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Sample records for aerial photogrammetry

  1. Unmanned aerial systems for photogrammetry and remote sensing: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomina, I.; Molina, P.

    2014-06-01

    We discuss the evolution and state-of-the-art of the use of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) in the field of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (PaRS). UAS, Remotely-Piloted Aerial Systems, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or simply, drones are a hot topic comprising a diverse array of aspects including technology, privacy rights, safety and regulations, and even war and peace. Modern photogrammetry and remote sensing identified the potential of UAS-sourced imagery more than thirty years ago. In the last five years, these two sister disciplines have developed technology and methods that challenge the current aeronautical regulatory framework and their own traditional acquisition and processing methods. Navety and ingenuity have combined off-the-shelf, low-cost equipment with sophisticated computer vision, robotics and geomatic engineering. The results are cm-level resolution and accuracy products that can be generated even with cameras costing a few-hundred euros. In this review article, following a brief historic background and regulatory status analysis, we review the recent unmanned aircraft, sensing, navigation, orientation and general data processing developments for UAS photogrammetry and remote sensing with emphasis on the nano-micro-mini UAS segment.

  2. Automatic Building Abstraction from Aerial Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, A.; Hänsch, R.; Hellwich, O.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-view stereo has been shown to be a viable tool for the creation of realistic 3D city models. Nevertheless, it still states significant challenges since it results in dense, but noisy and incomplete point clouds when applied to aerial images. 3D city modelling usually requires a different representation of the 3D scene than these point clouds. This paper applies a fully-automatic pipeline to generate a simplified mesh from a given dense point cloud. The mesh provides a certain level of abstraction as it only consists of relatively large planar and textured surfaces. Thus, it is possible to remove noise, outlier, as well as clutter, while maintaining a high level of accuracy.

  3. Ultramap v3 - a Revolution in Aerial Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitinger, B.; Sormann, M.; Zebedin, L.; Schachinger, B.; Hoefler, M.; Tomasi, R.; Lamperter, M.; Gruber, B.; Schiester, G.; Kobald, M.; Unger, M.; Klaus, A.; Bernoegger, S.; Karner, K.; Wiechert, A.; Ponticelli, M.; Gruber, M.

    2012-07-01

    In the last years, Microsoft has driven innovation in the aerial photogrammetry community. Besides the market leading camera technology, UltraMap has grown to an outstanding photogrammetric workflow system which enables users to effectively work with large digital aerial image blocks in a highly automated way. Best example is the project-based color balancing approach which automatically balances images to a homogeneous block. UltraMap V3 continues innovation, and offers a revolution in terms of ortho processing. A fully automated dense matching module strives for high precision digital surface models (DSMs) which are calculated either on CPUs or on GPUs using a distributed processing framework. By applying constrained filtering algorithms, a digital terrain model can be derived which in turn can be used for fully automated traditional ortho texturing. By having the knowledge about the underlying geometry, seamlines can be generated automatically by applying cost functions in order to minimize visual disturbing artifacts. By exploiting the generated DSM information, a DSMOrtho is created using the balanced input images. Again, seamlines are detected automatically resulting in an automatically balanced ortho mosaic. Interactive block-based radiometric adjustments lead to a high quality ortho product based on UltraCam imagery. UltraMap v3 is the first fully integrated and interactive solution for supporting UltraCam images at best in order to deliver DSM and ortho imagery.

  4. RBA: Reduced Bundle Adjustment for oblique aerial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanbiao; Sun, Huabo; Yan, Lei; Fan, Shiyue; Chen, Rui

    2016-11-01

    This study proposes an efficient Bundle Adjustment (BA) model for oblique aerial photogrammetry to reduce the number of unknown parameters and the dimensions of a non-linear optimization problem. Instead of serving as independent exterior orientations, oblique camera poses are parameterized with nadir camera poses and constant relative poses between oblique and nadir cameras. New observation functions are created with image points as a function of the nadir pose and the relative pose parameters. With these observation functions, the problem of BA is defined as finding optimal unknown parameters by minimizing the total difference between estimated and observed image points. A Gauss-Newton optimization method is utilized to provide a solution for this least-square problem with a reduced normal equation, which plays a very critical role in the convergence and efficiency of BA. Compared with traditional BA methods, the number of unknown parameters and the dimension of the normal equations decrease, this approach dramatically reduces the computational complexity and memory cost especially for large-scale scenarios with a number of oblique images. Four synthetic datasets and a real dataset were used to check the validation and the accuracy of the proposed method. The accuracy of the proposed method is very close to that of the traditional BA method, but the efficiency can be significantly improved by the proposed method. For very large-scale scenarios, the proposed method can still address the limitation of memory and orientate all images captured by an oblique aerial multi-camera system.

  5. Surveying a Landslide in a Road Embankment Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, F.; Agüera, F.; Pérez, M.

    2011-09-01

    Most of the works of civil engineering, and some others applications, need to be designed using a basic cartography with a suitable scale to the accuracy and extension of the plot.The Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Photogrammetry covers the gap between classical manned aerial photogrammetry and hand- made surveying techniques because it works in the close-range domain, combining aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, but also introduces low-cost alternatives. The aim of this work is developing of an accurate and low-cost method to characterize landslides located on the size of a road. It was applied at the kilometric point 339 belonging to the A92 dual carriageway, in the Abla municipal term, province of Almeria, Spain. A photogrammetric project was carried out from a set of images taken from an md4-200 Microdrones with an on-board calibrated camera 12 Megapixels Pentax Optio A40. The flight was previously planned to cover the whole extension of the embankment with three passes composed of 18 photos each one. All the images were taken with the vertical axe and it was registered 85% and 60% longitudinal and transversal overlaps respectively. The accuracy of the products, with planimetric and altimetric errors of 0.049 and 0.108m repectively, lets to take measurements of the landslide and projecting preventive and palliative actuations.

  6. Wetland Assessment Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (uav) Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, M. A.; Greenfield, R.; Tesfamichael, S.

    2016-06-01

    The use of Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry is a valuable tool to enhance our understanding of wetlands. Accurate planning derived from this technological advancement allows for more effective management and conservation of wetland areas. This paper presents results of a study that aimed at investigating the use of UAV photogrammetry as a tool to enhance the assessment of wetland ecosystems. The UAV images were collected during a single flight within 2½ hours over a 100 ha area at the Kameelzynkraal farm, Gauteng Province, South Africa. An AKS Y-6 MKII multi-rotor UAV and a digital camera on a motion compensated gimbal mount were utilised for the survey. Twenty ground control points (GCPs) were surveyed using a Trimble GPS to achieve geometrical precision and georeferencing accuracy. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) computer vision techniques were used to derive ultra-high resolution point clouds, orthophotos and 3D models from the multi-view photos. The geometric accuracy of the data based on the 20 GCP's were 0.018 m for the overall, 0.0025 m for the vertical root mean squared error (RMSE) and an over all root mean square reprojection error of 0.18 pixel. The UAV products were then edited and subsequently analysed, interpreted and key attributes extracted using a selection of tools/ software applications to enhance the wetland assessment. The results exceeded our expectations and provided a valuable and accurate enhancement to the wetland delineation, classification and health assessment which even with detailed field studies would have been difficult to achieve.

  7. The future of structural fieldwork - UAV assisted aerial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollgger, Stefan; Cruden, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), commonly referred to as drones, are opening new and low cost possibilities to acquire high-resolution aerial images and digital surface models (DSM) for applications in structural geology. UAVs can be programmed to fly autonomously along a user defined grid to systematically capture high-resolution photographs, even in difficult to access areas. The photographs are subsequently processed using software that employ SIFT (scale invariant feature transform) and SFM (structure from motion) algorithms. These photogrammetric routines allow the extraction of spatial information (3D point clouds, digital elevation models, 3D meshes, orthophotos) from 2D images. Depending on flight altitude and camera setup, sub-centimeter spatial resolutions can be achieved. By "digitally mapping" georeferenced 3D models and images, orientation data can be extracted directly and used to analyse the structural framework of the mapped object or area. We present UAV assisted aerial mapping results from a coastal platform near Cape Liptrap (Victoria, Australia), where deformed metasediments of the Palaeozoic Lachlan Fold Belt are exposed. We also show how orientation and spatial information of brittle and ductile structures extracted from the photogrammetric model can be linked to the progressive development of folds and faults in the region. Even though there are both technical and legislative limitations, which might prohibit the use of UAVs without prior commercial licensing and training, the benefits that arise from the resulting high-resolution, photorealistic models can substantially contribute to the collection of new data and insights for applications in structural geology.

  8. Application of Unmanned Aerial System-based Photogrammetry to Monitor Landforms Evolution of Mudstone Badlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yichin

    2017-04-01

    Mudstone badlands are the area characteristized by its rapid erosion and steep, fractured, and barren landforms. Monitoring the topography changes in badland help improve our knowledge of the hillslope and river processing on landforms and develop susceptibility model for surface erosion hazards. Recently, advances in unmanned aerial system (UAS) and close-range photogrammetry technology have opened up the possibility of effectively measuring topography changes with high spatiotemporal resolutions. In this study, we used the UAS and close-range photogrammetry technology to monitor the topography changes in a rapidly eroded badland, south-western Taiwan. A small mudstone hillslope with area of 0.2 ha approximately and with slope gradient of 37 degrees was selected as the study site. A widely used and commercial quadcopter equipped non-metric camera was used to take images with ground sampling distance (GSD) 5 mm approximately. The Pix4DMapper, a commercial close-range photogrammetry software, was used to perform stereo matching, extract point clouds, generate digital surface models (DSMs) and orthoimage. To control model accuracy, a set of ground control points was surveyed by using eGPS. The monitoring was carried out after every significant rainfall event that may induced observable erosion in the badland site. The results show that DSMs have the GSDs of 4.0 5.4 mm and vertical accuracy of 61 116 mm. The accuracy largely depends on the quality of ground control points. The spatial averaged erosion rate during six months of monitoring was 328 mm, which is higher in the gully sides than in the ridges. The erosion rate is positively correlated with the slope gradient and drainage contributing area that implies the important role of surface gully erosion in mudstone badland erosion. This study shows that UAS and close-range photogrammetry technology can be used to monitor the topography change in badland areas effectively and can provide high spatiotemporal

  9. Three-Dimensional Digital Documentation of Heritage Sites Using Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Y. H.; Kim, J. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Three-dimensional digital documentation is an important technique for the maintenance and monitoring of cultural heritage sites. This study focuses on the three-dimensional digital documentation of the Magoksa Temple, Republic of Korea, using a combination of terrestrial laser scanning and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry. Terrestrial laser scanning mostly acquired the vertical geometry of the buildings. In addition, the digital orthoimage produced by UAV photogrammetry had higher horizontal data acquisition rate than that produced by terrestrial laser scanning. Thus, the scanning and UAV photogrammetry were merged by matching 20 corresponding points and an absolute coordinate system was established using seven ground control points. The final, complete threedimensional shape had perfect horizontal and vertical geometries. This study demonstrates the potential of integrating terrestrial laser scanning and UAV photogrammetry for three-dimensional digital documentation. This new technique is expected to contribute to the three-dimensional digital documentation and spatial analysis of cultural heritage sites.

  10. Photogrammetry with an Unmanned Aerial System to Assess Body Condition and Growth of Blainville’s Beaked Whales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Photogrammetry with an Unmanned Aerial System to Assess...preferred feeding habitats could potentially impact survival and reproduction through compromised body condition. This is of particular concern for...lactating females with increased energetic demands, and could indeed result in lower reproductive success, reduced calf survival and negative population

  11. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles and Structure from Motion: A fresh approach to photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbit, Paul R.

    Three-dimensional mapping and modeling can contribute to knowledge about the real world. Techniques are largely driven by available technology and typically involve expensive equipment and expert skill. Recent advances have led to low-cost remotely sensed data collection and generation of 3D terrain models using Uninhabited Aerial Vehicles (UAV) and Structure from Motion (SfM) processing software. This research presents a low-cost alternative to 3D mapping by pairing UAV collection methods with three SfM processing techniques. Surface models are generated from the same image set captured from a low-cost UAV coupled with a digital camera. Accuracy of resulting models identifies strengths and weaknesses of each technique. Analysis of different slope ranges investigates the divide at which surfaces generated become less reliable. This research provides a deeper understanding of the strengths and limitations of emerging technologies used together in a fresh approach to photogrammetry.

  12. Monitoring beach evolution using low-altitude aerial photogrammetry and UAV drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Alessio; Casella, Elisa; Vacchi, Matteo; Mucerino, Luigi; Pedroncini, Andrea; Ferrari, Marco; Firpo, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Beach monitoring is essential in order to understand the mechanisms of evolution of soft coasts, and the rates of erosion. Traditional beach monitoring techniques involve topographic and bathymetric surveys of the beach, and/or aerial photos repeated in time and compared through geographical information systems. A major problem of this kind of approach is the high economic cost. This often leads to increase the time lag between successive monitoring campaigns to reduce survey costs, with the consequence of fragmenting the information available for coastal zone management. MIRAMar is a project funded by Regione Liguria through the PO CRO European Social Fund, and has two main objectives: i) to study and develop an innovative technique, relatively low-cost, to monitor the evolution of the shoreline using low-altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry; ii) to study the impact of different type of storm events on a vulnerable coastal tract subject to coastal erosion using also the data collected by the UAV instrument. To achieve these aims we use a drone with its hardware and software suit, traditional survey techniques (bathymetric surveys, topographic GPS surveys and GIS techniques) and we implement a numerical modeling chain (coupling hydrodynamic, wave and sand transport modules) in order to study the impact of different type of storm events on a vulnerable coastal tract subject to coastal erosion.

  13. Tracking Forest and Open Area Effects on Snow Accumulation by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendzioch, T.; Langhammer, J.; Jenicek, M.

    2016-06-01

    Airborne digital photogrammetry is undergoing a renaissance. The availability of low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms well adopted for digital photography and progress in software development now gives rise to apply this technique to different areas of research. Especially in determining snow depth spatial distributions, where repetitive mapping of cryosphere dynamics is crucial. Here, we introduce UAV-based digital photogrammetry as a rapid and robust approach for evaluating snow accumulation over small local areas (e.g., dead forest, open areas) and to reveal impacts related to changes in forest and snowpack. Due to the advancement of the technique, snow depth of selected study areas such as of healthy forest, disturbed forest, succession, dead forest, and of open areas can be estimated at a 1 cm spatial resolution. The approach is performed in two steps: 1) developing a high resolution Digital Elevation Model during snow-free and 2) during snow-covered conditions. By substracting these two models the snow depth can be accurately retrieved and volumetric changes of snow depth distribution can be achieved. This is a first proof-of-concept study combining snow depth determination and Leaf Area Index (LAI) retrieval to monitor the impact of forest canopy metrics on snow accumulation in coniferous forest within the Šumava National Park, Czech Republic. Both, downward-looking UAV images and upward-looking LAI-2200 canopy analyser measurements were applied to reveal the LAI, controlling interception and transmitting radiation. For the performance of downward-looking images the snow background instead of the sky fraction was used. In contrast to the classical determination of LAI by hemispherical photography or by LAI plant canopy analyser, our approach will also test the accuracy of LAI measurements by UAV that are taken simultaneously during the snow cover mapping campaigns. Since the LAI parameter is important for snowpack modelling, this method presents

  14. High spatial resolution mapping of folds and fractures using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruden, A. R.; Vollgger, S.

    2016-12-01

    The emerging capability of UAV photogrammetry combines a simple and cost-effective method to acquire digital aerial images with advanced computer vision algorithms that compute spatial datasets from a sequence of overlapping digital photographs from various viewpoints. Depending on flight altitude and camera setup, sub-centimeter spatial resolution orthophotographs and textured dense point clouds can be achieved. Orientation data can be collected for detailed structural analysis by digitally mapping such high-resolution spatial datasets in a fraction of time and with higher fidelity compared to traditional mapping techniques. Here we describe a photogrammetric workflow applied to a structural study of folds and fractures within alternating layers of sandstone and mudstone at a coastal outcrop in SE Australia. We surveyed this location using a downward looking digital camera mounted on commercially available multi-rotor UAV that autonomously followed waypoints at a set altitude and speed to ensure sufficient image overlap, minimum motion blur and an appropriate resolution. The use of surveyed ground control points allowed us to produce a geo-referenced 3D point cloud and an orthophotograph from hundreds of digital images at a spatial resolution < 10 mm per pixel, and cm-scale location accuracy. Orientation data of brittle and ductile structures were semi-automatically extracted from these high-resolution datasets using open-source software. This resulted in an extensive and statistically relevant orientation dataset that was used to 1) interpret the progressive development of folds and faults in the region, and 2) to generate a 3D structural model that underlines the complex internal structure of the outcrop and quantifies spatial variations in fold geometries. Overall, our work highlights how UAV photogrammetry can contribute to new insights in structural analysis.

  15. Low altitude aerial photogrammetry application to braided river systems. Example of the Buech River, Alps, France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jules Fleury, Thomas; Pothin, Virginie; Vella, Claude; Dussouillez, Philippe; Izem, Abdelkoddouss

    2015-04-01

    Low-altitude aerial photogrammetry offers new opportunities for geomorphology and other fields requiring very high-resolution topographic data. It combines the advantages of the reproducibility of GPS topographic surveys with the high accuracy of LIDAR, but at relatively low-cost, easy-to-deploy and with the synaptic advantage of remote sensing. In order to evaluate the potential of photogrammetry on river systems and to assess river-bed changes and erosion-accretion processes, we conducted several surveys over the period of one year on the Buech river, a gravel-bed braided river located in the French Southern Alps. The study area is located directly upstream of a gravel pit and there is an interest in evaluating its effects on the riverbed. Our field protocol was comprised of vertical aerial photographs taken from a microlight aircraft flying approximately 300 ft above the ground. The equipment used was a full-frame DSLR with a wide angle lense, synchronised with a DGPS onboard. Fourty 40cm wide targets were placed on the ground and georeferenced by RTK DGPS with an accuracy of 2cm. In addition, close to one thousand Ground Control Points (GCPs) were measured within the different types of ground surfaces (vegetated, water, gravels) in order to assess the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) accuracy. We operated the production of the 3D model and its derived products: Digital Surface Model (DSM) and orthophotography, with user-friendly Agisoft (c) Photoscan Professional software. The processing of several hundred pictures with 2.5 cm ground resolution resulted in a DSM with a resolution of 10 cm and a vertical accuracy within 5 cm. As is expected, accuracy was best on bare bars and decreased with increasing vegetation density. To complement the DSM in the wetted channels, we used the orthophotos to establish a relationship between water color and flow depth using statistical multivariate regressions. Merging the bathymetric model and the DSM produced a DTM with a vertical

  16. Morphological change on the River Towy, Wales assessed using aerial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Joshua; Hodge, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The dynamic nature of meandering channels has fascinated geomorphologists for decades; with the onset of remote sensing, and technological advances in field equipment, scientists are able to capture high-resolution data from the Earth's surface using cost-effective techniques that require minimal manual labour. Here we present a morphological assessment of three meander bends on the River Towy, Wales, using aerial photography captured by the Welsh Assembly Government and supplemented by data captured by a UAV. Migration rates and changes in channel length were measured between 1969 and 2016 and compared to a coupled discharge record to quantify the effects of discharge variability on the morphological evolution of the channel. A short-term (seasonal) assessment of channel change was conducted by comparing sub-metre resolution 3D point cloud and digital elevation models, generated using a UAV and Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry. Our results suggest that discharge variability plays a crucial role in controlling the evolution of meandering planforms and can be an effective means of excavating floodplain material over relatively short timescales, although erosion rates can be suppressed by bankline roughness, which effectively disrupts outwardly directed flow momentum. These findings have implications for land managers and those modelling the effects of climate change on hydrological regimes which are ultimately used to forecast channel planform changes. Additionally, our results demonstrate the potential of low-cost field surveying techniques in producing high resolution models of landscape change.

  17. Challenges in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photogrammetry for Archaeological Mapping at High Elevations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. A.; Wernke, S.

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), especially multi-rotor vehicles, are becoming ubiquitous and their appeal for generating photogrammetry-based maps has grown. The options are many and costs have plummeted in last five years; however, many challenges persist with their deployment. We mapped the archaeological site Maw­chu Llacta, a settlement in the southern highlands of Peru (Figure 1). Mawchu Llacta is a planned colonial town built over a major Inka-era center in the high-elevation grasslands at ~4,000m asl. The "general resettlement of Indians" was a massive forced resettlement program, for which very little local-level documentation exists. Mawachu Llacta's excellently preserved architecture includes >500 buildings and hundreds of walls spread across ~13h posed significant mapping challenges. Many environmental factors impact UAV deployment. The air pressure at 4,100 m asl is dramatically lower than at sea level. The dry season diurnal temperature differentials can vary from 7°C to 22°C daily. High and hot conditions frequently occur from late morning to early afternoon. Reaching Mawchu Llacta requires hiking 4km with 400m of vertical gain over steep and rocky terrain. There is also no on-site power or secure storage. Thus, the UAV must be packable. FAA regulations govern US UAV deployments, but regulations were less stringent in Peru. However, ITAR exemptions and Peruvian customs requirements were required. The Peruvian government has established an importation and approval process that entails leaving the UAV at customs, while obtaining the necessary government approvals, both of which can be problematic. We have deployed the Aurora Flight Sciences Skate fixed wing ßUAV, an in-house fixed wing UAV based on the Skywalker X-5 flying wing, and a tethered 9 m3 capacity latex meteorological weather balloon. Development of an autonomous blimp/balloon has been ruled-out. A 3DR Solo is being assessed for excavation mapping.

  18. Exploring the Potential of Aerial Photogrammetry for 3d Modelling of High-Alpine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legat, K.; Moe, K.; Poli, D.; Bollmannb, E.

    2016-03-01

    cameras of Microsoft's UltraCam series and the in-house processing chain centred on the Dense-Image-Matching (DIM) software SURE by nFrames. This paper reports the work carried out at AVT for the surface- and terrain modelling of several high-alpine areas using DIM- and ALS-based approaches. A special focus is dedicated to the influence of terrain morphology, flight planning, GNSS/IMU measurements, and ground-control distribution in the georeferencing process on the data quality. Based on the very promising results, some general recommendations for aerial photogrammetry processing in high-alpine areas are made to achieve best possible accuracy of the final 3D-, 2.5D- and 2D products.

  19. Study of wave runup using numerical models and low-altitude aerial photogrammetry: A tool for coastal management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, Elisa; Rovere, Alessio; Pedroncini, Andrea; Mucerino, Luigi; Casella, Marco; Cusati, Luis Alberto; Vacchi, Matteo; Ferrari, Marco; Firpo, Marco

    2014-08-01

    Monitoring the impact of sea storms on coastal areas is fundamental to study beach evolution and the vulnerability of low-lying coasts to erosion and flooding. Modelling wave runup on a beach is possible, but it requires accurate topographic data and model tuning, that can be done comparing observed and modeled runup. In this study we collected aerial photos using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle after two different swells on the same study area. We merged the point cloud obtained with photogrammetry with multibeam data, in order to obtain a complete beach topography. Then, on each set of rectified and georeferenced UAV orthophotos, we identified the maximum wave runup for both events recognizing the wet area left by the waves. We then used our topography and numerical models to simulate the wave runup and compare the model results to observed values during the two events. Our results highlight the potential of the methodology presented, which integrates UAV platforms, photogrammetry and Geographic Information Systems to provide faster and cheaper information on beach topography and geomorphology compared with traditional techniques without losing in accuracy. We use the results obtained from this technique as a topographic base for a model that calculates runup for the two swells. The observed and modeled runups are consistent, and open new directions for future research.

  20. Integrating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Terrestrial Structure from Motion Photogrammetry for Assessing High Mountain Glacier Change, Huaytapallana, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigmore, O.; Mark, B. G.; Lagos, P.; Somers, L. D.; McKenzie, J. M.; Huh, K. I.; Hopkinson, C.; Baraer, M.; Crumley, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry has a long and successful history of application to glaciological research. However, traditional methods rely upon large and expensive metric cameras and detailed triangulation of in-scene points for derivation of terrain models and analysis of glacier change. Recent developments in computer vision, including the advent of Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms and associated software packages have made it possible to use consumer grade digital cameras to produce highly precise digital elevation models. This has facilitated the rapid expansion of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for mapping purposes. However, without onboard RTK GNSS positions of the UAV, within scene survey-grade ground targets are required for accurate georectification. Gaining access to mountain glaciers for the installation and survey of ground targets is often labour intensive, hazardous and sometimes impossible. Compounding this are limitations of UAV flight within these confined and high elevation locations and reduced flight times that limit the total survey area. Luckily, these environments also present a highly suitable location for the application of terrestrial SfM photogrammetry; because; high moraines, cliffs and ridgelines provide excellent 'semi-nadir' viewing of the glacier surface; while steep mountain walls present a close to nadir view from an oblique angle. In this study we present a workflow and results from an integrated UAV and terrestrial SfM photogrammetry campaign at Huaytapallana glacier, Huancayo Peru. We combined terrestrial images taken from GNSS surveyed positions with oblique UAV imagery of the mountain face. From this data a centimetre resolution orthomosaic and a decimetre resolution DEM of the snow and ice covered mountain face and proglacial lake were generated, covering over 6km2. Accuracy of the surface was determined from comparison over ice free areas to 1m aerial LiDAR data collected in 2009. Changes in glacier volume were then

  1. Low-Altitude Coastal Aerial Photogrammetry for High-Resolution Seabed Imaging and Habitat Mapping of Shallow Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alevizos, E.

    2012-04-01

    This paper explores the application of Kite Aerial Photography at the coastal environment along with digital photogrammetry for seabed geomorphological mapping. This method takes advantage of sea-water clearance that allows the transmission of sunlight through the water column and backscatter of seabed reflection under certain conditions of sunlight, weather and sea state. We analyze the procedure of acquisition, processing and interpretation of kite aerial imagery from the sub-littoral zone up to 5 meters depth. Using a calibrated non-metric digital compact camera we managed to acquire several vertical aerial images from two coastal sites in the Attica Peninsula (Greece) covering an area of approximately 200x100 meters. Both sites express significant geomorphological variability and they have a relatively smooth slope profile. For the photogrammetric processing we acquired topographic and bathymetric survey simultaneously with Kite Aerial Photography using a portable GPS of sub-meter accuracy. In order to deal with bottom control measurements we developed Bottom Control Points which were placed on the seabed. These act like the Ground Control Points and they can be easily deployed in the marine environment. The processing included interior and exterior orientation as well as ortho-rectification of images. This produced final orthomosaics for each site at scales 1:500 - 1:1500 with a resolution of a few centimeters. Interpretation of the seabed was based on color and texture features of certain areas with explicit seabed reflectivity and was supported by underwater photographs for ground truthing. At the final stage of image analysis, we recognized the boundaries (contrasting reflectivity) between different bottom types and digitized them as 2D objects using GIS. Concluding, this project emphasizes on the advantages and physical restrictions of Kite Aerial Photography in mapping small-scale geomorphological features in coastal, estuarine and lagoonal environments

  2. Geomorphological processes in a semiarid badland area using new technologies: TLS, terrestrial and aerial SfM photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Victor; Errea, Paz; Alonso, Esteban; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro; Nadal-Romero, Estela

    2017-04-01

    We used three different methods Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS), terrestrial Structure from Motion photogrammetry (SfM) and aerial SfM photogrammetry with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to analyse geomorphological processes in a semiarid badland landscape. Los Aguarales badlands, located in the Ebro Depression (Spain), occur in the Holocene sediment accumulated in a wide valley infilled with silt and clay. The morphology of Los Aguarales badlands is complex, making the geomorphological interpretation a difficult task. Los Aguarales badlands are characterized by the sequence of incision and piping processes developing an abrupt and complex landscape. Three different representative and small study sites were selected to carry out a detailed analysis of the geomorphological processes. Moreover, the capability of the three methods to produce high resolution point clouds was evaluated. The obtained topographical changes were very low during the first 6 months (March-October 2016). Measured topographical changes, with TLS and terrestrial SfM, were very low, and these values fall within the range of the acquisition error of the devices used (2-6 cm). The preliminary results indicated the possibilities of a multiscale approach using new technologies to study geomorphological and erosion processes, although long-term studies will be necessary to obtain erosion rates in this semiarid badland area. Acknowledgement This research was supported by ESPAS and eTERA 3D projects (CGL2015- 65569-R and CGL2014-54822-R, funded by the MINECO-FEDER). Estela Nadal-Romero is the recipient of a Ramón y Cajal postdoctoral contract (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness).

  3. 'Unlocking the archive': Using photogrammetry of historic aerial photographs to extend the record of glacier change on the Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Lucy; Fox, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    Changes to glacier fronts and ice shelves and glacier acceleration are well documented, but there is almost no data on mass changes for the more than 400 glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. Current research demonstrates that the Antarctic Peninsula is contributing to sea-level change at a similar rate to that of other fast-changing near-polar or large mountain-glacier environments such as Iceland, Patagonia and Alaska (Hock, 2009). Forecasting the future impacts of the Antarctic Peninsula ice sheet on sea level will require a much improved understanding of 20th Century and contemporary glacier mass changes. Satellite data has been used to calculate these changes over the last three decades, but methods to quantify this over a longer time scale have eluded researchers. However, there is an archive of aerial photography of the Antarctic Peninsula dating back to the 1940s, this has been largely ignored due to the range of technical problems associated with deriving quantitative data from historic aerial photographs. This presentation demonstrates how advances in photogrammetric processing and capture of modern aerial photography have allowed this archive to be 'unlocked'. Accurate photogrammetric reconstruction from aerial photographs traditionally requires known ground control points acquired in the field; in remote and inaccessible areas, such as the Antarctic Peninsula, this is often impossible and so has restricted the use of photogrammetric analysis of the available aerial photography. A method for providing control for historic photos without fieldwork on the ground, by linking them to a newly acquired, highly accurate photogrammetric model adjusted through direct kinematic GPS positioning of the camera was developed by Fox and Cziferszky (2008), and this is now being applied to a number of glaciers across the Antarctic Peninsular using Intergraph Photogrammetry Suite (Erdas LPS 2013) software. This presentation will outline the photogrammetric workflow and

  4. Combined Study of Snow Depth Determination and Winter Leaf Area Index Retrieval by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendzioch, Theodora; Langhammer, Jakub; Jenicek, Michal

    2017-04-01

    A rapid and robust approach using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) digital photogrammetry was performed for evaluating snow accumulation over different small localities (e.g. disturbed forest and open area) and for indirect field measurements of Leaf Area Index (LAI) of coniferous forest within the Šumava National Park, Czech Republic. The approach was used to reveal impacts related to changes in forest and snowpack and to determine winter effective LAI for monitoring the impact of forest canopy metrics on snow accumulation. Due to the advancement of the technique, snow depth and volumetric changes of snow depth over these selected study areas were estimated at high spatial resolution (1 cm) by subtracting a snow-free digital elevation model (DEM) from a snow-covered DEM. Both, downward-looking UAV images and upward-looking digital hemispherical photography (DHP), and additional widely used LAI-2200 canopy analyser measurements were applied to determine the winter LAI, controlling interception and transmitting radiation. For the performance of downward-looking UAV images the snow background instead of the sky fraction was used. The reliability of UAV-based LAI retrieval was tested by taking an independent data set during the snow cover mapping campaigns. The results showed the potential of digital photogrammetry for snow depth mapping and LAI determination by UAV techniques. The average difference obtained between ground-based and UAV-based measurements of snow depth was 7.1 cm with higher values obtained by UAV. The SD of 22 cm for the open area seemed competitive with the typical precision of point measurements. In contrast, the average difference in disturbed forest area was 25 cm with lower values obtained by UAV and a SD of 36 cm, which is in agreement with other studies. The UAV-based LAI measurements revealed the lowest effective LAI values and the plant canopy analyser LAI-2200 the highest effective LAI values. The biggest bias of effective LAI was observed

  5. Multicopter-based small format aerial photography using free and open source photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Robert Matthew

    A process is described to convert aerial photographs from flat images to 3D point clouds and then convert into height maps to be used as pseudo digital elevation models for surface modeling. All software used in the process is either free or open source. The process uses a DJI Phanton multicoper and two Canon Point and Shoot digital cameras. One camera is unaltered, and a second camera is modified to produce infrared images. A DJI Phantom FC-40 multicopter is used as the aerial platform to carry the cameras. Multiple paths are described to convert from still images (or video to still images) to N-view matches, followed by sparse point clouds then dense point clouds. Point clouds are distinct 3D points charted in an XYZ coordinate system. The dense point clouds can be converted into 3D models for viewing and analysis. A height map is extracted from the point cloud and surface images (in raster format) are created and then used in QGIS or ArcMap as pseudo digital elevation models for surface modeling. Finally, the digital elevation models are evaluated in comparison to similar LIDAR images. Keywords: Passive Remote Sensing; LIDAR; Spatial Resolution.

  6. Determination of the State of Strain of Large Floating Covers Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Aided Photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wern Hann; Chiu, Wing Kong; Kuen, Thomas; Kodikara, Jayantha

    2017-07-28

    Floating covers used in waste water treatment plants are one of the many structures formed with membrane materials. These structures are usually large and can spread over an area measuring 470 m × 170 m. The aim of this paper is to describe recent work to develop an innovative and effective approach for structural health monitoring (SHM) of such large membrane-like infrastructure. This paper will propose a potentially cost-effective non-contact approach for full-field strain and stress mapping using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) mounted with a digital camera and a global positioning system (GPS) tracker. The aim is to use the images acquired by the UAV to define the geometry of the floating cover using photogrammetry. In this manner, any changes in the geometry of the floating cover due to forces acting beneath resulting from its deployment and usage can be determined. The time-scale for these changes is in terms of weeks and months. The change in the geometry can be implemented as input conditions to a finite element model (FEM) for stress prediction. This will facilitate the determination of the state of distress of the floating cover. This paper investigates the possibility of using data recorded from a UAV to predict the strain level and assess the health of such structures. An investigation was first conducted on a laboratory sized membrane structure instrumented with strain gauges for comparison against strains, which were computed from 3D scans of the membrane geometry. Upon validating the technique in the laboratory, it was applied to a more realistic scenario: an outdoor test membrane structure and capable UAV were constructed to see if the shape of the membrane could be computed. The membrane displacements were then used to calculate the membrane stress and strain, state demonstrating a new way to perform structural health monitoring on membrane structures.

  7. Determination of the State of Strain of Large Floating Covers Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Aided Photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Wern Hann; Chiu, Wing Kong; Kuen, Thomas; Kodikara, Jayantha

    2017-01-01

    Floating covers used in waste water treatment plants are one of the many structures formed with membrane materials. These structures are usually large and can spread over an area measuring 470 m × 170 m. The aim of this paper is to describe recent work to develop an innovative and effective approach for structural health monitoring (SHM) of such large membrane-like infrastructure. This paper will propose a potentially cost-effective non-contact approach for full-field strain and stress mapping using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) mounted with a digital camera and a global positioning system (GPS) tracker. The aim is to use the images acquired by the UAV to define the geometry of the floating cover using photogrammetry. In this manner, any changes in the geometry of the floating cover due to forces acting beneath resulting from its deployment and usage can be determined. The time-scale for these changes is in terms of weeks and months. The change in the geometry can be implemented as input conditions to a finite element model (FEM) for stress prediction. This will facilitate the determination of the state of distress of the floating cover. This paper investigates the possibility of using data recorded from a UAV to predict the strain level and assess the health of such structures. An investigation was first conducted on a laboratory sized membrane structure instrumented with strain gauges for comparison against strains, which were computed from 3D scans of the membrane geometry. Upon validating the technique in the laboratory, it was applied to a more realistic scenario: an outdoor test membrane structure and capable UAV were constructed to see if the shape of the membrane could be computed. The membrane displacements were then used to calculate the membrane stress and strain, state demonstrating a new way to perform structural health monitoring on membrane structures. PMID:28788081

  8. The potential of 3D gully monitoring with GIS using high-resolution aerial photography and a digital photogrammetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzolff, I.; Poesen, J.

    2009-10-01

    Although gully erosion is generally considered a major process of land degradation, its contribution to total soil loss by erosion has recently been a subject of much discussion. The lack of adequate methods for the documentation and monitoring of gullies resulted in the shortage of quantitative data. Therefore, a high-resolution remote sensing system for aerial surveys by blimp or kite has been developed which meets spatial and temporal image resolutions required for short-term gully monitoring. The objective of this paper is to examine the potential of a method using non-metric digital photogrammetry and GIS for gully surface modelling and monitoring. Two bank gullies representing different morphological types of gullies (V-shaped and U-shaped) were chosen from a dataset of gully systems in semi-arid Spain. The considerable relief energy and complex topography of the gullies in a natural, vegetated landscape were found to be a challenge to digital photogrammetric techniques, introducing errors which inhibit fully automated DEM generation. Using a hybrid method combining stereomatching for mass-point extraction with manual 3D editing and digitizing, high-resolution DEMs (5 and 7.5 cm pixel size) were created for the study sites. GIS analysis of the DEMs for different monitoring periods (2 to 4 years) allowed the computation of gully area and volume, as well as their changes with an accuracy and detail sufficient to represent the geomorphological forms and processes involved. Furthermore, the spatially continuous survey of the entire form offered the possibility of distinguishing different zones of activity both at the gully rim and within the gully interior, identifying patterns of erosion and deposition which indicate the limited use of headcut retreat rates for the assessment of sediment production on a short-term basis.

  9. 3D Tree Dimensionality Assessment Using Photogrammetry and Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Gatziolis, Demetrios; Lienard, Jean F; Vogs, Andre; Strigul, Nikolay S

    2015-01-01

    Detailed, precise, three-dimensional (3D) representations of individual trees are a prerequisite for an accurate assessment of tree competition, growth, and morphological plasticity. Until recently, our ability to measure the dimensionality, spatial arrangement, shape of trees, and shape of tree components with precision has been constrained by technological and logistical limitations and cost. Traditional methods of forest biometrics provide only partial measurements and are labor intensive. Active remote technologies such as LiDAR operated from airborne platforms provide only partial crown reconstructions. The use of terrestrial LiDAR is laborious, has portability limitations and high cost. In this work we capitalized on recent improvements in the capabilities and availability of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), light and inexpensive cameras, and developed an affordable method for obtaining precise and comprehensive 3D models of trees and small groups of trees. The method employs slow-moving UAVs that acquire images along predefined trajectories near and around targeted trees, and computer vision-based approaches that process the images to obtain detailed tree reconstructions. After we confirmed the potential of the methodology via simulation we evaluated several UAV platforms, strategies for image acquisition, and image processing algorithms. We present an original, step-by-step workflow which utilizes open source programs and original software. We anticipate that future development and applications of our method will improve our understanding of forest self-organization emerging from the competition among trees, and will lead to a refined generation of individual-tree-based forest models.

  10. 3D Tree Dimensionality Assessment Using Photogrammetry and Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Detailed, precise, three-dimensional (3D) representations of individual trees are a prerequisite for an accurate assessment of tree competition, growth, and morphological plasticity. Until recently, our ability to measure the dimensionality, spatial arrangement, shape of trees, and shape of tree components with precision has been constrained by technological and logistical limitations and cost. Traditional methods of forest biometrics provide only partial measurements and are labor intensive. Active remote technologies such as LiDAR operated from airborne platforms provide only partial crown reconstructions. The use of terrestrial LiDAR is laborious, has portability limitations and high cost. In this work we capitalized on recent improvements in the capabilities and availability of small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), light and inexpensive cameras, and developed an affordable method for obtaining precise and comprehensive 3D models of trees and small groups of trees. The method employs slow-moving UAVs that acquire images along predefined trajectories near and around targeted trees, and computer vision-based approaches that process the images to obtain detailed tree reconstructions. After we confirmed the potential of the methodology via simulation we evaluated several UAV platforms, strategies for image acquisition, and image processing algorithms. We present an original, step-by-step workflow which utilizes open source programs and original software. We anticipate that future development and applications of our method will improve our understanding of forest self-organization emerging from the competition among trees, and will lead to a refined generation of individual-tree-based forest models. PMID:26393926

  11. Detecting Surface Changes from an Underground Explosion in Granite Using Unmanned Aerial System Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Coppersmith, Ryan T.; Sussman, Aviva J.; Swanson, Erika M.; Cooley, James A.

    2017-08-01

    Efficient detection and high-fidelity quantification of surface changes resulting from underground activities are important national and global security efforts. In this investigation, a team performed field-based topographic characterization by gathering high-quality photographs at very low altitudes from an unmanned aerial system (UAS)-borne camera platform. The data collection occurred shortly before and after a controlled underground chemical explosion as part of the United States Department of Energy's Source Physics Experiments (SPE-5) series. The high-resolution overlapping photographs were used to create 3D photogrammetric models of the site, which then served to map changes in the landscape down to 1-cm-scale. Separate models were created for two areas, herein referred to as the test table grid region and the nearfield grid region. The test table grid includes the region within 40 m from surface ground zero, with photographs collected at a flight altitude of 8.5 m above ground level (AGL). The near-field grid area covered a broader area, 90-130 m from surface ground zero, and collected at a flight altitude of 22 m AGL. The photographs, processed using Agisoft Photoscan® in conjunction with 125 surveyed ground control point targets, yielded a 6-mm pixel-size digital elevation model (DEM) for the test table grid region. This provided the ≤3 cm resolution in the topographic data to map in fine detail a suite of features related to the underground explosion: uplift, subsidence, surface fractures, and morphological change detection. The near-field grid region data collection resulted in a 2-cm pixel-size DEM, enabling mapping of a broader range of features related to the explosion, including: uplift and subsidence, rock fall, and slope sloughing. This study represents one of the first works to constrain, both temporally and spatially, explosion-related surface damage using a UAS photogrammetric platform; these data will help to advance the science of

  12. Detecting Surface Changes from an Underground Explosion in Granite Using Unmanned Aerial System Photogrammetry

    DOE PAGES

    Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Coppersmith, Ryan T.; Sussman, Aviva J.; ...

    2017-08-19

    Efficient detection and high-fidelity quantification of surface changes resulting from underground activities are important national and global security efforts. In this investigation, a team performed field-based topographic characterization by gathering high-quality photographs at very low altitudes from an unmanned aerial system (UAS)-borne camera platform. The data collection occurred shortly before and after a controlled underground chemical explosion as part of the United States Department of Energy’s Source Physics Experiments (SPE-5) series. The high-resolution overlapping photographs were used to create 3D photogrammetric models of the site, which then served to map changes in the landscape down to 1-cm-scale. Separate models weremore » created for two areas, herein referred to as the test table grid region and the nearfield grid region. The test table grid includes the region within ~40 m from surface ground zero, with photographs collected at a flight altitude of 8.5 m above ground level (AGL). The near-field grid area covered a broader area, 90–130 m from surface ground zero, and collected at a flight altitude of 22 m AGL. The photographs, processed using Agisoft Photoscan® in conjunction with 125 surveyed ground control point targets, yielded a 6-mm pixel-size digital elevation model (DEM) for the test table grid region. This provided the ≤3 cm resolution in the topographic data to map in fine detail a suite of features related to the underground explosion: uplift, subsidence, surface fractures, and morphological change detection. The near-field grid region data collection resulted in a 2-cm pixel-size DEM, enabling mapping of a broader range of features related to the explosion, including: uplift and subsidence, rock fall, and slope sloughing. This study represents one of the first works to constrain, both temporally and spatially, explosion-related surface damage using a UAS photogrammetric platform; these data will help to advance the

  13. The evaluation of unmanned aerial system-based photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning to generate DEMs of agricultural watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouédraogo, Mohamar Moussa; Degré, Aurore; Debouche, Charles; Lisein, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    Agricultural watersheds tend to be places of intensive farming activities that permanently modify their microtopography. The surface characteristics of the soil vary depending on the crops that are cultivated in these areas. Agricultural soil microtopography plays an important role in the quantification of runoff and sediment transport because the presence of crops, crop residues, furrows and ridges may impact the direction of water flow. To better assess such phenomena, 3-D reconstructions of high-resolution agricultural watershed topography are essential. Fine-resolution topographic data collection technologies can be used to discern highly detailed elevation variability in these areas. Knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of existing technologies used for data collection on agricultural watersheds may be helpful in choosing an appropriate technology. This study assesses the suitability of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and unmanned aerial system (UAS) photogrammetry for collecting the fine-resolution topographic data required to generate accurate, high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) in a small watershed area (12 ha). Because of farming activity, 14 TLS scans (≈ 25 points m- 2) were collected without using high-definition surveying (HDS) targets, which are generally used to mesh adjacent scans. To evaluate the accuracy of the DEMs created from the TLS scan data, 1098 ground control points (GCPs) were surveyed using a real time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS). Linear regressions were then applied to each DEM to remove vertical errors from the TLS point elevations, errors caused by the non-perpendicularity of the scanner's vertical axis to the local horizontal plane, and errors correlated with the distance to the scanner's position. The scans were then meshed to generate a DEMTLS with a 1 × 1 m spatial resolution. The Agisoft PhotoScan and MicMac software packages were used to process the aerial photographs and generate a DEMPSC

  14. Using unmanned aerial vehicles and structure-from-motion photogrammetry to characterize sedimentary outcrops: An example from the Morrison Formation, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesley, J. T.; Leier, A. L.; White, S.; Torres, R.

    2017-06-01

    Recently developed data collection techniques allow for improved characterization of sedimentary outcrops. Here, we outline a workflow that utilizes unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry to produce sub-meter-scale outcrop reconstructions in 3-D. SfM photogrammetry uses multiple overlapping images and an image-based terrain extraction algorithm to reconstruct the location of individual points from the photographs in 3-D space. The results of this technique can be used to construct point clouds, orthomosaics, and digital surface models that can be imported into GIS and related software for further study. The accuracy of the reconstructed outcrops, with respect to an absolute framework, is improved with geotagged images or independently gathered ground control points, and the internal accuracy of 3-D reconstructions is sufficient for sub-meter scale measurements. We demonstrate this approach with a case study from central Utah, USA, where UAV-SfM data can help delineate complex features within Jurassic fluvial sandstones.

  15. Stanford automatic photogrammetry research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quam, L. H.; Hannah, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A feasibility study on the problem of computer automated aerial/orbital photogrammetry is documented. The techniques investigated were based on correlation matching of small areas in digitized pairs of stereo images taken from high altitude or planetary orbit, with the objective of deriving a 3-dimensional model for the surface of a planet.

  16. Mapping snow depth in alpine terrain with remotely piloted aerial systems and structure-from-motion photogrammetry - first results from a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Marc; Fromm, Reinhard; Bühler, Yves; Bösch, Ruedi; Ginzler, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Detailed information on the spatio-temporal distribution of seasonal snow in the alpine terrain plays a major role for the hydrological cycle, natural hazard management, flora and fauna, as well as tourism. Current methods are mostly only valid on a regional scale or require a trade-off between the data's availability, cost and resolution. During a one-year pilot study, we investigated the potential of remotely piloted aerial systems (RPAS) and structure-from-motion photogrammetry for snow depth mapping. We employed multi-copter and fixed-wing RPAS, equipped with different low-cost, off-the shelf sensors, at four test sites in Austria and Switzerland. Over 30 flights were performed during the winter 2014/15, where different camera settings, filters and lenses, as well as data collection routines were tested. Orthophotos and digital surface models (DSM) where calculated from the imagery using structure-from-motion photogrammetry software. Snow height was derived by subtracting snow-free from snow-covered DSMs. The RPAS-results were validated against data collected using a variety of well-established remote sensing (i.e. terrestrial laser scanning, large frame aerial sensors) and in-situ measurement techniques. The results show, that RPAS i) are able to map snow depth within accuracies of 0.07-0.15 m root mean square error (RMSE), when compared to traditional in-situ data; ii) can be operated at lower cost, easier repeatability, less operational constraints and higher GSD than large frame aerial sensors on-board manned aircraft, while achieving significantly higher accuracies; iii) are able to acquire meaningful data even under harsh environmental conditions above 2000 m a.s.l. (turbulence, low temperature and high irradiance, low air density). While providing a first prove-of-concept, the study also showed future challenges and limitations of RPAS-based snow depth mapping, including a high dependency on correct co-registration of snow-free and snow-covered height

  17. Surface and thickness variations of Brenva Glacier tongue (Mont Blanc, Italian Alps) in the second half of the 20th century by historical maps and aerial photogrammetry comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D Agata, C.; Zanutta, A.; Muzzu Martis, D.; Mancini, F.; Smiraglia, C.

    2003-04-01

    Aim of this contribution is the evaluation of volumetric and surface variations of Brenva Glacier (Mont Blanc, Italian Alps) during the second half of the 20th century, by GIS-based processing of maps and aerial photogrammetry technique. Brenva Glacier is a typical debris covered glacier, located in a valley on the S-E side of the Mont Blanc. The glacier covers a surface of 7 kmq and shows a length of 7,6 km at maximum. The glacier snout reaches 1415 m a.s.l., which is the lowest glacier terminus of the Italian Alps. To evaluate glacier variations different historical maps were used: 1) The 1959 Map, at the scale 1:5.000, by EIRA (Ente Italiano Rilievi Aerofotogrammetrici, Firenze), from terrestrial photogrammetric survey, published in the Bollettino del Comitato Glaciologico Italiano, 2, n. 19, 1971. 2) The 1971 Map, at the scale 1:5.000, from aerial photogrammetry (Alifoto, Torino) published in the Bollettino del Comitato Glaciologico Italiano, 2, n. 20, 1972. 3) The 1988 Map, at the scale 1:10.000, (Region Aosta Valley, Regional Technical Map) from 1983 aerial photogrammetric survey. 4) The 1999 Map, at the scale 1:10.000, (Region Aosta Valley, Regional Technical Map) from 1991 aerial photogrammetry survey. For the same purpose the following aereal photographs were used: 1) The 1975 image, CGR (Italian General Company aerial Surveys) flight RAVDA (Administrative Autonomous Region Aosta Valley), at the scale 1:17.000. 2) The 1991 image, CGR (Italian General Company aerial Surveys) flight RAVDA (Administrative Autonomous Region Aosta Valley), at the scale 1:17.000. Aerial imageries have been acquired over a long period from 1975 to 1991. The black and white images were scanned at suitable resolution if compared with the imagery scale and several models, representing the glacier tongue area, oriented using the inner and outer orientation parameters delivered with the images, were produced. The digital photogrammetric system, after orientation and matching, produces

  18. High-resolution topography of 1974 Mount Etna lava flow based on Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) surveys and Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaciai, Alessandro; Favalli, Massimiliano; Nannipieri, Luca; Harris, Andrew; Calvari, Sonia; Lormand, Charline

    2017-04-01

    The production of high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) of lava is of increasing interest in volcanology because the time scales of change are fast and involve vertical and planimetric changes of millimeters to meters. Among the wide range of terrestrial and aerial methods available to collect topographic data, the use of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) acquiring platform and structure from motion (SfM) photogrammetric technique is especially useful because it allow collecting data of inaccessible, kilometer scale areas, with low cost and minimal hazard to personnel. This study presents the application of UAV-SfM method to generate a high-resolution DEMs and orthomosaic of the 1974 Mount Etna lava field. The UAV was flown over lava field at flight altitude to about 70 m above ground level (AGL) and acquired 2781 photographs. SfM-photogrammetry applied to these images enabled the extraction of very (20 cm) high-resolution DEMs and 3 cm orthomosaic for a total area of 1.35 square kilometers. The data produced by the UAV-SfM was compared with airborne LiDAR data. Such comparison gives a root mean squared error between the two DEMs of 0.24 m. The unprecedented topographic resolution obtained with UAV-SfM methods enabled us to derive morphometry of sub-meter-scale lava features, such as folds, blocks, and cracks, over kilometric scale areas. The 3 cm orthomosaic allowed us to further push the analysis to dm-scale grain distribution of the lava surface. This study shows that SfM and UAV platforms can be effectively used for mapping volcanic features producing topographic data in a manner not possible with the 1-m LiDAR-derived DEM. The spectral analysis of surface folding support this analysis showing a much larger spectrum of frequencies of the SfM-derived DEM than the LiDAR DEM.

  19. Comparison of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) and Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry from unmanned aerial systems (UAS) for geomorphic change detection in beach-dune systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heathfield, D.; Walker, I. J.; Grilliot, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    The recent emergence of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and unmanned aerial systems (UAS) as mapping platforms in geomorphology research has allowed for expedited acquisition of high spatial and temporal resolution, three-dimensional topographic datasets. TLS provides dense 3D `point cloud' datasets that require careful acquisition strategies and appreciable post-processing to produce accurate digital elevation models (DEMs). UAS provide overlapping nadir and oblique imagery that can be analysed using Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry software to provide accurate, high-resolution orthophoto mosaics and accurate digital surface models (DSMs). Both methods yield centimeter to decimeter scale accuracy, depending on various hardware and field acquisition considerations (e.g., camera resolution, flight height, on-site GNSS control, etc.). Combined, the UAS-SfM workflow provides a comparable and more affordable solution to the more expensive TLS or aerial LiDAR methods. This paper compares and contrasts SfM and TLS survey methodologies and related workflow costs and benefits as used to quantify and examine seasonal beach-dune erosion and recovery processes at a site (Calvert Island) on British Columbia's central coast in western Canada. Seasonal SfM- and TLS-derived DEMs were used to quantify spatial patterns of surface elevation change, geomorphic responses, and related significant sediment volume changes. Cluster maps of positive (depositional) and negative (erosional) change are analysed to detect and interpret the geomorphic and sediment budget responses following an erosive water level event during winter 2016 season (Oct. 2015 - Apr. 2016). Vantage cameras also provided qualitative data on the frequency and magnitude of environmental drivers (e.g., tide, wave, wind forcing) of erosion and deposition events during the observation period. In addition, we evaluate the costs, time expenditures, and accuracy considerations for both SfM and TLS methodologies.

  20. Photogrammetry for Glaciology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, H. H.; Thompson, L. G.

    2004-12-01

    An "Introduction to Photogrammetry" is presented first and attention is called to some of the differences between satellite imagery and aerial photography. The application of some well-established aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry procedures, which have long been in general use for topographic mapping, to studies of glacier and ice sheet motion and extent is then discussed. Some examples of projects carried out by the first author are given: 1) surface motion studies from standard aerial mapping photography over relatively large areas (Byrd Glacier and one of the West Antarctic ice streams, Antarctica and Jakobshavn Glacier, Greenland), 2) studies of extent of relatively small pieces of ice from standard mapping photos (Mt. Kilimanjaro) and from unconventional, small-format photography (Deception Island, Antarctica) and 3) the application of terrestrial photogrammetry in the monitoring of the extent of Qori Kalis, the largest outlet glacier of the Quelccaya Icecap in the Peruvian Andes, over a period of more than 40 years. The results of the latter document accelerating rates of retreat of the terminus and loss of ice area and volume from 1963 to 2001. Retreat of the front was 42 times as fast between 2000 and 2001 as between 1963 and 1978. Since 2001, however, the retreat appears to have stopped, at least temporarily, as it did between 1991 and 1993. A proglacial lake formed sometime between 1983 and 1991 and presently covers about 31 ha.

  1. GPS-aided inertial technology and navigation-based photogrammetry for aerial mapping the San Andreas fault system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanchez, Richard D.; Hudnut, Kenneth W.

    2004-01-01

    Aerial mapping of the San Andreas Fault System can be realized more efficiently and rapidly without ground control and conventional aerotriangulation. This is achieved by the direct geopositioning of the exterior orientation of a digital imaging sensor by use of an integrated Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and an Inertial Navigation System (INS). A crucial issue to this particular type of aerial mapping is the accuracy, scale, consistency, and speed achievable by such a system. To address these questions, an Applanix Digital Sensor System (DSS) was used to examine its potential for near real-time mapping. Large segments of vegetation along the San Andreas and Cucamonga faults near the foothills of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains were burned to the ground in the California wildfires of October-November 2003. A 175 km corridor through what once was a thickly vegetated and hidden fault surface was chosen for this study. Both faults pose a major hazard to the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area and a near real-time mapping system could provide information vital to a post-disaster response.

  2. Observing the Calving Dynamics of Breiðamerkurjökull, Iceland, with Repeat UAV Aerial Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosch, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Since the summer of 2014, a cost-effective, fixed-wing UAV platform is used to map changes at the calving front of Breiðamerkurjökull, one of the largest outlet-glaciers of Vatnajökull, Iceland. The utilized wide angle camera (21 mm equivalent) delivers aerial images with a ground pixel resolution of approximately 18 cm, which are subsequently combined to digital elevation models (DEMs) mapping the calving front. Ground control points in the study area, measured with L1 phase GNSS receivers, are used to geo-locate the produced DEMs and ensure high quality co-registration between subsequent data sets. The 2 m wing span UAV platform is capable of 40 - 60 minutes of autonomous flight, guided by an open-source, open-hardware autopilot system (pixhawk.org) and thus can map rather large areas of the calving glacier. I will present results from the 2014 field season during which the calving front of Breiðamerkurjökull has been mapped repeatedly with data acquisition intervals ranging from hours to weeks. A lidar dataset from 2011 of the study region is used to validate the acquired DEM data and accuracy/precision statistics will be presented. I will also detail the UAV platform design, including instrumentation and flight mission planning.

  3. New techniques to measure cliff change from historical oblique aerial photographs and structure-from-motion photogrammetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan; Ritchie, Andy; Adelman, Gabrielle; Adelman, Ken; Limber, Patrick W

    2017-01-01

    Oblique aerial photograph surveys are commonly used to document coastal landscapes. Here it is shown that adequate overlap may exist in these photographic records to develop topographic models with Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetric techniques. Using photographs of Fort Funston, California, from the California Coastal Records Project, imagery were combined with ground control points in a four-dimensional analysis that produced topographic point clouds of the study area’s cliffs for 5 years spanning 2002 to 2010. Uncertainty was assessed by comparing point clouds with airborne LIDAR data, and these uncertainties were related to the number and spatial distribution of ground control points used in the SfM analyses. With six or more ground control points, the root mean squared errors between the SfM and LIDAR data were less than 0.30 m (minimum 1⁄4 0.18 m), and the mean systematic error was less than 0.10 m. The SfM results had several benefits over traditional airborne LIDAR in that they included point coverage on vertical- to-overhanging sections of the cliff and resulted in 10–100 times greater point densities. Time series of the SfM results revealed topographic changes, including landslides, rock falls, and the erosion of landslide talus along the Fort Funston beach. Thus, it was concluded that SfM photogrammetric techniques with historical oblique photographs allow for the extraction of useful quantitative information for mapping coastal topography and measuring coastal change. The new techniques presented here are likely applicable to many photograph collections and problems in the earth sciences.

  4. Analyzing the Potential for Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Photogrammetry in Estimating Surface Deformations at a Geothermal Fiel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, H.; Burnett, J.; Sladek, C.; Wing, M.; Feigl, K. L.; Selker, J. S.; Tyler, S.; Team, P.

    2016-12-01

    UAS systems equipped with a variety of spectral imaging devices are increasingly incorporated in spatial environmental assessments of continental surfaces (e.g., digital elevation maps, vegetative coverage classifications, surface temperatures). This presented work performed by the UAS team at the Center for Transformative Environmental Monitoring Programs (AirCTEMPS) examines the potential to measure small (sub-cm) deformation from a geothermal injection experiment at Brady's geothermal field in western Nevada (USA). Areal mapping of the 700 x 270 m area of interest was conducted with a nadir pointing Sony A5100 digital camera onboard an autopiloted quadcopter. A total of 16 ground control points were installed using a TopCon GR3 GPS receiver. Two such mapping campaigns were conducted with one before and one after an anticipated surface deformation event. A digital elevation map (DEM) for each time period was created from over 1500 images having 80% overlap/sidelap by using structure from motion (SfM) via Agisoft Photoscan software. The resulting DEM resolution was 8 mm/pixel with residual aerial triangulation errors was < 5 mm. We present preliminary results from an optimized workflow which achieved errors and average differential DEM heights between campaigns at the cm-scale which is broader than the maximum expected deformation. Despite the disconnect between error and deformation severity, this study presents a unique application of sub-cm UAS-based DEMs and further distinguishes itself by comparing results to concurrent Interferometric Synthetic Radar (InSAR). The intent of our study and presentation of results is to streamline, cross-validate, and share methods to encourage further adoption of UAS imagery into the standard toolkit for environmental surface sensing across spatial scales.

  5. Application of UAV-SfM photogrammetry and aerial lidar to a disastrous flood: repeated topographic measurement of a newly formed crevasse splay of the Kinu River, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumida, Atsuto; Uchiyama, Shoichiro; Sugai, Toshihiko

    2017-09-01

    Geomorphic impacts of a disastrous crevasse splay that formed in September 2015 and its post-formation modifications were quantitatively documented by using repeated, high-definition digital surface models (DSMs) of an inhabited and cultivated floodplain of the Kinu River, central Japan. The DSMs were based on pre-flood (resolution: 2 m) and post-flood (resolution: 1 m) aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data from January 2007 and September 2015, respectively, and on structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry data (resolution: 3.84 cm) derived from aerial photos taken by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in December 2015. After elimination of systematic errors among the DSMs and down-sampling of the SfM-derived DSM, elevation changes on the order of 10-1 m - including not only topography but also growth of vegetation, vanishing of flood waters, and restoration and repair works - were detected. Comparison of the DSMs showed that the volume eroded by the flood was more than twice the deposited volume in the area within 300-500 m of the breached artificial levee, where the topography was significantly affected. The results suggest that DSMs based on a combination of UAV-SfM and lidar data can be used to quantify, rapidly and in rich detail, topographic changes on floodplains caused by floods.

  6. 'Unlocking the archive': Using digital photogrammetry of modern and historic aerial photography to reconstruct 60 years of volumetric change on the Moider Glacier, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Lucy; Miller, Pauline; Ireland, Louise; Fox, Adrian; Mills, Jon; Fieber, Karolina

    2016-04-01

    The Antarctic Peninsula is a mountain glacier system comprised of over 400 glaciers, and is an important contributor to historical and future sea level rise. Assessment and monitoring of AP glaciers is crucial for understanding sensitivity to climate change. Changes to glacier fronts and ice shelves and glacier acceleration are well documented, but there are almost no data on mass changes on the Antarctic Peninsula. Satellite data have been used to calculate change over the last 3 decades, but methods to quantify this over longer timescales have eluded researchers. However there is an archive of aerial photography dating back to the 1940s, this has been largely ignored due to the range of technical problems associated with deriving quantitative data from historic imagery and the lack of ground control data. This presentation demonstrates how advances in photogrammetric processing and capture of modern aerial photography has allowed this archive to be 'unlocked'. Accurate photogrammetric reconstruction from aerial photographs traditionally requires known ground control points acquired in the field; in remote and inaccessible areas, such as the Antarctic Peninsula, this is often impossible. A method for providing control for historic photos without fieldwork, by linking them to a newly acquired, highly accurate photogrammetric model adjusted through direct kinematic GPS positioning of the camera has been applied to a number of glaciers across the Antarctic Peninsula. This presentation will outline the photogrammetric workflow with focus on the Moider Glacier in the Marguerite Bay region of the western Antarctic Peninsula to investigate the quality of data that can be obtained. Volumetric changes on the glaciers from the 1950s to present day (2015) have been reconstructed and can be used to explore the spatial and temporal changes that have occurred on this glacier. In particular, there is near-annual data over the last 5 years recording a period when there has been

  7. Performance Evaluation of 3d Modeling Software for Uav Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagi, H.; Chikatsu, H.

    2016-06-01

    UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry, which combines UAV and freely available internet-based 3D modeling software, is widely used as a low-cost and user-friendly photogrammetry technique in the fields such as remote sensing and geosciences. In UAV photogrammetry, only the platform used in conventional aerial photogrammetry is changed. Consequently, 3D modeling software contributes significantly to its expansion. However, the algorithms of the 3D modelling software are black box algorithms. As a result, only a few studies have been able to evaluate their accuracy using 3D coordinate check points. With this motive, Smart3DCapture and Pix4Dmapper were downloaded from the Internet and commercial software PhotoScan was also employed; investigations were performed in this paper using check points and images obtained from UAV.

  8. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  9. High Resolution Stratigraphic Mapping in Complex Terrain: A Comparison of Traditional Remote Sensing Techniques with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle - Structure from Motion Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesbit, P. R.; Hugenholtz, C.; Durkin, P.; Hubbard, S. M.; Kucharczyk, M.; Barchyn, T.

    2016-12-01

    Remote sensing and digital mapping have started to revolutionize geologic mapping in recent years as a result of their realized potential to provide high resolution 3D models of outcrops to assist with interpretation, visualization, and obtaining accurate measurements of inaccessible areas. However, in stratigraphic mapping applications in complex terrain, it is difficult to acquire information with sufficient detail at a wide spatial coverage with conventional techniques. We demonstrate the potential of a UAV and Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetric approach for improving 3D stratigraphic mapping applications within a complex badland topography. Our case study is performed in Dinosaur Provincial Park (Alberta, Canada), mapping late Cretaceous fluvial meander belt deposits of the Dinosaur Park formation amidst a succession of steeply sloping hills and abundant drainages - creating a challenge for stratigraphic mapping. The UAV-SfM dataset (2 cm spatial resolution) is compared directly with a combined satellite and aerial LiDAR dataset (30 cm spatial resolution) to reveal advantages and limitations of each dataset before presenting a unique workflow that utilizes the dense point cloud from the UAV-SfM dataset for analysis. The UAV-SfM dense point cloud minimizes distortion, preserves 3D structure, and records an RGB attribute - adding potential value in future studies. The proposed UAV-SfM workflow allows for high spatial resolution remote sensing of stratigraphy in complex topographic environments. This extended capability can add value to field observations and has the potential to be integrated with subsurface petroleum models.

  10. Uav Borne Low Altitude Photogrammetry System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Su, G.; Xie, F.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper,the aforementioned three major aspects related to the Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) system for low altitude aerial photogrammetry, i.e., flying platform, imaging sensor system and data processing software, are discussed. First of all, according to the technical requirements about the least cruising speed, the shortest taxiing distance, the level of the flight control and the performance of turbulence flying, the performance and suitability of the available UAV platforms (e.g., fixed wing UAVs, the unmanned helicopters and the unmanned airships) are compared and analyzed. Secondly, considering the restrictions on the load weight of a platform and the resolution pertaining to a sensor, together with the exposure equation and the theory of optical information, the principles of designing self-calibration and self-stabilizing combined wide-angle digital cameras (e.g., double-combined camera and four-combined camera) are placed more emphasis on. Finally, a software named MAP-AT, considering the specialty of UAV platforms and sensors, is developed and introduced. Apart from the common functions of aerial image processing, MAP-AT puts more effort on automatic extraction, automatic checking and artificial aided adding of the tie points for images with big tilt angles. Based on the recommended process for low altitude photogrammetry with UAVs in this paper, more than ten aerial photogrammetry missions have been accomplished, the accuracies of Aerial Triangulation, Digital orthophotos(DOM)and Digital Line Graphs(DLG) of which meet the standard requirement of 1:2000, 1:1000 and 1:500 mapping.

  11. The Scanning Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, T.; Zhang, Z. X.; Huang, S.

    2012-07-01

    The paper proposes a new photogrammetry method, the scanning photogrammetry, to solve the problem that large targets can hardly be processed as a whole one in close-range photogrammetry. The method enlarges the view angle and intersection angle effectively by rotating camera in horizontal and vertical direction when photographing large targets. Meanwhile, it is a kind of multi-baseline photogrammetry which increases matching reliability and improves the quality and quantity of observations. Besides, in order to acquire images automatically, we develop the photograph scanner which ensures the efficiency and quality of photography. And the scanning photogrammetry system has been successfully used in deformation monitoring of Wumen Circumvallation in the Forbidden City. In the experiments, data is processed automatically by classical triangulation and self-calibration bundle adjustment. The result proves that the precision can meet with the deformation monitoring requirements and data processing efficiency accomplishes to engineering measurement applications.

  12. Effect of the Resolution and Accuracy of DTM produced with Aerial Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning on Slope- and Catchment-scale Erosion Assessment in a Recently Burnt Forest Area: a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambra, Sílvia; Pereira, Luísa; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2010-05-01

    Wildfires are a common phenomenon in Portugal, affecting on average 100.000 ha of rural areas per year and up to 400.000 ha in dramatic years like 2003 and 2005. Wildfires can strongly enhance the hydrological response and associated sediment losses in recently burnt forest catchments and, thereby, negatively affect land-use sustainability of the affected terrains as well as ecosystem functioning of downstream aquatic habitats. Therefore, the EROSFIRE-I and -II projects aim at developing a GIS-tool for predicting soil erosion hazard following wildfire and, ultimately, for assessing the implications of alternative post-fire land management practices. Assessment of runoff and soil erosion rates critically depends on accurate estimates of the corresponding runoff areas. In the case of catchments as well as unbounded erosion plots (arguably, the only practical solution for slope-scale measurements), delineation of runoff area requires a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) with an adequate resolution and accuracy. The DTM that was available for the Colmeal study area, localized in the mountain range of Lousã, in the central part of Portugal, of EROSFIRE-II project is that of the 1:25.000 topographic map produced by the Military Geographic Institute. Since the Colmeal area involves a rather small experimental catchment of roughly 10 ha and relatively short study slopes of less than 100 m long, two different data acquisition techniques were used to produce high-resolution and high-accuracy DTM. One of the data acquisition techniques is aerial photogrammetry whilst the other is terrestrial laser scanning. In order to produce a DTM by photogrammetric means, a dedicated digital aerial photography mission was carried out. The images have a pixel size of 10 cm. Manual measurements permitted to measure breaklines and were complemented by automatic measurements. In this way, a DTM in a TIN format was produced. This was further converted to grid format using the ArcGIS software system

  13. Photogrammetry at the Warsaw University of Technology - Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawieska, Dorota; Kurczyński, Zdzisław

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems at the Warsaw University of Technology is one of six organizational units of the Faculty of Geodesy and Cartography. The photogrammetry has been under interest of scientists in Faculty for over 90 years. The last decades has been characterized by the incredible development of photogrammetric technologies, mainly towards wide automation and popularization of derivative products for processing data acquired at satellite, aerial, and terrestrial levels. The paper presents achievements of scientists employed in Photogrammetric Research Group during last decades related to projects that were carried out in this department.

  14. Development of photogrammetry in the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Morris M.

    1958-01-01

    Photogrammetry, the science or art of obtaining reliable measurements by means of photography, is now used extensively in topographic mapping. Precise photogrammetric plotting instruments now enable the map maker to extract from aerial photographs much.of the detailed information required for drawing the map that formerly was acquired by laborious ground surveys. Photography and photogrammetry have thus become essential components of all large mapping operations. The Geological Survey has played a leading role in the development of photogrammetric methods of mapping over a period of half a century. This role has been well documented in numerous articles appearing in technical publications during this time. It is the purpose of this circular to present, in brief form, the highlights of Geological Survey activities and developments in the field of photogrammetry, from pioneer efforts to present-day practice.

  15. Research on Reef Bathymetric Survey of Uav Stereopair Based on Two-Medium Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dongmei; Liao, Ming; Nan, Ao; Wang, Enquan; Zhou, Gaowei

    2016-06-01

    This paper is based on the principles of two-medium photogrammetry, with the purpose to perform a bathymetric survey of a reef in the South China Sea, using aerial imagery acquired by UAV. The first objectives are to introduce the basic principles of two-medium photogrammetry, discuss the technical requirements of this methodology to determine an accurate refractive index of sea water, and propose a new method to calculate seawater refraction and calculate corrected reef elevations. The second objective is to analyse and integrate the elevation and depth datum for both the land mass and the undersea reef. The final objective of this paper is performing stereoscopic mensuration on the UAV photography in order to transform reef elevation and depth datum. Our test shows that aerial two-medium photogrammetry is feasible in practical application, but requires relatively high aerial photography conditions.

  16. The Photogrammetry Cube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    We can determine distances between objects and points of interest in 3-D space to a useful degree of accuracy from a set of camera images by using multiple camera views and reference targets in the camera s field of view (FOV). The core of the software processing is based on the previously developed foreign-object debris vision trajectory software (see KSC Research and Technology 2004 Annual Report, pp. 2 5). The current version of this photogrammetry software includes the ability to calculate distances between any specified point pairs, the ability to process any number of reference targets and any number of camera images, user-friendly editing features, including zoom in/out, translate, and load/unload, routines to help mark reference points with a Find function, while comparing them with the reference point database file, and a comprehensive output report in HTML format. In this system, scene reference targets are replaced by a photogrammetry cube whose exterior surface contains multiple predetermined precision 2-D targets. Precise measurement of the cube s 2-D targets during the fabrication phase eliminates the need for measuring 3-D coordinates of reference target positions in the camera's FOV, using for example a survey theodolite or a Faroarm. Placing the 2-D targets on the cube s surface required the development of precise machining methods. In response, 2-D targets were embedded into the surface of the cube and then painted black for high contrast. A 12-inch collapsible cube was developed for room-size scenes. A 3-inch, solid, stainless-steel photogrammetry cube was also fabricated for photogrammetry analysis of small objects.

  17. Learning Photogrammetry with Interactive Software Tool PhoX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, T.

    2016-06-01

    Photogrammetry is a complex topic in high-level university teaching, especially in the fields of geodesy, geoinformatics and metrology where high quality results are demanded. In addition, more and more black-box solutions for 3D image processing and point cloud generation are available that generate nice results easily, e.g. by structure-from-motion approaches. Within this context, the classical approach of teaching photogrammetry (e.g. focusing on aerial stereophotogrammetry) has to be reformed in order to educate students and professionals with new topics and provide them with more information behind the scene. Since around 20 years photogrammetry courses at the Jade University of Applied Sciences in Oldenburg, Germany, include the use of digital photogrammetry software that provide individual exercises, deep analysis of calculation results and a wide range of visualization tools for almost all standard tasks in photogrammetry. During the last years the software package PhoX has been developed that is part of a new didactic concept in photogrammetry and related subjects. It also serves as analysis tool in recent research projects. PhoX consists of a project-oriented data structure for images, image data, measured points and features and 3D objects. It allows for almost all basic photogrammetric measurement tools, image processing, calculation methods, graphical analysis functions, simulations and much more. Students use the program in order to conduct predefined exercises where they have the opportunity to analyse results in a high level of detail. This includes the analysis of statistical quality parameters but also the meaning of transformation parameters, rotation matrices, calibration and orientation data. As one specific advantage, PhoX allows for the interactive modification of single parameters and the direct view of the resulting effect in image or object space.

  18. 1:500 Scale Aerial Triangulation Test with Unmanned Airship in Hubei Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feifei, Xie; Zongjian, Lin; Dezhu, Gui

    2014-03-01

    A new UAVS (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System) for low altitude aerial photogrammetry is introduced for fine surveying and mapping, including the platform airship, sensor system four-combined wide-angle camera and photogrammetry software MAP-AT. It is demonstrated that this low-altitude aerial photogrammetric system meets the precision requirements of 1:500 scale aerial triangulation based on the test of this system in Hubei province, including the working condition of the airship, the quality of image data and the data processing report. This work provides a possibility for fine surveying and mapping.

  19. Isprs Benchmark for Multi-Platform Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nex, F.; Gerke, M.; Remondino, F.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Bäumker, M.; Zurhorst, A.

    2015-03-01

    Airborne high resolution oblique imagery systems and RPAS/UAVs are very promising technologies that will keep on influencing the development of geomatics in the future years closing the gap between terrestrial and classical aerial acquisitions. These two platforms are also a promising solution for National Mapping and Cartographic Agencies (NMCA) as they allow deriving complementary mapping information. Although the interest for the registration and integration of aerial and terrestrial data is constantly increasing, only limited work has been truly performed on this topic. Several investigations still need to be undertaken concerning algorithms ability for automatic co-registration, accurate point cloud generation and feature extraction from multiplatform image data. One of the biggest obstacles is the non-availability of reliable and free datasets to test and compare new algorithms and procedures. The Scientific Initiative "ISPRS benchmark for multi-platform photogrammetry", run in collaboration with EuroSDR, aims at collecting and sharing state-of-the-art multi-sensor data (oblique airborne, UAV-based and terrestrial images) over an urban area. These datasets are used to assess different algorithms and methodologies for image orientation and dense matching. As ground truth, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS) as well as topographic networks and GNSS points were acquired to compare 3D coordinates on check points (CPs) and evaluate cross sections and residuals on generated point cloud surfaces. In this paper, the acquired data, the pre-processing steps, the evaluation procedures as well as some preliminary results achieved with commercial software will be presented.

  20. Virtual reality via photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahrt, John D.; Papcun, George; Childers, Randy A.; Rubin, Naama

    1996-03-01

    We wish to walk into a photograph just as Alice walked into the looking glass. From a mathematical perspective, this problem is exceedingly ill-posed (e.g. Is that a large, distant object or a small, nearby object?). A human expert can supply a large amount of a priori information that can function as mathematical constraints. The constrained problem can then be attacked with photogrammetry to obtain a great deal of quantitative information which is otherwise only qualitatively apparent. The user determines whether the object to be analyzed contains two or three vanishing points, then selects an appropriate number of points from the photon to enable the code to compute the locations of the vanishing points. Using this information and the standard photogrammetric geometric algorithms, the location of the camera, relative to the structure, is determined. The user must also enter information regarding an absolute sense of scale. As the vectors from the camera to the various points chosen from the photograph are determined, the vector components (coordinates) are handed to a virtual reality software package. Once the objects are entered, the appropriate surfaces of the 3D object are `wallpapered' with the surface from the photograph. The user is then able to move through the virtual scene. A video will demonstrate our work.

  1. Aspects of Voyager photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Schafer, Francis J.; Jordan, Raymond; Howington, Annie-Elpis

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986, Voyager 2 took a series of pictures of Uranus and its satellites with the Imaging Science System (ISS) on board the spacecraft. Based on six stereo images from the ISS narrow-angle camera, a topographic map was compiled of the Southern Hemisphere of Miranda, one of Uranus' moons. Assuming a spherical figure, a 20-km surface relief is shown on the map. With three additional images from the ISS wide-angle camera, a control network of Miranda's Southern Hemisphere was established by analytical photogrammetry, producing 88 ground points for the control of multiple-model compilation on the AS-11AM analytical stereoplotter. Digital terrain data from the topographic map of Miranda have also been produced. By combining these data and the image data from the Voyager 2 mission, perspective views or even a movie of the mapped area can be made. The application of these newly developed techniques to Voyager 1 imagery, which includes a few overlapping pictures of Io and Ganymede, permits the compilation of contour maps or topographic profiles of these bodies on the analytical stereoplotters.

  2. Photogrammetry - Remote Sensing and Geoinformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridou, M. A.; Patmio, E. N.

    2012-07-01

    Earth and its environment are studied by different scientific disciplines as geosciences, science of engineering, social sciences, geography, etc. The study of the above, beyond pure scientific interest, is useful for the practical needs of man. Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (defined by Statute II of ISPRS) is the art, science, and technology of obtaining reliable information from non-contact imaging and other sensor systems about the Earth and its environment, and other physical objects and of processes through recording, measuring, analyzing and representation. Therefore, according to this definition, photogrammetry and remote sensing can support studies of the above disciplines for acquisition of geoinformation. This paper concerns basic concepts of geosciences (geomorphology, geology, hydrology etc), and the fundamentals of photogrammetry-remote sensing, in order to aid the understanding of the relationship between photogrammetry-remote sensing and geoinformation and also structure curriculum in a brief, concise and coherent way. This curriculum can represent an appropriate research and educational outline and help to disseminate knowledge in various directions and levels. It resulted from our research and educational experience in graduate and post-graduate level (post-graduate studies relative to the protection of environment and protection of monuments and historical centers) in the Lab. of Photogrammetry - Remote Sensing in Civil Engineering Faculty of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki.

  3. Photogrammetry procedures applied to anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Okimoto, Maria Lúcialeite Ribeiro; Klein, Alison Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the reliability and establish procedures for the use of digital photogrammetry in anthropometric measurements of the human hand. The methodology included the construction of a platform to allow the placement of the hand always equivalent to a distance of the camera lens and to annul the effects of parallax. We developed a software to perform the measurements from the images and built up a subject of proof in a cast from a negative mold, this object was subjected to measurements with digital photogrammetry using the data collection platform in caliper and the Coordinate Measuring Machine (MMC). The results of the application of photogrammetry in the data collection segment hand, allow us to conclude that photogrammetry is an effective presenting precision coefficient below 0.940. Within normal and acceptable values, given the magnitude of the data used in anthropometry. It was concluded photogrammetry then be reliable, accurate and efficient for carrying out anthropometric surveys of population, and presents less difficulty to collect in-place.

  4. Classical Photogrammetry and Uav - Selected Ascpects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikrut, S.

    2016-06-01

    The UAV technology seems to be highly future-oriented due to its low costs as compared to traditional aerial images taken from classical photogrammetry aircrafts. The AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow - Department of Geoinformation, Photogrammetry and Environmental Remote Sensing focuses mainly on geometry and radiometry of recorded images. Various scientific research centres all over the world have been conducting the relevant research for years. The paper presents selected aspects of processing digital images made with the UAV technology. It provides on a practical example a comparison between a digital image taken from an airborne (classical) height, and the one made from an UAV level. In his research the author of the paper is trying to find an answer to the question: to what extent does the UAV technology diverge today from classical photogrammetry, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of both methods? The flight plan was made over the Tokarnia Village Museum (more than 0.5 km2) for two separate flights: the first was made by an UAV - System FT-03A built by FlyTech Solution Ltd. The second was made with the use of a classical photogrammetric Cesna aircraft furnished with an airborne photogrammetric camera (Ultra Cam Eagle). Both sets of photographs were taken with pixel size of about 3 cm, in order to have reliable data allowing for both systems to be compared. The project has made aerotriangulation independently for the two flights. The DTM was generated automatically, and the last step was the generation of an orthophoto. The geometry of images was checked under the process of aerotriangulation. To compare the accuracy of these two flights, control and check points were used. RMSE were calculated. The radiometry was checked by a visual method and using the author's own algorithm for feature extraction (to define edges with subpixel accuracy). After initial pre-processing of data, the images were put together, and shown side by side

  5. UAS Photogrammetry for Rapid Response Characterization of Subaerial Coastal Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, C.; Anarde, K.; Figlus, J.; Prouse, W.; Bedient, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UASs) provide an exciting new platform for rapid response measurement of subaerial coastal change. Here we validate the use of a coupled hobbyist UAS and optical photogrammetry framework for high-resolution mapping of portions of a low-lying barrier island along the Texas Gulf Coast. A DJI Phantom 3 Professional was used to capture 2D nadir images of the foreshore and back-beach environments containing both vegetated and non-vegetated features. The images were georeferenced using ground-truth markers surveyed via real-time kinematic (RTK) GPS and were then imported into Agisoft Photoscan, a photo-processing software, to generate 3D point clouds and digital elevation maps (DEMs). The georeferenced elevation models were then compared to RTK measurements to evaluate accuracy and precision. Thus far, DEMs derived from UAS photogrammetry show centimeter resolution for renderings of non-vegetated landforms. High-resolution renderings of vegetated and back-barrier regions have proven more difficult due to interstitial wetlands (surface reflectance) and uneven terrain for GPS backpack surveys. In addition to producing high-quality models, UAS photogrammetry has demonstrated to be more time-efficient than traditional mapping methods, making it advantageous for rapid response deployments. This study is part of a larger effort to relate field measurements of storm hydrodynamics to subaerial evidence of geomorphic change to better understand barrier island response to extreme storms.

  6. Uav Photogrammetry: a Practical Solution for Challenging Mapping Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatseresht, M.; Hashempour, A. H.; Hasanlou, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have observed huge attentions to application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in aerial mapping since a decade ago. Though, it has several advantages for handling time/cost/quality issues, there are a dozen of challenges in working with UAVs. In this paper, we; as the Robotic Photogrammetry Research Group (RPRG), will firstly review these challenges then show its advantages in three special practical projects. For each project, we will share our experiences through description of the UAV specifications, flight settings and processing steps. At the end, we will illustrate final result of each project and show how this technology could make unbelievable benefits to clients including 3D city realistic model in decimetre level, ultra high quality map production in several centimetre level, and accessing to a high risk and rough relief area for mapping aims.

  7. Photogrammetry Of A Parabolic Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, W. D.; Lansing, F. L.; Stoller, F. W.; Lobb, V. B.

    1988-01-01

    Surface measured with accuracy better than 10 to the negative fifth power times diameter. Report describes use of advanced close-range photogrammetry to determine deviations of 34-m-diameter antenna main reflector and subreflector from nominal paraboloidal shapes. Measurements enable removal of linear offsets and angular misalignments of subreflector, with consequent increase of 4 percent in aperture efficiency.

  8. A New Blondin System for Surveying and Photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Federico; Lopez-Rodriguez, Francisco M.; Esteban, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the system presented in this paper is to provide surveyors and engineers with a new photogrammetry device that can be easily integrated with surveying total stations and a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) infrastructure at a construction site, taking advantage of their accuracy and overcoming limitations of aerial vehicles with respect to weight, autonomy and skilled operator requirements in aerial photogrammetry. The system moves between two mounting points, in a blondin ropeway configuration, at the construction site, taking pictures and recording the data of the position and the orientation along the cable path. A cascaded extended Kalman filter is used to integrate measurements from the on-board inertial measurement unit (IMU), a GPS and a GNSS. Experimental results taken in a construction site show the system performance, including the validation of the position estimation, with a robotic surveying total station, or the creation of a digital surface model (DSM), using the emergent structure from motion (SfM) techniques and open software. The georeferencing of the DSM is performed based on estimated camera position or using ground control points (GCPs).

  9. Photogrammetry Tool for Forensic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2012-01-01

    A system allows crime scene and accident scene investigators the ability to acquire visual scene data using cameras for processing at a later time. This system uses a COTS digital camera, a photogrammetry calibration cube, and 3D photogrammetry processing software. In a previous instrument developed by NASA, the laser scaling device made use of parallel laser beams to provide a photogrammetry solution in 2D. This device and associated software work well under certain conditions. In order to make use of a full 3D photogrammetry system, a different approach was needed. When using multiple cubes, whose locations relative to each other are unknown, a procedure that would merge the data from each cube would be as follows: 1. One marks a reference point on cube 1, then marks points on cube 2 as unknowns. This locates cube 2 in cube 1 s coordinate system. 2. One marks reference points on cube 2, then marks points on cube 1 as unknowns. This locates cube 1 in cube 2 s coordinate system. 3. This procedure is continued for all combinations of cubes. 4. The coordinate of all of the found coordinate systems is then merged into a single global coordinate system. In order to achieve maximum accuracy, measurements are done in one of two ways, depending on scale: when measuring the size of objects, the coordinate system corresponding to the nearest cube is used, or when measuring the location of objects relative to a global coordinate system, a merged coordinate system is used. Presently, traffic accident analysis is time-consuming and not very accurate. Using cubes with differential GPS would give absolute positions of cubes in the accident area, so that individual cubes would provide local photogrammetry calibration to objects near a cube.

  10. Modelling Steep Surfaces by Various Configurations of Nadir and Oblique Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, V.; Franzini, M.

    2016-06-01

    Among the parts of the territory requiring periodical and careful monitoring, many have steep surfaces: quarries, river basins, land-slides, dangerous mountainsides. Aerial photogrammetry based on lightweight unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) is rapidly becoming the tool of election to survey limited areas of land with a high level of detail. Aerial photogrammetry is traditionally based on vertical images and only recently the use of significantly inclined imagery has been considered. Oblique photogrammetry presents peculiar aspects and offers improved capabilities for steep surface reconstruction. Full comprehension of oblique photogrammetry still requires research efforts and the evaluation of diverse case studies. In the present paper, the focus is on the photogrammetric UAS-based survey of a part of a large sandpit. Various flight configurations are considered: ordinary linear strips, radial strips (as the scarp considered has a semi-circular shape) and curved ones; moreover, nadir looking and oblique image blocks were acquired. Around 300 control points were measured with a topographic total station. The various datasets considered are evaluated in terms of density of the extracted point cloud and in terms of the distance between the reconstructed surface and a number of check points.

  11. Some Aspects in Photogrammetry Education at the Department of Geodesy and Cadastre of the VGTU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzgienė, Birutė

    2008-03-01

    The education in photogrammetry is very important when applying photogrammetric methods for the terrain mapping purposes, for spatial data modelling, solving engineering tasks, measuring of architectural monuments etc. During the time the traditional photogrammetric technologies have been changing to modern fully digital photogrammetric workflow. The number of potential users of the photogrammetric methods tends to increase, because of high-degree automation in photographs (images) processing. The main subjects in Photogrammetry (particularly in Digital Photogrammetry) educational process are discussed. Different methods and digital systems are demonstrated with the examples of aerial photogrammetry products. The main objective is to search the possibilities for training in the photogrammetric measurements. Special attention is paid to the stereo plotting from aerial photography applying modified for teaching analytical technology. The integration of functionality of Digital Photogrammetric Systems and Digital Image Processing is analysed as well with an intention of extending the application areas and possibilities for usage of modern technologies in urban mapping and land cadastre. The practical presentation of photos geometry restitution is implemented as significant part of the studies. The interactive teaching for main photogrammetric procedures and controlling systems are highly desirable that without any doubt improve the quality of educational process.

  12. Catchment-scale snow depth monitoring with balloon photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, M. T.; Li, D.; Wigmore, O.; Vanderjagt, B. J.; Molotch, N. P.; Bales, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    Field campaigns and permanent in-situ facilities provide extensive measurements of snowpack properties at catchment (or smaller) scales, and have consistently improved our understanding of snow processes and the estimation of snow water resources. However, snow depth, one of the most important snow states, has been measured almost entirely with discrete point-scale samplings in field measurements; spatiotemporally continuous snow depth measurements are nearly nonexistent, mainly due to the high cost of airborne flights and the ban of Unmanned Aerial Systems in many areas (e.g. in all the national parks). In this study, we estimate spatially continuous snow depth from photogrammetric reconstruction of aerial photos taken from a weather balloon. The study was conducted in a 0.2 km2 watershed in Wolverton, Sequoia National Park, California. We tied a point-and-shoot camera on a helium-inflated weather balloon to take aerial images; the camera was scripted to automatically capture images every 3 seconds and to record the camera position and orientation at the imaging times using a built-in GPS. With the 2D images of the snow-covered ground and the camera position and orientation data, the 3D coordinates of the snow surface were reconstructed at 10 cm resolution using photogrammetry software PhotoScan. Similar measurements were taken for the snow-free ground after snowmelt, and the snow depth was estimated from the difference between the snow-on and snow-off measurements. Comparing the photogrammetric-estimated snow depths with the 32 manually measured depths, taken at the same time as the snow-on balloon flight, we find the RMSE of the photogrammetric snow depth is 7 cm, which is 2% of the long-term peak snow depth in the study area. This study suggests that the balloon photogrammetry is a repeatable, economical, simple, and environmental-friendly method to continuously monitor snow at small-scales. Spatiotemporally continuous snow depth could be regularly measured in

  13. Dem Assessment Derived from Close Range Photogrammetry: a Case Study from Kadavur Area, Karur District, Tamil Nadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbarasan, S.; Sakthivel, R.

    2012-07-01

    Close-Range Photogrammetry is an accurate, cost effective technique of collecting measurements of real world objects and conditions, directly from photographs. Photogrammetry utilizes digital images to obtain accurate measurements and geometric data of the object or area of interest, in order to provide spatial information for Engineering design, spatial surveys or 3D modeling. The benefits of close-range Photogrammetry over other field procedures are purported to be: Increased accuracy; complete as-built information; reduced costs; reduced on-site time; and effective for small and large projects. The same basic principle of traditional Aerial Photogrammetry can be applied to stereoscopic pictures taken from lower altitudes or from the ground. Terrestrial, ground-based, and close-range are all descriptive terms that refer to photos taken with an object-to-camera distance less than 300m (1000 feet). (Matthews, N.A, 2008). Close range Photogrammetry is a technique for obtaining the geometric information (e.g. position, distance, size and shape) of any object in 3D space that was imaged on the two dimensional (2D) photos, (Wolf, P.R, et.al, 2000) DEM Generation requires many processing and computation, such as camera calibration, stereo matching, editing, and interpolation. All the mentioned steps contribute to the quality of DEM. Image on close range Photogrammetry can be captured using three kind of camera: metric camera, semi-metric camera, and non-metric camera (Hanke, K., et.al, 2002). In this paper DEM quality assessed at Kadavur area, Karur district, Tamil Naudu, India using Close Range Photogrammetry technique, Commercial Digital Camera and Leica Photogrammetry Suite.

  14. Photogrammetry in the line: recent developments in industrial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesemann, Werner

    2003-05-01

    In recent years industrial photogrammetry has emerged from a highly specialized niche technology to a well established tool in industrial coordinate measurement applications with numerous installations in a significantly growing market of flexible and portable optical measurement systems. This is due to the development of powerful, but affordable video and computer technology. The increasing industrial requirements for accuracy, speed, robustness and ease of use of these systems together with a demand for the highest possible degree of automation have forced universities and system manufacturers to develop hard- and software solutions to meet these requirements. The presentation will show the latest trends in hardware development, especially new generation digital and/or intelligent cameras, aspects of image engineering like use of controlled illumination or projection technologies,and algorithmic and software aspects like automation strategies or new camera models. The basic qualities of digital photogrammetry-like portability and flexibility on one hand and fully automated quality control on the other -- sometimes lead to certain conflicts in the design of measurement systems for different online, offline or real-time solutions. The presentation will further show, how these tools and methods are combined in different configurations to be able to cover the still growing demands of the industrial end-users.

  15. Stability analysis of chalk sea cliffs using UAV photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, John; Gilham, Jamie

    2017-04-01

    Cliff erosion and instability poses a significant hazard to communities and infrastructure located is coastal areas. We use point cloud and spectral data derived from close range digital photogrammetry to assess the stability of chalk sea cliffs located at Telscombe, UK. Data captured from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) were used to generate dense point clouds for a 712 m section of cliff face which ranges from 20 to 49 m in height. Generated models fitted our ground control network within a standard error of 0.03 m. Structural features such as joints, bedding planes, and faults were manually mapped and are consistent with results from other studies that have been conducted using direct measurement in the field. Kinematic analysis of these data was used to identify the primary modes of failure at the site. Our results indicate that wedge failure is by far the most likely mode of slope instability. An analysis of sequential surveys taken from the summer of 2016 to the winter of 2017 indicate several large failures have occurred at the site. We establish the volume of failure through change detection between sequential data sets and use back analysis to determine the strength of shear surfaces for each failure. Our results show that data capture through UAV photogrammetry can provide useful information for slope stability analysis over long sections of cliff. The use of this technology offers significant benefits in equipment costs and field time over existing methods.

  16. Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg; Ippolito, Corey

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results from a mission architecture study of planetary aerial explorers. In this study, several mission scenarios were developed in simulation and evaluated on success in meeting mission goals. This aerial explorer mission architecture study is unique in comparison with previous Mars airplane research activities. The study examines how aerial vehicles can find and gain access to otherwise inaccessible terrain features of interest. The aerial explorer also engages in a high-level of (indirect) surface interaction, despite not typically being able to takeoff and land or to engage in multiple flights/sorties. To achieve this goal, a new mission paradigm is proposed: aerial explorers should be considered as an additional element in the overall Entry, Descent, Landing System (EDLS) process. Further, aerial vehicles should be considered primarily as carrier/utility platforms whose purpose is to deliver air-deployed sensors and robotic devices, or symbiotes, to those high-value terrain features of interest.

  17. Forest structure analysis combining laser scanning with digital airborne photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissak, Candide; Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki

    2017-04-01

    The interest of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) for vegetation structure analysis has been demonstrated in several research context. Indeed, airborne or ground Lidar surveys can provide detailed three-dimensional data of the forest structure from understorey forest to the canopy. To characterize at different timescale the vegetation components in dense cedar forests we can combine several sources point clouds from Lidar survey and photogrammetry data. For our study, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS-Leica ScanStation C10 processed with Cyclone software) have been lead in three forest areas (≈ 200m2 each zone) mainly composed of japanese cedar (Japonica cryptomeria), in the region of Fukushima (Japan). The study areas are characterized by various vegetation densities. For the 3 areas, Terrestrial laser scanning has been performed from several location points and several heights. Various floors shootings (ground, 4m, 6m and 18m high) were able with the use of a several meters high tower implanted to study the canopy evolution following the Fukushima Daiishi nuclear power plant accident. The combination of all scanners provides a very dense 3D point cloud of ground and canopy structure (average 300 000 000 points). For the Tochigi forest area, a first test of a low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry has been lead and calibrated by ground GPS measurements to determine the coordinates of points. TLS combined to UAV photogrammetry make it possible to obtain information on vertical and horizontal structure of the Tochigi forest. This combination of technologies will allow the forest structure mapping, morphometry analysis and the assessment of biomass volume evolution from multi-temporal point clouds. In our research, we used a low-cost UAV 3 Advanced (200 m2 cover, 1300 pictures...). Data processing were performed using PotoScan Pro software to obtain a very dense point clouds to combine to TLS data set. This low-cost UAV photogrammetry data has been

  18. Relaxation matching algorithm for moving photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lei; Liu, Ke; Miao, Yinxiao; Zhu, Jigui

    2015-02-01

    Moving photogrammetry is an application of close range photogrammetry in industrial measurement to realize threedimensional coordinate measurement within large-scale volume. This paper describes an approach of relaxation matching algorithm applicable to moving photogrammetry according to the characteristics of accurate matching result of different measuring images. This method uses neighborhood matching support to improve the matching rate after coarse matching based on epipolar geometry constraint and precise matching using three images. It reflects the overall matching effect of all points, that means when a point is matched correctly, the matching results of those points round it must be correct. So for one point considered, the matching results of points round it are calculated to judge whether its result is correct. Analysis indicates that relaxation matching can eliminate the mismatching effectively and acquire 100% rate of correct matching. It will play a very important role in moving photogrammetry to ensure the following implement of ray bundle adjustment.

  19. UAV photogrammetry for topographic monitoring of coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, J. A.; Henriques, R.

    2015-06-01

    Coastal areas suffer degradation due to the action of the sea and other natural and human-induced causes. Topographical changes in beaches and sand dunes need to be assessed, both after severe events and on a regular basis, to build models that can predict the evolution of these natural environments. This is an important application for airborne LIDAR, and conventional photogrammetry is also being used for regular monitoring programs of sensitive coastal areas. This paper analyses the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to map and monitor sand dunes and beaches. A very light plane (SwingletCam) equipped with a very cheap, non-metric camera was used to acquire images with ground resolutions better than 5 cm. The Agisoft Photoscan software was used to orientate the images, extract point clouds, build a digital surface model and produce orthoimage mosaics. The processing, which includes automatic aerial triangulation with camera calibration and subsequent model generation, was mostly automated. To achieve the best positional accuracy for the whole process, signalised ground control points were surveyed with a differential GPS receiver. Two very sensitive test areas on the Portuguese northwest coast were analysed. Detailed DSMs were obtained with 10 cm grid spacing and vertical accuracy (RMS) ranging from 3.5 to 5.0 cm, which is very similar to the image ground resolution (3.2-4.5 cm). Where possible to assess, the planimetric accuracy of the orthoimage mosaics was found to be subpixel. Within the regular coastal monitoring programme being carried out in the region, UAVs can replace many of the conventional flights, with considerable gains in the cost of the data acquisition and without any loss in the quality of topographic and aerial imagery data.

  20. Research on the Key Technology of Large Scale Mapping from Low Altitude Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo-Yi, Wu; Ning, Zhang; Guo-Zhong, Su

    2016-06-01

    Based on the theoretic analysis of the accuracy in large scale photogrammetric mapping, some defects in traditional procedure were discussed. A set of key technologies dedicate to accuracy improvement in low altitude photogrammetry were analyzed in detail, namely the utilization of wide angle camera and low altitude flight, enhancement in image matching, predesigned layout of Ground Control Points (GCPs) in field survey, optimization of adjustment model and improvement in map processing. Besides, a low altitude aerial unmanned airship system was established. Finally, successful implementation in 1:500 topographic mapping project in built-up areas of 30 counties in Shanxi Province proves the practicability and effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  1. Analysis of accuracy of digital elevation models created from captured data by digital photogrammetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, P.

    2011-12-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) is an important part of many geoinformatic applications. For the creation of DEM, spatial data collected by geodetic measurements in the field, photogrammetric processing of aerial survey photographs, laser scanning and secondary sources (analogue maps) are used. It is very important from a user's point of view to know the vertical accuracy of a DEM. The article describes the verification of the vertical accuracy of a DEM for the region of Medzibodrožie, which was created using digital photogrammetry for the purposes of water resources management and modeling and resolving flood cases based on geodetic measurements in the field.

  2. Photogrammetry applied to Problematic artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolae, C.; Nocerino, E.; Menna, F.; Remondino, F.

    2014-06-01

    The process of creating 3D accurate and faithful textured models from 2D images has been a major endeavor within the cultural heritage field. This field has general requirements, such as accuracy, portability and costs, that are often integrated by more specific needs such as the integration of color information. The aim of this paper is to show how photogrammetry can be a valid and reliable techniques for creating 3D models of museum artefacts even in case of objects with materials featuring difficult optical properties (absorptivity, reflectivity, scattering), challenging texture and complex shape/geometry. The main objective is to establish some core specifications for data acquisition and modeling, in order to guarantee the scientific quality of data and the interoperability of 3D models with the archaeologists and conservators. All these aspects are taken into consideration and presented with three study cases (two statues - one made of marble and one made of bronze - and a restored ceramic jug). The established, comprehensive and accessible pipeline for the creation of complex artefacts 3D models in the field of cultural heritage is presented and discussed.

  3. Direct Photogrammetry Using Uav: Tests and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiabrando, F.; Lingua, A.; Piras, M.

    2013-08-01

    In recent years, the quality of high resolution acquisition platforms for geomatic applications has decidedly increased, especially in the performance of the sensors devoted to image acquisition. The small size of these new sensors combined with the increase in resolution allows them to be easily mounted onto Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs); in particular, calibrated, very-high-resolution digital cameras for photogrammetric purposes such as digital terrain model (DTM) and digital surface model (DSM) extraction, orthophotos, and map realization have been used. In this case, the UAV performance allows a high quality product to be obtained, considering the pixel size and the accuracy of the DTM/DSM which could be obtained with automatic procedures. Several navigation sensors (GPS/GNSS and IMU-MEMS) are embedded into UAVs in order to realize autonomous flight. The quality of these sensors, in terms of accuracy, depends on the model of UAV and its purpose. The navigation solution (position and attitude) is estimated by the internal UAV sensor and can be employed to directly georeference the images, in order to produce an quick and easy description and analysis of the overlooked area. This is a good condition for semi-automatic procedures using a bundle-block photogrammetric approach. But is it possible to realize a direct photogrammetry? And what are the limits? Several tests were carried out over different areas and in different conditions using three different UAVs belonging to the Geomatics group of the Politecnico di Torino. In this paper, an investigation of the limits of some commercial UAVs is reported, defining a dedicated procedure to valuate their performance, especially considering the use of UAVs for direct photogrammetry.

  4. Aerial monitoring in active mud volcano by UAV technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Capasso, Giorgio; Madonia, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    UAV photogrammetry opens various new applications in the close range domain, combining aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry, but also introduces low-cost alternatives to the classical manned aerial photogrammetry. Between 2014 and 2015 tree aerial surveys have been carried out. Using a quadrotor drone, equipped with a compact camera, it was possible to generate high resolution elevation models and orthoimages of The "Salinelle", an active mud volcanoes area, located in territory of Paternò (South Italy). The main risks are related to the damages produced by paroxysmal events. Mud volcanoes show different cyclic phases of activity, including catastrophic events and periods of relative quiescence characterized by moderate activity. Ejected materials often are a mud slurry of fine solids suspended in liquids which may include water and hydrocarbon fluids, the bulk of released gases are carbon dioxide, with some methane and nitrogen, usually pond-shaped of variable dimension (from centimeters to meters in diameter). The scope of the presented work is the performance evaluation of a UAV system that was built to rapidly and autonomously acquire mobile three-dimensional (3D) mapping data in a volcanic monitoring scenario.

  5. Photogrammetry Methodology Development for Gossamer Spacecraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Jones, Thomas W.; Walford, Alan; Black, Jonathan T.; Robson, Stuart; Shortis, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    Photogrammetry--the science of calculating 3D object coordinates from images-is a flexible and robust approach for measuring the static and dynamic characteristics of future ultralightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., Gossamer structures), such as large membrane reflectors, solar sails, and thin-film solar arrays. Shape and dynamic measurements are required to validate new structural modeling techniques and corresponding analytical models for these unconventional systems. This paper summarizes experiences at NASA Langley Research Center over the past three years to develop or adapt photogrammetry methods for the specific problem of measuring Gossamer space structures. Turnkey industrial photogrammetry systems were not considered a cost-effective choice for this basic research effort because of their high purchase and maintenance costs. Instead, this research uses mainly off-the-shelf digital-camera and software technologies that are affordable to most organizations and provide acceptable accuracy.

  6. Photogrammetry Methodology Development for Gossamer Spacecraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Jones, Thomas W.; Black, Jonathan T.; Walford, Alan; Robson, Stuart; Shortis, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    Photogrammetry--the science of calculating 3D object coordinates from images--is a flexible and robust approach for measuring the static and dynamic characteristics of future ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., Gossamer structures), such as large membrane reflectors, solar sails, and thin-film solar arrays. Shape and dynamic measurements are required to validate new structural modeling techniques and corresponding analytical models for these unconventional systems. This paper summarizes experiences at NASA Langley Research Center over the past three years to develop or adapt photogrammetry methods for the specific problem of measuring Gossamer space structures. Turnkey industrial photogrammetry systems were not considered a cost-effective choice for this basic research effort because of their high purchase and maintenance costs. Instead, this research uses mainly off-the-shelf digital-camera and software technologies that are affordable to most organizations and provide acceptable accuracy.

  7. a Three-Dimensional Simulation and Visualization System for Uav Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Qu, Y.; Cui, T.

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays UAVs has been widely used for large-scale surveying and mapping. Compared with manned aircraft, UAVs are more cost-effective and responsive. However, UAVs are usually more sensitive to wind condition, which greatly influences their positions and orientations. The flight height of a UAV is relative low, and the relief of the terrain may result in serious occlusions. Moreover, the observations acquired by the Position and Orientation System (POS) are usually less accurate than those acquired in manned aerial photogrammetry. All of these factors bring in uncertainties to UAV photogrammetry. To investigate these uncertainties, a three-dimensional simulation and visualization system has been developed. The system is demonstrated with flight plan evaluation, image matching, POS-supported direct georeferencing, and ortho-mosaicing. Experimental results show that the presented system is effective for flight plan evaluation. The generated image pairs are accurate and false matches can be effectively filtered. The presented system dynamically visualizes the results of direct georeferencing in three-dimensions, which is informative and effective for real-time target tracking and positioning. The dynamically generated orthomosaic can be used in emergency applications. The presented system has also been used for teaching theories and applications of UAV photogrammetry.

  8. Concepts and algorithms in digital photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, T.

    1994-01-01

    Despite much progress in digital photogrammetry, there is still a considerable lack of understanding of theories and methods which would allow a substantial increase in the automation of photogrammetric processes. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness that the automation problem is one that cannot be solved in a bottom-up fashion by a trial-and-error approach. We present a short overview of concepts and algorithms used in digital photogrammetry. This is followed by a more detailed presentation of perceptual organization, a typical middle-level task.

  9. Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul; Jones, Tom; Connell, John; Belvin, Keith; Watson, Kent

    2004-01-01

    An improved method of dot-projection photogrammetry and an extension of the method to encompass dot-projection videogrammetry overcome some deficiencies of dot-projection photogrammetry as previously practiced. The improved method makes it possible to perform dot-projection photogrammetry or videogrammetry on targets that have previously not been amenable to dot-projection photogrammetry because they do not scatter enough light. Such targets include ones that are transparent, specularly reflective, or dark. In standard dot-projection photogrammetry, multiple beams of white light are projected onto the surface of an object of interest (denoted the target) to form a known pattern of bright dots. The illuminated surface is imaged in one or more cameras oriented at a nonzero angle or angles with respect to a central axis of the illuminating beams. The locations of the dots in the image(s) contain stereoscopic information on the locations of the dots, and, hence, on the location, shape, and orientation of the illuminated surface of the target. The images are digitized and processed to extract this information. Hardware and software to implement standard dot-projection photogrammetry are commercially available. Success in dot-projection photogrammetry depends on achieving sufficient signal-to-noise ratios: that is, it depends on scattering of enough light by the target so that the dots as imaged in the camera(s) stand out clearly against the ambient-illumination component of the image of the target. In one technique used previously to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, the target is illuminated by intense, pulsed laser light and the light entering the camera(s) is band-pass filtered at the laser wavelength. Unfortunately, speckle caused by the coherence of the laser light engenders apparent movement in the projected dots, thereby giving rise to errors in the measurement of the centroids of the dots and corresponding errors in the computed shape and location of the

  10. Concepts and algorithms in digital photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenk, T.

    1994-01-01

    Despite much progress in digital photogrammetry, there is still a considerable lack of understanding of theories and methods which would allow a substantial increase in the automation of photogrammetric processes. The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness that the automation problem is one that cannot be solved in a bottom-up fashion by a trial-and-error approach. We present a short overview of concepts and algorithms used in digital photogrammetry. This is followed by a more detailed presentation of perceptual organization, a typical middle-level task.

  11. Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    John Hill, a pilot and commercial aerial photographer, needed an information base. He consulted NERAC and requested a search of the latest developments in camera optics. NERAC provided information; Hill contacted the manufacturers of camera equipment and reduced his photographic costs significantly.

  12. Application of photogrammetry to the study of volcano-glacier interactions on Mount Wrangell, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, C. S.; Follett, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    Most Alaskan volcanoes are glacier covered and provide excellent opportunities to study interactions between glaciers and volcanoes. The present paper is concerned with such a study, taking into account the Mt. Wrangell (4317 m) which is the northernmost active volcano (solfatara activity) on the Pacific Rim (62 deg N; 144 deg W). While the first photographs on the summit of Mt. Wrangell were published more than 75 years ago, research there began in 1953 and 1954. Satellite images reveal activity at the summit of Mt. Wrangell. However, the resolution is not sufficient for conducting important measurements regarding ice volume losses. For this reason, vertical aerial photographs of the summit were obtained, and a field trip to the summit was conducted. Aspects of photogrammetry are discussed, taking into account questions of ground control, aerial photography, topographic mapping, digital cross sections, and orthophotos.

  13. Application of photogrammetry to the study of volcano-glacier interactions on Mount Wrangell, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, C. S.; Follett, A. B.

    1986-01-01

    Most Alaskan volcanoes are glacier covered and provide excellent opportunities to study interactions between glaciers and volcanoes. The present paper is concerned with such a study, taking into account the Mt. Wrangell (4317 m) which is the northernmost active volcano (solfatara activity) on the Pacific Rim (62 deg N; 144 deg W). While the first photographs on the summit of Mt. Wrangell were published more than 75 years ago, research there began in 1953 and 1954. Satellite images reveal activity at the summit of Mt. Wrangell. However, the resolution is not sufficient for conducting important measurements regarding ice volume losses. For this reason, vertical aerial photographs of the summit were obtained, and a field trip to the summit was conducted. Aspects of photogrammetry are discussed, taking into account questions of ground control, aerial photography, topographic mapping, digital cross sections, and orthophotos.

  14. Analysis of Photogrammetry Data from ISIM Mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Maria; Hill, Mike

    2007-01-01

    During ground testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the ISIM Optics group plans to use a Photogrammetry Measurement System for cryogenic calibration of specific target points on the ISIM composite structure and Science Instrument optical benches and other GSE equipment. This testing will occur in the Space Environmental Systems (SES) chamber at Goddard Space Flight Center. Close range photogrammetry is a 3 dimensional metrology system using triangulation to locate custom targets in 3 coordinates via a collection of digital photographs taken from various locations and orientations. These photos are connected using coded targets, special targets that are recognized by the software and can thus correlate the images to provide a 3 dimensional map of the targets, and scaled via well calibrated scale bars. Photogrammetry solves for the camera location and coordinates of the targets simultaneously through the bundling procedure contained in the V-STARS software, proprietary software owned by Geodetic Systems Inc. The primary objectives of the metrology performed on the ISIM mock-up were (1) to quantify the accuracy of the INCA3 photogrammetry camera on a representative full scale version of the ISIM structure at ambient temperature by comparing the measurements obtained with this camera to measurements using the Leica laser tracker system and (2), empirically determine the smallest increment of target position movement that can be resolved by the PG camera in the test setup, i.e., precision, or resolution. In addition, the geometrical details of the test setup defined during the mockup testing, such as target locations and camera positions, will contribute to the final design of the photogrammetry system to be used on the ISIM Flight Structure.

  15. Oblique Photogrammetry Supporting 3d Urban Reconstruction of Complex Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, I.; Ramos, M. M.; Nocerino, E.; Menna, F.; Remondino, F.; Moe, K.; Poli, D.; Legat, K.; Fassi, F.

    2017-05-01

    Accurate 3D city models represent an important source of geospatial information to support various "smart city" applications, such as space management, energy assessment, 3D cartography, noise and pollution mapping as well as disaster management. Even though remarkable progress has been made in recent years, there are still many open issues, especially when it comes to the 3D modelling of complex urban scenarios like historical and densely-built city centres featuring narrow streets and non-conventional building shapes. Most approaches introduce strong building priors/constraints on symmetry and roof typology that penalize urban environments having high variations of roof shapes. Furthermore, although oblique photogrammetry is rapidly maturing, the use of slanted views for façade reconstruction is not completely included in the reconstruction pipeline of state-of-the-art software. This paper aims to investigate state-of-the-art methods for 3D building modelling in complex urban scenarios with the support of oblique airborne images. A reconstruction approach based on roof primitives fitting is tested. Oblique imagery is then exploited to support the manual editing of the generated building models. At the same time, mobile mapping data are collected at cm resolution and then integrated with the aerial ones. All approaches are tested on the historical city centre of Bergamo (Italy).

  16. Applications of photogrammetry for small-scaled Houshanyue landslides, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yu-Jui; Shen, Cheng-Han; Chiang, Yi-Lin; Chang, Kuo-Jen

    2013-04-01

    Over 70% of Taiwan land area is covered with mountain slopes. Also the recent years population continued to increase, the flat land potential regions gradually deplete. Therefore, hillside places need to be used increasingly. Due to the improper design and human overuses, landslides and slope failures have occurred frequently over the past few years. The study site, Mt. Houshanyue hiking trail, collapsed after the Kalmaegi typhoon (July 2008) and the Sinlaku typhoon (September 2008). This study try to decipher the change of landform before and after disasters, thus, 3D data acquisition technologies, such as Airborne LiDAR, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), Aerial Photogrammetry and GPS were compiled together. We firstly construct the six different Digital Terrain Model (DTM) from 2008-2012, based on 2m resolution LiDAR image taken in 2005 (before landslide). The precision and the accuracy of the aerial triangulation parameters were estimated according to the pre-landslide LiDAR DSM and DEM. In the meanwhile, the quality of the aerial photo derived DSM is analyzed, and the landslide cut-and-fill volumes is estimated accordingly. The calculated the slide volume is about 0.2 million cubic meters within an area of 5.8 hectares. The depth of the sliding surface is about 14m. On the other hand, the number of the sliding mass is a debate issue. This study demonstrates/suggests a single landslide by means of image correlation from the orthorectified images taken in different periods.

  17. Application of terrestrial 'structure-from-motion' photogrammetry on a medium-size Arctic valley glacier: potential, accuracy and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynek, Bernhard; Binder, Daniel; Boffi, Geo; Schöner, Wolfgang; Verhoeven, Geert

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry was the standard method for mapping high mountain terrain in the early days of mountain cartography, until it was replaced by aerial photogrammetry and airborne laser scanning. Modern low-price digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) cameras and highly automatic and cheap digital computer vision software with automatic image matching and multiview-stereo routines suggest the rebirth of terrestrial photogrammetry, especially in remote regions, where airborne surveying methods are expensive due to high flight costs. Terrestrial photogrammetry and modern automated image matching is widely used in geodesy, however, its application in glaciology is still rare, especially for surveying ice bodies at the scale of some km², which is typical for valley glaciers. In August 2013 a terrestrial photogrammetric survey was carried out on Freya Glacier, a 6km² valley glacier next to Zackenberg Research Station in NE-Greenland, where a detailed glacier mass balance monitoring was initiated during the last IPY. Photos with a consumer grade digital camera (Nikon D7100) were taken from the ridges surrounding the glacier. To create a digital elevation model, the photos were processed with the software photoscan. A set of ~100 dGPS surveyed ground control points on the glacier surface was used to georeference and validate the final DEM. Aim of this study was to produce a high resolution and high accuracy DEM of the actual surface topography of the Freya glacier catchment with a novel approach and to explore the potential of modern low-cost terrestrial photogrammetry combined with state-of-the-art automated image matching and multiview-stereo routines for glacier monitoring and to communicate this powerful and cheap method within the environmental research and glacier monitoring community.

  18. Uav Photogrammetry for Mapping and Monitoring of Northern Permafrost Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, R. H.; Olthof, I.; Maloley, M.; Fernandes, R.; Prevost, C.; van der Sluijs, J.

    2015-08-01

    Northern environments are changing in response to recent climate warming, resource development, and natural disturbances. The Arctic climate has warmed by 2-3°C since the 1950's, causing a range of cryospheric changes including declines in sea ice extent, snow cover duration, and glacier mass, and warming permafrost. The terrestrial Arctic has also undergone significant temperature-driven changes in the form of increased thermokarst, larger tundra fires, and enhanced shrub growth. Monitoring these changes to inform land managers and decision makers is challenging due to the vast spatial extents involved and difficult access. Environmental monitoring in Canada's North is often based on local-scale measurements derived from aerial reconnaissance and photography, and ecological, hydrologic, and geologic sampling and surveying. Satellite remote sensing can provide a complementary tool for more spatially comprehensive monitoring but at coarser spatial resolutions. Satellite remote sensing has been used to map Arctic landscape changes related to vegetation productivity, lake expansion and drainage, glacier retreat, thermokarst, and wildfire activity. However, a current limitation with existing satellite-based techniques is the measurement gap between field measurements and high resolution satellite imagery. Bridging this gap is important for scaling up field measurements to landscape levels, and validating and calibrating satellite-based analyses. This gap can be filled to a certain extent using helicopter or fixed-wing aerial surveys, but at a cost that is often prohibitive. Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology has only recently progressed to the point where it can provide an inexpensive and efficient means of capturing imagery at this middle scale of measurement with detail that is adequate to interpret Arctic vegetation (i.e. 1-5 cm) and coverage that can be directly related to satellite imagery (1-10 km2). Unlike satellite measurements, UAVs permit frequent

  19. Forensic terrestrial photogrammetry from a single image.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Aguilera, Diego; Gomez-Lahoz, Javier

    2009-11-01

    Forensic terrestrial photogrammetry is one of the most valuable and low-cost resources of spatial data available today. Due to the ephemeral crime scene characteristics, these photographs can often capture information that is never to be seen again. This paper presents a novelty approach for the documentation, analysis, and visualization of crime scenes for which only a single perspective image is available. The photogrammetric process consists of a few well-known steps in close-range photogrammetry: features extraction, vanishing points computation, camera self-calibration, 3D metric reconstruction, dimensional analysis, and interactive visualization. Likewise, the method incorporates a quality control of the different steps accomplished sequentially. As a result, several cases of study are presented in the experimental results section in order to test their viability. The full approach can be applied easily through the free software, sv3DVision, which has been evaluated by a number of police officers, forensic scientists, and forensic educators satisfactorily.

  20. Volumetric measurement of rock movement using photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Benton, Donovan J; Iverson, Stephen R; Martin, Lewis A; Johnson, Jeffrey C; Raffaldi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    NIOSH ground control safety research program at Spokane, Washington, is exploring applications of photogrammetry to rock mass and support monitoring. This paper describes two ways photogrammetric techniques are being used. First, photogrammetric data of laboratory testing is being used to correlate energy input and support deformation. This information can be used to infer remaining support toughness after ground deformation events. This technique is also demonstrated in a field application. Second, field photogrammetric data is compared to crackmeter data from a deep underground mine. Accuracies were found to average 8 mm, but have produced results within 0.2 mm of true displacement, as measured by crackmeters. Application of these techniques consists of monitoring overall fault activity by monitoring multiple points around the crackmeter. A case study is provided in which a crackmeter is clearly shown to have provided insufficient information regarding overall fault ground deformation. Photogrammetry is proving to be a useful ground monitoring tool due to its unobtrusiveness and ease of use.

  1. Photogrammetry of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Littell, Justin D.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, two large-scale models of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic decelerator were tested in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex at NASA Ames Research Center. One of the objectives of this test was to measure model deflections under aerodynamic loading that approximated expected flight conditions. The measurements were acquired using stereo photogrammetry. Four pairs of stereo cameras were mounted inside the NFAC test section, each imaging a particular section of the HIAD. The views were then stitched together post-test to create a surface deformation profile. The data from the photogram- metry system will largely be used for comparisons to and refinement of Fluid Structure Interaction models. This paper describes how a commercial photogrammetry system was adapted to make the measurements and presents some preliminary results.

  2. Close-Range Photogrammetry & Next Generation Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    NASA is focusing renewed attention on the topic of large, ultra-lightweight space structures, also known as 'gossamer' spacecraft. Nearly all of the details of the giant spacecraft are still to be worked out. But it's already clear that one of the most challenging aspects will be developing techniques to align and control these systems after they are deployed in space. A critical part of this process is creating new ground test methods to measure gossamer structures under stationary, deploying and vibrating conditions for validation of corresponding analytical predictions. In addressing this problem, I considered, first of all, the possibility of simply using conventional displacement or vibration sensor that could provide spatial measurements. Next, I turned my attention to photogrammetry, a method of determining the spatial coordinates of objects using photographs. The success of this research and development has convinced me that photogrammetry is the most suitable method to solve the gossamer measurement problem.

  3. Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jim G.

    2013-03-27

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering & Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video.

  4. Publication aspects of ethics in photogrammetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Morris M.

    1991-01-01

    According to the Code of Ethics of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), the principles on which ethics are founded consist of honesty, justice, and courtesy, forming a moral philosophy associated with mutual interest among men. We will cover in particular the ethical problems of publication of photogrammetric material in the various media. There are many such problems, and we often face a dilemma in selecting a course which is the right thing to do.

  5. An automatic high precision registration method between large area aerial images and aerial light detection and ranging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Q.; Xie, D.; Sun, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The integration of digital aerial photogrammetry and Light Detetion And Ranging (LiDAR) is an inevitable trend in Surveying and Mapping field. We calculate the external orientation elements of images which identical with LiDAR coordinate to realize automatic high precision registration between aerial images and LiDAR data. There are two ways to calculate orientation elements. One is single image spatial resection using image matching 3D points that registered to LiDAR. The other one is Position and Orientation System (POS) data supported aerotriangulation. The high precision registration points are selected as Ground Control Points (GCPs) instead of measuring GCPs manually during aerotriangulation. The registration experiments indicate that the method which registering aerial images and LiDAR points has a great advantage in higher automation and precision compare with manual registration.

  6. Classification of Aerial Photogrammetric 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, C.; Häni, N.; Rosinskaya, E.; d'Angelo, E.; Strecha, C.

    2017-05-01

    We present a powerful method to extract per-point semantic class labels from aerial photogrammetry data. Labelling this kind of data is important for tasks such as environmental modelling, object classification and scene understanding. Unlike previous point cloud classification methods that rely exclusively on geometric features, we show that incorporating color information yields a significant increase in accuracy in detecting semantic classes. We test our classification method on three real-world photogrammetry datasets that were generated with Pix4Dmapper Pro, and with varying point densities. We show that off-the-shelf machine learning techniques coupled with our new features allow us to train highly accurate classifiers that generalize well to unseen data, processing point clouds containing 10 million points in less than 3 minutes on a desktop computer.

  7. Inertial instrument system for aerial surveying

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, R.H.; Chapman, W.H.; Hanna, W.F.; Mongan, C.E.; Hursh, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    An inertial guidance system for aerial surveying has been developed under contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. This prototype system, known as the aerial profiling of terrain (APT) system, is designed to determine continuously the positions of points along an aircraft flight path, or the underlying terrain profile, to an accuracy of + or - 0.5 ft (15 cm) vertically and + or - 2 ft (61 cm) horizontally. The system 's objective thus is to accomplish, from a fixed-wing aircraft, what would traditionally be accomplished from ground-based topographic surveys combined with aerial photography and photogrammetry. The two-part strategy for measuring the terrain profile entails: (1) use of an inertial navigator for continuous determination of the three-coordinate position of the aircraft, and (2) use of an eye-safe pulsed laser profiler for continuous measurement of the vertical distance from aircraft to land surface, so that the desired terrain profile can then be directly computed. The APT system, installed in a DeHavilland Twin Otter aircraft, is typically flown at a speed of 115 mph (105 knots) at an altitude of 2,000 ft (610 m) above the terrain. Performance-evaluation flights have shown that the vertical and horizontal accuracy specifications are met. (USGS)

  8. Riverscape mapping with helicopter-based Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in the remote sensing of fluvial systems have provided researchers with unprecedented views on the complexity of rivers. An aerial perspective is key to mapping and understanding the river at a variety of spatial scales. I employed a helicopter-mounted digital SLR camera and Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry to bridge the gap between smaller scale aerial surveys from platforms like small unmanned aerial systems and larger scale commercial aerial photography or airborne LiDAR collections. This low-cost solution produced high spatial resolution aerial photography and digital elevation models for a 32-km segment of the Middle Fork John Day River in east central Oregon. Using these data, I extracted channel morphology data at 3-m intervals downstream and took an inductive approach to evaluating the controls on channel morphology and the human influences on the river using a combination of segment-scale and hyperscale analyses. The SfM process produced 10 cm/pixel orthophotographs and DEMs with submeter horizontal accuracy, but the DEMs suffered from a systematic distortion that resulted from the parallel camera geometry of the flight plan. The riverscape has been affected by human actions such as mining, cattle grazing, and restoration; however, differentiating a human signal from the natural patterns of channel morphology was difficult. The hyperscale analysis provided insight into several interesting downstream patterns in channel morphology that, with further analysis, could provide explanations on the physical controls of channel morphology. Overall, SfM has the potential to be a powerful, low-cost addition to the fluvial remote sensing toolkit.

  9. Digital mono- and 3D stereo-photogrammetry for geological and geomorphological mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapozza, Cristian; Schenker, Filippo Luca; Castelletti, Claudio; Bozzini, Claudio; Ambrosi, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The generalization of application of digital tools for managing, mapping and updating geological data have become widely accepted in the last decennia. Despite the increasing quality and availability of digital topographical maps, orthorectified aerial photographs (orthophotos) and high resolution (5 up to 0.5 m) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), a correct recognition of the kind, the nature and the boundaries of geological formations and geomophological landforms, unconsolidated sedimentary deposits or slope instabilities is often very difficult on conventional two-dimensional (2D) products, in particular in steep zones (rock walls and talus slopes), under the forest cover, for a very complex topography and in deeply urbanised zones. In many cases, photo-interpretative maps drawn only by 2D data sets must be improved by field verifications or, at least, by field oblique photographs. This is logical, because our natural perception of the real world is three-dimensional (3D), which is partially disabled by the application of 2D visualization techniques. Here we present some examples of application of digital mapping based on a 3D visualization (for aerial and satellite images photo-interpretation) or on a terrestrial perception by digital mono-photogrammetry (for oblique photographs). The 3D digital mapping was performed thanks to an extension of the software ESRI® ArcGIS™ called ArcGDS™. This methodology was also applied on historical aerial photographs (normally analysed by optical stereo-photogrammetry), which were digitized by scanning and then oriented and aero-triangulated thanks to the ArcGDS™ software, allowing the 3D visualisation and the mapping in a GIS environment (Ambrosi and Scapozza, 2015). The mono-photogrammetry (or monoplotting) is the technique of photogrammetrical georeferentiation of single oblique unrectified photographs, which are related to a DEM. In other words, the monoplotting allows relating each pixel of the photograph to the

  10. A simplified close range photogrammetry method for soil erosion assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the increased affordability of consumer grade cameras and the development of powerful image processing software, digital photogrammetry offers a competitive advantage as a tool for soil erosion estimation compared to other technologies. One bottleneck of digital photogrammetry is its dependency...

  11. Beach Volume Change Using Uav Photogrammetry Songjung Beach, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, C. I.; Oh, T. S.

    2016-06-01

    Natural beach is controlled by many factors related to wave and tidal forces, wind, sediment, and initial topography. For this reason, if numerous topographic data of beach is accurately collected, coastal erosion/acceleration is able to be assessed and clarified. Generally, however, many studies on coastal erosion have limitation to analyse the whole beach, carried out of partial area as like shoreline (horizontal 2D) and beach profile (vertical 2D) on account of limitation of numerical simulation. This is an important application for prevention of coastal erosion, and UAV photogrammetry is also used to 3D topographic data. This paper analyses the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) to 3D map and beach volume change. UAV (Quadcopter) equipped with a non-metric camera was used to acquire images in Songjung beach which is located south-east Korea peninsula. The dynamics of beach topography, its geometric properties and estimates of eroded and deposited sand volumes were determined by combining elevation data with quarterly RTK-VRS measurements. To explore the new possibilities for assessment of coastal change we have developed a methodology for 3D analysis of coastal topography evolution based on existing high resolution elevation data combined with low coast, UAV and on-ground RTK-VRS surveys. DSMs were obtained by stereo-matching using Agisoft Photoscan. Using GCPs the vertical accuracy of the DSMs was found to be 10 cm or better. The resulting datasets were integrated in a local coordinates and the method proved to be a very useful fool for the detection of areas where coastal erosion occurs and for the quantification of beach change. The value of such analysis is illustrated by applications to coastal of South Korea sites that face significant management challenges.

  12. Land Survey from Unmaned Aerial Veichle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, V.; Mesarič, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper we present, how we use a quadrocopter unmanned aerial vehicle with a camera attached to it, to do low altitude photogrammetric land survey. We use the quadrocopter to take highly overlapping photos of the area of interest. A "structure from motion" algorithm is implemented to get parameters of camera orientations and to generate a sparse point cloud representation of objects in photos. Than a patch based multi view stereo algorithm is applied to generate a dense point cloud. Ground control points are used to georeference the data. Further processing is applied to generate digital orthophoto maps, digital surface models, digital terrain models and assess volumes of various types of material. Practical examples of land survey from a UAV are presented in the paper. We explain how we used our system to monitor the reconstruction of commercial building, then how our UAV was used to assess the volume of coal supply for Ljubljana heating plant. Further example shows the usefulness of low altitude photogrammetry for documentation of archaeological excavations. In the final example we present how we used our UAV to prepare an underlay map for natural gas pipeline's route planning. In the final analysis we conclude that low altitude photogrammetry can help bridge the gap between laser scanning and classic tachymetric survey, since it offers advantages of both techniques.

  13. Photogrammetry and computer-aided piping design

    SciTech Connect

    Keneflick, J.F.; Chirillo, R.D.

    1985-02-18

    Three-dimensional measurements taken from photographs of a plant model can be digitized and linked with computer-aided piping design. This can short-cut the design and construction of new plants and expedite repair and retrofitting projects. Some designers bridge the gap between model and computer by digitizing from orthographic prints obtained via orthography or the laser scanning of model sections. Such valve or fitting then processed is described in this paper. The marriage of photogrammetry and computer-aided piping design can economically produce such numerical drawings.

  14. Transmission line icing measurement on photogrammetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huan; Ma, Xiaohong; Zhao, Lijin; Du, Hao; Luo, Hong; Mao, Xianyin; Tang, Min; Liu, Yawen

    2015-12-01

    Icing thickness parameter is the basic data for power sector to make decision for icing accident prevention. In this paper, a transmission line icing measurement method is proposed. It used the photogrammetry method to realize icing parameters measurement through the integration of high resolution camera, laser range finder and inertial measurement unit. Compared with traditional icing measurement method, this method is flexible and is the effective supplement of the fixed icing detection terminal. And its high accuracy measurement guarantees the reliability of the icing thickness parameters.

  15. Acquisition and Processing Protocols for Uav Images: 3d Modeling of Historical Buildings Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtiyoso, A.; Koehl, M.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Freville, T.

    2017-08-01

    Photogrammetry has seen an increase in the use of UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) for both large and smaller scale cartography. The use of UAVs is also advantageous because it may be used for tasks requiring quick response, including in the case of the inspection and monitoring of buildings. The objective of the project is to study the acquisition and processing protocols which exist in the literature and to adapt them for UAV projects. This implies a study on the calibration of the sensors, flight planning, comparison of software solutions, data management, and analysis on the different products of a UAV project. Two historical buildings of the city of Strasbourg were used as case studies: a part of the Rohan Palace façade and the St-Pierre-le-Jeune Catholic church. In addition, a preliminary test was performed on the Josephine Pavilion. Two UAVs were used in this research; namely the Sensefly Albris and the DJI Phantom 3 Professional. The experiments have shown that the calibration parameters tend to be unstable for small sensors. Furthermore, the dense matching of images remains a particular problem to address in a close range photogrammetry project, more so in the presence of noise on the images. Data management in cases where the number of images is high is also very important. The UAV is nevertheless a suitable solution for the surveying and recording of historical buildings because it is able to take images from points of view which are normally inaccessible to classical terrestrial techniques.

  16. Initiation of a major calving event on the Bowdoin Glacier captured by UAV photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvet, Guillaume; Weidmann, Yvo; Seguinot, Julien; Funk, Martin; Abe, Takahiro; Sakakibara, Daiki; Seddik, Hakime; Sugiyama, Shin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we analyse the calving activity of the Bowdoin Glacier, north-western Greenland, in 2015 by combining satellite images, UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) photogrammetry and ice flow modelling. In particular, a high-resolution displacement field is inferred from UAV orthoimages taken immediately before and after the initiation of a large fracture, which induced a major calving event. A detailed analysis of the strain rate field allows us to accurately map the path taken by the opening crack. Modelling results reveal (i) that the crack was more than half-thickness deep, filled with water and getting irreversibly deeper when it was captured by the UAV and (ii) that the crack initiated in an area of high horizontal shear caused by a local basal bump immediately behind the current calving front. The asymmetry of the bed at the front explains the systematic calving pattern observed in May and July-August 2015. As a corollary, we infer that the calving front of the Bowdoin Glacier is currently stabilized by this bedrock bump and might enter into an unstable mode and retreat rapidly if the glacier keeps thinning in the coming years. Beyond this outcome, our study demonstrates that the combination of UAV photogrammetry and ice flow modelling is a promising tool to horizontally and vertically track the propagation of fractures responsible for large calving events.

  17. Accuracy Validation of Point Clouds of Uav Photogrammetry and its Application for River Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, S.; Kawai, Y.; Kadotani, R.

    2017-08-01

    River administration facilities such as levees and river walls play a major role in preventing flooding due to heavy rain. The forms of such facilities must be constantly monitored for alteration due to rain and running water, and limited human resources and budgets make it necessary to efficiently maintain river administration facilities. During maintenance, inspection results are commonly recorded on paper documents. Continuous inspection and repair using information systems are an on-going challenge. This study proposes a maintenance management system for river facilities that uses three-dimensional data to solve these problems and make operation and maintenance more efficient. The system uses three-dimensional data to visualize river facility deformation and its process, and it has functions that visualize information about river management at any point in the three-dimensional data. The three-dimensional data is generated by photogrammetry using a camera on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.

  18. Integration of UAV photogrammetry and SPH modelling of fluids to study runoff on real terrains.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Anxo; Domínguez, Jose M; C Crespo, Alejandro J; González-Jorge, Higinio; Roca, David; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho

    2014-01-01

    Roads can experience runoff problems due to the intense rain discharge associated to severe storms. Two advanced tools are combined to analyse the interaction of complex water flows with real terrains. UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry is employed to obtain accurate topographic information on small areas, typically on the order of a few hectares. The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique is applied by means of the DualSPHysics model to compute the trajectory of the water flow during extreme rain events. The use of engineering solutions to palliate flood events is also analysed. The study case simulates how the collected water can flow into a close road and how precautionary measures can be effective to drain water under extreme conditions. The amount of water arriving at the road is calculated under different protection scenarios and the efficiency of a ditch is observed to decrease when sedimentation reduces its depth.

  19. Integration of UAV Photogrammetry and SPH Modelling of Fluids to Study Runoff on Real Terrains

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Anxo; Domínguez, Jose M.; C. Crespo, Alejandro J.; González-Jorge, Higinio; Roca, David; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho

    2014-01-01

    Roads can experience runoff problems due to the intense rain discharge associated to severe storms. Two advanced tools are combined to analyse the interaction of complex water flows with real terrains. UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry is employed to obtain accurate topographic information on small areas, typically on the order of a few hectares. The Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique is applied by means of the DualSPHysics model to compute the trajectory of the water flow during extreme rain events. The use of engineering solutions to palliate flood events is also analysed. The study case simulates how the collected water can flow into a close road and how precautionary measures can be effective to drain water under extreme conditions. The amount of water arriving at the road is calculated under different protection scenarios and the efficiency of a ditch is observed to decrease when sedimentation reduces its depth. PMID:25372035

  20. Digital Photogrammetry for Documentation of Maritime Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorelli, Massimo; Pensa, Claudio; Speranza, Domenico

    2014-06-01

    Documentation of maritime heritage is essential for its protection, and for reference in restoration and renovation processes. These functions become problematic in the case of historical ships and boats that lack lines drawings. The purpose of this paper is to describe a procedure for creation of lines drawings based on the shape analysis of surviving historical boats or their small-scale models with the help of reverse engineering (RE) techniques. The paper describes how digital photogrammetry and the iterative method were used to analyze the shape of three historical boats: Tomahawk, Refola and Nada. The application of the proposed procedure produced the lines drawings of the boats as its result. The accuracy of the 3D CAD model obtained with the photogrammetric technique was verified by comparing it against a more accurate 3D model produced with the help of a RE laser scanner. The examination of the resulting lines drawings proves that the digital photogrammetry process and the proposed iterative method are adequate tools for developing lines plans of boat models. The research offers the methodological basis for the creation of an archive of lines drawings of historical boats. Such an archive would provide reference for philologically correct restorations, and permit definition and classification of distinctive elements of various types of historical boats, particularly those produced in the Campania Region.

  1. Volumetric measurement of rock movement using photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Donovan J.; Iverson, Stephen R.; Martin, Lewis A.; Johnson, Jeffrey C.; Raffaldi, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    NIOSH ground control safety research program at Spokane, Washington, is exploring applications of photogrammetry to rock mass and support monitoring. This paper describes two ways photogrammetric techniques are being used. First, photogrammetric data of laboratory testing is being used to correlate energy input and support deformation. This information can be used to infer remaining support toughness after ground deformation events. This technique is also demonstrated in a field application. Second, field photogrammetric data is compared to crackmeter data from a deep underground mine. Accuracies were found to average 8 mm, but have produced results within 0.2 mm of true displacement, as measured by crackmeters. Application of these techniques consists of monitoring overall fault activity by monitoring multiple points around the crackmeter. A case study is provided in which a crackmeter is clearly shown to have provided insufficient information regarding overall fault ground deformation. Photogrammetry is proving to be a useful ground monitoring tool due to its unobtrusiveness and ease of use. PMID:27110429

  2. Data Provenance in Photogrammetry Through Documentation Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carboni, N.; Bruseker, G.; Guillem, A.; Bellido Castañeda, D.; Coughenour, C.; Domajnko, M.; de Kramer, M.; Ramos Calles, M. M.; Stathopoulou, E. K.; Suma, R.

    2016-06-01

    Documenting the relevant aspects in digitisation processes such as photogrammetry in order to provide a robust provenance for their products continues to present a challenge. The creation of a product that can be re-used scientifically requires a framework for consistent, standardised documentation of the entire digitisation pipeline. This article provides an analysis of the problems inherent to such goals and presents a series of protocols to document the various steps of a photogrammetric workflow. We propose this pipeline, with descriptors to track all phases of digital product creation in order to assure data provenance and enable the validation of the operations from an analytic and production perspective. The approach aims to support adopters of the workflow to define procedures with a long term perspective. The conceptual schema we present is founded on an analysis of information and actor exchanges in the digitisation process. The metadata were defined through the synthesis of previous proposals in this area and were tested on a case study. We performed the digitisation of a set of cultural heritage artefacts from an Iron Age burial in Ilmendorf, Germany. The objects were captured and processed using different techniques, including a comparison of different imaging tools and algorithms. This augmented the complexity of the process allowing us to test the flexibility of the schema for documenting complex scenarios. Although we have only presented a photogrammetry digitisation scenario, we claim that our schema is easily applicable to a multitude of 3D documentation processes.

  3. Cost effective aero-photogrammetry toys at active volcanoes: On the use of drones, balloons and kites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Thomas R.

    2014-05-01

    The availability of aerial photographs allows spatial mapping of flows and fractures, generation of digital elevation models and other change detection. Therefore aerial photographs significantly improve our understanding of volcanic processes. The common problem is the lack of available data for most volcanoes, and the lack of systematic and chronologic repeat surveys. This work summarizes the current state of knowledge and technical implementations that currently revolutionize the field of aero-photogrammetry. By the use of unmanned vehicles, such as octocopters, helicopters and small airplanes, photo data can be acquired from almost any place at distances up to kilometres from the operator. Moreover, by the use of helium balloons, kites or their hybrid helikites, near field aero-photographs are obtained. In combination with modern stitching procedures and computer vision algorithms, the positioning of the camera and the digital elevation model of the ground can be extracted, and the active volcano and its eruption cloud be imaged from almost any perspective. This field is increasingly gaining flexibility, as lightweight cameras are available from visible, infrared and other spectral bands. Here example data are provided from volcanoes that are difficult to access by regular airplanes, showing the strengths and the limits of these new aero-photogrammetry toys.

  4. Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry applied to historical imagery: plug & play?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Maarten; Lane, Stuart N.

    2017-04-01

    The development of Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry has led to a vast increase and expansion of geomorphological applications. Highly detailed Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) can be efficiently generated from a variety of platforms that cover a large range of spatial scales. For the application of DEMs in geomorphic change analysis, precision and spatial resolution are not of sole importance, but also their accuracy, temporal resolution and temporal coverage. The use of archival imagery may substantially lengthen temporal coverage, allowing quantification of annual to decadal scale landform change. Whilst archival photogrammetry is not new, a question arises as to how applicable SfM methods are as a more cost-effective and straightforward alternative to the conventional approach. Here, we studied a relatively extreme case where we applied SfM techniques to archival aerial imagery, to investigate the decadal evolution of a low relief braided river. The Borgne is an Alpine river in south-west Switzerland which is strongly affected by flow abstraction for hydropower, allowing the fairly straightforward application of photogrammetry on the near-dry river bed. For 8 sets of scanned historical aerial images in the period 1959-2005 we performed Ground Control Point (GCP) assisted bundle adjustment using both classical archival digital photogrammetry (used as a reference dataset) and SfM based photogrammetry. For the SfM method, no further data were used to constrain camera or exterior orientation parameters a priori, but instead we used these for a posteriori verification. The resulting densified point clouds were registered onto a reference surface based on stable areas, allowing the correction for any systematic error in DEMs that may arise from (random) error in the bundle adjustment. The obtained results show that the quality of the SfM based bundle adjustment is similar to that of the classical photogrammetric approach. Next to image scale, the quality is

  5. Time-lapse photogrammetry in geomorphic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltner, Anette; Kaiser, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Image based approaches to reconstruct the earth surface (Structure from Motion - SfM) are establishing as a standard technology for high resolution topographic data. This is amongst other advantages due to the comparatively ease of use and flexibility of data generation. Furthermore, the increased spatial resolution led to its implementation at a vast range of applications from sub-mm to tens-of-km scale. Almost fully automatic calculation of referenced digital elevation models allows for a significant increase of temporal resolution, as well, potentially up to sub-second scales. Thereby, the setup of a time-lapse multi-camera system is necessary and different aspects need to be considered: The camera array has to be temporary stable or potential movements need to be compensated by temporary stable reference targets/areas. The stability of the internal camera geometry has to be considered due to a usually significantly lower amount of images of the scene, and thus redundancy for parameter estimation, compared to more common SfM applications. Depending on the speed of surface change, synchronisation has to be very accurate. Due to the usual application in the field, changing environmental conditions important for lighting and visual range are also crucial factors to keep in mind. Besides these important considerations much potential is comprised by time-lapse photogrammetry. The integration of multi-sensor systems, e.g. using thermal cameras, enables the potential detection of other processes not visible with RGB-images solely. Furthermore, the implementation of low-cost sensors allows for a significant increase of areal coverage and their setup at locations, where a loss of the system cannot be ruled out. The usage of micro-computers offers smart camera triggering, e.g. acquiring images with increased frequency controlled by a rainfall-triggered sensor. In addition these micro-computers can enable on-site data processing, e.g. recognition of increased surface

  6. Photogrammetry on glaciers: Old and new knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, W. T.; Welty, E.; O'Neel, S.

    2014-12-01

    In the past few decades terrestrial photogrammetry has become a widely used tool for glaciological research, brought about in part by the proliferation of high-quality, low-cost digital cameras, dramatic increases in image-processing power of computers, and very innovative progress in image processing, much of which has come from computer vision research and from the computer gaming industry. At present, glaciologists have developed their capacity to gather images much further than their ability to process them. Many researchers have accumulated vast inventories of imagery, but have no efficient means to extract the data they desire from them. In many cases these are single-image time series where the processing limitation lies in the paucity of methods to obtain 3-dimension object space information from measurements in the 2-dimensional image space; in other cases camera pairs have been operated but no automated means is in hand for conventional stereometric analysis of many thousands of image pairs. Often the processing task is further complicated by weak camera geometry or ground control distribution, either of which will compromise the quality of 3-dimensional object space solutions. Solutions exist for many of these problems, found sometimes among the latest computer vision results, and sometimes buried in decades-old pre-digital terrestrial photogrammetric literature. Other problems, particularly those arising from poorly constrained or underdetermined camera and ground control geometry, may be unsolvable. Small-scale, ground-based photography and photogrammetry of glaciers has grown over the past few decades in an organic and disorganized fashion, with much duplication of effort and little coordination or sharing of knowledge among researchers. Given the utility of terrestrial photogrammetry, its low cost (if properly developed and implemented), and the substantial value of the information to be had from it, some further effort to share knowledge and methods

  7. Texture mapping based on multiple aerial imageries in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoqing; Ye, Siqi; Wang, Yuefeng; Han, Caiyun; Wang, Chenxi

    2015-12-01

    In the realistic 3D model reconstruction, the requirement of the texture is very high. Texture is one of the key factors that affecting realistic of the model and using texture mapping technology to realize. In this paper we present a practical approach of texture mapping based on photogrammetry theory from multiple aerial imageries in urban areas. By collinearity equation to matching the model and imageries, and in order to improving the quality of texture, we describe an automatic approach for select the optimal texture to realized 3D building from the aerial imageries of many strip. The texture of buildings can be automatically matching by the algorithm. The experimental results show that the platform of texture mapping process has a high degree of automation and improve the efficiency of the 3D modeling reconstruction.

  8. Photogrammetry of Apollo 11 Surface Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustynski, V.-V.; Jones, E. M.

    We used photogrammetry to study surface photographs made by the crew of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module (LM). We represent photogrammetrically determined locations of 116 from total 123 camera stations (6 additional stations were located approximately based on auxiliary data), hardware left on the surface and natural features. Our analysis improves results of earlier determinations made with rough methods. Errors of distances from the LM to the EASEP instruments have been reduced from meters in the map from the Preliminary Scientific Report to about 0.1 m. Determined locations were compared to positions of artifacts in orbital photographs made by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC); an excellent agreement was established. We identified at least 58 boulders seen both in LROC images and in EVA photographs. Distance accuracies are mostly within 3 percent. A new, more exact and detailed map of Tranquility Base was composed.

  9. Applications of MACRO Photogrammetry in Archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajski, D.; Solter, A.; Gašparovic, M.

    2016-06-01

    Many valuable archaeological artefacts have the size of a few centimetres or less. The production of relevant documentation of such artefacts is mainly limited to subjective interpretation and manual drawing techniques using a magnifier. Most of the laser scanners available for the archaeological purposes cannot reach sufficient space resolution to gather all relevant features of the artefact, such as the shape, the relief, the texture and any damage present. Digital photogrammetric techniques make measuring with high accuracy possible and such techniques can be used to produce the relevant archaeometric documentation with a high level of detail. The approaches for shooting a good macro photograph (in the photogrammetric sense) will be explored and discussed as well as the design of a calibration test-field and the self-calibration methods suitable for macro photogrammetry. Finally, the method will be tested by producing a photorealistic 3D-model of an ancient figurine.

  10. a Modular Geometric Model for Underwater Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, H.-G.

    2015-04-01

    Underwater applications of photogrammetric measurement techniques usually need to deal with multimedia photogrammetry aspects, which are characterized by the necessity of handling optical rays that are broken at interfaces between optical media with different refrative indices according to Snell's Law. This so-called multimedia geometry has to be incorporated into geometric models in order to achieve correct measurement results. The paper shows a flexible yet strict geometric model for the handling of refraction effects on the optical path, which can be implemented as a module into photogrammetric standard tools such as spatial resection, spatial intersection, bundle adjustment or epipolar line computation. The module is especially well suited for applications, where an object in water is observed by cameras in air through one or more plane parallel glass interfaces, as it allows for some simplifications here.

  11. Applications of digital photogrammetry to medical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, H. L.

    Photogrammetric measurement for the diagnosis and treatment of human conditions and for bio-medical research is a form of close-range photogrammetry with its own distinctive challenges and constraints. Reports of fully digital systems are somewhat limited so far, being restricted primarily to face and body measurement and to motion recording, but clear patterns are apparent in the approaches being adopted. The effectiveness of photogrammetric measurement in gait analyses and some other body measurements involving targets, has stimulated commercial development of a number of comprehensive digital systems. They are characterised by the use of multiple cameras, LED or reflective targets, fast image processing based on target detection, links to other recording systems, and by the provision of comprehensive medical information. Surface shape measurements by state-of-the-art photogrammetric systems have been aimed primarily at the face, back and torso. But in contrast to target-based measurement systems, they are characterised not by commercial systems, but by individually tailored hardware and software systems based on low-cost, low-resolution cameras, the casting of a texturising light pattern, image processing to detect features within the pattern, and area-based rather than feature-based matching methods for automated stereoscopic correlation. In common with motion measurement, effective and informative output is crucial for these applications. Medical photogrammetry does not end with these applications, but distinctive trends in the use of digital methodology are not apparent among other measurement tasks. On the other hand, digital image processing has contributed usefully to optical measurement techniques which are not strictly photogrammetric but which are useful for external measurement on the human body.

  12. Sampling supraglacial debris thickness using terrestrial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Lindsey; Mertes, Jordan

    2017-04-01

    The melt rate of debris-covered ice differs to that of clean ice primarily as a function of debris thickness. The spatial distribution of supraglacial debris thickness must therefore be known in order to understand how it is likely to impact glacier behaviour, and meltwater contribution to local hydrological resources and global sea level rise. However, practical means of determining debris cover thickness remain elusive. In this study we explore the utility of terrestrial photogrammetry to produce high resolution, scaled and texturized digital terrain models of debris cover exposures above ice cliffs as a means of quantifying and characterizing debris thickness. Two Nikon D5000 DSLRs with Tamron 100mm lenses were used to photograph a sample area of the Ngozumpa glacier in the Khumbu Himal of Nepal in April 2016. A Structure from Motion workflow using Agisoft Photoscan software was used to generate a surface models with <10cm resolution. A Trimble Geo7X differential GPS with Zephyr antenna, along with a local base station, was used to precisely measure marked ground control points to scale the photogrammetric surface model. Measurements of debris thickness along the exposed cliffline were made from this scaled model, assuming that the ice surface at the debris-ice boundary is horizontal, and these data are compared to 50 manual point measurements along the same clifftops. We conclude that sufficiently high resolution photogrammetry, with precise scaling information, provides a useful means to determine debris thickness at clifftop exposures. The resolution of the possible measurements depends on image resolution, the accuracy of the ground control points and the computational capacity to generate centimetre scale surface models. Application of such techniques to sufficiently high resolution imagery from UAV-borne cameras may offer a powerful means of determining debris thickness distribution patterns over debris covered glacier termini.

  13. Oblique Photogrammetry and Usage on Land Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisa, A.; Ozmus, L.; Erkek, B.; Ates, H. B.; Bakici, S.

    2013-08-01

    Projects based on Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have started within the body of the General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre (GDLRC) by the Land Registry and Cadastre Information System (LRCIS) in the beginning of 2000s. LRCIS was followed by other projects which are Turkish National Geographic Information System (TNGIS), Continuously Operating GPS Reference Stations (CORS-TR), Geo Metadata Portal (GMP), Orthophoto Web Services, Completion of Initial Cadastre, Cadastre Renovation Project (CRP), 2B and Land Registry Achieve Information System (LRAIS). When examining the projects generated by GDLRC, it is realized that they include basic functions of land administration required for sustainable development. Sustainable development is obtained through effective land administration as is known. Nowadays, land use becomes more intense as a result of rapid population increase. The importance of land ownership has increased accordingly. At this point, the necessity of cadastre appears. In Turkey, cadastral registration is carried out by the detection of parcels. In other words, it is obtained through the division of land surface into 2D boundaries and mapping of them. However, existing land administration systems have begun to lose their efficiency while coping with rights, restrictions and responsibilities (RRRs) belonging to land which become more complicated day by day. Overlapping and interlocking constructions appear particularly in urban areas with dense housing and consequently, the problem of how to project these structures onto the surface in 2D cadastral systems has arisen. Herein, the necessity of 3D cadastre concept and 3D property data is confronted. In recent years, oblique photogrammetry, whose applications are gradually spreading, is used as an effective method for producing 3D data. In this study, applications of oblique photogrammetry and usability of oblique images as base for 3D Cadastre and Land Administration projects are examined.

  14. Water Penetration Photogrammetry. Volume 1. Feasibility and Evaluation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Photogrammetry: Volume I, Feasibility and Evaluation Study Prepared for NORDA Code 550 by the Mapping, Charting , and Geodesy Division (NORDA Code...370) Sponsored by the Defense Mapping Agency HQSTT R. Brown A. Zied Mapping, Charting and Geodesy Division R. Arnone Oceanography Division Ocean...sponsored by DMA under Program Element 63703B, "Water Penetration Photogrammetry" and was performed for NORDA Code 550, Mapping, Charting and Geodesy

  15. Close-range photogrammetry for aircraft quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, D. S.

    Close range photogrammetry is applicable to quality assurance inspections, design data acquisition, and test management support tasks, yielding significant cost avoidance and increased productivity. An understanding of mensuration parameters and their related accuracies is fundamental to the successful application of industrial close range photogrammetry. Attention is presently given to these parameters and to the use of computer modelling as an aid to the photogrammetric entrepreneur in industry. Suggested improvements to cameras and film readers for industrial applications are discussed.

  16. Aerial radiation surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Jobst, J.

    1980-01-01

    A recent aerial radiation survey of the surroundings of the Vitro mill in Salt Lake City shows that uranium mill tailings have been removed to many locations outside their original boundary. To date, 52 remote sites have been discovered within a 100 square kilometer aerial survey perimeter surrounding the mill; 9 of these were discovered with the recent aerial survey map. Five additional sites, also discovered by aerial survey, contained uranium ore, milling equipment, or radioactive slag. Because of the success of this survey, plans are being made to extend the aerial survey program to other parts of the Salt Lake valley where diversions of Vitro tailings are also known to exist.

  17. Direct Georeferencing : a New Standard in Photogrammetry for High Accuracy Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizaldy, A.; Firdaus, W.

    2012-07-01

    Direct georeferencing is a new method in photogrammetry, especially in the digital camera era. Theoretically, this method does not require ground control points (GCP) and the Aerial Triangulation (AT), to process aerial photography into ground coordinates. Compared with the old method, this method has three main advantages: faster data processing, simple workflow and less expensive project, at the same accuracy. Direct georeferencing using two devices, GPS and IMU. GPS recording the camera coordinates (X, Y, Z), and IMU recording the camera orientation (omega, phi, kappa). Both parameters merged into Exterior Orientation (EO) parameter. This parameters required for next steps in the photogrammetric projects, such as stereocompilation, DSM generation, orthorectification and mosaic. Accuracy of this method was tested on topographic map project in Medan, Indonesia. Large-format digital camera Ultracam X from Vexcel is used, while the GPS / IMU is IGI AeroControl. 19 Independent Check Point (ICP) were used to determine the accuracy. Horizontal accuracy is 0.356 meters and vertical accuracy is 0.483 meters. Data with this accuracy can be used for 1:2.500 map scale project.

  18. Application of UAS photogrammetry for assessment of flood driven fluvial dynamics of montane stream. Case study - Roklansky creek, Sumava Mts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhammer, Jakub; Miřijovský, Jakub; Hartvich, Filip; Kaiglová, Jana

    2014-05-01

    Current progress in hydrology and fluvial geomorphology is largely based on new field survey and analysis techniques, employing advanced technologies for monitoring the dynamics of the runoff process, field surveying and for remote monitoring of changes in riverbeds and of fluvial dynamics. Application of these techniques allows researchers to obtain information on a significantly higher qualitative level than using traditional methods of field survey and measurement, either in terms of spatial accuracy and resolution, frequency of sampling or qualitative characteristics of acquired data. The contribution demonstrates the potential of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) for analysis of fluvial dynamics of montane stream, driven by flood in combination with other survey techniques, namely the ground LiDAR scanning, digital granulometry and automated water level monitoring. The UAS photogrammetry is employed in the study to acquire high precision DTMs, enabling reconstruction of riverbed and quantitative analysis of volumetric changes related to initial flood events. The hexacopter UAS platform has been used to acquire the data for photogrammetric analysis of complex stretch of stream with historically elevated fluvial dynamics. The photogrammetric reconstruction enabled to build accurate DTM of riverbed and floodplain before and after the initial event and to calculate the extent of volumetric changes. The potential of UAS photogrammetry for fluvio morphological study is in combination with other monitoring and survey techniques, enabling complex analysis of fluvial dynamics. The magnitude, duration and hydrological properties of initial flood event were derived from automated high frequency water level monitoring. The digital granulometry enabled to analyze the structure of sedimentary material in floodplain. The terrestrial LiDAR scanning allows construction of very detailed 3D models of selected fluvial forms, enabling deeper insight into the effects of fluvial

  19. Aerial Image Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Robert E.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial images produce the best stereoscopic images of the viewed world. Despite the fact that every optic in existence produces an aerial image, few persons are aware of their existence and possible uses. Constant reference to the eye and other optical systems have produced a psychosis of design that only considers "focal planes" in the design and analysis of optical systems. All objects in the field of view of the optical device are imaged by the device as an aerial image. Use of aerial images in vision and visual display systems can provide a true stereoscopic representation of the viewed world. This paper discusses aerial image systems - their applications and designs and presents designs and design concepts that utilize aerial images to obtain superior visual displays, particularly with application to visual simulation.

  20. 11. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the U.S. Forest Service, Toiyabe National Forest, Carson District Office). AERIAL VIEW OF THE GENOA PEAK ROAD, SPUR. - Genoa Peak Road, Spur, Glenbrook, Douglas County, NV

  1. 18. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the U.S. Forest Service, Toiyabe National Forest, Carson District Office). AERIAL VIEW OF THE GENOA PEAK ROAD SEGMENT - Genoa Peak Road, Glenbrook, Douglas County, NV

  2. Structural characterization of rotor blades through photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Giovanni; Serafini, Jacopo; Enei, Claudio; Mattioni, Luca; Ficuciello, Corrado; Vezzari, Valerio

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the use of photogrammetry for the experimental identification of structural and inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades4. The identification procedure is based upon theoretical/numerical algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions which are an extension of those proposed in the past by Larsen, whereas the torsional properties (stiffness and shear center position) are determined through the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory. The identification algorithms require the knowledge of the blade displacement field produced by known steady loads. These data are experimentally obtained through photogrammetric detection technique, which allows the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D digital photos. Indeed, the displacement field is simply evaluated by comparing the markers positions on the loaded configuration with those on the reference one. The proposed identification procedure, numerically and experimentally validated in the past by the authors, has been here applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopters. Strain gauges measurements have been used to assess the accuracy of the identified properties through natural frequencies comparison as well as to evaluate the blades damping characteristics.

  3. Cryospheric Applications of Modern Airborne Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne photogrammetry is undergoing a renaissance. Lower-cost equipment, more powerful software, and simplified methods have lowered the barriers-to-entry significantly and now allow repeat-mapping of cryospheric dynamics that were previously too expensive to consider. The current state-of-the-art is the ability to use an airborne equipment package costing less than $20,000 to make topographic maps on landscape-scales at 10 cm pixel size with a vertical repeatability of about 10 cm. Nearly any surface change on the order of decimeters can be measured using these techniques through analysis of time-series of such maps. This presentation will discuss these new methods and their application to cryospheric dynamics such as the measurement of snow depth, coastal erosion, valley-glacier volume-change, permafrost thaw, frost heave of infrastructure, river bed geomorphology, and aufeis melt. Because of the expense of other airborne methods, by necessity measurements of these dynamics are currently most often made on the ground along benchmark transects that are then extrapolated to the broader scale. The ability to directly measure entire landscapes with equal or higher accuracy than transects eliminates the need to extrapolate them and the ability to do so at lower costs than transects may revolutionize the way we approach studying change in the cryosphere, as well as our understanding of the cryosphere itself.

  4. A new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-05-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing day to day for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally three main image based approaches are using for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling and third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete solution available to create complete 3D city model by using images. These image based methods also have limitations This paper gives a new approach towards image based virtual 3D city modeling by using close range photogrammetry. This approach is divided into three sections. First, data acquisition process, second is 3D data processing, and third is data combination process. In data acquisition process, a multi-camera setup developed and used for video recording of an area. Image frames created from video data. Minimum required and suitable video image frame selected for 3D processing. In second section, based on close range photogrammetric principles and computer vision techniques, 3D model of area created. In third section, this 3D model exported to adding and merging of other pieces of large area. Scaling and alignment of 3D model was done. After applying the texturing and rendering on this model, a final photo-realistic textured 3D model created. This 3D model transferred into walk-through model or in movie form. Most of the processing steps are automatic. So this method is cost effective and less laborious. Accuracy of this model is good. For this research work, study area is the campus of department of civil engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. This campus acts as a prototype for city. Aerial photography is restricted in many country

  5. High resolution channel geometry from repeat aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, T.; Neilson, B. T.; Jensen, A.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Winkelaar, M.; Rasmussen, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    River channel cross sectional geometry is a key attribute for controlling the river energy balances where surface heat fluxes dominate and discharge varies significantly over short time periods throughout the open water season. These dynamics are seen in higher gradient portions of Arctic rivers where surface heat fluxes can dominates river energy balances and low hillslope storage produce rapidly varying hydrographs. Additionally, arctic river geometry can be highly dynamic in the face of thermal erosion of permafrost landscape. While direct in-situ measurements of channel cross sectional geometry are accurate, they are limited in spatial resolution and coverage, and can be access limited in remote areas. Remote sensing can help gather data at high spatial resolutions and large areas, however techniques for extracting channel geometry is often limited to the banks and flood plains adjacent to river, as the water column inhibits sensing of the river bed itself. Green light LiDAR can be used to map bathymetry, however this is expensive, difficult to obtain at large spatial scales, and dependent on water quality. Alternatively, 3D photogrammetry from aerial imagery can be used to analyze the non-wetted portion of the river channel, but extracting full cross sections requires extrapolation into the wetted portion of the river. To bridge these gaps, an approach for using repeat aerial imagery surveys with visual (RGB) and near infrared (NIR) to extract high resolution channel geometry for the Kuparuk River in the Alaskan Arctic was developed. Aerial imagery surveys were conducted under multiple flow conditions and water surface geometry (elevation and width) were extracted through photogrammetry. Channel geometry was extracted by combining water surface widths and elevations from multiple flights. The accuracy of these results were compared against field surveyed cross sections at many locations throughout the study reach and a digital elevation model created under

  6. Beach monitoring using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: results of a multi-temporal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casella, Elisa; Rovere, Alessio; Casella, Marco; Pedroncini, Andrea; Ferrari, Marco; Vacchi, Matteo; Firpo, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The application of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and photogrammetry techniques in earth sciences is flourishing. In this study, we show how we applied small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to the study of topographic changes of a beach in Italy, NW Mediterranean Sea. We surveyed the same stretch of coastline three times in 5 months, obtaining ortophotos and digital elevation models of the beach using a structure from motion approach. We then calculated the difference in beach topography between each time step, and we related topography changes to both human and natural modifications of the beach morphology that can be inferred from aerial photos or wave data. We conclude that small drones have the potential to open new possibilities for beach monitoring studies, and can be successfully employed for multi-temporal monitoring studies at relatively low cost.

  7. Photogrammetry and optical methods in structural dynamics - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baqersad, Javad; Poozesh, Peyman; Niezrecki, Christopher; Avitabile, Peter

    2017-03-01

    In the last few decades, there has been a surge of research in the area of non-contact measurement techniques. Photogrammetry has received considerable attention due to its ability to achieve full-field measurement and its robustness to work in testing environments and on testing articles in which using other measurement techniques may not be practical. More recently, researchers have used this technique to study transient phenomena and to perform measurements on vibrating structures. The current paper reviews the most current trends in the photogrammetry technique (point tracking, digital image correlation, and target-less approaches) and compares the applications of photogrammetry to other measurement techniques used in structural dynamics (e.g. laser Doppler vibrometry and interferometry techniques). The paper does not present the theoretical background of the optical techniques, but instead presents the general principles of each approach and highlights the novel structural dynamic measurement concepts and applications that are enhanced by utilizing optical techniques.

  8. Analysis of Photogrammetry Data from ISIM Mockup, June 1, 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Maria; Hill, Mike

    2007-01-01

    During ground testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), the ISIM Optics group plans to use a Photogrammetry Measurement System for cryogenic calibration of specific target points on the ISIM composite structure and Science Instrument optical benches and other GSE equipment. This testing will occur in the Space Environmental Systems (SES) chamber at Goddard Space Flight Center. Close range photogrammetry is a 3 dimensional metrology system using triangulation to locate custom targets in 3 coordinates via a collection of digital photographs taken from various locations and orientations. These photos are connected using coded targets, special targets that are recognized by the software and can thus correlate the images to provide a 3 dimensional map of the targets, and scaled via well calibrated scale bars. Photogrammetry solves for the camera location and coordinates of the targets simultaneously through the bundling procedure contained in the V-STARS software.

  9. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The National Cartographic Information Center of the U.S. Geological Survey maintains records of aerial photographic coverage of the United States and its Territories, based on reports from other Federal agencies as well as State governmental agencies and commercial companies. From these records, the Center furnishes data to prospective purchasers on available photography and the agency holding the aerial film.

  10. Quality of terrestrial data derived from UAV photogrammetry: a case study of the Hetao irrigation district in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongming; Baartman, Jantiene E. M.; Yang, Xiaomei; Gai, Lingtong; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    Most crops in northern China are irrigated, but the topography affects water use, soil erosion, runoff and yields,. Technologies for collecting high-resolution topographic data are essential for adequately assessing these effects. Ground surveys and techniques of light detection and ranging have good accuracy, but data acquisition can be time-consuming and expensive for large catchments. Recent rapid technological development has provided new, flexible, high-resolution methods for collecting topographic data, such as photogrammetry using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The accuracy of UAV photogrammetry for generating high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and for determining the width of irrigation channels, however, has not been assessed. We used a fixed-wing UAV for collecting high-resolution (0.15 m) topographic data for the Hetao irrigation district, the third largest irrigation district in China. We surveyed 112 ground checkpoints (GCPs) using a real-time kinematic global positioning system to evaluate the accuracy of the DEMs and channel widths. A comparison of manually measured channel widths with the widths derived from the DEMs indicated that the DEM-derived widths had vertical and horizontal root mean square errors of 13.0 and 7.9 cm, respectively. UAV photogrammetric data can thus be used for land surveying, digital mapping, calculating channel capacity, monitoring crops, and predicting yields, with the advantages of economy, speed, and ease.

  11. Catchment-Scale Terrain Modelling with Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry: a replacement for airborne lidar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, James; James, Joe; Cook, Simon; Cox, Simon; Lotsari, Eliisa; McColl, Sam; Lehane, Niall; Williams, Richard; Vericat, Damia

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, 3D terrain reconstructions based on Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry have dramatically democratized the availability of high quality topographic data. This approach involves the use of a non-linear bundle adjustment to estimate simultaneously camera position, pose, distortion and 3D model coordinates. In contrast to traditional aerial photogrammetry, the bundle adjustment is typically solved without external constraints and instead ground control is used a posteriori to transform the modelled coordinates to an established datum using a similarity transformation. The limited data requirements, coupled with the ability to self-calibrate compact cameras, has led to a burgeoning of applications using low-cost imagery acquired terrestrially or from low-altitude platforms. To date, most applications have focused on relatively small spatial scales (0.1-5 Ha), where relaxed logistics permit the use of dense ground control networks and high resolution, close-range photography. It is less clear whether this low-cost approach can be successfully upscaled to tackle larger, watershed-scale projects extending over 102-3 km2 where it could offer a competitive alternative to established landscape modelling with airborne lidar. At such scales, compromises over the density of ground control, the speed and height of sensor platform and related image properties are inevitable. In this presentation we provide a systematic assessment of the quality of large-scale SfM terrain products derived for over 80 km2 of the braided Dart River and its catchment in the Southern Alps of NZ. Reference data in the form of airborne and terrestrial lidar are used to quantify the quality of 3D reconstructions derived from helicopter photography and used to establish baseline uncertainty models for geomorphic change detection. Results indicate that camera network design is a key determinant of model quality, and that standard aerial photogrammetric networks based on strips of nadir

  12. Catchment-Scale Terrain Modelling with Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry: a replacement for airborne lidar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasington, J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last five years, Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry has dramatically democratized the availability of high quality topographic data. This approach involves the use of a non-linear bundle adjustment to estimate simultaneously camera position, pose, distortion and 3D model coordinates. In contrast to traditional aerial photogrammetry, the bundle adjustment is typically solved without external constraints and instead ground control is used a posteriori to transform the modelled coordinates to an established datum using a similarity transformation. The limited data requirements, coupled with the ability to self-calibrate compact cameras, has led to a burgeoning of applications using low-cost imagery acquired terrestrially or from low-altitude platforms. To date, most applications have focused on relatively small spatial scales where relaxed logistics permit the use of dense ground control and high resolution, close-range photography. It is less clear whether this low-cost approach can be successfully upscaled to tackle larger, watershed-scale projects extending over 102-3 km2 where it could offer a competitive alternative to landscape modelling with airborne lidar. At such scales, compromises over the density of ground control, the speed and height of sensor platform and related image properties are inevitable. In this presentation we provide a systematic assessment of large-scale SfM terrain products derived for over 80 km2 of the braided Dart River and its catchment in the Southern Alps of NZ. Reference data in the form of airborne and terrestrial lidar are used to quantify the quality of 3D reconstructions derived from helicopter photography and used to establish baseline uncertainty models for geomorphic change detection. Results indicate that camera network design is a key determinant of model quality, and that standard aerial networks based on strips of nadir photography can lead to unstable camera calibration and systematic errors that are difficult

  13. Complementing forest inventory data with information from unmanned aerial vehicle imagery and photogrammetry

    Treesearch

    Nikolay S. Strigul; Demetrios Gatziolis; Jean F. Liénard; Andre. Vogs

    2015-01-01

    Although a prerequisite for an accurate assessment of tree competition, growth, and morphological plasticity, measurements conducive to three-dimensional (3D) representations of individual trees are seldom part of forest inventory operations. This is in part because until recently our ability to measure the dimensionality, spatial arrangement, and shape of trees and...

  14. Photogrammetry of the Map Instrument in a Cryogenic Vacuum Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, M.; Packard, E.; Pazar, R.

    2000-01-01

    MAP Instrument requirements dictated that the instruments Focal Plane Assembly (FPA) and Thermal Reflector System (TRS) maintain a high degree of structural integrity at operational temperatures (< 50K). To verify integrity at these extremes, an elaborate test fixture was constructed to provide a large cryogenic (< 20K) radiative environment and a mobile photogrammetry camera. This paper will discuss MAP's Instrument requirements, how those requirements were verified using photogrammetry, and the test setup used to provide the environment and camera movement needed to verify the instrument's requirements.

  15. Drone-acquired structure-from-motion photogrammetry for high-precision measurements of biomass in semi-arid rangelands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, Andrew; Brazier, Richard; Anderson, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Covering 40% of the terrestrial surface, dryland ecosystems have a distinct vegetation structure that is strongly linked to their function. Recent global modelling studies have indicated interannual variations in semiarid ecosystem biomass accounts for ca. 40%-60% of interannual variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Empirical evidence is needed to validate these model predictions; however, existing survey approaches cannot provide sufficiently precise data at landscape-scale extents to quantify this structure appropriately. Using a small unpiloted aerial system (UAS) to acquire aerial photographs and processing using structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry, three dimensional models were produced quantifying the vegetation structure of semi-arid ecosystems at seven areas of interest (AOI). This approach yielded ultrafine (<1 cm2) spatial resolution canopy height models over landscape-scales (10 ha), which resolved individual grass tussocks just a few cm3 in volume. Canopy height cumulative distributions for each AOI illustrated ecologically-significant differences in ecosystem structure over a grass- to shrub-dominated vegetation transition. Strong coefficients of determination (r2 >0.64) supported prediction of aboveground biomass from canopy volume. Canopy volumes, modelled biomass and carbon stocks were sensitive to spatial changes in vegetation community structure. We demonstrate the use of an inexpensive UAS and SfM photogrammetry to produce ultrafine-scale biophysical data products. The high-precision of this approach affords sensitivity to subtle differences in the biotic structure (and therefore function) of heterogeneous ecosystems subject to rapid environmental change, and has exciting potential to revolutionise the study of spatial ecology in ecosystems with either spatially or temporally discontinuous canopy cover.

  16. Small format digital photogrammetry for applications in the earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke-Zapp, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Small format digital photogrammetry for applications in the earth sciences Photogrammetry is often considered one of the most precise and versatile surveying techniques. The same camera and analysis software can be used for measurements from sub-millimetre to kilometre scale. Such a measurement device is well suited for application by earth scientists working in the field. In this case a small toolset and a straight forward setup best fit the needs of the operator. While a digital camera is typically already part of the field equipment of an earth scientist the main focus of the field work is often not surveying. Lack in photogrammetric training at the same time requires an easy to learn, straight forward surveying technique. A photogrammetric method was developed aimed primarily at earth scientists for taking accurate measurements in the field minimizing extra bulk and weight of the required equipment. The work included several challenges. A) Definition of an upright coordinate system without heavy and bulky tools like a total station or GNS-Sensor. B) Optimization of image acquisition and geometric stability of the image block. C) Identification of a small camera suitable for precise measurements in the field. D) Optimization of the workflow from image acquisition to preparation of images for stereo measurements. E) Introduction of students and non-photogrammetrists to the workflow. Wooden spheres were used as target points in the field. They were more rugged and available in different sizes than ping pong balls used in a previous setup. Distances between three spheres were introduced as scale information in a photogrammetric adjustment. The distances were measured with a laser distance meter accurate to 1 mm (1 sigma). The vertical angle between the spheres was measured with the same laser distance meter. The precision of the measurement was 0.3° (1 sigma) which is sufficient, i.e. better than inclination measurements with a geological compass. The upright

  17. Close range photogrammetry--a clinical dental research tool.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, R G

    1992-08-01

    Photogrammetry is the art, science and technology of obtaining reliable information about physical objects through processes of recording and interpreting photographic images. This review outlines the principles of the technique and summarizes the various methodologies and applications in clinical dental research.

  18. Low-Outgassing Photogrammetry Targets for Use in Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Jason N.; Sampler, Henry; Reed, Benjamin B.

    2011-01-01

    A short document discusses an investigation of materials for photogrammetry targets for highly sensitive optical scientific instruments to be operated in outer space and in an outer-space-environment- simulating thermal vacuum chamber on Earth. A key consideration in the selection of photogrammetry-target materials for vacuum environments is the need to prevent contamination that could degrade the optical responses of the instruments. Therefore, in addition to the high levels and uniformity of reflectivity required of photogrammetry-target materials suitable for use in air, the materials sought must exhibit minimal outgassing. Commercially available photogrammetry targets were found to outgas excessively under the thermal and vacuum conditions of interest; this finding prompted the investigators to consider optically equivalent or superior, lower-outgassing alternative target materials. The document lists several materials found to satisfy the requirements, but does not state explicitly whether the materials can be used individually or must be combined in the proper sequence into layered target structures. The materials in question are an aluminized polyimide tape, an acrylic pressure- sensitive adhesive, a 500-A-thick layer of vapor-deposited aluminum, and spherical barium titanate glass beads having various diameters from 20 to 63 microns..

  19. Hydraulic risk assessment of bridges using UAV photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackl, Jürgen; Adey, Bryan T.; Woźniak, Michał; Schümperlin, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Road networks are essential for economic growth and development. Of the objects within a road network, bridges are of special interest, because their failure often results in relatively large interruptions to how the network is used, their replacement costs are generally large, and it usually takes a considerable amount of time to restore them once they have failed. Of the different types of bridges, bridges in mountainous regions are of special interest because their failure could cause severe societal consequences, for example, if it renders an area inaccessible. One of the main causes of the failure of bridges in mountainous regions is the occurrence of a hydraulic event, for example, flood waters above a certain level, scour below a certain depth or debris build up beyond a certain level. An assessment of risk related to a bridge in a mountainous region is challenging. The probability of occurrence of these events, and the resulting consequences, depend greatly on the characteristics (e.g. slope, soil, vegetation, precipitation, …) of the specific regions where the bridges are located. An indication of the effect of these characteristics can be seen in the sediment deposition during floods in mountain catchments. Additionally, there is often no, or no recent, topological information that can be used to develop terrain models to be used for realistic water flow simulations in mountain regions, and most hydrology and hydraulic models have been developed for lower gradient rivers and can often not be directly used to model water flow in mountain rivers. In an effort to improve the assessment of risk related to bridges in mountainous regions, using the setting for risk assessments established by Hackl et al. (2015) and Adey et al. (2016), an investigation was undertaken to determine whether unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and photogrammetry could be used to generate the topological information required to run realistic water flow simulations. The process

  20. Cadastral Audit and Assessments Using Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, K.; Walker, G.; Stahlke, E.; Wilson, R.

    2011-09-01

    Ground surveys and remote sensing are integral to establishing fair and equitable property valuations necessary for real property taxation. The International Association of Assessing Officers (IAAO) has embraced aerial and street-view imaging as part of its standards related to property tax assessments and audits. New technologies, including unmanned aerial systems (UAS) paired with imaging sensors, will become more common as local governments work to ensure their cadastre and tax rolls are both accurate and complete. Trends in mapping technology have seen an evolution in platforms from large, expensive manned aircraft to very small, inexpensive UAS. Traditional methods of photogrammetry have also given way to new equipment and sensors: digital cameras, infrared imagers, light detection and ranging (LiDAR) laser scanners, and now synthetic aperture radar (SAR). At the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), we work extensively with unmanned aerial systems equipped with each of these newer sensors. UAF has significant experience flying unmanned systems in the US National Airspace, having begun in 1969 with scientific rockets and expanded to unmanned aircraft in 2003. Ongoing field experience allows UAF to partner effectively with outside organizations to test and develop leading-edge research in UAS and remote sensing. This presentation will discuss our research related to various sensors and payloads for mapping. We will also share our experience with UAS and optical systems for creating some of the first cadastral surveys in rural Alaska.

  1. The methodology of documenting cultural heritage sites using photogrammetry, UAV, and 3D printing techniques: the case study of Asinou Church in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, K.; Ioannides, M.; Agapiou, A.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-06-01

    As the affordability, reliability and ease-of-use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) advances, the use of aerial surveying for cultural heritage purposes becomes a popular choice, yielding an unprecedented volume of high-resolution, geo-tagged image-sets of historical sites from above. As well, recent developments in photogrammetry technology provide a simple and cost-effective method of generating relatively accurate 3D models from 2D images. These techniques provide a set of new tools for archaeologists and cultural heritage experts to capture, store, process, share, visualise and annotate 3D models in the field. This paper focuses on the methodology used to document the cultural heritage site of Asinou Church in Cyprus using various state of the art techniques, such as UAV, photogrammetry and 3D printing. Hundreds of images of the Asinou Church were taken by a UAV with an attached high resolution, low cost camera. These photographic images were then used to create a digital 3D model and a 3D printer was used to create a physical model of the church. Such a methodology provides archaeologists and cultural heritage experts a simple and cost-effective method of generating relatively accurate 3D models from 2D images of cultural heritage sites.

  2. AERIAL METHODS OF EXPLORATION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The development of photointerpretation techniques for identifying kimberlite pipes on aerial photographs is discussed. The geographic area considered is the Daldyn region, which lies in the zone of Northern Taiga of Yakutiya.

  3. SITE I - AERIAL - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-08-01

    S65-51530 (September 1965) --- Aerial view of Manned Spacecraft Center, Site 1, Houston, Texas, looking north. NOTE: The Manned Spacecraft Center was named Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in memory of the late President following his death.

  4. SITE I - AERIAL - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-07-01

    S66-42379 (1966) --- Aerial view of construction progress at the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas. NOTE: The Manned Spacecraft Center was named Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in memory of the late President following his death.

  5. Aerial Refueling Test Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-13

    guide to assess technical compatibility to complement the Aerial Refueling clearance process defined in ARSAG document 43-08-14. The purpose of this...operate the tanker and receiver aircraft. The technical , political, and operational authorities for both aircraft must agree that the appropriate amount of...law, regulation, or technical evaluation. This document serves as an informative database for organizations to consult when developing an aerial

  6. Retrieval of Snow Depth Using Low Cost UAV-Based Lidar and Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderjagt, B. J.; Turner, D.; Lucieer, A.; Durand, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Snow and its water equivalent is an important hydrologic variable for many areas of the world. Thus, being able to make accurate measurements of snow variables over large spatial scales has both scientific and civil merit. Herein, we present the results of a field campaign in the summer of 2013 in which estimates of snow depth were derived using a combined Light Detection And Ranging (Lidar) and photogrammetry approach aboard an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Previous photogrammetric approaches have failed, typically due to the homogeneity of the snow covered scene that is being imaged. However, due to the decreased flying heights of the UAV as compared to airborne or spaceborne imagery, dense photogrammetric reconstruction is easily realized from texture within the images. Additionally, the Lidar-derived point clouds provide redundancy in areas where photogrammetric reconstruction isn't possible, such as areas with dense vegetation coverage. To accurately georeference our point clouds, we use dual-frequency differential GPS measurements in conjunction with a MEMS IMU to provide initial estimates of the exterior orientation parameters which are then combined into a photogrammetric bundle adjustment to determine the optimal estimates of sensor position and orientation. Our results indicate the UAV is capable of providing high resolution and high accuracy estimates of snow depth over a mountain transect at a fraction of the cost of airborne approaches.

  7. Evaluating RGB photogrammetry and multi-temporal digital surface models for detecting soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia; Seeger, Manuel

    2013-04-01

    Photogrammetry is a widely used tool for generating high-resolution digital surface models. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), equipped with a Red Green Blue (RGB) camera, have great potential in quickly acquiring multi-temporal high-resolution orthophotos and surface models. Such datasets would ease the monitoring of geomorphological processes, such as local soil erosion and rill formation after heavy rainfall events. In this study we test a photogrammetric setup to determine data requirements for soil erosion studies with UAVs. We used a rainfall simulator (5 m2) and above a rig with attached a Panasonic GX1 16 megapixel digital camera and 20mm lens. The soil material in the simulator consisted of loamy sand at an angle of 5 degrees. Stereo pair images were taken before and after rainfall simulation with 75-85% overlap. Acquired images were automatically mosaicked to create high-resolution orthorectified images and digital surface models (DSM). We resampled the DSM to different spatial resolutions to analyze the effect of cell size to the accuracy of measured rill depth and soil loss estimations, and determined an optimal cell size (thus flight altitude). Furthermore, the high spatial accuracy of the acquired surface models allows further analysis of rill formation and channel initiation related to e.g. surface roughness. We suggest implementing near-infrared and temperature sensors to combine soil moisture and soil physical properties with surface morphology for future investigations.

  8. Photogrammetry for Early Recognition of High Mountain Hazards: New Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaab, A.

    2000-09-01

    Steady mass shift as well as catastrophic massmovement events are the natural expression of the dynamics of high-mountain mass-transport systems, causing a variety of natural hazards. Computer-aided aerial photogrammetry, especially a newly developed technique for determining surface velocity fields in 3D, offers a wide range of possibilities to map disasters and hazard potentials, to monitor medium- and long-term development of dangerous situations and to provide area-wide boundary conditions for 2D- and 3D-modelling of kinetic and dynamic processes. Three pilot studies in the Swiss Alps illustrate the potential of highprecision and multi-temporal image analysis for early recognition of glacial and periglacial hazards: (1) The increasing risk of lake-outbursts and related debris-flows (up to several 105m3) was detected by a 25-year monitoring series of glacier geometry, ice flow, permafrost creep and changes of glacier-lakes. (2) Analyzing permafrost creep above a potential starting zone of debris flows allowed for assessing mass transport and accumulation rates in this zone. (3) The kinetic processes and the extent of a rock slide (∼ 106-107m3), induced by a marked retreat of a glacier tongue and the related stress-relief at the valley flanks could be determined.

  9. Comparisons of Simultaneously Acquired Airborne Sfm Photogrammetry and Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) created using images from a consumer DSLR camera are compared against simultaneously acquired LiDAR on a number of airborne mapping projects across Alaska, California and Utah. The aircraft used is a Cessna 180, and is equipped with the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute (UAF-GI) scanning airborne LiDAR system. This LiDAR is the same as described in Johnson et al, 2013, and is the principal instrument used for NASA's Operation IceBridge flights in Alaska. The system has been in extensive use since 2009, and is particularly well characterized with dozens of calibration flights and a careful program of boresight angle determination and monitoring. The UAF-GI LiDAR has a precision of +/- 8 cm and accuracy of +/- 15 cm. The photogrammetry DEM simultaneously acquired with the LiDAR relies on precise shutter timing using an event marker input to the IMU associated with the LiDAR system. The photo positions are derived from the fully coupled GPS/IMU processing, which samples at 100 Hz and is able to directly calculate the antenna to image plane offset displacements from the full orientation data. This use of the GPS/IMU solution means that both the LiDAR and Cessna 180 photogrammetry DEM share trajectory input data, however no orientation data nor ground control is used for the photorammetry processing. The photogrammetry DEMs are overlaid on the LiDAR point cloud and analyzed for horizontal shifts or warps relative to the LiDAR. No warping or horizontal shifts have been detectable for a number of photogrammetry DEMs. Vertical offsets range from +/- 30 cm, with a typical standard deviation about that mean of 10 cm or better. LiDAR and photogrammetry function inherently differently over trees and brush, and direct comparisons between the two methods show much larger differences over vegetated areas. Finally, the differences in flight patterns associated with the two methods will be discussed, highlighting the photogrammetry

  10. Aerial Photography Summary Record System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    The Aerial Photography Summary Record System (APSRS) describes aerial photography projects that meet specified criteria over a given geographic area of the United States and its territories. Aerial photographs are an important tool in cartography and a number of other professions. Land use planners, real estate developers, lawyers, environmental specialists, and many other professionals rely on detailed and timely aerial photographs. Until 1975, there was no systematic approach to locate an aerial photograph, or series of photographs, quickly and easily. In that year, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) inaugurated the APSRS, which has become a standard reference for users of aerial photographs.

  11. Erosion rates of a small coastal island revealed by repeated measurements using TLS and UAS-SfM photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Y. S.; Obanawa, H.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the weak bedrock and constant wave erosion, sea cliffs along the outer Boso Peninsula, central Japan, have been eroded at ca. 1 m per year for centuries. Modern coastal protection work had significantly reduced the erosion rate, while this became a cause of limited supply of sands along beaches in this area. Among the almost complete protection, a small coastal island, so-called Suzume-Jima Island (70 km southeast of Tokyo), has not been protected, in which we can still observe processes of coastal cliff erosion at the original rate. We have performed multi-temporal (3 times a year), high-resolution (centimeters) topographic measurements of the small island for 3 years, using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and structure-from-motion multi-view stereo (SfM-MVS) photogrammetry with an unmanned aerial system (UAS). Landside of the island can be measured by both TLS and UAS, but the seaside could only be captured by UAS, therefore these data are combined to analyze the entire island morphology with a reasonable accuracy. Frequent, spatially variable wave erosion and rockfalls were observed during the measurement period. The dominant wave direction and geologic structure (joint location and orientation) may account for these differences. A severe notch development in the cliff suggests a possible formation of a sea cave through the island in the near future. The measured, short-term results were also compared with the longer-term development of the island shape, obtained by historical aerial photographs for 50 years.

  12. Using semi-automated photogrammetry software to generate 3D surfaces from oblique and vertical photographs at Mount St. Helens, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, S.; Diefenbach, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Photogrammetry has been used to generate contours and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) to monitor change at Mount St. Helens, WA since the 1980 eruption. We continue to improve techniques to monitor topographic changes within the crater. During the 2004-2008 eruption, 26 DEMs were used to track volume and rates of growth of a lava dome and changes of Crater Glacier. These measurements constrained seismogenic extrusion models and were compared with geodetic deflation volume to constrain magma chamber behavior. We used photogrammetric software to collect irregularly spaced 3D points primarily by hand and, in reasonably flat areas, by automated algorithms, from commercial vertical aerial photographs. These models took days to months to complete and the areal extent of each surface was determined by visual inspection. Later in the eruption, we pioneered the use of different software to generate irregularly spaced 3D points manually from oblique images captured by a hand-held digital camera. In each case, the irregularly spaced points and intervening interpolated points formed regular arrays of cells or DEMs. Calculations using DEMs produced from the hand-held images duplicated volumetric and rate results gleaned from the vertical aerial photographs. This manual point capture technique from oblique hand-held photographs required only a few hours to generate a model over a focused area such as the lava dome, but would have taken perhaps days to capture data over the entire crater. Here, we present results from new photogrammetric software that uses robust image-matching algorithms to produce 3D surfaces automatically after inner, relative, and absolute orientations between overlapping photographs are completed. Measurements using scans of vertical aerial photographs taken August 10, 2005 produced dome volume estimates within two percent of those from a surface generated using the vertical aerial photograph manual method. The new August 10th orientations took less than 8

  13. Evaluating the accuracy of orthophotos and 3D models from UAV photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julge, Kalev; Ellmann, Artu

    2015-04-01

    Rapid development of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in recent years has made their use for various applications more feasible. This contribution evaluates the accuracy and quality of different UAV remote sensing products (i.e. orthorectified image, point cloud and 3D model). Two different autonomous fixed wing UAV systems were used to collect the aerial photographs. One is a mass-produced commercial UAV system, the other is a similar state-of-the-art UAV system. Three different study areas with varying sizes and characteristics (including urban areas, forests, fields, etc.) were surveyed. The UAV point clouds, 3D models and orthophotos were generated with three different commercial and free-ware software. The performance of each of these was evaluated. The effect of flying height on the accuracy of the results was explored, as well as the optimum number and placement of ground control points. Also the achieved results, when the only georeferencing data originates from the UAV system's on-board GNSS and inertial measurement unit, are investigated. Problems regarding the alignment of certain types of aerial photos (e.g. captured over forested areas) are discussed. The quality and accuracy of UAV photogrammetry products are evaluated by comparing them with control measurements made with GNSS-measurements on the ground, as well as high-resolution airborne laser scanning data and other available orthophotos (e.g. those acquired for large scale national mapping). Vertical comparisons are made on surfaces that have remained unchanged in all campaigns, e.g. paved roads. Planar comparisons are performed by control surveys of objects that are clearly identifiable on orthophotos. The statistics of these differences are used to evaluate the accuracy of UAV remote sensing. Some recommendations are given on how to conduct UAV mapping campaigns cost-effectively and with minimal time-consumption while still ensuring the quality and accuracy of the UAV data products. Also the

  14. Uav Onboard Photogrammetry and GPS Positionning for Earthworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daakir, M.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Bosser, P.; Pichard, F.; Thom, C.

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decade, Unmanned Airbone Vehicles (UAVs) have been largely used for civil applications. Airborne photogrammetry has found place in these applications not only for 3D modeling but also as a measurement tool. Vinci-Construction-Terrassement is a private company specialized in public works sector and uses airborn photogrammetry as a mapping solution and metrology investigation tool on its sites. This technology is very efficient for the calculation of stock volumes for instance, or for time tracking of specific areas with risk of landslides. The aim of the present work is to perform a direct georeferencing of images acquired by the camera leaning on an embedded GPS receiver. UAV, GPS receiver and camera used are low-cost models and therefore data processing is adapted to this particular constraint.

  15. Dot-Projection Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry of Gossamer Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Black, Jonathan T.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Dorrington, Adrian A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the technique of using hundreds or thousands of projected dots of light as targets for photogrammetry and videogrammetry of gossamer space structures. Photogrammetry calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of each target on the structure, and videogrammetry tracks the coordinates versus time. Gossamer structures characteristically contain large areas of delicate, thin-film membranes. Examples include solar sails, large antennas, inflatable solar arrays, solar power concentrators and transmitters, sun shields, and planetary balloons and habitats. Using projected-dot targets avoids the unwanted mass, stiffness, and installation costs of traditional retroreflective adhesive targets. Four laboratory applications are covered that demonstrate the practical effectiveness of white-light dot projection for both static-shape and dynamic measurement of reflective and diffuse surfaces, respectively. Comparisons are made between dot-projection videogrammetry and traditional laser vibrometry for membrane vibration measurements. The paper closes by introducing a promising extension of existing techniques using a novel laser-induced fluorescence approach.

  16. Advantages of High Tolerance Measurements in Fusion Environments Applying Photogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    T. Dodson, R. Ellis, C. Priniski, S. Raftopoulos, D. Stevens, M. Viola

    2009-02-04

    Photogrammetry, a state-of-the-art technique of metrology employing digital photographs as the vehicle for measurement, has been investigated in the fusion environment. Benefits of this high tolerance methodology include relatively easy deployment for multiple point measurements and deformation/distortion studies. Depending on the equipment used, photogrammetric systems can reach tolerances of 25 microns (0.001 in) to 100 microns (0.004 in) on a 3-meter object. During the fabrication and assembly of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) the primary measurement systems deployed were CAD coordinate-based computer metrology equipment and supporting algorithms such as both interferometer-aided (IFM) and absolute distance measurementbased (ADM) laser trackers, as well as portable Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) arms. Photogrammetry was employed at NCSX as a quick and easy tool to monitor coil distortions incurred during welding operations of the machine assembly process and as a way to reduce assembly downtime for metrology processes.

  17. Sensor modelling and camera calibration for close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, Thomas; Fraser, Clive; Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2016-05-01

    Metric calibration is a critical prerequisite to the application of modern, mostly consumer-grade digital cameras for close-range photogrammetric measurement. This paper reviews aspects of sensor modelling and photogrammetric calibration, with attention being focussed on techniques of automated self-calibration. Following an initial overview of the history and the state of the art, selected topics of current interest within calibration for close-range photogrammetry are addressed. These include sensor modelling, with standard, extended and generic calibration models being summarised, along with non-traditional camera systems. Self-calibration via both targeted planar arrays and targetless scenes amenable to SfM-based exterior orientation are then discussed, after which aspects of calibration and measurement accuracy are covered. Whereas camera self-calibration is largely a mature technology, there is always scope for additional research to enhance the models and processes employed with the many camera systems nowadays utilised in close-range photogrammetry.

  18. Automation in photogrammetry: Recent developments and applications (1972-1976)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, M.M.; Mikhail, E.M.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of recent developments in the automation of photogrammetry in various countries is presented. Conclusions regarding automated photogrammetry reached at the 1972 Congress in Ottawa are reviewed first as a background for examining the developments of 1972-1976. Applications are described for each country reporting significant developments. Among fifteen conclusions listed are statements concerning: the widespread practice of equipping existing stereoplotters with simple digitizers; the growing tendency to use minicomputers on-line with stereoplotters; the optimization of production of digital terrain models by progressive sampling in stereomodels; the potential of digitization of a photogrammetric model by density correlation on epipolar lines; the capabilities and economic aspects of advanced systems which permit simultaneous production of orthophotos, contours, and digital terrain models; the economy of off-line orthophoto systems; applications of digital image processing; automation by optical techniques; applications of sensors other than photographic imagery, and the role of photogrammetric phases in a completely automated cartographic system. ?? 1976.

  19. Towards AN Easier Orientation for Spherical Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangi, G.

    2015-02-01

    For architectural metric documentation, Spherical Photogrammetry (SP) has demonstrated its validity and efficiency in many projects already. The speed of surveying is high, the accuracy and completeness of the plotting are satisfactory. However, there are still many problems to be solved. The weakest point is the orientation procedure, which is rather difficult to perform, in the sense that only very experienced people can run it, and few people only make use of it. The old orientation steps are 1) model formation (limited to binocular panoramas couples); 2) link of all the models in a block adjustment with independent model triangulation; 3) block bundle adjustment with 4 parameters/pano (3 coord.+1 orientation bearing); 4) block bundle adjustment with 6 parameters/pano, say the previous 4 + 2 correction angles around the horizontal axes. The panoramas must be spherical and quasi-horizontal. In order to make easier the orientation, enabling more people to use SP, an improved approach has been set up. It consists in the combination of any possible model formed either by three and two panoramas. The trinocular vision, say the combination of three different panoramas to form a unique model, has the advantage to be much more robust in comparison to binocular vision in the sense that the trinocular model is likely to be more error-free than any of the three composing binocular models. It contains less model deformation, the model coordinates are validated by the mutual comparison of the three intersecting binocular models. In addition, the number of possible trinocular models is normally much larger than the one of binocular models. The steps for a semi-automatic orientation of a block of panoramas proceed as follows: - Form any possible trinocular models by combination of the panoramas; - in case that no trinocular model has been formed, form any possible binocular model; - run a block adjustment with the algorithm of independent model, to link together the models in

  20. 26. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the U.S. Forest Service, Toiyabe National Forest, Carson District Office). AERIAL VIEW OF THE WESTERN END OF THE KINGS CANYON ROAD SEGMENT, 1993. - Kings Canyon Road, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  1. 27. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in the U.S. Forest Service, Toiyabe National Forest, Carson District Office). AERIAL VIEW OF THE WEST-CENTRAL END OF THE KINGS CANYON ROAD SEGMENT, 1993. - Kings Canyon Road, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  2. Close Range Digital Photogrammetry Applied to Topography and Landslide Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Che

    2016-06-01

    Landslide monitoring is a crucial tool for the prevention of hazards. It is often the only solution for the survey and the early-warning of large landslides cannot be stabilized. The objective of present study is to use a low-cost image system to monitor the active landslides. We adopted the direct linear transformation (DLT) method in close range digital photogrammetry to measure terrain of landslide at the Huoyen Shan, Miaoli of central Taiwan and to compare measured results with e-GPS. The results revealed that the relative error in surface area was approximately 1.7% as comparing the photogrammetry with DLT method and e-GPS measurement. It showed that the close range digital photogrammetry with DLT method had the availability and capability to measure the landslides. The same methodology was then applied to measure the terrain before landslide and after landslide in the study area. The digital terrain model (DTM) was established and then was used to calculate the volume of the terrain before landslide and after landslide. The volume difference before and after landslides was 994.16 m3.

  3. Greenland outlet glacier dynamics from Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawbecker, P.; Box, J. E.; Balog, J. D.; Ahn, Y.; Benson, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    Time Lapse cameras fill gaps in our observational capabilities: 1. By providing much higher temporal resolution than offered by conventional airborne or satellite remote sensing. 2. While GPS or auto-theodolite observations can provide higher time resolution data than from photogrammetry, survival of these instruments on the hazardous glacier surface is limited, plus, the maintenance of such systems can be more expensive than the maintenance of a terrestrial photogrammetry installation. 3. Imagery provide a high spatial density of observations across the glacier surface, higher than is realistically available from GPS or other in-situ observations. 4. time lapse cameras provide observational capabilities in Eulerian and Lagrangian frames while GPS or theodolite targets, going along for a ride on the glacier, provide only Lagrangian data. Photogrammetry techniques are applied to a year-plus of images from multiple west Greenland glaciers to determine the glacier front horizontal velocity variations at hourly to seasonal time scales. The presentation includes comparisons between glacier front velocities and: 1. surface melt rates inferred from surface air temperature and solar radiation observations; 2. major calving events identified from camera images; 3. surface and near-surface ocean temperature; 4. land-fast sea ice breakup; 5. tidal variations; 6. supra-glacial melt lake drainage events observed in daily optical satellite imagery; and 7.) GPS data. Extreme Ice Survey (EIS) time lapse camera overlooking the Petermann glacier, installed to image glacier dynamics and to capture the predicted ice "island" detachment.

  4. On the Accuracy Potential in Underwater/Multimedia Photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Underwater applications of photogrammetric measurement techniques usually need to deal with multimedia photogrammetry aspects, which are characterized by the necessity of handling optical rays that are refracted at interfaces between optical media with different refractive indices according to Snell’s Law. This so-called multimedia geometry has to be incorporated into geometric models in order to achieve correct measurement results. The paper shows a flexible yet strict geometric model for the handling of refraction effects on the optical path, which can be implemented as a module into photogrammetric standard tools such as spatial resection, spatial intersection, bundle adjustment or epipolar line computation. The module is especially well suited for applications, where an object in water is observed by cameras in air through one or more planar glass interfaces, as it allows for some simplifications here. In the second part of the paper, several aspects, which are relevant for an assessment of the accuracy potential in underwater/multimedia photogrammetry, are discussed. These aspects include network geometry and interface planarity issues as well as effects caused by refractive index variations and dispersion and diffusion under water. All these factors contribute to a rather significant degradation of the geometric accuracy potential in underwater/multimedia photogrammetry. In practical experiments, a degradation of the quality of results by a factor two could be determined under relatively favorable conditions. PMID:26213942

  5. On the Accuracy Potential in Underwater/Multimedia Photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Maas, Hans-Gerd

    2015-07-24

    Underwater applications of photogrammetric measurement techniques usually need to deal with multimedia photogrammetry aspects, which are characterized by the necessity of handling optical rays that are refracted at interfaces between optical media with different refractive indices according to Snell's Law. This so-called multimedia geometry has to be incorporated into geometric models in order to achieve correct measurement results. The paper shows a flexible yet strict geometric model for the handling of refraction effects on the optical path, which can be implemented as a module into photogrammetric standard tools such as spatial resection, spatial intersection, bundle adjustment or epipolar line computation. The module is especially well suited for applications, where an object in water is observed by cameras in air through one or more planar glass interfaces, as it allows for some simplifications here. In the second part of the paper, several aspects, which are relevant for an assessment of the accuracy potential in underwater/multimedia photogrammetry, are discussed. These aspects include network geometry and interface planarity issues as well as effects caused by refractive index variations and dispersion and diffusion under water. All these factors contribute to a rather significant degradation of the geometric accuracy potential in underwater/multimedia photogrammetry. In practical experiments, a degradation of the quality of results by a factor two could be determined under relatively favorable conditions.

  6. Assessing the performance of aerial image point cloud and spectral metrics in predicting boreal forest canopy cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, M.; Korhonen, L.; Kukkonen, M.; Packalen, P.

    2017-07-01

    Canopy cover (CC) is a variable used to describe the status of forests and forested habitats, but also the variable used primarily to define what counts as a forest. The estimation of CC has relied heavily on remote sensing with past studies focusing on satellite imagery as well as Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) using light detection and ranging (lidar). Of these, ALS has been proven highly accurate, because the fraction of pulses penetrating the canopy represents a direct measurement of canopy gap percentage. However, the methods of photogrammetry can be applied to produce point clouds fairly similar to airborne lidar data from aerial images. Currently there is little information about how well such point clouds measure canopy density and gaps. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of aerial image point clouds for CC estimation and compare the results with those obtained using spectral data from aerial images and Landsat 5. First, we modeled CC for n = 1149 lidar plots using field-measured CCs and lidar data. Next, this data was split into five subsets in north-south direction (y-coordinate). Finally, four CC models (AerialSpectral, AerialPointcloud, AerialCombi (spectral + pointcloud) and Landsat) were created and they were used to predict new CC values to the lidar plots, subset by subset, using five-fold cross validation. The Landsat and AerialSpectral models performed with RMSEs of 13.8% and 12.4%, respectively. AerialPointcloud model reached an RMSE of 10.3%, which was further improved by the inclusion of spectral data; RMSE of the AerialCombi model was 9.3%. We noticed that the aerial image point clouds managed to describe only the outermost layer of the canopy and missed the details in lower canopy, which was resulted in weak characterization of the total CC variation, especially in the tails of the data.

  7. Aerial Explorers and Robotic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg

    2004-01-01

    A unique bio-inspired approach to autonomous aerial vehicle, a.k.a. aerial explorer technology is discussed. The work is focused on defining and studying aerial explorer mission concepts, both as an individual robotic system and as a member of a small robotic "ecosystem." Members of this robotic ecosystem include the aerial explorer, air-deployed sensors and robotic symbiotes, and other assets such as rovers, landers, and orbiters.

  8. Aerial Views of KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-23

    This aerial view, looking northwest, shows the newly opened Space Commerce Way that winds from S.R 3 on the right to its exit on S.R. 405 (near the top) in the background. The road is the new public access from Merritt Island to the KSC Visitor Complex (seen at top).

  9. Aerial of the VAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Even in this aerial view at KSC, the Vehicle Assembly Building is imposing. In front of it is the Launch Control Center. In the background is the Rotation/Processing Facility, next to the Banana Creek. In the foreground is the Saturn Causeway that leads to Launch Pads 39A and 39B.

  10. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1971-01-01

    Geological Survey vertical aerial photography is obtained primarily for topographic and geologic mapping. Reproductions from this photography are usually satisfactory for general use. Because reproductions are not stocked, but are custom processed for each order, they cannot be returned for credit or refund.

  11. Photogrammetry surveys and mosaic: a useful tool to monitor active zones. Applications to the Indonesian Lusi eruption site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Giovanni; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Mazzini, Adriano; Iarocci, Alessandro; Caramelli, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Unmanned and remotely operated aircraft showed to be an efficient and cost effective way to explore remote or extreme environments. Comparative photogrammetry studies are an efficient way to study and monitor he evolution of geologically active areas and ongoing events and are able to highlight details that are typically lost during traditional field campaigns. The Lusi mud eruption in eastern Java (Indonesia) represents one of the most spectacular geological phenomena that is ongoing since May 2006. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we designed and constructed a multipurpose drone to survey the eruption site. Among the numerous other payloads, the Lusi drone is equipped with Olympus EPM-2 and Go-Pro Hero3 cameras that allow the operator to collect video stills, high quality pictures and to complete photogrammetry surveys. Targeted areas have been selected for detailed studies in the 7 km2 region inside the embankment that was prevent the mud burial of the settlements in the Sidoarjo Regency. The region is characterized by the presence of the Watukosek fault zone. This strike slip system originates from the Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex and extends to the north east of the Java Island intersecting the Lusi crater. Therefore of particular interest are the faulted surveyed areas present around the Lusi crater inside the embankment. Results reveal a surprising accuracy for the collected mosaic. Multiple surveys are able to reveal the changes and the evolution of the fault through time and to indicate more active zones. In particular this type of survey can highlight the weakness zones and is thus useful to prevent potential geohazards in the area. The poster shows the aerial survey results, including a 3d-printed slice of LuSi, obtained combining 2500 16 Mp photographs. A 3d zoomed detail is also shown, evidencing the resolution that this technique can offer.

  12. Glacier Inventory Update at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico by Digital Photogrammetry: Documentation of Glacier Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julio-Miranda, P.; Delgado-Granados, H.; Ortega-del-Valle, S.; Huggel, C.

    2001-12-01

    Monitoring of glaciers at volcanoes at inter-tropical latitudes is very important for several reasons. Glacier fluctuations provide insights to the climate change in these latitudes. Also, inventory of glaciers at volcanoes allows evaluation of hazards during eruptive periods. However, glaciological work is a difficult task during eruptions and becomes hazardous to researchers. In this context, a tool such as digital photogrammetry helps in fast, accurate and safe updating of glacier inventories. Popocatépetl volcano's glaciers have been studied during the last decade but after the onset of the present eruption in late 1994 glaciological work has been very difficult and at the same time, very much needed for debris-flow-related risk assessment. Glacier tongues have retreated strongly for their size but have reached the maximum elevation they could before they started to decrease in volume by thinning. The morphology of the glaciers has changed from a lobed-hanging glacier to a chaotic series of elongated seracs of a range of dimensions and forms. They trend always perpendicular to the slope. Aerial photographs obtained on December 16, 2000 were processed by digital photogrammetry and the estimated total glaciated area resulted in 0.255 km2 (< 0.25 km2 correspond to Ventorrillo Glacier and the rest to Noroccidental Glacier). The decrease in glaciated area since the first inventory represents 72 % of the total area reported in 1958. This information allows to state that the current glacier retreat precludes their extinction. Studies made for the last 7 years of eruptive activity reveal a strong glacier retreat forced by global, regional, and local climate changes, as well as by volcanic activity.

  13. Close-range airborne Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry for high-resolution beach morphometric surveys: Examples from an embayed rotating beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Fleury, Jules; Anthony, Edward J.; Gardel, Antoine; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The field of photogrammetry has seen significant new developments essentially related to the emergence of new computer-based applications that have fostered the growth of the workflow technique called Structure-from-Motion (SfM). Low-cost, user-friendly SfM photogrammetry offers interesting new perspectives in coastal and other fields of geomorphology requiring high-resolution topographic data. The technique enables the construction of topographic products such as digital surface models (DSMs) and orthophotographs, and combines the advantages of the reproducibility of GPS surveys and the high density and accuracy of airborne LiDAR, but at very advantageous cost compared to the latter. Three SfM-based photogrammetric experiments were conducted on the embayed beach of Montjoly in Cayenne, French Guiana, between October 2013 and 2014, in order to map morphological changes and quantify sediment budgets. The beach is affected by a process of rotation induced by the alongshore migration of mud banks from the mouths of the Amazon River that generate spatial and temporal changes in wave refraction and incident wave angles, thus generating the reversals in longshore drift that characterise this process. Sub-vertical aerial photographs of the beach were acquired from a microlight aircraft that flew alongshore at low elevation (275 m). The flight plan included several parallel flight axes with an overlap of 85% between pictures in the lengthwise direction and 50% between paths. Targets of 40 × 40 cm, georeferenced by RTK-DGPS, were placed on the beach, spaced 100 m apart. These targets served in optimizing the model and in producing georeferenced 3D products. RTK-GPS measurements of random points and cross-shore profiles were used to validate the photogrammetry results and assess their accuracy. We produced dense point clouds with 150 to 200 points/m², from which we generated DSMs and orthophotos with respective resolutions of 10 cm and 5 cm. Compared to the GPS control

  14. Quantifying fluvial topography using UAS imagery and SfM photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodget, Amy; Carbonneau, Patrice; Visser, Fleur; Maddock, Ian; Habit, Evelyn

    2014-05-01

    The measurement and monitoring of fluvial topography at high spatial and temporal resolutions is in increasing demand for a range of river science and management applications, including change detection, hydraulic models, habitat assessments, river restorations and sediment budgets. Existing approaches are yet to provide a single technique for rapidly quantifying fluvial topography in both exposed and submerged areas, with high spatial resolution, reach-scale continuous coverage, high accuracy and reasonable cost. In this paper, we explore the potential of using imagery acquired from a small unmanned aerial system (UAS) and processed using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry for filling this gap. We use a rotary winged hexacopter known as the Draganflyer X6, a consumer grade digital camera (Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX3) and the commercially available PhotoScan Pro SfM software (Agisoft LLC). We test the approach on three contrasting river systems; a shallow margin of the San Pedro River in the Valdivia region of south-central Chile, the lowland River Arrow in Warwickshire, UK, and the upland Coledale Beck in Cumbria, UK. Digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthophotos of hyperspatial resolution (0.01-0.02m) are produced. Mean elevation errors are found to vary somewhat between sites, dependent on vegetation coverage and the spatial arrangement of ground control points (GCPs) used to georeference the data. Mean errors are in the range 4-44mm for exposed areas and 17-89mm for submerged areas. Errors in submerged areas can be improved to 4-56mm with the application of a simple refraction correction procedure. Multiple surveys of the River Arrow site show consistently high quality results, indicating the repeatability of the approach. This work therefore demonstrates the potential of a UAS-SfM approach for quantifying fluvial topography.

  15. Mapping Eroded Areas on Mountain Grassland with Terrestrial Photogrammetry and Object-Based Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, Andreas; Rutzinger, Martin; Bremer, Magnus; Geitner, Clemens

    2016-06-01

    In the Alps as well as in other mountain regions steep grassland is frequently affected by shallow erosion. Often small landslides or snow movements displace the vegetation together with soil and/or unconsolidated material. This results in bare earth surface patches within the grass covered slope. Close-range and remote sensing techniques are promising for both mapping and monitoring these eroded areas. This is essential for a better geomorphological process understanding, to assess past and recent developments, and to plan mitigation measures. Recent developments in image matching techniques make it feasible to produce high resolution orthophotos and digital elevation models from terrestrial oblique images. In this paper we propose to delineate the boundary of eroded areas for selected scenes of a study area, using close-range photogrammetric data. Striving for an efficient, objective and reproducible workflow for this task, we developed an approach for automated classification of the scenes into the classes grass and eroded. We propose an object-based image analysis (OBIA) workflow which consists of image segmentation and automated threshold selection for classification using the Excess Green Vegetation Index (ExG). The automated workflow is tested with ten different scenes. Compared to a manual classification, grass and eroded areas are classified with an overall accuracy between 90.7% and 95.5%, depending on the scene. The methods proved to be insensitive to differences in illumination of the scenes and greenness of the grass. The proposed workflow reduces user interaction and is transferable to other study areas. We conclude that close-range photogrammetry is a valuable low-cost tool for mapping this type of eroded areas in the field with a high level of detail and quality. In future, the output will be used as ground truth for an area-wide mapping of eroded areas in coarser resolution aerial orthophotos acquired at the same time.

  16. Using digital photogrammetry to constrain the segmentation of Paleocene volcanic marker horizons within the Nuussuaq basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vest Sørensen, Erik; Pedersen, Asger Ken

    2017-04-01

    Digital photogrammetry is used to map important volcanic marker horizons within the Nuussuaq Basin, West Greenland. We use a combination of oblique stereo images acquired from helicopter using handheld cameras and traditional aerial photographs. The oblique imagery consists of scanned stereo photographs acquired with analogue cameras in the 90´ties and newer digital images acquired with high resolution digital consumer cameras. Photogrammetric software packages SOCET SET and 3D Stereo Blend are used for controlling the seamless movement between stereo-models at different scales and viewing angles and the mapping is done stereoscopically using 3d monitors and the human stereopsis. The approach allows us to map in three dimensions three characteristic marker horizons (Tunoqqu, Kûgánguaq and Qordlortorssuaq Members) within the picritic Vaigat Formation. They formed toward the end of the same volcanic episode and are believed to be closely related in time. They formed an approximately coherent sub-horizontal surface, the Tunoqqu Surface that at the time of formation covered more than 3100 km2 on Disko and Nuussuaq. Our mapping shows that the Tunoqqu Surface is now segmented into areas of different elevation and structural trend as a result of later tectonic deformation. This is most notable on Nuussuaq where the western part is elevated and in parts highly faulted. In western Nuussuaq the surface has been uplifted and faulted so that it now forms an asymmetric anticline. The flanks of the anticline are coincident with two N-S oriented pre-Tunoqqu extensional faults. The deformation of the Tunoqqu surface could be explained by inversion of older extensional faults due to an overall E-W directed compressive regime in the late Paleocene.

  17. [Assessment of precision and accuracy of digital surface photogrammetry with the DSP 400 system].

    PubMed

    Krimmel, M; Kluba, S; Dietz, K; Reinert, S

    2005-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of facial anthropometric measurements obtained through digital 3-D surface photogrammetry with the DSP 400 system in comparison to traditional 2-D photogrammetry. Fifty plaster casts of cleft infants were imaged and 21 standard anthropometric measurements were obtained. For precision assessment the measurements were performed twice in a subsample. Accuracy was determined by comparison of direct measurements and indirect 2-D and 3-D image measurements. Precision of digital surface photogrammetry was almost as good as direct anthropometry and clearly better than 2-D photogrammetry. Measurements derived from 3-D images showed better congruence to direct measurements than from 2-D photos. Digital surface photogrammetry with the DSP 400 system is sufficiently precise and accurate for craniofacial anthropometric examinations.

  18. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks.

    PubMed

    Rohner, Christoph A; Richardson, Anthony J; Prebble, Clare E M; Marshall, Andrea D; Bennett, Michael B; Weeks, Scarla J; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P; Pierce, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432-917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122) in southern Mozambique and from 420-990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46) in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347-1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal) time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania), the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania). The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (<400 cm) whale sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species.

  19. Digital photogrammetry for quantitative wear analysis of retrieved TKA components.

    PubMed

    Grochowsky, J C; Alaways, L W; Siskey, R; Most, E; Kurtz, S M

    2006-11-01

    The use of new materials in knee arthroplasty demands a way in which to accurately quantify wear in retrieved components. Methods such as damage scoring, coordinate measurement, and in vivo wear analysis have been used in the past. The limitations in these methods illustrate a need for a different methodology that can accurately quantify wear, which is relatively easy to perform and uses a minimal amount of expensive equipment. Off-the-shelf digital photogrammetry represents a potentially quick and easy alternative to what is readily available. Eighty tibial inserts were visually examined for front and backside wear and digitally photographed in the presence of two calibrated reference fields. All images were segmented (via manual and automated algorithms) using Adobe Photoshop and National Institute of Health ImageJ. Finally, wear was determined using ImageJ and Rhinoceros software. The absolute accuracy of the method and repeatability/reproducibility by different observers were measured in order to determine the uncertainty of wear measurements. To determine if variation in wear measurements was due to implant design, 35 implants of the three most prevalent designs were subjected to retrieval analysis. The overall accuracy of area measurements was 97.8%. The error in automated segmentation was found to be significantly lower than that of manual segmentation. The photogrammetry method was found to be reasonably accurate and repeatable in measuring 2-D areas and applicable to determining wear. There was no significant variation in uncertainty detected among different implant designs. Photogrammetry has a broad range of applicability since it is size- and design-independent. A minimal amount of off-the-shelf equipment is needed for the procedure and no proprietary knowledge of the implant is needed.

  20. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Anthony J.; Prebble, Clare E.M.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Bennett, Michael B.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P.; Pierce, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432–917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122) in southern Mozambique and from 420–990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46) in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347–1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal) time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania), the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania). The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (<400 cm) whale sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species. PMID:25870776

  1. Implementation of Active Teaching Methods and Emerging Topics in Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmatin Fras, M.; Grigillo, D.

    2016-06-01

    Fast technological developments in photogrammetry and remote sensing areas demand quick and steady changes in the education programme and its realization. The university teachers and assistants are faced with ensuring the learning materials, data and software for practical lessons, as well as project proposals for student's team work and bachelor or master thesis. In this paper the emerging topics that already have a considerable impact in the practice are treated mostly from the educational aspect. These relatively new topics that are considered in this paper are unmanned aerial systems for spatial data collection, terrestrial and aerial laser scanning, mobile mapping systems, and novelties in satellite remote sensing. The focus is given to practical implementation of these topics into the teaching and learning programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation at the University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, and experiences gained by the authors so far. Together with the technological advances, the teaching approaches must be modernized as well. Classical approaches of teaching, where a lecturer gives lecture ex cathedra and students are only listeners, are not effective enough. The didactics science of teaching has developed and proved in the practice many useful approaches that can better motivate students for more active learning. We can use different methods of team work like pro et contra debate, buzzing groups, press conference, moderated discussion etc. An experimental study on active teaching methods in the class of students of the Master programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation has been made and the results are presented. After using some new teaching methods in the class, the students were asked to answer two types of a questionnaire. First questionnaire was the standard form developed by Noel Entwistle, an educational psychologist who developed the Approaches to Studying Inventory (ASI) for identifying deep and surface approaches to

  2. An Application of Close-Up Photogrammetry in Viticulture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia D'Urso, Maria; Marino, Costantino Luis

    2016-06-01

    Within the context of Geomatic-based Agriculture an application of close-up photogrammetry is illustrated with reference to precision farming. The application has been carried out in a particularly attractive archaeological site and concerns some viticulture species produced in situ by following a farming technique dated about two thousand years. Specifically we illustrate and comment the photogrammetric close-range acquisitions, carried out both outdoor and indoor, aimed at producing a digital botanic atlas that can adequately replace the traditional ones drawn by hand. High precision geometric measurements of vineyard leaves and grapes, are suitable indices of their growth rate and an objective estimate of the relevant repening degree.

  3. Indirect field technology for detecting areas object of illegal spills harmful to human health: application of drones, photogrammetry and hydrological models.

    PubMed

    Capolupo, Alessandra; Pindozzi, Stefania; Okello, Collins; Boccia, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    The accumulation of heavy metals in agricultural soils is a serious environmental problem. The Campania region in southern Italy has higher levels of cancer risk, presumably due to the accumulation of geogenic and anthropogenic soil pollutants, some of which have been incorporated into organic matter. The aim of this study was to introduce and test an innovative, field-applicable methodology to detect heavy metal accumulation using drone-based photogrammetry and microrill network modelling, specifically to generate wetlands wetlands prediction indices normally applied at large catchment scales, such as a large geographic basin. The processing of aerial photos taken using a hexacopter equipped with fifth-generation software for photogrammetry allowed the generation of a digital elevation model (DEM) with a resolution as high as 30 mm. Not only this provided a high potential for the study of micro-rill processes, but it was also useful for testing and comparing the capability of the topographic index (TI) and the clima-topographic index (CTI) to predict heavy metal sedimentation points at scales from 0.1 to 10 ha. Our results indicate that the TI and CTI indices can be used to predict points of heavy metal accumulation for small field catchments.

  4. Evaluating the use of drone photogrammetry for measurement of stream channel morphology and response to high flow events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Katie; Ballow, William

    2015-04-01

    Traditional high-precision survey methods for stream channel measurement are labor-intensive and require wadeability or boat access to streams. These conditions limit the number of sites researchers are able to study and generally prohibit the possibility of repeat channel surveys to evaluate short-term fluctuations in channel morphology. In recent years, unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) equipped with photo and video capabilities have become widely available and affordable. Concurrently, developments in photogrammetric software offer unprecedented mapping and 3D rendering capabilities of drone-captured photography. In this study, we evaluate the potential use of drone-mounted cameras for detailed stream channel morphometric analysis. We used a relatively low-cost drone (DJI Phantom 2+ Vision) and commercially available, user friendly software (Agisoft Photscan) for photogrammetric analysis of drone-captured stream channel photography. Our test study was conducted on Proctor Creek, a highly responsive urban stream in Atlanta, Georgia, within the crystalline Piedmont region of the southeastern United States. As a baseline, we performed traditional high-precision survey methods to collect morphological measurements (e.g., bankfull and wetted width, bankfull and wetted thalweg depth) at 11 evenly-spaced transects, following USGS protocols along reaches of 20 times average channel width. We additionally used the drone to capture 200+ photos along the same reaches, concurrent with the channel survey. Using the photogrammetry software, we generated georeferenced 3D models of the stream channel, from which morphological measurements were derived from the 11 transects and compared with measurements from the traditional survey method. We additionally explored possibilities for novel morphometric characterization available from the continuous 3D surface, as an improvement on the limited number of detailed cross-sections available from standard methods. These results showed

  5. D City Transformations by Time Series of Aerial Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, A.

    2015-02-01

    Recent photogrammetric applications, based on dense image matching algorithms, allow to use not only images acquired by digital cameras, amateur or not, but also to recover the vast heritage of analogue photographs. This possibility opens up many possibilities in the use and enhancement of existing photos heritage. The research of the original figuration of old buildings, the virtual reconstruction of disappeared architectures and the study of urban development are some of the application areas that exploit the great cultural heritage of photography. Nevertheless there are some restrictions in the use of historical images for automatic reconstruction of buildings such as image quality, availability of camera parameters and ineffective geometry of image acquisition. These constrains are very hard to solve and it is difficult to discover good dataset in the case of terrestrial close range photogrammetry for the above reasons. Even the photographic archives of museums and superintendence, while retaining a wealth of documentation, have no dataset for a dense image matching approach. Compared to the vast collection of historical photos, the class of aerial photos meets both criteria stated above. In this paper historical aerial photographs are used with dense image matching algorithms to realize 3d models of a city in different years. The models can be used to study the urban development of the city and its changes through time. The application relates to the city centre of Verona, for which some time series of aerial photographs have been retrieved. The models obtained in this way allowed, right away, to observe the urban development of the city, the places of expansion and new urban areas. But a more interesting aspect emerged from the analytical comparison between models. The difference, as the Euclidean distance, between two models gives information about new buildings or demolitions. As considering accuracy it is necessary point out that the quality of final

  6. Mapping the kinematics of the Blaubach landslide (Austria) using digital photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, V.; Lieb, G. K.

    2003-04-01

    The Blaubach landslide (12°08'E, 47°12'N, northern margin of the Hohe Tauern range, Austria) is located in the upper part of the catchment area of the Blaubach torrent. The latter follows an important Eastern Alpine fault. The area of interest is built of tectonically fractured rock favoring fluvial erosion, debris flows, and other types of mass movements triggered by widespread deep reaching gravitational slope deformations. The Blaubach landslide is characterized by high surface movement and a front with several secondary slides, which are free of vegetation and provide high quantities of material to the torrent below. This natural hazard has induced the construction of protective measures such as retaining walls in the torrent bed since 1950. However, as of yet no numerical data have been available concerning the surface kinematics of the landslide, such as flow/creep velocity, surface height change, or volumetric change. The Austrian Forest Engineering Service of Torrent and Avalanche Control therefore launched a project related to these questions. One task was to reconstruct the morphodynamics of the landslide area using historical multi-temporal aerial photographs. Aerial photographs at various image scales between 1:9,300 and 1:45,800 of 11 different data acquisition periods between 1953 and 1999 were acquired from the Austrian Federal Office of Surveying and Mapping. The photographs were scanned using the UltraScan 5000 of Vexcel Imaging Austria in order to facilitate digital photogrammetry. A special software package ADVM (Automatic Displacement Vector Measurement), originally developed at the Institute of Geodesy for monitoring debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers, was used to automatically derive three-dimensional displacement vectors, both area-wide and dense, based on advanced image matching techniques. The digital photogrammetric method applied is based on quasi-orthophotos. This approach supports the fusion of multi-temporal aerial photographs

  7. The sky is the limit? 20 years of small-format aerial photography taken from UAS for monitoring geomorphological processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzolff, Irene

    2014-05-01

    One hundred years after the first publication on aerial photography taken from unmanned aerial platforms (Arthur Batut 1890), small-format aerial photography (SFAP) became a distinct niche within remote sensing during the 1990s. Geographers, plant biologists, archaeologists and other researchers with geospatial interests re-discovered the usefulness of unmanned platforms for taking high-resolution, low-altitude photographs that could then be digitized and analysed with geographical information systems, (softcopy) photogrammetry and image processing techniques originally developed for digital satellite imagery. Even before the ubiquity of digital consumer-grade cameras and 3D analysis software accessible to the photogrammetric layperson, do-it-yourself remote sensing using kites, blimps, drones and micro air vehicles literally enabled the questing researcher to get their own pictures of the world. As a flexible, cost-effective method, SFAP offered images with high spatial and temporal resolutions that could be ideally adapted to the scales of landscapes, forms and distribution patterns to be monitored. During the last five years, this development has been significantly accelerated by the rapid technological advancements of GPS navigation, autopiloting and revolutionary softcopy-photogrammetry techniques. State-of-the-art unmanned aerial systems (UAS) now allow automatic flight planning, autopilot-controlled aerial surveys, ground control-free direct georeferencing and DEM plus orthophoto generation with centimeter accuracy, all within the space of one day. The ease of use of current UAS and processing software for the generation of high-resolution topographic datasets and spectacular visualizations is tempting and has spurred the number of publications on these issues - but which advancements in our knowledge and understanding of geomorphological processes have we seen and can we expect in the future? This presentation traces the development of the last two decades

  8. Online, offline, realtime: recent developments in industrial photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesemann, Werner

    2003-01-01

    In recent years industrial photogrammetry has emerged from a highly specialized niche technology to a well established tool in industrial coordinate measurement applications with numerous installations in a significantly growing market of flexible and portable optical measurement systems. This is due to the development of powerful, but affordable video and computer technology. The increasing industrial requirements for accuracy, speed, robustness and ease of use of these systems together with a demand for the highest possible degree of automation have forced universities and system manufacturer to develop hard- and software solutions to meet these requirements. The presentation will show the latest trends in hardware development, especially new generation digital and/or intelligent cameras, aspects of image engineering like use of controlled illumination or projection technologies, and algorithmic and software aspects like automation strategies or new camera models. The basic qualities of digital photogrammetry- like portability and flexibility on one hand and fully automated quality control on the other - sometimes lead to certain conflicts in the design of measurement systems for different online, offline, or real-time solutions. The presentation will further show, how these tools and methods are combined in different configurations to be able to cover the still growing demands of the industrial end-users.

  9. Absolute surface reconstruction by slope metrology and photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yue

    Developing the manufacture of aspheric and freeform optical elements requires an advanced metrology method which is capable of inspecting these elements with arbitrary freeform surfaces. In this dissertation, a new surface measurement scheme is investigated for such a purpose, which is to measure the absolute surface shape of an object under test through its surface slope information obtained by photogrammetric measurement. A laser beam propagating toward the object reflects on its surface while the vectors of the incident and reflected beams are evaluated from the four spots they leave on the two parallel transparent windows in front of the object. The spots' spatial coordinates are determined by photogrammetry. With the knowledge of the incident and reflected beam vectors, the local slope information of the object surface is obtained through vector calculus and finally yields the absolute object surface profile by a reconstruction algorithm. An experimental setup is designed and the proposed measuring principle is experimentally demonstrated by measuring the absolute surface shape of a spherical mirror. The measurement uncertainty is analyzed, and efforts for improvement are made accordingly. In particular, structured windows are designed and fabricated to generate uniform scattering spots left by the transmitted laser beams. Calibration of the fringe reflection instrument, another typical surface slope measurement method, is also reported in the dissertation. Finally, a method for uncertainty analysis of a photogrammetry measurement system by optical simulation is investigated.

  10. Subjective speckle suppression in laser-based stereo photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Andreas Walter; Wong, Eugene; Weigel, Daniel; Babovsky, Holger; Schott, Thomas; Kowarschik, Richard

    2016-12-01

    The use of objective speckles as patterns is of high interest for the ongoing development of stereo photogrammetry. The depth of focus of the projected speckle patterns, which can be found to be several meters, can hardly be matched by other projection principles. On the downside, the use of coherent light leads to subjective speckles generated by the rough surface of the object under test. This effect decreases the accuracy under which objects can be reconstructed. We show how laser-based stereo photogrammetry can be adjusted to increase the measurement accuracy of three-dimensional (3-D)-surface measurements while preserving the advantages of speckles projection. Therefore, we present a method to decrease the contrast of subjective speckles in the images by pixel-wise shifting the cameras orthogonally to their viewing direction and back shifting the taken images numerically, accordingly. This leads to an increase in 3-D-reconstruction quality, as seen in a decrease in standard deviation, peak-to-valley value and in an increase in the number of reconstructed points for measured test objects.

  11. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  12. Defense Science Board Study on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    Defense Science Board Study on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles February 2004 Office...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defense Science Board Study on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles 5a. CONTRACT...the Defense Science Board Task Force on Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Uninhabited Combat Aerial Vehicles I am pleased to forward the final report of

  13. The Potential of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle for Large Scale Mapping of Coastal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwin, N.; Ahmad, A.; Zainon, O.

    2014-02-01

    Many countries in the tropical region are covered with cloud for most of the time, hence, it is difficult to get clear images especially from high resolution satellite imagery. Aerial photogrammetry can be used but most of the time the cloud problem still exists. Today, this problem could be solved using a system known as unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) where the aerial images can be acquired at low altitude and the system can fly under the cloud. The UAV system could be used in various applications including mapping coastal area. The UAV system is equipped with an autopilot system and automatic method known as autonomous flying that can be utilized for data acquisition. To achieve high resolution imagery, a compact digital camera of high resolution was used to acquire the aerial images at an altitude. In this study, the UAV system was employed to acquire aerial images of a coastal simulation model at low altitude. From the aerial images, photogrammetric image processing was executed to produce photogrammetric outputs such a digital elevation model (DEM), contour line and orthophoto. In this study, ground control point (GCP) and check point (CP) were established using conventional ground surveying method (i.e total station). The GCP is used for exterior orientation in photogrammetric processes and CP for accuracy assessment based on Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). From this study, it was found that the UAV system can be used for large scale mapping of coastal simulation model with accuracy at millimeter level. It is anticipated that the same system could be used for large scale mapping of real coastal area and produces good accuracy. Finally, the UAV system has great potential to be used for various applications that require accurate results or products at limited time and less man power.

  14. Computer Vision Photogrammetry for Underwater Archaeological Site Recording in a Low-Visibility Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Damme, T.

    2015-04-01

    Computer Vision Photogrammetry allows archaeologists to accurately record underwater sites in three dimensions using simple twodimensional picture or video sequences, automatically processed in dedicated software. In this article, I share my experience in working with one such software package, namely PhotoScan, to record a Dutch shipwreck site. In order to demonstrate the method's reliability and flexibility, the site in question is reconstructed from simple GoPro footage, captured in low-visibility conditions. Based on the results of this case study, Computer Vision Photogrammetry compares very favourably to manual recording methods both in recording efficiency, and in the quality of the final results. In a final section, the significance of Computer Vision Photogrammetry is then assessed from a historical perspective, by placing the current research in the wider context of about half a century of successful use of Analytical and later Digital photogrammetry in the field of underwater archaeology. I conclude that while photogrammetry has been used in our discipline for several decades now, for various reasons the method was only ever used by a relatively small percentage of projects. This is likely to change in the near future since, compared to the `traditional' photogrammetry approaches employed in the past, today Computer Vision Photogrammetry is easier to use, more reliable and more affordable than ever before, while at the same time producing more accurate and more detailed three-dimensional results.

  15. 2. AERIAL VIEW OF MINUTEMAN SILOS. Low oblique aerial view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. AERIAL VIEW OF MINUTEMAN SILOS. Low oblique aerial view (original in color) of the two launch silos, covered. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Missile Silo Type, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. Quality of DEMs derived from Kite Aerial Photogrammety System: a case study of Dutch coastal environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, Paolo; Smith, Mike J.; Anders, Niels; Meesuk, Vorawit

    2014-05-01

    Coastal protection is one of the main challenges for the Netherlands, where a large proportion of anthropogenic activity is located below sea level (both residential and economic). The Dutch government is implementing an innovative method of coastal replenishment using natural waves and winds to relocate sand from one side to the other of the country. This requires close monitoring of the spatio-temporal evolution of beaches in order to correctly model the future direction and amount of sand movement. To do so -on the onshore beach- we tested a Kite-Aerial Photography System for monitoring the beach dynamics at Zandmotor (http://www.dezandmotor.nl/en-GB/). The equipment used for data collection were a commercial DSLR camera (Nikon D7000 with a 20mm lens), gyro-levelled rig, Sutton Flowform 16 kite and Leica GNSS Viva GS10, with GSM connection to the Dutch geodetic network. We flew using a 115 m line with an average inclination of 40 to 45°; this gave a camera vertical distance of ~80 m and pixel size of ~20 mm. The methodology follows that of Smith et al. (2009), and of Paron & Smith (2013), applied to a highly dynamic environment with low texture and small relief conditions. Here we present a comparison of the quality of the digital elevation model (DEM) generated from the same dataset using two different systems: Structure from Motion (SfM) using Agisoft Photoscan Pro and traditional photogrammetry using Leica Photograpmmetry Suite. In addition the outputs from the two data processing methods are presented, including both an image mosaic and DEM, and highlighting pros and cons of both methods. References Smith, M. J. et al. 2009. High spatial resolution data acquisition for the geosciences: kite aerial photography. ESPL, 34(1), 155-161. Paron, P., Smith, M.J. 2013. Kite aerial photogrammetry system for monitoring coastal change in the Netherlands. 8th IAG International Conference on Geomorphology, Paris, August.

  17. Aerial Video Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    When Michael Henry wanted to start an aerial video service, he turned to Johnson Space Center for assistance. Two NASA engineers - one had designed and developed TV systems in Apollo, Skylab, Apollo- Soyuz and Space Shuttle programs - designed a wing-mounted fiberglass camera pod. Camera head and angles are adjustable, and the pod is shaped to reduce vibration. The controls are located so a solo pilot can operate the system. A microprocessor displays latitude, longitude, and bearing, and a GPS receiver provides position data for possible legal references. The service has been successfully utilized by railroads, oil companies, real estate companies, etc.

  18. KSC Aerial Photos SI

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-28

    KSC Aerial Photos; 00;00;12;00-00;00;28;50 VAB 00;00;28;50 -00;02;11;55 Pad 39B 00;02;11;55 -00;02;31;13 Sand Dunes/Beach 00;02;31;13-00;03;41;33 Pad 39A SpaceX 00;03;41;33-00;04;41;45 LC-41 ULA 00;04;41;45-00;05;54;40 NASA KSC Headquarters 00;05;54;40-00;07;18;00 KSC Industrial Area; Center Contact - Gregory B. Harland (321) 867-2468

  19. Unmanned Aerial Systems and DSM matching for rock glacier monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Elisa; Forlani, Gianfranco; Roncella, Riccardo; Santise, Marina; Diotri, Fabrizio; Morra di Cella, Umberto

    2017-05-01

    Among other techniques, aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry have long been used to control the displacements of landslides and glaciers as well as for the detection of terrain morphological changes. Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are today an efficient tool to perform data acquisition in rough or difficult terrain, both safely and quickly, avoiding hazards and risks for the operators while at the same time containing the survey costs. Since 2012 ARPAVdA (the Regional Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley, Italy) periodically surveys with UAS photogrammetry the Gran Sometta rock glacier, the Agency main monitoring site for the climate change impacts on high-mountain areas and related infrastructures. A Digital Surface Model (DSM) and an orthophoto of the rock glacier are produced after each survey flight. In order to accurately georeference them in a stable reference system, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) campaign is carried out at each epoch, to update the coordinates of signalised Ground Control Points (GCPs), since they partly lay in unstable (moving) areas. In late August 2015 a survey flight has been executed with a senseFly eBee RTK, with differential corrections sent from a ground reference station. The block has been adjusted without GCP using, as control information, only the projection centres coordinates encoded in the images. The RMS of the differences found on twelve Check Points were about 4 cm in horizontal and 7 cm in elevation, i.e. practically the same accuracy found using GCP. Differences between the DSMs produced at the same epoch with block orientation performed with GCP and with GNSS-determined projection centres were also investigated. To evaluate the rock glacier displacement fields between two epochs, corresponding features were at first manually identified on the orthophotos by a trained operator. To avoid the manual time-consuming procedure and increase the density of displacement information, two automatic

  20. Rapid, low-cost photogrammetry to monitor volcanic eruptions: an example from Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, Angela K.; Crider, Juliet G.; Schilling, Steve P.; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We describe a low-cost application of digital photogrammetry using commercially available photogrammetric software and oblique photographs taken with an off-the-shelf digital camera to create sequential digital elevation models (DEMs) of a lava dome that grew during the 2004–2008 eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) volcano. Renewed activity at MSH provided an opportunity to devise and test this method, because it could be validated against other observations of this well-monitored volcano. The datasets consist of oblique aerial photographs (snapshots) taken from a helicopter using a digital single-lens reflex camera. Twelve sets of overlapping digital images of the dome taken during 2004–2007 were used to produce DEMs and to calculate lava dome volumes and extrusion rates. Analyses of the digital images were carried out using photogrammetric software to produce three-dimensional coordinates of points identified in multiple photos. The evolving morphology of the dome was modeled by comparing successive DEMs. Results were validated by comparison to volume measurements derived from traditional vertical photogrammetric surveys by the US Geological Survey Cascades Volcano Observatory. Our technique was significantly less expensive and required less time than traditional vertical photogrammetric techniques; yet, it consistently yielded volume estimates within 5% of the traditional method. This technique provides an inexpensive, rapid assessment tool for tracking lava dome growth or other topographic changes at restless volcanoes.

  1. Fusion of Remote Sensing Methods, UAV Photogrammetry and LiDAR Scanning products for monitoring fluvial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendzioch, Theodora; Langhammer, Jakub; Hartvich, Filip

    2015-04-01

    Fusion of remote sensing data is a common and rapidly developing discipline, which combines data from multiple sources with different spatial and spectral resolution, from satellite sensors, aircraft and ground platforms. Fusion data contains more detailed information than each of the source and enhances the interpretation performance and accuracy of the source data and produces a high-quality visualisation of the final data. Especially, in fluvial geomorphology it is essential to get valuable images in sub-meter resolution to obtain high quality 2D and 3D information for a detailed identification, extraction and description of channel features of different river regimes and to perform a rapid mapping of changes in river topography. In order to design, test and evaluate a new approach for detection of river morphology, we combine different research techniques from remote sensing products to drone-based photogrammetry and LiDAR products (aerial LiDAR Scanner and TLS). Topographic information (e.g. changes in river channel morphology, surface roughness, evaluation of floodplain inundation, mapping gravel bars and slope characteristics) will be extracted either from one single layer or from combined layers in accordance to detect fluvial topographic changes before and after flood events. Besides statistical approaches for predictive geomorphological mapping and the determination of errors and uncertainties of the data, we will also provide 3D modelling of small fluvial features.

  2. Photogrammetry for environmental monitoring: the use of drones and hydrological models for detection of soil contaminated by copper.

    PubMed

    Capolupo, Alessandra; Pindozzi, Stefania; Okello, Collins; Fiorentino, Nunzio; Boccia, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    Campania Region of Southern Italy has a complex environmental situation, due to geogenic and anthropogenic soil pollution. Some of the pollutants such as copper are mobilized in the organic matter. It has been shown that wetlands provide physical as well as biogeochemical barriers against pollutants. Therefore, the objective of this study was to introduce and test an innovative approach able to predict copper accumulation points at plot scales, using a combination of aerial photos, taken by drones, micro-rill network modelling and wetland prediction indices usually used at catchment scales. Data were collected from an area measuring 4500 m(2) in Trentola Ducenta locality of Caserta Province of southern Italy. The photos processing with a fifth generation software for photogrammetry resulted in a high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM), used to study micro-rill processes. The DEM was also used to test the ability of Topographic Index (TI) and the Clima-Topographic Index (CTI) to predict copper sedimentation points at plot scale (0.1-10 ha) by comparing the map of the predicted and the actual copper distribution in the field. The DEM obtained with a resolution of 30 mm showed a high potential for the study of micro-rill processes and TI and CTI indices were able to predict zones of copper accumulation at a plot scale.

  3. Precision Improvement of Photogrammetry by Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsiang; Sung, Wen-Pei; Tung, Shih-Heng; Hsiao, Hanwei

    2016-04-01

    The combination of aerial triangulation technology and unmanned aerial vehicle greatly reduces the cost and application threshold of the digital surface model technique. Based on the report in the literatures, the measurement error in the x-y coordinate and in the elevation lies between 8cm~15cm and 10cm~20cm respectively. The measurement accuracy for the geological structure survey already has sufficient value, but for the slope and structures in terms of deformation monitoring is inadequate. The main factors affecting the accuracy of the aerial triangulation are image quality, measurement accuracy of control point and image matching accuracy. In terms of image matching, the commonly used techniques are Harris Corner Detection and Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT). Their pairing error is in scale of pixels, usually lies between 1 to 2 pixels. This study suggests that the error on the pairing is the main factor causing the aerial triangulation errors. Therefore, this study proposes the application of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method instead of the pairing method mentioned above. DIC method can provide a pairing accuracy of less than 0.01 pixel, indeed can greatly enhance the accuracy of the aerial triangulation, to have sub-centimeter level accuracy. In this study, the effects of image pairing error on the measurement error of the 3-dimensional coordinate of the ground points are explored by numerical simulation method. It was confirmed that when the image matching error is reduced to 0.01 pixels, the ground three-dimensional coordinate measurement error can be controlled in mm level. A combination of DIC technique and the traditional aerial triangulation provides the potential of application on the deformation monitoring of slope and structures, and achieve an early warning of natural disaster.

  4. Research on the Application of Rapid Surveying and Mapping for Large Scare Topographic Map by Uav Aerial Photography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z.; Song, Y.; Li, C.; Zeng, F.; Wang, F.

    2017-08-01

    Rapid acquisition and processing method of large scale topographic map data, which relies on the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) low-altitude aerial photogrammetry system, is studied in this paper, elaborating the main work flow. Key technologies of UAV photograph mapping is also studied, developing a rapid mapping system based on electronic plate mapping system, thus changing the traditional mapping mode and greatly improving the efficiency of the mapping. Production test and achievement precision evaluation of Digital Orth photo Map (DOM), Digital Line Graphic (DLG) and other digital production were carried out combined with the city basic topographic map update project, which provides a new techniques for large scale rapid surveying and has obvious technical advantage and good application prospect.

  5. Some Examples of Photogrammetry for the Characterization of Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonon, Fulvio

    2015-04-01

    The presentation starts by briefly describing the basic elements of close-range photogrammetry, which are then used to understand its limitations, its accuracy, and its differences with respect to the LiDAR. Examples of applications will follow: • Baseline model accurate to 1.5 cm for a sub-vertical slope (800 m wide and 450 m high) in a narrow canyon in Colorado. • 3-D model for a 2.6 km long, 300 m high slope in Northern Italy. Its use for fracture mapping and analysis, and the determination of unstable blocks. • Monitoring of a by-pass tunnel in a Hydroelectric Power Scheme in California, where a major shear zone creates water seepage and movements

  6. Intraoperative raster photogrammetry--the PAR Corneal Topography System.

    PubMed

    Belin, M W

    1993-01-01

    The PAR Corneal Topography System (CTS) is a computer-driven corneal imaging system that uses close-range raster photogrammetry to measure and produce a topographic map of the corneal surface. The CTS determines distortion in a projected two-dimensional grid. Unlike Placido-disc-based videokeratoscopes, the PAR CTS produces a true topographic map (elevation map) and requires neither a smooth reflective surface nor precise spatial alignment for accurate imaging. Because the system uses two noncoaxial optical paths, it can be integrated into other optical devices. A modified CTS was integrated into an experimental erbium: YAG photoablative laser. The CTS successfully imaged corneas before, after, and during laser photoablation. Its ability to image nonreflective surfaces and to be integrated into other optical systems may make it suitable for intraoperative refractive monitoring.

  7. In-Vacuum Photogrammetry of a 10-Meter Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Chris G.; Jones, Thomas W.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    In July 2004, a 10-meter solar sail structure developed by L Garde, Inc. was tested in vacuum at the NASA Glenn 30-meter Plum Brook Space Power Facility in Sandusky, Ohio. The three main objections of the test were to demonstrate unattended deployment from a stowed configuration, to measure the deployed shape of the sail at both ambient and cryogenic room temperatures, and to measure the deployed structural dynamic characteristics (vibration modes). This paper summarizes the work conducted to fulfill the second test objective. The deployed shape was measured photogrammetrically in vacuum conditions with four 2-megapixel digital video cameras contained in custom made pressurized canisters. The canisters included high-intensity LED ring lights to illuminate a grid of retroreflective targets distributed on the solar sail. The test results closely matched pre-test photogrammetry numerical simulations and compare well with ABAQUS finite-element model predictions.

  8. Optimal marker placement in photogrammetry patient positioning system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haisong; Yu, Yan; Schell, M C; O'Dell, Walter G; Ruo, Russell; Okunieff, Paul

    2003-02-01

    A photogrammetry-based patient positioning system has been used instead of the conventional laser alignment technique for patient set-up in external beam radiotherapy. It tracks skin affixed reflective markers with multiple infrared cameras. The three-dimensional (3D) positions of the markers provide reference information to determine the treatment plan isocenter location and hence provide the ability to position the lesion at the isocenter of the treatment linear accelerator. However, in current clinical practice for lung or liver lesion treatments, fiducial markers are usually randomly affixed onto the patients' chest and abdomen, so that the actual target registration error (TRE) of the internal lesions inside the body may be large, depending on the fiducial registration error (FRE). There exists an optimal marker configuration that can minimize the TRE. In this paper, we developed methods to design the patient-specific optimal configurations of the surface makers to minimize the TRE, given the patient's surface contour, the lesion position and the FRE. Floating genetic algorithm (GA) optimization was used to optimize the positions of the skin markers. The surface curve of the patient body was determined by an automatic segmentation algorithm from the planning CT. The method was evaluated using a body phantom implanted with a metal ball (a simulated target). By registering two CT scans using the surface markers and measuring the displacement of the target, the TRE was measured. The TRE was also measured by taking two orthogonal portal films after positioning the phantom using the photogrammetry based patient positioning system. A 50% reduction in TRE has been achieved by using the optimal configuration compared to the random configuration. This result demonstrates that the optimization of a fiducial configuration can result in improved tumor targeting ability.

  9. Use of Assisted Photogrammetry for Indoor and Outdoor Navigation Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliari, D.; Cazzaniga, N. E.; Pinto, L.

    2015-05-01

    Nowadays, devices and applications that require navigation solutions are continuously growing. For instance, consider the increasing demand of mapping information or the development of applications based on users' location. In some case it could be sufficient an approximate solution (e.g. at room level), but in the large amount of cases a better solution is required. The navigation problem has been solved from a long time using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). However, it can be unless in obstructed areas, such as in urban areas or inside buildings. An interesting low cost solution is photogrammetry, assisted using additional information to scale the photogrammetric problem and recovering a solution also in critical situation for image-based methods (e.g. poor textured surfaces). In this paper, the use of assisted photogrammetry has been tested for both outdoor and indoor scenarios. Outdoor navigation problem has been faced developing a positioning system with Ground Control Points extracted from urban maps as constrain and tie points automatically extracted from the images acquired during the survey. The proposed approach has been tested under different scenarios, recovering the followed trajectory with an accuracy of 0.20 m. For indoor navigation a solution has been thought to integrate the data delivered by Microsoft Kinect, by identifying interesting features on the RGB images and re-projecting them on the point clouds generated from the delivered depth maps. Then, these points have been used to estimate the rotation matrix between subsequent point clouds and, consequently, to recover the trajectory with few centimeters of error.

  10. Accuracy of Measurements in Oblique Aerial Images for Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrowski, W.

    2016-10-01

    Oblique aerial images have been a source of data for urban areas for several years. However, the accuracy of measurements in oblique images during this time has been limited to a single meter due to the use of direct -georeferencing technology and the underlying digital elevation model. Therefore, oblique images have been used mostly for visualization purposes. This situation changed in recent years as new methods, which allowed for a higher accuracy of exterior orientation, were developed. Current developments include the process of determining exterior orientation and the previous but still crucial process of tie point extraction. Progress in this area was shown in the ISPRS/EUROSDR Benchmark on Multi-Platform Photogrammetry and is also noticeable in the growing interest in the use of this kind of imagery. The higher level of accuracy in the orientation of oblique aerial images that has become possible in the last few years should result in a higher level of accuracy in the measurements of these types of images. The main goal of this research was to set and empirically verify the accuracy of measurements in oblique aerial images. The research focused on photogrammetric measurements composed of many images, which use a high overlap within an oblique dataset and different view angles. During the experiments, two series of images of urban areas were used. Both were captured using five DigiCam cameras in a Maltese cross configuration. The tilt angles of the oblique cameras were 45 degrees, and the position of the cameras during flight used a high grade GPS/INS navigation system. The orientation of the images was set using the Pix4D Mapper Pro software with both measurements of the in-flight camera position and the ground control points (measured with GPS RTK technology). To control the accuracy, check points were used (which were also measured with GPS RTK technology). As reference data for the whole study, an area of the city-based map was used. The archived results

  11. Dynamic Impact Deformation Analysis Using High-speed Cameras and ARAMIS Photogrammetry Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    photogrammetry for high-speed impact deformation. ARAMIS is a non-contact measurement system that calculates the strain history of a deformation event...stereo photography and photogrammetry, one can obtain a detail history of a target that undergoes fast rate of deformation. This report is a...desired (highlighted) panel, and then selecting the Edit option. The values in the “Name,” “Calibration scale,” “Cert. Temp.,” and “Exp. Coff

  12. A Method for Assessing the Accuracy of a Photogrammetry System for Precision Deployable Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ashley

    2005-01-01

    The measurement techniques used to validate analytical models of large deployable structures are an integral Part of the technology development process and must be precise and accurate. Photogrammetry and videogrammetry are viable, accurate, and unobtrusive methods for measuring such large Structures. Photogrammetry uses Software to determine the three-dimensional position of a target using camera images. Videogrammetry is based on the same principle, except a series of timed images are analyzed. This work addresses the accuracy of a digital photogrammetry system used for measurement of large, deployable space structures at JPL. First, photogrammetry tests are performed on a precision space truss test article, and the images are processed using Photomodeler software. The accuracy of the Photomodeler results is determined through, comparison with measurements of the test article taken by an external testing group using the VSTARS photogrammetry system. These two measurements are then compared with Australis photogrammetry software that simulates a measurement test to predict its accuracy. The software is then used to study how particular factors, such as camera resolution and placement, affect the system accuracy to help design the setup for the videogrammetry system that will offer the highest level of accuracy for measurement of deploying structures.

  13. Evaluation of DSMs generated from multi-temporal aerial photographs using emerging structure from motion-multi-view stereo technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Satoshi; Yamano, Hiroya; Oguma, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    An accuracy assessment of digital surface models (DSMs) generated from archived aerial photographs using the structure from motion-multi-view stereo (SfM-MVS) technique was carried out. A four-step accuracy-assessment procedure was adopted using aerial photography from eight periods, as follows. Step 1: generate a DSM and orthophoto from digital aerial photographs taken in 2013 and ground control points (GCPs) measured by GNSS. Step 2: assess the accuracy of the DSM by comparison with altitude measured by leveling survey. Step 3: generate other historical DSMs and orthophotos from historical aerial photographs using GCPs extracted from the DSM of 2013. Step 4: assess the accuracy of all historical DSMs by comparing with the leveling survey. Then re-calculate the accuracy of historical DSMs by reducing the inherent error in the 2013 DSM. The DSM based on the aerial photographs taken in 2013 was generated with a resolution of 48.2 cm. The residual height error of the GCPs was 15.4 cm. Validation against the altitudes of 171 points revealed that this DSM has a height root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of 24.1 cm and is 9.2 cm lower than the leveling data on average. Even using US military photos with unconfirmed detailed specifications, the model can measure the altitude with an RMSE value of 121.5 cm. It appears therefore that analysis by SfM-MVS can give comparable measurement accuracy to traditional aerial photogrammetry. The low cost and high accuracy obtained with archived aerial photographs are worthy of special mention.

  14. Aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal infrared scanning from an aircraft is a convenient and commercially available means for determining relative rates of energy loss from building roofs. The need to conserve energy as fuel costs makes the mass survey capability of aerial thermography an attractive adjunct to community energy awareness programs. Background information on principles of aerial thermography is presented. Thermal infrared scanning systems, flight and environmental requirements for data acquisition, preparation of thermographs for display, major users and suppliers of thermography, and suggested specifications for obtaining aerial scanning services were reviewed.

  15. Estimating rates of coastal cliff erosion in a small island using terrestrial laser scanning and RPAS-based SfM-MVS photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Yuichi S.; Obanawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Rapid erosion of coastal cliffs has been historically observed to be more than 1 m/y in the outer Boso Peninsula area, eastern Japan. However, due to the modern work of coastal protection, the erosion rates of the coastal cliffs have significantly decreased. This caused coastal erosion in the nearby sand beach, to which sands had been supplied from the formerly eroded rocky coast. In order to assess the relationships between erosion and protection in both rocky and sandy coasts, quantitative evaluation of erosion rates by natural processes would be necessary. The Suzume-jima Island, a small coastal island in the outer Boso Peninsula area, is an ideal site, which is located outside of the coastal protection and natural processes of erosion can still be observed. Here we carried out multiple measurements of the entire shape of the island using remotely piloted aerial system (RPAS) and structure-from-motion multi-view stereo (SfM-MVS) photogrammetry. Terrestrial laser scanning is also performed for the accuracy assessment. The high-frequency (3 times a year) and high-resolution (cm) measurements of the small island for 3 years revealed spatially variable rockfalls and wave erosion, whose volume of mass has been quantitatively revealed from the 3-D point cloud obtained. The relatively short-term measurements are also compared with the long-term 2-D topographic changes in the island by aerial photographs for 50 years.

  16. Estimation of high resolution shallow water bathymetry via two-media-photogrammetry - a case study at the Pielach River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, Michael; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Ressl, Camillo; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    In our contribution, a photogrammetric approach for water depth estimation of a shallow water body is developed and applied to a gravel-bed river in order to evaluate the possibilities of passive optical remote sensing for high resolution bathymetry. While 2-media (air and water) photogrammetry has been described before, it was concentrated on reconstruction of individual points. Here, we take a different approach and aim at a dense surface description of the river bed as seen from the aerial image through the water column. In a first step, the influence of light refraction at the boundary between two media for photogrammetric point retrieval is assessed. The effect is theoretically investigated under varying conditions, i.e. the 3D point displacement caused by refraction is related to parameters such as water depth, image geometry et cetera. Especially the assumption of a plain, horizontal water surface does not hold in practice. Therefore, also the limitations of the theoretical model are determined by investigating, how water surface waves and the corresponding deviation of the surface normal vectors from vertical direction distort the results. In the second, practical part of the work, a refraction correction procedure is derived from the prior investigations and is embedded into the photogrammetric workflow. A full photogrammetric processing chain is applied to a set of aerial images of the pre-Alpine Pielach River in Lower Austria. The RGB images were taken simultaneously to an Airborne Laser Bathymetry (ALB) campaign providing high resolution reference data. Based on these images, a Digital Terrain Model is derived for the open as well as the submerged areas. Running through the procedure gives important insights about the possibilities of influencing the processing pipeline of commercial photogrammetric software packages in order to apply the developed refraction correction. Especially, the deviation from the epipolar constraint caused by refraction and the

  17. Action cameras and low-cost aerial vehicles in archaeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarin, M.; Balletti, C.; Guerra, F.

    2015-05-01

    This research is focused on the analysis of the potential of a close range aerial photogrammetry system, which is accessible both in economic terms and in terms of simplicity of use. In particular the Go Pro Hero3 Black Edition and the Parrot Ar. Drone 2.0 were studied. There are essentially two limitations to the system and they were found for both the instruments used. Indeed, the frames captured by the Go Pro are subject to great distortion and consequently pose numerous calibration problems. On the other hand, the limitation of the system lies in the difficulty of maintaining a flight configuration suitable for photogrammetric purposes in unfavourable environmental conditions. The aim of this research is to analyse how far the limitations highlighted can influence the precision of the survey and consequent quality of the results obtained. To this end, the integrated GoPro and Parrot system was used during a survey campaign on the Altilia archaeological site, in Molise. The data obtained was compared with that gathered by more traditional methods, such as the laser scanner. The system was employed in the field of archaeology because here the question of cost often has a considerable importance and the metric aspect is frequently subordinate to the qualitative and interpretative aspects. Herein one of the products of these systems; the orthophoto will be analysed, which is particularly useful in archaeology, especially in situations such as this dig in which there aren't many structures in elevation present. The system proposed has proven to be an accessible solution for producing an aerial documentation, which adds the excellent quality of the result to metric data for which the precision is known.

  18. Reconstruction of former glacier surface topography from archive oblique aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, N. G.; Tonkin, T. N.

    2017-04-01

    Archive oblique aerial imagery offers the potential to reconstruct the former geometry of valley glaciers and other landscape surfaces. Whilst the use of Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry with multiview stereopsis (MVS) to process small-format imagery is now well established in the geosciences, the potential of the technique for extracting topographic data from archive oblique aerial imagery is unclear. Here, SfM-MVS is used to reconstruct the former topography of two high-Arctic glaciers (Midtre and Austre Lovénbreen, Svalbard, Norway) using three archive oblique aerial images obtained by the Norwegian Polar Institute in 1936. The 1936 point cloud was produced using seven LiDAR-derived ground control points located on stable surfaces in proximity to the former piedmont glacier termini. To assess accuracy, the 1936 data set was compared to a LiDAR data set using the M3C2 algorithm to calculate cloud-to-cloud differences. For stable areas (such as nonglacial surfaces), vertical differences were detected between the two point clouds (RMS M3C2 vertical difference of 8.5 m), with the outwash zones adjacent to the assessed glacier termini showing less extensive vertical discrepancies (94% of M3C2 vertical differences between ± 5 m). This

  19. Aerial Surveying Uav Based on Open-Source Hardware and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, J.

    2011-09-01

    In the last years the functionality and type of UAV-systems increased fast, but unfortunately these systems are hardly available for researchers in some cases. A simple and low-cost solution was developed to build an autonomous aerial surveying airplane, which can fulfil the necessities (aerial photographs with very-high resolution) of other departments at the university and very useful and practical for teaching photogrammetry.. The base was a commercial, remote controlled model airplane and an open-source GPS/IMU system (MatrixPilot) was adapted to achieve the semi-automatic or automatic stabilization and navigation of the model airplane along predefined trajectory. The firmware is completely open-source and easily available on the website of the project. The first used camera system was a low-budget, low-quality video camera, which could provide only 1.2 megapixel photographs or low resolution video depending on the light conditions and the desired spatial resolution. A field measurement test was carried out with the described system: the aerial surveying of an undiscovered archaeological site, signed by a crop-mark in mountain Pilis (Hungary).

  20. High-resolution topography using SfM-photogrammetry from UAV for coastal mudflat geomorphic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Jules; Brunier, Guillaume; Michaud, Emma; Anthony, Edward; Morvan, Sylvain; Dussouillez, Philippe; Gardel, Antoine

    2016-04-01

    The coast between the Amazon and the Orinoco river mouths comprises mud banks formed from the large muddy discharge of the Amazon and migrating westward under the influence of waves and currents. These banks are highly dynamic and strongly affected by complex hydro-bio-geochemical interactions that are also important in mangrove colonization of bare mudflats in the upper intertidal zone of these banks. The surface topography of these mud banks is further affected by physical and biological processes such as tidal channel incision and bioturbation. Surveying the morphology of these mudflats over large areas and at a high-resolution without perturbing their surface is a real challenge that cannot be accomplished using classical survey methods such as RTK-GPS or Total Stations. To overcome this hurdle, we conducted a SfM(Surface from Motion)-photogrammetry experiment over 1 ha of a large intertidal mudflat colonized by pioneer mangroves at the mouth of the Sinnamary estuary in French Guiana. We developed a topographic data acquisition system based on sub-vertical aerial photography from a UAV flying at low altitude (15 m), in order to produce images at 3 mm resolution. A light DJI F550 drone was used, with an automatic flight programming using GPS navigation and a flight plan designed on photogrammetric criteria. The payload was a lightweight (250 grams) Ricoh GR camera with an APS-C sensor of 16.2 Megapixel and including an intervalometer triggering function. The drone had a flight autonomy of 12 minutes thus covering entirely the surrounding mudflat platform. The landing procedure was conducted manually in order for the drone to land safely on a very narrow artificial ground base set up for our experiment. 3D-models and derived products were generated using Agisoft Photoscan Professionnal software. We produced a gridded Digital Surface Model (DSM) and an orthophoto in visible bands at 1 cm and 5mm pixel resolution respectively. The vertical accuracy of the DSM based

  1. Monitoring fluvial erosion of the Oso landslide, Washington, using repeat Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S. W.; Magirl, C. S.; Keith, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    On March 22, 2014, the Oso landslide, located in northwestern Washington State, catastrophically mobilized about 8 million m3 of mixed glacial sediment, creating a valley-wide blockage that impounded the North Fork Stillaguamish River to a height of 8 m. The river overtopped the landslide blockage within several days and incised a new channel through predominately fine-grained, cohesive glaciolacustrine sediment in the center of the deposit. Our research focuses on the evolution of this new channel. Using a consumer-grade digital camera mounted on a fixed wing-aircraft, we used structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry to produce 25 cm digital elevation models (DEMs) of the channel at one-month intervals between November 2014 and July 2015. A large RTK GPS validation dataset and inter-survey comparisons documents sub-decimeter vertical and horizontal accuracies. In combination with aerial lidar surveys acquired in March and April 2014, this dataset provides a uniquely resolved look at the erosion of a landslide dam. The newly-formed channel incised rapidly, lowering to within a meter of its pre-slide elevation by May 2014 despite modest flows. During high flows of the 2014-2015 winter flood season, erosion was dominated by channel widening of tens of meters with an overall stable planform. Incision fully returned the channel to pre-slide elevations by December 2014. A total of 510,000 +/- 50,000 m3 of material was eroded between March 2014 and July 2015, split evenly between the initial period of incision and the later period of widening. Sediment yield and channel morphology showed asymptotic trends towards stability. Measurements of deposit bulk density and grain size allowed conversion of volumetric sediment yields to mass yields by size classes. Over the 16 months after the slide, the river eroded about 0.82 +/- 0.1 Mt of sediment, of which 0.78 Mt was finer than 2mm. This yield agrees within 15% of an independent estimate based on concurrent sediment gaging

  2. Rapid melting dynamics of the Morteratsch glacier (Swiss Alps) from UAV photogrammetry and field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Garzonio, Roberto; Rossini, Micol; Baccolo, Giovanni; Julitta, Tommaso; Cavallini, Giuseppe; Mattavelli, Matteo; Colombo, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The impact of atmospheric impurities on the optical properties of snow and ice has been largely acknowledged in the scientific literature. Beyond this, the evaluation of the effect of specific organic and inorganic particles on melting dynamics remains a major challenge. In this contribution, we examine the annual melting dynamics of a large valley glacier of the Swiss Alps using UAV photogrammetry. We then compare the melting patterns to the presence of surface impurities on the glacier surface. Two surveys (in July and September 2016) with a lightweight Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) were organized on the ablation zone of the Morteratsch glacier (Swiss Alps). The UAV (DJI, Phantom 4) was equipped with a high resolution digital camera, and flew at a constant altitude of 150 from the glacier surface. 30 ground control points were placed on the glacier, and their coordinates were determined with a differential GPS (dGPS) for georeferencing UAV images. Contemporary to the UAV surveys, field spectroscopy data were collected on the glacier surface with an Analytical Spectral Device (ASD Field spec.) spectrometer covering the visible and near infrared spectral ranges, and ice samples were collected to determine the abundance of microorganism and algae. From the UAV RGB data, two point clouds were created using Structure from Motion (SfM) algorithms. The point clouds (each consisting of about 15M points) were then converted in Digital Surface Models (DSM) and orthomosaics by interpolation. The difference between the two DSM was calculated and converted in Snow Water Equivalent (SWE), in order to assess the ice lost by the glacier during the ablation season. The point clouds were compared and the displacement vectors were estimated using different algorithms. The elevation changes estimated from UAV data were compared with the abundance of microorganisms and algae. The reflectance spectra of ice with microorganisms and algae show a chlorophyll absorption feature at 680 nm

  3. Development of an aerial counting system in oil palm plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulyma Miserque Castillo, Jhany; Laverde Diaz, Rubbermaid; Rueda Guzmán, Claudia Leonor

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes the development of a counting aerial system capable of capturing, process and analyzing images of an oil palm plantation to register the number of cultivated palms. It begins with a study of the available UAV technologies to define the most appropriate model according to the project needs. As result, a DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ is used to capture pictures that are processed by a photogrammetry software to create orthomosaics from the areas of interest, which are handled by the developed software to calculate the number of palms contained in them. The implemented algorithm uses a sliding window technique in image pyramids to generate candidate windows, an LBP descriptor to model the texture of the picture, a logistic regression model to classify the windows and a non-maximum suppression algorithm to refine the decision. The system was tested in different images than the ones used for training and for establishing the set point. As result, the system showed a 95.34% detection rate with a 97.83% precision in mature palms and a 79.26% detection rate with a 97.53% precision in young palms giving an FI score of 0.97 for mature palms and 0.87 for the small ones. The results are satisfactory getting the census and high-quality images from which is possible to get more information from the area of interest. All this, achieved through a low-cost system capable of work even in cloudy conditions.

  4. Venus Aerial Platform Modeling Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutts, J. A.; Matthies, L. H.; Thompson, T. W.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to define the models that are important for both engineering and scientific aspects of the design of Venus aerial platform missions and to discuss how they will be applied in assessing technology readiness.

  5. High-Resolution Debris Flow Volume Mapping with Unmanned Aerial Systems (uas) and Photogrammetric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. S.; Fromm, R.; Lechner, V.

    2016-06-01

    Debris flows cause an average € 30 million damages and 1-2 fatalities every year in Austria. Detailed documentation of their extent and magnitude is essential for understanding, preventing and mitigating these natural hazard events. The recent development of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has provided a new possibility for on-demand high-resolution monitoring and mapping. Here, we present a study, where the spatial extent and volume of a large debris flow event were mapped with different UAS, fitted with commercial off-the-shelf sensors. Orthophotos and digital terrain models (DTM) were calculated using structure-from-motion photogrammetry software. Terrain height differences caused by the debris flow in the catchment and valley floor were derived by subtracting the pre-event airborne laser scanning (ALS) DTM from a post-event UAS-DTM. The analysis of the volumetric sediment budget showed, that approximately 265,000 m³ material was mobilised in the catchment, of which 45,000 m³ settled there; of the material, which reached the valley floor, 120,000 m³ was deposited, while another 10,000 m³ was eroded from there. The UAS-results were validated against ALS data and imagery from a traditional manned-aircraft photogrammetry campaign. In conclusion, the UAS-data can reach an accuracy and precision comparable to manned aircraft data, but with the added benefits of higher flexibility, easier repeatability, less operational constraints and higher spatial resolution.

  6. Modeling aerial refueling operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Allen B., III

    Aerial Refueling (AR) is the act of offloading fuel from one aircraft (the tanker) to another aircraft (the receiver) in mid flight. Meetings between tanker and receiver aircraft are referred to as AR events and are scheduled to: escort one or more receivers across a large body of water; refuel one or more receivers; or train receiver pilots, tanker pilots, and boom operators. In order to efficiently execute the Aerial Refueling Mission, the Air Mobility Command (AMC) of the United States Air Force (USAF) depends on computer models to help it make tanker basing decisions, plan tanker sorties, schedule aircraft, develop new organizational doctrines, and influence policy. We have worked on three projects that have helped AMC improve its modeling and decision making capabilities. Optimal Flight Planning. Currently Air Mobility simulation and optimization software packages depend on algorithms which iterate over three dimensional fuel flow tables to compute aircraft fuel consumption under changing flight conditions. When a high degree of fidelity is required, these algorithms use a large amount of memory and CPU time. We have modeled the rate of aircraft fuel consumption with respect to AC GrossWeight, Altitude and Airspeed. When implemented, this formula will decrease the amount of memory and CPU time needed to compute sortie fuel costs and cargo capacity values. We have also shown how this formula can be used in optimal control problems to find minimum costs flight plans. Tanker Basing Demand Mismatch Index. Since 1992, AMC has relied on a Tanker Basing/AR Demand Mismatch Index which aggregates tanker capacity and AR demand data into six regions. This index was criticized because there were large gradients along regional boundaries. Meanwhile tankers frequently cross regional boundaries to satisfy the demand for AR support. In response we developed continuous functions to score locations with respect to their proximity to demand for AR support as well as their

  7. Aerial Refueling Clearance Initiation Request

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-14

    Signed] _________ __________ [Signed] _________ Thomas Swiderek, Omega Air Working Group Lead Group Number 5 Thomas Swiderek, Omega Air Document...Definitions ARSAG Aerial Refueling Systems Advisory Group, International AR Aerial Refueling AAR Air -to- Air Refueling AR Boom Tanker fuel delivery system via...1995 NATO ATP 3.3.4.2, Air to Air Refuelling Ed C Ver 1 Edition D accepting edits through April 2016. Expected Promulgation Sep 2016. Nov 2013 AR

  8. Aerial Refueling Clearance Process Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-21

    08-2014 2. REPORT TYPE Guidance Document 3. DATES COVERED 2008-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Aerial Refueling Clearance Process Guide Attachment: Aerial...ATP-3.3.4.2 covers general operational procedures for AR and national/organizational SRDs cover data and procedures specific to their AR platforms...Receptacle, Probe/Drogue, and BDA Kit. 3.1.3 The items for assessment consideration cover several areas of interface for both the tanker and the

  9. Effects of image orientation and ground control points distribution on unmanned aerial vehicle photogrammetry projects on a road cut slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal-Ramírez, Fernando; Agüera-Vega, Francisco; Martínez-Carricondo, Patricio J.

    2016-07-01

    The morphology of road cut slopes, such as length and high slopes, is one of the most prevalent causes of landslides and terrain stability troubles. Digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthoimages are used for land management purposes. Two flights with different orientations with respect to the target surface were planned, and four photogrammetric projects were carried out during these flights to study the image orientation effects. Orthogonal images oriented to the cut slope with only sidelaps were compared to the classical vertical orientation, with sidelapping, endlapping, and both types of overlapping simultaneously. DEM and orthoimages obtained from the orthogonal project showed smaller errors than those obtained from the other three photogrammetric projects, with the first one being much easier to manage. One additional flight and six photogrammetric projects were used to establish an objective criterion to locate the three ground control points for georeferencing and rectification DEMs and orthoimages. All possible sources of errors were evaluated in the DEMs and orthoimages.

  10. Comparisons of feature extraction algorithm based on unmanned aerial vehicle image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Wenfei; Shi, Zhengtao; Li, Dongsheng

    2017-07-01

    Feature point extraction technology has become a research hotspot in the photogrammetry and computer vision. The commonly used point feature extraction operators are SIFT operator, Forstner operator, Harris operator and Moravec operator, etc. With the high spatial resolution characteristics, UAV image is different from the traditional aviation image. Based on these characteristics of the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), this paper uses several operators referred above to extract feature points from the building images, grassland images, shrubbery images, and vegetable greenhouses images. Through the practical case analysis, the performance, advantages, disadvantages and adaptability of each algorithm are compared and analyzed by considering their speed and accuracy. Finally, the suggestions of how to adapt different algorithms in diverse environment are proposed.

  11. Modelling and representation issues in automated feature extraction from aerial and satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowmya, Arcot; Trinder, John

    New digital systems for the processing of photogrammetric and remote sensing images have led to new approaches to information extraction for mapping and Geographic Information System (GIS) applications, with the expectation that data can become more readily available at a lower cost and with greater currency. Demands for mapping and GIS data are increasing as well for environmental assessment and monitoring. Hence, researchers from the fields of photogrammetry and remote sensing, as well as computer vision and artificial intelligence, are bringing together their particular skills for automating these tasks of information extraction. The paper will review some of the approaches used in knowledge representation and modelling for machine vision, and give examples of their applications in research for image understanding of aerial and satellite imagery.

  12. Modeling human faces with multi-image photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Apuzzo, Nicola

    2002-03-01

    Modeling and measurement of the human face have been increasing by importance for various purposes. Laser scanning, coded light range digitizers, image-based approaches and digital stereo photogrammetry are the used methods currently employed in medical applications, computer animation, video surveillance, teleconferencing and virtual reality to produce three dimensional computer models of the human face. Depending on the application, different are the requirements. Ours are primarily high accuracy of the measurement and automation in the process. The method presented in this paper is based on multi-image photogrammetry. The equipment, the method and results achieved with this technique are here depicted. The process is composed of five steps: acquisition of multi-images, calibration of the system, establishment of corresponding points in the images, computation of their 3-D coordinates and generation of a surface model. The images captured by five CCD cameras arranged in front of the subject are digitized by a frame grabber. The complete system is calibrated using a reference object with coded target points, which can be measured fully automatically. To facilitate the establishment of correspondences in the images, texture in the form of random patterns can be projected from two directions onto the face. The multi-image matching process, based on a geometrical constrained least squares matching algorithm, produces a dense set of corresponding points in the five images. Neighborhood filters are then applied on the matching results to remove the errors. After filtering the data, the three-dimensional coordinates of the matched points are computed by forward intersection using the results of the calibration process; the achieved mean accuracy is about 0.2 mm in the sagittal direction and about 0.1 mm in the lateral direction. The last step of data processing is the generation of a surface model from the point cloud and the application of smooth filters. Moreover, a

  13. SU-E-T-754: Three-Dimensional Patient Modeling Using Photogrammetry for Collision Avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, R; Cardan, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate photogrammetry for creating a three-dimensional patient model. Methods: A mannequin was configured on the couch of a CT scanner to simulate a patient setup using an indexed positioning device. A CT fiducial was placed on the indexed CT table-overlay at the reference index position. Two dimensional photogrammetry targets were placed on the table in known positions. A digital SLR camera was used to obtain 27 images from different positions around the CT table. The images were imported into a commercial photogrammetry package and a 3D model constructed. Each photogrammetry target was identified on 2 to 5 images. The CT DICOM metadata and the position of the CT fiducial were used to calculate the coordinates of the photogrammetry targets in the CT image frame of reference. The coordinates were transferred to the photogrammetry software to orient the 3D model. The mannequin setup was transferred to the treatment couch of a linear accelerator and positioned at isocenter using in-room lasers. The treatment couch coordinates were noted and compared with prediction. The collision free regions were measured over the full range of gantry and table motion and were compared with predictions obtained using a general purpose polygon interference algorithm. Results: The reconstructed 3D model consisted of 180000 triangles. The difference between the predicted and measured couch positions were 5 mm, 1 mm, and 1 mm for longitudinal, lateral, and vertical, respectively. The collision prediction tested 64620 gantry table combinations in 11.1 seconds. The accuracy was 96.5%, with false positive and negative results occurring at the boundaries of the collision space. Conclusion: Photogrammetry can be used as a tool for collision avoidance during treatment planning. The results indicate that a buffer zone is necessary to avoid false negatives at the boundary of the collision-free zone. Testing with human patients is underway. Research partially supported by a grant

  14. Digital photogrammetry at the U.S. Geological Survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greve, Clifford W.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is converting its primary map production and revision operations to use digital photogrammetric techniques. The primary source of data for these operations is the digital orthophoto quadrangle derived from National Aerial Photography Program images. These digital orthophotos are used on workstations that permit comparison of existing vector and raster data with the orthophoto and interactive collection and revision of the vector data.

  15. Integrating Terrestrial LIDAR with Point Clouds Created from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslar, M.

    2015-08-01

    Using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) for the purposes of conducting high-accuracy aerial surveying has become a hot topic over the last year. One of the most promising means of conducting such a survey involves integrating a high-resolution non-metric digital camera with the UAV and using the principals of digital photogrammetry to produce high-density colorized point clouds. Through the use of stereo imagery, precise and accurate horizontal positioning information can be produced without the need for integration with any type of inertial navigation system (INS). Of course, some form of ground control is needed to achieve this result. Terrestrial LiDAR, either static or mobile, provides the solution. Points extracted from Terrestrial LiDAR can be used as control in the digital photogrammetry solution required by the UAV. In return, the UAV is an affordable solution for filling in the shadows and occlusions typically experienced by Terrestrial LiDAR. In this paper, the accuracies of points derived from a commercially available UAV solution will be examined and compared to the accuracies achievable by a commercially available LIDAR solution. It was found that the LiDAR system produced a point cloud that was twice as accurate as the point cloud produced by the UAV's photogrammetric solution. Both solutions gave results within a few centimetres of the control field. In addition the about of planar dispersion on the vertical wall surfaces in the UAV point cloud was found to be multiple times greater than that from the horizontal ground based UAV points or the LiDAR data.

  16. Kinematic parameter estimation using close range photogrammetry for sport applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magre Colorado, Luz Alejandra; Martínez Santos, Juan Carlos

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we show the development of a low-cost hardware/software system based on close range photogrammetry to track the movement of a person performing weightlifting. The goal is to reduce the costs to the trainers and athletes dedicated to this sport when it comes to analyze the performance of the sportsman and avoid injuries or accidents. We used a web-cam as the data acquisition hardware and develop the software stack in Processing using the OpenCV library. Our algorithm extracts size, position, velocity, and acceleration measurements of the bar along the course of the exercise. We present detailed characteristics of the system with their results in a controlled setting. The current work improves the detection and tracking capabilities from a previous version of this system by using HSV color model instead of RGB. Preliminary results show that the system is able to profile the movement of the bar as well as determine the size, position, velocity, and acceleration values of a marker/target in scene. The average error finding the size of object at four meters of distance is less than 4%, and the error of the acceleration value is 1.01% in average.

  17. Industrial Photogrammetry - Accepted Metrology Tool or Exotic Niche

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bösemann, Werner

    2016-06-01

    New production technologies like 3D printing and other adaptive manufacturing technologies have changed the industrial manufacturing process, often referred to as next industrial revolution or short industry 4.0. Such Cyber Physical Production Systems combine virtual and real world through digitization, model building process simulation and optimization. It is commonly understood that measurement technologies are the key to combine the real and virtual worlds (eg. [Schmitt 2014]). This change from measurement as a quality control tool to a fully integrated step in the production process has also changed the requirements for 3D metrology solutions. Key words like MAA (Measurement Assisted Assembly) illustrate that new position of metrology in the industrial production process. At the same time it is obvious that these processes not only require more measurements but also systems to deliver the required information in high density in a short time. Here optical solutions including photogrammetry for 3D measurements have big advantages over traditional mechanical CMM's. The paper describes the relevance of different photogrammetric solutions including state of the art, industry requirements and application examples.

  18. Close-range photogrammetry in underground mining ground control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, Donovan J.; Chambers, Amy J.; Raffaldi, Michael J.; Finley, Seth A.; Powers, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Monitoring underground mine deformation and support conditions has traditionally involved visual inspection and geotechnical instrumentation. Monitoring displacements with conventional instrumentation can be expensive and time-consuming, and the number of locations that can be effectively monitored is generally limited. Moreover, conventional methods typically produce vector rather than tensor descriptions of geometry changes. Tensor descriptions can provide greater insight into hazardous ground movements, particularly in recently excavated openings and in older workings that have been negatively impacted by high stress concentrations, time-dependent deformation, or corrosion of ground support elements. To address these issues, researchers with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Spokane Mining Research Division are developing and evaluating photogrammetric systems for ground control monitoring applications in underground mines. This research has demonstrated that photogrammetric systems can produce millimeter-level measurements that are comparable to conventional displacement-measuring instruments. This paper provides an overview of the beneficial use of close-range photogrammetry for the following three ground control applications in underground mines: monitoring the deformation of surface support, monitoring rock mass movement, and monitoring the corrosion of surface support. Preliminary field analyses, case studies, limitations, and best practices for these applications are also discussed.

  19. Systematic Calibration for a Backpacked Spherical Photogrammetry Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, J. Y.; Su, B. W.; Hsiao, K. W.; Jhan, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    A spherical camera can observe the environment for almost 720 degrees' field of view in one shoot, which is useful for augmented reality, environment documentation, or mobile mapping applications. This paper aims to develop a spherical photogrammetry imaging system for the purpose of 3D measurement through a backpacked mobile mapping system (MMS). The used equipment contains a Ladybug-5 spherical camera, a tactical grade positioning and orientation system (POS), i.e. SPAN-CPT, and an odometer, etc. This research aims to directly apply photogrammetric space intersection technique for 3D mapping from a spherical image stereo-pair. For this purpose, several systematic calibration procedures are required, including lens distortion calibration, relative orientation calibration, boresight calibration for direct georeferencing, and spherical image calibration. The lens distortion is serious on the ladybug-5 camera's original 6 images. Meanwhile, for spherical image mosaicking from these original 6 images, we propose the use of their relative orientation and correct their lens distortion at the same time. However, the constructed spherical image still contains systematic error, which will reduce the 3D measurement accuracy. Later for direct georeferencing purpose, we need to establish a ground control field for boresight/lever-arm calibration. Then, we can apply the calibrated parameters to obtain the exterior orientation parameters (EOPs) of all spherical images. In the end, the 3D positioning accuracy after space intersection will be evaluated, including EOPs obtained by structure from motion method.

  20. Measurement of compressed breast thickness by optical stereoscopic photogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, Albert H.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2009-02-15

    The determination of volumetric breast density (VBD) from mammograms requires accurate knowledge of the thickness of the compressed breast. In attempting to accurately determine VBD from images obtained on conventional mammography systems, the authors found that the thickness reported by a number of mammography systems in the field varied by as much as 15 mm when compressing the same breast or phantom. In order to evaluate the behavior of mammographic compression systems and to be able to predict the thickness at different locations in the breast on patients, they have developed a method for measuring the local thickness of the breast at all points of contact with the compression paddle using optical stereoscopic photogrammetry. On both flat (solid) and compressible phantoms, the measurements were accurate to better than 1 mm with a precision of 0.2 mm. In a pilot study, this method was used to measure thickness on 108 volunteers who were undergoing mammography examination. This measurement tool will allow us to characterize paddle surface deformations, deflections and calibration offsets for mammographic units.

  1. Concentricity calibration of photogrammetry retro-reflector target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hengzheng; Wang, Weinong; Pei, Limei; Ren, Guoying

    2016-11-01

    Close range digital photogrammetry is being widely used in industrial measurements. The measurements are usually carried out with a mobile retro-reflector target, which is consists of a shaft and reflective target fixed in the center of the shaft. When the center of the target and the axis of the shaft is not consistent, it will introduce measurement error. Therefore, the concentricity of target is an important parameter for the measurement results. To achieve the concentricity of retro-reflector target a multi-sensor coordinate measurement machine with imaging probe and touch probe is used. In this combined measurement system the touch probe measure the axis of the shaft, and imaging probe measure the center of reflective target. An artifact is designed to evaluate the performance of combined system. This artifact is defined as a sharp edged hole in a metal plate. It is suitable to measure with touch probe as well as imaging probe. The touch probe measures 25 points on the hole and then with the imaging probe. With all the points measured by two kinds of probe the evaluation parameters including combination size error, form error and location error are calculated. These parameters are consistent with the ISO standard 10360-9. It indicates that combined measurement uncertainty is 3.2 microns which can meet the calibration requirements of target concentricity.

  2. Underwater Photogrammetry and 3d Reconstruction of Marble Cargos Shipwreck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balletti, C.; Beltrame, C.; Costa, E.; Guerra, F.; Vernier, P.

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays archaeological and architectural surveys are based on the acquisition and processing of point clouds, allowing a high metric precision, essential prerequisite for a good documentation. Digital image processing and laser scanner have changed the archaeological survey campaign, from manual and direct survey to a digital one and, actually, multi-image photogrammetry is a good solution for the underwater archaeology. This technical documentation cannot operate alone, but it has to be supported by a topographical survey to georeference all the finds in the same reference system. In the last years the Ca' Foscari and IUAV University of Venice are conducting a research on integrated survey techniques to support underwater metric documentation. The paper will explain all the phases regarding the survey's design, images acquisition, topographic measure and the data processing of two Roman shipwrecks in south Sicily. The cargos of the shipwrecks are composed by huge marble blocks, but they are different for morphological characteristic of the sites, for the depth and for their distribution on the seabed. Photogrammetrical and topographical surveys were organized in two distinct methods, especially for the second one, due to the depth that have allowed an experimentation of GPS RTK's measurements on one shipwreck. Moreover, this kind of three-dimensional documentation is useful for educational and dissemination aspect, for the ease of understanding by wide public.

  3. Apollo Video Photogrammetry Estimation Of Plume Impingement Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher; Lane, John; Metzger, Philip T.; Clements, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The Constellation Project's planned return to the moon requires numerous landings at the same site. Since the top few centimeters are loosely packed regolith, plume impingement from the Lander ejects the granular material at high velocities. Much work is needed to understand the physics of plume impingement during landing in order to protect hardware surrounding the landing sites. While mostly qualitative in nature, the Apollo Lunar Module landing videos can provide a wealth of quantitative information using modem photogrammetry techniques. The authors have used the digitized videos to quantify plume impingement effects of the landing exhaust on the lunar surface. The dust ejection angle from the plume is estimated at 1-3 degrees. The lofted particle density is estimated at 10(exp 8)- 10(exp 13) particles per cubic meter. Additionally, evidence for ejection of large 10-15 cm sized objects and a dependence of ejection angle on thrust are presented. Further work is ongoing to continue quantitative analysis of the landing videos.

  4. Documenting Architectural Heritage in Bahia, Brazil, Using Spherical Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Amorim, A. L.; Fangi, G.; Malinverni, E. S.

    2013-07-01

    The Cultural Heritage disappears at a rate higher than we are able, not only, to restore but also to document: human and natural factors, negligence or worst, deliberate demolitions put in danger the collective Architectural Heritage (AH). According to CIPA statements, the recording is important and has to follow some guidelines. The Architectural and Urban Heritage data have to be historically related, critically assessed and analyzed, before to be organized according to a thematic structure and become available for further uses. This paper shows the experiences developed by the Laboratory of Computer Graphics applied to Architecture and Design (LCAD), at the Architecture School of the Federal University of Bahia (FAUFBA), Brazil, in cooperation with the Università Politecnica delle Marche (UNIVPM, DICEA Department), Italy, in documenting architectural heritage. The research set up now has been carried out in the historical sites of Bahia, as Pelourinho neighborhood, a World Heritage by UNESCO. Other historical sites are in the plan of this survey, like the cities of Lençóis and Mucugê in Chapada Diamantina region. The aim is to build a technological platform based on low cost digital technologies and open source tools, such as Panoramic Spherical Photogrammetry, Spatial Database, Geographic Information Systems, Three-dimensional Geometric Modeling, CAD technology, for the collection, validation and dissemination of AH.

  5. Efficient detection and recognition algorithm of reference points in photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weimin; Liu, Gang; Zhu, Lichun; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Yuhai; Shan, Siyu

    2016-04-01

    In photogrammetry, an approach of automatic detection and recognition on reference points have been proposed to meet the requirements on detection and matching of reference points. The reference points used here are the CCT(circular coded target), which compose of two parts: the round target point in central region and the circular encoding band in surrounding region. Firstly, the contours of image are extracted, after that noises and disturbances of the image are filtered out by means of a series of criteria, such as the area of the contours, the correlation coefficient between two regions of contours etc. Secondly, the cubic spline interpolation is adopted to process the central contour region of the CCT. The contours of the interpolated image are extracted again, then the least square ellipse fitting is performed to calculate the center coordinates of the CCT. Finally, the encoded value is obtained by the angle information from the circular encoding band of the CCT. From the experiment results, the location precision of the CCT can be achieved to sub-pixel level of the algorithm presented. Meanwhile the recognition accuracy is pretty high, even if the background of the image is complex and full of disturbances. In addition, the property of the algorithm is robust. Furthermore, the runtime of the algorithm is fast.

  6. Personalized models of bones based on radiographic photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Berthonnaud, E; Hilmi, R; Dimnet, J

    2009-07-01

    The radiographic photogrammetry is applied, for locating anatomical landmarks in space, from their two projected images. The goal of this paper is to define a personalized geometric model of bones, based uniquely on photogrammetric reconstructions. The personalized models of bones are obtained from two successive steps: their functional frameworks are first determined experimentally, then, the 3D bone representation results from modeling techniques. Each bone functional framework is issued from direct measurements upon two radiographic images. These images may be obtained using either perpendicular (spine and sacrum) or oblique incidences (pelvis and lower limb). Frameworks link together their functional axes and punctual landmarks. Each global bone volume is decomposed in several elementary components. Each volumic component is represented by simple geometric shapes. Volumic shapes are articulated to the patient's bone structure. The volumic personalization is obtained by best fitting the geometric model projections to their real images, using adjustable articulations. Examples are presented to illustrating the technique of personalization of bone volumes, directly issued from the treatment of only two radiographic images. The chosen techniques for treating data are then discussed. The 3D representation of bones completes, for clinical users, the information brought by radiographic images.

  7. Digital macro-photogrammetry in orthodontic tooth movement: case report.

    PubMed

    Hlongwa, P; Sander, F G; Geiger, M

    2007-11-01

    Digital macro-photogrammetry (DMP) method was used to assess the 3-dimensional (3D) movement of the canine during retraction with a Hybrid Retractor (HR) spring (Forestadent, Pforzheim, Germany) following extraction of first premolars. Computer images of the canine were generated from multiple synchronous digital photos of a patient taken during clinical follow-ups. Time intervals were recorded from the begining of the treatment before the insertion of the spring (T0), to the last follow-up session of canine retraction (T8). All movements of the canine were calculated from the generated three dimensional co-ordinates (X,Y, & Z). The results indicated that the canine was distalized about 6,78 mm over a period of 258 days. The maximum velocity of the canine movement was found to be approximately 1 mm/month. In conclusion, it was found that DMP can be applied in clinical orthodontics to monitor orthodontic tooth movement. This technique is cost-effective and measurements can be made on site as the use of computers and digital photographs have been incorporated in the majority of orthodontic practices.

  8. Measurement of compressed breast thickness by optical stereoscopic photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Tyson, Albert H; Mawdsley, Gordon E; Yaffe, Martin J

    2009-02-01

    The determination of volumetric breast density (VBD) from mammograms requires accurate knowledge of the thickness of the compressed breast. In attempting to accurately determine VBD from images obtained on conventional mammography systems, the authors found that the thickness reported by a number of mammography systems in the field varied by as much as 15 mm when compressing the same breast or phantom. In order to evaluate the behavior of mammographic compression systems and to be able to predict the thickness at different locations in the breast on patients, they have developed a method for measuring the local thickness of the breast at all points of contact with the compression paddle using optical stereoscopic photogrammetry. On both flat (solid) and compressible phantoms, the measurements were accurate to better than 1 mm with a precision of 0.2 mm. In a pilot study, this method was used to measure thickness on 108 volunteers who were undergoing mammography examination. This measurement tool will allow us to characterize paddle surface deformations, deflections and calibration offsets for mammographic units.

  9. Computer-aided light sheet flow visualization using photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Kathryn; Severance, Kurt; Childers, Brooks A.

    1994-01-01

    A computer-aided flow visualization process has been developed to analyze video images acquired from rotating and translating light sheet visualization systems. The computer process integrates a mathematical model for image reconstruction, advanced computer graphics concepts, and digital image processing to provide a quantitative and a visual analysis capability. The image reconstruction model, based on photogrammetry, uses knowledge of the camera and light sheet locations and orientations to project two-dimensional light sheet video images into three-dimensional space. A sophisticated computer visualization package, commonly used to analyze computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results, was chosen to interactively display the reconstructed light sheet images with the numerical surface geometry for the model or aircraft under study. The photogrammetric reconstruction technique and the image processing and computer graphics techniques and equipment are described. Results of the computer-aided process applied to both a wind tunnel translating light sheet experiment and an in-flight rotating light sheet experiment are presented. The capability to compare reconstructed experimental light sheet images with CFD solutions in the same graphics environment is also demonstrated.

  10. Estimating Foreign-Object-Debris Density from Photogrammetry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Jason; Metzger, Philip; Lane, John

    2013-01-01

    Within the first few seconds after launch of STS-124, debris traveling vertically near the vehicle was captured on two 16-mm film cameras surrounding the launch pad. One particular piece of debris caught the attention of engineers investigating the release of the flame trench fire bricks. The question to be answered was if the debris was a fire brick, and if it represented the first bricks that were ejected from the flame trench wall, or was the object one of the pieces of debris normally ejected from the vehicle during launch. If it was typical launch debris, such as SRB throat plug foam, why was it traveling vertically and parallel to the vehicle during launch, instead of following its normal trajectory, flying horizontally toward the north perimeter fence? By utilizing the Runge-Kutta integration method for velocity and the Verlet integration method for position, a method that suppresses trajectory computational instabilities due to noisy position data was obtained. This combination of integration methods provides a means to extract the best estimate of drag force and drag coefficient under the non-ideal conditions of limited position data. This integration strategy leads immediately to the best possible estimate of object density, within the constraints of unknown particle shape. These types of calculations do not exist in readily available off-the-shelf simulation software, especially where photogrammetry data is needed as an input.

  11. Flat Versus Hemispherical Dome Ports in Underwater Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, F.; Nocerino, E.; Remondino, F.

    2017-02-01

    Underwater photogrammetry, like its counterpart in 'air', has gained an increasing diffusion thanks to the availability of easy-to-use, fast and often quite inexpensive software applications. Moreover, underwater equipment that allows the use of digital cameras normally designed to work in air also in water are largely available. However, for assuring accurate and reliable 3D modelling results a profound knowledge of the employed devices as well as physical and geometric principle is even more crucial than in air. This study aims to take a step forward in understanding the effect of underwater ports in front of the photographic lens. In particular, the effect of dome or flat ports on image quality in 3D modelling applications is investigated. Experiments conducted in a semi submerged indust rial structure show that the tested flat port performs worse than the dome, providing higher image residuals and lower precision and accuracy in object space. A significant different quality per colour channel is also observed and its influence on achievable processing results is discussed.

  12. Mapping the Large Millimeter Telescope primary reflector using photogrammetry: a first comparison with 12 GHz holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gale, David M.; Leon-Huerta, Andrea; Cabrera Cuevas, Lizeth; Castro Santos, David; Hernández Ríos, Emilio; Lucero Álvarez, Maribel; Tecuapetla Sosa, Esteban; Tzile Torres, Carlos; Sánchez-Argüelles, David; Narayanan, Gopal; Schloerb, F. Peter; Wilson, Grant W.; Smith, David R.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) makes extensive use of 12 GHz holography during maintenance periods to finetune the alignment of primary reflector segments to the best-fit design parabola. Tracker measurements have also been used for this task, however the technique is severely limited by environmental noise and large data collection times, on the order of many hours for a single map. In 2015 we started photogrammetry trials as a complimentary measurement technique. Photogrammetry can offer reduced mapping times compared with laser trackers, and like holography, allows maps to be made at arbitrary elevation angles. Depending on the placement of reflecting targets, the technique can also provide higher spatial resolution than currently achieved using our holography system. Accurate photogrammetry requires a robust strategy for the incorporation of multiple camera stations, a task complicated by the size of the antenna, obstructions of the surface by the sub-reflector and tetrapod legs, and the practicability of using the site tower crane as a moving camera platform. Image scaling is also a major consideration, since photogrammetry lacks any inherent distance reference. Therefore appropriate scale bars must be fabricated and located within the camera field of view. Additional considerations relate to the size and placement of reflective targets, and the optimization of camera settings. In this paper we present some initial comparisons of laser tracker, holography and photogrammetry measurements taken in 2015, showing clearly the status of alignment for distinct zones of the currently operating 32.5 m primary collecting area.

  13. Spatially explicit rangeland erosion monitoring using high-resolution digital aerial imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillan, Jeffrey K.; Karl, Jason W.; Barger, Nichole N.; Elaksher, Ahmed; Duniway, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all of the ecosystem services supported by rangelands, including production of livestock forage, carbon sequestration, and provisioning of clean water, are negatively impacted by soil erosion. Accordingly, monitoring the severity, spatial extent, and rate of soil erosion is essential for long-term sustainable management. Traditional field-based methods of monitoring erosion (sediment traps, erosion pins, and bridges) can be labor intensive and therefore are generally limited in spatial intensity and/or extent. There is a growing effort to monitor natural resources at broad scales, which is driving the need for new soil erosion monitoring tools. One remote-sensing technique that can be used to monitor soil movement is a time series of digital elevation models (DEMs) created using aerial photogrammetry methods. By geographically coregistering the DEMs and subtracting one surface from the other, an estimate of soil elevation change can be created. Such analysis enables spatially explicit quantification and visualization of net soil movement including erosion, deposition, and redistribution. We constructed DEMs (12-cm ground sampling distance) on the basis of aerial photography immediately before and 1 year after a vegetation removal treatment on a 31-ha Piñon-Juniper woodland in southeastern Utah to evaluate the use of aerial photography in detecting soil surface change. On average, we were able to detect surface elevation change of ± 8−9cm and greater, which was sufficient for the large amount of soil movement exhibited on the study area. Detecting more subtle soil erosion could be achieved using the same technique with higher-resolution imagery from lower-flying aircraft such as unmanned aerial vehicles. DEM differencing and process-focused field methods provided complementary information and a more complete assessment of soil loss and movement than any single technique alone. Photogrammetric DEM differencing could be used as a technique to

  14. Detecting Landslide Long-term Movements By Differential Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Paolo; Bitelli, Gabriele; Carrara, Alberto; Zanutta, Antonio

    The identification of the spatial and temporal evolution of landslides requires the in- tegration of geomorphological, topographical and geophysical surveys. Aerial pho- tographs flown in a long time span makes it possible to evaluate the morphological changes of the landscape, qualitatively (by photo-interpretation) and quantitatively (by photogrammetric techniques). In particular, the comparison of detailed DTMs, derived from aerial photographs and inserted in a unique reference system, may per- mit a quantitative reconstruction of landslide long-term movements. To generate high resolution DTMs, it is necessary to have a set of photogrammetric ground control points with adequate accuracy, located in an optimal way. However, in historical sur- veys, calibration certificates concerning the employed photogrammetric cameras, and ground control points are not available therefore it is not possible to calculate the ex- ternal orientation parameters of the photographs with the traditional methods. In such circumstances it turns out difficult to orient the stereoscopic models in a unique ref- erence system and approximate techniques are usually adopted (archival photogram- metric techniques). In the present research an archival photogrammetric technique has been applied to investigate a landslide located in Vergato (Bologna, Italy). Three DTMs obtained from three sets of aerial photographs, flown in 1971, 1976 and 2001, were generated through both an analytic stereoplotter and two different digital work- stations. The technique adopted to produce DTMs from historical photogrammetric models, the quantitative comparisons of the DTMs and some considerations concern- ing the main problems arisen are illustrated and discussed in the framework of setting forth a feasible procedure for monitoring landslide evolution over wide areas.

  15. Coastal cliff geometry derived from structure-from-motion photogrammetry at Stara Ba\\vska, Krk Island, Croatia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ružić, Igor; Marović, Ivan; Benac, Čedomir; Ilić, Suzana

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the capability of structure-from-motion photogrammetry in defining the geometry of cliffs and undercuts in rocks of complex geomorphology. A case site was chosen along pocket beaches near the village of Stara Ba\\vska on the Adriatic Sea island of Krk, Gulf of Kvarner, Croatia, where cliff erosion of 5 m in breccias was identified by comparison of aerial photographs from 1960 and 2004. The 3D point cloud was derived from approx. 800 photos taken on 9 January 2014 by a single camera from various elevations and angles, and processed using the online software ReCap (Autodesk). Data acquisition was found to be quick and the method easy to implement. The difference between the georeferenced 3D cloud points and an RTK-GPS survey was 7 cm, i.e. within the limits of RTK-GPS precision. Quantifying the spatial variation in undercut geometries revealed that the deepest and largest (17 m3) undercut was in the south-eastern sector of the beach. Reconstructing the detailed geomorphology of this 3.8-m-deep undercut convincingly demonstrates the high efficiency of the method. Such assessments of spatiotemporal changes in undercut and overhang volumes can prove useful for evaluations of cliff erosion risk. Coupled with the low cost and relatively simple application, this is evidently an attractive technique for meaningful geotechnical and coastal engineering monitoring in the future on the island of Krk and, for that matter, also on other Adriatic islands and in similar settings worldwide.

  16. Application of Close Range Photogrammetry to Deck Measurement in Recreational Ships

    PubMed Central

    Ordóñez, Celestino; Riveiro, Belén; Arias, Pedro; Armesto, Julia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present results that demonstrate the utility of close range photogrammetry in the measurement of decks in recreational craft as an alternate measurement system to the one based on direct acquisition of coordinates. The areas of deck covered with teakwood for aesthetic or security reasons were measured. Both methods were compared in terms of precision of measurements, time consumption, equipment cost, and ease of manipulation and equipment transportation. Based on the results, we conclude that photogrammetry has advantages in almost every aspect with respect to the direct method. Consequently, photogrammetry is suggested as a suitable method for coordinate measurement of decks in recreational ships. However, in some special circumstances, where ships have wide corridors with few obstacles the direct method can be more appropriate than the photogrammetric method. PMID:22399983

  17. Application of close range photogrammetry to deck measurement in recreational ships.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Celestino; Riveiro, Belén; Arias, Pedro; Armesto, Julia

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present results that demonstrate the utility of close range photogrammetry in the measurement of decks in recreational craft as an alternate measurement system to the one based on direct acquisition of coordinates. The areas of deck covered with teakwood for aesthetic or security reasons were measured. Both methods were compared in terms of precision of measurements, time consumption, equipment cost, and ease of manipulation and equipment transportation. Based on the results, we conclude that photogrammetry has advantages in almost every aspect with respect to the direct method. Consequently, photogrammetry is suggested as a suitable method for coordinate measurement of decks in recreational ships. However, in some special circumstances, where ships have wide corridors with few obstacles the direct method can be more appropriate than the photogrammetric method.

  18. Pathfinder Photogrammetry Research for Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis Roy Miller

    2001-01-01

    The defining characteristic of ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures is that they are both very large and very low mass. This makes standard contacting methods of measurement (e.g. attaching accelerometers) impractical because the dynamics of the structure would be changed by the mass of the contacting instrument. Optical measurements are therefore more appropriate. Photogrammetry is a leading candidate for the optical analysis of gossamer structures because it allows for the measurement of a large number of points, is amenable to time sequences, and offers the potential for a high degree of accuracy. The purpose of this thesis is to develop the methodology and determine the effectiveness of a photogrammetry system in measuring ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures. The results of this thesis will be considered in the design of an automated photogrammetry system for the l6m-diameter vacuum chamber at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  19. Dynamics of aerial target pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, S.

    2015-12-01

    During pursuit and predation, aerial species engage in multitasking behavior that involve simultaneous target detection, tracking, decision-making, approach and capture. The mobility of the pursuer and the target in a three dimensional environment during predation makes the capture task highly complex. Many researchers have studied and analyzed prey capture dynamics in different aerial species such as insects and bats. This article focuses on reviewing the capture strategies adopted by these species while relying on different sensory variables (vision and acoustics) for navigation. In conclusion, the neural basis of these capture strategies and some applications of these strategies in bio-inspired navigation and control of engineered systems are discussed.

  20. Positioning sensor by combining optical projection and photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Benrui

    Six spatial parameters, (x, y, z) for translation, and pitch, roll, and yaw for rotation, are used to describe the 3-dimensional position and orientation of a rigid body---the 6 degrees of freedom (DOF). The ability to measure these parameters is required in a diverse range of applications including machine tool metrology, robot calibration, motion control, motion analysis, and reconstructive surgery. However, there are limitations associated with the currently available measurement systems. Shortcomings include some of the following: short dynamic range, limited accuracy, line of sight restrictions, and capital cost. The objective of this dissertation was to develop a new metrology system that overcomes line of sight restrictions, reduces system costs, allows large dynamic range and has the potential to provide high measurement accuracy. The new metrology system proposed in this dissertation is based on a combination of photogrammetry and optical pattern projection. This system has the potential to enable real-time measurement of a small lightweight module's location. The module generates an optical pattern that is observable on the surrounding walls, and photogrammetry is used to measure the absolute coordinates of features in the projected optical pattern with respect to a defined global coordinate system. By combining these absolute coordinates with the known angular information of the optical projection beams, a minimization algorithm can be used to extract the absolute coordinates and angular orientation of the module itself. The feasibility of the proposed metrology system was first proved through preliminary experimental tests. By using a module with a 7x7 dot matrix pattern, experimental agreement of 1 to 5 parts in 103 was obtained by translating the module over 0.9 m and by rotating it through 60°. The proposed metrology system was modeled through numerical simulations and factors affecting the uncertainty of the measurement were investigated. The

  1. Rotating blade vibration analysis using photogrammetry and tracking laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwashavanhu, Benjamin; Oberholster, Abrie J.; Heyns, P. Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Online structural dynamic analysis of turbomachinery blades is conventionally done using contact techniques such as strain gauges for the collection of data. To transfer the captured data from the sensor to the data logging system, installation of telemetry systems is required. This is usually complicated, time consuming and may introduce electrical noise into the data. In addition, contact techniques are intrusive by definition and can introduce significant local mass loading. This affects the integrity of the captured measurements. Advances in technology now allow for the use of optical non-contact methods to analyse the dynamics of rotating structures. These include photogrammetry and tracking laser Doppler vibrometry (TLDV). Various investigations to establish the integrity of photogrammetry measurements for rotating structures involved a comparison to data captured using accelerometers. Discrepancies that were noticed were attributed to the intrusive nature of the contact measurement technique. As an extended investigation, the presented work focuses on the validation of photogrammetry applied to online turbomachinery blade measurements, using TLDV measurements. Through a frequency based characterisation approach of the dynamics of the two scanning mirrors inside the scanning head of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV), TLDV is employed in developing a system that can be used to achieve a perfect circular scan with a Polytec SLDV, (PSV 300). Photogrammetry out-of-plane displacements of a laser dot focused on a specific point on a rotating blade are compared to displacements captured by the laser scanning system. It is shown that there is good correlation between the two measurement techniques when applied to rotating structures, both in the time and frequency domains. The presence of slight discrepancies between the two techniques after elimination of accelerometer based errors illustrated that the optical system noise floor of photogrammetry does

  2. Applications of structure-from-motion photogrammetry to fluvial geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, James Thomas

    Since 2011, Structure-from-Motion Multi-View Stereo Photogrammetry (SfM or SfM-MVS) has gone from an overlooked computer vision technique to an emerging methodology for collecting low-cost, high spatial resolution three-dimensional data for topographic or surface modeling in many academic fields. This dissertation examines the applications of SfM to the field of fluvial geomorphology. My research objectives for this dissertation were to determine the error and uncertainty that are inherent in SfM datasets, the use of SfM to map and monitor geomorphic change in a small river restoration project, and the use of SfM to map and extract data to examine multi-scale geomorphic patterns for 32 kilometers of the Middle Fork John Day River. SfM provides extremely consistent results, although there are systematic errors that result from certain survey patterns that need to be accounted for in future applications. Monitoring change on small restoration stream channels with SfM gave a more complete spatial perspective than traditional cross sections on small-scale geomorphic change. Helicopter-based SfM was an excellent platform for low-cost, large scale fluvial remote sensing, and the data extracted from the imagery provided multi-scalar perspectives of downstream patterns of channel morphology. This dissertation makes many recommendations for better and more efficient SfM surveys at all of the spatial scales surveyed. By implementing the improvements laid out here and by other authors, SfM will be a powerful tool that will make 3D data collection more accessible to the wider geomorphic community.

  3. Study of Lever-Arm Effect Using Embedded Photogrammetry and On-Board GPS Receiver on Uav for Metrological Mapping Purpose and Proposal of a Free Ground Measurements Calibration Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daakir, M.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Bosser, P.; Pichard, F.; Thom, C.; Rabot, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) on-board photogrammetry knows a significant growth due to the democratization of using drones in the civilian sector. Also, due to changes in regulations laws governing the rules of inclusion of a UAV in the airspace which become suitable for the development of professional activities. Fields of application of photogrammetry are diverse, for instance: architecture, geology, archaeology, mapping, industrial metrology, etc. Our research concerns the latter area. Vinci-Construction- Terrassement is a private company specialized in public earthworks that uses UAVs for metrology applications. This article deals with maximum accuracy one can achieve with a coupled camera and GPS receiver system for direct-georeferencing of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) without relying on Ground Control Points (GCPs) measurements. This article focuses specially on the lever-arm calibration part. This proposed calibration method is based on two steps: a first step involves the proper calibration for each sensor, i.e. to determine the position of the optical center of the camera and the GPS antenna phase center in a local coordinate system relative to the sensor. A second step concerns a 3d modeling of the UAV with embedded sensors through a photogrammetric acquisition. Processing this acquisition allows to determine the value of the lever-arm offset without using GCPs.

  4. Automated photogrammetry for three-dimensional models of urban spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leberl, Franz; Meixner, Philipp; Wendel, Andreas; Irschara, Arnold

    2012-02-01

    The location-aware Internet is inspiring intensive work addressing the automated assembly of three-dimensional models of urban spaces with their buildings, circulation spaces, vegetation, signs, even their above-ground and underground utility lines. Two-dimensional geographic information systems (GISs) and municipal utility information exist and can serve to guide the creation of models being built with aerial, sometimes satellite imagery, streetside images, indoor imaging, and alternatively with light detection and ranging systems (LiDARs) carried on airplanes, cars, or mounted on tripods. We review the results of current research to automate the information extraction from sensor data. We show that aerial photography at ground sampling distances (GSD) of 1 to 10 cm is well suited to provide geometry data about building facades and roofs, that streetside imagery at 0.5 to 2 cm is particularly interesting when it is collected within community photo collections (CPCs) by the general public, and that the transition to digital imaging has opened the no-cost option of highly overlapping images in support of a more complete and thus more economical automation. LiDAR-systems are a widely used source of three-dimensional data, but they deliver information not really superior to digital photography.

  5. Low Cost Surveying Using AN Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, M.; Agüera, F.; Carvajal, F.

    2013-08-01

    Traditional manned airborne surveys are usually expensive and the resolution of the acquired images is often limited. The main advantage of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) system acting as a photogrammetric sensor platform over more traditional manned airborne system is the high flexibility that allows image acquisition from unconventional viewpoints, the low cost in comparison with classical aerial photogrammetry and the high resolution images obtained. Nowadays there is a necessity for surveying small areas and in these cases, it is not economical the use of normal large format aerial or metric cameras to acquire aerial photos, therefore, the use of UAV platforms can be very suitable. Also the large availability of digital cameras has strongly enhanced the capabilities of UAVs. The use of digital non metric cameras together with the UAV could be used for multiple applications such as aerial surveys, GIS, wildfire mapping, stability of landslides, crop monitoring, etc. The aim of this work was to develop a low cost and accurate methodology in the production of orthophotos and Digital Elevation Models (DEM). The study was conducted in the province of Almeria, south of Spain. The photogrammetric flight had an altitude of 50 m over ground, covering an area of 5.000 m2 approximately. The UAV used in this work was the md4-200, which is an electronic battery powered quadrocopter UAV developed by Microdrones GmbH, Germany. It had on-board a Pextax Optio A40 digital non metric camera with 12 Megapixels. It features a 3x optical zoom lens with a focal range covering angles of view equivalent to those of 37-111 mm lens in 35 mm format. The quadrocopter can be programmed to follow a route defined by several waypoints and actions and it has the ability for vertical take off and landing. Proper flight geometry during image acquisition is essential in order to minimize the number of photographs, avoid areas without a good coverage and make the overlaps homogeneous. The flight

  6. Aerial detection surveys in the United States

    Treesearch

    E. W. Johnson; D. Wittwer

    2006-01-01

    Aerial detection surveys, also known as aerial sketchmapping, is a remote sensing technique of observing forest change events from an aircraft and documenting them manually onto a map. Data from aerial surveys have become an important component of the Forest Health Monitoring, a national program designed to determine the status, changes, and trends in indicators of...

  7. 47 CFR 32.2421 - Aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aerial cable. 32.2421 Section 32.2421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2421 Aerial cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of aerial cable and of drop and block wires served by such...

  8. 47 CFR 32.2421 - Aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aerial cable. 32.2421 Section 32.2421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2421 Aerial cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of aerial cable and of drop and block wires served by such...

  9. 47 CFR 32.2421 - Aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aerial cable. 32.2421 Section 32.2421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2421 Aerial cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of aerial cable and of drop and block wires served by such...

  10. 47 CFR 32.2421 - Aerial cable.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aerial cable. 32.2421 Section 32.2421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2421 Aerial cable. (a) This account shall include the original cost of aerial cable and of drop and block wires served by such...

  11. North West Shelf Unmanned Aerial System Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    North West Shelf Unmanned Aerial System Trial Duncan Craig Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Division Defence... Unmanned Aerial System Trial Executive Summary In response to a government policy announcement issued during the lead-up to the 2004...federal election, Defence invited General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Incorporated (GA-ASI) and Northrop Grumman (NG) to participate in an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS

  12. Aerial shows Stennis test stands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-16

    An aerial photo shows the B-1/B-2 Test Stand (foreground), A-2 Test Stand (middle) and A-1 Test Stand (back). The historic stands have been used to test engines used on every manned Apollo and space shuttle mission.

  13. Constructing aerial photo volume tables.

    Treesearch

    Robert B. Pope

    1962-01-01

    Although most foresters are familiar with the use of aerial photo volume tables, little has been written on how to make them. Certain pitfalls in the construction process have either been ignored or only casually mentioned in the existing literature. The forester tackling his first photo volume table is likely to bypass some of the important considerations without...

  14. Reconnaissance mapping from aerial photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeden, H. A.; Bolling, N. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Engineering soil and geology maps were successfully made from Pennsylvania aerial photographs taken at scales from 1:4,800 to 1:60,000. The procedure involved a detailed study of a stereoscopic model while evaluating landform, drainage, erosion, color or gray tones, tone and texture patterns, vegetation, and cultural or land use patterns.

  15. Mapping snow depth in complex alpine terrain with close range aerial imagery - estimating the spatial uncertainties of repeat autonomous aerial surveys over an active rock glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Jason; Marcer, Marco; Bodin, Xavier; Brenning, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Snow depth mapping in open areas using close range aerial imagery is just one of the many cases where developments in structure-from-motion and multi-view-stereo (SfM-MVS) 3D reconstruction techniques have been applied for geosciences - and with good reason. Our ability to increase the spatial resolution and frequency of observations may allow us to improve our understanding of how snow depth distribution varies through space and time. However, to ensure accurate snow depth observations from close range sensing we must adequately characterize the uncertainty related to our measurement techniques. In this study, we explore the spatial uncertainties of snow elevation models for estimation of snow depth in a complex alpine terrain from close range aerial imagery. We accomplish this by conducting repeat autonomous aerial surveys over a snow-covered active-rock glacier located in the French Alps. The imagery obtained from each flight of an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is used to create an individual digital elevation model (DEM) of the snow surface. As result, we obtain multiple DEMs of the snow surface for the same site. These DEMs are obtained from processing the imagery with the photogrammetry software Agisoft Photoscan. The elevation models are also georeferenced within Photoscan using the geotagged imagery from an onboard GNSS in combination with ground targets placed around the rock glacier, which have been surveyed with highly accurate RTK-GNSS equipment. The random error associated with multi-temporal DEMs of the snow surface is estimated from the repeat aerial survey data. The multiple flights are designed to follow the same flight path and altitude above the ground to simulate the optimal conditions of repeat survey of the site, and thus try to estimate the maximum precision associated with our snow-elevation measurement technique. The bias of the DEMs is assessed with RTK-GNSS survey observations of the snow surface elevation of the area on and surrounding

  16. Low aerial imagery - an assessment of georeferencing errors and the potential for use in environmental inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaczyński, Maciej; Medyńska-Gulij, Beata

    2017-06-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles are increasingly being used in close range photogrammetry. Real-time observation of the Earth's surface and the photogrammetric images obtained are used as material for surveying and environmental inventory. The following study was conducted on a small area (approximately 1 ha). In such cases, the classical method of topographic mapping is not accurate enough. The geodetic method of topographic surveying, on the other hand, is an overly precise measurement technique for the purpose of inventorying the natural environment components. The author of the following study has proposed using the unmanned aerial vehicle technology and tying in the obtained images to the control point network established with the aid of GNSS technology. Georeferencing the acquired images and using them to create a photogrammetric model of the studied area enabled the researcher to perform calculations, which yielded a total root mean square error below 9 cm. The performed comparison of the real lengths of the vectors connecting the control points and their lengths calculated on the basis of the photogrammetric model made it possible to fully confirm the RMSE calculated and prove the usefulness of the UAV technology in observing terrain components for the purpose of environmental inventory. Such environmental components include, among others, elements of road infrastructure, green areas, but also changes in the location of moving pedestrians and vehicles, as well as other changes in the natural environment that are not registered on classical base maps or topographic maps.

  17. Assisted Control Point Measurement for Close Range Photogrammetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, E.; Hernandez, M. A.; Cardenal, J.; Perez, J. L.

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the automation and optimization in control points measurement and elaboration of sketches in Close Range Photogrammetry. The system can be controlled by an operator alone and it integrates a robotized and reflectorless total station, two digital cameras, a laptop computer and the control software. The measured data with the station are registered and the control point will get associated to their marks in the images. So, it is possible to eliminate the handmade sketches since the marking of control points in the image is instantaneously made. The sketch includes object images with enlargements so the point is clearly identified and marked with the support of a virtual reticle. Also the sketch includes object coordinates, image coordinates, identification code (ID) and some additional information about the point. The use of the system by only one operator allows the reduction of costs, organization and time in control point surveying. Different tests have been made in order to check the system. TDC: this test has been made in close range conditions with targets and artificial illumination. EDIF: in this case the test includes long range conditions and control points targeted at natural points in building façade. The tests have allowed several analyses to study the feasibility and the improvement of the system. So we have made in situ tests by comparing direct observations with and without the camera telescope, with targets and natural points, close and long distances and different conditions of illumination. Moreover in one of these tests we include the observation and sketch realization with a manual method. With respect to the use of the aiming eyepiece camera, the tests (TDC) realized in laboratory (close distance -4 m- and good light conditions) show very small spatial differences (below the nominal precision of the total station) comparing the direct aim through the telescope without camera. Other test (EDIF) made over longer distance (130

  18. Application of Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry in laboratory flumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jacob A.; Brogan, Daniel J.; Nelson, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry has become widely used for topographic data collection in field and laboratory studies. However, the relative performance of SfM against other methods of topographic measurement in a laboratory flume environment has not been systematically evaluated, and there is a general lack of guidelines for SfM application in flume settings. As the use of SfM in laboratory flume settings becomes more widespread, it is increasingly critical to develop an understanding of how to acquire and process SfM data for a given flume size and sediment characteristics. In this study, we: (1) compare the resolution and accuracy of SfM topographic measurements to terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) measurements in laboratory flumes of varying physical dimensions containing sediments of varying grain sizes; (2) explore the effects of different image acquisition protocols and data processing methods on the resolution and accuracy of topographic data derived from SfM techniques; and (3) provide general guidance for image acquisition and processing for SfM applications in laboratory flumes. To investigate the effects of flume size, sediment size, and photo overlap on the density and accuracy of SfM data, we collected topographic data using both TLS and SfM in five flumes with widths ranging from 0.22 to 6.71 m, lengths ranging from 9.14 to 30.48 m, and median sediment sizes ranging from 0.2 to 31 mm. Acquisition time, image overlap, point density, elevation data, and computed roughness parameters were compared to evaluate the performance of SfM against TLS. We also collected images of a pan of gravel where we varied the distance and angle between the camera and sediment in order to explore how photo acquisition affects the ability to capture grain-scale microtopographic features in SfM-derived point clouds. A variety of image combinations and SfM software package settings were also investigated to determine optimal processing techniques. Results from this

  19. 3D reconstruction of SEM images by use of optical photogrammetry software.

    PubMed

    Eulitz, Mona; Reiss, Gebhard

    2015-08-01

    Reconstruction of the three-dimensional (3D) surface of an object to be examined is widely used for structure analysis in science and many biological questions require information about their true 3D structure. For Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) there has been no efficient non-destructive solution for reconstruction of the surface morphology to date. The well-known method of recording stereo pair images generates a 3D stereoscope reconstruction of a section, but not of the complete sample surface. We present a simple and non-destructive method of 3D surface reconstruction from SEM samples based on the principles of optical close range photogrammetry. In optical close range photogrammetry a series of overlapping photos is used to generate a 3D model of the surface of an object. We adapted this method to the special SEM requirements. Instead of moving a detector around the object, the object itself was rotated. A series of overlapping photos was stitched and converted into a 3D model using the software commonly used for optical photogrammetry. A rabbit kidney glomerulus was used to demonstrate the workflow of this adaption. The reconstruction produced a realistic and high-resolution 3D mesh model of the glomerular surface. The study showed that SEM micrographs are suitable for 3D reconstruction by optical photogrammetry. This new approach is a simple and useful method of 3D surface reconstruction and suitable for various applications in research and teaching. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Photogrammetry and Its Potential Application in Medical Science on the Basis of Selected Literature.

    PubMed

    Ey-Chmielewska, Halina; Chruściel-Nogalska, Małgorzata; Frączak, Bogumiła

    2015-01-01

    Photogrammetry is a science and technology which allows quantitative traits to be determined, i.e. the reproduction of object shapes, sizes and positions on the basis of their photographs. Images can be recorded in a wide range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation. The most common is the visible range, but near- and medium-infrared, thermal infrared, microwaves and X-rays are also used. The importance of photogrammetry has increased with the development of computer software. Digital image processing and real-time measurement have allowed the automation of many complex manufacturing processes. Photogrammetry has been widely used in many areas, especially in geodesy and cartography. In medicine, this method is used for measuring the widely understood human body for the planning and monitoring of therapeutic treatment and its results. Digital images obtained from optical-electronic sensors combined with computer technology have the potential of objective measurement thanks to the remote nature of the data acquisition, with no contact with the measured object and with high accuracy. Photogrammetry also allows the adoption of common standards for archiving and processing patient data.

  1. Combined aerial and terrestrial images for complete 3D documentation of Singosari Temple based on Structure from Motion algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Husnul; Cahyono, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    Singosaritemple is one of cultural heritage building in East Java, Indonesia which was built in 1300s and restorated in 1934-1937. Because of its history and importance, complete documentation of this temple is required. Nowadays with the advent of low cost UAVs combining aerial photography with terrestrial photogrammetry gives more complete data for 3D documentation. This research aims to make complete 3D model of this landmark from aerial and terrestrial photographs with Structure from Motion algorithm. To establish correct scale, position, and orientation, the final 3D model was georeferenced with Ground Control Points in UTM 49S coordinate system. The result shows that all facades, floor, and upper structures can be modeled completely in 3D. In terms of 3D coordinate accuracy, the Root Mean Square Errors (RMSEs) are RMSEx=0,041 m; RMSEy=0,031 m; RMSEz=0,049 m which represent 0.071 m displacement in 3D space. In addition the mean difference of lenght measurements of the object is 0,057 m. With this accuracy, this method can be used to map the site up to 1:237 scale. Although the accuracy level is still in centimeters, the combined aerial and terrestrial photographs with Structure from Motion algorithm can provide complete and visually interesting 3D model.

  2. Photogrammetry in 3d Modelling of Human Bone Structures from Radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinian, S.; Arefi, H.

    2017-05-01

    Photogrammetry can have great impact on the success of medical processes for diagnosis, treatment and surgeries. Precise 3D models which can be achieved by photogrammetry improve considerably the results of orthopedic surgeries and processes. Usual 3D imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have some limitations such as being used only in non-weight-bearing positions, costs and high radiation dose(for CT) and limitations of MRI for patients with ferromagnetic implants or objects in their bodies. 3D reconstruction of bony structures from biplanar X-ray images is a reliable and accepted alternative for achieving accurate 3D information with low dose radiation in weight-bearing positions. The information can be obtained from multi-view radiographs by using photogrammetry. The primary step for 3D reconstruction of human bone structure from medical X-ray images is calibration which is done by applying principles of photogrammetry. After the calibration step, 3D reconstruction can be done using efficient methods with different levels of automation. Because of the different nature of X-ray images from optical images, there are distinct challenges in medical applications for calibration step of stereoradiography. In this paper, after demonstrating the general steps and principles of 3D reconstruction from X-ray images, a comparison will be done on calibration methods for 3D reconstruction from radiographs and they are assessed from photogrammetry point of view by considering various metrics such as their camera models, calibration objects, accuracy, availability, patient-friendly and cost.

  3. Experiment on Uav Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Ict-Integrated Construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Wakutsu, R.; Kato, T.; Wakaizumi, T.; Ooishi, T.; Matsuoka, R.

    2017-08-01

    In the 2016 fiscal year the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism of Japan started a program integrating construction and ICT in earthwork and concrete placing. The new program named "i-Construction" focusing on productivity improvement adopts such new technologies as UAV photogrammetry and TLS. We report a field experiment to investigate whether the procedures of UAV photogrammetry and TLS following the standards for "i-Construction" are feasible or not. In the experiment we measured an embankment of about 80 metres by 160 metres immediately after earthwork was done on the embankment. We used two sets of UAV and camera in the experiment. One is a larger UAV enRoute Zion QC730 and its onboard camera Sony α6000. The other is a smaller UAV DJI Phantom 4 and its dedicated onboard camera. Moreover, we used a terrestrial laser scanner FARO Focus3D X330 based on the phase shift principle. The experiment results indicate that the procedures of UAV photogrammetry using a QC730 with an α6000 and TLS using a Focus3D X330 following the standards for "i-Construction" would be feasible. Furthermore, the experiment results show that UAV photogrammetry using a lower price UAV Phantom 4 was unable to satisfy the accuracy requirement for "i-Construction." The cause of the low accuracy by Phantom 4 is under investigation. We also found that the difference of image resolution on the ground would not have a great influence on the measurement accuracy in UAV photogrammetry.

  4. Aerial Photographs and Satellite Images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Photographs and other images of the Earth taken from the air and from space show a great deal about the planet's landforms, vegetation, and resources. Aerial and satellite images, known as remotely sensed images, permit accurate mapping of land cover and make landscape features understandable on regional, continental, and even global scales. Transient phenomena, such as seasonal vegetation vigor and contaminant discharges, can be studied by comparing images acquired at different times. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which began using aerial photographs for mapping in the 1930's, archives photographs from its mapping projects and from those of some other Federal agencies. In addition, many images from such space programs as Landsat, begun in 1972, are held by the USGS. Most satellite scenes can be obtained only in digital form for use in computer-based image processing and geographic information systems, but in some cases are also available as photographic products.

  5. UAV-Based Photogrammetry and Integrated Technologies for Architectural Applications--Methodological Strategies for the After-Quake Survey of Vertical Structures in Mantua (Italy).

    PubMed

    Achille, Cristiana; Adami, Andrea; Chiarini, Silvia; Cremonesi, Stefano; Fassi, Francesco; Fregonese, Luigi; Taffurelli, Laura

    2015-06-30

    This paper examines the survey of tall buildings in an emergency context like in the case of post-seismic events. The after-earthquake survey has to guarantee time-savings, high precision and security during the operational stages. The main goal is to optimize the application of methodologies based on acquisition and automatic elaborations of photogrammetric data even with the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems in order to provide fast and low cost operations. The suggested methods integrate new technologies with commonly used technologies like TLS and topographic acquisition. The value of the photogrammetric application is demonstrated by a test case, based on the comparison of acquisition, calibration and 3D modeling results in case of use of a laser scanner, metric camera and amateur reflex camera. The test would help us to demonstrate the efficiency of image based methods in the acquisition of complex architecture. The case study is Santa Barbara Bell tower in Mantua. The applied survey solution allows a complete 3D database of the complex architectural structure to be obtained for the extraction of all the information needed for significant intervention. This demonstrates the applicability of the photogrammetry using UAV for the survey of vertical structures, complex buildings and difficult accessible architectural parts, providing high precision results.

  6. UAV-based photogrammetry combination of the elevational outcrop and digital surface models: an example of Sanyi active fault in western Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Cheng-En; Huang, Wen-Jeng; Chang, Ping-Yu; Lo, Wei

    2016-04-01

    An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a digital camera is an efficient tool for geologists to investigate structure patterns in the field. By setting ground control points (GCPs), UAV-based photogrammetry provides high-quality and quantitative results such as a digital surface model (DSM) and orthomosaic and elevational images. We combine the elevational outcrop 3D model and a digital surface model together to analyze the structural characteristics of Sanyi active fault in Houli-Fengyuan area, western Taiwan. Furthermore, we collect resistivity survey profiles and drilling core data in the Fengyuan District in order to build the subsurface fault geometry. The ground sample distance (GSD) of an elevational outcrop 3D model is 3.64 cm/pixel in this study. Our preliminary result shows that 5 fault branches are distributed 500 meters wide on the elevational outcrop and the width of Sanyi fault zone is likely much great than this value. Together with our field observations, we propose a structural evolution model to demonstrate how the 5 fault branches developed. The resistivity survey profiles show that Holocene gravel was disturbed by the Sanyi fault in Fengyuan area.

  7. UAV-Based Photogrammetry and Integrated Technologies for Architectural Applications—Methodological Strategies for the After-Quake Survey of Vertical Structures in Mantua (Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Achille, Cristiana; Adami, Andrea; Chiarini, Silvia; Cremonesi, Stefano; Fassi, Francesco; Fregonese, Luigi; Taffurelli, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the survey of tall buildings in an emergency context like in the case of post-seismic events. The after-earthquake survey has to guarantee time-savings, high precision and security during the operational stages. The main goal is to optimize the application of methodologies based on acquisition and automatic elaborations of photogrammetric data even with the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems in order to provide fast and low cost operations. The suggested methods integrate new technologies with commonly used technologies like TLS and topographic acquisition. The value of the photogrammetric application is demonstrated by a test case, based on the comparison of acquisition, calibration and 3D modeling results in case of use of a laser scanner, metric camera and amateur reflex camera. The test would help us to demonstrate the efficiency of image based methods in the acquisition of complex architecture. The case study is Santa Barbara Bell tower in Mantua. The applied survey solution allows a complete 3D database of the complex architectural structure to be obtained for the extraction of all the information needed for significant intervention. This demonstrates the applicability of the photogrammetry using UAV for the survey of vertical structures, complex buildings and difficult accessible architectural parts, providing high precision results. PMID:26134108

  8. Aerial robotic data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Pendergast, M.M.; Corban, J.E.

    1993-12-31

    A small, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), equipped with sensors for physical and chemical measurements of remote environments, is described. A miniature helicopter airframe is used as a platform for sensor testing and development. The sensor output is integrated with the flight control system for real-time, interactive, data acquisition and analysis. Pre-programmed flight missions will be flown with several sensors to demonstrate the cost-effective surveillance capabilities of this new technology.

  9. Aerial Interdiction of WMD Shipments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    interdiction near Alaska with russian tu–95 U .S . A ir Fo rc e Download as wallpaper at ndupress.ndu.edu JFQ44[text].indd 34 11/27/06 10:34:17...Download as wallpaper at ndupress.ndu.edu JFQ44[text].indd 37 11/27/06 10:34:24 AM Aerial Interdiction not been widely publicized.21 The doctrine

  10. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr.

    2002-10-01

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration.

  11. Detection of Tree Crowns Based on Reclassification Using Aerial Images and LIDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, S.; Zarea, A.; Sadeghian, S.; Arefi, H.

    2013-09-01

    Tree detection using aerial sensors in early decades was focused by many researchers in different fields including Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry. This paper is intended to detect trees in complex city areas using aerial imagery and laser scanning data. Our methodology is a hierarchal unsupervised method consists of some primitive operations. This method could be divided into three sections, in which, first section uses aerial imagery and both second and third sections use laser scanners data. In the first section a vegetation cover mask is created in both sunny and shadowed areas. In the second section Rate of Slope Change (RSC) is used to eliminate grasses. In the third section a Digital Terrain Model (DTM) is obtained from LiDAR data. By using DTM and Digital Surface Model (DSM) we would get to Normalized Digital Surface Model (nDSM). Then objects which are lower than a specific height are eliminated. Now there are three result layers from three sections. At the end multiplication operation is used to get final result layer. This layer will be smoothed by morphological operations. The result layer is sent to WG III/4 to evaluate. The evaluation result shows that our method has a good rank in comparing to other participants' methods in ISPRS WG III/4, when assessed in terms of 5 indices including area base completeness, area base correctness, object base completeness, object base correctness and boundary RMS. With regarding of being unsupervised and automatic, this method is improvable and could be integrate with other methods to get best results.

  12. D Modeling of Historical Doger Caravansaries by Digital Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakar, M.; Uysal, M.; Toprak, A. S.; Polat, N.

    2013-07-01

    Caravansaries are sort of bigger khan that established on the busy trade roads to provide any kind of supplies but essentially all Caravansaries on Anatolia are established for caravans' accommodations which are passing through on caravan rout. After the Turks had chosen being Muslim, the land that Islam religion spread on it has expanded. As a result of this expansion it is required a safe route for trade caravans. During the ruling time of Seljuk's Empire, Caravansaries took the most advanced form. Sultans of the Seljuk's Empire were aware of importance of trade and economy. That's why they established Caravansaries near marines, between the important trade centers and on Anatolian lands which is a bridge between East and West. But these trade routes has changed at the time of Ottoman Empire. Many of the historical places in the world have been totally or partly destroyed by natural events and human activities such as earthquake, flood and fire until the present day and still going on. Documentation is essentially required for protection and restoration these historical places and photogrammetry is one of the most effective method for documentation of cultural heritages. In this study, it is aimed to get 3D models of Doger Caravansaries which is established in Afyonkarahisar for relief and advertising. Doger Caravansaries was built in 15. Century at Sultan II Murat eras but the exact date of building is not known. The structure has rectangular plan in width. The total length of it is 56.50 in meters. The Caravansaries is consisting of attached two parts. The first part has two floors. There are pointed arched niches in the two sides of the wall and there are windows (iron barred) in the middle of the each niche. The door is fillet low arched. First floor rises on four elephant foot columns and ten other small columns. Short sides are covered by two each cross squinch and the other parts with barrel vault. There is a ladder with only ten remain levels opposite the

  13. Ground and Aerial Digital Documentation of Cultural Heritage: Providing Tools for 3d Exploitation of Archaeological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoro, G.

    2017-02-01

    Archaeology is by its nature strictly connected with the physical landscape and as such it explores the inter-relations of individuals with places in which they leave and the nature that surrounds them. Since its earliest stages, archaeology demonstrated its permeability to scientific methods and innovative techniques or technologies. Archaeologists were indeed between the first to adopt GIS platforms (since already almost three decades) on large scale and are now between the most demanding customers for emerging technologies such as digital photogrammetry and drone-aided aerial photography. This paper aims at presenting case studies where the "3D approach" can be critically analysed and compared with more traditional means of documentation. Spot-light is directed towards the benefits of a specifically designed platform for user to access the 3D point-clouds and explore their characteristics. Beside simple measuring and editing tools, models are presented in their actual context and location, with historical and archaeological information provided on the side. As final step of a parallel project on geo-referencing and making available a large archive of aerial photographs, 3D models derived from photogrammetric processing of images have been uploaded and linked to photo-footprints polygons. Of great importance in such context is the possibility to interchange the point-cloud colours with satellite imagery from OpenLayers. This approach makes it possible to explore different landscape configurations due to time-changes with simple clicks. In these cases, photogrammetry or 3D laser scanning replaced, sided or integrated legacy documentation, creating at once a new set of information for forthcoming research and ideally new discoveries.

  14. Spatial Feature Evaluation for Aerial Scene Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Swearingen, Thomas S; Cheriyadat, Anil M

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution aerial images are becoming more readily available, which drives the demand for robust, intelligent and efficient systems to process increasingly large amounts of image data. However, automated image interpretation still remains a challenging problem. Robust techniques to extract and represent features to uniquely characterize various aerial scene categories is key for automated image analysis. In this paper we examined the role of spatial features to uniquely characterize various aerial scene categories. We studied low-level features such as colors, edge orientations, and textures, and examined their local spatial arrangements. We computed correlograms representing the spatial correlation of features at various distances, then measured the distance between correlograms to identify similar scenes. We evaluated the proposed technique on several aerial image databases containing challenging aerial scene categories. We report detailed evaluation of various low-level features by quantitatively measuring accuracy and parameter sensitivity. To demonstrate the feature performance, we present a simple query-based aerial scene retrieval system.

  15. UAV Photogrammetry Implementation to Enhance Land Surveying, Comparisons and Possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Meouche, R.; Hijazi, I.; Poncet, P. A.; Abunemeh, M.; Rezoug, M.

    2016-10-01

    The use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for surveying is now widespread and operational for several applications - quarry monitoring, archeological site surveys, forest management and 3D modeling for buildings, for instance. UAV is increasingly used by land surveyors especially for those kinds of projects. It is still ambiguous whether UAV can be applicable for smaller sites and property division. Therefore, the objective of this research is to extract a vectorized plan utilizing a UAV for a small site and investigate the possibility of an official land surveyor exploiting and certificating it. To do that, two plans were created, one using a UAV and another utilizing classical land surveyor instruments (Total Station). A comparison was conducted between the two plans to evaluate the accuracy of the UAV technique compared to the classical one. Moreover, other parameters were also considered such as execution time and the surface covered. The main problems associated with using a UAV are the level of precision and the visualization of the whole area. The results indicated that the precision is quite satisfactory with a maximum error of 1.0 cm on ground control points, and 4 cm for the rest of the model. On the other hand, the results showed that it is not possible to represent the whole area of interest utilizing a UAV, due to vegetation.

  16. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Master Plan, 1993.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    PHOTOGRAPH THIS SHEET AND RETURN To DTIC-FDAC DTIC 70A DOCUMENT PROCESSMING I~ SlEW -, mmllamm LOAN DOCUMENT DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAV...11 B. Program Executive Officer for Cruise Missiles 3 and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (PEO[CU...69 I ! I I ivI -- UAV 1993 MASTER PLAN U I EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3 A. OVERVIEW Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)* can make significant

  17. Twenty-First-Century Aerial Mining

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Views March–April 2015 Air & Space Power Journal | 129 Twenty-First-Century Aerial Mining Col Michael W. Pietrucha, USAFR On 23 September 2014, a B...52H bomber at high altitude north of Guam accomplished an aviation first—the release of a winged, precision aerial mine (fig. 1). The inert, orange...settled to the bottom to lie in wait for a target. This effort marked the first advance in aerial mine - delivery techniques since 1943 and demonstrated

  18. 3D Modelling of Inaccessible Areas using UAV-based Aerial Photography and Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obanawa, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Yuichi; Gomez, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    In hardly accessible areas, the collection of 3D point-clouds using TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) can be very challenging, while airborne equivalent would not give a correct account of subvertical features and concave geometries like caves. To solve such problem, the authors have experimented an aerial photography based SfM (Structure from Motion) technique on a 'peninsular-rock' surrounded on three sides by the sea at a Pacific coast in eastern Japan. The research was carried out using UAS (Unmanned Aerial System) combined with a commercial small UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) carrying a compact camera. The UAV is a DJI PHANTOM: the UAV has four rotors (quadcopter), it has a weight of 1000 g, a payload of 400 g and a maximum flight time of 15 minutes. The camera is a GoPro 'HERO3 Black Edition': resolution 12 million pixels; weight 74 g; and 0.5 sec. interval-shot. The 3D model has been constructed by digital photogrammetry using a commercial SfM software, Agisoft PhotoScan Professional®, which can generate sparse and dense point-clouds, from which polygonal models and orthophotographs can be calculated. Using the 'flight-log' and/or GCPs (Ground Control Points), the software can generate digital surface model. As a result, high-resolution aerial orthophotographs and a 3D model were obtained. The results have shown that it was possible to survey the sea cliff and the wave cut-bench, which are unobservable from land side. In details, we could observe the complexity of the sea cliff that is nearly vertical as a whole while slightly overhanging over the thinner base. The wave cut bench is nearly flat and develops extensively at the base of the cliff. Although there are some evidences of small rockfalls at the upper part of the cliff, there is no evidence of very recent activity, because no fallen rock exists on the wave cut bench. This system has several merits: firstly lower cost than the existing measuring methods such as manned-flight survey and aerial laser

  19. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) associated DTM quality evaluation and hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jen; Chen, Shao-Der; Chao, Yu-Jui; Chiang, Yi-Lin; Chang, Kuo-Jen

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan, due to the high seismicity and high annual rainfall, numerous landslides triggered every year and severe impacts affect the island. Concerning to the catastrophic landslides, the key information of landslide, including range of landslide, volume estimation and the subsequent evolution are important when analyzing the triggering mechanism, hazard assessment and mitigation. Thus, the morphological analysis gives a general overview for the landslides and been considered as one of the most fundamental information. We try to integrate several technologies, especially by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and multi-spectral camera, to decipher the consequence and the potential hazard, and the social impact. In recent years, the remote sensing technology improves rapidly, providing a wide range of image, essential and precious information. Benefited of the advancing of informatics, remote-sensing and electric technologies, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry mas been improve significantly. The study tries to integrate several methods, including, 1) Remote-sensing images gathered by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and by aerial photos taken in different periods; 2) field in-situ geologic investigation; 3) Differential GPS, RTK GPS and Ground LiDAR field in-site geoinfomatics measurements; 4) Construct the DTMs before and after landslide, as well as the subsequent periods using UAV and aerial photos; 5) Discrete element method should be applied to understand the geomaterial composing the slope failure, for predicting earthquake-induced and rainfall-induced landslides displacement. First at all, we evaluate the Microdrones MD4-1000 UAV airphotos derived Digital Terrain Model (DTM). The ground resolution of the DSM point cloud of could be as high as 10 cm. By integrated 4 ground control point within an area of 56 hectares, compared with LiDAR DSM and filed RTK-GPS surveying, the mean error is as low as 6cm with a standard deviation of 17cm. The quality of the

  20. Structural modelling of thrust zones utilizing photogrammetry: Western Champsaur basin, SE France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totake, Yukitsugu; Butler, Rob; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in photogrammetric technologies allow geoscientists to easily obtain a high-resolution 3D geospatial data across multiple scales, from rock specimen to landscape. Although resolution and accuracy of photogrammetry models are dependent on various factors (a quality of photography, number of overlapping photo images, distance to targets, etc), modern photogrammetry techniques can even provide a comparable data resolution to laser scanning technologies (< ~1cm resolution) if conditions are complete. Such high-resolution datasets enable to perform accurate and detailed mapping or modelling of various geological objects. Another advantages of photogrammetry techniques, high portability and low costs for infrastructures, ease to incorporate these techniques with conventional geological surveys. Photogrammetry techniques have a great potential to enhance performances of geological surveys. We present a workflow for building basin-scale 3D structural models utilizing the ground-based photogrammetry along with field observations. The workflow is applied to model thrust zones in Eocene-Oligocene turbidite sequences called Champsaur Sandstone (Gres du Champsaur) filling an Alpine fore-deep basin, Western Champsaur basin, in southeastern France. The study area is located ca. 20km northeast from Gap, and approximately extends 10 km from east to west and 6 km from north to south. During a 2-week fieldwork, over 9400 photographs were taken at 133 locations by a handheld digital camera from ground, and were georeferenced with a handheld GPS. Photo images were processed within software PhotoScan to build a 3D photogrammetric model. The constructed photogrammetry model was then imported into software Move to map faults and geological layers along with georeferenced field data so that geological cross sections and 3D surfaces are produced. The workflow succeeded to produce a detailed topography and textures of landscape at ~1m resolution, and enabled to characterize

  1. On the Quality of Point-Clouds Derived from Sfm-Photogrammetry Applied to UAS Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonneau, P.; James, T.

    2014-12-01

    Structure from Motion photogrammetry (SfM-photogrammetry) recently appeared in environmental sciences as an impressive tool allowing for the creation of topographic data from unstructured imagery. Several authors have tested the performance of SfM-photogrammetry vs that of TLS or dGPS. Whilst the initial results were very promising, there is currently a growing awareness that systematic deformations occur in DEMs and point-clouds derived from SfM-photogrammetry. Notably, some authors have identified a systematic doming manifest as an increasing error vs distance to the model centre. Simulation studies have confirmed that this error is due to errors in the calibration of camera distortions. This work aims to further investigate these effects in the presence of real data. We start with a dataset of 220 images acquired from a sUAS. After obtaining an initial self-calibration of the camera lens with Agisoft Photoscan, our method consists in applying systematic perturbations to 2 key lens parameters: Focal length and the k1 distortion parameter. For each perturbation, a point-cloud was produced and compared to LiDAR data. After deriving the mean and standard deviation of the error residuals (ɛ), a 2nd order polynomial surface was fitted to the errors point-cloud and the peak ɛ defined as the mathematical extrema of this surface. The results are presented in figure 1. This figure shows that lens perturbations can induce a range of errors with systematic behaviours. Peak ɛ is primarily controlled by K1 with a secondary control exerted by the focal length. These results allow us to state that: To limit the peak ɛ to 10cm, the K1 parameter must be calibrated to within 0.00025 and the focal length to within 2.5 pixels (≈10 µm). This level of calibration accuracy can only be achieved with proper design of image acquisition and control network geometry. Our main point is therefore that SfM is not a bypass to a rigorous and well-informed photogrammetric approach. Users

  2. Three-Dimensional Mapping of AN Ancient Cave Paintings Using Close-Range Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Z.; Ariff, M. F. M.; Idris, K. M.; Yusoff, A. R.; Idris, K. M.; Aspuri, A.; Abbas, M. A.; Zainuddin, K.; Ghani, A. R. A.; Saeman, A. A. Bin

    2017-02-01

    The paper describes the used of close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning technologies as an innovative technology for acquiring the three-dimensional data of an ancient cave paintings. The close-range photogrammetry technology used in the research was divided in two categories which are the UAV-based close-range photogrammetry and the terrestrialbased close-range photogrammetry. The UAV-based technology involved with the used of calibrated Phantom 4 System while the terrestrial-based technology involved with the calibrated Sony F828 digital camera and pPhotoModeler software. Both stereo and convergent image acquisition techniques were used to acquire the images of the paintings. The ancient cave paintings were also recorded using terrestrial laser scanning technology. In the research, the FARO Focus 3D terrestrial laser scanner was used to capture the three-dimensional point clouds and images of the paintings. The finding shows that both close-range photogrammetry and laser scanning technologies provide excellent solutions to map and to record the ancient paintings. As compared to the conventional method, both close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning technology provide a noncontact solution for data acquisition and the data was recorded in digital format for better protection and security.

  3. 28. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in U.S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in U.S. Forest Service, Toiyabe National Forest, Carson District Office). AERIAL VIEW OF THE CENTRAL SECTION OF THE KINGS CANYON ROAD SEGMENT, 1993. - Kings Canyon Road, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  4. 29. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in U.S. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of aerial photograph (original aerial located in U.S. Forest Service, Toiyabe National Forest, Carson District Office). AERIAL VIEW OF THE EASTERN END OF THE KINGS CANYON ROAD SEGMENT, 1993. - Kings Canyon Road, Carson City, Carson City, NV

  5. Using UAS optical imagery and SfM photogrammetry to characterize the surface grain size of gravel bars in a braided river (Vénéon River, French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Tarrío, Daniel; Borgniet, Laurent; Liébault, Frédéric; Recking, Alain

    2017-05-01

    This paper explores the potential of unmanned aerial system (UAS) optical aerial imagery to characterize grain roughness and size distribution in a braided, gravel-bed river (Vénéon River, French Alps). With this aim in view, a Wolman field campaign (19 samples) and five UAS surveys were conducted over the Vénéon braided channel during summer 2015. The UAS consisted of a small quadcopter carrying a GoPro camera. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry was used to extract dense and accurate three-dimensional point clouds. Roughness descriptors (roughness heights, standard deviation of elevation) were computed from the SfM point clouds and were correlated with the median grain size of the Wolman samples. A strong relationship was found between UAS-SfM-derived grain roughness and Wolman grain size. The procedure employed has potential for the rapid and continuous characterization of grain size distribution in exposed bars of gravel-bed rivers. The workflow described in this paper has been successfully used to produce spatially continuous grain size information on exposed gravel bars and to explore textural changes following flow events.

  6. A Spherical Aerial Terrestrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Christopher J.

    This thesis focuses on the design of a novel, ultra-lightweight spherical aerial terrestrial robot (ATR). The ATR has the ability to fly through the air or roll on the ground, for applications that include search and rescue, mapping, surveillance, environmental sensing, and entertainment. The design centers around a micro-quadcopter encased in a lightweight spherical exoskeleton that can rotate about the quadcopter. The spherical exoskeleton offers agile ground locomotion while maintaining characteristics of a basic aerial robot in flying mode. A model of the system dynamics for both modes of locomotion is presented and utilized in simulations to generate potential trajectories for aerial and terrestrial locomotion. Details of the quadcopter and exoskeleton design and fabrication are discussed, including the robot's turning characteristic over ground and the spring-steel exoskeleton with carbon fiber axle. The capabilities of the ATR are experimentally tested and are in good agreement with model-simulated performance. An energy analysis is presented to validate the overall efficiency of the robot in both modes of locomotion. Experimentally-supported estimates show that the ATR can roll along the ground for over 12 minutes and cover the distance of 1.7 km, or it can fly for 4.82 minutes and travel 469 m, on a single 350 mAh battery. Compared to a traditional flying-only robot, the ATR traveling over the same distance in rolling mode is 2.63-times more efficient, and in flying mode the system is only 39 percent less efficient. Experimental results also demonstrate the ATR's transition from rolling to flying mode.

  7. Ice-cored moraine degradation mapped and quantified using an unmanned aerial vehicle: A case study from a polythermal glacier in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonkin, T. N.; Midgley, N. G.; Cook, S. J.; Graham, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    Ice-cored lateral-frontal moraines are common at the margins of receding high-Arctic valley glaciers, but the preservation potential of these features within the landform record is unclear. Recent climatic amelioration provides an opportunity to study the morphological evolution of these landforms as they de-ice. This is important because high-Arctic glacial landsystems have been used as analogues for formerly glaciated areas in the mid-latitudes. This study uses SfM (Structure-from-Motion) photogrammetry and a combination of archive aerial and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) derived imagery to investigate the degradation of an ice-cored lateral-frontal moraine at Austre Lovénbreen, Svalbard. Across the study area as a whole, over an 11-year period, the average depth of surface lowering was - 1.75 ± 0.89 m. The frontal sections of the moraine showed low or undetectable rates of change. Spatially variable rates of surface lowering are associated with differences in the quantity of buried ice within the structure of the moraine. Morphological change was dominated by surface lowering, with limited field evidence of degradation via back-wastage. This permits the moraine a greater degree of stability than previously observed at other sites in Svalbard. It is unclear whether the end point will be a fully stabilised ice-cored moraine, in equilibrium with its environment, or an ice-free lateral-frontal moraine complex. Controls on geomorphological change (e.g. topography and climate) and the preservation potential of the lateral-frontal moraine are discussed. The methods used by this research also demonstrate the potential value of SfM photogrammetry and unmanned aerial vehicles for monitoring environmental change and are likely to have wider applications in other geoscientific sub-disciplines.

  8. Unmanned aerial vehicles in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondi, Federico; Magrin, Demetrio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Greggio, Davide; Dima, Marco; Gullieuszik, Marco; Bergomi, Maria; Carolo, Elena; Marafatto, Luca; Portaluri, Elisa

    2016-07-01

    In this work we discuss some options for using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for daylight alignment activities and maintenance of optical telescopes, relating them to a small numbers of parameters, and tracing which could be the schemes, requirements and benefits for employing them both at the stage of erection and maintenance. UAVs can easily reach the auto-collimation points of optical components of the next class of Extremely Large Telescopes. They can be equipped with tools for the measurement of the co-phasing, scattering, and reflectivity of segmented mirrors or environmental parameters like C2n and C2T to characterize the seeing during both the day and the night.

  9. Point Cloud Generation from Aerial Image Data Acquired by a Quadrocopter Type Micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Digital Still Camera

    PubMed Central

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems’ SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft®’s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation. PMID:22368479

  10. Point cloud generation from aerial image data acquired by a quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle and a digital still camera.

    PubMed

    Rosnell, Tomi; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop and investigate methods for point cloud generation by image matching using aerial image data collected by quadrocopter type micro unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging systems. Automatic generation of high-quality, dense point clouds from digital images by image matching is a recent, cutting-edge step forward in digital photogrammetric technology. The major components of the system for point cloud generation are a UAV imaging system, an image data collection process using high image overlaps, and post-processing with image orientation and point cloud generation. Two post-processing approaches were developed: one of the methods is based on Bae Systems' SOCET SET classical commercial photogrammetric software and another is built using Microsoft(®)'s Photosynth™ service available in the Internet. Empirical testing was carried out in two test areas. Photosynth processing showed that it is possible to orient the images and generate point clouds fully automatically without any a priori orientation information or interactive work. The photogrammetric processing line provided dense and accurate point clouds that followed the theoretical principles of photogrammetry, but also some artifacts were detected. The point clouds from the Photosynth processing were sparser and noisier, which is to a large extent due to the fact that the method is not optimized for dense point cloud generation. Careful photogrammetric processing with self-calibration is required to achieve the highest accuracy. Our results demonstrate the high performance potential of the approach and that with rigorous processing it is possible to reach results that are consistent with theory. We also point out several further research topics. Based on theoretical and empirical results, we give recommendations for properties of imaging sensor, data collection and processing of UAV image data to ensure accurate point cloud generation.

  11. Photogrammetry System and Method for Determining Relative Motion Between Two Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Samuel A. (Inventor); Severance, Kurt (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A photogrammetry system and method provide for determining the relative position between two objects. The system utilizes one or more imaging devices, such as high speed cameras, that are mounted on a first body, and three or more photogrammetry targets of a known location on a second body. The system and method can be utilized with cameras having fish-eye, hyperbolic, omnidirectional, or other lenses. The system and method do not require overlapping fields-of-view if two or more cameras are utilized. The system and method derive relative orientation by equally weighting information from an arbitrary number of heterogeneous cameras, all with non-overlapping fields-of-view. Furthermore, the system can make the measurements with arbitrary wide-angle lenses on the cameras.

  12. Single Image Camera Calibration in Close Range Photogrammetry for Solder Joint Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, D.; Knabner, S.; Baumgarten, D.

    2016-06-01

    Printed Circuit Boards (PCB) play an important role in the manufacturing of electronic devices. To ensure a correct function of the PCBs a certain amount of solder paste is needed during the placement of components. The aim of the current research is to develop an real-time, closed-loop solution for the analysis of the printing process where solder is printed onto PCBs. Close range photogrammetry allows for determination of the solder volume and a subsequent correction if necessary. Photogrammetry is an image based method for three dimensional reconstruction from two dimensional image data of an object. A precise camera calibration is indispensable for an accurate reconstruction. In our certain application it is not possible to use calibration methods with two dimensional calibration targets. Therefore a special calibration target was developed and manufactured, which allows for single image camera calibration.

  13. Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry Methods Development for Solar Sail Structures. Masters Thesis awarded by George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S. (Technical Monitor); Black, Jonathan T.

    2003-01-01

    This report discusses the development and application of metrology methods called photogrammetry and videogrammetry that make accurate measurements from photographs. These methods have been adapted for the static and dynamic characterization of gossamer structures, as four specific solar sail applications demonstrate. The applications prove that high-resolution, full-field, non-contact static measurements of solar sails using dot projection photogrammetry are possible as well as full-field, non-contact, dynamic characterization using dot projection videogrammetry. The accuracy of the measurement of the resonant frequencies and operating deflection shapes that were extracted surpassed expectations. While other non-contact measurement methods exist, they are not full-field and require significantly more time to take data.

  14. Application of Composite Small Calibration Objects in Traffic Accident Scene Photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Xu, Hongguo; Tan, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In order to address the difficulty of arranging large calibration objects and the low measurement accuracy of small calibration objects in traffic accident scene photogrammetry, a photogrammetric method based on a composite of small calibration objects is proposed. Several small calibration objects are placed around the traffic accident scene, and the coordinate system of the composite calibration object is given based on one of them. By maintaining the relative position and coplanar relationship of the small calibration objects, the local coordinate system of each small calibration object is transformed into the coordinate system of the composite calibration object. The two-dimensional direct linear transformation method is improved based on minimizing the reprojection error of the calibration points of all objects. A rectified image is obtained using the nonlinear optimization method. The increased accuracy of traffic accident scene photogrammetry using a composite small calibration object is demonstrated through the analysis of field experiments and case studies. PMID:26011052

  15. Experimental comparison of photogrammetry for additive manufactured parts with and without laser speckle projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims-Waterhouse, D.; Bointon, P.; Piano, S.; Leach, R. K.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we show that, by using a photogrammetry system with and without laser speckle, a large range of additive manufacturing (AM) parts with different geometries, materials and post-processing textures can be measured to high accuracy. AM test artefacts have been produced in three materials: polymer powder bed fusion (nylon-12), metal powder bed fusion (Ti-6Al-4V) and polymer material extrusion (ABS plastic). Each test artefact was then measured with the photogrammetry system in both normal and laser speckle projection modes and the resulting point clouds compared with the artefact CAD model. The results show that laser speckle projection can result in a reduction of the point cloud standard deviation from the CAD data of up to 101 μm. A complex relationship with surface texture, artefact geometry and the laser speckle projection is also observed and discussed.

  16. Application of composite small calibration objects in traffic accident scene photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Xu, Hongguo; Tan, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In order to address the difficulty of arranging large calibration objects and the low measurement accuracy of small calibration objects in traffic accident scene photogrammetry, a photogrammetric method based on a composite of small calibration objects is proposed. Several small calibration objects are placed around the traffic accident scene, and the coordinate system of the composite calibration object is given based on one of them. By maintaining the relative position and coplanar relationship of the small calibration objects, the local coordinate system of each small calibration object is transformed into the coordinate system of the composite calibration object. The two-dimensional direct linear transformation method is improved based on minimizing the reprojection error of the calibration points of all objects. A rectified image is obtained using the nonlinear optimization method. The increased accuracy of traffic accident scene photogrammetry using a composite small calibration object is demonstrated through the analysis of field experiments and case studies.

  17. Method for Correcting Control Surface Angle Measurements in Single Viewpoint Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, Alpheus W. (Inventor); Barrows, Danny A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method of determining a corrected control surface angle for use in single viewpoint photogrammetry to correct control surface angle measurements affected by wing bending. First and second visual targets are spaced apart &om one another on a control surface of an aircraft wing. The targets are positioned at a semispan distance along the aircraft wing. A reference target separation distance is determined using single viewpoint photogrammetry for a "wind off condition. An apparent target separation distance is then computed for "wind on." The difference between the reference and apparent target separation distances is minimized by recomputing the single viewpoint photogrammetric solution for incrementally changed values of target semispan distances. A final single viewpoint photogrammetric solution is then generated that uses the corrected semispan distance that produced the minimized difference between the reference and apparent target separation distances. The final single viewpoint photogrammetric solution set is used to determine the corrected control surface angle.

  18. Assessment of engineered surfaces roughness by high-resolution 3D SEM photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Gontard, L C; López-Castro, J D; González-Rovira, L; Vázquez-Martínez, J M; Varela-Feria, F M; Marcos, M; Calvino, J J

    2017-06-01

    We describe a methodology to obtain three-dimensional models of engineered surfaces using scanning electron microscopy and multi-view photogrammetry (3DSEM). For the reconstruction of the 3D models of the surfaces we used freeware available in the cloud. The method was applied to study the surface roughness of metallic samples patterned with parallel grooves by means of laser. The results are compared with measurements obtained using stylus profilometry (PR) and SEM stereo-photogrammetry (SP). The application of 3DSEM is more time demanding than PR or SP, but it provides a more accurate representation of the surfaces. The results obtained with the three techniques are compared by investigating the influence of sampling step on roughness parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Recent Deglaciation of Darwin Mountains (Tierra de Fuego) after Little Ice Age: monitoring by photogrammetry, lichenometry, dendrochronology and field studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Sancho, L.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Green, A.; Vivas, M.; Pintado, A.

    2012-04-01

    Glaciers from the Darwin mountain range have been retreating since the Little Ice Age (LIA). However, the amount of retreat varies and is minimal for some glacial snouts and substantial for others. Possible explanations for this different behaviour include climatic and glacial dynamic causes. The aim of this work was to analyse the impact of climate change on these glaciers. The research site was the terminus of glacier Pia, which descends to the south of Mount Darwin (2488 m asl, 54°45'S, 69°29'W) and reaches the coastline at the Beagle Channel. The terminus is situated some hundreds of meters above the LIA moraine but, whereas one sector retreated rapidly and then stabilized, another sector has had several advances and retreats leaving a number of moraine arches. To better understand the origin of this dynamic behaviour, we undertook a study of the evolution of the terminus of glacier Pia over the last 60 years. We used aerial photographs and satellite images to determine the exact location of the glacial terminus in certain years (1943, 1963, 1987, 1990, 2001 and 2006). These results were completed in 2008 and 2009 through field work. We also carried out lichenometric studies of the two most abundant lichen species that rapidly colonize the moraine boulders abandoned by the glacier: Placopsis perrugosa and Rhizocarpon geographicum. By comparing results from field work carried out in 2008 and 2009, we were able to determine the growth rate of these two species (García-Sancho et al. 2011). In addition, we also carried out a dendrochronological study of Nothofagus antarctica and N. betuloides. The use of the four techniques involved in this study (photogrammetry, lichenometry, dendrochronology and multiyear field work) allowed us to establish the ecesis period of each species as well as their growth curves, from which we can deduce the movements of the glacial terminus from the end of the LIA to the present. From this study we can infer that the different

  20. 3-D uncertainty-based topographic change detection with structure-from-motion photogrammetry and precision maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.; Robson, Stuart; Smith, Mark W.

    2017-04-01

    Structure-from-motion (SfM) software greatly facilitates the generation of 3-D surface models from photographs, but doesn't provide the detailed error metrics that are characteristic of rigorous photogrammetry. Here, we present a novel approach to generate maps of 3-D survey precision which describe the spatial variability in 3-D photogrammetric and georeferencing precision across surveys. Such maps then enable confidence-bounded quantification of 3-D topographic change that, for the first time, specifically account for the precision characteristics of photo-based surveys. Precision maps for surveys georeferenced either directly using camera positions or by ground control, illustrate the spatial variability in precision that is associated with the relative influences of photogrammetric (e.g. image network geometry, tie point quality) and georeferencing considerations. For common SfM-based software (which does not provide precision estimates directly), precision maps can be generated using a Monte Carlo procedure. Confidence-bounded full 3-D change detection between repeat surveys with associated precision maps, is then derived through adapting a state-of-the-art point-cloud comparison (M3C2; Lague, et al., 2013). We demonstrate the approach using annual aerial SfM surveys of an eroding badland, benchmarked against TLS data for validation. 3-D precision maps enable more probable erosion patterns to be identified than existing analyses. If precision is limited by weak georeferencing (e.g. using direct georeferencing with camera positions of multi-metre precision, such as from a consumer UAV), then overall survey precision scales as n-1 /2 of the control precision (n = number of images). However, direct georeferencing results from SfM software (PhotoScan) were not consistent with those from rigorous photogrammetric analysis. Our method not only enables confidence-bounded 3-D change detection and uncertainty-based DEM processing, but also provides covariance

  1. Aerial Images from AN Uav System: 3d Modeling and Tree Species Classification in a Park Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gini, R.; Passoni, D.; Pinto, L.; Sona, G.

    2012-07-01

    The use of aerial imagery acquired by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is scheduled within the FoGLIE project (Fruition of Goods Landscape in Interactive Environment): it starts from the need to enhance the natural, artistic and cultural heritage, to produce a better usability of it by employing audiovisual movable systems of 3D reconstruction and to improve monitoring procedures, by using new media for integrating the fruition phase with the preservation ones. The pilot project focus on a test area, Parco Adda Nord, which encloses various goods' types (small buildings, agricultural fields and different tree species and bushes). Multispectral high resolution images were taken by two digital compact cameras: a Pentax Optio A40 for RGB photos and a Sigma DP1 modified to acquire the NIR band. Then, some tests were performed in order to analyze the UAV images' quality with both photogrammetric and photo-interpretation purposes, to validate the vector-sensor system, the image block geometry and to study the feasibility of tree species classification. Many pre-signalized Control Points were surveyed through GPS to allow accuracy analysis. Aerial Triangulations (ATs) were carried out with photogrammetric commercial software, Leica Photogrammetry Suite (LPS) and PhotoModeler, with manual or automatic selection of Tie Points, to pick out pros and cons of each package in managing non conventional aerial imagery as well as the differences in the modeling approach. Further analysis were done on the differences between the EO parameters and the corresponding data coming from the on board UAV navigation system.

  2. Augmented reality and photogrammetry: A synergy to visualize physical and virtual city environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portalés, Cristina; Lerma, José Luis; Navarro, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Close-range photogrammetry is based on the acquisition of imagery to make accurate measurements and, eventually, three-dimensional (3D) photo-realistic models. These models are a photogrammetric product per se. They are usually integrated into virtual reality scenarios where additional data such as sound, text or video can be introduced, leading to multimedia virtual environments. These environments allow users both to navigate and interact on different platforms such as desktop PCs, laptops and small hand-held devices (mobile phones or PDAs). In very recent years, a new technology derived from virtual reality has emerged: Augmented Reality (AR), which is based on mixing real and virtual environments to boost human interactions and real-life navigations. The synergy of AR and photogrammetry opens up new possibilities in the field of 3D data visualization, navigation and interaction far beyond the traditional static navigation and interaction in front of a computer screen. In this paper we introduce a low-cost outdoor mobile AR application to integrate buildings of different urban spaces. High-accuracy 3D photo-models derived from close-range photogrammetry are integrated in real (physical) urban worlds. The augmented environment that is presented herein requires for visualization a see-through video head mounted display (HMD), whereas user's movement navigation is achieved in the real world with the help of an inertial navigation sensor. After introducing the basics of AR technology, the paper will deal with real-time orientation and tracking in combined physical and virtual city environments, merging close-range photogrammetry and AR. There are, however, some software and complex issues, which are discussed in the paper.

  3. Paleomagnetism and multi-model stereo photogrammetry of the West Greenland flood volcanic province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisager, J.; Riisager, P.; Pedersen, A. K.

    2002-12-01

    We present new paleomagnetic and multi-model photogrammetry data from the West Greenland part of the North Atlantic igneous province (NAIP). During fieldwork the paleomagnetic sampling sites were photographed from helicopter with stereoscopic overlap and in colour. The photographs have been set up for multi-model photogrammetry allowing three-dimensional lithological mapping, giving us important information for interpreting the paleomagnetic data in their stratigraphic context. Another advantage of the multi-model photogrammetry coverage is that individual lavas can be traced in three-dimensional space allowing very precise measurements of the attitude of strata (+/-0.5°) to be made for tectonic correction of the paleomagnetic data. The paleomagnetic study is based on a large collection of 586 oriented paleomagnetic drill cores collected from 81 lava flows. All sampled flows carry stable thermoremanent magnetization of reversed polarity. The earliest part of the volcanic sequence (i.e. Vaigat Fm.) is characterized by several consecutive flows recording statistically indistinguishable paleomagnetic field directions. The thickest Vaigat Fm. directional group consists of 37 lava flows (combined thickness 104 meter), which based on photogrammetry and XRF observations we interpret to represent a single flow field (i.e. one eruption consisting of several lavas erupted in a short period of time). If Paleocene paleosecular variation was similar to Holocene variations, the thick directional groups would form within 100 years implying an extreme volcanic activity at the onset of NAIP volcanism on West Greenland. Based on directional groups we obtain a new well-defined paleomagnetic pole for Greenland, which is statistically similar to a recently published NAIP pole from Faroe Islands (Riisager et al., 2002) rotated to Greenland. The corresponding paleolatitude of the central NAIP in Paleocene is ~20° south of the present latitude of the Iceland hotspot, indicating that the

  4. Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Jim G.

    2013-03-27

    Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure.

  5. Impression of multiple implants using photogrammetry: Description of technique and case presentation

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Bagán, Leticia; Giménez, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe a technique for registering the positions of multiple dental implants using a system based on photogrammetry. A case is presented in which a prosthetic treatment was performed using this technique. Study Design: Three Euroteknika® dental implants were placed to rehabilitate a 55-year-old male patient with right posterior maxillary edentulism. Three months later, the positions of the implants were registered using a photogrammetry-based stereo-camera (PICcamera®). After processing patient and implant data, special abutments (PICabutment®) were screwed onto each implant. The PICcamera® was then used to capture images of the implant positions, automatically taking 150 images in less than 60 seconds. From this information a file was obtained describing the relative positions – angles and distances – of each implant in vector form. Information regarding the soft tissues was obtained from an alginate impression that was cast in plaster and scanned. A Cr-Co structure was obtained using CAD/CAM, and its passive fit was verified in the patient’s mouth using the Sheffield test and the screw resistance test. Results and Conclusions: Twelve months after loading, peri-implant tissues were healthy and no marginal bone loss was observed. The clinical application of this new system using photogrammetry to record the position of multiple dental implants facilitated the rehabilitation of a patient with posterior maxillary edentulism by means of a prosthesis with optimal fit. The prosthetic process was accurate, fast, simple to apply and comfortable for the patient. Key words:Dental implants, photogrammetry, dental impression technique, CAD/CAM. PMID:24608216

  6. The Creation of Space Vector Models of Buildings From RPAS Photogrammetry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trhan, Ondrej

    2017-06-01

    The results of Remote Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) photogrammetry are digital surface models and orthophotos. The main problem of the digital surface models obtained is that buildings are not perpendicular and the shape of roofs is deformed. The task of this paper is to obtain a more accurate digital surface model using building reconstructions. The paper discusses the problem of obtaining and approximating building footprints, reconstructing the final spatial vector digital building model, and modifying the buildings on the digital surface model.

  7. Intra-rainfall soil surface change detection using close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; James, Michael R.; McShane, Gareth; Quinton, John N.; Strauss, Peter

    2015-04-01

    During precipitation events, the physical properties of soil surfaces change significantly. Such changes influence a large range of processes, e.g. surface runoff, soil erosion, water infiltration, soil-atmosphere interactions and plant growth. It has been proven that successive precipitation events change soil surfaces, but detailed studies on soil surface change within a single rainfall event do, to the best of our knowledge, not exist, due to a lack of suitable methods. However, recent developments in the use of photogrammetry are becoming a common tool in geoscience and can be utilized in soil surface detection. New concepts, developments in hardware and software allow a quick and user friendly calculation of surface models with close-range imagery and processing based on structure from motion (SfM) approaches. In this study we tested the potential of close range photogrammetry for detecting changes in soil surface topography within an artificial rainfall event. We used a photogrammetric approach to capture multiple images of the soil surface on two different soil types (loamy and sandy soil) under laboratory conditions while they were exposed to a 60 minute duration 47(60) mm hr-1 intensity rainfall event from a gravity driven rainfall simulator. The photographs were processed using Photoscan to produce point clouds which were then interpolated to produce DEM surfaces. Of the 126 surfaces produced during the rainfall event 125 were usable and able to demonstrate changes with a resolution of <1 mm in the z dimension and with a xy resolution of <0.5 mm. We demonstrate the potential of photogrammetry for surface detection within a precipitation event. The use of close-range photogrammetry opens new possibilities to monitor soil surfaces and could be developed for a range of other applications. Our results have the potential to lead to better understanding of infiltration, runoff, nutrient transport and soil erosion processes within precipitation event.

  8. Biostereometric Study Of A Sample Of 50 Young Adults By Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollard, R.; Sauvignon, M.; Pineau, J. C.

    1983-07-01

    An specific photogrammetric device is described. It is composed of one pair of cameras on a vertical base and two vertical mirrors. A sample of 50 young French males was studied by using this method for the purpose of establishing the relationship between overall and segmentary dimensions, surfaces and body volumes and evaluating the variability of these parameters. Conventional anthropometric method and photogrammetry are compared.

  9. Photogrammetry as a tool for the postural evaluation of the spine: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetto, Tássia Silveira; Sedrez, Juliana Adami; Candotti, Cláudia Tarragô; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the use of photogrammetry and identify the mathematical procedures applied when evaluating spinal posture. METHODS: A systematic search using keywords was conducted in the PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Science and Medicine® databases. The following inclusion criteria adopted were: (1) the use of photogrammetry as a method to evaluate spinal posture; (2) evaluations of spinal curvature in the sagittal and/or frontal plane; (3) studies published within the last three decades; and (4) written entirely in English. The exclusion criteria were: (1) studies which objective involved the verification of some aspect of validation of instruments; (2) studies published as abstracts and those published in scientific events; and (3) studies using evaluation of the anteriorization of the head to determine the angular positioning of the cervical spine. The articles in this review were included and evaluated for their methodological quality, based on the Downs and Black scale, by two independent reviewers. RESULTS: Initially, 1758 articles were found, 76 of which were included upon reading the full texts and 29 were included in accordance with the predetermined criteria. In addition, after analyzing the references in those articles, a further six articles were selected, so that 35 articles were included in this review. This systematic review revealed that the photogrammetry has been using in observational studies. Furthermore, it was also found that, although the data collection methodologies are similar across the studies, in relation to aspects of data analysis, the methodologies are very different, especially regarding the mathematical routines employed to support different postural evaluation software. CONCLUSION: With photogrammetry, the aim of the assessment, whether it is for clinical, research or collective health purposes, must be considered when choosing which protocol to use to evaluate spinal posture. PMID:26925386

  10. Study on Improvement of Accuracy in Inertial Photogrammetry by Combining Images with Inertial Measurement Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Shojiro; Koizumi, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Inertial photogrammetry is defined as photogrammetry that involves using a camera on which an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is mounted. In inertial photogrammetry, the position and inclination of a shooting camera are calculated using the IMU. An IMU is characterized by error growth caused by time accumulation because acceleration is integrated with respect to time. This study examines the procedure to estimate the position of the camera accurately while shooting using the IMU and the structure from motion (SfM) technology, which is applied in many fields, such as computer vision. When neither the coordinates of the position of the camera nor those of feature points are known, SfM provides a similar positional relationship between the position of the camera and feature points. Therefore, the actual length of positional coordinates is not determined. If the actual length of the position of the camera is unknown, the camera acceleration is obtained by calculating the second order differential of the position of the camera, with respect to the shooting time. The authors had determined the actual length by assigning the position of IMU to the SfM-calculated position. Hence, accuracy decreased because of the error growth, which was the characteristic feature of IMU. In order to solve this problem, a new calculation method was proposed. Using this method, the difference between the IMU-calculated acceleration and the camera-calculated acceleration can be obtained using the method of least squares, and the magnification required for calculating the actual dimension from the position of the camera can be obtained. The actual length can be calculated by multiplying all the SfM point groups by the obtained magnification factor. This calculation method suppresses the error growth, which is due to the time accumulation in IMU, and improves the accuracy of inertial photogrammetry.

  11. Practical target location and accuracy indicator in digital close range photogrammetry using consumer grade cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Gentaro; Chikatsu, Hirofumi

    2011-07-01

    Recently, pixel numbers and functions of consumer grade digital camera are amazingly increasing by modern semiconductor and digital technology, and there are many low-priced consumer grade digital cameras which have more than 10 mega pixels on the market in Japan. In these circumstances, digital photogrammetry using consumer grade cameras is enormously expected in various application fields. There is a large body of literature on calibration of consumer grade digital cameras and circular target location. Target location with subpixel accuracy had been investigated as a star tracker issue, and many target location algorithms have been carried out. It is widely accepted that the least squares models with ellipse fitting is the most accurate algorithm. However, there are still problems for efficient digital close range photogrammetry. These problems are reconfirmation of the target location algorithms with subpixel accuracy for consumer grade digital cameras, relationship between number of edge points along target boundary and accuracy, and an indicator for estimating the accuracy of normal digital close range photogrammetry using consumer grade cameras. With this motive, an empirical testing of several algorithms for target location with subpixel accuracy and an indicator for estimating the accuracy are investigated in this paper using real data which were acquired indoors using 7 consumer grade digital cameras which have 7.2 mega pixels to 14.7 mega pixels.

  12. Evaluation of the Quality of Action Cameras with Wide-Angle Lenses in Uav Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastedt, H.; Ekkel, T.; Luhmann, T.

    2016-06-01

    The application of light-weight cameras in UAV photogrammetry is required due to restrictions in payload. In general, consumer cameras with normal lens type are applied to a UAV system. The availability of action cameras, like the GoPro Hero4 Black, including a wide-angle lens (fish-eye lens) offers new perspectives in UAV projects. With these investigations, different calibration procedures for fish-eye lenses are evaluated in order to quantify their accuracy potential in UAV photogrammetry. Herewith the GoPro Hero4 is evaluated using different acquisition modes. It is investigated to which extent the standard calibration approaches in OpenCV or Agisoft PhotoScan/Lens can be applied to the evaluation processes in UAV photogrammetry. Therefore different calibration setups and processing procedures are assessed and discussed. Additionally a pre-correction of the initial distortion by GoPro Studio and its application to the photogrammetric purposes will be evaluated. An experimental setup with a set of control points and a prospective flight scenario is chosen to evaluate the processing results using Agisoft PhotoScan. Herewith it is analysed to which extent a pre-calibration and pre-correction of a GoPro Hero4 will reinforce the reliability and accuracy of a flight scenario.

  13. Analysis of the reliability and reproducibility of goniometry compared to hand photogrammetry

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Rosana Martins Ferreira; Mazzer, Nilton; Barbieri, Claudio Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner reliability and reproducibility of goniometry in relation to photogrammetry of hand, comparing the angles of thumb abduction, PIP joint flexion of the II finger and MCP joint flexion of the V finger. Methods: The study included 30 volunteers, who were divided into three groups: one group of 10 physiotherapy students, one group of 10 physiotherapists, and a third group of 10 therapists of the hand. Each examiner performed the measurements on the same hand mold, using the goniometer followed by two photogrammetry software programs; CorelDraw® and ALCimagem®. Results: The results revealed that the groups and the methods proposed presented inter-examiner reliability, generally rated as excellent (ICC 0.998 I.C. 95% 0.995 - 0.999). In the intra-examiner evaluation, an excellent level of reliability was found between the three groups. In the comparison between groups for each angle and each method, no significant differences were found between the groups for most of the measurements. Conclusion: Goniometry and photogrammetry are reliable and reproducible methods for evaluating measurements of the hand. However, due to the lack of similar references, detailed studies are needed to define the normal parameters between the methods in the joints of the hand. Level of Evidence II, Diagnostic Study. PMID:24453594

  14. Impression of multiple implants using photogrammetry: description of technique and case presentation.

    PubMed

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Bagán, Leticia; Giménez, Beatriz; Peñarrocha, María

    2014-07-01

    To describe a technique for registering the positions of multiple dental implants using a system based on photogrammetry. A case is presented in which a prosthetic treatment was performed using this technique. Three Euroteknika® dental implants were placed to rehabilitate a 55-year-old male patient with right posterior maxillary edentulism. Three months later, the positions of the implants were registered using a photogrammetry-based stereo-camera (PICcamera®). After processing patient and implant data, special abutments (PICabutment®) were screwed onto each implant. The PICcamera® was then used to capture images of the implant positions, automatically taking 150 images in less than 60 seconds. From this information a file was obtained describing the relative positions - angles and distances - of each implant in vector form. Information regarding the soft tissues was obtained from an alginate impression that was cast in plaster and scanned. A Cr-Co structure was obtained using CAD/CAM, and its passive fit was verified in the patient's mouth using the Sheffield test and the screw resistance test. Twelve months after loading, peri-implant tissues were healthy and no marginal bone loss was observed. The clinical application of this new system using photogrammetry to record the position of multiple dental implants facilitated the rehabilitation of a patient with posterior maxillary edentulism by means of a prosthesis with optimal fit. The prosthetic process was accurate, fast, simple to apply and comfortable for the patient.

  15. Automatic urban 3D building reconstruction from multi-ray photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClune, A. P.; Miller, P. E.; Mills, J. P.; Holland, D.

    2014-08-01

    Over the last 20 years the use of, and demand for, three dimensional (3D) building models has meant there has been a vast amount of research conducted in automating the extraction and reconstruction of these models from airborne sensors. Whilst many different approaches have been suggested, full automation is yet to be achieved and research has suggested that the combination of data from multiple sources is required in order to achieve this. Developments in digital photogrammetry have delivered improvements in spatial resolution whilst higher image overlap to increase the number of pixel correspondents between images, giving the name multi-ray photogrammetry, has improved the resolution and quality of its by-products. In this paper the extraction of roof geometry from multiray photogrammetry will be covered, which underpins 3D building reconstruction. Using orthophotos, roof vertices are extracted using the Canny edge detector. Roof planes are detected from digital surface models (DSM) by extracting information from 2D cross sections and measuring height differences. To eliminate overhanging vegetation, the segmentation of trees is investigated by calculating the characteristics of a point within a local neighbourhood of the photogrammetric point cloud. The results highlight the complementary nature of these information sources, and a methodology for integration and reconstruction of roof geometry is proposed.

  16. Verification of micro-scale photogrammetry for smooth three-dimensional object measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims-Waterhouse, Danny; Piano, Samanta; Leach, Richard

    2017-05-01

    By using sub-millimetre laser speckle pattern projection we show that photogrammetry systems are able to measure smooth three-dimensional objects with surface height deviations less than 1 μm. The projection of laser speckle patterns allows correspondences on the surface of smooth spheres to be found, and as a result, verification artefacts with low surface height deviations were measured. A combination of VDI/VDE and ISO standards were also utilised to provide a complete verification method, and determine the quality parameters for the system under test. Using the proposed method applied to a photogrammetry system, a 5 mm radius sphere was measured with an expanded uncertainty of 8.5 μm for sizing errors, and 16.6 μm for form errors with a 95 % confidence interval. Sphere spacing lengths between 6 mm and 10 mm were also measured by the photogrammetry system, and were found to have expanded uncertainties of around 20 μm with a 95 % confidence interval.

  17. Metopic synostosis: Measuring intracranial volume change following fronto-orbital advancement using three-dimensional photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Freudlsperger, Christian; Steinmacher, Sahra; Bächli, Heidi; Somlo, Elek; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Engel, Michael

    2015-06-01

    There is still disagreement regarding the intracranial volumes of patients with metopic synostosis compared with healthy patients. This study aimed to compare the intracranial volume of children with metopic synostosis before and after surgery to an age- and sex-matched control cohort using three-dimensional (3D) photogrammetry. Eighteen boys with metopic synostosis were operated on using standardized fronto-orbital advancement. Frontal, posterior and total intracranial volumes were measured exactly 1 day pre-operatively and 10 days post-operatively, using 3D photogrammetry. To establish an age- and sex-matched control group, the 3D photogrammetric data of 634 healthy boys between the ages of 3 and 13 months were analyzed. Mean age at surgery was 9 months (SD 1.7). Prior to surgery, boys with metopic synostosis showed significantly reduced frontal and total intracranial volumes compared with the reference group, but similar posterior volumes. After surgery, frontal and total intracranial volumes did not differ statistically from the control group. As children with metopic synostosis showed significantly smaller frontal and total intracranial volumes compared with an age- and sex-matched control group, corrective surgery should aim to achieve volume expansion. Furthermore, 3D photogrammetry provides a valuable alternative to CT scans in the measurement of intracranial volume in children with metopic synostosis, which significantly reduces the amount of radiation exposure to the growing brain.

  18. A single camera photogrammetry system for multi-angle fast localization of EEG electrodes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shuo; Sheng, Yang

    2011-11-01

    Photogrammetry has become an effective method for the determination of electroencephalography (EEG) electrode positions in three dimensions (3D). Capturing multi-angle images of the electrodes on the head is a fundamental objective in the design of photogrammetry system for EEG localization. Methods in previous studies are all based on the use of either a rotating camera or multiple cameras, which are time-consuming or not cost-effective. This study aims to present a novel photogrammetry system that can realize simultaneous acquisition of multi-angle head images in a single camera position. Aligning two planar mirrors with the angle of 51.4°, seven views of the head with 25 electrodes are captured simultaneously by the digital camera placed in front of them. A complete set of algorithms for electrode recognition, matching, and 3D reconstruction is developed. It is found that the elapsed time of the whole localization procedure is about 3 min, and camera calibration computation takes about 1 min, after the measurement of calibration points. The positioning accuracy with the maximum error of 1.19 mm is acceptable. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system provides a fast and cost-effective method for the EEG positioning.

  19. Comparison of parameters of spinal curves in the sagittal plane measured by photogrammetry and inclinometry.

    PubMed

    Walicka-Cupryś, Katarzyna; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Mrozkowiak, Mirosław

    2013-10-31

    BACKGROUND. The photogrammetric method and inclinometer-based measurements are commonly employed to assess the anteroposterior curvatures of the spine. These methods are used both in clinical trials and for screening purposes. The aim of the study was to compare the parameters used to characterise the anteroposterior spinal curvatures as measured by photogrammetry and inclinometry. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study enrolled 341 subjects: 169 girls and 172 boys, aged 4 to 9 years, from kindergartens and primary schools in Rzeszów. The anteroposterior spinal curvatures were examined by photogrammetry and with a mechanical inclinometer. RESULTS. There were significant differences in the α angle between the inclinometric and photogrammetric assessment in the Student t test (p=0.017) and the Fisher Snedecor test (p=0.0001), with similar differences in the β angle (Student's t p=0.0001, Fisher Snedecor p=0.007). For the γ angle, significant differences were revealed with Student's t test (p=0.0001), but not with the Fisher Snedecor test (p = 0.22). CONCLUSIONS. 1. Measurements of inclination of particular segments of the spine obtained with the photogrammetric method and the inclinometric method in the same study group revealed statistically significant differences. 2. The results of measurements obtained by photogrammetry and inclinometry are not comparable. 3. Further research on agreement between measurements of the anteroposterior spinal curvatures obtained using the available measurement equipment is recommended.

  20. Astronomical Methods in Aerial Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beij, K Hilding

    1925-01-01

    The astronomical method of determining position is universally used in marine navigation and may also be of service in aerial navigation. The practical application of the method, however, must be modified and adapted to conform to the requirements of aviation. Much of this work of adaptation has already been accomplished, but being scattered through various technical journals in a number of languages, is not readily available. This report is for the purpose of collecting under one cover such previous work as appears to be of value to the aerial navigator, comparing instruments and methods, indicating the best practice, and suggesting future developments. The various methods of determining position and their application and value are outlined, and a brief resume of the theory of the astronomical method is given. Observation instruments are described in detail. A complete discussion of the reduction of observations follows, including a rapid method of finding position from the altitudes of two stars. Maps and map cases are briefly considered. A bibliography of the subject is appended.

  1. BOREAS Level-0 ER-2 Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Dominquez, Roseanne; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    For BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), the ER-2 and other aerial photography was collected to provide finely detailed and spatially extensive documentation of the condition of the primary study sites. The ER-2 aerial photography consists of color-IR transparencies collected during flights in 1994 and 1996 over the study areas.

  2. A Classroom Simulation of Aerial Photography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Simon

    1981-01-01

    Explains how a simulation of aerial photography can help students in a college level beginning course on interpretation of aerial photography understand the interrelationships of the airplane, the camera, and the earth's surface. Procedures, objectives, equipment, and scale are discussed. (DB)

  3. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... American National Standards for “Vehicle Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms,” ANSI A92.2-1969, including appendix. Aerial lifts acquired before January 22, 1973 which do not meet the requirements of ANSI... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... American National Standards for “Vehicle Mounted Elevating and Rotating Work Platforms,” ANSI A92.2-1969, including appendix. Aerial lifts acquired before January 22, 1973 which do not meet the requirements of ANSI... conform with the applicable design and construction requirements of ANSI A92.2-1969. Aerial lifts include...

  5. 47 CFR 32.2431 - Aerial wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aerial wire. 32.2431 Section 32.2431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2431 Aerial wire. (a) This account shall include the original cost of bare line wire and other material used in...

  6. 47 CFR 32.2431 - Aerial wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aerial wire. 32.2431 Section 32.2431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2431 Aerial wire. (a) This account shall include the original cost of bare line wire and other material used in...

  7. 47 CFR 32.2431 - Aerial wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aerial wire. 32.2431 Section 32.2431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2431 Aerial wire. (a) This account shall include the original cost of bare line wire and other material used in...

  8. 47 CFR 32.2431 - Aerial wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aerial wire. 32.2431 Section 32.2431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2431 Aerial wire. (a) This account shall include the original cost of bare line wire and other material used in...

  9. Adaptive planning of emergency aerial photogrammetric mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fuqiang; Zhu, Qing; Zhang, Junxiao; Miao, Shuangxi; Zhou, Xingxia; Cao, Zhenyu

    2015-12-01

    Aiming at the diversity of emergency aerial photogrammetric mission requirements, complex ground and air environmental constraints make the planning mission time-consuming. This paper presents a fast adaptation for the UAV aerial photogrammetric mission planning. First, Building emergency aerial UAVs mission the unified expression of UAVs model and mechanical model of performance parameters in the semantic space make the integrated expression of mission requirements and low altitude environment. Proposed match assessment method which based on resource and mission efficiency. Made the Adaptive match of UAV aerial resources and mission. According to the emergency aerial resource properties, considering complex air-ground environment and mission requirements constraints. Made accurate design of UAV route. Experimental results show, the method scientific and efficient, greatly enhanced the emergency response rate.

  10. Maximizing feature detection in aerial unmanned aerial vehicle datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Jonathan; Laefer, Debra F.; O'Keeffe, Evan

    2017-04-01

    This paper compares several feature detectors applied to imagery from an unmanned aerial vehicle to find the best detection algorithm when applied to datasets that vary in translation and have little or no image overlap. Metrics of inliers and reconstruction accuracy of feature detectors are considered with respect to three-dimensional reconstruction results. The image matching results are tested experimentally, and an approach to detecting false matches is outlined. Results showed that although the detectors varied in the number of keypoints generated, a large number of inliers does not necessarily translate into more points in the final point cloud reconstruction and that the process of comparing a large quantity of redundant keypoints may outweigh the advantage of having the extra points. The results also showed that despite the development of keypoint detectors and descriptors, none of them consistently demonstrated a substantial improvement in the quality of structure from motion reconstruction when applied to a wide range of disparate urban and rural images.

  11. Self-Calibrated In-Process Photogrammetry for Large Raw Part Measurement and Alignment before Machining.

    PubMed

    Mendikute, Alberto; Yagüe-Fabra, José A; Zatarain, Mikel; Bertelsen, Álvaro; Leizea, Ibai

    2017-09-09

    Photogrammetry methods are being used more and more as a 3D technique for large scale metrology applications in industry. Optical targets are placed on an object and images are taken around it, where measuring traceability is provided by precise off-process pre-calibrated digital cameras and scale bars. According to the 2D target image coordinates, target 3D coordinates and camera views are jointly computed. One of the applications of photogrammetry is the measurement of raw part surfaces prior to its machining. For this application, post-process bundle adjustment has usually been adopted for computing the 3D scene. With that approach, a high computation time is observed, leading in practice to time consuming and user dependent iterative review and re-processing procedures until an adequate set of images is taken, limiting its potential for fast, easy-to-use, and precise measurements. In this paper, a new efficient procedure is presented for solving the bundle adjustment problem in portable photogrammetry. In-process bundle computing capability is demonstrated on a consumer grade desktop PC, enabling quasi real time 2D image and 3D scene computing. Additionally, a method for the self-calibration of camera and lens distortion has been integrated into the in-process approach due to its potential for highest precision when using low cost non-specialized digital cameras. Measurement traceability is set only by scale bars available in the measuring scene, avoiding the uncertainty contribution of off-process camera calibration procedures or the use of special purpose calibration artifacts. The developed self-calibrated in-process photogrammetry has been evaluated both in a pilot case scenario and in industrial scenarios for raw part measurement, showing a total in-process computing time typically below 1 s per image up to a maximum of 2 s during the last stages of the computed industrial scenes, along with a relative precision of 1/10,000 (e.g. 0.1 mm error in 1 m) with

  12. Self-Calibrated In-Process Photogrammetry for Large Raw Part Measurement and Alignment before Machining

    PubMed Central

    Mendikute, Alberto; Zatarain, Mikel; Bertelsen, Álvaro; Leizea, Ibai

    2017-01-01

    Photogrammetry methods are being used more and more as a 3D technique for large scale metrology applications in industry. Optical targets are placed on an object and images are taken around it, where measuring traceability is provided by precise off-process pre-calibrated digital cameras and scale bars. According to the 2D target image coordinates, target 3D coordinates and camera views are jointly computed. One of the applications of photogrammetry is the measurement of raw part surfaces prior to its machining. For this application, post-process bundle adjustment has usually been adopted for computing the 3D scene. With that approach, a high computation time is observed, leading in practice to time consuming and user dependent iterative review and re-processing procedures until an adequate set of images is taken, limiting its potential for fast, easy-to-use, and precise measurements. In this paper, a new efficient procedure is presented for solving the bundle adjustment problem in portable photogrammetry. In-process bundle computing capability is demonstrated on a consumer grade desktop PC, enabling quasi real time 2D image and 3D scene computing. Additionally, a method for the self-calibration of camera and lens distortion has been integrated into the in-process approach due to its potential for highest precision when using low cost non-specialized digital cameras. Measurement traceability is set only by scale bars available in the measuring scene, avoiding the uncertainty contribution of off-process camera calibration procedures or the use of special purpose calibration artifacts. The developed self-calibrated in-process photogrammetry has been evaluated both in a pilot case scenario and in industrial scenarios for raw part measurement, showing a total in-process computing time typically below 1 s per image up to a maximum of 2 s during the last stages of the computed industrial scenes, along with a relative precision of 1/10,000 (e.g., 0.1 mm error in 1 m) with

  13. MEMS Based Micro Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Niranjan; Köhler, Elof; Enoksson, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Designing a flapping wing insect robot requires understanding of insect flight mechanisms, wing kinematics and aerodynamic forces. These subsystems are interconnected and their dependence on one another affects the overall performance. Additionally it requires an artificial muscle like actuator and transmission to power the wings. Several kinds of actuators and mechanisms are candidates for this application with their own strengths and weaknesses. This article provides an overview of the insect scaled flight mechanism along with discussion of various methods to achieve the Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) flight. Ongoing projects in Chalmers is aimed at developing a low cost and low manufacturing time MAV. The MAV design considerations and design specifications are mentioned. The wings are manufactured using 3D printed carbon fiber and are under experimental study.

  14. COCOA: tracking in aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Saad; Shah, Mubarak

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming a core intelligence asset for reconnaissance, surveillance and target tracking in urban and battlefield settings. In order to achieve the goal of automated tracking of objects in UAV videos we have developed a system called COCOA. It processes the video stream through number of stages. At first stage platform motion compensation is performed. Moving object detection is performed to detect the regions of interest from which object contours are extracted by performing a level set based segmentation. Finally blob based tracking is performed for each detected object. Global tracks are generated which are used for higher level processing. COCOA is customizable to different sensor resolutions and is capable of tracking targets as small as 100 pixels. It works seamlessly for both visible and thermal imaging modes. The system is implemented in Matlab and works in a batch mode.

  15. How To Obtain Aerial Photographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains an informational data base of aerial photographic coverage of the United States and its territories that dates back to the 1940?s. This information describes photographic projects from the USGS, other Federal, State, and local government agencies, and commercial firms. The pictures on this page show a part of a standard 9- by 9-inch photograph and the results obtained by enlarging the original photograph two and four times. Compare the size of the Qualcomm Stadium, Jack Murphy Field, in San Diego, Calif, and the adjacent parking lot and freeways shown at the different scales. USGS Earth Science Information Center (ESIC) representatives will assist you in locating and ordering photographs. Please submit the completed checklist and a marked map showing your area of interest to any ESIC.

  16. Unmanned Aerial Survey of Elephants

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Cédric; Lejeune, Philippe; Lisein, Jonathan; Sawadogo, Prosper; Bouché, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The use of a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) was tested to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing ×100™ equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to test animal reaction as the UAS passed, and visibility on the images. No reaction was recorded as the UAS passed at a height of 100 m. Observations, made on a set of more than 7000 images, revealed that only elephants (Loxodonta africana) were easily visible while medium and small sized mammals were not. The easy observation of elephants allows experts to enumerate them on images acquired at a height of 100 m. We, therefore, implemented an aerial strip sample count along transects used for the annual wildlife foot count. A total of 34 elephants were recorded on 4 transects, each overflown twice. The elephant density was estimated at 2.47 elephants/km2 with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 36.10%. The main drawback of our UAS was its low autonomy (45 min). Increased endurance of small UAS is required to replace manned aircraft survey of large areas (about 1000 km of transect per day vs 40 km for our UAS). The monitoring strategy should be adapted according to the sampling plan. Also, the UAS is as expensive as a second-hand light aircraft. However the logistic and flight implementation are easier, the running costs are lower and its use is safer. Technological evolution will make civil UAS more efficient, allowing them to compete with light aircraft for aerial wildlife surveys. PMID:23405088

  17. The DOE ARM Aerial Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Hubbe, John M.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Chand, Duli; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Biraud, S.; McFarquhar, Greg

    2014-05-01

    The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a climate research user facility operating stationary ground sites that provide long-term measurements of climate relevant properties, mobile ground- and ship-based facilities to conduct shorter field campaigns (6-12 months), and the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF). The airborne observations acquired by the AAF enhance the surface-based ARM measurements by providing high-resolution in-situ measurements for process understanding, retrieval-algorithm development, and model evaluation that are not possible using ground- or satellite-based techniques. Several ARM aerial efforts were consolidated into the AAF in 2006. With the exception of a small aircraft used for routine measurements of aerosols and carbon cycle gases, AAF at the time had no dedicated aircraft and only a small number of instruments at its disposal. In this "virtual hangar" mode, AAF successfully carried out several missions contracting with organizations and investigators who provided their research aircraft and instrumentation. In 2009, AAF started managing operations of the Battelle-owned Gulfstream I (G-1) large twin-turboprop research aircraft. Furthermore, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided funding for the procurement of over twenty new instruments to be used aboard the G-1 and other AAF virtual-hangar aircraft. AAF now executes missions in the virtual- and real-hangar mode producing freely available datasets for studying aerosol, cloud, and radiative processes in the atmosphere. AAF is also engaged in the maturation and testing of newly developed airborne sensors to help foster the next generation of airborne instruments.

  18. Unmanned aerial survey of elephants.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Cédric; Lejeune, Philippe; Lisein, Jonathan; Sawadogo, Prosper; Bouché, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The use of a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) was tested to survey large mammals in the Nazinga Game Ranch in the south of Burkina Faso. The Gatewing ×100™ equipped with a Ricoh GR III camera was used to test animal reaction as the UAS passed, and visibility on the images. No reaction was recorded as the UAS passed at a height of 100 m. Observations, made on a set of more than 7000 images, revealed that only elephants (Loxodonta africana) were easily visible while medium and small sized mammals were not. The easy observation of elephants allows experts to enumerate them on images acquired at a height of 100 m. We, therefore, implemented an aerial strip sample count along transects used for the annual wildlife foot count. A total of 34 elephants were recorded on 4 transects, each overflown twice. The elephant density was estimated at 2.47 elephants/km(2) with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 36.10%. The main drawback of our UAS was its low autonomy (45 min). Increased endurance of small UAS is required to replace manned aircraft survey of large areas (about 1000 km of transect per day vs 40 km for our UAS). The monitoring strategy should be adapted according to the sampling plan. Also, the UAS is as expensive as a second-hand light aircraft. However the logistic and flight implementation are easier, the running costs are lower and its use is safer. Technological evolution will make civil UAS more efficient, allowing them to compete with light aircraft for aerial wildlife surveys.

  19. Aerial shaking performance of wet Anna's hummingbirds

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Jimenez, Victor Manuel; Dudley, Robert

    2012-01-01

    External wetting poses problems of immediate heat loss and long-term pathogen growth for vertebrates. Beyond these risks, the locomotor ability of smaller animals, and particularly of fliers, may be impaired by water adhering to the body. Here, we report on the remarkable ability of hummingbirds to perform rapid shakes in order to expel water from their plumage even while in flight. Kinematic performance of aerial versus non-aerial shakes (i.e. those performed while perching) was compared. Oscillation frequencies of the head, body and tail were lower in aerial shakes. Tangential speeds and accelerations of the trunk and tail were roughly similar in aerial and non-aerial shakes, but values for head motions in air were twice as high when compared with shakes while perching. Azimuthal angular amplitudes for both aerial and non-aerial shakes reached values greater than 180° for the head, greater than 45° for the body trunk and slightly greater than 90° for the tail and wings. Using a feather on an oscillating disc to mimic shaking motions, we found that bending increased average speeds by up to 36 per cent and accelerations of the feather tip up to fourfold relative to a hypothetical rigid feather. Feather flexibility may help to enhance shedding of water and reduce body oscillations during shaking. PMID:22072447

  20. Aerial videotape mapping of coastal geomorphic changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debusschere, Karolien; Penland, Shea; Westphal, Karen A.; Reimer, P. Douglas; McBride, Randolph A.

    1991-01-01

    An aerial geomorphic mapping system was developed to examine the spatial and temporal variability in the coastal geomorphology of Louisiana. Between 1984 and 1990 eleven sequential annual and post-hurricane aerial videotape surveys were flown covering periods of prolonged fair weather, hurricane impacts and subsequent post-storm recoveries. A coastal geomorphic classification system was developed to map the spatial and temporal geomorphic changes between these surveys. The classification system is based on 10 years of shoreline monitoring, analysis of aerial photography for 1940-1989, and numerous field surveys. The classification system divides shorelines into two broad classes: natural and altered. Each class consists of several genetically linked categories of shorelines. Each category is further subdivided into morphologic types on the basis of landform relief, elevation, habitat type, vegetation density and type, and sediment characteristics. The classification is used with imagery from the low-altitude, high-resolution aerial videotape surveys to describe and quantify the longshore and cross-shore geomorphic, sedimentologic, and vegetative character of Louisiana's shoreline systems. The mapping system makes it possible to delineate and map detailed geomorphic habitat changes at a resolution higher than that of conventional vertical aerial photography. Morphologic units are mapped parallel to the regional shoreline from the aerial videotape imagery onto the base maps at a scale of 1:24,000. The base maps were constructed from vertical aerial photography concurrent with the data of the video imagery.

  1. Overview of NASA aerial applications research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    Aerial applications research conducted by NASA seeks improvements in environmental safety, fuel efficiency, and aircraft productivity and safety. From 1976 to 1978, NASA studied the technology needs of the aerial applications industry and developed in-house research capabilities for meeting those needs. This paper presents the research plans developed by NASA. High potential appears to exist for near term contributions to the industry from existing NASA research capabilities in drift reduction, stall departure safety, and dry materials dispersal system technology. A brief, annotated bibliography is included listing documents recently produced as a result of NASA aerial applications research efforts.

  2. 7 CFR 1755.507 - Aerial cable services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aerial cable services. 1755.507 Section 1755.507... § 1755.507 Aerial cable services. (a) Where more than six pairs are needed initially, and where an aerial service is necessary, the service shall consist of 22 AWG filled aerial cable of a pair size adequate for...

  3. 7 CFR 1755.507 - Aerial cable services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aerial cable services. 1755.507 Section 1755.507... § 1755.507 Aerial cable services. (a) Where more than six pairs are needed initially, and where an aerial service is necessary, the service shall consist of 22 AWG filled aerial cable of a pair size adequate for...

  4. 7 CFR 1755.507 - Aerial cable services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aerial cable services. 1755.507 Section 1755.507... § 1755.507 Aerial cable services. (a) Where more than six pairs are needed initially, and where an aerial service is necessary, the service shall consist of 22 AWG filled aerial cable of a pair size adequate for...

  5. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Replacing the Army’s Comanche Helicopter?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This strategic research project explores the possibility of unmanned aerial vehicles replacing the Comanche Helicopter in its doctrinal missions...capabilities of unmanned aerial vehicles , and analyzes unmanned aerial vehicles capabilities against those aviation critical tasks. This research will...Army’s current helicopters, this analysis reveals that unmanned aerial vehicles can only perform 67% of the reconnaissance critical tasks, 50% of the

  6. Mapping temporal changes in connectivity using high-resolution aerial data and object based image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselink, Rens; Anders, Niels; Keesstra, Saskia; Seeger, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Within the field of geomorphology mapping has always been an important tool to interpret spatial and temporal distributions of phenomena and processes at the surface. In the field of connectivity however, although throughout the past decade many articles have been published, there are only very few that go into the mapping of connectivity. This study aimed at developing a new, automated method for mapping connectivity within agricultural catchments. The method, which is a combination of Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) and traditional geomorphological field mapping, was applied to two agricultural catchments in Navarre, Spain, both with an area of approximately 2 sq.km. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was used to take aerial photographs with a resolution of 6 cm, of which a DEM with a 12 cm resolution was created using structure-from-motion photogrammetry. Connectivity was mapped within the study areas using OBIA using a top down method, meaning that connectivity was mapped at different scale levels, starting at the largest scale. Firstly sub-catchments were automatically delineated, after which several characteristics and features that affect connectivity within the sub-catchments were classified, e.g. landuse, landslides, rills, gullies, riparian vegetation, changes in slope, ploughing direction etc. In two consecutive years (2013-2014) photographs were taken and connectivity of both catchments of both years will be compared. Future work will include a quantification of the mapped connectivity (highly connected years vs. low connected years), causes and consequences of these differences in connectivity, comparison to existing connectivity indices and comparison of mapped connectivity in sub-catchments and measured discharge.

  7. Analysis and Exploitation of Automatically Generated Scene Structure from Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilosek, David R.

    The recent advancements made in the field of computer vision, along with the ever increasing rate of computational power has opened up opportunities in the field of automated photogrammetry. Many researchers have focused on using these powerful computer vision algorithms to extract three-dimensional point clouds of scenes from multi-view imagery, with the ultimate goal of creating a photo-realistic scene model. However, geographically accurate three-dimensional scene models have the potential to be exploited for much more than just visualization. This work looks at utilizing automatically generated scene structure from near-nadir aerial imagery to identify and classify objects within the structure, through the analysis of spatial-spectral information. The limitation to this type of imagery is imposed due to the common availability of this type of aerial imagery. Popular third-party computer-vision algorithms are used to generate the scene structure. A voxel-based approach for surface estimation is developed using Manhattan-world assumptions. A surface estimation confidence metric is also presented. This approach provides the basis for further analysis of surface materials, incorporating spectral information. Two cases of spectral analysis are examined: when additional hyperspectral imagery of the reconstructed scene is available, and when only R,G,B spectral information can be obtained. A method for registering the surface estimation to hyperspectral imagery, through orthorectification, is developed. Atmospherically corrected hyperspectral imagery is used to assign reflectance values to estimated surface facets for physical simulation with DIRSIG. A spatial-spectral region growing-based segmentation algorithm is developed for the R,G,B limited case, in order to identify possible materials for user attribution. Finally, an analysis of the geographic accuracy of automatically generated three-dimensional structure is performed. An end-to-end, semi-automated, workflow

  8. From Hype to an Operational Tool: Efforts to Establish a Long-Term Monitoring Protocol of Alluvial Sandbars using 'Structure-from-Motion' Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the use of 'Structure-from-Motion' (SfM) photogrammetry to accurately map landforms, its utility for reliably detecting and monitoring geomorphic change from repeat surveys remains underexplored in fluvial environments. It is unclear how the combination of various image acquisition platforms and techniques, survey scales, vegetation cover, and terrain complexities translate into accuracy and precision metrics for SfM-based construction of digital elevation models (DEMs) of fluvial landforms. Although unmanned aerial vehicles offer the potential to rapidly image large areas, they can be relatively costly, require skilled operators, are vulnerable in adverse weather conditions, and often rely on GPS-positioning to improve their stability. This research details image acquisition techniques for an underrepresented SfM platform: the pole-mounted camera. We highlight image acquisition and post-processing limitations of the SfM method for alluvial sandbars (10s to 100s m2) located in Marble and Grand Canyons in a remote, fluvial landscape with limited field access, strong light gradients, highly variable surface texture and limited ground control. We recommend a pole-based SfM protocol and evaluate it by comparing SfM-derived DEMs against concurrent, total station surveys and TLS derived DEMs. Error models of the sandbar surfaces are developed for a variety of surface characteristics (e.g., bare sand, steep slopes, and areas of shadow). The Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) Software is used to compare SfM DEMs from before and after the 2014 high flow release from Glen Canyon Dam. Complementing existing total-station based sandbar surveys with potentially more efficient and cost-effective SfM methods will contribute to the understanding of morphodynamic responses of sandbars to high flow releases from Glen Canyon Dam. In addition, the development and implementation of a SfM-based operational protocol for monitoring geomorphic change will provide

  9. From Hype to an Operational Tool: Efforts to Establish a Long-Term Monitoring Protocol of Alluvial Sandbars using `Structure-from-Motion' Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Buscombe, D.; Grams, P. E.; Schmidt, J. C.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the use of `Structure-from-Motion' (SfM) photogrammetry to accurately map landforms, its utility for reliably detecting and monitoring geomorphic change from repeat surveys remains underexplored in fluvial environments. It is unclear how the combination of various image acquisition platforms and techniques, survey scales, vegetation cover, and terrain complexities translate into accuracy and precision metrics for SfM-based construction of digital elevation models (DEMs) of fluvial landforms. Although unmanned aerial vehicles offer the potential to rapidly image large areas, they can be relatively costly, require skilled operators, are vulnerable in adverse weather conditions, and often rely on GPS-positioning to improve their stability. This research details image acquisition techniques for an underrepresented SfM platform: the pole-mounted camera. We highlight image acquisition and post-processing limitations of the SfM method for alluvial sandbars (10s to 100s m2) located in Marble and Grand Canyons in a remote, fluvial landscape with limited field access, strong light gradients, highly variable surface texture and limited ground control. We recommend a pole-based SfM protocol and evaluate it by comparing SfM-derived DEMs against concurrent, total station surveys. Error models of the sandbar surfaces are developed for a variety of surface characteristics (e.g., bare sand, steep slopes, and areas of shadow). The Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) Software is used to compare SfM DEMs from before and after the 2014 high flow release from Glen Canyon Dam. Complementing existing total-station based sandbar surveys with potentially more efficient and cost-effective SfM methods will contribute to the understanding of morphodynamic responses of sandbars to high flow releases from Glen Canyon Dam. In addition, the development and implementation of a SfM-based operational method for monitoring geomorphic change will provide a methodological

  10. Geomorphic changes of a coral shingle cay measured using Kite Aerial Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Mitch; Duce, Stephanie; Harris, Dan; Webster, Jody M.; Thompson, Alisha; Vila-Concejo, Ana; Williams, Stefan B.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of geomorphic change in the intertidal zones of coral reefs are made using a variety of remote sensing and in-situ techniques, where variations in the coverage and spatial-temporal precision achieved are directly related to the cost of data acquisition. We present a novel, low-cost technique for measuring high-resolution changes in reef environments based on Kite Aerial Photography (KAP) and photogrammetry/structure-from-motion post-processing. KAP images are used to measure fine-scale changes in intertidal topography and sediment texture characteristics, including rubble particle size, of a coral shingle cay at One Tree Island, Great Barrier Reef in the context of storm activity. Validation using Real Time Kinematic DGPS demonstrates the ability to measure topographic elevation with an error of 5.53 cm (RMSE) and a spatial resolution of 5 cm per point, an accuracy/resolution that is superior to airborne LiDAR and equivalent to terrestrial LiDAR, but at a fraction of the equipment cost.

  11. The Potential of Light Laser Scanners Developed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles - The Review and Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarska, M.; Ostrowski, W.; Bakuła, K.; Górski, K.; Kurczyński, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Modern photogrammetry and remote sensing have found small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to be a valuable source of data in various branches of science and industry (e.g., agriculture, cultural heritage). Recently, the growing role of laser scanning in the application of UAVs has also been observed. Laser scanners dedicated to UAVs consist of four basic components: a laser scanner (LiDAR), an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver and an on-board computer. The producers of the system provide users with detailed descriptions of the accuracies separately for each component. However, the final measurement accuracy is not given. This paper reviews state-of-the-art of laser scanners developed specifically for use on a UAV, presenting an overview of several constructions that are available nowadays. The second part of the paper is focussed on analysing the influence of the sensor accuracies on the final measurement accuracy. Mathematical models developed for Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) accuracy analyses are used to estimate the theoretical accuracies of different scanners with conditions typical for UAV missions. Finally, the theoretical results derived from the mathematical simulations are compared with an experimental use case.

  12. Identifying Southern Forest Types on Aerial Photographs

    Treesearch

    Gene Avery

    1960-01-01

    This booklet has been prepared to assist photo interpreters in recognizing broad forest types on aerial photographs of the South, and to illustrate primary differences between panchromatic and infrared photography from the standpoint of timber type-mapping.

  13. AERIAL - MSC SITE - CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-12-24

    S63-23656 (1963) --- Aerial view of construction progress at the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas. NOTE: The Manned Spacecraft Center was named Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in memory of the late President following his death.

  14. Rangeland monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have great potential for rangeland management applications, such as monitoring vegetation change, developing grazing strategies, determining rangeland health, and assessing remediation treatment effectiveness. UAVs have several advantages: they can be deployed quickly...

  15. Future Role of Aerial Platforms at Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutts, J. A.; Pauken, M.; Hall, J. L.; Baines, K. H.; Grimm, R.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reviews the brief experience with deploying aerial platforms at Venus, the various mission concepts that have been proposed over the last three decades, and a vision for their application through 2050.

  16. Bridging scales from satellite to grains: Structural mapping aided by tablet and photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Mancktelow, Neil; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Wex, Sebastian; Camacho, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Bridging scales from satellite to grains: Structural mapping aided by tablet and photogrammetry A fundamental problem in small-scale mapping is linking outcrop observations to the large scale deformation pattern. The evolution of handheld devices such as tablets with integrated GPS and the availability of airborne imagery allows a precise localization of outcrops. Detailed structural geometries can be analyzed through ortho-rectified photo mosaics generated by photogrammetry software. In this study, we use a cheap standard Samsung-tablet (< 300 Euro) to map individual, up to 60 m long shear zones with the tracking option offered by the program Locus Map. Even though GPS accuracy is about 3 m, the relative error from one point to another during tracking is on the order of only about 1 dm. Parts of the shear zone with excellent outcrop are photographed with a standard camera with a relatively wide angle in a mosaic array. An area of about 30 sqm needs about 50 photographs with enough overlap to be used for photogrammetry. The software PhotoScan from Agisoft matches the photographs in a fully automated manner, calculates a 3D model of the outcrop, and has the option to project this as an orthophoto onto a flat surface. This allows original orientations of grain-scale structures to be recorded over areas on a scale up to tens to hundreds of metres. The photo mosaics can then be georeferenced with the aid of the GPS-tracks of the shear zones and included in a GIS. This provides a cheap recording of the structures in high detail. The great advantages over mapping with UAVs (drones) is the resolution (<1mm to >1cm), the independence from weather and energy source, and the low cost.

  17. Plot-scale soil loss estimation with laser scanning and photogrammetry methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Boglárka; Szabó, Judit; Jakab, Gergely; Centeri, Csaba; Szalai, Zoltán; Somogyi, Árpád; Barsi, Árpád

    2017-04-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) is an automatic feature-matching algorithm, which nowadays is widely used tool in photogrammetry for geoscience applications. SfM method and parallel terrestrial laser scanning measurements are widespread and they can be well accomplished for quantitative soil erosion measurements as well. Therefore, our main scope was soil erosion characterization quantitatively and qualitatively, 3D visualization and morphological characterization of soil-erosion-dynamics. During the rainfall simulation, the surface had been measured and compared before and after the rainfall event by photogrammetry (SfM - Structure from Motion) and laser scanning (TLS - Terrestrial Laser Scanning) methods. The validation of the given results had been done by the caught runoff and the measured soil-loss value. During the laboratory experiment, the applied rainfall had 40 mm/h rainfall intensity. The size of the plot was 0.5 m2. The laser scanning had been implemented with Faro Focus 3D 120 S type equipment, while the SfM shooting had been carried out by 2 piece SJCAM SJ4000+ type, 12 MP resolution and 4K action cams. The photo-reconstruction had been made with Agisoft Photoscan software, while evaluation of the resulted point-cloud from laser scanning and photogrammetry had been implemented partly in CloudCompare and partly in ArcGIS. The resulted models and the calculated surface changes didn't prove to be suitable for estimating soil-loss, only for the detection of changes in the vertical surface. The laser scanning resulted a quite precise surface model, while the SfM method is affected by errors at the surface model due to other factors. The method needs more adequate technical laboratory preparation.

  18. UAV-LiDAR accuracy and comparison to Structure from Motion photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharczyk, M.; Hugenholtz, C.; Zou, X.; Nesbit, P. R.; Barchyn, T.

    2016-12-01

    We compare the spatial accuracy of a UAV-LiDAR system with Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry. UAV-based LiDAR remote sensing potentially offers advantages over SfM photogrammetry in vegetated terrain, particularly with respect to canopy penetration and related measurements of ground surface elevation and vegetation height; however, little quantitative evidence has been presented to date. To address this, we performed a case study at a field site in Alberta, Canada with six different land cover types: short grass, tall grass, short shrubs, tall shrubs, deciduous trees, and coniferous trees. Both UAV datasets were acquired on the same day. The SfM dataset was derived from images acquired by a senseFly eBee fixed-wing UAV equipped with a 16.1 megapixel RGB camera. The UAV-LiDAR system is a proprietary design that consists of a single-rotor helicopter (2-m rotor diameter) equipped with a Riegl VUX-1UAV laser scanner, KVH 1750 inertial measurement unit, and dual NovAtel GNSS receivers. We measured vegetation height from at least 30 samples in each land cover type and acquired check point measurements to determine horizontal and vertical accuracy. Vegetation height was measured manually for grasses and shrubs with a level staff, and with a total station for trees. Coordinates of horizontal and vertical check points were surveyed with real-time kinematic (RTK) GNSS. We followed standard methods for computing horizontal and vertical accuracies based on the 2015 guidelines from the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. Results will be presented at the AGU Fall Meeting.

  19. Locating buildings in aerial photos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Algorithms and techniques for use in the identification and location of large buildings in digitized copies of aerial photographs are developed and tested. The building data would be used in the simulation of objects located in the vicinity of an airport that may be detected by aircraft radar. Two distinct approaches are considered. Most building footprints are rectangular in form. The first approach studied is to search for right-angled corners that characterize rectangular objects and then to connect these corners to complete the building. This problem is difficult because many nonbuilding objects, such as street corners, parking lots, and ballparks often have well defined corners which are often difficult to distinguish from rooftops. Furthermore, rooftops come in a number of shapes, sizes, shadings, and textures which also limit the discrimination task. The strategy used linear sequences of different samples to detect straight edge segments at multiple angles and to determine when these segments meet at approximately right-angles with respect to each other. This technique is effective in locating corners. The test image used has a fairly rectangular block pattern oriented about thirty degrees clockwise from a vertical alignment, and the overall measurement data reflect this. However, this technique does not discriminate between buildings and other objects at an operationally suitable rate. In addition, since multiple paths are tested for each image pixel, this is a time consuming task. The process can be speeded up by preprocessing the image to locate the more optimal sampling paths. The second approach is to rely on a human operator to identify and select the building objects and then to have the computer determine the outline and location of the selected structures. When presented with a copy of a digitized aerial photograph, the operator uses a mouse and cursor to select a target building. After a button on the mouse is pressed, with the cursor fully within

  20. Reliable aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.; Bowman, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for energy conservation, the aerial thermography survey, is discussed. It locates sources of energy losses and wasteful energy management practices. An operational map is presented for clear sky conditions. The map outlines the key environmental conditions conductive to obtaining reliable aerial thermography. The map is developed from defined visual and heat loss discrimination criteria which are quantized based on flat roof heat transfer calculations.

  1. Aerial righting reflexes in flightless animals.

    PubMed

    Jusufi, Ardian; Zeng, Yu; Full, Robert J; Dudley, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Animals that fall upside down typically engage in an aerial righting response so as to reorient dorsoventrally. This behavior can be preparatory to gliding or other controlled aerial behaviors and is ultimately necessary for a successful landing. Aerial righting reflexes have been described historically in various mammals such as cats, guinea pigs, rabbits, rats, and primates. The mechanisms whereby such righting can be accomplished depend on the size of the animal and on anatomical features associated with motion of the limbs and body. Here we apply a comparative approach to the study of aerial righting to explore the diverse strategies used for reorientation in midair. We discuss data for two species of lizards, the gecko Hemidactylus platyurus and the anole Anolis carolinensis, as well as for the first instar of the stick insect Extatosoma tiaratum, to illustrate size-dependence of this phenomenon and its relevance to subsequent aerial performance in parachuting and gliding animals. Geckos can use rotation of their large tails to reorient their bodies via conservation of angular momentum. Lizards with tails well exceeding snout-vent length, and correspondingly large tail inertia to body inertia ratios, are more effective at creating midair reorientation maneuvers. Moreover, experiments with stick insects, weighing an order of magnitude less than the lizards, suggest that aerodynamic torques acting on the limbs and body may play a dominant role in the righting process for small invertebrates. Both inertial and aerodynamic effects, therefore, can play a role in the control of aerial righting. We propose that aerial righting reflexes are widespread among arboreal vertebrates and arthropods and that they represent an important initial adaptation in the evolution of controlled aerial behavior.

  2. Non-Lethal Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-15

    ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION N.- Same as Item Yb 11. TITLE (Include Security Clasiiicotion) "Non- Lethal Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)" (U) 12. PERSONAL...NOTATION Non- Lethal Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) reflects current terminolcgy. Remotely Piloted Vehicle (RPV) and Drone Aircraft are outdated terms...1?. COSAT CODES tS SUBJECT T-RMS (Cont,’we on reverfe if necesary and identi•y by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP UAVs Flight Terminal I

  3. Non-Lethal Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UVs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-15

    Security Classification) "Non- Lethal Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs)" (U) ERSONAL AUTHOR(S) 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year...Month,,Oay) 15. PAGE COUNT Final FROM TO 1 1993 June 15 39 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION Non- Lethal Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) reflects current...identify by 3lock number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP UAVs Flight Terminal Payload FLIR Infrared 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and

  4. Digital 2D-photogrammetry and direct anthropometry--a comparing study on test accomplishment and measurement data.

    PubMed

    Franke-Gromberg, Christine; Schüler, Grit; Hermanussen, Michael; Scheffler, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this methodological anthropometric study was to compare direct anthropometry and digital two-dimensional photogrammetry in 18 male and 27 female subjects, aged 24 to 65 years, from Potsdam, Germany. In view of the rising interest in reliable biometric kephalofacial data, we focussed on head and face measurements. Out of 34 classic facial anatomical landmarks, 27 landmarks were investigated both by direct anthropometry and 2D-photogrammetry; 7 landmarks could not be localized by 2D-photogrammetry. Twenty-six kephalofacial distances were analysed both by direct anthropometry and digital 2D-photogrammetry. Kephalofacial distances are on average 7.6% shorter when obtained by direct anthropometry. The difference between the two techniques is particularly evident in total head height (vertex-gnathion) due to the fact that vertex is usually covered by hair and escapes from photogrammetry. Also the distances photographic sellion-gnathion (1.3 cm, i. e. 11.6%) and nasal-gnathion (1.2 cm, i. e. 9.4%) differ by more than one centimetre. Differences below 0.5 cm between the two techniques were found when measuring mucosa-lip-height (2.2%), gonia (3.0%), glabella-stomion (3.9%), and nose height (glabella-subnasal) (4.0%). Only the estimates of forehead width were significantly narrower when obtained by 2D-photogrammetry (-1.4 cm, -13.1%). The methodological differences increased with increasing magnitude of the kephalometric distance. Apart from these limitations, both techniques are similarly valid and may replace each other.

  5. CFD Simulation of Aerial Crop Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Zamri; Qiang, Kua Yong; Mohd, Sofian; Rosly, Nurhayati

    2016-11-01

    Aerial crop spraying, also known as crop dusting, is made for aerial application of pesticides or fertilizer. An agricultural aircraft which is converted from an aircraft has been built to combine with the aerial crop spraying for the purpose. In recent years, many studies on the aerial crop spraying were conducted because aerial application is the most economical, large and rapid treatment for the crops. The main objective of this research is to study the airflow of aerial crop spraying system using Computational Fluid Dynamics. This paper is focus on the effect of aircraft speed and nozzle orientation on the distribution of spray droplet at a certain height. Successful and accurate of CFD simulation will improve the quality of spray during the real situation and reduce the spray drift. The spray characteristics and efficiency are determined from the calculated results of CFD. Turbulence Model (k-ɛ Model) is used for the airflow in the fluid domain to achieve a more accurate simulation. Furthermore, spray simulation is done by setting the Flat-fan Atomizer Model of Discrete Phase Model (DPM) at the nozzle exit. The interaction of spray from each flat-fan atomizer can also be observed from the simulation. The evaluation of this study is validation and grid dependency study using field data from industry.

  6. In-Vacuum Photogrammetry of a Ten-Meter Square Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Jones, Thomas W.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Meyer, Christopher G.

    2006-01-01

    Solar sailing is a promising, future in-space propulsion method that uses the small force of reflecting sunlight to accelerate a large, reflective membrane without expendable propellants. One of two solar sail configurations under development by NASA is a striped net approach by L'Garde, Inc. This design uses four inflatably deployed, lightweight booms supporting a network of thin strings onto which four quadrants of ultrathin aluminized membranes are attached. The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) provided both experimental and analytical support to L'Garde for validating the structural characteristics of this unique, ultralightweight spacecraft concept. One of LaRC's responsibilities was to develop and apply photogrammetric methods to measure sail shape. The deployed shape provides important information for validating the accuracy of finite-element modeling techniques. Photogrammetry is the science and art of calculating 3D coordinates of targets or other distinguishing features on structures using images. A minimum of two camera views of each target is required for 3D determination, but having four or more camera views is preferable for improved reliability and accuracy. Using retroreflective circular targets typically provides the highest measurement accuracy and automation. References 3 and 4 provide details of photogrammetry technology, and reference 5 discusses previous experiences with photogrammetry for measuring gossamer spacecraft structures such as solar sails. This paper discusses the experimental techniques used to measure a L Garde 10-m solar sail test in vacuum with photogrammetry. The test was conducted at the NASA-Glenn Space Power Facility (SPF) located at Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. The SPF is the largest vacuum chamber in the United States, measuring 30 m in diameter by 37 m in height. High vacuum levels (10(exp -6) torr) can be maintained inside the chamber, and cold environments (-195 C) are possible using variable

  7. In-Vacuum Photogrammetry of a Ten-Meter Square Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Jones, Thomas W.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Meyer, Christopher G.

    2006-01-01

    Solar sailing is a promising, future in-space propulsion method that uses the small force of reflecting sunlight to accelerate a large, reflective membrane without expendable propellants. One of two solar sail configurations under development by NASA is a striped net approach by L'Garde, Inc. This design uses four inflatably deployed, lightweight booms supporting a network of thin strings onto which four quadrants of ultrathin aluminized membranes are attached. The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) provided both experimental and analytical support to L'Garde for validating the structural characteristics of this unique, ultralightweight spacecraft concept. One of LaRC's responsibilities was to develop and apply photogrammetric methods to measure sail shape. The deployed shape provides important information for validating the accuracy of finite-element modeling techniques. Photogrammetry is the science and art of calculating 3D coordinates of targets or other distinguishing features on structures using images. A minimum of two camera views of each target is required for 3D determination, but having four or more camera views is preferable for improved reliability and accuracy. Using retroreflective circular targets typically provides the highest measurement accuracy and automation. References 3 and 4 provide details of photogrammetry technology, and reference 5 discusses previous experiences with photogrammetry for measuring gossamer spacecraft structures such as solar sails. This paper discusses the experimental techniques used to measure a L Garde 10-m solar sail test in vacuum with photogrammetry. The test was conducted at the NASA-Glenn Space Power Facility (SPF) located at Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. The SPF is the largest vacuum chamber in the United States, measuring 30 m in diameter by 37 m in height. High vacuum levels (10(exp -6) torr) can be maintained inside the chamber, and cold environments (-195 C) are possible using variable

  8. A New Application of Photogrammetry in the Underground Pipe Network Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, N.; Tian, H.; Yang, Y.; Jin, J.; Li, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2016-06-01

    This paper mainly introduces a device that can be used for underground pipeline survey task. Through the cameras installed on the device, we can obtain stereo synchronous shooting images, and then use the method of close range photogrammetry to investigate and measure underground objects. During working process, the staff put the camera into the well and to control camera shooting from the ground. Greatly improve work efficiency, at the same time to avoid the underground toxis gas damage to people. The main content of this paper includes three parts: hardware design, software development and test production.

  9. Fold-Thrust mapping using photogrammetry in Western Champsaur basin, SE France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totake, Y.; Butler, R.; Bond, C. E.

    2016-12-01

    There is an increasing demand for high-resolution geometric data for outcropping geological structures - not only to test models for their formation and evolution but also to create synthetic seismic visualisations for comparison with subsurface data. High-resolution 3D scenes reconstructed by modern photogrammetry offer an efficient toolbox for such work. When integrated with direct field measurements and observations, these products can be used to build geological interpretations and models. Photogrammetric techniques using standard equipment are ideally suited to working in the high mountain terrain that commonly offers the best outcrops, as all equipment is readily portable and, in the absence of cloud-cover, not restricted to the meteorological and legal restrictions that can affect some airborne approaches. The workflows and approaches for generating geological models utilising such photogrammetry techniques are the focus of our contribution. Our case study comes from SE France where early Alpine fore-deep sediments have been deformed into arrays of fold-thrust complexes. Over 1500m vertical relief provides excellent outcrop control with surrounding hillsides providing vantage points for ground-based photogrammetry. We collected over 9,400 photographs across the fold-thrust array using a handheld digital camera from 133 ground locations that were individually georeferenced. We processed the photographic images within the software PhotoScan-Pro to build 3D landscape scenes. The built photogrammetric models were then imported into the software Move, along with field measurements, to map faults and sedimentary layers and to produce geological cross sections and 3D geological surfaces. Polylines of sediment beds and faults traced on our photogrammetry models allow interpretation of a pseudo-3D geometry of the deformation structures, and enable prediction of dips and strikes from inaccessible field areas, to map the complex geometries of the thrust faults and

  10. Combining laser scan and photogrammetry for 3D object modeling using a single digital camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2009-07-01

    In the fields of industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation, physical objects are usually digitalized by reverse engineering through some 3D scanning methods. Laser scan and photogrammetry are two main methods to be used. For laser scan, a video camera and a laser source are necessary, and for photogrammetry, a digital still camera with high resolution pixels is indispensable. In some 3D modeling tasks, two methods are often integrated to get satisfactory results. Although many research works have been done on how to combine the results of the two methods, no work has been reported to design an integrated device at low cost. In this paper, a new 3D scan system combining laser scan and photogrammetry using a single consumer digital camera is proposed. Nowadays there are many consumer digital cameras, such as Canon EOS 5D Mark II, they usually have features of more than 10M pixels still photo recording and full 1080p HD movie recording, so a integrated scan system can be designed using such a camera. A square plate glued with coded marks is used to place the 3d objects, and two straight wood rulers also glued with coded marks can be laid on the plate freely. In the photogrammetry module, the coded marks on the plate make up a world coordinate and can be used as control network to calibrate the camera, and the planes of two rulers can also be determined. The feature points of the object and the rough volume representation from the silhouettes can be obtained in this module. In the laser scan module, a hand-held line laser is used to scan the object, and the two straight rulers are used as reference planes to determine the position of the laser. The laser scan results in dense points cloud which can be aligned together automatically through calibrated camera parameters. The final complete digital model is obtained through a new a patchwise energy functional method by fusion of the feature points, rough volume and the dense points cloud. The design

  11. Quantitative facial asymmetry: using three-dimensional photogrammetry to measure baseline facial surface symmetry.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Helena O; Morrison, Clinton S; Linden, Olivia; Phillips, Benjamin; Chang, Johnny; Byrne, Margaret E; Sullivan, Stephen R; Forrest, Christopher R

    2014-01-01

    Although symmetry is hailed as a fundamental goal of aesthetic and reconstructive surgery, our tools for measuring this outcome have been limited and subjective. With the advent of three-dimensional photogrammetry, surface geometry can be captured, manipulated, and measured quantitatively. Until now, few normative data existed with regard to facial surface symmetry. Here, we present a method for reproducibly calculating overall facial symmetry and present normative data on 100 subjects. We enrolled 100 volunteers who underwent three-dimensional photogrammetry of their faces in repose. We collected demographic data on age, sex, and race and subjectively scored facial symmetry. We calculated the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between the native and reflected faces, reflecting about a plane of maximum symmetry. We analyzed the interobserver reliability of the subjective assessment of facial asymmetry and the quantitative measurements and compared the subjective and objective values. We also classified areas of greatest asymmetry as localized to the upper, middle, or lower facial thirds. This cluster of normative data was compared with a group of patients with subtle but increasing amounts of facial asymmetry. We imaged 100 subjects by three-dimensional photogrammetry. There was a poor interobserver correlation between subjective assessments of asymmetry (r = 0.56). There was a high interobserver reliability for quantitative measurements of facial symmetry RMSD calculations (r = 0.91-0.95). The mean RMSD for this normative population was found to be 0.80 ± 0.24 mm. Areas of greatest asymmetry were distributed as follows: 10% upper facial third, 49% central facial third, and 41% lower facial third. Precise measurement permitted discrimination of subtle facial asymmetry within this normative group and distinguished norms from patients with subtle facial asymmetry, with placement of RMSDs along an asymmetry ruler. Facial surface symmetry, which is poorly assessed

  12. How large is the world's largest fish? Measuring whale sharks Rhincodon typus with laser photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Rohner, C A; Richardson, A J; Marshall, A D; Weeks, S J; Pierce, S J

    2011-01-01

    Laser photogrammetry was found to be a promising new cost-effective technique for measuring free-swimming whale sharks Rhincodon typus. Photogrammetric measurements were more precise than visual size estimates by experienced researchers, with results from the two methods differing by 9· 8 ± 1· 1% (mean ±s.e.). A new metric of total length and the length between the fifth gill and first dorsal fin (r² = 0· 93) is proposed to facilitate easy, accurate length measurements of whale sharks in the field.

  13. The combined use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technologies for the 3D illustration of the progress of works in infrastructure construction projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacanas, Yiannis; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Agapiou, Athos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2016-08-01

    Building Information Modelling (BIM) technology is already part of the construction industry and is considered by professionals as a very useful tool for all phases of a construction project. BIM technology, with the particularly useful 3D illustrations which it provides, can be used to illustrate and monitor the progress of works effectively through the entire lifetime of the project. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have undergone significant advances in equipment capabilities and now have the capacity to acquire high resolution imagery from different angles in a cost effective and efficient manner. By using photogrammetry, characteristics such as distances, areas, volumes, elevations, object sizes, and object shape can be determined within overlapping areas. This paper explores the combined use of BIM and UAV technologies in order to achieve efficient and accurate as-built data collection and 3D illustrations of the works progress during an infrastructure construction project.

  14. Endurance bounds of aerial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Aaron M.; Kroninger, Christopher M.

    2014-06-01

    Within the past few years micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) have received much more attention and are starting to proliferate into military as well as civilian roles. However, one of the major drawbacks for this technology currently, has been their poor endurance, usually below 10 minutes. This is a direct result of the inefficiencies inherent in their design. Often times, designers do not consider the various components in the vehicle design and match their performance to the desired mission for the vehicle. These vehicles lack a prescribed set of design guidelines or empirically derived design equations which often limits their design to selection of commercial off-the-shelf components without proper consideration of their affect on vehicle performance. In the current study, the design space for different vehicle configurations has been examined including insect flapping, avian flapping, rotary wing, and fixed wing, and their performance bounds are established. The propulsion system typical of a rotary wing vehicle is analyzed to establish current baselines for efficiency of vehicles at this scale. The power draw from communications is analyzed to determine its impact on vehicle performance. Finally, a representative fixed wing MAV is examined and the effects of adaptive structures as a means for increasing vehicle endurance and range are examined. This paper seeks to establish the performance bounds for micro air vehicles and establish a path forward for future designs so that efficiency may be maximized.

  15. Aerial photo SBVC1962". Photo no. 360. Low oblique aerial view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial photo -SBVC-1962". Photo no. 360. Low oblique aerial view of the campus, looking southeast. Stamped on the rear: "Ron Wilhite, Sun-Telegram photo, file, 10/22/62/ - San Bernardino Valley College, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Integration of aerial imaging and variable-rate technology for site-specific aerial herbicide application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As remote sensing and variable rate technology are becoming more available for aerial applicators, practical methodologies on effective integration of these technologies are needed for site-specific aerial applications of crop production and protection materials. The objectives of this study were to...

  17. Multiscale Documentation and Monitoring of L'aquila Historical Centre Using Uav Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominici, D.; Alicandro, M.; Rosciano, E.; Massimi, V.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays geomatic techniques can guarantee not only a precise and accurate survey for the documentation of our historical heritage but also a solution to monitor its behaviour over time after, for example, a catastrophic event (earthquakes, landslides, ecc). Europe is trying to move towards harmonized actions to store information on cultural heritage (MIBAC with the ICCS forms, English heritage with the MIDAS scheme, etc) but it would be important to provide standardized methods in order to perform measuring operations to collect certified metric data. The final result could be a database to support the entire management of the cultural heritage and also a checklist of "what to do" and "when to do it". The wide range of geomatic techniques provides many solutions to acquire, to organize and to manage data at a multiscale level: high resolution satellite images can provide information in a short time during the "early emergency" while UAV photogrammetry and laser scanning can provide digital high resolution 3D models of buildings, ortophotos of roofs and facades and so on. This paper presents some multiscale survey case studies using UAV photogrammetry: from a minor historical village (Aielli) to the centre of L'Aquila (Santa Maria di Collemaggio Church) from the post-emergency to now. This choice has been taken not only to present how geomatics is an effective science for modelling but also to present a complete and reliable way to perform conservation and/or restoration through precise monitoring techniques, as shown in the third case study.

  18. D Data Acquisition Based on Opencv for Close-Range Photogrammetry Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurjević, L.; Gašparović, M.

    2017-05-01

    Development of the technology in the area of the cameras, computers and algorithms for 3D the reconstruction of the objects from the images resulted in the increased popularity of the photogrammetry. Algorithms for the 3D model reconstruction are so advanced that almost anyone can make a 3D model of photographed object. The main goal of this paper is to examine the possibility of obtaining 3D data for the purposes of the close-range photogrammetry applications, based on the open source technologies. All steps of obtaining 3D point cloud are covered in this paper. Special attention is given to the camera calibration, for which two-step process of calibration is used. Both, presented algorithm and accuracy of the point cloud are tested by calculating the spatial difference between referent and produced point clouds. During algorithm testing, robustness and swiftness of obtaining 3D data is noted, and certainly usage of this and similar algorithms has a lot of potential in the real-time application. That is the reason why this research can find its application in the architecture, spatial planning, protection of cultural heritage, forensic, mechanical engineering, traffic management, medicine and other sciences.

  19. A multi-scale approach of fluvial biogeomorphic dynamics using photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Hortobágyi, Borbála; Corenblit, Dov; Vautier, Franck; Steiger, Johannes; Roussel, Erwan; Burkart, Andreas; Peiry, Jean-Luc

    2017-11-01

    Over the last twenty years, significant technical advances turned photogrammetry into a relevant tool for the integrated analysis of biogeomorphic cross-scale interactions within vegetated fluvial corridors, which will largely contribute to the development and improvement of self-sustainable river restoration efforts. Here, we propose a cost-effective, easily reproducible approach based on stereophotogrammetry and Structure from Motion (SfM) technique to study feedbacks between fluvial geomorphology and riparian vegetation at different nested spatiotemporal scales. We combined different photogrammetric methods and thus were able to investigate biogeomorphic feedbacks at all three spatial scales (i.e., corridor, alluvial bar and micro-site) and at three different temporal scales, i.e., present, recent past and long term evolution on a diversified riparian landscape mosaic. We evaluate the performance and the limits of photogrammetric methods by targeting a set of fundamental parameters necessary to study biogeomorphic feedbacks at each of the three nested spatial scales and, when possible, propose appropriate solutions. The RMSE varies between 0.01 and 2 m depending on spatial scale and photogrammetric methods. Despite some remaining difficulties to properly apply them with current technologies under all circumstances in fluvial biogeomorphic studies, e.g. the detection of vegetation density or landform topography under a dense vegetation canopy, we suggest that photogrammetry is a promising instrument for the quantification of biogeomorphic feedbacks at nested spatial scales within river systems and for developing appropriate river management tools and strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Is SfM photogrammetry really the tool we've waited 30 years for?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Jim; Micheletti, Natan; Lane, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    SFM photogrammetry has evolved rapidly in the last few years, to the point where it is beginning to surpass terrestrial laser scanning for capturing 3-D models of natural surfaces. The ability to generate high resolution digital terrain models using just a consumer grade digital camera, or even a smart phone, is an important advance. The fact that this can be achieved at a range of scales and resolutions and from a variety of platforms, whilst using software which is freely available, appears almost incredible. This invited presentation seeks to place SfM photogrammetry in its proper historical context, by demonstrating just how rapidly techniques have evolved over the last 30 years. However, it is important to look forward and help ensure that future use is effective, even if spatial measurement expertise is limited. Consequently, the presentation will also demonstrate just how well-established lessons learnt in the past continue to remain important, particularly if accurate spatial data is desired. The application of SfM to a range of case studies will help to demonstrate the importance of scene geometry and accurate camera calibration and modelling. In addition, the establishment of external control remains critical for determining true change and the provision of independent checkpoints provides important verification of accuracies actually achieved. Recognition of these traditional photogrammetric principles and well-established practices should help ensure that expectations are both realistic and can be fulfilled, even for a new generation of non-expert users.

  1. Comparative evaluation of consumer grade cameras and mobile phone cameras for close range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikatsu, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Yoji

    2009-08-01

    The authors have been concentrating on developing convenient 3D measurement methods using consumer grade digital cameras, and it was concluded that consumer grade digital cameras are expected to become a useful photogrammetric device for the various close range application fields. On the other hand, mobile phone cameras which have 10 mega pixels were appeared on the market in Japan. In these circumstances, we are faced with alternative epoch-making problem whether mobile phone cameras are able to take the place of consumer grade digital cameras in close range photogrammetric applications. In order to evaluate potentials of mobile phone cameras in close range photogrammetry, comparative evaluation between mobile phone cameras and consumer grade digital cameras are investigated in this paper with respect to lens distortion, reliability, stability and robustness. The calibration tests for 16 mobile phone cameras and 50 consumer grade digital cameras were conducted indoors using test target. Furthermore, practability of mobile phone camera for close range photogrammetry was evaluated outdoors. This paper presents that mobile phone cameras have ability to take the place of consumer grade digital cameras, and develop the market in digital photogrammetric fields.

  2. The Metric Documentation of Cham Towers in Vietnam by Spherical Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangi, G.; Malinverni, E. S.; Tassetti, A. N.

    2013-07-01

    The Università Politecnica delle Marche is charged of the study, survey and documentation of the Chan towers in Vietnam. The towers are spread near the coastline from latitude 16° 30', to latitude of 10° 56'. The Champa civilization flourished from 8th century till 17th century produced the Cham towers, places of religious worship. The ancient Cham people created a developed culture expressed in the architecture in the towers, which were Buddhist temples. Roughly there are six different architectonic styles and two different layouts in plan. One lay-out is that one main tower is surrounded by smaller service buildings, like walls, doors, gates; the other layout is a set of three aligned towers. We carried out the documentation with three different techniques, laser scanning, dense point clouds generation with SfM (Structure from Motion) algorithm, and mainly by Panoramic Spherical Photogrammetry (PSP). Laser scanning is indeed the best instrument but sometimes its availability is very limited for different practical and logistic reasons. The point cloud generation produced good results, but it has some problems and limitations of management too. On the other hand PSP is very quick technique in the taking phase, but the restitution is rather slow. PSP is suitable for a good metric documentation, making the Cham tower project the main project of documentation executed with spherical photogrammetry.

  3. Ground-based multi-view photogrammetry for the monitoring of landslide deformation and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, A.; Malet, J.-P.; Allemand, P.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Skupinski, G.

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in multi-view photogrammetry have resulted in a new class of algorithms and software tools for more automated surface reconstruction. These new techniques have a great potential to provide topographic information for geoscience applications at significantly lower costs than classical topographic and laser scanning surveys. Based on open-source libraries for multi-view stereo-photogrammetry and Structure-from-Motion, this study investigates the accuracy that can be obtained from several processing pipelines for the 3D surface reconstruction of landslides and the detection of changes over time. Two different algorithms for point-cloud comparison are tested and the accuracy of the resulting models is assessed against terrestrial and airborne LiDAR point clouds. Change detection over a period of more than two years allows a detailed assessment of the seasonal dynamics of the landslide; the possibility to estimate sediment volumes and 3D displacement are illustrated for the most active parts of the landslide. Algorithm parameters and the image acquisition protocols are found to have important impacts on the quality of the results and are discussed in detail.

  4. Development and Evaluation of a UAV-Photogrammetry System for Precise 3D Environmental Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mozhdeh; Sohn, Gunho; Théau, Jérôme; Menard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The specific requirements of UAV-photogrammetry necessitate particular solutions for system development, which have mostly been ignored or not assessed adequately in recent studies. Accordingly, this paper presents the methodological and experimental aspects of correctly implementing a UAV-photogrammetry system. The hardware of the system consists of an electric-powered helicopter, a high-resolution digital camera and an inertial navigation system. The software of the system includes the in-house programs specifically designed for camera calibration, platform calibration, system integration, on-board data acquisition, flight planning and on-the-job self-calibration. The detailed features of the system are discussed, and solutions are proposed in order to enhance the system and its photogrammetric outputs. The developed system is extensively tested for precise modeling of the challenging environment of an open-pit gravel mine. The accuracy of the results is evaluated under various mapping conditions, including direct georeferencing and indirect georeferencing with different numbers, distributions and types of ground control points. Additionally, the effects of imaging configuration and network stability on modeling accuracy are assessed. The experiments demonstrated that 1.55 m horizontal and 3.16 m vertical absolute modeling accuracy could be achieved via direct geo-referencing, which was improved to 0.4 cm and 1.7 cm after indirect geo-referencing. PMID:26528976

  5. Multi-image Photogrammetry for Underwater Archaeological Site Recording: An Accessible, Diver-Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, John; Benjamin, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    This article presents a discussion of recent advances in underwater photogrammetric survey, illustrated by case studies in Scotland and Denmark between 2011 and 2013. Results from field trials are discussed with the aim of illustrating practical low-cost solutions for recording underwater archaeological sites in 3D using photogrammetry and using this data to offer enhanced recording, interpretation and analysis. We argue that the availability of integrated multi-image photogrammetry software, highly light-sensitive digital sensors and wide-aperture compact cameras, now allow for simple work flows with minimal equipment and excellent natural colour images even at depths of up to 30 m. This has changed the possibilities for underwater photogrammetric recording, which can now be done on a small scale, through the use of a single camera and automated work flow. The intention of this paper is to demonstrate the quality and versatility of the `one camera/ambient light/integrated software' technique through the case studies presented and the results derived from this process. We also demonstrate how the 3D data generated can be subjected to surface analysis techniques to enhance detail and to generate data-driven fly-throughs and reconstructions, opening the door to new avenues of engagement with both specialists and the wider public.

  6. Fusion of range camera and photogrammetry: a systematic procedure for improving 3-D models metric accuracy.

    PubMed

    Guidi, G; Beraldin, J A; Ciofi, S; Atzeni, C

    2003-01-01

    The generation of three-dimensional (3-D) digital models produced by optical technologies in some cases involves metric errors. This happens when small high-resolution 3-D images are assembled together in order to model a large object. In some applications, as for example 3-D modeling of Cultural Heritage, the problem of metric accuracy is a major issue and no methods are currently available for enhancing it. The authors present a procedure by which the metric reliability of the 3-D model, obtained through iterative alignments of many range maps, can be guaranteed to a known acceptable level. The goal is the integration of the 3-D range camera system with a close range digital photogrammetry technique. The basic idea is to generate a global coordinate system determined by the digital photogrammetric procedure, measuring the spatial coordinates of optical targets placed around the object to be modeled. Such coordinates, set as reference points, allow the proper rigid motion of few key range maps, including a portion of the targets, in the global reference system defined by photogrammetry. The other 3-D images are normally aligned around these locked images with usual iterative algorithms. Experimental results on an anthropomorphic test object, comparing the conventional and the proposed alignment method, are finally reported.

  7. Development and Evaluation of a UAV-Photogrammetry System for Precise 3D Environmental Modeling.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mozhdeh; Sohn, Gunho; Théau, Jérôme; Menard, Patrick

    2015-10-30

    The specific requirements of UAV-photogrammetry necessitate particular solutions for system development, which have mostly been ignored or not assessed adequately in recent studies. Accordingly, this paper presents the methodological and experimental aspects of correctly implementing a UAV-photogrammetry system. The hardware of the system consists of an electric-powered helicopter, a high-resolution digital camera and an inertial navigation system. The software of the system includes the in-house programs specifically designed for camera calibration, platform calibration, system integration, on-board data acquisition, flight planning and on-the-job self-calibration. The detailed features of the system are discussed, and solutions are proposed in order to enhance the system and its photogrammetric outputs. The developed system is extensively tested for precise modeling of the challenging environment of an open-pit gravel mine. The accuracy of the results is evaluated under various mapping conditions, including direct georeferencing and indirect georeferencing with different numbers, distributions and types of ground control points. Additionally, the effects of imaging configuration and network stability on modeling accuracy are assessed. The experiments demonstrated that 1.55 m horizontal and 3.16 m vertical absolute modeling accuracy could be achieved via direct geo-referencing, which was improved to 0.4 cm and 1.7 cm after indirect geo-referencing.

  8. Advancements in Open Geospatial Standards for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing from Ogc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percivall, George; Simonis, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    The necessity of open standards for effective sharing and use of remote sensing continues to receive increasing emphasis in policies of agencies and projects around the world. Coordination on the development of open standards for geospatial information is a vital step to insure that the technical standards are ready to support the policy objectives. The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to advance development and use of international standards and supporting services that promote geospatial interoperability. To accomplish this mission, OGC serves as the global forum for the collaboration of geospatial data / solution providers and users. Photogrammetry and remote sensing are sources of the largest and most complex geospatial information. Some of the most mature OGC standards for remote sensing include the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards, the Web Coverage Service (WCS) suite of standards, encodings such as NetCDF, GMLJP2 and GeoPackage, and the soon to be approved Discrete Global Grid Systems (DGGS) standard. In collaboration with ISPRS, OGC working with government, research and industrial organizations continue to advance the state of geospatial standards for full use of photogrammetry and remote sensing.

  9. Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry Methods for Solar Sails and Other Gossamer Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Jonathan T.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight and inflatable gossamer space structures are designed to be tightly packaged for launch, then deploy or inflate once in space. These properties will allow for in-space construction of very large structures 10 to 1000 meters in size such as solar sails, inflatable antennae, and space solar power stations using a single launch. Solar sails are of particular interest because of their potential for propellantless propulsion. Gossamer structures do, however, have significant complications. Their low mass and high flexibility make them very difficult to test on the ground. The added mass and stiffness of attached measurement devices can significantly alter the static and dynamic properties of the structure. This complication necessitates an alternative approach for characterization. This paper discusses the development and application of photogrammetry and videogrammetry methods for the static and dynamic characterization of gossamer structures, as four specific solar sail applications demonstrate. The applications prove that high-resolution, full-field, non-contact static measurements of solar sails using dot projection photogrammetry are possible as well as full-field, noncontact, dynamic characterization using dot projection videogrammetry.

  10. From the air to digital landscapes: generating reach-scale topographic models from aerial photography in gravel-bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vericat, Damià; Narciso, Efrén; Béjar, Maria; Tena, Álvaro; Brasington, James; Gibbins, Chris; Batalla, Ramon J.

    2014-05-01

    Digital Terrain Models are fundamental to characterise landscapes, to support numerical modelling and to monitor topographic changes. Recent advances in topography, remote sensing and geomatics are providing new opportunities to obtain high density/quality and rapid topographic data. In this paper we present an integrated methodology to rapidly obtain reach scale topographic models of fluvial systems. This methodology has been tested and is being applied to develop event-scale terrain models of a 11-km river reach in the highly dynamic Upper Cinca (NE Iberian Peninsula). This research is conducted in the background of the project MorphSed. The methodology integrates (a) the acquisition of dense point clouds of the exposed floodplain (aerial photography and digital photogrammetry); (b) the registration of all observations to the same coordinate system (using RTK-GPS surveyed GCPs); (c) the acquisition of bathymetric data (using aDcp measurements integrated with RTK-GPS); (d) the intelligent decimation of survey observations (using the open source TopCat toolkit) and, finally, (e) data fusion (elaborating Digital Elevation Models). In this paper special emphasis is given to the acquisition and registration of point clouds. 3D point clouds are obtained from aerial photography and by means of automated digital photogrammetry. Aerial photographs are taken at 275 meters above the ground by means of a SLR digital camera manually operated from an autogyro. Four flight paths are defined in order to cover the 11 km long and 500 meters wide river reach. A total of 45 minutes are required to fly along these paths. Camera has been previously calibrated with the objective to ensure image resolution at around 5 cm. A total of 220 GCPs are deployed and RTK-GPS surveyed before the flight is conducted. Two people and one full workday are necessary to deploy and survey the full set of GCPs. Field data acquisition may be finalised in less than 2 days. Structure-from-Motion is

  11. Looking for an old aerial photograph

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Attempts to photograph the surface of the Earth date from the 1800's, when photographers attached cameras to balloons, kites, and even pigeons. Today, aerial photographs and satellite images are commonplace. The rate of acquiring aerial photographs and satellite images has increased rapidly in recent years. Views of the Earth obtained from aircraft or satellites have become valuable tools to Government resource planners and managers, land-use experts, environmentalists, engineers, scientists, and a wide variety of other users. Many people want historical aerial photographs for business or personal reasons. They may want to locate the boundaries of an old farm or a piece of family property. Or they may want a photograph as a record of changes in their neighborhood, or as a gift. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintains the Earth Science Information Centers (ESIC?s) to sell aerial photographs, remotely sensed images from satellites, a wide array of digital geographic and cartographic data, as well as the Bureau?s wellknown maps. Declassified photographs from early spy satellites were recently added to the ESIC offerings of historical images. Using the Aerial Photography Summary Record System database, ESIC researchers can help customers find imagery in the collections of other Federal agencies and, in some cases, those of private companies that specialize in esoteric products.

  12. Local and General Monitoring of Forni Glacier (italian Alps) Using Multi-Platform Structure-From Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaioni, M.; Corti, M.; Diolaiuti, G.; Fugazza, D.; Cernuschi, M.

    2017-09-01

    Experts from the University of Milan have been investigating Forni Glacier in the Italian alps for decades, resulting in the archive of a cumbersome mass of observed data. While the analysis of archive maps, medium resolution satellite images and DEM's may provide an overview of the long-term processes, the application of close-range sensing techniques offers the unprecedented opportunity to operate a 4D reconstruction of the glacier geometry at both global and local levels. In the latest years the availability of high-resolution DEM's from stereo-photogrammetry (2007) and UAV-photogrammetry (2014 and 2016) has allowed an improved analysis of the glacier ice-mass balance within time. During summer 2016 a methodology to record the local disruption processes has been investigated. The presence of vertical and sub-vertical surfaces has motivated the use of Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry from ground-based stations, which yielded results comparable to the ones achieved using a long-range terrestrial laser scanner. This technique may be assumed as benchmarking for accuracy assessment, but is more difficult to be operated in high-mountain areas. Nevertheless, the measurement of GCP's for the terrestrial photogrammetric project has revealed to be a complex task, involving the need of a total station a GNSS. The effect of network geometry on the final output has also been investigated for SfM-Photogrammetry, considering the severe limitations implied in the Alpine environment.

  13. Introducing close-range photogrammetry for characterizing forest understory plant diversity and surface fuel structure at fine scales

    Treesearch

    Benjamin C. Bright; E. Louise Loudermilk; Scott M. Pokswinski; Andrew T. Hudak; Joseph J. O' Brien

    2016-01-01

    Methods characterizing fine-scale fuels and plant diversity can advance understanding of plant-fire interactions across scales and help in efforts to monitor important ecosystems such as longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) forests of the southeastern United States. Here, we evaluate the utility of close-range photogrammetry for measuring fuels and plant...

  14. Report on the Development of a Close Range Photogrammetry (CRP) Educational Technician Program (Museum and Archive Use).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobelin, Joel

    A close range photogrammetry (CRP) technician training program was developed at Miami-Dade Community College and used to teach the technology to 16 students. Although the results of the study show that it is possible to teach CRP in a two-year program, the technology is too new in the United States to support a sustaining educational program. The…

  15. Mapping snow depth in alpine terrain with unmanned aerial systems (UASs): potential and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühler, Yves; Adams, Marc S.; Bösch, Ruedi; Stoffel, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Detailed information on the spatiotemporal snow depth distribution is a crucial input for numerous applications in hydrology, climatology, ecology and avalanche research. Today, snow depth distribution is usually estimated by combining point measurements from weather stations or observers in the field with spatial interpolation algorithms. However, even a dense measurement network like the one in Switzerland, with more than one measurement station per 10 km2 on average, is not able to capture the large spatial variability of snow depth present in alpine terrain.Remote sensing methods, such as laser scanning or digital photogrammetry, have recently been successfully applied to map snow depth variability at local and regional scales. However, in most countries such data acquisition is costly if manned airplanes are involved. The effectiveness of ground-based measurements on the other hand is often hindered by occlusions, due to the complex terrain or acute viewing angles. In this paper, we investigate the application of unmanned aerial systems (UASs), in combination with structure-from-motion photogrammetry, to map snow depth distribution. Compared to manual measurements, such systems are relatively cost-effective and can be applied very flexibly to cover terrain not accessible from the ground. In this study, we map snow depth at two different locations: (a) a sheltered location at the bottom of the Flüela valley (1900 m a.s.l.) and (b) an exposed location on a peak (2500 m a.s.l.) in the ski resort Jakobshorn, both in the vicinity of Davos, Switzerland. At the first test site, we monitor the ablation on three different dates. We validate the photogrammetric snow depth maps using simultaneously acquired manual snow depth measurements. The resulting snow depth values have a root mean square error (RMSE) of less than 0.07 to 0.15 m on meadows and rocks and a RMSE of less than 0.30 m on sections covered by bushes or tall grass, compared to manual probe measurements

  16. Navigation and Remote Sensing Payloads and Methods of the Sarvant Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, P.; Fortuny, P.; Colomina, I.; Remy, M.; Macedo, K. A. C.; Zúnigo, Y. R. C.; Vaz, E.; Luebeck, D.; Moreira, J.; Blázquez, M.

    2013-08-01

    In a large number of scenarios and missions, the technical, operational and economical advantages of UAS-based photogrammetry and remote sensing over traditional airborne and satellite platforms are apparent. Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) or combined optical/SAR operation in remote areas might be a case of a typical "dull, dirty, dangerous" mission suitable for unmanned operation - in harsh environments such as for example rain forest areas in Brazil, topographic mapping of small to medium sparsely inhabited remote areas with UAS-based photogrammetry and remote sensing seems to be a reasonable paradigm. An example of such a system is the SARVANT platform, a fixed-wing aerial vehicle with a six-meter wingspan and a maximumtake- of-weight of 140 kilograms, able to carry a fifty-kilogram payload. SARVANT includes a multi-band (X and P) interferometric SAR payload, as the P-band enables the topographic mapping of densely tree-covered areas, providing terrain profile information. Moreover, the combination of X- and P-band measurements can be used to extract biomass estimations. Finally, long-term plan entails to incorporate surveying capabilities also at optical bands and deliver real-time imagery to a control station. This paper focuses on the remote-sensing concept in SARVANT, composed by the aforementioned SAR sensor and envisioning a double optical camera configuration to cover the visible and the near-infrared spectrum. The flexibility on the optical payload election, ranging from professional, medium-format cameras to mass-market, small-format cameras, is discussed as a driver in the SARVANT development. The paper also focuses on the navigation and orientation payloads, including the sensors (IMU and GNSS), the measurement acquisition system and the proposed navigation and orientation methods. The latter includes the Fast AT procedure, which performs close to traditional Integrated Sensor Orientation (ISO) and better than Direct Sensor Orientation (Di

  17. USGS Releases New Digital Aerial Products

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) has initiated distribution of digital aerial photographic products produced by scanning or digitizing film from its historical aerial photography film archive. This archive, located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, contains thousands of rolls of film that contain more than 8 million frames of historic aerial photographs. The largest portion of this archive consists of original film acquired by Federal agencies from the 1930s through the 1970s to produce 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic quadrangle maps. Most of this photography is reasonably large scale (USGS photography ranges from 1:8,000 to 1:80,000) to support the production of the maps. Two digital products are currently available for ordering: high-resolution scanned products and medium-resolution digitized products.

  18. Detection of linear features in aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Rui

    Over the past decades, considerable progress had been made to develop automatic image interpretation tools in remote sensing. However, there is still a gap between the results and the requirements for accuracy and robustness. Noisy aerial image interpretation, especially for low resolution images, is still difficult. In this thesis, we propose a fully automatic system for linear feature detection in aerial images. We present how the system works on the application of extraction and reconstruction of road and pipeline networks. The work in this thesis is divided by three parts: line detection, feature interpretation, and feature tracking. An improved Hough transform based on orientation information is introduced for the line detection. We explore the Markov random field model and Bayesian filtering for feature interpretation and tracking. Experimental results show that our proposed system is robust and effective to deal with low resolution aerial images.

  19. Resource understanding: a challenge to aerial methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udall, Stewart L.

    1965-01-01

    Aerial survey methods are speeding acquisition of survey data needed to provide and manage the nation's resources. These methods have been applied to topographic mapping for a number of years and the record clearly shows their advantages in terms of cost and speed in contrast to the ground methods that have been historically employed. Limited use is now being made of aerial methods to assist cadastral surveys, in location, acquisition and development of National Parks, in mapping the geology of the nation, in locating and developing water resources, and in surveys of the oceans. It is the purpose of this paper to call attention to these uses and to encourage the scientific community to further refine aerial methods so that their use may be increased and the veracity of data improved.

  20. Shutter/aperture settings for aerial photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.; Perry, L.

    1976-01-01

    Determination of aerial camera shutter and aperture settings to produce consistently high-quality aerial photographs is a task complicated by numerous variables. Presented in this article are brief discussions of each variable and specific data which may be used for the systematic control of each. The variables discussed include sunlight, aircraft altitude, subject and season, film speed, and optical system. Data which may be used as a base reference are included, and encompass two sets of sensitometric specifications for two film-chemistry processes along with camera-aircraft parameters, which have been established and used to produce good exposures. Information contained here may be used to design and implement an exposure-determination system for aerial photography.

  1. Aerial Measuring System Sensor Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    R. S. Detwiler

    2002-04-01

    This project deals with the modeling the Aerial Measuring System (AMS) fixed-wing and rotary-wing sensor systems, which are critical U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Consequence Management assets. The fixed-wing system is critical in detecting lost or stolen radiography or medical sources, or mixed fission products as from a commercial power plant release at high flying altitudes. The helicopter is typically used at lower altitudes to determine ground contamination, such as in measuring americium from a plutonium ground dispersal during a cleanup. Since the sensitivity of these instruments as a function of altitude is crucial in estimating detection limits of various ground contaminations and necessary count times, a characterization of their sensitivity as a function of altitude and energy is needed. Experimental data at altitude as well as laboratory benchmarks is important to insure that the strong effects of air attenuation are modeled correctly. The modeling presented here is the first attempt at such a characterization of the equipment for flying altitudes. The sodium iodide (NaI) sensors utilized with these systems were characterized using the Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. For the fixed wing system, calculations modeled the spectral response for the 3-element NaI detector pod and High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector, in the relevant energy range of 50 keV to 3 MeV. NaI detector responses were simulated for both point and distributed surface sources as a function of gamma energy and flying altitude. For point sources, photopeak efficiencies were calculated for a zero radial distance and an offset equal to the altitude. For distributed sources approximating an infinite plane, gross count efficiencies were calculated and normalized to a uniform surface deposition of 1 {micro}Ci/m{sup 2}. The helicopter calculations modeled the transport of americium-241 ({sup 241}Am

  2. The Development and Flight Testing of an Aerially Deployed Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew

    An investigation into the feasibility of aerial deployed unmanned aerial vehicles was completed. The investigation included the development and flight testing of multiple unmanned aerial systems to investigate the different components of potential aerial deployment missions. The project consisted of two main objectives; the first objective dealt with the development of an airframe capable of surviving aerial deployment from a rocket and then self assembling from its stowed configuration into its flight configuration. The second objective focused on the development of an autopilot capable of performing basic guidance, navigation, and control following aerial deployment. To accomplish these two objectives multiple airframes were developed to verify their completion experimentally. The first portion of the project, investigating the feasibility of surviving an aerial deployment, was completed using a fixed wing glider that following a successful deployment had 52 seconds of controlled flight. Before developing the autopilot in the second phase of the project, the glider was significantly upgraded to fix faults discovered in the glider flight testing and to enhance the system capabilities. Unfortunately to conform to outdoor flight restrictions imposed by the university and the Federal Aviation Administration it was required to switch airframes before flight testing of the new fixed wing platform could begin. As a result, an autopilot was developed for a quadrotor and verified experimentally completely indoors to remain within the limits of governing policies.

  3. Metrically preserving the USGS aerial film archive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moe, Donald; Longhenry, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Since 1972, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, has provided fi lm-based products to the public. EROS is home to an archive of 12 million frames of analog photography ranging from 1937 to the present. The archive contains collections from both aerial and satellite platforms including programs such as the National High Altitude Program (NHAP), National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP), U.S. Antarctic Resource Center (USARC), Declass 1(CORONA, ARGON, and LANYARD), Declass 2 (KH-7 and KH-9), and Landsat (1972 – 1992, Landsat 1–5).

  4. ARM Unmanned Aerial Systems Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Beat; Ivey, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) coupled with changes in the regulatory environment for operations of UAS in the National Airspace increase the potential value of UAS to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. UAS include unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and tethered balloon systems (TBS). The roles UAVs and TBSs could play within the ARM Facility, particularly science questions they could help address, have been discussed in several workshops, reports, and vision documents, including: This document describes the implementation of a robust and vigorous program for use of UAV and TBS for the science missions ARM supports.

  5. Aerial Robotic System for Transportation and Logistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Kakuya; Hashimoto, Naohisa; Komoriya, Kiyoshi

    The status quo of a research on a novel aerial robotic system for transportation and logistics is presented. Under a new concept for an aerial robotic transportation system, three-Dimensional Transportation Robots (3DTR) were constructed with twin turbojet engines equipped by high performance noise reduction system and a flexibly jointed delta wing controlled by 2-axis actuators. This vehicle is also stable in the air due to its pendulum structure. The first flight was successfully conducted on November 22, 2005. Flight examination of 3DTR indicates its short take-off and landing (STOL) capability.

  6. MicroProbe Small Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Geoffrey; Miles, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The MicroProbe unmanned aerial system (UAS) concept incorporates twin electric motors mounted on the vehicle wing, thus enabling an aerodynamically and environmentally clean nose area for atmospheric sensors. A payload bay is also incorporated in the fuselage to accommodate remote sensing instruments. A key feature of this concept is lightweight construction combined with low flying speeds to minimize kinetic energy and associated hazards, as well as maximizing spatial resolution. This type of aerial platform is needed for Earth science research and environmental monitoring. There were no vehicles of this type known to exist previously.

  7. Advanced Image Processing of Aerial Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodell, Glenn; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Aerial imagery of the Earth is an invaluable tool for the assessment of ground features, especially during times of disaster. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have developed techniques which have proven to be useful for such imagery. Aerial imagery from various sources, including Langley's Boeing 757 Aries aircraft, has been studied extensively. This paper discusses these studies and demonstrates that better-than-observer imagery can be obtained even when visibility is severely compromised. A real-time, multi-spectral experimental system will be described and numerous examples will be shown.

  8. Ground cover estimated from aerial photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerbermann, A. H.; Cuellar, J. A.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Estimates of per cent ground cover made by ground observers were compared with independent estimates made on the basis of low-altitude (640-1219 m) aerial photographs of the same fields. Standard statistical simple correlation and linear regression analyses revealed a high correlation between the two estimation methods. In crops such as grain, sorghum, corn, and forage sorghum, in which the broadest part of the leaf canopy is near the top of the plant, there was a tendency to overestimate the per cent ground cover from aerial photographs.

  9. Career Profile- Jim Ross, Aerial Photographer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-21

    Check out what it takes to “capture the moment” at Mach speeds. The stunning aerial imagery of NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center comes from well-skilled photographers like Jim Ross, Photo Lead. This career profile video highlights Jim’s job responsibilities in documenting aircraft hardware installations, aerial research, and mission work that happens both on center and around the world. During Jim’s 27-year career, he has logged over 800 flight hours in twelve different types of aircraft.

  10. Noise from aerial bursts of fireworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, D. J.; Henderson, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made recording the pressure time histories of the aerial bursts of mortars of various sizes launched during an actual fireworks display. The peak overpressure and duration of blast noise as well as the energy spectral density are compared with the characteristics of a blasting cap and of an F-104 aircraft at a Mach number of 1.4 and an altitude of 42,000 ft. Noise levels of the fireworks aerial bursts peaked 15 decibels below levels deemed damaging to hearing.

  11. Noise from aerial bursts of fireworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maglieri, D. J.; Henderson, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    A study was made recording the pressure time histories of the aerial bursts of mortars of various sizes launched during an actual fireworks display. The peak overpressure and duration of blast noise as well as the energy spectral density are compared with the characteristics of a blasting cap and of an F-104 aircraft at a Mach number of 1.4 and an altitude of 42,000 ft. Noise levels of the fireworks aerial bursts peaked 15 decibels below levels deemed damaging to hearing.

  12. Laser Doppler velocimeter aerial spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Eberle, W. R.; Howle, R. E.; Shrider, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the location, spatial extent, and relative concentration of airborne spray clouds generated by agricultural aircraft is described. The measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and the results of the flight tests are discussed. The cross section of the aerial spray cloud and the observed location, extent, and relative concentration of the airborne particulates are presented. It is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to track and monitor the transport and dispersion of aerial spray generated by an agricultural aircraft.

  13. 59. AERIAL VIEW OF OWYHEE DAM SHOWING RINGGATE SPILLWAY. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. AERIAL VIEW OF OWYHEE DAM SHOWING RING-GATE SPILLWAY. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. Aerial photo by Glade Walker, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Pacific Northwest Region, September 29, 1989. - Owyhee Dam, Across Owyhee River, Nyssa, Malheur County, OR

  14. AERIAL OF VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER [VIC] & ROCKET GARDEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    AERIAL OF VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER [VIC] & ROCKET GARDEN KSC-373C-0556.20 116-KSC-373C-556.20, P-01622-B, ARCHIVE-04455 Aerial view of Easter crowds at Visitors Information Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

  15. AERIAL OF SHUTTLE LANDING FACILITY [SLF] POURING OF CONCRETE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    AERIAL OF SHUTTLE LANDING FACILITY [SLF] POURING OF CONCRETE KSC-375C-10036.31 108-KSC-375C-10036.31, P-21426, ARCHIVE-04502 Aerial oblique of Shuttle runway facilities. Pouring concrete on runway. Direction north - altitude 100'.

  16. Ground-based multi-view photogrammetry for the monitoring of landslide deformation and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, André; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Allemand, Pascal; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc; Skupinski, Grzegorz; Delacourt, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in multi-view photogrammetry have resulted in a new class of algorithms and software tools for more automated surface reconstruction. These new techniques have a great potential to provide topographic information for geoscience applications at significantly lower costs than classical topographic and laser scanning surveys. Based on several open-source libraries for multi-view stereo-photogrammetry and Structure-from-Motion, we investigate the accuracy that can be obtained from different processing pipelines for the 3D surface reconstruc- tion of landslides and the detection of changes over time. Two different algorithms for point-cloud comparison are tested and the accuracy of the resulting models is assessed against terrestrial and airborne LiDAR point clouds. Change detection over a period of more than two years allows a detailed assessment of the seasonal dynamics of the landslide; the possibility to estimate sediment volumes, as well as the quantification of the 3D displacement at most active parts of the landslide. Compared to LiDAR point clouds, the root-mean squared error of the photogrammetric point clouds did generally not exceed 0.2 m for the reconstruction of the entire landslide and 0.06 m for the reconstruction of the main scarp. We show that at the slope scale terrestrial multi-view photogrammetry is sufficiently accurate to detect surface changes in the range of decimeters. Thus, the technique currently remains less precise than terrestrial laser scanning or differential satellite positioning systems but provides spatially distributed information at significant lower costs and is, therefore, valuable for many practical landslide investigations. Algorithm parameters and the image acquisition protocols are found to have important impacts on the quality of the results and are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that a relative precision of 1:500 and better is possible. The results of the change detection show a strong seasonality

  17. Testing photogrammetry-based techniques for three-dimensional surface documentation in forensic pathology.

    PubMed

    Urbanová, Petra; Hejna, Petr; Jurda, Mikoláš

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional surface technologies particularly close range photogrammetry and optical surface scanning have recently advanced into affordable, flexible and accurate techniques. Forensic postmortem investigation as performed on a daily basis, however, has not yet fully benefited from their potentials. In the present paper, we tested two approaches to 3D external body documentation - digital camera-based photogrammetry combined with commercial Agisoft PhotoScan(®) software and stereophotogrammetry-based Vectra H1(®), a portable handheld surface scanner. In order to conduct the study three human subjects were selected, a living person, a 25-year-old female, and two forensic cases admitted for postmortem examination at the Department of Forensic Medicine, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic (both 63-year-old males), one dead to traumatic, self-inflicted, injuries (suicide by hanging), the other diagnosed with the heart failure. All three cases were photographed in 360° manner with a Nikon 7000 digital camera and simultaneously documented with the handheld scanner. In addition to having recorded the pre-autopsy phase of the forensic cases, both techniques were employed in various stages of autopsy. The sets of collected digital images (approximately 100 per case) were further processed to generate point clouds and 3D meshes. Final 3D models (a pair per individual) were counted for numbers of points and polygons, then assessed visually and compared quantitatively using ICP alignment algorithm and a cloud point comparison technique based on closest point to point distances. Both techniques were proven to be easy to handle and equally laborious. While collecting the images at autopsy took around 20min, the post-processing was much more time-demanding and required up to 10h of computation time. Moreover, for the full-body scanning the post-processing of the handheld scanner required rather time-consuming manual image alignment. In all instances the applied approaches

  18. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles DOD’s Acquisition Efforts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles : Hunter System Is Not Appropriate for Navy Fleet Use (GAO/NSIAD-96-2, Dec. 1, 1995). Unmanned Aerial Vehicles : Maneuver...System Schedule Includes Unnecessary Risk (GAO/NSIAD-95-161, Sept. 15, 1995). Unmanned Aerial Vehicles : No More Hunter Systems...Should Be Bought Until Problems are Fixed (GAO/NSIAD-95-52, Mar. 1, 1995). Unmanned Aerial Vehicles : Performance of Short-Range System in Question

  19. Insights into the evolution of the Yenkahe resurgent dome (Siwi caldera, Tanna Island, Vanuatu) inferred from aerial high-resolution photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Normier, A.; Bacri, C.; Peltier, A.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Merle, O.; Finizola, A.; Garaebiti, E.

    2016-08-01

    The Yenkahe dome (Tanna Island, Vanuatu) is one of the most spectacular examples of presently active post-caldera resurgence, exhibiting a very high uplift rate over the past 1000 years (156 mm/year on average). Although numerous inhabited areas are scattered around the dome, the dynamics of this structure and associated hazards remain poorly studied because of its remote location and dense vegetation cover. A high-resolution photogrammetric campaign was carried out in November 2011 over the dome. Georeferenced photographs were treated by "Structure from Motion" and "Multiple-view Stereophotogrammetry" methods to produce a 3D-digital surface model (DSM) of the area and its associated orthophotograph. This DSM is much more accurate than previously available SRTM and Aster digital elevation models (DEMs), particularly at minimal (coastline) and maximal altitudes (Yasur culmination point, 390 m). While previous mapping relied mostly on low resolution DEMs and satellite images, the high precision of the DSM allows for a detailed structural analysis of the Yenkahe dome, notably based on the quantification of fault displacements. The new structural map, inferred from the 3D reconstruction and morphological analysis of the dome, reveals a complex pattern of faults and destabilization scars reflecting a succession of constructive and destructive events. Numerous landslide scars directed toward the sea highlight the probable occurrence of a tsunami event affecting the south-eastern coast of Tanna. Simulations of landslide-triggered tsunamis show the short time propagation of such a wave (1-2 min), which could affect coastal localities even following relatively small destabilized volumes (a few million cubic meters).

  20. Insights into the evolution of the Yenkahe resurgent dome (Siwi caldera, Tanna Island, Vanuatu) inferred from aerial high-resolution photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Normier, A.; Bacri, C.; Peltier, A.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Merle, O.; Finizola, A.; Garaebiti, E.

    2015-06-01

    Due to a production error, the following article was wrongly included as part of this regular issue Volume Volgeo 299C. This article is now replaced with this note and will be included in the upcoming special issue.

  1. System for interactive management of aerial imaging campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wypych, Tom; Kuester, Falko

    We present a system to enable real time management of interchangeable imaging platforms aboard commodity unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to improve interactivity during aerial imaging campaigns. We argue that this improvement in interactivity enables powerful immediate-mode inspection by the ground operator, and implements a more intuitive, flexible, and ultimately useful control interface to aerial imaging systems.

  2. 47 CFR 32.6421 - Aerial cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aerial cable expense. 32.6421 Section 32.6421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6421 Aerial cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with aerial cable. (b) Subsidiary record categories...

  3. 47 CFR 32.6421 - Aerial cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aerial cable expense. 32.6421 Section 32.6421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6421 Aerial cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with aerial cable. (b) Subsidiary record categories...

  4. 47 CFR 32.6421 - Aerial cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aerial cable expense. 32.6421 Section 32.6421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6421 Aerial cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with aerial cable. (b) Subsidiary record categories...

  5. 47 CFR 32.6421 - Aerial cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aerial cable expense. 32.6421 Section 32.6421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6421 Aerial cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with aerial cable. (b) Subsidiary record categories...

  6. 47 CFR 32.6421 - Aerial cable expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aerial cable expense. 32.6421 Section 32.6421... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6421 Aerial cable expense. (a) This account shall include expenses associated with aerial cable. (b) Subsidiary record categories...

  7. 47 CFR 32.6431 - Aerial wire expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aerial wire expense. 32.6431 Section 32.6431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6431 Aerial wire expense. This account shall include expenses associated with aerial wire. ...

  8. Multifunctional aerial display through use of polarization-processing display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Keitaro; Ito, Shusei; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    2017-02-01

    We have realized a multifunctional aerial display. An aerial image of a polarization-processing display is formed through aerial imaging by retro-reflection. By changing the polarization modulation patterns, we can switch between a three-layered display and a secure display.

  9. 47 CFR 32.6431 - Aerial wire expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aerial wire expense. 32.6431 Section 32.6431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6431 Aerial wire expense. This account shall include expenses associated with aerial wire....

  10. 47 CFR 32.6431 - Aerial wire expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aerial wire expense. 32.6431 Section 32.6431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6431 Aerial wire expense. This account shall include expenses associated with aerial wire....

  11. 47 CFR 32.6431 - Aerial wire expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aerial wire expense. 32.6431 Section 32.6431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6431 Aerial wire expense. This account shall include expenses associated with aerial wire....

  12. 47 CFR 32.6431 - Aerial wire expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aerial wire expense. 32.6431 Section 32.6431... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6431 Aerial wire expense. This account shall include expenses associated with aerial wire....

  13. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Mishap Taxonomy for Range Safety Reviews

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    RANGE SAFETY GROUP DOCUMENT 326-16 UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE MISHAP TAXONOMY FOR RANGE SAFETY REVIEWS DISTRIBUTION A: APPROVED...DOCUMENT 326-16 UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE MISHAP TAXONOMY FOR RANGE SAFETY REVIEWS February 2016 Prepared by Range...intentionally left blank. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Mishap Taxonomy for Range Safety Reviews, RCC 326-16, February 2016 iii Table of Contents Preface

  14. Runoff experiment and adapted SfM photogrammetry to assess rill erosion in Mediterranean agricultural fields from a holistic point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronz, Oliver; Rodrigo-Comino, Jesús; Seeger, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    , S., Pereira, P., Novara, A., Brevik, E.C., Azorin-Molina, C., Parras-Alcántara, L., Jordán, A., Cerdà, A., 2016. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards. Sci. Total Environ. 551-552, 357-366. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.01.182 Marzolff, I., Poesen, J., 2009. The potential of 3D gully monitoring with GIS using high-resolution aerial photography and a digital photogrammetry system. Geomorphology, GIS and SDA applications in geomorphology 111, 48-60. doi:10.1016/j.geomorph.2008.05.047 Poesen, J., Nachtergaele, J., Verstraeten, G., Valentin, C., 2003. Gully erosion and environmental change: importance and research needs. Catena, Gully Erosion and Global Change 50, 91-133. doi:10.1016/S0341-8162(02)00143-1 Rodrigo Comino, J., Brings, C., Lassu, T., Iserloh, T., Senciales, J., Martínez Murillo, J., Ruiz Sinoga, J., Seeger, M., Ries, J., 2015. Rainfall and human activity impacts on soil losses and rill erosion in vineyards (Ruwer Valley, Germany). Solid Earth 6, 823-837. doi:10.5194/se-6-823-2015 Wirtz, S., Seeger, M., Ries, J.B., 2012. Field experiments for understanding and quantification of rill erosion processes. Catena 91, 21-34. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catena.2010.12.002 Wirtz, S., Seeger, M., Ries, J.B., 2010. The rill experiment as a method to approach a quantification of rill erosion process activity. Z. Für Geomorphol. NF 54, 47-64. Wirtz, S., Seeger, M., Zell, A., Wagner, C., Wagner, J.-F., Ries, J.B., 2013. Applicability of Different Hydraulic Parameters to Describe Soil Detachment in Eroding Rills. PLoS ONE 8, 1-11. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0064861

  15. Close-range airborne photogrammetry: an effective tool for high-resolution sandy beach morphometric surveys. Examples from embayed beaches in French Guyana.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunier, Guillaume; Fleury, Jules; Anthony, Edward; Gardel, Antoine; Dussouillez, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Photogrammetric techniques are at a turning point in their history with the development of new algorithms, such as SIFT (Lowe, 1999) for automatic camera alignment and point cloud densification (Furukawa, 2010) integrated in user-friendly end-products. These innovations facilitate the utilization of this technique to study objects with low to mild morphological contrasts at low cost and by non-specialists. It is now possible to produce high-resolution 3D morphometric models, and derived products such as Digital Surface Models (DSM) and Orthophotographs. We conducted three photogrammetric experiments on the embayed beach of Montjoly (4 km long, 100-200 m wide) in Cayenne, French Guyana, in order to quantify morphological changes. The beach is affected by rotation induced by westward migration of mud banks from the Amazon that generate spatio-temporal changes in wave refraction and incident wave angles. The current rotation involves massive erosion of the northern part of the beach (50 m retreat between October 2013 and March 2014) and deposition in the southern sector (50 m advance). We acquired subvertical aerial photographs from a microlight aircraft using a full frame DSLR sensor with a 50 mm lens synchronized with an onboard DGPS, and flew alongshore at low elevation (900 ft). The flight plan included several parallel flight axes with a 50 m interband distance. Meanwhile on the ground, we placed around 30 square targets of 40 cm width georeferenced by RTK-DGPS with centimetre accuracy. These targets served in producing the georeferenced output 3D model. Third, we measured the topography of random points and cross-shore profiles to validate our results and assess the process accuracy. We produced the model and its derived products with user-friendly Agisoft Photoscan© software. We obtained three morphometric models realized in October 2013, March 2014 and October 2014 covering the entire beach. These models were produced at a resolution of 10 cm per pixel and

  16. Evaluation of Low-Cost Terrestrial Photogrammetry for 3d Reconstruction of Complex Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, S.; Xiao, W.; Grayson, B.

    2017-09-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry is an accessible method of 3D digital modelling, and can be done with low-cost consumer grade equipment. Globally there are many undocumented buildings, particularly in the developing world, that could benefit from 3D modelling for documentation, redesign or restoration. Areas with buildings at risk of destruction by natural disaster or war could especially benefit. This study considers a range of variables that affect the quality of photogrammetric results. Different point clouds of the same building are produced with different variables, and they are systematically tested to see how the output was affected. This is done by geometrically comparing them to a laser scanned point cloud of the same building. It finally considers how best results can be achieved for different applications, how to mitigate negative effects, and the limits of this technique.

  17. D Survey of Pre-Hispanic Wall Painting with High Resolution Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucet, G.

    2013-07-01

    The survey and representation of pre-hispanic wall painting use to be done with traditional photography, we describe the difficulties and limitations found in this approach and we show another solution to improve the quality of this documentation. It relies on the use of photogrammetry and MicMac program. The calculated orthophotos have an accurate geometry, they are high resolution and the three-dimensional models present a high level of detail. We obtain a complete representation which satisfy the requirements of art historians and conservators to study the meanings of the paintings and their conservation state. Furthermore, as this improvement is achieved by following a particular strategy for the photo sessions and the mathematical processing on the images, it doesn't need the acquisition of additional equipment. We explain how we applied the method in the registration of a structure covered with pictorial representations that was discovered in the archaeological site of Las Higueras, México.

  18. PAR Corneal Topography System (PAR CTS): the clinical application of close-range photogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Belin, M W; Cambier, J L; Nabors, J R; Ratliff, C D

    1995-11-01

    The PAR Corneal Topography System (CTS) is a computer-driven corneal imaging system which uses close-range photogrammetry (rasterphotogrammetry) to measure and produce a topographic map of the corneal surface. The PAR CTS makes direct point-by-point measurements of surface elevation using a stereo-triangulation technique. The CTS uses a grid pattern composed of horizontal and vertical lines spaced about 0.2 mm (200 microns) apart. Each grid intersection comprises a surface feature which can be located in multiple images and used to generate an (x,y,z) coordinate. Unlike placido disc-based videokeratoscopes, the PAR CTS requires neither a smooth reflective surface nor precise spatial alignment for accurate imaging. In addition to surface elevation, the PAR CTS computes axial and tangential curvatures and refractive power. Difference maps are available in all curvatures, refractive power, and in absolute elevation.

  19. Automatic Shape-Based Target Extraction for Close-Range Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Chen, Y.; Wang, C.; Cheng, M.; Wen, C.; Yu, J.

    2016-06-01

    In order to perform precise identification and location of artificial coded targets in natural scenes, a novel design of circle-based coded target and the corresponding coarse-fine extraction algorithm are presented. The designed target separates the target box and coding box totally and owns an advantage of rotation invariance. Based on the original target, templates are prepared by three geometric transformations and are used as the input of shape-based template matching. Finally, region growing and parity check methods are used to extract the coded targets as final results. No human involvement is required except for the preparation of templates and adjustment of thresholds in the beginning, which is conducive to the automation of close-range photogrammetry. The experimental results show that the proposed recognition method for the designed coded target is robust and accurate.

  20. Application on-line imagery for photogrammetry comparison of natural hazards events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voumard, Jérémie; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri

    2015-04-01

    The airborne (ALS) and terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) technologies are well known and actually one of the most common technics to obtain 3D terrain models. However those technologies are expensive and logistically demanding. Another way to obtain DEM without those inconveniences is photogrammetry, in particular the structure from motion (SfM) technic that allows high quality 3D model extraction from common digital camera images without need of a expensive material. If the usual way to get images for SfM 3D modelling is to take pictures on-site, on-line imagery offer the possibility to get images from many roads and other places. The most common on-line street view resource is Google Street View. Since April 2014, this service proposes a back-in-time function on a certain number of locations. Google Street View images are composed from many pictures taken with a set of panoramic cameras mounted on a platform like a car roof. Those images are affected by strong deformations, which are not recommended for photogrammetry. At first sight, using street view images to make photogrammetry may bring some processing problems. The aim of this project is to study the possibility to made SfM 3D model from Google Street View images with open source processing software (Visual SFM) and low-cost software (Agisoft). The main interest of this method is to evaluate at low cost changes without terrain visit. Study areas are landslides (such those of Séchilienne in France) and cliffs near or far away from roads. Human-made terrain changes like stone wall collapse by high rain precipitations near of Monaco are also studied. For each case, 50 to 200 pictures have been used. The mains conditions to obtain 3D model results are: to have a street view image of the area of interest. Some countries like USA or France are well documented. Other countries like Switzerland are only partially or not at all like Germany. The second constraint is to have two or more sets of images at different

  1. A photogrammetry-based system for 3D surface reconstruction of prosthetics and orthotics.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang-kun; Gao, Fan; Wang, Zhi-gang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an innovative close range digital photogrammetry (CRDP) system using the commercial digital SLR cameras to measure and reconstruct the 3D surface of prosthetics and orthotics. This paper describes the instrumentation, techniques and preliminary results of the proposed system. The technique works by taking pictures of the object from multiple view angles. The series of pictures were post-processed via feature point extraction, point match and 3D surface reconstruction. In comparison with the traditional method such as laser scanning, the major advantages of our instrument include the lower cost, compact and easy-to-use hardware, satisfactory measurement accuracy, and significantly less measurement time. Besides its potential applications in prosthetics and orthotics surface measurement, the simple setup and its ease of use will make it suitable for various 3D surface reconstructions.

  2. Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing in the MSc Program "ESPACE" at Technische Universitaet Muenchen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilla, U.; Iwaszczuk, D.; Pail, R.

    2014-04-01

    ESPACE is an interdisciplinary Master's study programme of Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) positioned at the interface between space technology and the engineering and natural science-based use of satellite data. It combines the technical aspects of the satellite and observation systems with scientific and commercial applications. A core topic beside space engineering and satellite applications engineering is satellite and remote sensing data analysis. This paper explains the background and goals of the Masters's study programme, addresses the target groups and qualification profile, and gives an overview about the specialization fields. The special role of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing is further explained in this context. The structure and embedding of international alliances by a double degree program with Wuhan University is shown.

  3. Optical Strain Measurement of an Inflated Cylinder using Photogrammetry with Application to Scientific Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandino, Joseph R.; Sterling, Jerry; Baginski, Frank; Steadman, Eric; Black, Jonathan T.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2004-01-01

    A study is presented using photogrammetry to measure the biaxial strain in an inflated cylinder. Two cylinders constructed from polyethylene and each approximately 222 mm in diameter and 930 mm in length were studied. The first had a 0.038 mm wall thickness while the second had a 0.02 mm wall thickness. The cylinders were inflated to a maximum pressure of 1379 Pa. The strain was determined from data collected from 60 retro-reflective targets arranged in a 12 x 5 grid. The uncertainty of the measurement system was determined to be 0.08, 0.04 and 0.06 mm in the x, y, and z directions respectively. The hoop and meridional strains determined from displacement data were compared to values obtained from a finite element analysis of a related proxy problem. The predicted hoop strains showed good agreement over the entire range of pressures while the meridional strains showed good agreement at the lower pressures.

  4. Building Facade Documentation Using Laser Scanning and Photogrammetry and Data Implementation Into Bim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faltýnová, M.; Matoušková, E.; Šedina, J.; Pavelka, K.

    2016-06-01

    A project started last year called MORE-CONNECT, which focuses on the renovation of buildings (especially building facades) using prefabricated elements. The aim of this project is to create a competitive solution consisting of a technology and processes which enable fast, cost-effective renovation with minimal difficulties to inhabitants. Significant cost savings in renovation costs lies in the usage of prefabricated elements and the reduction of construction works on site. The precision of the prefabricated element depends on the precision of the construction, project and building documentation. This article offers an overview of the possible methods for building documentation and spatial data transfer into BIM (Building Information Modelling) software. The description of methods focuses on laser scanning and photogrammetry (including RPAS based), its advantages, disadvantages and limitations according to the documented building, level of renovation, situation on site etc. The next part involves spatial data transfer into BIM software. A proposed solution is tested in a case study.

  5. High-speed photogrammetry system for measuring the kinematics of insect wings

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Iain D.; Lawson, Nicholas J.; Harvey, Andrew R.; Jones, Julian D. C.; Moore, Andrew J

    2006-06-10

    We describe and characterize an experimental system to perform shape measurements on deformable objects using high-speed close-range photogrammetry. The eventual application is to extract the kinematics of several marked points on an insect wing during tethered and hovering flight. We investigate the performance of the system with a small number of views and determine an empirical relation between the mean pixel error of the optimization routine and the position error. Velocity and acceleration are calculated by numerical differencing, and their relation to the position errors is verified. For a field of view of {approx}40mmx40 mm, a rms accuracy of 30 {mu}m in position, 150 mm/s in velocity, and 750 m/s2 in acceleration at 5000 frames/s is achieved. This accuracy is sufficient to measure the kinematics of hoverfly flight.

  6. High-speed photogrammetry system for measuring the kinematics of insect wings.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Iain D; Lawson, Nicholas J; Harvey, Andrew R; Jones, Julian D C; Moore, Andrew J

    2006-06-10

    We describe and characterize an experimental system to perform shape measurements on deformable objects using high-speed close-range photogrammetry. The eventual application is to extract the kinematics of several marked points on an insect wing during tethered and hovering flight. We investigate the performance of the system with a small number of views and determine an empirical relation between the mean pixel error of the optimization routine and the position error. Velocity and acceleration are calculated by numerical differencing, and their relation to the position errors is verified. For a field of view of approximately 40 mm x 40 mm, a rms accuracy of 30 mum in position, 150 mm/s in velocity, and 750 m/s2 in acceleration at 5000 frames/s is achieved. This accuracy is sufficient to measure the kinematics of hoverfly flight.

  7. Simultaneous, Unsteady PIV and Photogrammetry Measurements of a Tension-Cone Decelerator in Subsonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Heineck, James T.; Walker, Louise Ann; Kushner, Laura Kathryn; Zilliac, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes simultaneous, synchronized, high-frequency measurements of both unsteady flow in the wake of a tension-cone decelerator in subsonic flow (by PIV) and the unsteady shape of the decelerator (by photogrammetry). The purpose of these measurements was to develop the test techniques necessary to validate numerical methods for computing fluid-structure interactions of flexible decelerators. A critical need for this effort is to map fabric surfaces that have buckled or wrinkled so that code developers can accurately represent them. This paper describes a new photogrammetric technique that performs this measurement. The work was done in support of the Entry, Descent, and Landing discipline within the Supersonics Project of NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program.

  8. Utilizing Photogrammetry and Strain Gage Measurement to Characterize Pressurization of an Inflatable Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Gerard D.; Selig, Molly; Litteken, Doug; Oliveras, Ovidio

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents the integration of a large hatch penetration into an inflatable module. This paper also documents the comparison of analytical load predictions with measured results utilizing strain measurement. Strain was measured by utilizing photogrammetric measurement and through measurement obtained from strain gages mounted to selected clevises that interface with the structural webbings. Bench testing showed good correlation between strain measurement obtained from an extensometer and photogrammetric measurement especially after the fabric has transitioned through the low load/high strain region of the curve. Test results for the full-scale torus showed mixed results in the lower load and thus lower strain regions. Overall strain, and thus load, measured by strain gages and photogrammetry tracked fairly well with analytical predictions. Methods and areas of improvements are discussed.

  9. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Photogrammetry for Dynamic Characterization of Transparent and Aluminized Membrane Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorrington, Adrian A.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2003-01-01

    Photogrammetry has proven to be a valuable tool for static and dynamic profiling of membrane based inflatable and ultra-lightweight space structures. However, the traditional photogrammetric targeting techniques used for solid structures, such as attached retro-reflective targets and white-light dot projection, have some disadvantages and are not ideally suited for measuring highly transparent or reflective membrane structures. In this paper, we describe a new laser-induced fluorescence based target generation technique that is more suitable for these types of structures. We also present several examples of non-contact non-invasive photogrammetric measurements of laser-dye doped polymers, including the dynamic measurement and modal analysis of a 1m-by-1m aluminized solar sail style membrane.

  10. Photogrammetry of a 5m Inflatable Space Antenna With Consumer Digital Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Giersch, Louis R.; Quagliaroli, Jessica M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses photogrammetric measurements of a 5m-diameter inflatable space antenna using four Kodak DC290 (2.1 megapixel) digital cameras. The study had two objectives: 1) Determine the photogrammetric measurement precision obtained using multiple consumer-grade digital cameras and 2) Gain experience with new commercial photogrammetry software packages, specifically PhotoModeler Pro from Eos Systems, Inc. The paper covers the eight steps required using this hardware/software combination. The baseline data set contained four images of the structure taken from various viewing directions. Each image came from a separate camera. This approach simulated the situation of using multiple time-synchronized cameras, which will be required in future tests of vibrating or deploying ultra-lightweight space structures. With four images, the average measurement precision for more than 500 points on the antenna surface was less than 0.020 inches in-plane and approximately 0.050 inches out-of-plane.

  11. Extreme Agility Micro Aerial Vehicle - Control of Hovering Maneuvers for a Mini-Aerial Vehicle with an Onboard Autopilot System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Extreme Agility Micro Aerial Vehicle - Control of hovering maneuvers for a mini-aerial vehicle with an onboard autopilot system P.-R. Bilodeau AEREX...Micro Aerial Vehicle - Control of hovering maneuvers for a mini-aerial vehicle with an onboard autopilot system P.-R. Bilodeau AEREX Avionique inc...onboard autopilot. The implementation of the controllers on the onboard autopilot reduced system delays observed from an off board controller

  12. Photogrammetry Measurements During a Tanking Test on the Space Shuttle External Tank, ET-137

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Schmidt, Tim; Tyson, John; Oliver, Stanley T.; Melis, Matthew E.; Ruggeri, Charles

    2012-01-01

    On November 5, 2010, a significant foam liberation threat was observed as the Space Shuttle STS-133 launch effort was scrubbed because of a hydrogen leak at the ground umbilical carrier plate. Further investigation revealed the presence of multiple cracks at the tops of stringers in the intertank region of the Space Shuttle External Tank. As part of an instrumented tanking test conducted on December 17, 2010, a three dimensional digital image correlation photogrammetry system was used to measure radial deflections and overall deformations of a section of the intertank region. This paper will describe the experimental challenges that were overcome in order to implement the photogrammetry measurements for the tanking test in support of STS-133. The technique consisted of configuring and installing two pairs of custom stereo camera bars containing calibrated cameras on the 215-ft level of the fixed service structure of Launch Pad 39-A. The cameras were remotely operated from the Launch Control Center 3.5 miles away during the 8 hour duration test, which began before sunrise and lasted through sunset. The complete deformation time history was successfully computed from the acquired images and would prove to play a crucial role in the computer modeling validation efforts supporting the successful completion of the root cause analysis of the cracked stringer problem by the Space Shuttle Program. The resulting data generated included full field fringe plots, data extraction time history analysis, section line spatial analyses and differential stringer peak ]valley motion. Some of the sample results are included with discussion. The resulting data showed that new stringer crack formation did not occur for the panel examined, and that large amounts of displacement in the external tank occurred because of the loads derived from its filling. The measurements acquired were also used to validate computer modeling efforts completed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  13. Measuring coral reef terrain roughness using 'Structure-from-Motion' close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, J. X.; Roelfsema, Chris M.; Saunders, Megan I.; Phinn, Stuart R.

    2015-08-01

    Our understanding of Earth surface processes is rapidly advancing as new remote sensing technologies such as LiDAR and close-range digital photogrammetry become more accessible and affordable. A very-high spatial resolution digital terrain model (DTM) and orthophoto mosaic (mm scale) were produced using close-range digital photogrammetry based on 'Structure-from-Motion' (SfM) algorithms for a 250 m transect along a shallow coral reef flat on Heron Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The precise terrain data were used to characterise surface roughness, a critical factor affecting ecological and physical processes on the reef. Three roughness parameters, namely the root mean square height, tortuosity (or rugosity) and fractal dimension, were derived and compared in order to asses which one better characterises reef flat roughness. The typical relief across the shallow reef flat was 0.1 m with a maximum value of 0.42 m. Coral reef terrain roughness, as characterised by the three chosen parameters, generally increased towards the middle of the transect where live coral covers most of the reef flat and decreases towards the edges of the transect. The fractal dimension (values ranging from 2.2 to 2.59) best characterised reef roughness, as evidenced by a closer agreement with the distribution of known coral benthic substrates. This is the first study quantifying scale-independent roughness of a coral reef at benthic and biotope/patch levels (cm-m). The readily available and cost-effective methods presented are highly appropriate for data collection, processing and analysis to generate very-high spatial resolution DTMs and orthophoto mosaics of shallow and energetic coral reefs.

  14. Comparison of high resolution terrestrial laser scanning and terrestrial photogrammetry for modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Samed; Bayrak, Temel

    2016-04-01

    3D documentation of cultural heritage and engineering projects is an important matter. These documentation applications, requires highest possible accuracy and detail to represent the actual surface correctly. Terrestrial photogrammetric method which is employed to produce 3D models to day, now can obtain dense point clouds thanks to advancements in computer technology. Terrestrial laser scanners gained popularity in the last decade because of their high capacity and today they are being widely used in many applications. However every application has its own requirements that depend on the type of application, modeling environment, accuracy and budget limitations. This means, for every application highest accuracy instruments are not always best, considering the facts that mentioned before. In this study, laser scanner and terrestrial photogrammetric methods' spatial and model accuracies investigated under various conditions which include measuring targets at different instrument to object distances then investigating the accuracy of these measurements, modeling an irregular shaped surface to compare two surfaces volume and surface areas, at last comparing dimensions of known geometrical shaped small objects. Also terrestrial laser scanners and terrestrial photogrammetric methods most suitable application conditions investigated in terms of cost, time, mobility and accuracy. Terrestrial laser scanner has the ability to, measure distances under cm accuracy and directly measuring 3D world but there is also some drawbacks like sensitive, bulky and expensive equipment. When it comes to terrestrial photogrammetry, it has above cm accuracy, comparatively fast (considering the image acquisition stage), inexpensive but it can be affected by the coarse geometry, surface texture and the environmental lighting. Key Words: Accuracy, Comparison, Model, Terrestrial Photogrammetry, Terrestrial Laser Scanning,.

  15. Photogrammetry in maritime and underwater archaeology: two marble wrecks from Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balletti, C.; Beltrame, C.; Costa, E.; Guerra, F.; Vernier, P.

    2015-06-01

    Underwater survey, compared to land archaeology, needs some specific techniques, because the application of some active 3D sensor, such as laser scanner, is obviously impossible. The necessity to produce three-dimensional survey, offering the same accuracy of classical terrestrial laserscanning or photogrammetric methods, combined with the request of low costs and rapid solutions, led the researchers to test and apply oftentimes image-based techniques. In the last two years the Ca' Foscari University and University IUAV of Venice are conducting a research on the application of integrated techniques to support underwater metric documentation, comparing them to the manual traditional one. The gained experience (and confirmed by other recently published papers) shows that the actual multiimage digital photogrammetry is a good solution for the underwater archaeology. This approach is useful both from a metric and from a recording point of view, because it achieves high quality results, such as accurate 3D models or 2D representations, offering a complete documentation of underwater sites. But photogrammetry has to be supported by a topographical survey (to acquire ground control points - GCP) to georeference all the finds in the same reference system. This paper presents the integrated survey of two roman shipwrecks, approaching differently in the GCP's acquisition just for the different morphological characteristic of the sites. The wrecks' cargos are huge marble blocks, presenting differences in quantities, layout and depths. Those characteristics determine the choice of the topographic survey. The results of the survey are two 3D polygonal textured models of the sites, which can be easily used for different analyses and reconstructive hypothesis, opening new possibilities of documentation with both specialists and the wider public. Furthermore, 3D models are the geometric base for 2D orthophoto and cross section extraction. The paper will illustrate all the phases

  16. Stream restoration monitoring using Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry, Teton Creek, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegman, Tobin K.

    Stream restoration is a rapidly growing field in applied fluvial geomorphology. Monitoring provides an essential tool for tracking restoration project success, and can improve a project's effectiveness, but often is neglected due to budgetary limitations. This research investigates the potential of Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry to provide an inexpensive and accurate method for monitoring river restoration projects. Structure-from-Motion field survey data was collected in the summer of 2014 to evaluate the performance of a recent stream restoration project intended to reduce erosion along a 1.9 km reach of Teton Creek in eastern Idaho. Channel changes were quantified by creating a digital elevation model of difference that compared an initial, as-built Global Positioning System survey to Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry data collected one year after project completion. A morphological sediment budget and a two-dimensional flow model were used to investigate sediment transport within the study reach. We also used high resolution data derived from Structure-from-Motion point clouds to create continuous grain size maps for Teton Creek that in turn were used to estimate critical shear stresses for sediment entrainment. Our findings suggest Structure-from-Motion techniques provide valuable tools for river managers seeking to monitor restoration efforts. For example, we employed terrain products derived via Structure-from-Motion to verify that hardened riffle treatments effectively prevented erosion. Similarly, we demonstrated the utility of Structure-from-Motion for evaluating the sediment mass balance within the project area. This research establishes a framework for conducting Structure-from-Motion surveys of streams for use in restoration design and monitoring.

  17. Systems based on photogrammetry to evaluation of built heritage: tentative guidelines and control parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valença, J.

    2014-06-01

    Technological innovations based on close-range imaging have arisen. The developments are related with both the advances in mathematical algorithms and acquisition equipment. This evolution allows to acquire data with large and powerful sensors and the fast and efficient processing of data. In general, the preservation of built heritage have applied these technological innovations very successfully in their different areas of intervention, namely, photogrammetry, digital image processing and multispectral image analysis. Furthermore, commercial packages of software and hardware have emerged. Thus, guidelines to best-practice procedures and to validate the results usually obtained should be established. Therefore, simple and easy to understand concepts, even for nonexperts in the field, should relate the characteristics of: (i) objects under study; (ii) acquisition conditions; (iii) methods applied; and (iv) equipment applied. In this scope, the limits of validity of the methods and a comprehensive protocol to achieve the required precision and accuracy for structural analysis is a mandatory task. Application of close-range photogrammetry to build 3D geometric models and for evaluation of displacements are herein presented. Parameters such as distance-to-object, sensor size and focal length, are correlated to the precision and accuracy achieved for displacement in both experimental and on site environment. This paper shows an early stage study. The aim consist in defining simple expressions to estimate the characteristics of the equipment and/or the conditions for image acquisition, depending on the required precision and accuracy. The results will be used to define tentative guidelines considered the all procedure, from image acquisition to final results of coordinates and displacements.

  18. Using photogrammetry and color scoring to assess sexual dimorphism in wild western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Breuer, Thomas; Robbins, Martha M; Boesch, Christophe

    2007-11-01

    Investigating sexual dimorphism is important for our understanding of its influence on reproductive strategies including male-male competition, mate choice, and sexual conflict. Measuring physical traits in wild animals can be logistically challenging and disruptive for the animals. Therefore body size and ornament variation in wild primates have rarely been quantified. Gorillas are amongst the most sexually dimorphic and dichromatic primates. Adult males (silverbacks) possess a prominent sagittal crest, a pad of fibrous and fatty tissue on top of the head, have red crest coloration, their saddle appears silver, and they possess a silverline along their stomach. Here we measure levels of sexual dimorphism and within-male variation of body length, head size, and sexual dichromatism in a population of wild western gorillas using photogrammetry. Digital photogrammetry is a useful and precise method to measure sexual dimorphism in physical traits yielding sexual dimorphism indices (ISD), similar to those derived from traditional measurements of skeletal remains. Silverbacks were on an average 1.23 times longer in body length than adult females. Sexual dimorphism of head size was highest in measures of crest size (max ISD: 60.4) compared with measures of facial height (max ISD: 24.7). The most sexually dimorphic head size measures also showed the highest within-sex variation. We found no clear sex differences in crest coloration but there was large sexual dichromatism with high within-male variation in saddle coloration and silverline size. Further studies should examine if these sexually dimorphic traits are honest signals of competitive ability and confer an advantage in reproductive success.

  19. "A" Is for Aerial Maps and Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Reese H.; Delahunty, Tina

    2007-01-01

    The technology of satellite imagery and remote sensing adds a new dimension to teaching and learning about maps with elementary school children. Just a click of the mouse brings into view some images of the world that could only be imagined a generation ago. Close-up aerial pictures of the school and neighborhood quickly catch the interest of…

  20. Aerial Infrared Photos for Citrus Growers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blazquez, C. H.; Horn, F. W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Handbook advises on benefits and methods of aerial photography with color infrared film. Interpretation of photographs is discussed in detail. Necessary equipment for interpretation is described--light table, magnifying lenses, and microfiche viewers, for example. Advice is given on rating tree condition; identifying effects of diseases, insects, and nematodes; and evaluating effects of soil, water, and weather.