking method for probe-and-drogue style autonomous aerial refueling tasks by combining sensitivity adjustments of a 3D Flash LIDAR camera with computer vision based image-processing techniques. The method overcomes the inherit ambiguity issues when reconstructing 3D information from traditional 2D images by taking advantage of ready to use 3D point cloud data from the camera, followed by well-established computer vision techniques. These techniques include curve fitting algorithms and outlier removal with the random sample consensus (RANSAC) algorithm to reliably estimate the drogue center in 3D space, as well as to establish the relative position between the probe and the drogue. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method on a real system, a ground navigation robot was designed and fabricated. Results presented in the paper show that using images acquired from a 3D Flash LIDAR camera as real time visual feedback, the ground robot is able to track a moving simulated drogue and continuously narrow the gap between the robot and the target autonomously. PMID:25970254

  4. A Digital Sensor Simulator of the Pushbroom Offner Hyperspectral Imaging Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Dongxing; Jia, Guorui; Yuan, Yan; Zhao, Huijie

    2014-01-01

    Sensor simulators can be used in forecasting the imaging quality of a new hyperspectral imaging spectrometer, and generating simulated data for the development and validation of the data processing algorithms. This paper presents a novel digital sensor simulator for the pushbroom Offner hyperspectral imaging spectrometer, which is widely used in the hyperspectral remote sensing. Based on the imaging process, the sensor simulator consists of a spatial response module, a spectral response module, and a radiometric response module. In order to enhance the simulation accuracy, spatial interpolation-resampling, which is implemented before the spatial degradation, is developed to compromise the direction error and the extra aliasing effect. Instead of using the spectral response function (SRF), the dispersive imaging characteristics of the Offner convex grating optical system is accurately modeled by its configuration parameters. The non-uniformity characteristics, such as keystone and smile effects, are simulated in the corresponding modules. In this work, the spatial, spectral and radiometric calibration processes are simulated to provide the parameters of modulation transfer function (MTF), SRF and radiometric calibration parameters of the sensor simulator. Some uncertainty factors (the stability, band width of the monochromator for the spectral calibration, and the integrating sphere uncertainty for the radiometric calibration) are considered in the simulation of the calibration process. With the calibration parameters, several experiments were designed to validate the spatial, spectral and radiometric response of the sensor simulator, respectively. The experiment results indicate that the sensor simulator is valid. PMID:25615727

  5. A digital sensor simulator of the pushbroom Offner hyperspectral imaging spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dongxing; Jia, Guorui; Yuan, Yan; Zhao, Huijie

    2014-01-01

    Sensor simulators can be used in forecasting the imaging quality of a new hyperspectral imaging spectrometer, and generating simulated data for the development and validation of the data processing algorithms. This paper presents a novel digital sensor simulator for the pushbroom Offner hyperspectral imaging spectrometer, which is widely used in the hyperspectral remote sensing. Based on the imaging process, the sensor simulator consists of a spatial response module, a spectral response module, and a radiometric response module. In order to enhance the simulation accuracy, spatial interpolation-resampling, which is implemented before the spatial degradation, is developed to compromise the direction error and the extra aliasing effect. Instead of using the spectral response function (SRF), the dispersive imaging characteristics of the Offner convex grating optical system is accurately modeled by its configuration parameters. The non-uniformity characteristics, such as keystone and smile effects, are simulated in the corresponding modules. In this work, the spatial, spectral and radiometric calibration processes are simulated to provide the parameters of modulation transfer function (MTF), SRF and radiometric calibration parameters of the sensor simulator. Some uncertainty factors (the stability, band width of the monochromator for the spectral calibration, and the integrating sphere uncertainty for the radiometric calibration) are considered in the simulation of the calibration process. With the calibration parameters, several experiments were designed to validate the spatial, spectral and radiometric response of the sensor simulator, respectively. The experiment results indicate that the sensor simulator is valid. PMID:25615727

  6. High Redshift Simulations Using the GALEX Ultraviolet Images of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, Bum-Suk; Kim, Young Kwang; Rey, Soo-Chang; Joe, Young Hoon; Gil de Paz, Armando

    2009-03-01

    We present simulated optical images of galaxies at high redshift using diverse and high-quality ultraviolet (UV) images of nearby galaxies obtained through the GALEX (Galaxy Evolution Explorer). Galaxy morphology plays an important role in the study of the evolution of galaxies. In this respect, the appearance of galaxies at high redshift requires images of nearby galaxies with various morphologies in the UV bandpass. Our simulation will be important in providing the basic information needed to study the evolution of galaxies.

  7. Analysis of simulated image sequences from sensors for restricted-visibility operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar

    1991-01-01

    A real time model of the visible output from a 94 GHz sensor, based on a radiometric simulation of the sensor, was developed. A sequence of images as seen from an aircraft as it approaches for landing was simulated using this model. Thirty frames from this sequence of 200 x 200 pixel images were analyzed to identify and track objects in the image using the Cantata image processing package within the visual programming environment provided by the Khoros software system. The image analysis operations are described.

  8. Evaluation of the short-term sea cliff retreat along the Tróia-Sines Embayed Coast (Costa da Galé sector), using stereo digital aerial images and Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, C.; Jalobeanu, A.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring the sediment budget of coastal systems is essential to understand the costal equilibrium, and is an important aspect to be considered in coastal management. Thus, the identification and the quantitative evaluation of sedimentary sources and sinks are the first steps towards a better understanding of the dynamics of coastal morphology. The Tróia-Sines Embayed Coast (TSEC) in the southwest Portuguese coast corresponds to a continuous sandy beach that extends for approximately 65 km. It is limited at north by the Sado river estuary and at south by the Sines cape. Beaches are discontinuously limited landward by dunes (≈42 km) and by sea cliffs (≈18 km) made of poorly consolidated Plio-Plistocene detrital deposits. Cliff erosion by subaerial processes or gullying is a continuous phenomenon that contributes a significant amount of sediment to the TSEC coastal system, which is what we want to measure. Mainly due to winter rainfall, sea cliffs develop debris fans at the backshore inner limit, therefore we chose to make morphological measurements at one year interval. Thus, two series digital aerial images at 20 cm resolution were acquired in Oct 2008 and July 2009, supported by a collection of ground control points (GCP) to constrain the sensor orientation. Digital aerial stereo image pairs are used as main data source to reconstruct digital surface models (DSM). A new stereo photogrammetric method is used, based on dense disparity maps and Bayesian inference (Jalobeanu et al, 2010 and Jalobeanu, 2011). The originality of this method is in the computation of the spatial distribution of elevation errors in the DSM using stochastic modelling and probabilistic inference, which helps to detect the statistically significant changes in the estimated topography. The difference between the two generated DSMs is used to characterize the variability of the main subaerial beach morphodynamics parameters, such as: i) the alongshore beach configuration; ii) the beach

  9. Onboard utilization of ground control points for image correction. Volume 2: Analysis and simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An approach to remote sensing that meets future mission requirements was investigated. The deterministic acquisition of data and the rapid correction of data for radiometric effects and image distortions are the most critical limitations of remote sensing. The following topics are discussed: onboard image correction systems, GCP navigation system simulation, GCP analysis, and image correction analysis measurement.

  10. Automatic Sea Bird Detection from High Resolution Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, S.; Grenzdörffer, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    Great efforts are presently taken in the scientific community to develop computerized and (fully) automated image processing methods allowing for an efficient and automatic monitoring of sea birds and marine mammals in ever-growing amounts of aerial imagery. Currently the major part of the processing, however, is still conducted by especially trained professionals, visually examining the images and detecting and classifying the requested subjects. This is a very tedious task, particularly when the rate of void images regularly exceeds the mark of 90%. In the content of this contribution we will present our work aiming to support the processing of aerial images by modern methods from the field of image processing. We will especially focus on the combination of local, region-based feature detection and piecewise global image segmentation for automatic detection of different sea bird species. Large image dimensions resulting from the use of medium and large-format digital cameras in aerial surveys inhibit the applicability of image processing methods based on global operations. In order to efficiently handle those image sizes and to nevertheless take advantage of globally operating segmentation algorithms, we will describe the combined usage of a simple performant feature detector based on local operations on the original image with a complex global segmentation algorithm operating on extracted sub-images. The resulting exact segmentation of possible candidates then serves as a basis for the determination of feature vectors for subsequent elimination of false candidates and for classification tasks.

  11. Monte-Carlo simulation of a slot-scanning X-ray imaging system.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Mayuresh; Dendere, Ronald; Nicolls, Fred; Steiner, Stef; Douglas, Tania S

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for simulating slot-scanning X-ray imaging using the general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation package PENELOPE and penEasy Imaging. Different phantoms can be defined with the PENGEOM package, which defines bodies as combinations of volumes limited by quadric surfaces. The source-detector geometry, the position of the object, the collimator, the X-ray tube properties, the detector material and the pixel dimensions are defined. The output of the time-delay integration detector is simulated using sequential slot outputs derived from penEasy Imaging. The simulations are validated using tungsten and aluminium test objects, which are both simulated and imaged. The simulations are compared to the X-ray images using standard image quality metrics. The MTF, NPS and DQE curves show that the real and simulated X-ray images are comparable in terms of spatial resolution, noise and frequency information. The implementation can be modified to suit alterations in the system being simulated. PMID:26725256

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of PET and SPECT imaging of {sup 90}Y

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihiko Sasaki, Masayuki; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuo; Komiya, Isao; Baba, Shingo

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Yittrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) is traditionally thought of as a pure beta emitter, and is used in targeted radionuclide therapy, with imaging performed using bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, because {sup 90}Y also emits positrons through internal pair production with a very small branching ratio, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is also available. Because of the insufficient image quality of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT, PET imaging has been suggested as an alternative. In this paper, the authors present the Monte Carlo-based simulation–reconstruction framework for {sup 90}Y to comprehensively analyze the PET and SPECT imaging techniques and to quantitatively consider the disadvantages associated with them. Methods: Our PET and SPECT simulation modules were developed using Monte Carlo simulation of Electrons and Photons (MCEP), developed by Dr. S. Uehara. PET code (MCEP-PET) generates a sinogram, and reconstructs the tomography image using a time-of-flight ordered subset expectation maximization (TOF-OSEM) algorithm with attenuation compensation. To evaluate MCEP-PET, simulated results of {sup 18}F PET imaging were compared with the experimental results. The results confirmed that MCEP-PET can simulate the experimental results very well. The SPECT code (MCEP-SPECT) models the collimator and NaI detector system, and generates the projection images and projection data. To save the computational time, the authors adopt the prerecorded {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photon data calculated by MCEP. The projection data are also reconstructed using the OSEM algorithm. The authors simulated PET and SPECT images of a water phantom containing six hot spheres filled with different concentrations of {sup 90}Y without background activity. The amount of activity was 163 MBq, with an acquisition time of 40 min. Results: The simulated {sup 90}Y-PET image accurately simulated the experimental results. PET image is visually

  13. Aerial thermography in archaeological prospection: Applications & processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Autumn Chrysantha

    Aerial thermography is one of the least utilized archaeological prospection methods, yet it has great potential for detecting anthropogenic anomalies. Thermal infrared radiation is absorbed and reemitted at varying rates by all objects on and within the ground depending upon their density, composition, and moisture content. If an area containing archaeological features is recorded at the moment when their thermal signatures most strongly contrast with that of the surrounding matrix, they can be visually identified in thermal images. Research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s established a few basic rules for conducting thermal survey, but the expense associated with the method deterred most archaeologists from using this technology. Subsequent research was infrequent and almost exclusively appeared in the form of case studies. However, as the current proliferation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and compact thermal cameras draws renewed attention to aerial thermography as an attractive and exciting form of survey, it is appropriate and necessary to reevaluate our approach. In this thesis I have taken a two-pronged approach. First, I built upon the groundwork of earlier researchers and created an experiment to explore the impact that different environmental and climatic conditions have on the success or failure of thermal imaging. I constructed a test site designed to mimic a range of archaeological features and imaged it under a variety of conditions to compare and contrast the results. Second, I explored a new method for processing thermal data that I hope will lead to a means of reducing noise and increasing the clarity of thermal images. This step was done as part of a case study so that the effectiveness of the processing method could be evaluated by comparison with the results of other geophysical surveys.

  14. Validation of a Low Dose Simulation Technique for Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Muenzel, Daniela; Koehler, Thomas; Brown, Kevin; Žabić, Stanislav; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Waldt, Simone; Bendik, Edgar; Zahel, Tina; Schneider, Armin; Dobritz, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Noël, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Evaluation of a new software tool for generation of simulated low-dose computed tomography (CT) images from an original higher dose scan. Materials and Methods Original CT scan data (100 mAs, 80 mAs, 60 mAs, 40 mAs, 20 mAs, 10 mAs; 100 kV) of a swine were acquired (approved by the regional governmental commission for animal protection). Simulations of CT acquisition with a lower dose (simulated 10–80 mAs) were calculated using a low-dose simulation algorithm. The simulations were compared to the originals of the same dose level with regard to density values and image noise. Four radiologists assessed the realistic visual appearance of the simulated images. Results Image characteristics of simulated low dose scans were similar to the originals. Mean overall discrepancy of image noise and CT values was −1.2% (range −9% to 3.2%) and −0.2% (range −8.2% to 3.2%), respectively, p>0.05. Confidence intervals of discrepancies ranged between 0.9–10.2 HU (noise) and 1.9–13.4 HU (CT values), without significant differences (p>0.05). Subjective observer evaluation of image appearance showed no visually detectable difference. Conclusion Simulated low dose images showed excellent agreement with the originals concerning image noise, CT density values, and subjective assessment of the visual appearance of the simulated images. An authentic low-dose simulation opens up opportunity with regard to staff education, protocol optimization and introduction of new techniques. PMID:25247422

  15. Application of Adaptive Autopilot Designs for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Yoonghyun; Calise, Anthony J.; Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the application of two adaptive approaches to autopilot design, and presents an evaluation and comparison of the two approaches in simulation for an unmanned aerial vehicle. One approach employs two-stage dynamic inversion and the other employs feedback dynamic inversions based on a command augmentation system. Both are augmented with neural network based adaptive elements. The approaches permit adaptation to both parametric uncertainty and unmodeled dynamics, and incorporate a method that permits adaptation during periods of control saturation. Simulation results for an FQM-117B radio controlled miniature aerial vehicle are presented to illustrate the performance of the neural network based adaptation.

  16. 1:500 Scale Aerial Triangulation Test with Unmanned Airship in Hubei Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feifei, Xie; Zongjian, Lin; Dezhu, Gui

    2014-03-01

    A new UAVS (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System) for low altitude aerial photogrammetry is introduced for fine surveying and mapping, including the platform airship, sensor system four-combined wide-angle camera and photogrammetry software MAP-AT. It is demonstrated that this low-altitude aerial photogrammetric system meets the precision requirements of 1:500 scale aerial triangulation based on the test of this system in Hubei province, including the working condition of the airship, the quality of image data and the data processing report. This work provides a possibility for fine surveying and mapping.

  17. Sources of Image Degradation in Fundamental and Harmonic Ultrasound Imaging: A Nonlinear, Full-Wave, Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-and-sum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSF) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is due to reverberation from near-field structures. Compared to fundamental imaging, reverberation clutter in harmonic imaging is 27.1 dB lower. Simulated tissue with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for fundamental imaging, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. PMID:21507753

  18. Erratum: Sources of Image Degradation in Fundamental and Harmonic Ultrasound Imaging: A Nonlinear, Full-Wave, Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain. This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-and-sum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSFs) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is due to reverberation from near-field structures. Compared with fundamental imaging, reverberation clutter in harmonic imaging is 27.1 dB lower. Simulated tissue with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for harmonic imaging, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. PMID:21693410

  19. AERIAL MEASURING SYSTEM IN JAPAN

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Craig; Colton, David

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency’s Aerial Measuring System deployed personnel and equipment to partner with the U.S. Air Force in Japan to conduct multiple aerial radiological surveys. These were the first and most comprehensive sources of actionable information for U.S. interests in Japan and provided early confirmation to the government of Japan as to the extent of the release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Generation Station. Many challenges were overcome quickly during the first 48 hours; including installation and operation of Aerial Measuring System equipment on multiple U.S. Air Force Japan aircraft, flying over difficult terrain, and flying with talented pilots who were unfamiliar with the Aerial Measuring System flight patterns. These all combined to make for a dynamic and non-textbook situation. In addition, the data challenges of the multiple and on-going releases, and integration with the Japanese government to provide valid aerial radiological survey products that both military and civilian customers could use to make informed decisions, was extremely complicated. The Aerial Measuring System Fukushima response provided insight in addressing these challenges and gave way to an opportunity for the expansion of the Aerial Measuring System’s mission beyond the borders of the US.

  20. The use of a virtual printer model for the simulation of imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultgren, Bror

    2006-01-01

    In a companion paper we discuss the impact of statistical variability on perceived image quality. Early in a development program, systems may not be capable of rendering images suitable for quality testing. This does not diminish the program need to estimate the perceived quality of the imaging system. During the development of imaging systems, simulations are extremely effective for demonstrating the visual impact of design choices, allowing both the development process to prioritize these choices and management to understand the risks and benefits of such choices. Where the simulation mirrors the mechanisms of image formation, it not only improves the simulation but also informs the understanding of the image formation process. Clearly the simulation process requires display or printing devices whose quality does not limit the simulation. We will present a generalized methodology. When used with common profile making and color management tools, it will provide simulations of both source and destination devices. The device to be simulated is modeled by its response to a fixed set of input stimuli. In the case of a digital still camera (DSC), these are the reflection spectra of a fixed set of color patches -e.g. the MacBeth DCC, and in the case of a printer, the set of image RGBs. We will demonstrate this methodology with examples of various print media systems.

  1. CFD simulations of a deforming human lung using dynamic and static CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyawaki, Shinjiro; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2015-11-01

    The authors have developed a CFD model to simulate airflow in deforming lungs using dynamic (4D) CT images. After obtaining the surface mesh for one CT image, we deformed the surface mesh to match other CT images using an image registration technique. During the CFD simulations, we deformed the surface mesh by cubic interpolation as a function of lung volume, and deformed the volume mesh using a computational solid mechanics-based algorithm. To investigate the effect of CT scanning method and relative hysteresis with respect to lung volume on pressure drop along the central airways, we performed CFD simulations using different numbers of 4D and static CT images of one healthy subject. Based on the simulation with 13 4DCT images, we found that air flow fractions in airways remain nearly constant over time. By comparing the simulations with 13, 2, and 1 4DCT images, we found that the overall effect of relative hysteresis of lung structure on pressure drop along each branch at peak inspiration was 12%, and the effect of deformation was 16%. As a result of the comparison between simulations with 2 and 1 of 4D and static CT images, the effect of CT scanning method was 16-39%, depending on the deformation of the lung. NIH grants R01-HL094315, U01-HL114494, R01-HL112986, and S10-RR022421. Computer time provided by XSEDE.

  2. The Large Binocular Camera image simulator: predicting the performances of LBC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazian, Andrea; Fontana, Adriano; De Santis, Cristian; Gallozzi, Stefano; Giallongo, Emanuele

    2004-09-01

    The LBC (Large Binocular Camera) Image Simulator is a package for generating artificial images in the typical FITS format. It operates on real or artificial images, simulating the expected performances of real instruments including several observing conditions (filters, air-mass, flat-field, exposure time) and creating images with the LBC instrumental artifacts (optical deformations, noise, CCD architectures). This simulator can be used also to produce artificial images for other existing and future telescopes, since it is very flexible on its structure. The main aim of LBCSIM is to support the development of pipeline and data analysis procedure able to cope with wide field imaging and fast reduction of huge amount of photometric data. The software consists of three stand alone programs written in C language, using IRAF and running under Linux OS. The LBC Image Simulator is built with particular attention to the Virtual Observatory and Data Grid applications. In this paper, we first describe the software, the performances and several tests carried out before the public release and some examples for the users. In particular, we compared the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS) as seen by FORS1 with a simulated image and found that the agreement is good. Then, we use this software to predict the expected performances of the LBC instrument by means of realistic simulations of deep field observations with the LBT telescope.

  3. Building the Case for SNAP: Creation of Multi-Band, Simulated Images With Shapelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferry, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    Dark energy has simultaneously been the most elusive and most important phenomenon in the shaping of the universe. A case for a proposed space-telescope called SNAP (SuperNova Acceleration Probe) is being built, a crucial component of which is image simulations. One method for this is "Shapelets," developed at Caltech. Shapelets form an orthonormal basis and are uniquely able to represent realistic space images and create new images based on real ones. Previously, simulations were created using the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) as a basis Set in one band. In this project, image simulations are created.using the 4 bands of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UDF) as a basis set. This provides a better basis for simulations because (1) the survey is deeper, (2) they have a higher resolution, and (3) this is a step closer to simulating the 9 bands of SNAP. Image simulations are achieved by detecting sources in the UDF, decomposing them into shapelets, tweaking their parameters in realistic ways, and recomposing them into new images. Morphological tests were also run to verify the realism of the simulations. They have a wide variety of uses, including the ability to create weak gravitational lensing simulations.

  4. Optimizing selection of controllable variables to minimize downwind drift from aerially applied sprays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drift of aerially applied crop protection and production materials is studied using a novel simulation-based approach. This new approach first studies many factors that can potentially contribute to downwind deposition from aerial spray application to narrow down the major contributing factors. An o...

  5. Aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal infrared scanning from an aircraft is a convenient and commercially available means for determining relative rates of energy loss from building roofs. The need to conserve energy as fuel costs makes the mass survey capability of aerial thermography an attractive adjunct to community energy awareness programs. Background information on principles of aerial thermography is presented. Thermal infrared scanning systems, flight and environmental requirements for data acquisition, preparation of thermographs for display, major users and suppliers of thermography, and suggested specifications for obtaining aerial scanning services were reviewed.

  6. Observation of a Large Landslide on La Reunion Island Using Differential Sar Interferometry (JERS and Radarsat) and Correlation of Optical (Spot5 and Aerial) Images.

    PubMed

    Delacourt, Christophe; Raucoules, Daniel; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Carnec, Claudie; Feurer, Denis; Allemand, Pascal; Cruchet, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Slope instabilities are one of the most important geo-hazards in terms of socio-economic costs. The island of La Réunion (Indian Ocean) is affected by constant slope movements and huge landslides due to a combination of rough topography, wet tropical climate and its specific geological context. We show that remote sensing techniques (Differential SAR Interferometry and correlation of optical images) provide complementary means to characterize landslides on a regional scale. The vegetation cover generally hampers the analysis of C-band interferograms. We used JERS-1 images to show that the L-band can be used to overcome the loss of coherence observed in Radarsat C-band interferograms. Image correlation was applied to optical airborne and SPOT 5 sensors images. The two techniques were applied to a landslide near the town of Hellbourg in order to assess their performance for detecting and quantifying the ground motion associated to this landslide. They allowed the mapping of the unstable areas. Ground displacement of about 0.5 m yr(-1) was measured. PMID:22389620

  7. Observation of a Large Landslide on La Reunion Island Using Differential Sar Interferometry (JERS and Radarsat) and Correlation of Optical (Spot5 and Aerial) Images

    PubMed Central

    Delacourt, Christophe; Raucoules, Daniel; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Carnec, Claudie; Feurer, Denis; Allemand, Pascal; Cruchet, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Slope instabilities are one of the most important geo-hazards in terms of socio-economic costs. The island of La Réunion (Indian Ocean) is affected by constant slope movements and huge landslides due to a combination of rough topography, wet tropical climate and its specific geological context. We show that remote sensing techniques (Differential SAR Interferometry and correlation of optical images) provide complementary means to characterize landslides on a regional scale. The vegetation cover generally hampers the analysis of C–band interferograms. We used JERS-1 images to show that the L-band can be used to overcome the loss of coherence observed in Radarsat C-band interferograms. Image correlation was applied to optical airborne and SPOT 5 sensors images. The two techniques were applied to a landslide near the town of Hellbourg in order to assess their performance for detecting and quantifying the ground motion associated to this landslide. They allowed the mapping of the unstable areas. Ground displacement of about 0.5 m yr-1 was measured. PMID:22389620

  8. SAR image simulation in the time domain for moving ocean surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takero; Rheem, Chang-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a fundamental simulation method to generate synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images for moving ocean surfaces. We have designed the simulation based on motion induced modulations and Bragg scattering, which are important features of ocean SAR images. The time domain simulation is able to obtain time series of microwave backscattering modulated by the orbital motions of ocean waves. Physical optics approximation is applied to calculate microwave backscattering. The computational grids are smaller than transmit microwave to demonstrate accurate interaction between electromagnetic waves and ocean surface waves. In this paper, as foundations for SAR image simulation of moving ocean surfaces, the simulation is carried out for some targets and ocean waves. The SAR images of stationary and moving targets are simulated to confirm SAR signal processing and motion induced modulation. Furthermore, the azimuth signals from the regular wave traveling to the azimuth direction also show the azimuthal shifts due to the orbital motions. In addition, incident angle dependence is simulated for irregular wind waves to compare with Bragg scattering theory. The simulation results are in good agreement with the theory. These results show that the simulation is applicable for generating numerical SAR images of moving ocean surfaces. PMID:23549367

  9. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation by use of computer-generated images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Tadao; Ohashi, Katsuumi; Mitani, Akihiro

    1999-07-01

    In recent years computer performance has been improving so rapidly that hardware-in-the-loop simulation by using computer generated images (CGI-HWIL simulation) has come to play the great role in developing and evaluating many kinds of imaging missile systems. Generally speaking, there are two principle methods in CGI-HWIL simulation. One is a method using scene projector for in-band seeker under test, and the other is a method injecting image directly into missile signal processing unit beyond seeker sensor.

  10. JSC Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS) visual system payload bay video image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This video image is of the STS-2 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, payload bay (PLB) showing the Office of Space Terrestrial Applications 1 (OSTA-1) pallet (Shuttle Imaging Radar A (SIR-A) antenna (left) and SIR-A recorder, Shuttle Multispectral Infrared Radiometer (SMIRR), Feature Identification Location Experiment (FILE), Measurement of Air Pollution for Satellites (MAPS) (right)). The image is used in JSC's Fixed Based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). It is projected inside the FB-SMS crew compartment during mission simulation training. The FB-SMS is located in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  11. A model for simulation and processing of radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiles, J. A.; Frost, V. S.; Shanmugam, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    A model for recording, processing, presentation, and analysis of radar images in digital form is presented. The observed image is represented as having two random components, one which models the variation due to the coherent addition of electromagnetic energy scattered from different objects in the illuminated areas. This component is referred to as fading. The other component is a representation of the terrain variation which can be described as the actual signal which the radar is attempting to measure. The combination of these two components provides a description of radar images as being the output of a linear space-variant filter operating on the product of the fading and terrain random processes. In addition, the model is applied to a digital image processing problem using the design and implementation of enhancement scene. Finally, parallel approaches are being employed as possible means of solving other processing problems such as SAR image map-matching, data compression, and pattern recognition.

  12. Uniform illumination and rigorous electromagnetic simulations applied to CMOS image sensors.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Jérôme; Crocherie, Axel; Hirigoyen, Flavien; Cadien, Adam; Pond, James

    2007-04-30

    This paper describes a new methodology we have developed for the optical simulation of CMOS image sensors. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) software is used to simulate light propagation and diffraction effects throughout the stack of dielectrics layers. With the use of an incoherent summation of plane wave sources and Bloch Periodic Boundary Conditions, this new methodology allows not only the rigorous simulation of a diffuse-like source which reproduces real conditions, but also an important gain of simulation efficiency for 2D or 3D electromagnetic simulations. This paper presents a theoretical demonstration of the methodology as well as simulation results with FDTD software from Lumerical Solutions. PMID:19532805

  13. 3D multiple-point statistics simulation using 2D training images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comunian, A.; Renard, P.; Straubhaar, J.

    2012-03-01

    One of the main issues in the application of multiple-point statistics (MPS) to the simulation of three-dimensional (3D) blocks is the lack of a suitable 3D training image. In this work, we compare three methods of overcoming this issue using information coming from bidimensional (2D) training images. One approach is based on the aggregation of probabilities. The other approaches are novel. One relies on merging the lists obtained using the impala algorithm from diverse 2D training images, creating a list of compatible data events that is then used for the MPS simulation. The other (s2Dcd) is based on sequential simulations of 2D slices constrained by the conditioning data computed at the previous simulation steps. These three methods are tested on the reproduction of two 3D images that are used as references, and on a real case study where two training images of sedimentary structures are considered. The tests show that it is possible to obtain 3D MPS simulations with at least two 2D training images. The simulations obtained, in particular those obtained with the s2Dcd method, are close to the references, according to a number of comparison criteria. The CPU time required to simulate with the method s2Dcd is from two to four orders of magnitude smaller than the one required by a MPS simulation performed using a 3D training image, while the results obtained are comparable. This computational efficiency and the possibility of using MPS for 3D simulation without the need for a 3D training image facilitates the inclusion of MPS in Monte Carlo, uncertainty evaluation, and stochastic inverse problems frameworks.

  14. Study of the Effects of Target Geometry on Synthetic Aperture Radar Images using Simulation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tummala, K.; Jha, A. K.; Kumar, S.

    2014-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar technology has revolutionized earth observation with very high resolutions of below 5m, making it possible to distinguish individual urban features like buildings and even cars on the surface of the earth. But, the difficulty in interpretation of these images has hindered their use. The geometry of target objects and their orientation with respect to the SAR sensor contribute enormously to unexpected signatures on SAR images. Geometry of objects can cause single, double or multiple reflections which, in turn, affect the brightness value on the SAR images. Occlusions, shadow and layover effects are present in the SAR images as a result of orientation of target objects with respect to the incident microwaves. Simulation of SAR images is the best and easiest way to study and understand the anomalies. This paper discusses synthetic aperture radar image simulation, with the study of effect of target geometry as the main aim. Simulation algorithm has been developed in the time domain to provide greater modularity and to increase the ease of implementation. This algorithm takes into account the sensor and target characteristics, their locations with respect to the earth, 3-dimensional model of the target, sensor velocity, and SAR parameters. two methods have been discussed to obtain position and velocity vectors of SAR sensor - the first, from the metadata of real SAR image used to verify the simulation algorithm, and the second, from satellite orbital parameters. Using these inputs, the SAR image coordinates and backscatter coefficients for each point on the target are calculated. The backscatter coefficients at target points are calculated based on the local incidence angles using Muhleman's backscatter model. The present algorithm has been successfully implemented on radarsat-2 image of San Francisco bay area. Digital elevation models (DEMs) of the area under consideration are used as the 3d models of the target area. DEMs of different

  15. Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) for breast tumor imaging: numerical modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lian; Li, Xu; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2011-04-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) was recently introduced as a noninvasive electrical conductivity imaging approach with high spatial resolution close to ultrasound imaging. In this study, we test the feasibility of the MAT-MI method for breast tumor imaging using numerical modeling and computer simulation. Using the finite element method, we have built three-dimensional numerical breast models with varieties of embedded tumors for this simulation study. In order to obtain an accurate and stable forward solution that does not have numerical errors caused by singular MAT-MI acoustic sources at conductivity boundaries, we first derive an integral forward method for calculating MAT-MI acoustic sources over the entire imaging volume. An inverse algorithm for reconstructing the MAT-MI acoustic source is also derived with spherical measurement aperture, which simulates a practical setup for breast imaging. With the numerical breast models, we have conducted computer simulations under different imaging parameter setups and all the results suggest that breast tumors that have large conductivity in contrast to the surrounding tissue as reported in the literature may be readily detected in the reconstructed MAT-MI images. In addition, our simulations also suggest that the sensitivity of imaging breast tumors using the presented MAT-MI setup depends more on the tumor location and the conductivity contrast between the tumor and its surrounding tissue than on the tumor size.

  16. Research on the intelligent control simulation target with IR imaging target for hardware-in-the-loop simulation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Key-an; Gu, Ye; An, Yan; Meng, Xiang-kai; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Ya-lin; Zhan, Juntong; Song, Yan-song; Dong, Yan; Tong, Shou-feng

    2014-11-01

    The intelligent control of simulation target with infrared imaging target in the indoor and outdoor environment can effectively and quantitatively evaluated the parameters such as the minimum resolution temperature difference (MRTD) and spatial resolution of airborne forward looking infrared, infrared detection and tracking, infrared alarm, and etc. This paper focused on introducing the working principles of the intelligent control simulation target of Infrared imaging target, studying the thermal radiation characteristics of the infrared target surface material, analyzing the influences of the infrared radiation energy distribution, and developing the intelligent control simulation target with IR imaging target for hardware-in-the-loop simulation test. The intelligent control simulation target which area was 5 m2 and concluded 44 infrared targets including two kinds of infrared targets ,0.25m×0.25m;, and 0.25m×0.5m, achieved 1°~10° temperature simulation of target and the background, and temperature control precision better than 0.5°. Field test requirements were achieved by actual test.

  17. Aeolic vibration of aerial electricity transmission cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, A.; Rodriguez-Vera, Ramon; Rayas, Juan A.; Barrientos, Bernardino

    2005-02-01

    A feasibility study for amplitude and frequency vibration measurement in aerial electricity transmission cable has been made. This study was carried out incorporating a fringe projection method for the experimental part and horizontal taut string model for theoretical one. However, this kind of model ignores some inherent properties such as cable sag and cable inclination. Then, this work reports advances on aeolic vibration considering real cables. Catenary and sag are considered in our theoretical model in such a way that an optical theodolite for measuring has been used. Preliminary measurements of the catenary as well as numerical simulation of a sagged cable vibration are given.

  18. Simulated 3D ultrasound LV cardiac images for active shape model training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butakoff, Constantine; Balocco, Simone; Ordas, Sebastian; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper a study of 3D ultrasound cardiac segmentation using Active Shape Models (ASM) is presented. The proposed approach is based on a combination of a point distribution model constructed from a multitude of high resolution MRI scans and the appearance model obtained from simulated 3D ultrasound images. Usually the appearance model is learnt from a set of landmarked images. The significant level of noise, the low resolution of 3D ultrasound images (3D US) and the frequent failure to capture the complete wall of the left ventricle (LV) makes automatic or manual landmarking difficult. One possible solution is to use artificially simulated 3D US images since the generated images will match exactly the shape in question. In this way, by varying simulation parameters and generating corresponding images, it is possible to obtain a training set where the image matches the shape exactly. In this work the simulation of ultrasound images is performed by a convolutional approach. The evaluation of segmentation accuracy is performed on both simulated and in vivo images. The results obtained on 567 simulated images had an average error of 1.9 mm (1.73 +/- 0.05 mm for epicardium and 2 +/- 0.07 mm for endocardium, with 95% confidence) with voxel size being 1.1 × 1.1 × 0.7 mm. The error on 20 in vivo data was 3.5 mm (3.44 +/- 0.4 mm for epicardium and 3.73 +/- 0.4 mm for endocardium). In most images the model was able to approximate the borders of myocardium even when the latter was indistinguishable from the surrounding tissues.

  19. Efficient scatter model for simulation of ultrasound images from computed tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amato, J. P.; Lo Vercio, L.; Rubi, P.; Fernandez Vera, E.; Barbuzza, R.; Del Fresno, M.; Larrabide, I.

    2015-12-01

    Background and motivation: Real-time ultrasound simulation refers to the process of computationally creating fully synthetic ultrasound images instantly. Due to the high value of specialized low cost training for healthcare professionals, there is a growing interest in the use of this technology and the development of high fidelity systems that simulate the acquisitions of echographic images. The objective is to create an efficient and reproducible simulator that can run either on notebooks or desktops using low cost devices. Materials and methods: We present an interactive ultrasound simulator based on CT data. This simulator is based on ray-casting and provides real-time interaction capabilities. The simulation of scattering that is coherent with the transducer position in real time is also introduced. Such noise is produced using a simplified model of multiplicative noise and convolution with point spread functions (PSF) tailored for this purpose. Results: The computational efficiency of scattering maps generation was revised with an improved performance. This allowed a more efficient simulation of coherent scattering in the synthetic echographic images while providing highly realistic result. We describe some quality and performance metrics to validate these results, where a performance of up to 55fps was achieved. Conclusion: The proposed technique for real-time scattering modeling provides realistic yet computationally efficient scatter distributions. The error between the original image and the simulated scattering image was compared for the proposed method and the state-of-the-art, showing negligible differences in its distribution.

  20. Generalized image charge solvation model for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shaozhong; Xue, Changfeng; Baumketner, Andriy; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2013-07-01

    This paper extends the image charge solvation model (ICSM) [Y. Lin, A. Baumketner, S. Deng, Z. Xu, D. Jacobs, W. Cai, An image-based reaction field method for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 154103], a hybrid explicit/implicit method to treat electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of biomolecules formulated for spherical cavities, to prolate spheroidal and triaxial ellipsoidal cavities, designed to better accommodate non-spherical solutes in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In addition to the utilization of a general truncated octahedron as the MD simulation box, central to the proposed extension is an image approximation method to compute the reaction field for a point charge placed inside such a non-spherical cavity by using a single image charge located outside the cavity. The resulting generalized image charge solvation model (GICSM) is tested in simulations of liquid water, and the results are analyzed in comparison with those obtained from the ICSM simulations as a reference. We find that, for improved computational efficiency due to smaller simulation cells and consequently a less number of explicit solvent molecules, the generalized model can still faithfully reproduce known static and dynamic properties of liquid water at least for systems considered in the present paper, indicating its great potential to become an accurate but more efficient alternative to the ICSM when bio-macromolecules of irregular shapes are to be simulated.

  1. Striping noise mitigation: performance evaluation on real and simulated hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastri, Cinzia; Guzzi, Donatella; Barducci, Alessandro; Pippi, Ivan; Nardino, Vanni; Raimondi, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    Striping noise is a phenomenon intrinsic to the process of image acquisition by means of scanning or pushbroom systems, caused by a poor radiometric calibration of the sensor. Although in-flight calibration has been performed, residual spatially and spectrally coherent noise may perturb the quantitative analysis of images and the extraction of physical parameters. Destriping methods can be classified in three main groups: statistical-based methods, digital-filtering methods and radiometric-equalisation methods. Their performances depend both on the scene under investigation and on the type and intensity of noise to be treated. Availability of simulated data at each step of the digital image formation process, including that one before the introduction of the striping effect, is particularly useful since it offers the opportunity to test and adjust a variety of image processing and calibration algorithms. This paper presents the performance of a statistical-based destriping method applied to a set of simulated and to images acquired by the EO-1 Hyperion hyperspectral sensor. The set of simulated data with different intensities of coherent and random noise was generated using an image simulator implemented for the PRISMA mission. Algorithm's performance was tested by evaluating most commonly used quality indexes. For the same purpose, a statistical evaluation based on image correlation and image differences between the corrected and ideal images was carried out. Results of the statistical analysis were compared with the outcome of the quality indexes-based analysis.

  2. First-Principles Atomic Force Microscopy Image Simulations with Density Embedding Theory.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuki; Lee, Alex J; Chelikowsky, James R

    2016-05-11

    We present an efficient first-principles method for simulating noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) images using a "frozen density" embedding theory. Frozen density embedding theory enables one to efficiently compute the tip-sample interaction by considering a sample as a frozen external field. This method reduces the extensive computational load of first-principles AFM simulations by avoiding consideration of the entire tip-sample system and focusing on the tip alone. We demonstrate that our simulation with frozen density embedding theory accurately reproduces full density functional theory simulations of freestanding hydrocarbon molecules while the computational time is significantly reduced. Our method also captures the electronic effect of a Cu(111) substrate on the AFM image of pentacene and reproduces the experimental AFM image of Cu2N on a Cu(100) surface. This approach is applicable for theoretical imaging applications on large molecules, two-dimensional materials, and materials surfaces. PMID:27050710

  3. Simulation of agronomic images for an automatic evaluation of crop/ weed discrimination algorithm accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G.; Gée, Ch.; Truchetet, F.

    2007-01-01

    In the context of precision agriculture, we present a robust and automatic method based on simulated images for evaluating the efficiency of any crop/weed discrimination algorithms for a inter-row weed infestation rate. To simulate these images two different steps are required: 1) modeling of a crop field from the spatial distribution of plants (crop and weed) 2) projection of the created field through an optical system to simulate photographing. Then an application is proposed investigating the accuracy and robustness of crop/weed discrimination algorithm combining a line detection (Hough transform) and a plant discrimination (crop and weeds). The accuracy of weed infestation rate estimate for each image is calculated by direct comparison to the initial weed infestation rate of the simulated images. It reveals an performance better than 85%.

  4. Use of archive aerial photography for monitoring black mangrove populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted on the south Texas Gulf Coast to evaluate archive aerial color-infrared (CIR) photography combined with supervised image analysis techniques to quantify changes in black mangrove [Avicennia germinans (L.) L.] populations over a 26-year period. Archive CIR film from two study si...

  5. High throughput phenotyping using an unmanned aerial vehicle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field trials are expensive and labor-intensive to carry out. Strategies to maximize data collection from these trials will improve research efficiencies. We have purchased a small unmanned aerial vehicle (AEV) to collect digital images from field plots. The AEV is remote-controlled and can be guided...

  6. Development of an airborne remote sensing system for aerial applicators

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An airborne remote sensing system was developed and tested for recording aerial images of field crops, which were analyzed for variations of crop health or pest infestation. The multicomponent system consists of a multi-spectral camera system, a camera control system, and a radiometer for normalizi...

  7. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of human breast cancer: a Monte Carlo simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, F.; Pagliazzi, M.; Spinelli, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is a novel molecular imaging technique based on the detection of Cerenkov light produced by beta particles traveling through biological tissues. In this paper we simulated using 18F and 90Y the possibility of detecting Cerenkov luminescence in human breast tissues, in order to evaluate the potential of the CLI technique in a clinical setting. A human breast digital phantom was obtained from an 18F-FDG CT-PET scan. The spectral features of the breast surface emission were obtained as well as the simulated images obtainable by a cooled CCD detector. The simulated images revealed a signal to noise ratio equal to 6 for a 300 s of acquisition time. We concluded that a dedicated human Cerenkov imaging detector can be designed in order to offer a valid low cost alternative to diagnostic techniques in nuclear medicine, in particular allowing the detection of beta-minus emitters used in radiotherapy.

  8. Application of digital image processing for the generation of voxels phantoms for Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Boia, L S; Menezes, A F; Cardoso, M A C; da Rosa, L A R; Batista, D V S; Cardoso, S C; Silva, A X; Facure, A

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a computational methodology for optimizing the conversion of medical tomographic images in voxel anthropomorphic models for simulation of radiation transport using the MCNP code. A computational system was developed for digital image processing that compresses the information from the DICOM medical image before it is converted to the Scan2MCNP software input file for optimization of the image data. In order to validate the computational methodology, a radiosurgery treatment simulation was performed using the Alderson Rando phantom and the acquisition of DICOM images was performed. The simulation results were compared with data obtained with the BrainLab planning system. The comparison showed good agreement for three orthogonal treatment beams of (60)Co gamma radiation. The percentage differences were 3.07%, 0.77% and 6.15% for axial, coronal and sagital projections, respectively. PMID:21945017

  9. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2. Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Nair, Bindu; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Pavlovsky, Andrey

    2011-04-01

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) microwave tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three dimensional (3D) in the spatial domain plus one dimensional (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short-term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using a dedicated MWT system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging.

  10. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2) Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Nair, Bindu; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Pavlovsky, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of an already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) Microwave Tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three-dimensional (3D) in spatial domain plus one-dimension (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using dedicated microwave tomographic system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading of reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging. PMID:21364266

  11. Microwave tomography of extremities: 2. Functional fused imaging of flow reduction and simulated compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Serguei; Kellam, James; Nair, Bindu; Williams, Thomas; Quinn, Michael; Sizov, Yuri; Nazarov, Alexei; Pavlovsky, Andrey

    2011-04-01

    Medical imaging has recently expanded into the dual- or multi-modality fusion of anatomical and functional imaging modalities. This significantly improves the diagnostic power while simultaneously increasing the cost of already expensive medical devices or investigations and decreasing their mobility. We are introducing a novel imaging concept of four-dimensional (4D) microwave tomographic (MWT) functional imaging: three dimensional (3D) in the spatial domain plus one dimensional (1D) in the time, functional dynamic domain. Instead of a fusion of images obtained by different imaging modalities, 4D MWT fuses absolute anatomical images with dynamic, differential images of the same imaging technology. The approach was successively validated in animal experiments with short-term arterial flow reduction and a simulated compartment syndrome in an initial simplified experimental setting using a dedicated MWT system. The presented fused images are not perfect as MWT is a novel imaging modality at its early stage of the development and ways of reading reconstructed MWT images need to be further studied and understood. However, the reconstructed fused images present clear evidence that microwave tomography is an emerging imaging modality with great potentials for functional imaging. PMID:21364266

  12. A Poisson resampling method for simulating reduced counts in nuclear medicine images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Duncan; Lawson, Richard S.

    2015-05-01

    Nuclear medicine computers now commonly offer resolution recovery and other software techniques which have been developed to improve image quality for images with low counts. These techniques potentially mean that these images can give equivalent clinical information to a full-count image. Reducing the number of counts in nuclear medicine images has the benefits of either allowing reduced activity to be administered or reducing acquisition times. However, because acquisition and processing parameters vary, each user should ideally evaluate the use of images with reduced counts within their own department, and this is best done by simulating reduced-count images from the original data. Reducing the counts in an image by division and rounding off to the nearest integer value, even if additional Poisson noise is added, is inadequate because it gives incorrect counting statistics. This technical note describes how, by applying Poisson resampling to the original raw data, simulated reduced-count images can be obtained while maintaining appropriate counting statistics. The authors have developed manufacturer independent software that can retrospectively generate simulated data with reduced counts from any acquired nuclear medicine image.

  13. Monte Carlo package for simulating radiographic images of realistic anthropomorphic phantoms described by triangle meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Andreu; Kyprianou, Iacovos; Badano, Aldo; Sempau, Josep; Myers, Kyle J.

    2007-03-01

    X-ray imaging system optimization increases the benefit-to-cost ratio by reducing the radiation dose to the patient while maximizing image quality. We present a new simulation tool for the generation of realistic medical x-ray images for assessment and optimization of complete imaging systems. The Monte Carlo code simulates radiation transport physics using the subroutine package PENELOPE, which accurately simulates the transport of electrons and photons within the typical medical imaging energy range. The new code implements a novel object-oriented geometry package that allows simulations with homogeneous objects of arbitrary shapes described by triangle meshes. The flexibility of this code, which uses the industry standard PLY input-file format, allows the use of detailed anatomical models developed using computer-aided design tools applied to segmented CT and MRI data. The use of triangle meshes highly simplifies the ray-tracing algorithm without reducing the generality of the code, since most surface models can be tessellated into triangles while retaining their geometric details. Our algorithm incorporates an octree spatial data structure to sort the triangles and accelerate the simulation, reaching execution speeds comparable to the original quadric geometry model of PENELOPE. Coronary angiograms were simulated using a tessellated version of the NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom. The phantom models 330 objects, comprised in total of 5 million triangles. The dose received by each organ and the contribution of the different scattering processes to the final image were studied in detail.

  14. An imaging-based stochastic model for simulation of tumour vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Adhikarla, Vikram; Jeraj, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model which reconstructs the structure of existing vasculature using patient-specific anatomical, functional and molecular imaging as input was developed. The vessel structure is modelled according to empirical vascular parameters, such as the mean vessel branching angle. The model is calibrated such that the resultant oxygen map modelled from the simulated microvasculature stochastically matches the input oxygen map to a high degree of accuracy (R2 ≈ 1). The calibrated model was successfully applied to preclinical imaging data. Starting from the anatomical vasculature image (obtained from contrast-enhanced computed tomography), a representative map of the complete vasculature was stochastically simulated as determined by the oxygen map (obtained from hypoxia [64Cu]Cu-ATSM positron emission tomography). The simulated microscopic vasculature and the calculated oxygenation map successfully represent the imaged hypoxia distribution (R2 = 0.94). The model elicits the parameters required to simulate vasculature consistent with imaging and provides a key mathematical relationship relating the vessel volume to the tissue oxygen tension. Apart from providing an excellent framework for visualizing the imaging gap between the microscopic and macroscopic imagings, the model has the potential to be extended as a tool to study the dynamics between the tumour and the vasculature in a patient-specific manner and has an application in the simulation of anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:22971525

  15. The study on the image quality of varied line spacing plane grating by computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shouqiang; Zhang, Weiping; Liu, Lei; Yang, Qingyi

    2014-11-01

    Varied line spacing plane gratings have the features of self-focusing , aberration-reduced and easy manufacturing ,which are widely applied in synchrotron radiation, plasma physics and space astronomy, and other fields. In the study of diffracting imaging , the optical path function is expanded into maclaurin series, aberrations are expressed by the coefficient of series, most of the aberration coefficients are similar and the category is more, can't directly reflects image quality in whole. The paper will study on diffraction imaging of the varied line spacing plane gratings by using computer simulation technology, for a method judging the image quality visibly. In this paper, light beam from some object points on the same object plane are analyzed and simulated by ray trace method , the evaluation function is set up, which can fully scale the image quality. In addition, based on the evaluation function, the best image plane is found by search algorithm .

  16. An object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis imaging system.

    PubMed

    Seyyedi, Saeed; Cengiz, Kubra; Kamasak, Mustafa; Yildirim, Isa

    2013-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an innovative imaging modality that provides 3D reconstructed images of breast to detect the breast cancer. Projections obtained with an X-ray source moving in a limited angle interval are used to reconstruct 3D image of breast. Several reconstruction algorithms are available for DBT imaging. Filtered back projection algorithm has traditionally been used to reconstruct images from projections. Iterative reconstruction algorithms such as algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) were later developed. Recently, compressed sensing based methods have been proposed in tomosynthesis imaging problem. We have developed an object-oriented simulator for 3D digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system using C++ programming language. The simulator is capable of implementing different iterative and compressed sensing based reconstruction methods on 3D digital tomosynthesis data sets and phantom models. A user friendly graphical user interface (GUI) helps users to select and run the desired methods on the designed phantom models or real data sets. The simulator has been tested on a phantom study that simulates breast tomosynthesis imaging problem. Results obtained with various methods including algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and total variation regularized reconstruction techniques (ART+TV) are presented. Reconstruction results of the methods are compared both visually and quantitatively by evaluating performances of the methods using mean structural similarity (MSSIM) values. PMID:24371468

  17. Velocity measurements and changes in position of Thwaites Glacier/iceberg tongue from aerial photography, Landsat images and NOAA AVHRR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrigno, Jane G.; Lucchitta, Baerbel K.; Mullinsallison, A. L.; Allen, Robert J.; Gould, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The Thwaites Glacier/iceberg tongue complex has been a significant feature of the Antarctic coastline for at least 50 years. In 1986, major changes began to occur in this area. Fast ice melted and several icebergs calved from the base of the iceberg tongue and the terminus of Thwaites Glacier. The iceberg tongue rotated to an east-west orientation and drifted westward. Between 1986 and 1992, a total of 140 km of drift has occurred. Remote digital velocity measurements were made on Thwaites Glacier using sequential Landsat images to try to determine if changes in velocity had occurred in conjunction with the changes in ice position. Examination of the morphology of the glacier/iceberg tongue showed no evidence of surge activity.

  18. Validation of the Monte Carlo simulator GATE for indium-111 imaging.

    PubMed

    Assié, K; Gardin, I; Véra, P; Buvat, I

    2005-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are useful for optimizing and assessing single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) protocols, especially when aiming at measuring quantitative parameters from SPECT images. Before Monte Carlo simulated data can be trusted, the simulation model must be validated. The purpose of this work was to validate the use of GATE, a new Monte Carlo simulation platform based on GEANT4, for modelling indium-111 SPECT data, the quantification of which is of foremost importance for dosimetric studies. To that end, acquisitions of (111)In line sources in air and in water and of a cylindrical phantom were performed, together with the corresponding simulations. The simulation model included Monte Carlo modelling of the camera collimator and of a back-compartment accounting for photomultiplier tubes and associated electronics. Energy spectra, spatial resolution, sensitivity values, images and count profiles obtained for experimental and simulated data were compared. An excellent agreement was found between experimental and simulated energy spectra. For source-to-collimator distances varying from 0 to 20 cm, simulated and experimental spatial resolution differed by less than 2% in air, while the simulated sensitivity values were within 4% of the experimental values. The simulation of the cylindrical phantom closely reproduced the experimental data. These results suggest that GATE enables accurate simulation of (111)In SPECT acquisitions. PMID:15972984

  19. Computer simulation of the effects of a distributed array antenna on synthetic aperture radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The ARL:UT orbital SAR simulation has been upgraded to use three-dimensional antenna gain patterns. This report describes the modifications and presents quantitative image analyses of a simulation using antenna patterns generated from the modeling of a distributed array antenna.

  20. Applicability Evaluation of Object Detection Method to Satellite and Aerial Imageries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, K.; Fuse, T.; Takahashi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Since satellite and aerial imageries are recently widely spread and frequently observed, combination of them are expected to complement spatial and temporal resolution each other. One of the prospective applications is traffic monitoring, where objects of interest, or vehicles, need to be recognized automatically. Techniques that employ object detection before object recognition can save a computational time and cost, and thus take a significant role. However, there is not enough knowledge whether object detection method can perform well on satellite and aerial imageries. In addition, it also has to be studied how characteristics of satellite and aerial imageries affect the object detection performance. This study employ binarized normed gradients (BING) method that runs significantly fast and is robust to rotation and noise. For our experiments, 11-bits BGR-IR satellite imageries from WorldView-3, and BGR-color aerial imageries are used respectively, and we create thousands of ground truth samples. We conducted several experiments to compare the performances with different images, to verify whether combination of different resolution images improved the performance, and to analyze the applicability of mixing satellite and aerial imageries. The results showed that infrared band had little effect on the detection rate, that 11-bit images performed less than 8-bit images and that the better spatial resolution brought the better performance. Another result might imply that mixing higher and lower resolution images for training dataset could help detection performance. Furthermore, we found that aerial images improved the detection performance on satellite images.

  1. Flexible vision-based navigation system for unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik P.

    1995-01-01

    A critical component of unmanned aerial vehicles in the navigation system which provides position and velocity feedback for autonomous control. The Georgia Tech Aerial Robotics navigational system (NavSys) consists of four DVTStinger70C Integrated Vision Units (IVUs) with CCD-based panning platforms, software, and a fiducial onboard the vehicle. The IVUs independently scan for the retro-reflective bar-code fiducial while the NavSys image processing software performs a gradient threshold followed by a image search localization of three vertical bar-code lines. Using the (x,y) image coordinate and CCD angle, the NavSys triangulates the fiducial's (x,y) position, differentiates for velocity, and relays the information to the helicopter controller, which independently determines the z direction with an onboard altimeter. System flexibility is demonstrated by recognition of different fiducial shapes, night and day time operation, and is being extended to on-board and off-board navigation of aerial and ground vehicles. The navigation design provides a real-time, inexpensive, and effective system for determining the (x,y) position of the aerial vehicle with updates generated every 51 ms (19.6 Hz) at an accuracy of approximately +/- 2.8 in.

  2. The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) 2002 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Box, Richard C.; Fink, Mary; Gogos, George; Lehrer, Henry R.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Tarry, Scott E.; Vlasek, Karisa D.; O'Neil, Patrick D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium (NSGC) & EPSCoR programs at the University of Nebraska at Omaha are involved in a variety of innovative research activities. Such research is supported through the Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) and collaborative seed funds. AERIAL is a comprehensive, multi-faceted, five year NASA EPSCoR initiative that contributes substantially to the strategic research and technology priorities of NASA while intensifying Nebraska s rapidly growing aeronautics research and development endeavors. AERIAL includes three major collaborative research teams (CRTs) whose nexus is a common focus in aeronautics research. Each CRT - Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Airborne Remote Sensing for Agricultural Research and Commercialization Applications (ARS), and Numerical Simulation of the Combustion of Fuel Droplets: Finite Rate Kinetics and Flame Zone Grid Adaptation (CEFD) -has a distinct research agenda. This program provides the template for funding of new and innovative research that emphasizes aerospace technology.

  3. Fluorescence volume imaging with an axicon: simulation study based on scalar diffraction method.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juanjuan; Yang, Yanlong; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong

    2012-10-20

    In a two-photon excitation fluorescence volume imaging (TPFVI) system, an axicon is used to generate a Bessel beam and at the same time to collect the generated fluorescence to achieve large depth of field. A slice-by-slice diffraction propagation model in the frame of the angular spectrum method is proposed to simulate the whole imaging process of TPFVI. The simulation reveals that the Bessel beam can penetrate deep in scattering media due to its self-reconstruction ability. The simulation also demonstrates that TPFVI can image a volume of interest in a single raster scan. Two-photon excitation is crucial to eliminate the signals that are generated by the side lobes of Bessel beams; the unwanted signals may be further suppressed by placing a spatial filter in the front of the detector. The simulation method will guide the system design in improving the performance of a TPFVI system. PMID:23089777

  4. Simulation of high-resolution X-ray microscopic images for improved alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiangxia; Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Gang; Cheng, Xianchao; Li, Wenjie; Guan, Yong; Liu, Ying; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Yangchao

    2011-12-01

    The introduction of precision optical elements to X-ray microscopes necessitates fine realignment to achieve optimal high-resolution imaging. In this paper, we demonstrate a numerical method for simulating image formation that facilitates alignment of the source, condenser, objective lens, and CCD camera. This algorithm, based on ray-tracing and Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction theory, is applied to simulate the X-ray microscope beamline U7A of National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The simulations and imaging experiments show that the algorithm is useful for guiding experimental adjustments. Our alignment simulation method is an essential tool for the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) with optical elements and may also be useful for the alignment of optical components in other modes of microscopy.

  5. Simulation of electronic registration of multispectral remote sensing images to 0.1 pixel accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitsema, H. J.; Mord, A. J.; Fraser, D.; Richard, H. L.; Speaker, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Band-to-band coregistration of multispectral remote sensing images can be achieved by electronic signal processing techniques rather than by costly and difficult mechanical alignment. This paper describes the results of a study of the end-to-end performance of electronic registration. The software simulation includes steps which model the performance of the geometric calibration process, the instrument image quality, detector performance and the effects of achieving coregistration through image resampling. The image resampling step emulates the Pipelined Resampling Processor, a real-time image resampler. The study demonstrates that the electronic alignment technique produces multispectral images which are superior to those produced by an imager whose pixel geometry is accurate to 0.1 pixel rms. The implications of this approach for future earth observation programs are discussed.

  6. HART: An Efficient Modeling Framework for Simulated Solar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkevitch, L. V.; Oberoi, D.; Benjamin, M. D.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2012-09-01

    The Haystack & AOSS Ray Tracer (HART) is a software tool for modeling propagation of electromagnetic radiation through a realistic description of the magnetized solar corona, along with the associated radiative transfer effects. Its primary outputs are solar brightness temperature (or flux density) images corresponding to a user-specified coronal description and radio frequency. HART is based on native high-efficiency algorithms coded in the C language, and provides convenient command-line (Python) and graphical user interfaces. HART is a necessary tool for enabling the extraction of solar physics from the images that will be produced by the new generation of low radio frequency arrays like the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and Long Wavelength Array (LWA).

  7. Simulation of brain tumors in MR images for evaluation of segmentation efficacy.

    PubMed

    Prastawa, Marcel; Bullitt, Elizabeth; Gerig, Guido

    2009-04-01

    Obtaining validation data and comparison metrics for segmentation of magnetic resonance images (MRI) are difficult tasks due to the lack of reliable ground truth. This problem is even more evident for images presenting pathology, which can both alter tissue appearance through infiltration and cause geometric distortions. Systems for generating synthetic images with user-defined degradation by noise and intensity inhomogeneity offer the possibility for testing and comparison of segmentation methods. Such systems do not yet offer simulation of sufficiently realistic looking pathology. This paper presents a system that combines physical and statistical modeling to generate synthetic multi-modal 3D brain MRI with tumor and edema, along with the underlying anatomical ground truth, Main emphasis is placed on simulation of the major effects known for tumor MRI, such as contrast enhancement, local distortion of healthy tissue, infiltrating edema adjacent to tumors, destruction and deformation of fiber tracts, and multi-modal MRI contrast of healthy tissue and pathology. The new method synthesizes pathology in multi-modal MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) by simulating mass effect, warping and destruction of white matter fibers, and infiltration of brain tissues by tumor cells. We generate synthetic contrast enhanced MR images by simulating the accumulation of contrast agent within the brain. The appearance of the the brain tissue and tumor in MRI is simulated by synthesizing texture images from real MR images. The proposed method is able to generate synthetic ground truth and synthesized MR images with tumor and edema that exhibit comparable segmentation challenges to real tumor MRI. Such image data sets will find use in segmentation reliability studies, comparison and validation of different segmentation methods, training and teaching, or even in evaluating standards for tumor size like the RECIST criteria (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors). PMID:19119055

  8. A Web simulation of medical image reconstruction and processing as an educational tool.

    PubMed

    Papamichail, Dimitrios; Pantelis, Evaggelos; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2015-02-01

    Web educational resources integrating interactive simulation tools provide students with an in-depth understanding of the medical imaging process. The aim of this work was the development of a purely Web-based, open access, interactive application, as an ancillary learning tool in graduate and postgraduate medical imaging education, including a systematic evaluation of learning effectiveness. The pedagogic content of the educational Web portal was designed to cover the basic concepts of medical imaging reconstruction and processing, through the use of active learning and motivation, including learning simulations that closely resemble actual tomographic imaging systems. The user can implement image reconstruction and processing algorithms under a single user interface and manipulate various factors to understand the impact on image appearance. A questionnaire for pre- and post-training self-assessment was developed and integrated in the online application. The developed Web-based educational application introduces the trainee in the basic concepts of imaging through textual and graphical information and proceeds with a learning-by-doing approach. Trainees are encouraged to participate in a pre- and post-training questionnaire to assess their knowledge gain. An initial feedback from a group of graduate medical students showed that the developed course was considered as effective and well structured. An e-learning application on medical imaging integrating interactive simulation tools was developed and assessed in our institution. PMID:25000920

  9. BOREAS Level-0 C-130 Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Dominguez, Roseanne; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    For BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), C-130 and other aerial photography was collected to provide finely detailed and spatially extensive documentation of the condition of the primary study sites. The NASA C-130 Earth Resources aircraft can accommodate two mapping cameras during flight, each of which can be fitted with 6- or 12-inch focal-length lenses and black-and-white, natural-color, or color-IR film, depending upon requirements. Both cameras were often in operation simultaneously, although sometimes only the lower resolution camera was deployed. When both cameras were in operation, the higher resolution camera was often used in a more limited fashion. The acquired photography covers the period of April to September 1994. The aerial photography was delivered as rolls of large format (9 x 9 inch) color transparency prints, with imagery from multiple missions (hundreds of prints) often contained within a single roll. A total of 1533 frames were collected from the C-130 platform for BOREAS in 1994. Note that the level-0 C-130 transparencies are not contained on the BOREAS CD-ROM set. An inventory file is supplied on the CD-ROM to inform users of all the data that were collected. Some photographic prints were made from the transparencies. In addition, BORIS staff digitized a subset of the tranparencies and stored the images in JPEG format. The CD-ROM set contains a small subset of the collected aerial photography that were the digitally scanned and stored as JPEG files for most tower and auxiliary sites in the NSA and SSA. See Section 15 for information about how to acquire additional imagery.

  10. Precision Improvement of Photogrammetry by Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Sung, Wen-Pei; Tung, Shih-Heng; Hsiao, Hanwei

    2016-04-01

    The combination of aerial triangulation technology and unmanned aerial vehicle greatly reduces the cost and application threshold of the digital surface model technique. Based on the report in the literatures, the measurement error in the x-y coordinate and in the elevation lies between 8cm~15cm and 10cm~20cm respectively. The measurement accuracy for the geological structure survey already has sufficient value, but for the slope and structures in terms of deformation monitoring is inadequate. The main factors affecting the accuracy of the aerial triangulation are image quality, measurement accuracy of control point and image matching accuracy. In terms of image matching, the commonly used techniques are Harris Corner Detection and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). Their pairing error is in scale of pixels, usually lies between 1 to 2 pixels. This study suggests that the error on the pairing is the main factor causing the aerial triangulation errors. Therefore, this study proposes the application of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method instead of the pairing method mentioned above. DIC method can provide a pairing accuracy of less than 0.01 pixel, indeed can greatly enhance the accuracy of the aerial triangulation, to have sub-centimeter level accuracy. In this study, the effects of image pairing error on the measurement error of the 3-dimensional coordinate of the ground points are explored by numerical simulation method. It was confirmed that when the image matching error is reduced to 0.01 pixels, the ground three-dimensional coordinate measurement error can be controlled in mm level. A combination of DIC technique and the traditional aerial triangulation provides the potential of application on the deformation monitoring of slope and structures, and achieve an early warning of natural disaster.

  11. Simulation of Meteosat Third Generation-Lightning Imager through tropical rainfall measuring mission: Lightning Imaging Sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biron, Daniele; De Leonibus, Luigi; Laquale, Paolo; Labate, Demetrio; Zauli, Francesco; Melfi, Davide

    2008-08-01

    The Centro Nazionale di Meteorologia e Climatologia Aeronautica recently hosted a fellowship sponsored by Galileo Avionica, with the intent to study and perform a simulation of Meteosat Third Generation - Lightning Imager (MTG-LI) sensor behavior through Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Lightning Imaging Sensor data (TRMM-LIS). For the next generation of earth observation geostationary satellite, major operating agencies are planning to insert an optical imaging mission, that continuously observes lightning pulses in the atmosphere; EUMETSAT has decided in recent years that one of the three candidate mission to be flown on MTG is LI, a Lightning Imager. MTG-LI mission has no Meteosat Second Generation heritage, but users need to evaluate the possible real time data output of the instrument to agree in inserting it on MTG payload. Authors took the expected LI design from MTG Mission Requirement Document, and reprocess real lightning dataset, acquired from space by TRMM-LIS instrument, to produce a simulated MTG-LI lightning dataset. The simulation is performed in several run, varying Minimum Detectable Energy, taking into account processing steps from event detection to final lightning information. A definition of the specific meteorological requirements is given from the potential use in meteorology of lightning final information for convection estimation and numerical cloud modeling. Study results show the range of instrument requirements relaxation which lead to minimal reduction in the final lightning information.

  12. Dynamics of aerial target pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, S.

    2015-12-01

    During pursuit and predation, aerial species engage in multitasking behavior that involve simultaneous target detection, tracking, decision-making, approach and capture. The mobility of the pursuer and the target in a three dimensional environment during predation makes the capture task highly complex. Many researchers have studied and analyzed prey capture dynamics in different aerial species such as insects and bats. This article focuses on reviewing the capture strategies adopted by these species while relying on different sensory variables (vision and acoustics) for navigation. In conclusion, the neural basis of these capture strategies and some applications of these strategies in bio-inspired navigation and control of engineered systems are discussed.

  13. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, DL; Peterson, TE

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140-keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a −5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time. PMID:25360792

  14. Scatter correction for kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarry, G.; Graham, S. A.; Jaffray, D. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Verhaegen, F.

    2006-03-01

    In this work Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used to correct kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) projections for scatter radiation. All images were acquired using a kV CBCT bench-top system composed of an x-ray tube, a rotation stage and a flat-panel imager. The EGSnrc MC code was used to model the system. BEAMnrc was used to model the x-ray tube while a modified version of the DOSXYZnrc program was used to transport the particles through various phantoms and score phase space files with identified scattered and primary particles. An analytical program was used to read the phase space files and produce image files. The scatter correction was implemented by subtracting Monte Carlo predicted scatter distribution from measured projection images; these projection images were then reconstructed. Corrected reconstructions showed an important improvement in image quality. Several approaches to reduce the simulation time were tested. To reduce the number of simulated scatter projections, the effect of varying the projection angle on the scatter distribution was evaluated for different geometries. It was found that the scatter distribution does not vary significantly over a 30-degree interval for the geometries tested. It was also established that increasing the size of the voxels in the voxelized phantom does not affect the scatter distribution but reduces the simulation time. Different techniques to smooth the scatter distribution were also investigated.

  15. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. L.; Peterson, T. E.

    2014-11-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  16. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  17. AERIAL OF VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING & SURROUNDING AREA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    AERIAL OF VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING & SURROUNDING AREA KSC-377C-0082.41 116-KSC-377C-82.41, P-15877, ARCHIVE-04151 Aerial view - Shuttle construction progress - VAB and Orbiter Processing Facilities - direction northwest.

  18. Ground-Cover Measurements: Assessing Correlation Among Aerial and Ground-Based Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, D. Terrance; Cox, Samuel E.; Meikle, Tim; Zuuring, Hans R.

    2008-12-01

    Wyoming’s Green Mountain Common Allotment is public land providing livestock forage, wildlife habitat, and unfenced solitude, amid other ecological services. It is also the center of ongoing debate over USDI Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) adjudication of land uses. Monitoring resource use is a BLM responsibility, but conventional monitoring is inadequate for the vast areas encompassed in this and other public-land units. New monitoring methods are needed that will reduce monitoring costs. An understanding of data-set relationships among old and new methods is also needed. This study compared two conventional methods with two remote sensing methods using images captured from two meters and 100 meters above ground level from a camera stand (a ground, image-based method) and a light airplane (an aerial, image-based method). Image analysis used SamplePoint or VegMeasure software. Aerial methods allowed for increased sampling intensity at low cost relative to the time and travel required by ground methods. Costs to acquire the aerial imagery and measure ground cover on 162 aerial samples representing 9000 ha were less than 3000. The four highest correlations among data sets for bare ground—the ground-cover characteristic yielding the highest correlations (r)—ranged from 0.76 to 0.85 and included ground with ground, ground with aerial, and aerial with aerial data-set associations. We conclude that our aerial surveys are a cost-effective monitoring method, that ground with aerial data-set correlations can be equal to, or greater than those among ground-based data sets, and that bare ground should continue to be investigated and tested for use as a key indicator of rangeland health.

  19. A method of infrared imaging missile's aerodynamic heating modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chunqin; Xiang, Jingbo; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Weiqiang

    2013-09-01

    The infrared (IR) imaging missile's dome will be heated when fly at high speed in the atmosphere because of the friction of the air flow blocking. The detector's performance will be decline if the dome surface is heated to a certain temperature. In this paper, we find a right way to evaluate the aerothermal effects in the imaging and information processing algorithm. Which have three steps including the aerothermal radiation calculation, quantization and image reconstruction. Firstly, the aerothermal radiation is calculated by using a combination of both methods of theoretical analysis and experiment data. Secondly, the relationship between aerothermal radiation and IR images background mean gray and noise can be calculated through the analysis of the experiment data. At last, we can rebuild an aerodynamic heating effect of infrared images fusion with target and decoy, which can be used for virtual prototyping platform missile trajectory simulation. It can be found that the above constructed images have good agreements with the actual image according to comparison between the simulation data and experiment data. It is an economic method that can solve the lab aerodynamic heating simulation and modeling problems.