Science.gov

Sample records for aerial primary productivity

  1. Remote sensing of biomass and annual net aerial primary productivity of a salt marsh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardisky, M. A.; Klemas, V.; Daiber, F. C.; Roman, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Net aerial primary productivity is the rate of storage of organic matter in above-ground plant issues exceeding the respiratory use by the plants during the period of measurement. It is pointed out that this plant tissue represents the fixed carbon available for transfer to and consumption by the heterotrophic organisms in a salt marsh or the estuary. One method of estimating annual net aerial primary productivity (NAPP) required multiple harvesting of the marsh vegetation. A rapid nondestructive remote sensing technique for estimating biomass and NAPP would, therefore, be a significant asset. The present investigation was designed to employ simple regression models, equating spectral radiance indices with Spartina alterniflora biomass to nondestructively estimate salt marsh biomass. The results of the study showed that the considered approach can be successfully used to estimate salt marsh biomass.

  2. Remote sensing of aboveground biomass and annual net aerial primary productivity in tidal wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Hardisky, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A technique was investigated for estimating biomass and net aerial primary productivity (NAPP) in Delaware tidal marshes from spectral data, describing marsh vegetation canopies. Spectral radiance data were collected with hand-held radiometers from the ground and from low altitude aircraft. Spectral wavebands corresponding to Landsat 4 thematic mapper bands 3, 4 and 5 and multispectral scanner bands 5 and 7 were employed. Spectral data, expressed as index values, were substituted into simple regression models to nondestructively compute total aboveground biomass. Dead biomass, salt crystals on plant leaves and soil background reflectance, all attenuated the spectral radiance index values. A large spectral contribution from any one of these canopy components caused an underestimate of live biomass. Biomass and annual NAPP of a S. alterniflora dominated salt marsh was estimated by traditional harvesting techniques and from ground-gathered spectral radiance data. The live and dead standing crop biomass estimates computed from spectral data were usually not significantly different from harvest biomass estimates. Spectral estimates of NAPP were usually within 10% of NAPP estimates calculated from harvest data. August live standing crop biomass estimates computed from ground-gathered spectral data for a tidal brackish marsh were generally within 10% of harvest estimates. Live biomass estimates computed from spectral data gathered from a low altitude aircraft were equally similar to harvest biomass estimates. The remote sensing technique holds much promise for rapid and accurate estimates of biomass and NAPP in tidal marshes.

  3. Metagenomic evidence for sulfur lithotrophy by Epsilonproteobacteria as the major energy source for primary productivity in a sub-aerial arctic glacial deposit, Borup Fiord Pass

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Katherine E.; Williamson, Charles; Grasby, Stephen E.; Spear, John R.; Templeton, Alexis S.

    2013-01-01

    We combined free enenergy calculations and metagenomic analyses of an elemental sulfur (S0) deposit on the surface of Borup Fiord Pass Glacier in the Canadian High Arctic to investigate whether the energy available from different redox reactions in an environment predicts microbial metabolism. Many S, C, Fe, As, Mn, and NH4+ oxidation reactions were predicted to be energetically feasible in the deposit, and aerobic oxidation of S0 was the most abundant chemical energy source. Small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequence data showed that the dominant phylotypes were Sulfurovum and Sulfuricurvum, both Epsilonproteobacteria known to be capable of sulfur lithotrophy. Sulfur redox genes were abundant in the metagenome, but sox genes were significantly more abundant than reverse dsr (dissimilatory sulfite reductase)genes. Interestingly, there appeared to be habitable niches that were unoccupied at the depth of genome coverage obtained. Photosynthesis and NH4+ oxidation should both be energetically favorable, but we found few or no functional genes for oxygenic or anoxygenic photosynthesis, or for NH4+ oxidation by either oxygen (nitrification) or nitrite (anammox). The free energy, SSU rRNA gene and quantitative functional gene data are all consistent with the hypothesis that sulfur-based chemolithoautotrophy by Epsilonproteobacteria (Sulfurovum and Sulfuricurvum) is the main form of primary productivity at this site, instead of photosynthesis. This is despite the presence of 24-h sunlight, and the fact that photosynthesis is not known to be inhibited by any of the environmental conditions present. This is the first time that Sulfurovum and Sulfuricurvum have been shown to dominate a sub-aerial environment, rather than anoxic or sulfidic settings. We also found that Flavobacteria dominate the surface of the sulfur deposits. We hypothesize that this aerobic heterotroph uses enough oxygen to create a microoxic environment in the sulfur below, where the

  4. Gross Primary Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's new Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) allows scientists to gauge our planet's metabolism on an almost daily basis. GPP, gross primary production, is the technical term for plant photosynthesis. This composite image over the continental United States, acquired during the period March 26-April 10, 2000, shows regions where plants were more or less productive-i.e., where they 'inhaled' carbon dioxide and then used the carbon from photosynthesis to build new plant structures. This false-color image provides a map of how much carbon was absorbed out of the atmosphere and fixed within land vegetation. Areas colored blue show where plants used as much as 60 grams of carbon per square meter. Areas colored green and yellow indicate a range of anywhere from 40 to 20 grams of carbon absorbed per square meter. Red pixels show an absorption of less than 10 grams of carbon per square meter and white pixels (often areas covered by snow or masked as urban) show little or no absorption. This is one of a number of new measurements that MODIS provides to help scientists understand how the Earth's landscapes are changing over time. Scientists' goal is use of these GPP measurements to refine computer models to simulate how the land biosphere influences the natural cycles of water, carbon, and energy throughout the Earth system. The GPP will be an integral part of global carbon cycle source and sink analysis, an important aspect of Kyoto Protocol assessments. This image is the first of its kind from the MODIS instrument, which launched in December 1999 aboard the Terra spacecraft. MODIS began acquiring scientific data on February 24, 2000, when it first opened its aperture door. The MODIS instrument and Terra spacecraft are both managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Image courtesy Steven Running, MODIS Land Group Member, University of Montana

  5. Use of unmanned aerial vehicles for medical product transport.

    PubMed

    Thiels, Cornelius A; Aho, Johnathon M; Zietlow, Scott P; Jenkins, Donald H

    2015-01-01

    Advances in technology and decreasing costs have led to an increased use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) by the military and civilian sectors. The use of UAVs in commerce is restricted by US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations, but the FAA is drafting new regulations that are expected to expand commercial applications. Currently, the transportation of medical goods in times of critical need is limited to wheeled motor vehicles and manned aircraft, options that can be costly and slow. This article explores the demand for, feasibility of, and risks associated with the use of UAVs to deliver medical products, including blood derivatives and pharmaceuticals, to hospitals, mass casualty scenes, and offshore vessels in times of critical demand. PMID:25733117

  6. Development and prospect of unmanned aerial vehicles for agricultural production management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned aerial vehicles have been developed and applied to support agricultural production management. Compared to piloted aircrafts, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) can focus on small crop fields in lower flight altitude than regular airplanes to perform site-specific management with high precisi...

  7. Microbial production of primary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demain, Arnold L.

    1980-12-01

    Microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon sources can produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids, and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavor or increase its nutritive value. The contribution of microorganisms will go well beyond the food industry with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum-derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. The role of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance.

  8. Primary productivity in the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in primary productivity is discussed in the book based on 27 symposia texts and 19 poster abstracts. Most papers deal with particular cellular processes in pelagic phytoplankton and their relationship to whole plant photosynthesis and growth. In addition, presentations on the productivity of the seaweed, Laminaria, zooxanthellae and whole corals are included. Other articles discuss predictive modeling, new developments in remote sensing, nutrient regeneration within the sea, grazing effects, and carbon cycling. (JMT)

  9. Nematicidal natural products from the aerial parts of Rubus niveus.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Nighat; Akhter, Musarrat; Khatoon, Zakia

    2010-03-01

    Studies on the aerial parts of Rubus niveus yielded six known compounds, 3,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid C(7)H(6)O(4), (1), gallic acid C(7)H(6)O(5) (2), ethyl galactoside (3), oleanolic acid (4), beta-sitosterol (5) and 3-O-[beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(12)-D-glucopyranoside (6). Besides this, a gallic acid derivative with methyl substitution was synthesised as tetramethyl gallate (3). Together with this derivative, compounds 1, 2, the alcohol soluble, chloroform soluble and petroleum ether soluble extracts of the aerial parts of R. niveus were screened for its nematicidal activity against freshly hatched second stage juveniles of Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode), exhibiting 100, 94, 100, 52, 45 and 14% mortality, respectively of M. incognita after 48 h at 0.5% concentration. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 were found to be more potent than the nematicide Azadirachta indica at the same concentration. Negative results were obtained for nematicidal activity of the petroleum ether extract of R. niveus leaf extract. This is the first report on the isolation of chemical constituents as well as the nematicidal activity of compounds and any part of R. niveus. PMID:20306362

  10. Effects of drift from 39 aerially-applied herbicides on production pond plankton and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-nine, aerially-applied row crop herbicides were tested for possible adverse effects from drift on fish pond plankton and water quality over 10 years of testing at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. Phytoplankton biomass and productivity, 6 water quality parameters of interest in aquac...

  11. Combining LANDSAT MSS, aerial photographs and ground measurements to estimate rangeland productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gialdini, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The production of a vegetation map of over 2.2 million acres with detail down to the plant community level, and the production of estimates of rangeland productivity (pounds of usable forage per acre for cattle) for a 500,000 acre subset of area with a design goal for accuracy and precision of + or - 20% at the 80% confidence level, are considered. The data consist of five groups: maps of area, LANDSAT data, digital terrain data, large scale aerial photography, and ground plots. An outline of the data acquisition and data reduction schemes are presented.

  12. An aerial radiological survey of the neutron products company and surrounding area

    SciTech Connect

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1994-12-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from November 1-10, 1993, over the Neutron Products Company and neighboring areas. The company, located in Dickerson, Maryland, has two major operations involving the radioisotope cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co)-the manufacture of commercial {sup 60}Co sources and the sterilization of medical products by exposure to radiation. The sterilization facility consists of two {sup 60}Co sources with activities of approximately 500,000 and 1,500,000 Ci, respectively. The purpose of the aerial survey was to detect and document any anomalous gamma-emitting radionuclides in the environment which may have resulted from operations of the Neutron Products Company. The survey covered two areas: the first was a 6.5- by 6.5-kilometer area centered over the Neutron Products facility; the second area was a 2- by 2.5-kilometer region surrounding a waste pumping station on Muddy Branch in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This site is approximately fifteen kilometers southeast of the Neutron Products facility and was included because sanitary and other liquid waste materials from the plant site are being disposed of at the pumping station. Contour maps showing gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level, overlaid on an aerial photo of the area, were constructed from the data measured during the flights. The exposure rates measured within the survey regions were generally uniform and typical of rates resulting from natural background radiation. Only one area showed an enhanced exposure rate not attributable to natural background. This area, located directly over the Neutron Products facility, was analyzed and identified as {sup 60}Co, the radioisotope used in the irradiation and source production operations conducted at the Neutron Products Company. The measurements over the Muddy Branch area in Gaithersburg were typical of natural background radiation and showed no evidence of {sup 60}Co or any other man-made radionuclide.

  13. Increased productivity of repair verification by offline analysis of aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Ernesto; Sartelli, Luca; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Scheruebl, Thomas; Richter, Rigo; Thaler, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Using AIMSTM to qualify repairs of defects on photomasks is the industry standard. AIMSTM provides a reasonable matching of lithographic imaging performances without the need of wafer prints. The need of utilisation of this capability by photomask manufacturers has risen due to the increased complexity of layouts incorporating aggressive RET and phase shift technologies as well as tighter specifications have pushed aerial image metrology to consider CD performance results in addition to the traditional intensity verification. The content of the paper describes the utilisation of the AIMSTM Repair Verification (RV) software for the verification of aerial images in a mask shop production environment. The software is used to analyze images from various AIMSTM tool generations and the two main routines, Multi Slice Analysis (MSA) and Image Compare (IC), are used to compare defective and non-defective areas of aerial images. It is detailed how the RV software cleans "non real" errors potentially induced by operator misjudgements, thus providing accurate and repeatable analyses all proven against the results achieved manually. A user friendly GUI drives the user through few simple, fast and safe operations and automatically provides summary tables containing all the relevant results of the analysis that can be easily exported in a proper format and sent out to the customer as a technical documentation. This results in a sensible improvement of the throughput of the printability evaluation process in a mask manufacturing environment, providing reliable analyses at a higher productivity.

  14. Inhibitory constituents from the aerial parts of Polygala tenuifolia on LPS-induced NO production in BV2 microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tian-Xing; Wang, Shu; Zeng, Ke-Wu; Tu, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Yong

    2013-11-01

    Five new phenolic glycosides, tenuisides A-E (1-5), and a new megastigmane glycoside, tenuiside F (6), along with seventeen known compounds (7-23) were isolated from the aerial parts of Polygala tenuifolia Willd. Their structures were established by detailed analysis of NMR and HRESIMS spectroscopic data, and the absolute configurations of compounds 5 and 6 were determined by CD spectra and in-NMR-tube Mosher's method. The inhibitory effects of these compounds were evaluated on NO production in LPS-activated BV-2 microglia cells. Compound 17 showed the strongest activity, with an IC50 value of 7.4μM, while compounds 1, 8, 14, and 18 showed the moderate activities, with IC50 values of 16.2-38.5μM. And their primary structure-activity relationships (SARs) of NO inhibitory effects were also briefly discussed. PMID:24042007

  15. Production of the pepper aroma compound, (-)-rotundone, by aerial oxidation of α-guaiene.

    PubMed

    Huang, An-Cheng; Burrett, Stacey; Sefton, Mark A; Taylor, Dennis K

    2014-11-01

    The aroma link between pepper and wine has recently been elucidated to be due to the important aroma compound rotundone. To date, rotundone is the only known impact odorant with a peppery aroma. Although the concentration found in products of natural origin is small, the odor detection threshold is among the lowest of any natural product yet discovered. We report herein the identification of the first known precursor to rotundone, namely, α-guaiene, and that one mechanism of transformation is simple aerial oxidation. PMID:25307830

  16. Primary production in Southern Ocean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Worthen, Denise; Schnell, Anthony; Lizotte, Michael P.

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Ocean forms a link between major ocean basins, is the site of deep and intermediate water ventilation, and is one of the few areas where macronutrients are underutilized by phytoplankton. Paradoxically, prior estimates of annual primary production are insufficient to support the Antarctic food web. Here we present results from a primary production algorithm based upon monthly climatological phytoplankton pigment concentrations from the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS). Phytoplankton production was forced using monthly temperature profiles and a radiative transfer model that computed changes in photosynthetically usable radiation at each CZCS pixel location. Average daily productivity (g C m-2 d-1) and total monthly production (Tg C month-1) were calculated for each of five geographic sectors (defined by longitude) and three ecological provinces (defined by sea ice coverage and bathymetry as the pelagic province, the marginal ice zone, and the shelf). Annual primary production in the Southern Ocean (south of 50°S) was calculated to be 4414 Tg C yr-1, 4-5 times higher than previous estimates made from in situ data. Primary production was greatest in the month of December (816 Tg C month-1) and in the pelagic province (contributing 88.6% of the annual primary production). Because of their small size the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and the shelf contributed only 9.5% and 1.8%, respectively, despite exhibiting higher daily production rates. The Ross Sea was the most productive region, accounting for 28% of annual production. The fourfold increase in the estimate of primary production for the Southern Ocean likely makes the notion of an "Antarctic paradox" (primary production insufficient to support the populations of Southern Ocean grazers, including krill, copepods, microzooplankton, etc.) obsolete.

  17. Variability in primary productivity determines metapopulation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Néstor; Román, Jacinto; Delibes, Miguel

    2016-04-13

    Temporal variability in primary productivity can change habitat quality for consumer species by affecting the energy levels available as food resources. However, it remains unclear how habitat-quality fluctuations may determine the dynamics of spatially structured populations, where the effects of habitat size, quality and isolation have been customarily assessed assuming static habitats. We present the first empirical evaluation on the effects of stochastic fluctuations in primary productivity-a major outcome of ecosystem functions-on the metapopulation dynamics of a primary consumer. A unique 13-year dataset from an herbivore rodent was used to test the hypothesis that inter-annual variations in primary productivity determine spatiotemporal habitat occupancy patterns and colonization and extinction processes. Inter-annual variability in productivity and in the growing season phenology significantly influenced habitat colonization patterns and occupancy dynamics. These effects lead to changes in connectivity to other potentially occupied habitat patches, which then feed back into occupancy dynamics. According to the results, the dynamics of primary productivity accounted for more than 50% of the variation in occupancy probability, depending on patch size and landscape configuration. Evidence connecting primary productivity dynamics and spatiotemporal population processes has broad implications for metapopulation persistence in fluctuating and changing environments. PMID:27053739

  18. Variability in primary productivity determines metapopulation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Temporal variability in primary productivity can change habitat quality for consumer species by affecting the energy levels available as food resources. However, it remains unclear how habitat-quality fluctuations may determine the dynamics of spatially structured populations, where the effects of habitat size, quality and isolation have been customarily assessed assuming static habitats. We present the first empirical evaluation on the effects of stochastic fluctuations in primary productivity—a major outcome of ecosystem functions—on the metapopulation dynamics of a primary consumer. A unique 13-year dataset from an herbivore rodent was used to test the hypothesis that inter-annual variations in primary productivity determine spatiotemporal habitat occupancy patterns and colonization and extinction processes. Inter-annual variability in productivity and in the growing season phenology significantly influenced habitat colonization patterns and occupancy dynamics. These effects lead to changes in connectivity to other potentially occupied habitat patches, which then feed back into occupancy dynamics. According to the results, the dynamics of primary productivity accounted for more than 50% of the variation in occupancy probability, depending on patch size and landscape configuration. Evidence connecting primary productivity dynamics and spatiotemporal population processes has broad implications for metapopulation persistence in fluctuating and changing environments. PMID:27053739

  19. Patterns of net primary production across sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net primary production (NPP) is a fundamentally important and commonly measured ecosystem process that provides an integrative estimate of energy capture and flow into systems, and consequently the energy available for use by other trophic levels. A wide range of productivity levels occurs globally ...

  20. Primary Production in Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Worthen, Denise L.; Lizotte, Michael P.; Dixon, Paul; Dieckmann, Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    A numerical model shows that in Antarctic sea ice, increased flooding in regions with thick snow cover enhances primary production in the infiltration (surface) layer. Productivity in the freeboard (sea level) layer is also determined by sea ice porosity, which varies with temperature. Spatial and temporal variation in snow thickness and the proportion of first-year ice thus determine regional differences in sea ice primary production. Model results show that of the 40 tera-grams of carbon produced annually in the Antarctic ice pack, 75 percent was associated with first-year ice and nearly 50 percent was produced in the Weddell Sea.

  1. Production of Aerial Conidia of Lecanicillium lecanii 41185 by Solid-State Fermentation for Use as a Mycoinsecticide

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Van Hanh; Hong, Suk Il

    2008-01-01

    The production of aerial conidia of Lecanicillium lecanii 41185, a highly virulent fungus, by solid-state fermentation was studied for use as a biocontrol agent against aphids. Among several agro-industrial solid media, steamed polished rice was found to produce the highest amount of aerial conidia. The optimal conditions for aerial conidia production were determined to be a 28.5% moisture content in the rice, 25℃ culture temperature, rice pH of 6.0, 75% ambient relative humidity, 4-dold seeding culture, 0.6% KNO3, and 12 d of culture time. The conidia yield increased from 5.7 × 109 conidia/g polished rice to 18.2 × 109 conidia/g polished rice following application of these optimized conditions. PMID:23997622

  2. QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTY IN NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Net primary production (NPP, e.g., g m-2 yr-1), a key ecosystem attribute, is estimated from a combination of other variables, e.g. standing crop biomass at several points in time, each of which is subject to errors in their measurement. These errors propagate as the variables a...

  3. Primary Productivity in Meduxnekeag River, Maine, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldstein, Robert M.; Schalk, Charles W.; Kempf, Joshua P.

    2009-01-01

    During August and September 2005, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, specific conductance, streamflow, and light intensity (LI) were determined continuously at six sites defining five reaches on Meduxnekeag River above and below Houlton, Maine. These data were collected as input for a dual-station whole-stream metabolism model to evaluate primary productivity in the river above and below Houlton. The river receives nutrients and organic matter from tributaries and the Houlton wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Model output estimated gross and net primary productivity for each reach. Gross primary productivity (GPP) varied in each reach but was similar and positive among the reaches. GPP was correlated to LI in the four reaches above the WWTP but not in the reach below. Net primary productivity (NPP) decreased in each successive downstream reach and was negative in the lowest two reaches. NPP was weakly related to LI in the upper two reaches and either not correlated or negatively correlated in the lower three reaches. Relations among GPP, NPP, and LI indicate that the system is heterotrophic in the downstream reaches. The almost linear decrease in NPP (the increase in metabolism and respiration) indicates a cumulative effect of inputs of nutrients and organic matter from tributaries that drain agricultural land, the town of Houlton, and the discharges from the WWTP.

  4. Salmonberry and salal annual aerial stem production: The maintenance of shrub cover in forest stands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tappeiner, J. C., II; Zasada, J.; Huffman, D.; Ganio, L.

    2001-01-01

    Annual sprouting of aerial stems and ramets enables populations of salmonberry (Rubus spectabilis Pursh), salal (Gaultheria shallon Pursh), and probably other forest shrubs to maintain dense covers (>20 000 stems/ha). We studied annual stem production of salmonberry on cut (all stems cut within 15 cm of the ground) and uncut (stems were not treated) plots for 8 years and salal for 5 years in the understories of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), alder, and riparian stands, as well as clearcuts, which are all common stand types in western Oregon. Mean salmonberry stem production on uncut plots ranged from 4.7 stemsA?ma??2A?yeara??1 (95% CI 2.9a??7.4) in alder stands and clearcuts to 1.6 stemsA?ma??2A?yeara??1 (95% CI 1.0a??2.6) in conifer stands. Mean salal production was greater, ranging from 58 stemsA?ma??2A?yeara??1 (95% CI 25a??135) to 8.6 stemsA?ma??2A?yeara??1 (95% CI 3.7a??20.1) on uncut plots in clearcuts and unthinned Douglas-fir stands, respectively. Annual production of both species was somewhat greater on cut plots. Most stems produced in early spring die by December, but enough are recruited to replace mortality of older stems. Stem density was maintained for 8 years for salmonberry and 5 years for salal on both cut and uncut plots. Based on length of rhizomes and bud density we estimate that only 1a??5% of the buds in the rhizomes are needed to support this annual stem production. Although these species sprout vigorously after their aerial stems are killed, disturbance is not necessary for maintaining a dense cover. It appears that, once established, salal, salmonberry, and probably other clonal forest shrubs can maintain a dense cover that can interfere with establishment of trees and other shrubs in canopy gaps or other openings.

  5. Submerged Conidiation and Product Formation by Aspergillus niger at Low Specific Growth Rates Are Affected in Aerial Developmental Mutants ▿

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Thomas R.; Nielsen, Kristian F.; Arentshorst, Mark; Park, JooHae; van den Hondel, Cees A.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Ram, Arthur F.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to an aerial environment or severe nutrient limitation induces asexual differentiation in filamentous fungi. Submerged cultivation of Aspergillus niger in carbon- and energy-limited retentostat cultures both induces and fuels conidiation. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses have revealed that this differentiation strongly affects product formation. Since conidiation is inherent in the aerial environment, we hypothesized that product formation near zero growth can be influenced by affecting differentiation or development of aerial hyphae in general. To investigate this idea, three developmental mutants (ΔfwnA, scl-1, and scl-2 mutants) that have no apparent vegetative growth defects were cultured in maltose-limited retentostat cultures. The secondary-metabolite profile of the wild-type strain defined flavasperone, aurasperone B, tensidol B, and two so far uncharacterized compounds as associated with conidium formation, while fumonisins B2, B4, and B6 were characteristic of early response to nutrient limitation by the vegetative mycelium. The developmental mutants responded differently to the severe substrate limitation, which resulted in distinct profiles of growth and product formation. fwnA encodes the polyketide synthase responsible for melanin biosynthesis during aerial differentiation, and we show that conidial melanin synthesis in submerged retentostat cultures and aurasperone B production are fwnA dependent. The scl-1 and scl-2 strains are two UV mutants generated in the ΔfwnA background that displayed reduced asexual conidiation and formed sclerotium-like structures on agar plates. The reduced conidiation phenotypes of the scl-1 and scl-2 strains are reflected in the retentostat cultivation and are accompanied by elimination or severely reduced accumulation of secondary metabolites and distinctly enhanced accumulation of extracellular protein. This investigation shows that submerged conidiation and product formation of a mitosporic fungus

  6. Development of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Site-Specific Crop Production Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been developed and applied to support the practice of precision agriculture. Compared to piloted aircrafts, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle can focus on much smaller crop fields with much lower flight altitude than regular airplanes to perform site-specific management ...

  7. Chemolithotrophic Primary Production in a Subglacial Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Trinity L.; Havig, Jeff R.; Skidmore, Mark L.; Shock, Everett L.

    2014-01-01

    Glacial comminution of bedrock generates fresh mineral surfaces capable of sustaining chemotrophic microbial communities under the dark conditions that pervade subglacial habitats. Geochemical and isotopic evidence suggests that pyrite oxidation is a dominant weathering process generating protons that drive mineral dissolution in many subglacial systems. Here, we provide evidence correlating pyrite oxidation with chemosynthetic primary productivity and carbonate dissolution in subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Alberta, Canada. Quantification and sequencing of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) transcripts suggest that populations closely affiliated with Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, an iron sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium, are abundant constituents of microbial communities at RG. Microcosm experiments indicate sulfate production during biological assimilation of radiolabeled bicarbonate. Geochemical analyses of subglacial meltwater indicate that increases in sulfate levels are associated with increased calcite and dolomite dissolution. Collectively, these data suggest a role for biological pyrite oxidation in driving primary productivity and mineral dissolution in a subglacial environment and provide the first rate estimate for bicarbonate assimilation in these ecosystems. Evidence for lithotrophic primary production in this contemporary subglacial environment provides a plausible mechanism to explain how subglacial communities could be sustained in near-isolation from the atmosphere during glacial-interglacial cycles. PMID:25085483

  8. Chemolithotrophic primary production in a subglacial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Hamilton, Trinity L; Havig, Jeff R; Skidmore, Mark L; Shock, Everett L

    2014-10-01

    Glacial comminution of bedrock generates fresh mineral surfaces capable of sustaining chemotrophic microbial communities under the dark conditions that pervade subglacial habitats. Geochemical and isotopic evidence suggests that pyrite oxidation is a dominant weathering process generating protons that drive mineral dissolution in many subglacial systems. Here, we provide evidence correlating pyrite oxidation with chemosynthetic primary productivity and carbonate dissolution in subglacial sediments sampled from Robertson Glacier (RG), Alberta, Canada. Quantification and sequencing of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) transcripts suggest that populations closely affiliated with Sideroxydans lithotrophicus, an iron sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacterium, are abundant constituents of microbial communities at RG. Microcosm experiments indicate sulfate production during biological assimilation of radiolabeled bicarbonate. Geochemical analyses of subglacial meltwater indicate that increases in sulfate levels are associated with increased calcite and dolomite dissolution. Collectively, these data suggest a role for biological pyrite oxidation in driving primary productivity and mineral dissolution in a subglacial environment and provide the first rate estimate for bicarbonate assimilation in these ecosystems. Evidence for lithotrophic primary production in this contemporary subglacial environment provides a plausible mechanism to explain how subglacial communities could be sustained in near-isolation from the atmosphere during glacial-interglacial cycles. PMID:25085483

  9. PRIMARY PRODUCTION ESTIMATES IN CHESAPEAKE BAY USING SEAWIFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The temporal and spatial variability in primary production along the main stem of Chesapeake Bay was examined from 1997 through 2000. Primary production estimates were determined from the Vertically Generalized Production Model (VGPM) (Behrenfeld and Falkowski, 1997) using chloro...

  10. Observations of Ocean Primary Productivity Using MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, Wayne E.; Abbott, Mark R.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Measuring the magnitude and variability of oceanic net primary productivity (NPP) represents a key advancement toward our understanding of the dynamics of marine ecosystems and the role of the ocean in the global carbon cycle. MODIS observations make two new contributions in addition to continuing the bio-optical time series begun with Orbview-2's SeaWiFS sensor. First, MODIS provides weekly estimates of global ocean net primary productivity on weekly and annual time periods, and annual empirical estimates of carbon export production. Second, MODIS provides additional insight into the spatial and temporal variations in photosynthetic efficiency through the direct measurements of solar-stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The two different weekly productivity indexes (first developed by Behrenfeld & Falkowski and by Yoder, Ryan and Howard) are used to derive daily productivity as a function of chlorophyll biomass, incident daily surface irradiance, temperature, euphotic depth, and mixed layer depth. Comparisons between these two estimates using both SeaWiFS and MODIS data show significant model differences in spatial distribution after allowance for the different integration depths. Both estimates are strongly dependence on the accuracy of the chlorophyll determination. In addition, an empirical approach is taken on annual scales to estimate global NPP and export production. Estimates of solar stimulated fluorescence efficiency from chlorophyll have been shown to be inversely related to photosynthetic efficiency by Abbott and co-workers. MODIS provides the first global estimates of oceanic chlorophyll fluorescence, providing an important proof of concept. MODIS observations are revealing spatial patterns of fluorescence efficiency which show expected variations with phytoplankton photo-physiological parameters as measured during in-situ surveys. This has opened the way for research into utilizing this information to improve our understanding of oceanic NPP

  11. The productivity of primary care research networks.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, F; Wild, A; Harvey, J; Fenton, E

    2000-11-01

    Primary care research networks are being publicly funded in the United Kingdom to promote a culture of research and development in primary care. This paper discusses the organisational form of these networks and how their productivity can be evaluated, drawing on evidence from management science. An evaluation of a research network has to take account of the complexity of the organisation, the influence of its local context, and its stage of development. Output measures, such as number of research papers, and process measures, such as number of research meetings, may contribute to an evaluation. However, as networking relies on the development of informal, trust-based relationships, the quality of interactions within a network is of paramount importance for its success. Networks can audit and reflect on their success in promoting such relationships and a more formal qualitative evaluation by an independent observer can document their success to those responsible for funding. PMID:11141879

  12. MODIS-Derived Terrestrial Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Maosheng; Running, Steven; Heinsch, Faith Ann; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    Temporal and spatial changes in terrestrial biological productivity have a large impact on humankind because terrestrial ecosystems not only create environments suitable for human habitation, but also provide materials essential for survival, such as food, fiber and fuel. A recent study estimated that consumption of terrestrial net primary production (NPP; a list of all the acronyms is available in the appendix at the end of the chapter) by the human population accounts for about 14-26% of global NPP (Imhoff et al. 2004). Rapid global climate change is induced by increased atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration, especially CO2, which results from human activities such as fossil fuel combustion and deforestation. This directly impacts terrestrial NPP, which continues to change in both space and time (Melillo et al. 1993; Prentice et al. 2001; Nemani et al. 2003), and ultimately impacts the well-being of human society (Milesi et al. 2005). Additionally, substantial evidence show that the oceans and the biosphere, especially terrestrial ecosystems, currently play a major role in reducing the rate of the atmospheric CO2 increase (Prentice et al. 2001; Schimel et al. 2001). NPP is the first step needed to quantify the amount of atmospheric carbon fixed by plants and accumulated as biomass. Continuous and accurate measurements of terrestrial NPP at the global scale are possible using satellite data. Since early 2000, for the first time, the MODIS sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites, have operationally provided scientists with near real-time global terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) and net photosynthesis (PsnNet) data. These data are provided at 1 km spatial resolution and an 8-day interval, and annual NPP covers 109,782,756 km2 of vegetated land. These GPP, PsnNet and NPP products are collectively known as MOD17 and are part of a larger suite of MODIS land products (Justice et al. 2002), one of the core Earth System or Climate Data Records (ESDR or

  13. Mass extinctions: Ecological selectivity and primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Melissa Clark; Thayer, Charles W.

    1991-09-01

    If mass extinctions were caused by reduced primary productivity, then extinctions should be concentrated among animals with starvation-susceptible feeding modes, active lifestyles, and high-energy budgets. The stratigraphic ranges (by stage) of 424 genera of bivalves and 309 genera of articulate brachiopods suggest that there was an unusual reduction of primary productivity at the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary extinction. For bivalves at the K/T, there were (1) selective extinction of suspension feeders and other susceptible trophic categories relative to deposit feeders and other resistant categories, and (2) among suspension feed-ers, selective extinction of bivalves with active locomotion. During the Permian-Triassic (P/Tr) extinction and Jurassic background time, extinction rates among suspension feeders were greater for articulate brachiopods than for bivalves. But during the K/T event, extinction rates of articulates and suspension-feeding bivalves equalized, possibly because the low-energy budgets of articulates gave them an advantage when food was scarce.

  14. Biospheric primary production during an ENSO transition.

    PubMed

    Behrenfeld, M J; Randerson, J T; McClain, C R; Feldman, G C; Los, S O; Tucker, C J; Falkowski, P G; Field, C B; Frouin, R; Esaias, W E; Kolber, D D; Pollack, N H

    2001-03-30

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) provides global monthly measurements of both oceanic phytoplankton chlorophyll biomass and light harvesting by land plants. These measurements allowed the comparison of simultaneous ocean and land net primary production (NPP) responses to a major El Niño to La Niña transition. Between September 1997 and August 2000, biospheric NPP varied by 6 petagrams of carbon per year (from 111 to 117 petagrams of carbon per year). Increases in ocean NPP were pronounced in tropical regions where El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) impacts on upwelling and nutrient availability were greatest. Globally, land NPP did not exhibit a clear ENSO response, although regional changes were substantial. PMID:11283369

  15. New solid-state fermentation chamber for bulk production of aerial conidia of fungal biocontrol agents on rice.

    PubMed

    Ye, S D; Ying, S H; Chen, C; Feng, M G

    2006-06-01

    A novel solid-state fermentation apparatus, namely an upright multi-tray conidiation chamber, was developed to facilitate the production of aerial conidia of fungal biocontrol agents, such as Beauveria bassiana. The chamber with 25 bottom-meshed metal trays had a capacity of > or =50 kg rice with each tray holding > or =2 kg. In repeated trials, a mean yield of 2.4 (1.8-2.7) x 10(12) conidia kg(-1) rice was harvested from the 7-day cultures of B. bassiana in a fully loaded chamber. The new apparatus has a high potential for bulk production of fungal conidia. PMID:16786244

  16. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production. PMID:26098841

  17. Herbivory and Stoichiometric Feedbacks to Primary Production

    PubMed Central

    Krumins, Jennifer Adams; Krumins, Valdis; Forgoston, Eric; Billings, Lora; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Established theory addresses the idea that herbivory can have positive feedbacks on nutrient flow to plants. Positive feedbacks likely emerge from a greater availability of organic carbon that primes the soil by supporting nutrient turnover through consumer and especially microbially-mediated metabolism in the detrital pool. We developed an entirely novel stoichiometric model that demonstrates the mechanism of a positive feedback. In particular, we show that sloppy or partial feeding by herbivores increases detrital carbon and nitrogen allowing for greater nitrogen mineralization and nutritive feedback to plants. The model consists of differential equations coupling flows among pools of: plants, herbivores, detrital carbon and nitrogen, and inorganic nitrogen. We test the effects of different levels of herbivore grazing completion and of the stoichiometric quality (carbon to nitrogen ratio, C:N) of the host plant. Our model analyses show that partial feeding and plant C:N interact because when herbivores are sloppy and plant biomass is diverted to the detrital pool, more mineral nitrogen is available to plants because of the stoichiometric difference between the organisms in the detrital pool and the herbivore. This model helps to identify how herbivory may feedback positively on primary production, and it mechanistically connects direct and indirect feedbacks from soil to plant production. PMID:26098841

  18. Primary production in the northern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qurban, Mohammed Ali; Balala, Arvin C.; Kumar, Sanjeev; Bhavya, P. S.; Wafar, Mohideen

    2014-04-01

    Rates of uptake of carbon and nitrogen (ammonium, nitrate and urea) by phytoplankton, along with concentrations of nutrients and chlorophyll a, in the Saudi Arabian waters of the northern Red Sea (23 °N-28 °N) were measured in autumn, 2012. Concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and phosphate within the euphotic zone were in trace amounts while those of silicon were in excess of 0.5 μmol L- 1. Concentrations of chlorophyll (Chl a) were very low within the euphotic zone (0.01-0.6 μg L- 1 at discrete depths and 1.53-21.5 mg m- 2 as column-integrated values). A deep chlorophyll maximum and a nitrite maximum were present between 60 and 80 m at almost all of the stations occupied. Rates of carbon uptake at discrete depths ranged from 0.02 to 3 μg C L- 1 h- 1. Chl-normalized carbon uptake rates related with ambient light in a Michaelis-Menten kinetic pattern. About 80% of the carbon uptake was attributable to the < 20 μm fraction. Ammonium and urea were the nitrogen compounds taken up in preference by phytoplankton and accounted for close to 90% of the total N uptake. Considered together, these results indicate that the waters of the northern Red Sea are oligotrophic and that the primary production is strongly N-controlled. Analyses of the data and interpretation of the results led to the following speculations: (1) the perceived north-south gradient in Chl a (and possibly in primary production) in the Red Sea is maintained by circulation of Chl- and nutrient-rich waters through a series of gyres, (2) there is a greater role for heterotrophy and microbial loop in the trophic dynamics, and (3) in situ nitrification in the euphotic zone is an important source of N for phytoplankton and consequently export of carbon to deep sea could be lesser than that indicated by f-ratios.

  19. Responses of primary productivity to increased temperature and phytoplankton diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M.; Breithaupt, Petra; Hillebrand, Helmut; Hoppe, Hans-Georg; Jürgens, Klaus; Sommer, Ulrich

    2012-08-01

    In order to examine the effects of warming and diversity changes on primary productivity, we conducted a meta-analysis on six independent indoor mesocosm experiments with a natural plankton community from the Baltic Sea. Temperature effects on primary productivity changed with light intensity and zooplankton density and analysed pathways between temperature, diversity and productivity, elucidating direct and indirect effects of warming on primary productivity during the spring phytoplankton bloom. Our findings indicate that warming directly increased carbon specific primary productivity, which was more pronounced under low grazing pressure. On the other hand, primary productivity per unit water volume did not respond to increased temperature, because of a negative temperature effect on phytoplankton biomass. Moreover, primary productivity response to temperature changes depended on light limitation. Using path analysis, we tested whether temperature effects were direct or mediated by warming effects on phytoplankton diversity. Although phytoplankton species richness had a positive impact on both net primary productivity and carbon specific primary productivity - and evenness had a negative effect on net primary productivity - both richness and evenness were not affected by temperature. Thus, we suggest that diversity effects on primary productivity depended mainly on other factors than temperature like grazing, sinking or nutrient limitation, which themselves are temperature dependent.

  20. Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg; Ippolito, Corey

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results from a mission architecture study of planetary aerial explorers. In this study, several mission scenarios were developed in simulation and evaluated on success in meeting mission goals. This aerial explorer mission architecture study is unique in comparison with previous Mars airplane research activities. The study examines how aerial vehicles can find and gain access to otherwise inaccessible terrain features of interest. The aerial explorer also engages in a high-level of (indirect) surface interaction, despite not typically being able to takeoff and land or to engage in multiple flights/sorties. To achieve this goal, a new mission paradigm is proposed: aerial explorers should be considered as an additional element in the overall Entry, Descent, Landing System (EDLS) process. Further, aerial vehicles should be considered primarily as carrier/utility platforms whose purpose is to deliver air-deployed sensors and robotic devices, or symbiotes, to those high-value terrain features of interest.

  1. Enhanced Primary Productivity at the Subtropical Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llido, J.; Garcon, V.; Lutjeharms, J.; Sudre, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Subtropical Convergence is one of the major frontal systems in the world ocean. It is not just simply a biogeographical boundary, but forms a unique biological habitat of its own. Ocean colour satellite data indicate that it is a region of enhanced chlorophyll a and thus a potential key region of carbon drawdown from the atmosphere. Ship crossings sometimes show peaks in chlorophyll a at the front, but at other times these peaks are absent. If the normal mode of primary productivity at the front consists of intermittent bloom events, as these observations suggest, organisms endemic to this habitat may have to be adapted to a boom-or-bust situation. We have studied the presence of chlorophyll a using daily SeaWiFS images and showed that bloom events with limited spatial and temporal scales are indeed the norm. A coupled physical-biological model simulates this process with a fair degree of verisimilitude. We use this model to investigate the physico-biogeochemical requirements for bloom events and demonstrate that in most cases the limiting factor is intensity of vertical stratification combined with light availability.

  2. Purification of an Extracellular Signaling Molecule Involved in Production of Aerial Mycelium by Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Nodwell, Justin R.; Losick, Richard

    1998-01-01

    We have extensively purified a factor from conditioned medium that restores aerial mycelium formation to a mutant of Streptomyces coelicolor that is defective in morphological differentiation. Response to this factor is shown to depend on the presence of the BldK oligopeptide import system. We suggest that this substance acts at the first step in a putative cascade of developmental regulatory signals. PMID:9495776

  3. Global Patterns in Human Consumption of Net Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence William T.

    2004-01-01

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our Net primary production-the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis-can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, flows within food webs and the provision of important primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial ba!mce sheet of net primary production supply and demand for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production "imports" and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  4. A review of ocean chlorophyll algorithms and primary production models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingwen; Zhou, Song; Lv, Nan

    2015-12-01

    This paper mainly introduces the five ocean chlorophyll concentration inversion algorithm and 3 main models for computing ocean primary production based on ocean chlorophyll concentration. Through the comparison of five ocean chlorophyll inversion algorithm, sums up the advantages and disadvantages of these algorithm,and briefly analyzes the trend of ocean primary production model.

  5. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2013-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of four phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First, we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production ((is)approximately 50%, the equivalent of 20 PgC·y1). Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed approximately 20% ((is) approximately 7 PgC·y1) of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10% ((is) approximately 4 PgC·y1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in the high latitudes ((is) greater than 40 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4% (1-2 PgC·y1). We assessed the effects of climate variability on group-specific primary production using global (i.e., Multivariate El Niño Index, MEI) and "regional" climate indices (e.g., Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p (is) less than 0.05) between the MEI and the group-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatoms/cyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect

  6. Characterization of in-swath spray deposition for CP-11TT flat-fan nozzles used in low volume aerial application of crop production and protection materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For aerial application of crop production and protection materials, a complex interaction of controllable and uncontrollable factors is involved. It is difficult to completely characterize spray drift and deposition, but estimates can be made with appropriate sampling protocol and analysis. With c...

  7. Mean Angular Momenta of Primary Photofission Products

    SciTech Connect

    Bezshyyko, O.A.; Kadenko, I.M.; Plujko, V.A.; Yermolenko, R.V.; Mazur, V.M.; Strilchuk, N.V.; Vishnevsky, I.M.; Zheltonozhsky, V.A.

    2005-05-24

    Isomer ratios and mean angular momenta for photofission products of 237Np and 238U are obtained. The technique of gamma-ray spectrometry for isomeric ratio determination was used. Fissionable nuclei were irradiated by bremsstrahlung spectrum of microtron M-30 with electron energy 16 MeV. Calculations of mean angular momenta were performed by modified version of the EMPIRE II code.

  8. Primary and Bacterial Secondary Production in a Southwestern Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Chrzanowski, Thomas H.; Hubbard, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Rates of primary and bacterial secondary production in Lake Arlington, Texas, were determined. The lake is a warm (annual temperature range, 7 to 32°C), shallow, monomictic reservoir with limited macrophyte development in the littoral zone. Samples were collected from six depths within the photic zone from a site located over the deepest portion of the lake. Primary production and bacterial production were calculated from NaH14CO3 and [methyl-3H]thymidine incorporation, respectively. Peak instantaneous production ranged between 14.8 and 220.5 μg of C liter−1 h−1. There were two distinct periods of high rates of production. From May through July, production near the metalimnion exceeded 100 μg of C liter−1 h−1. During holomixis, production throughout the water column was in excess of 100 μg of C liter−1 h−1 and above 150 μg of C liter−1 h−1 near the surface. Annual areal primary production was 588 g of C m−2. Bacterial production was markedly seasonal. Growth rates during late fall through spring were typically around 0.002 h−1, and production rates were typically 5 μg of C liter−1 h−1. Growth rates were higher during warmer parts of the year and reached 0.03 h−1 by August. The maximum instantaneous rate of bacterial production was approximately 45 μg of C liter−1 h−1. Annual areal bacterial production was 125 g of C m−2. Temporal and spatial distributions of bacterial numbers and activities coincided with temporal and spatial distributions of primary production. Areal primary and bacterial secondary production were highly correlated (r = 0.77, n = 15, P < 0.002). PMID:16347577

  9. Remote estimation of crop gross primary production with Landsat data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accurate and synoptic quantification of gross primary productivity (GPP) in crops is essential for studies of carbon budgets at regional and global scales. In this study, we developed a model relating crop GPP to a product of total canopy chlorophyll (Chl) content and potential incident photosynt...

  10. Global climate change and terrestrial net primary production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Mcguire, A. D.; Kicklighter, David W.; Moore, Berrien, III; Vorosmarty, Charles J.; Schloss, Annette L.

    1993-01-01

    A process-based model was used to estimate global patterns of net primary production and soil nitrogen cycling for contemporary climate conditions and current atmospheric CO2 concentration. Over half of the global annual net primary production was estimated to occur in the tropics, with most of the production attributable to tropical evergreen forest. The effects of CO2 doubling and associated climate changes were also explored. The responses in tropical and dry temperate ecosystems were dominated by CO2, but those in northern and moist temperate ecosystems reflected the effects of temperature on nitrogen availability.

  11. Primary production of the cryptoendolithic microbiota from the Antarctic Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Primary production in the Antarctic cryptoendolithic microbiota can be determined from biomass and photosynthetic 14CO2 incorporation measurements. Even though good nanoclimate data are available, it is difficult to determine the amount of time when abiotic conditions permit metabolism. Making appropriate assumptions concerning the metabolism of the cryptoendolithic microbiota during periods of warmth, light and moisture, the primary production of the biota was calculated to be on the order of 0.108 to 4.41 mgC/m2/yr, with a carbon turnover time from 576 to 23,520 years. These production values are the lowest found on planet Earth.

  12. Looking Inward to the Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for Rice Production Assessment in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komaladara, A. A. S. P.; Ambarawati, I. G. A. A.; Wijaya, I. M. A. S.; Hongo, C.; Mirah Adi, A. A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Rice is the main source of carbohydrate for most Indonesians. Rice production has been very dynamic due to improved infrastructure, research and development, and better farm management. However, rice production is susceptible to loss caused by drought, pest and disease attack and climate change. With the growing concern on sustainable and self-reliance food production in the country, there is an urgency to encourage research and efforts to increase rice productivity. Attempts to provide spatial distribution of rice fields on high resolution optical remote sensing data have been employed to some extent, however this technology could be costly. The use of UAV has been introduced to estimate damage ratio in rice crop recently in Indonesia. This technology is one of the ways to estimate rice production quicker, cost-saving and before harvesting time. This study aims to analyze spatio temporal and damage ratio of rice crop using UAV in Indonesia. The study empirically presents the use of UAV (Phantom 2 Vision +) on rice fields to the soil condition and development of management zone map in Bali as an example. The study concludes that the use of UAV allows researchers to pin point characteristics of crop and land in a specific area of a farm. This will then allow researchers to assist farmers in implementing specific and appropriate solutions to production issues. Key words: UAV, rice production, damage ratio

  13. Benthic primary production in the Columbia River Estuary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntire, C.D.; Amspoker, M.C.

    1984-02-01

    The general objective of the research associated with the Benthic Primary Production Work Unit of Columbia River Estuary Development Program was to determine mechanisms that control the production dynamics and species composition of benthic plant assemblages in the Columbia River Estuary. In particular, the work was concerned with effects of selected physical variables on structural and functional attributes of micro- and macro- vegetation, and on the productivity and biomass of benthic autotrophs on the tidal flats of the estuary.

  14. Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production - Can Earth Keep Up?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.

    2006-01-01

    The amount of Earth's vegetation or net primary production required to support human activities is powerful measure of aggregate human impacts on the biosphere. Biophysical models applied to consumption statistics were used to estimate the annual amount of net primary production in the form of elemental carbon required for food, fibre, and fuel-wood by the global population. The calculations were then compared to satellite-based estimates of Earth's average net primary production to produce a geographically explicit balance sheet of net primary production "supply" and "demand". Humans consume 20% of Earth's net primary production (11.5 petagrams carbon) annually and this percentage varies regionally from 6% (South America) to over 70% (Europe and Asia), and locally from near 0% (central Australia) to over 30,000% (New York City, USA). The uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations are vulnerable to climate change and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of NPP demand.

  15. Nuclide production by primary cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in the solar system and in interstellar space were calculated for the primary protons in the galactic and solar cosmic rays. At 1 AU, the long-term average fluxes of solar protons usually produce many more atoms of a cosmogenic nuclide than the primary protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR), the exceptions being nuclides made only by high-energy reactions (like /sup 10/Be). Because the particle fluxes inside meteorites and other large objects in space include many secondary neutrons, the production rates are much higher and ratios inside large objects are often very different from those by just the primary GCR protons in small objects. The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides are calculated to vary by about factors of 2.5 during at typical 11-year solar cycle, in agreement with measurements of short-lived radionuclides in recently fallen meteorites. The production of cosmogenic nuclides by the GCR particles outside the heliosphere is higher than that by the modulated GCR primaries normally in the solar system. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the fluxes of interstellar protons and, therefore, in the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in interstellar space. Production rates and ratios for cosmogenic nuclides would be able to identify particles that were small in space or that were exposed to an unmodulated spectrum of GCR particles. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Characterization of a gamma-butyrolactone synthetase gene homologue (stcA) involved in bafilomycin production and aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces sp. SBI034.

    PubMed

    Intra, Bungonsiri; Euanorasetr, Jirayut; Nihira, Takuya; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2016-03-01

    Streptomyces SBI034 produces several bafilomycin derivatives. Its afsA homologue (stcA) and putative γ-butyrolactone receptor gene (stcB) were cloned. Construction of a stcA disruptant (stcA gene knockout) resulted in complete abolishment of all bafilomycin production. Electron microscopic analysis showed a defect of aerial mycelium formation and sporulation in the stcA disruptant. Restoration of all phenotypic defects and bafilomycin production was observed in a stcA complemented strain. Addition of exogenous γ-butyrolactone (GBL) extracted from the culture broth of the wild-type strain could stimulate the aerial mycelium and spore formation of the stcA disruptant. These results suggest that stcA plays a role in GBL-mediated regulation of bafilomycin biosynthesis and morphological development in Streptomyces strain SBI034. PMID:26603758

  17. Primary production of edaphic algal communities in a Mississippi salt marsh

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.J.; Moncreiff, C.A.

    1988-03-01

    Primary production rates of edaphic algae associated with the sediments beneath four monospecific canopies of vascular plants were determined over an annual cycle in a Mississippi salt marsh. The edaphic algal flora was dominated by small, motile pennate diatoms. Algal production (as measured by /sup 14/C uptake) was generally highest in spring-early summer and lowest in fall. Hourly rates ranged from a low of 1.4 mg C/m/sup 2/ in Juncus roemerianus Scheele to a high of 163 mg C/m/sup 2/ beneath the Scirpus olneyi Gray canopy. Stepwise multiple regressions identified a soil moisture index and chlorophyll a as the best environmental predictors of hourly production; light energy reaching the marsh surface and sediment and air temperature proved of little value. Adding the relative abundances of 33 diatom taxa to the set of independent variables only slightly increased R/sup 2/; however, virtually all variables selected were diatom taxa. R/sup 2/ was only 0.38 for the Spartina alterniflora Loisel. habitat but ranged from 0.70 to 0.87 for the remaining three vascular plant zones. Annual rates of algal production (g C/m/sup 2/) were estimated as follows: Juncus (28), Spartina (57), Distichlis spicata (L.) Greene (88), and Scirpus (151). The ratio of annual edaphic algal production to vascular plant net aerial production (EAP/VPP) was 10-12% for the first three habitats and 61% for Scirpus. Chlorophyll a concentrations, annual algal production rates, and EAP/VPP values were comparable to those determined in Texas, Delaware, and Massachusetts salt marshes but lower than those reported for Georgia and particularly California marshes.

  18. Primary production control of methane emission from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, G. J.; Chanton, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Based on simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands extending from subarctic peatlands to subtropical marshes, a positive correlation between CH4 emission and net ecosystem production is reported. It is suggested that net ecosystem production is a master variable integrating many factors which control CH4 emission in vegetated wetlands. It is found that about 3 percent of the daily net ecosystem production is emitted back to the atmosphere as CH4. With projected stimulation of primary production and soil microbial activity in wetlands associated with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the potential for increasing CH4 emission from inundated wetlands, further enhancing the greenhouse effect, is examined.

  19. Evaluation of primary production in Lake Erie by multiple proxies.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Nathaniel E; Carrick, Hunter J; Twiss, Michael R; Piwinski, Leah

    2005-06-01

    Direct measurements of rates of primary production in Lake Erie are few and uncertainties surround rate measurements based on radiocarbon and the light-dark bottle incubation methods. For these reasons, we conducted a series of simultaneous primary productivity measurements in Lake Erie in July and August of 2003, based on incubation with [14C]-NaHCO3, the light-dark bottle method, and incubation with (18)O enriched water. Significant differences in the rates of primary production obtained by incubations with [(18)O]-H2O (0.19-34.60 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1)), [14C]-NaHCO3 (0.03-90.50 mmol-C m(-3) h(-1)), and light-dark bottles (0.06-60.78 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1)) were evident in six out of nine comparisons. Within the epilimnion, [(18)O]-H2O rates of primary production were significantly different from rates based on [14C]-NaHCO3 and light-dark bottles in all four comparisons and lower rates were obtained in three out of four comparisons. Eutrophic conditions in Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie were evident from the high primary production rates of 20.50-34.60 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1) ([(18)O]-H2O), 34.39-90.50 mmol-C m(-3) h(-1) ([14C]-NaHCO3), and 46.66-60.78 mmol-O2 m(-3) h(-1) (light-dark bottle). The photosynthetic quotient (PQ), or ratio of O2 production to CO2 consumption during photosynthesis, averaged 0.64+/-0.33 and 1.93+/-1.93, respectively, based on a comparison of [(18)O]-H2O to [14C]-NaHCO3 rates or light-dark bottle to [14C]-NaHCO3 production rates, respectively, demonstrating that photosynthesis in Lake Erie communities primarily follows expected stochiometric trends. The average of the ratio of production rates based on incubation with [(18)O]-H2O relative to those obtained by the light-dark incubation method was 0.66+/-0.33, indicating a tendency for the [(18)O]-H2O method to provide slightly lower estimates of production in Lake Erie. Lower estimates of primary production based on [(18)O]-H2O incubation relative to the other two approaches is most likely a consequence

  20. Decadal Changes in Global Ocean Annual Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson; Conkright, Margarita E.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Ginoux, Paul; Casey, Nancy W.; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) has produced the first multi-year time series of global ocean chlorophyll observations since the demise of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) in 1986. Global observations from 1997-present from SeaWiFS combined with observations from 1979-1986 from the CZCS should in principle provide an opportunity to observe decadal changes in global ocean annual primary production, since chlorophyll is the primary driver for estimates of primary production. However, incompatibilities between algorithms have so far precluded quantitative analysis. We have developed and applied compatible processing methods for the CZCS, using modern advances in atmospheric correction and consistent bio-optical algorithms to advance the CZCS archive to comparable quality with SeaWiFS. We applied blending methodologies, where in situ data observations are incorporated into the CZCS and SeaWiFS data records, to provide improvement of the residuals. These re-analyzed, blended data records provide maximum compatibility and permit, for the first time, a quantitative analysis of the changes in global ocean primary production in the early-to-mid 1980's and the present, using synoptic satellite observations. An intercomparison of the global and regional primary production from these blended satellite observations is important to understand global climate change and the effects on ocean biota. Photosynthesis by chlorophyll-containing phytoplankton is responsible for biotic uptake of carbon in the oceans and potentially ultimately from the atmosphere. Global ocean annual primary decreased from the CZCS record to SeaWiFS, by nearly 6% from the early 1980s to the present. Annual primary production in the high latitudes was responsible for most of the decadal change. Conversely, primary production in the low latitudes generally increased, with the exception of the tropical Pacific. The differences and similarities of the two data records provide evidence

  1. Aerial Surveys of Waterfowl Production in North America, 1955-71

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Anderson, D.R.; Pospahala, R.S.

    1972-01-01

    Basic information obtained from the July Waterfowl Production Survey is presented in 32 Appendix tables for the period 1955-71. The discussion of the data is minimized because the report is designed primarily to make the data available to waterfowl biologists and other interested individuals. Data presented include: (1) the number of July ponds, (2) the brood index, (3) the average size forClass II and Cia s s !II broods, and (4) the late nesting index. These statistics are presented for each stratum surveyed. A few of the obvious correlations are discussed, although more refined analyses of the data will be presented in the Mallard Study reports. Furthermore, additional supporting information will be available for the mallard reports.

  2. Seasonality of primary and secondary production in an Arctic river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, M.; Huryn, A.; Deegan, L.

    2011-12-01

    Rivers and streams that freeze solid for 8-9 months each year provide excellent examples of the extreme seasonality of arctic habitats. The communities of organisms inhabiting these rivers must complete growth and development during summer, resulting in a rapid ramp-up and down of production over the short ice-free period. The effects of recent shifts in the timing of the spring thaw and autumn freeze-up on the duration and pattern of the period of active production are poorly understood. We are currently investigating: 1) the response of the biotic community of the Kuparuk River (Arctic Alaska) to shifts in the seasonality of the ice-free period, and 2) the community response to increases in phosphorous (P) supply anticipated as the volume of the permafrost active-layer increases in response to climate warming. Here algal production supports a 2-tier web of consumers. We tracked primary and secondary production from the spring thaw through mid-August in a reference reach and one receiving low-level P fertilization. Gross primary production/community respiration (GPP/R) ratios for both reaches were increasing through mid-July, with higher GPP/R in response to the P addition. Understanding the degree of synchrony between primary and secondary production in this Arctic river system will enhance further understanding of how shifts in seasonality affect trophic dynamics.

  3. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS OF NET PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have estimated the potential effects of greenhouse gas-induced climate change on various systems using outputs of general circulation models (GCMs). he purpose of this study was to generate comparable estimates of potential impacts on net primary production using ...

  4. STUDIES OF CIRCULATION AND PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN DEEP INLET ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of a three-year grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to investigate various aspects of circulation dynamics and primary production in a deep inlet environment. Throughout the course of the research, special attention has been give...

  5. Quantifying Annual Aboveground Net Primary Production in the Intermountain West

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a larger project, methods were developed to quantify current year growth on grasses, forbs, and shrubs. Annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP) data are needed for this project to calibrate results from computer simulation models and remote-sensing data. Measuring annual ANPP of ...

  6. Chapter 12. Net primary production in the shortgrass steppe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net primary production (NPP), the amount of carbon or energy fixed by green plants in excess of their respiratory needs, is the fundamental quantity upon which all heterotrophs and the ecosystem processes they are associated with depend. Understanding NPP is therefore a prerequisite to understanding...

  7. Deep-sea primary production at the Galapagos hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, D.M.; Wirsen, C.O.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1980-03-21

    Dense animal populations surrounding recently discovered hydrothermal vents at the Galapagos Rift sea-floor spreading center, 2550 meters deep, are probably sustained by microbial primary production. Energy in the form of geothermically reduced sulfur compounds emitted from the vents is liberated during oxidation and used for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic matter by chemosynthetic bacteria.

  8. Forecasting annual aboveground net primary production in the intermountain west

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many land manager’s annual aboveground net primary production, or plant growth, is a key factor affecting business success, profitability and each land manager's ability to successfully meet land management objectives. The strategy often utilized for forecasting plant growth is to assume every y...

  9. Tight coordination of aerial flight maneuvers and sonar call production in insectivorous bats.

    PubMed

    Falk, Benjamin; Kasnadi, Joseph; Moss, Cynthia F

    2015-11-01

    Echolocating bats face the challenge of coordinating flight kinematics with the production of echolocation signals used to guide navigation. Previous studies of bat flight have focused on kinematics of fruit and nectar-feeding bats, often in wind tunnels with limited maneuvering, and without analysis of echolocation behavior. In this study, we engaged insectivorous big brown bats in a task requiring simultaneous turning and climbing flight, and used synchronized high-speed motion-tracking cameras and audio recordings to quantify the animals' coordination of wing kinematics and echolocation. Bats varied flight speed, turn rate, climb rate and wingbeat rate as they navigated around obstacles, and they adapted their sonar signals in patterning, duration and frequency in relation to the timing of flight maneuvers. We found that bats timed the emission of sonar calls with the upstroke phase of the wingbeat cycle in straight flight, and that this relationship changed when bats turned to navigate obstacles. We also characterized the unsteadiness of climbing and turning flight, as well as the relationship between speed and kinematic parameters. Adaptations in the bats' echolocation call frequency suggest changes in beam width and sonar field of view in relation to obstacles and flight behavior. By characterizing flight and sonar behaviors in an insectivorous bat species, we find evidence of exquisitely tight coordination of sensory and motor systems for obstacle navigation and insect capture. PMID:26582935

  10. Aerial Surveys of Elevated Hydrocarbon Emissions from Oil and Gas Production Sites.

    PubMed

    Lyon, David R; Alvarez, Ramón A; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Brandt, Adam R; Jackson, Robert B; Hamburg, Steven P

    2016-05-01

    Oil and gas (O&G) well pads with high hydrocarbon emission rates may disproportionally contribute to total methane and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from the production sector. In turn, these emissions may be missing from most bottom-up emission inventories. We performed helicopter-based infrared camera surveys of more than 8000 O&G well pads in seven U.S. basins to assess the prevalence and distribution of high-emitting hydrocarbon sources (detection threshold ∼ 1-3 g s(-1)). The proportion of sites with such high-emitting sources was 4% nationally but ranged from 1% in the Powder River (Wyoming) to 14% in the Bakken (North Dakota). Emissions were observed three times more frequently at sites in the oil-producing Bakken and oil-producing regions of mixed basins (p < 0.0001, χ(2) test). However, statistical models using basin and well pad characteristics explained 14% or less of the variance in observed emission patterns, indicating that stochastic processes dominate the occurrence of high emissions at individual sites. Over 90% of almost 500 detected sources were from tank vents and hatches. Although tank emissions may be partially attributable to flash gas, observed frequencies in most basins exceed those expected if emissions were effectively captured and controlled, demonstrating that tank emission control systems commonly underperform. Tanks represent a key mitigation opportunity for reducing methane and VOC emissions. PMID:27045743

  11. Estimation of primary dendrite arm spacings in continuous casting products

    SciTech Connect

    Cicutti, C.; Bilmes, P.; Boeri, R.

    1997-09-01

    The proportion of steels produced by continuous casting has grown drastically during the last two decades, increasing to such an extent that in some countries, several grades of steel are exclusively made by this process. Many investigations recognized the significant influence of the solidification structure on the quality of cast products, and pointed out the importance of the development of appropriate tools to predict the microstructure as a function of thermal and physical parameters. The estimation of secondary dendrite arm spacings in continuously cast steel products has received some attention. However, very little effort has been focused on the prediction of primary dendrite arm spacings, to the best of the authors` knowledge. The main objective of this study is to develop simple expressions to estimate the variation of primary dendrite arm spacings through the section of continuous casting steel products.

  12. AERIAL MEASURING SYSTEM IN JAPAN

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Craig; Colton, David

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Agency’s Aerial Measuring System deployed personnel and equipment to partner with the U.S. Air Force in Japan to conduct multiple aerial radiological surveys. These were the first and most comprehensive sources of actionable information for U.S. interests in Japan and provided early confirmation to the government of Japan as to the extent of the release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Generation Station. Many challenges were overcome quickly during the first 48 hours; including installation and operation of Aerial Measuring System equipment on multiple U.S. Air Force Japan aircraft, flying over difficult terrain, and flying with talented pilots who were unfamiliar with the Aerial Measuring System flight patterns. These all combined to make for a dynamic and non-textbook situation. In addition, the data challenges of the multiple and on-going releases, and integration with the Japanese government to provide valid aerial radiological survey products that both military and civilian customers could use to make informed decisions, was extremely complicated. The Aerial Measuring System Fukushima response provided insight in addressing these challenges and gave way to an opportunity for the expansion of the Aerial Measuring System’s mission beyond the borders of the US.

  13. BOREAS Level-0 ER-2 Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Dominquez, Roseanne; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    For BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), the ER-2 and other aerial photography was collected to provide finely detailed and spatially extensive documentation of the condition of the primary study sites. The ER-2 aerial photography consists of color-IR transparencies collected during flights in 1994 and 1996 over the study areas.

  14. Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

    1981-02-01

    At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

  15. Factors affecting the estimate of primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, W. M.; Byrne, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    Remote sensing of primary production in the euphotic zone has been based mostly on visible-band and water-leaving radiance measured with the coastal zone color scanner. There are some robust, simple relationships for calculating integral production based on surface measurements, but they also require knowledge for photoadaptive parameters such as maximum photosynthesis which currently cannot be obtained from spave. A 17,000-station data set is used to show that space-based estimates of maximum photosynthesis could improve predictions of psi, the water column light utiliztion index, which is an important term in many primary productivity models. Temperature is also examined as a factor for predicting hydrographic structure and primary production. A simple model is used to relate temperature and maximum photosynthesis; the model incorporates (1) the positive relationship between maximum photosynthesis and temperature and (2) the strongly negative relationship between temperature and nitrate in the ocean (which directly affects maximum growth rates via nitrogen limitation). Since these two factors relate to carbon and nitrogen, 'balanced carbon/nitrogen assimilation' was calculated using the Redfield ratio, It is expected that the relationship between maximum balanced carbon assimilation versus temperature is concave-down, with the peak dependent on nitrate uptake kinetics, temperature-nitrate relationships,a nd the carbon chlorophyll ration. These predictions were compared with the sea truth data. The minimum turnover time for nitrate was also calculated using this approach. Lastly, sea surface temperature gradients were used to predict the slope of isotherms (a proxy for the slope of isopycnals in many waters). Sea truth data show that at size scales of several hundred kilometers, surface temperature gradients can provide information on the slope of isotherms in the top 200 m of the water column. This is directly relevant to the supply of nutrients into the surface

  16. Evaluating North American net primary productivity with satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Dye, Dennis G.

    An ecological model is developed to estimate annual net primary productivity in twelve North American biomes. Existing models were combined which together address canopy photosynthesis in response to light, temperature, and moisture availability, and account for respiration. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the NOAA-7 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor provided estimates of canopy-intercepted photosynthetically active radiation for the twelve-month study period. Estimates of NPP generated from the model compare favorably with figures reported in the literature. However the model estimates are, in general, less than reported figures, suggesting the possibility of systematic error in the model. Difficulties confronted in specifying certain model parameters are discussed as possible sources of error. The results of this study suggest the promise of remotely sensed measurements for macroscale evaluation and modeling of primary productivity.

  17. Satellites for the study of ocean primary productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.; Baker, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques for obtaining estimates of global marine primary productivity is examined. It is shown that remote sensing and multiplatform (ship, aircraft, and satellite) sampling strategies can be used to significantly lower the variance in estimates of phytoplankton abundance and of population growth rates from the values obtained using the C-14 method. It is noted that multiplatform sampling strategies are essential to assess the mean and variance of phytoplankton biomass on a regional or on a global basis. The relative errors associated with shipboard and satellite estimates of phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity, as well as the increased statistical accuracy possible from the utilization of contemporaneous data from both sampling platforms, are examined. It is shown to be possible to follow changes in biomass and the distribution patterns of biomass as a function of time with the use of satellite imagery.

  18. The remote sensing of oceanic primary productivity - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    The ocean is a major sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. This paper assesses the correctness of the present estimates of the marine primary productivity, obtained by remote sensing techniques, by modeling the physiological mechanisms of carbon assimilation by phytoplankton. The model uses, as the input, measurements of the ocean-surface pigments and data on the incident solar irradiance, and incorporates a description of the photosynthetically available and usable irradiance in the ocean, to describe the light field required for photosynthesis. A comparison of measured and estimated values of the water-column integrated primary marine productivity over large ocean regions yielded favorable results. These estimates do not appear to depend on regional or seasonal factors.

  19. Productivity of aquatic primary producers under global climate change.

    PubMed

    Häder, Donat-P; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter

    2014-10-01

    The productivity of aquatic primary producers depends on a number of biotic and abiotic factors, such as pH, CO2 concentration, temperature, nutrient availability, solar UV and PAR irradiances, mixing frequency as well as herbivore pressure and the presence of viruses, among others. The effects of these factors, within a climate change context, may be additive, synergistic or antagonistic. Since some of them, e.g. solar radiation and temperature, vary along a latitudinal gradient, this perspective about the effects of global climate change on primary producers will consider ecosystems individually, separated into polar (Arctic and Antarctic), temperate and tropical waters. As coastal waters are characterized by lower light penetration and higher DOM and nutrient concentrations, they are considered in a separate section. Freshwater systems are also governed by different conditions and therefore also treated in their own section. Overall, we show that although there are general common trends of changes in variables associated with global change (e.g. the impact of UVR on photosynthesis tends to decrease with increasing temperature and nutrient input), the responses of aquatic primary producers have great variability in the different ecosystems across latitudes. This is mainly due to direct or indirect effects associated with physico-chemical changes that occur within water bodies. Therefore we stress the need for regional predictions on the responses of primary producers to climate change as it is not warranted to extrapolate from one system to another. PMID:25191675

  20. Global net primary production and heterotrophic respiration for 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.E. Jr.; Piper, S.C.; Nemani, R. |

    1995-06-01

    An ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, was parameterized and used to simulate the actual net primary production and heterotrophic respiration using daily climatic data, land cover type, leaf area index gridded to 1{degree} latitude by 1{degree} longitude grid cells for the year 1987. Global net primary production was 52 Pg C. These estimates were validated directly by two different methods. First, the grid cells were aggregated and used as inputs to a 3D atmospheric transport model, to compare CO{sub 2} station data with predictions. We simulated the intra-annual variation of atmospheric CO{sub 2} well for the northern hemisphere, but not for the southern hemisphere. Second, we calculated the net {sup 13}C uptake of vegetation, which is a function of water use efficiency. The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios agreed with measured data, indicating a strong limitation of global primary processes by the hydrologic cycle, especially precipitation. These are different from other global carbon models as we can simulate the year-to-year variation of climate, including El Nino, on the global carbon cycle.

  1. Differential effects of nutrient-limited primary production on primary, secondary or tertiary consumers.

    PubMed

    Malzahn, Arne M; Hantzsche, Florian; Schoo, Katherina L; Boersma, Maarten; Aberle, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional imbalances between predator and prey are the rule rather than the exception at the lower end of food webs. We investigated the role of different grazers in the propagation of nutritionally imbalanced primary production by using the same primary producers in a three-trophic-level food chain and a four-trophic-level food chain experimental setup. The three-trophic-level food chain consisted of a classic single-cell primary producer (Rhodomonas salina), a metazoan grazer (the copepod Acartia tonsa) and a top predator (the jellyfish Gonionemus vertens), while we added a protozoan grazer (Oxyrrhis marina) as primary consumer to the food chain to establish the four-trophic-level food chain. This setup allowed us to investigate how nutrient-limitation effects change from one trophic level to another, and to investigate the performance of two components of our experimental food chains in different trophic positions. Stoichiometry and fatty acid profiles of the algae showed significant differences between the nutrient-depleted [no N and no P addition (-P), respectively] and the nutrient-replete (f/2) treatments. The differences in stoichiometry could be traced when O. marina was the first consumer. Copepods feeding on these flagellates were not affected by the nutritional imbalance of their prey in their stoichiometry, their respiration rates nor in their developmental rates. In contrast, when copepods were the primary consumer, those reared on the -P algae showed significantly higher respiration rates along with significantly lower developmental rates. In neither of our two experimental food chains did the signals from the base of the food chains travel up to jelly fish, our top predator. PMID:19784675

  2. Ocean color observations of phytoplankton distributions and primary productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esaias, W.

    1988-01-01

    The primary goal of this activity is to develop the means to assess the mean and variability of phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity on global scales. There are three major approaches whose goals are to provide global scale observations. These are processing and analysis of the complete CZCS data set in a consistent manner; preparing science mission and project implementation plans for the SeaWiFS sensor to be launched on LANDSAT 6 in 1991; and providing guidance to EOS flight projects for ocean color observations using the MODIS sensor planned for the Polar Platform in the mid 1990's. This processing presents the first consistent view of phytoplankton pigments on global scales, and analysis of this temporally undersampled data set is proving very instructive in specifying mission requirements for SeaWiFS and future algorithm development.

  3. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. ); Geider, R. . Coll. of Marine Studies)

    1992-01-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  4. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    SciTech Connect

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G.; Geider, R.

    1992-07-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  5. Global impact of tropical cyclones on primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menkes, Christophe E.; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Lévy, Marina; Ethé, Christian; Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Olivier; Vincent, Emmanuel; Vialard, Jérôme; Jullien, Swen

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we explore the global responses of surface temperature, chlorophyll, and primary production to tropical cyclones (TCs). Those ocean responses are first characterized from the statistical analysis of satellite data under ~1000 TCs over the 1998-2007 period. Besides the cold wake, the vast majority of TCs induce a weak chlorophyll response, with only ~10% of induced blooms exceeding 0.1 mg m-3. The largest chlorophyll responses mostly occur within coastal regions, in contrast to the strongest cold wakes that generally occur farther offshore. To understand this decoupling, we analyze a coupled dynamical-biogeochemical oceanic simulation forced by realistic wind vortices applied along observed TC tracks. The simulation displays a realistic spatial structure of TC-induced blooms and its observed decoupling with TC cold wakes. In regions of strong TC energy input, the strongest cold wakes occur in regions of shallow thermocline (<60 m) and the strongest blooms in regions of shallow nitracline and/or subsurface chlorophyll maximum (<60 m). Shallow thermoclines are found over many open ocean regions, while regions of shallow nitracline and/or subsurface chlorophyll maximum are most prominent in near-coastal areas, explaining the spatial decoupling between the cold and bloom wakes. The overall TC contribution to annual primary production is weak and amounts to ~1%, except in a few limited areas (east Eurasian coast, South tropical Indian Ocean, Northern Australian coast, and Eastern Pacific Ocean in the TC-prone region) where it can locally reach up to 20-30%. Nearly 80% of this TC-induced annual primary production is the result of the biogeochemical response to the 30% strongest TCs.

  6. Evaluating North American net primary productivity with satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goward, Samuel N.; Dye, Dennis G.

    1987-01-01

    An ecological model is developed to estimate annual net primary productivity (NPP) in 12 North American biomes. The model combines existing models which address canopy photosynthesis in response to light, temperature, and moisture availability, and account for respiration. Climate data, solar radiation data, and spectral vegetation index data are utilized. Estimates of NPP from the model compare well with data in the literature, but a systematic error is suspected. Difficulties encountered in specifying certain model parameters are discussed as possible sources of this error. The results of this study suggest the promise of remotely sensed measurements for macroscale evaluation and modeling of NPP.

  7. Light-enhanced primary marine aerosol production from biologically productive seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, M. S.; Keene, W. C.; Kieber, D. J.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Maben, J. R.; Kinsey, J. D.; Quinn, P. K.; Bates, T. S.

    2014-04-01

    Physical and biogeochemical processes in seawater controlling primary marine aerosol (PMA) production and composition are poorly understood and associated with large uncertainties in estimated fluxes into the atmosphere. PMA production was investigated in the biologically productive NE Pacific Ocean and in biologically productive and oligotrophic regions of the NW Atlantic Ocean. Physicochemical properties of model PMA, produced by aeration of fresh seawater under controlled conditions, were quantified. Diel variability in model PMA mass and number fluxes was observed in biologically productive waters, increasing following sunrise and decreasing to predawn levels overnight. Such variability was not seen in oligotrophic waters. During daytime, surfactant scavenging by aeration in the aerosol generator without replenishing the seawater in the reservoir reduced the model PMA production in productive waters to nighttime levels but had no influence on production from oligotrophic waters. Results suggest bubble plume interactions with sunlight-mediated biogenic surfactants in productive seawater significantly enhanced model PMA production.

  8. Short-term effects of herbicides on primary productivity of periphyton in lotic environments.

    PubMed

    Day, K E

    1993-06-01

    : Freshwater algae are quite sensitive to herbicides that enter running water ecosystems through direct application, aerial drift, and/or watershed run-off. However, due to a lack of suitable methodologies, few studies examine the effects of such contamination on naturally occurring attached algal communities under field conditions (i. e., exposure regimes using pulsed doses or brief episodes of peak concentrations to simulate surface run-off during storm events). This paper describes a method for determining the acute short-term effects of four herbicides (hexazinone, atrazine, tebuthiuron and metolachlor) on the net primary productivity (NPP) of periphytic algae in the field using a portable bankside incubator; NPP was measured by monitoring changes in oxygen production (mg O2 per m(2)) upper surface of rock substrate per h and mg O2 h per mg chlorophyll using the light-dark technique. All herbicides with photosynthetic inhibition as a mode of action significantly reduced NPP. The lowest observed effect concentrations (LOECs) for the herbicides were 43 μg hexazinone l(-1), 109 μg atrazine l(-1) and 137 μg tebuthiuron l(-1). The no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) for these chemicals were <43 μg hexazinone l(-1), 93 μg atrazine l(-1) and 52 μg tebuthiuron l(-1). Metolachlor did not significantly reduce NPP at the concentrations that were tested (range 19.6-274 μg l(-1)). However, community respiration (which included respiration by invertebrates) was significantly reduced at the highest metolachlor concentration (274 μg l(-1)). Community respiration was not significantly affected by any concentration of the other three herbicides used. PMID:24201554

  9. Physical control of primary production on the Faroe Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasen, Solva; Margretha Larsen, Karin; Hansen, Bogi

    2014-05-01

    The Faroe Islands are surrounded by a shelf with tidally mixed water, partly isolated from the open ocean by a tidal front. The on-shelf areas support a relatively uniform shelf ecosystem, distinct from the off-shelf waters. Earlier studies have shown high inter-annual variability in biological production on-shelf, with high correlation between fluctuations in the various trophic levels. It seems as if phytoplankton production is the prime driver in the ecosystem since grazing pressure by the zooplankton community during the spring bloom is not large enough to postpone and/or suppress the phytoplankton spring bloom. This indicates that physical effects are the dominant control of the primary production on the Faroe Shelf. For a well-mixed shelf water mass, solar radiation is an obvious candidate as a controlling factor, but inter-annual variations in light intensity show no correlation with primary production. Instead, it appears that variations in the horizontal exchange rate on-shelf and between on-shelf and off-shelf waters can explain the main features in both the inter-annual and shorter term variations of the spring bloom on-shelf. Two competing forcing factors seem to control the exchange rate: the homogenizing tidal currents and the air-sea heat exchange, which tends to induce both vertical and horizontal density gradients. In the presentation, a simple model is proposed to explain how the variations in these two factors affect the horizontal exchange rate and through that the spring bloom on the Faroe shelf.

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei induces IL-23 production in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kulsantiwong, Panthong; Pudla, Matsayapan; Boondit, Jitrada; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Dunachie, Susanna J; Chantratita, Narisara; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a gram-negative intracellular bacterium, is a causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium has been shown to induce the innate immune response, particularly pro-inflammatory cytokine production in several of both mouse and human cell types. In the present study, we investigate host immune response in B. pseudomallei-infected primary human monocytes. We discover that wild-type B. pseudomallei is able to survive and multiply inside the primary human monocytes. In contrast, B. pseudomallei LPS mutant, a less virulent strain, is susceptible to host killing during bacterial infection. Moreover, microarray result showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei but not B. pseudomallei LPS mutant is able to activate gene expression of IL-23 as demonstrated by the up-regulation of p19 and p40 subunit expression. Consistent with gene expression analysis, the secretion of IL-23 analyzed by ELISA also showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei induces a significantly higher level of IL-23 secretion than that of B. pseudomallei LPS mutant. These results implied that IL-23 may be an important cytokine for the innate immune response during B. pseudomallei infection. The regulation of IL-23 production may drive the different host innate immune responses between patients and may relate to the severity of melioidosis. PMID:26563410

  11. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... for production of biologics. 113.51 Section 113.51 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from normal... of Production, each batch of primary cells used to prepare a biological product shall be tested...

  12. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of

  13. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Foster, S.Q.; Kleckner, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land – estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m−2 yr−1, but the range is large: from −105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m−2 yr−1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148

  14. Changes in Net Primary Production over Korea and Climate Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, C.; Hong, J.; Lee, M.; Baek, G.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variabilities of NPP(Net Primary Production) retrieved from two satellite instruments, AVHRR(Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer, 1981-2000) and MODIS(MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, 2000-2006), were investigated. The range of mean NPP from AVHRR and MODIS were estimated to be 894-1068 g C/m2/yr and 610-694.90 g C/m2/yr, respectively. The discrepancy of NPP between the two instruments is about 325 g C/m2/yr, and MODIS product is generally closer to the ground measurement than AVHRR despite the limitation in direct comparison such as spatial resolution and vegetation classification. The higher NPP values over South Korea are related to the regions with higher biomass (e.g., mountains) and higher annual temperature. The interannual NPP trends from the two satellite products were computed, and both mean annual trends show continuous NPP increase; 41 g C/m2/yr from AVHRR (1981-2000) and 36 g C/m2/yr from MODIS (2000-2006) over South Korea. Specifically, the higher increasing trends over the Southwestern region are likely due to the increasing productivity of crop fields from sufficient irrigation and fertilizer use. The retrieved NPP shows a closer relationship between monthly temperature and precipitation, which results in maximum correlation during summer monsoons. The difference in the detection wavelength and model schemes during the retrieval can make a significant difference in the satellite products, and a better accuracy in the meterological and land use data and modeling applications will be necessary to improve the satellite-based NPP data.

  15. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  16. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  17. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  18. 9 CFR 113.51 - Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for primary cells used... VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Ingredient Requirements § 113.51 Requirements for primary cells used for production of biologics. Primary cells used to prepare biological products shall be derived from...

  19. Interfacing primary heat sources and cycles for thermochemical hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    Advantages cited for hydrogen production from water by coupling thermochemical cycles with primary heat include the possibility of high efficiencies. These can be realized only if the cycle approximates the criteria required to match the characteristics of the heat source. Different types of cycles may be necessary for fission reactors, for fusion reactors or for solar furnaces. Very high temperature processes based on decomposition of gaseous H/sub 2/O or CO/sub 2/ appear impractical even for projected solar technology. Cycles based on CdO decomposition are potentially quite efficient and require isothermal heat at temperatures that may be available from solar furnaces of fusion reactors. Sulfuric acid and solid sulfate cycles are potentially useful at temperatures available from each heat source. Solid sulfate cycles offer advantages for isothermal heat sources. All cycles under development include concentration and drying steps. Novel methods for improving such operations would be beneficial.

  20. Primary productivity and its correlation with rainfall on Aldabra Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekeine, J.; Turnbull, L. A.; Cherubini, P.; de Jong, R.; Baxter, R.; Hansen, D.; Bunbury, N.; Fleischer-Dogley, F.; Schaepman-Strub, G.

    2015-01-01

    Aldabra Atoll, a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1982, hosts the world's largest population of giant tortoises. In view of recent rainfall declines in the East African region, it is important to assess the implications of local rainfall trends on the atoll's ecosystem and evaluate potential threats to the food resources of the giant tortoises. However, building an accurate picture of the effects of climate change requires detailed context-specific case-studies, an approach often hindered by data deficiencies in remote areas. Here, we present and analyse a new historical rainfall record of Aldabra atoll together with two potential measures of primary productivity: (1) tree-ring measurements of the deciduous tree species Ochna ciliata and, (2) satellite-derived NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) data for the period 2001-2012. Rainfall declined by about 6 mm yr-1 in the last four decades, in agreement with general regional declines, and this decline could mostly be attributed to changes in wet-season rainfall. We were unable to cross-date samples of O. ciliata with sufficient precision to deduce long-term patterns of productivity. However, satellite data were used to derive Aldabra's land surface phenology (LSP) for the period 2001-2012 which was then linked to rainfall seasonality. This relationship was strongest in the eastern parts of the atoll (with a time-lag of about six weeks between rainfall changes and LSP responses), an area dominated by deciduous grasses that supports high densities of tortoises. While the seasonality in productivity, as reflected in the satellite record, is correlated with rainfall, we did not find any change in mean rainfall or productivity for the shorter period 2001-2012. The sensitivity of Aldabra's vegetation to rainfall highlights the potential impact of increasing water stress in East Africa on the region's endemic ecosystems.

  1. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-05-22

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk rivers. In 15 of these, the potential for methane oxidation (methanotrophy) was also compared with photosynthesis. In addition, we performed detailed concurrent measurements of photosynthesis and methanotrophy in one large chalk river over a complete annual cycle, where we found methanotrophy to be active to at least 15 cm into the riverbed and to be strongly substrate limited. The seasonal trend in methanotrophic activity reflected that of the riverine methane concentrations, and thus the highest rates were measured in mid-summer. At the sediment surface, photosynthesis was limited by light for most of the year with heavy shading induced by dense beds of aquatic macrophytes. Across 15 rivers, in late summer, we conservatively calculated that net methanotrophy was equivalent to between 1% and 46% of benthic net photosynthetic production within the gravel riverbed, with a median value of 4%. Hence, riverbed chemosynthesis, coupled to the oxidation of methane, is widespread and significant in English chalk rivers. PMID:24695425

  2. Potential role of large oceanic diatoms in new primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Joel C.

    1993-01-01

    Very large phytoplankton species >50 μm in size, particularly diatoms, generally are found in background numbers throughout the euphotic zone of oceanic waters. Yet, when responding to episodic injections of new nutrients across the nutricline at the base of the euphotic zone these phototrophs may make a disproportionately large contribution to new primary production. To test this concept, we isolated a group of large diatoms from the Sargasso Sea and found that the specific growth rate of several of these species in culture was great enough at the ≈2% light level in oligotrophic waters to meet the requirements of several hypothetical scenarios in which annual rates of new production from the sum of one or more episodic blooms were equal to contemporary estimates. Two of the fast-growing species, Stephanopyxis palmeriana (Greville) Grunow and Pseudoguinardia recta von Stosch, formed giant flocculant masses while growing. Such masses could sink rapidly out of the euphotic zone or be a direct food source for invertebrates or fish higher up the food chain. Not only would a short, simple trophic system with low losses result, but the events would virtually be impossible to observe with conventional sampling.

  3. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    2002-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or the annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and respiration (R) per unit ground area. Available field observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), although it is generally recognized that there are considerable difficulties in determining these fluxes, and thus pose challenge in assessing the accuracy. Further uncertainties arise in extrapolating field measurements (which are acquired over a hectare or so area) to regional scale. Here, an approach is presented for determining these fluxes using satellite and ancillary data to be representative of regional scale and allow assessment of interannual variation. A, has been expressed as the product of radiation use efficiency for gross photosynthesis by an unstressed canopy and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation, which is then adjusted for stresses due to soil water shortage and temperature away from optimum. R has been calculated as the sum of growth and maintenance components (respectively, R(sub g) and R(sub m)).The R(sub m) has been determined from nitrogen content of plant tissue per unit ground area, while R(sub g) has been obtained as a fraction of the difference of A(sub g) and R(sub m). Results for five consecutive years (1986-1990) are presented for the Amazon-Tocontins, Mississippi, and Ob River basins.

  4. Widespread methanotrophic primary production in lowland chalk rivers

    PubMed Central

    Shelley, Felicity; Grey, Jonathan; Trimmer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Methane is oversaturated relative to the atmosphere in many rivers, yet its cycling and fate is poorly understood. While photosynthesis is the dominant source of autotrophic carbon to rivers, chemosynthesis and particularly methane oxidation could provide alternative sources of primary production where the riverbed is heavily shaded or at depth beneath the sediment surface. Here, we highlight geographically widespread methanotrophic carbon fixation within the gravel riverbeds of over 30 chalk rivers. In 15 of these, the potential for methane oxidation (methanotrophy) was also compared with photosynthesis. In addition, we performed detailed concurrent measurements of photosynthesis and methanotrophy in one large chalk river over a complete annual cycle, where we found methanotrophy to be active to at least 15 cm into the riverbed and to be strongly substrate limited. The seasonal trend in methanotrophic activity reflected that of the riverine methane concentrations, and thus the highest rates were measured in mid-summer. At the sediment surface, photosynthesis was limited by light for most of the year with heavy shading induced by dense beds of aquatic macrophytes. Across 15 rivers, in late summer, we conservatively calculated that net methanotrophy was equivalent to between 1% and 46% of benthic net photosynthetic production within the gravel riverbed, with a median value of 4%. Hence, riverbed chemosynthesis, coupled to the oxidation of methane, is widespread and significant in English chalk rivers. PMID:24695425

  5. Climate change enhances primary production in the western Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Sébastien; Mostajir, Behzad; Bélanger, Simon; Schloss, Irene R; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Demers, Serge; Ferreyra, Gustavo A

    2015-06-01

    Intense regional warming was observed in the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) over the last 50 years. Here, we investigate the impact of climate change on primary production (PP) in this highly productive region. This study is based on temporal data series of ozone thickness (1972-2010), sea ice concentration (1978-2010), sea-surface temperature (1990-2010), incident irradiance (1988-2010) and satellite-derived chlorophyll a concentration (Chl-a, 1997-2010) for the coastal WAP. In addition, we apply a photosynthesis/photoinhibition spectral model to satellite-derived data (1997-2010) to compute PP and examine the separate impacts of environmental forcings. Since 1978, sea ice retreat has been occurring earlier in the season (in March in 1978 and in late October during the 2000s) while the ozone hole is present in early spring (i.e. August to November) since the early 1990s, increasing the intensity of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR, 280-320 nm). The WAP waters have also warmed over 1990-2010. The modelled PP rates are in the lower range of previously reported PP rates in the WAP. The annual open water PP in the study area increased from 1997 to 2010 (from 0.73 to 1.03 Tg C yr(-1) ) concomitantly with the increase in the production season length. The coincidence between the earlier sea ice retreat and the presence of the ozone hole increased the exposure to incoming radiation (UVBR, UVAR and PAR) and, thus, increased photoinhibition during austral spring (September to November) in the study area (from 0.014 to 0.025 Tg C yr(-1) ). This increase in photoinhibition was minor compared to the overall increase in PP, however. Climate change hence had an overall positive impact on PP in the WAP waters. PMID:25626857

  6. Investigating the potential for subsurface primary production fueled by serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazelton, W. J.; Nelson, B. Y.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2011-12-01

    Ultramafic rocks in the Earth's mantle represent a tremendous reservoir of carbon and reducing power. Tectonic uplift of these materials into the crust can result in serpentinization, a highly exothermic geochemical reaction that releases hydrogen gas (H2) and promotes the abiogenic synthesis of organic molecules. The extent and activity of microbial communities in serpentinite-hosted subsurface habitats is almost entirely unknown, but they clearly have great potential to host extensive sunlight-independent primary production fueled by H2 and abiotic carbon compounds. We have been testing this hypothesis at several sites of serpentinization around the globe utilizing a suite of techniques including metagenomics, 16S rRNA pyrotag sequencing, and stable isotope tracing experiments. All four of our study sites, which include deep-sea hydrothermal vents, terrestrial alkaline springs, and continental drill holes, are characteristically low in archaeal and bacterial genetic diversity. In carbonate chimneys of the Lost City hydrothermal field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge), for example, a single archaeal phylotype dominates the biofilm community. Stable isotope tracing experiments indicated that these archaeal biofilms are capable of both production and anaerobic oxidation of methane at 80C and pH 10. Both production and oxidation were stimulated by H2, suggesting a possible syntrophic relationship among cells within the biofilm. Preliminary results from similar stable isotope tracing experiments at terrestrial alkaline seeps at the Tablelands Ophiolite (Newfoundland), Ligurian springs (Italy), and McLaughlin Reserve (California) have indicated the potential for microbial activity fueled by H2 and acetate. Furthermore, recent metagenomic sequencing of fluids from the Tablelands and Ligurian springs have revealed genomic potential for chemolithotrophy powered by iron reduction with H2. In summary, these data support the potential for extensive microbial activity fueled by

  7. Aerial radiation surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Jobst, J.

    1980-01-01

    A recent aerial radiation survey of the surroundings of the Vitro mill in Salt Lake City shows that uranium mill tailings have been removed to many locations outside their original boundary. To date, 52 remote sites have been discovered within a 100 square kilometer aerial survey perimeter surrounding the mill; 9 of these were discovered with the recent aerial survey map. Five additional sites, also discovered by aerial survey, contained uranium ore, milling equipment, or radioactive slag. Because of the success of this survey, plans are being made to extend the aerial survey program to other parts of the Salt Lake valley where diversions of Vitro tailings are also known to exist.

  8. Occupational exposure to beryllium in primary aluminium production.

    PubMed

    Skaugset, Nils Petter; Ellingsen, Dag G; Dahl, Kari; Martinsen, Ivar; Jordbekken, Lars; Drabløs, Per Arne; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2012-02-01

    Alumina used in the production of primary aluminium contains Be which partly vaporises from the cryolite bath into the workroom atmosphere. Since Be may be toxic at lower exposure levels than previously thought, the personal exposure to Be among workers in 7 Norwegian primary smelters has been assessed. In total, 480 personal Respicon® virtual impactor full shift air samples have been collected during 2 sampling campaigns and analysed for water soluble Be, Al and Na using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. In addition, water soluble F(-) has been measured by ion chromatography. The Be air concentrations in the inhalable, thoracic and respirable aerosol fractions have been calculated. The Be concentrations in the inhalable aerosol fraction vary between the different smelters. The highest GM concentration of Be in the inhalable fraction (122 ng m(-3), n = 30) was measured in the prebake pot room of a smelter using predominantly Jamaican alumina where also the highest individual air concentration of 270 ng m(-3) of Be was identified. The relative distribution of Be in the different aerosol fractions was fairly constant with the mean Be amount for the two sampling campaigns between 44-49% in the thoracic fraction expressed as % of the inhalable amount. Linear regression analysis shows a high correlation between water soluble Be, Al, F and Na describing an average measured chemical bulk composition of the water soluble thoracic fraction as Na(5.7)Al(3.1)F(18). Be is likely to be present as traces in this particulate matter by replacing Al atoms in the condensed fluorides and/or as a major element in a nanoparticle sized fluoride. Thus, the major amount of Be present in the work room atmosphere of Al smelter pot rooms will predominantly be present in combination with substantial amounts of water soluble Al, F and Na. PMID:21993554

  9. Palaeoenvironmental Indications of Enhanced Primary Productivity During Pliocene Sapropel Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, D.; Hopmans, E. C.; Schouten, S.; van Bergen, P. F.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Cores taken during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 160 in the eastern Mediterranean basin revealed periodic, laminated intervals with high organic contents, i.e. sapropels (Emeis et al., 1996). These include Pliocene sediments showing cyclic variations in organic matter deposition strongly correlated to the precession cyclicity of the Earth's orbit (e.g. Rossignol-Strick, 1985; Lourens et al., 1996a). The two main causes for sapropel formation are either climate-related enhanced organic matter productivity and/or increased preservation due to oxygen depletion of the bottom waters (e.g. Calvert et al., 1992; Canfield, 1994). Increased productivity is suggested to be the driving force in generating euxinic conditions leading to sapropel deposition (e.g. Passier et al., 1999). Photic zone euxinia was most probably triggered by large-scale input of nutrients from the Nile and other rivers leading to enhanced primary productivity and consequently high organic matter fluxes. This was based on concentrations of isorenieratene, a biomarker of photic zone euxinia, studied in three lateral time-equivalent Pliocene sapropels (subm. Menzel et al., 2001). Photic zone euxinia was more pronounced at the central and western part of the eastern Mediterranean basin, when compared with the most eastern part, where a deepening of the chemocline resulted from the increased delivery of fresh water. Using additional biomarkers will provide detailed insights in palaeoenvironmental changes that caused high organic matter deposition. The quantitative analysis of compounds specific for phytoplankton classes, e.g. isololiolides and loliolides reflecting Bacillariophyta, C37 - C39 alkenones indicative of Prymnesiophyta etc., will result in reconstruction of compositions of the standing crop and changes thereof at the time of deposition. The quantitative analysis of long-chain n-alkanes, indicating higher land plants, could reveal river input into the basin. Carbon isotope compositions of

  10. Extreme events in gross primary production: a characterization across continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zscheischler, J.; Reichstein, M.; Harmeling, S.; Rammig, A.; Tomelleri, E.; Mahecha, M. D.

    2014-06-01

    Climate extremes can affect the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, for instance via a reduction of the photosynthetic capacity or alterations of respiratory processes. Yet the dominant regional and seasonal effects of hydrometeorological extremes are still not well documented and in the focus of this paper. Specifically, we quantify and characterize the role of large spatiotemporal extreme events in gross primary production (GPP) as triggers of continental anomalies. We also investigate seasonal dynamics of extreme impacts on continental GPP anomalies. We find that the 50 largest positive extremes (i.e., statistically unusual increases in carbon uptake rates) and negative extremes (i.e., statistically unusual decreases in carbon uptake rates) on each continent can explain most of the continental variation in GPP, which is in line with previous results obtained at the global scale. We show that negative extremes are larger than positive ones and demonstrate that this asymmetry is particularly strong in South America and Europe. Our analysis indicates that the overall impacts and the spatial extents of GPP extremes are power-law distributed with exponents that vary little across continents. Moreover, we show that on all continents and for all data sets the spatial extents play a more important role for the overall impact of GPP extremes compared to the durations or maximal GPP. An analysis of possible causes across continents indicates that most negative extremes in GPP can be attributed clearly to water scarcity, whereas extreme temperatures play a secondary role. However, for Europe, South America and Oceania we also identify fire as an important driver. Our findings are consistent with remote sensing products. An independent validation against a literature survey on specific extreme events supports our results to a large extent.

  11. Extreme events in gross primary production: a characterization across continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zscheischler, J.; Mahecha, M. D.; Harmeling, S.; Rammig, A.; Tomelleri, E.; Reichstein, M.

    2014-01-01

    Climate extremes can affect the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems, for instance via a reduction of the photosynthetic capacity or alterations of respiratory processes. Yet the dominant regional and seasonal effects of hydrometeorological extremes are still not well documented. Here we quantify and characterize the role of large spatiotemporal extreme events in gross primary production (GPP) as triggers of continental anomalies. We also investigate seasonal dynamics of extreme impacts on continental GPP anomalies. We find that the 50 largest positive (increase in uptake) and negative extremes (decrease in uptake) on each continent can explain most of the continental variation in GPP, which is in line with previous results obtained at the global scale. We show that negative extremes are larger than positive ones and demonstrate that this asymmetry is particularly strong in South America and Europe. Most extremes in GPP start in early summer. Our analysis indicates that the overall impacts and the spatial extents of GPP extremes are power law distributed with exponents that vary little across continents. Moreover, we show that on all continents and for all data sets the spatial extents play a more important role than durations or maximal GPP anomaly when it comes to the overall impact of GPP extremes. An analysis of possible causes implies that across continents most extremes in GPP can best be explained by water scarcity rather than by extreme temperatures. However, for Europe, South America and Oceania we identify also fire as an important driver. Our findings are consistent with remote sensing products. An independent validation against a literature survey on specific extreme events supports our results to a large extent.

  12. Controls on the ratio of mesozooplankton production to primary production in marine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Charles; Dunne, John

    2010-01-01

    An ecosystem model was used to (1) determine the extent to which global trends in the ratio of mesozooplankton production to primary production (referred to herein as the " z-ratio") can be explained by nutrient enrichment, temperature, and euphotic zone depth, and (2) quantitatively diagnose the mechanisms driving these trends. Equilibrium model solutions were calibrated to observed and empirically derived patterns in phytoplankton biomass and growth rates, mesozooplankton biomass and growth rates, and the fraction of phytoplankton that are large (>5 μm ESD). This constrained several otherwise highly uncertain model parameters. Most notably, half-saturation constants for zooplankton feeding were constrained by the biomass and growth rates of their prey populations, and low zooplankton basal metabolic rates were required to match observations from oligotrophic ecosystems. Calibrated model solutions had no major biases and produced median z-ratios and ranges consistent with estimates. However, much of the variability around the median values in the calibration dataset (72 points) could not be explained. Model results were then compared with an extended global compilation of z-ratio estimates (>10 000 points). This revealed a modest yet significant ( r=0.40) increasing trend in z-ratios from values ˜0.01-0.04 to ˜0.1-0.2 with increasing primary productivity, with the transition from low to high z-ratios occurring at lower primary productivity in cold-water ecosystems. Two mechanisms, both linked to increasing phytoplankton biomass, were responsible: (1) zooplankton gross growth efficiencies increased as their ingestion rates became much greater than basal metabolic rates and (2) the trophic distance between primary producers and mesozooplankton shortened as primary production shifted toward large phytoplankton. Mechanism (1) was most important during the transition from low to moderate productivity ecosystems and mechanism (2) was responsible for a relatively

  13. Estimation of gross primary production capacity from global satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Kanako; Thanyapraneedkul, Juthasinee; Furumi, Shinobu; Soyama, Noriko; Daigo, Motomasa

    2012-10-01

    To estimate gross primary production (GPP), the process of photosynthesis was considered as two separate phases: capacity and reduction. The reduction phase is influenced by environmental conditions such as soil moisture and weather conditions such as vapor pressure differences. For a particular leaf, photosynthetic capacity mainly depends on the amount of chlorophyll and the RuBisCO enzyme. The chlorophyll content can be estimated by the color of the leaf, and leaf color can be detected by optical sensors. We used the chlorophyll content of leaves to estimate the level of GPP. A previously developed framework for GPP capacity estimation employs a chlorophyll index. The index is based on the linear relationship between the chlorophyll content of a leaf and the maximum photosynthesis at PAR =2000 (μmolm -2s-1) on a light-response curve under low stress conditions. As a first step, this study examined the global distribution of the index and found that regions with high chlorophyll index values in winter corresponded to tropical rainforest areas. The seasonal changes in the chlorophyll index differed from those shown by the normalized difference vegetation index. Next, the capacity of GPP was estimated from the light-response curve using the index. Most regions exhibited a higher GPP capacity than that estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations, except in areas of tropical rainforest, where the GPP capacity and the MODIS GPP estimates were almost identical.

  14. Natural Organic Matter as Global Antennae for Primary Production

    PubMed Central

    Van Trump, J. Ian; Rivera Vega, Fransheska J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Humic substances (HS) are high-molecular-weight complex refractory organics that are ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic environments. While resistant to microbial degradation, these compounds nevertheless support microbial metabolism via oxidation or reduction of their (hydro)quinone moieties. As such, they are known to be important electron sinks for respiratory and fermentative bacteria and electron sources for denitrifying and perchlorate-reducing bacteria. HS also strongly promote abiotic reduction of Fe(III) when irradiated with light. Here, we show that HS-enhanced Fe(III) photoreduction can also drive chemolithotrophic microbial respiration by producing Fe(II), which functions as a respiratory electron donor. Due to their molecular complexity, HS absorb most of the electromagnetic spectrum and can act as broad-spectrum antennae converting radiant energy into bioavailable chemical energy. The finding that chemolithotrophic organisms can utilize this energy has important implications for terrestrial, and possibly extraterrestrial, microbial processes and offers an alternative mechanism of radiation-driven primary productivity to that of phototrophy. Key Words: Deep subsurface biosphere—Chemolithotrophic microorganisms—Organic matter—Geochemistry—Iron-oxidizing bacteria. Astrobiology 13, 476–482. PMID:23683047

  15. Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering enhances terrestrial gross primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, L.; Robock, A.; Tilmes, S.; Neely, R. R., III

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric sulfate geoengineering could impact the terrestrial carbon cycle by enhancing the carbon sink. With an 8 Tg yr-1 injection of SO2 to balance a Representative Concentration Pathway 6.0 (RCP6.0) scenario, we conducted climate model simulations with the Community Earth System Model, with the Community Atmospheric Model 4 fully coupled to tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (CAM4-chem). During the geoengineering period, as compared to RCP6.0, land-averaged downward visible diffuse radiation increased 3.2 W m-2 (11 %). The enhanced diffuse radiation combined with the cooling increased plant photosynthesis by 2.4 %, which could contribute to an additional 3.8 ± 1.1 Gt C yr-1 global gross primary productivity without nutrient limitation. This increase could potentially increase the land carbon sink. Suppressed plant and soil respiration due to the cooling would reduce natural land carbon emission and therefore further enhance the terrestrial carbon sink during the geoengineering period. This beneficial impact of stratospheric sulfate geoengineering would need to be balanced by a large number of potential risks in any future decisions about implementation of geoengineering.

  16. Natural organic matter as global antennae for primary production.

    PubMed

    Van Trump, J Ian; Rivera Vega, Fransheska J; Coates, John D

    2013-05-01

    Humic substances (HS) are high-molecular-weight complex refractory organics that are ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic environments. While resistant to microbial degradation, these compounds nevertheless support microbial metabolism via oxidation or reduction of their (hydro)quinone moieties. As such, they are known to be important electron sinks for respiratory and fermentative bacteria and electron sources for denitrifying and perchlorate-reducing bacteria. HS also strongly promote abiotic reduction of Fe(III) when irradiated with light. Here, we show that HS-enhanced Fe(III) photoreduction can also drive chemolithotrophic microbial respiration by producing Fe(II), which functions as a respiratory electron donor. Due to their molecular complexity, HS absorb most of the electromagnetic spectrum and can act as broad-spectrum antennae converting radiant energy into bioavailable chemical energy. The finding that chemolithotrophic organisms can utilize this energy has important implications for terrestrial, and possibly extraterrestrial, microbial processes and offers an alternative mechanism of radiation-driven primary productivity to that of phototrophy. PMID:23683047

  17. Gross primary production of global forest ecosystems has been overestimated

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jianyong; Yan, Xiaodong; Dong, Wenjie; Chou, Jieming

    2015-01-01

    Coverage rate, a critical variable for gridded forest area, has been neglected by previous studies in estimating the annual gross primary production (GPP) of global forest ecosystems. In this study, we investigated to what extent the coverage rate could impact forest GPP estimates from 1982 to 2011. Here we show that the traditional calculation without considering the coverage rate globally overestimated the forest gross carbon dioxide uptake by approximately 8.7%, with a value of 5.12 ± 0.23 Pg C yr−1, which is equivalent to 48% of the annual emissions from anthropogenic activities in 2012. Actually, the global annual GPP of forest ecosystems is approximately 53.71 ± 4.83 Pg C yr−1 for the past 30 years by taking the coverage rate into account. Accordingly, we argue that forest annual GPP calculated by previous studies has been overestimated due to the exaggerated forest area, and therefore, coverage rate may be a required factor to further quantify the global carbon cycle. PMID:26027557

  18. Verification of Potency of Aerial Digital Oblique Cameras for Aerial Photogrammetry in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Ryuji; Takigawa, Masanori; Ohga, Tomowo; Fujii, Noritsuna

    2016-06-01

    Digital oblique aerial camera (hereinafter called "oblique cameras") is an assembly of medium format digital cameras capable of shooting digital aerial photographs in five directions i.e. nadir view and oblique views (forward and backward, left and right views) simultaneously and it is used for shooting digital aerial photographs efficiently for generating 3D models in a wide area. For aerial photogrammetry of public survey in Japan, it is required to use large format cameras, like DMC and UltraCam series, to ensure aerial photogrammetric accuracy. Although oblique cameras are intended to generate 3D models, digital aerial photographs in 5 directions taken with them should not be limited to 3D model production but they may also be allowed for digital mapping and photomaps of required public survey accuracy in Japan. In order to verify the potency of using oblique cameras for aerial photogrammetry (simultaneous adjustment, digital mapping and photomaps), (1) a viewer was developed to interpret digital aerial photographs taken with oblique cameras, (2) digital aerial photographs were shot with an oblique camera owned by us, a Penta DigiCAM of IGI mbH, and (3) accuracy of 3D measurements was verified.

  19. Attributing Changes in Gross Primary Productivity from 1901 to 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, C. R.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Michalak, A. M.; Cook, R. B.; El Masri, B.; Hayes, D. J.; Huang, M.; Jacobson, A. R.; Jain, A. K.; Lei, H.; Lu, C.; Tian, H.; Schaefer, K. M.; Wei, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Model-based studies are foundational to perform diagnosis (has there been a change?) and attribution (what caused this change?) in the context of global environmental change. Here we employ a dual method approach using machine learning and simulation differencing across an ensemble of terrestrial biosphere models (TBM) to attribute changes in gross primary productivity (GPP) from 1901 to 2010. The simulations are taken from the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). For each TBM MsTMIP prescribes a semi-factorial set of five runs (globally at 0.5º spatial resolution) where time-varying controls on carbon metabolism are sequentially enabled. MsTMIP has a constrained simulation protocol -driving data, vegetation cover, boundary conditions, and steady-state spin up protocol are all standardized- such that only model structure varies and ensemble spread addresses process uncertainty. Applying this dual method to MsTMIP simulation output we attribute changes in GPP to changes in climate, land cover/land use change, atmospheric CO2, nitrogen deposition, near-surface air temperature, precipitation, and downwelling shortwave radiation as well as climate sigma (irreducible climate noise) and nonlinearity (interactions). Globally, the key factor associated with the Anthropocene, namely the sustained increase in atmospheric CO2, dominates changes in GPP across the full time period. Climate factors are of secondary importance and, along with land cover/land use change, may act to decrease GPP depending on decade and reference period. Despite differences in model structure attribution results across the full ensemble are generally consistent. Spatial morphologies, replicating the same dual approach by grid cell, exhibit high variability but with an atmospheric CO2 fertilization effect dominating the tropical zone. Our results suggest that the modern era of global warming, when viewed through the prism of GPP attribution, reaches back at

  20. Estimating Net Primary Productivity Using Satellite and Ancillary Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The net primary productivity (C) or annual rate of carbon accumulation per unit ground area by terrestrial plant communities is the difference of the rate of gross photosynthesis (A(sub g)) and autotrophic respiration (R) per unit ground area. Although available observations show that R is a large and variable fraction of A(sub g), viz., 0.3 to 0.7, it is generally recognized that much uncertainties exist in this fraction due to difficulties associated with the needed measurements. Additional uncertainties arise when these measurements are extrapolated to regional or global land surface using empirical equations, for example, using regression equations relating C to mean annual precipitation and air temperature. Here, a process-based approach has been taken to calculate A(sub g) and R using satellite and ancillary data. A(sub g) has been expressed as a product of radiation use efficiency, magnitude of intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and normalized by stresses due to soil water shortage and air temperature away from the optimum range. A biophysical model has been used to determine the radiation use efficiency from the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf, foliage temperature, and the fraction of diffuse PAR incident on a canopy. All meteorological data (PAR, air temperature, precipitation, etc.) needed for the calculation are derived from satellite observations, while a land use, land cover data (based on satellite and ground measurements) have been used to assess the maximum rate of carbon assimilation by a leaf of varied cover type based on field measurements. R has been calculated as the sum of maintenance and growth components. The maintenance respiration of foliage and live fine roots at a standard temperature of different land cover has been determined from their nitrogen content using field and satellite measurements, while that of living fraction of woody stem (viz., sapwood) from the seasonal maximum leaf area index as

  1. Aerial Image Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Robert E.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial images produce the best stereoscopic images of the viewed world. Despite the fact that every optic in existence produces an aerial image, few persons are aware of their existence and possible uses. Constant reference to the eye and other optical systems have produced a psychosis of design that only considers "focal planes" in the design and analysis of optical systems. All objects in the field of view of the optical device are imaged by the device as an aerial image. Use of aerial images in vision and visual display systems can provide a true stereoscopic representation of the viewed world. This paper discusses aerial image systems - their applications and designs and presents designs and design concepts that utilize aerial images to obtain superior visual displays, particularly with application to visual simulation.

  2. Quantitative grain density autoradiography and the intraspecific distribution of primary productivity in phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, J.B.; Maguire, B. Jr.

    1984-03-01

    Analysis of a method of grain density autoradiography demonstrates that reliable measurements of the primary productivity of individual phytoplankton species can be obtained with this technique. Grain density autoradiography is particularly useful for providing an estimate of the intraspecific distribution of primary productivity. As an example, the productivity distribution of the marine diatom Chaetoceros curvisetus became positively skewed during a period of population decline.

  3. ANALYSIS OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS AT A PRIMARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project investigated the source of priority pollutants, assessment of the wastewater treatment plant, and priority pollutant removal efficiency for a single Soderberg-type primary aluminum plant. Forty-eight hour composite samples were collected from the following streams: (...

  4. Fine root production across a primary successional ecosystem chronosequence at Mt. Shasta, California.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estimating changes in belowground biomass and production is essential for understanding fundamental patterns and processes during ecosystem development. We examined patterns of fine root production, aboveground litterfall, and forest floor accumulation during forest primary succession at the Mt. Sha...

  5. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1975-01-01

    The National Cartographic Information Center of the U.S. Geological Survey maintains records of aerial photographic coverage of the United States and its Territories, based on reports from other Federal agencies as well as State governmental agencies and commercial companies. From these records, the Center furnishes data to prospective purchasers on available photography and the agency holding the aerial film.

  6. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    H. W. Clark, Jr.

    2002-10-01

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration.

  7. Region Three Aerial Measurement System Flight Planning Tool - 12006

    SciTech Connect

    Messick, Chuck; Pham, Minh; Smith, Ron; Isiminger, Dave

    2012-07-01

    The Region 3 Aerial Measurement System Flight Planning Tool is used by the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA), United States Department of Energy, Radiological Assistance Program, Region 3, to respond to emergency radiological situations. The tool automates the flight planning package process while decreasing Aerial Measuring System response times and decreases the potential for human error. Deployment of the Region Three Aerial Measurement System Flight Planning Tool has resulted in an immediate improvement to the flight planning process in that time required for mission planning has been reduced from 1.5 hours to 15 minutes. Anecdotally, the RAP team reports that the rate of usable data acquired during surveys has improved from 40-60 percent to over 90 percent since they began using the tool. Though the primary product of the flight planning tool is a pdf format document for use by the aircraft flight crew, the RAP team has begun carrying their laptop computer on the aircraft during missions. By connecting a Global Positioning System (GPS) device to the laptop and using ESRI ArcMap's GPS tool bar to overlay the aircraft position directly on the flight plan in real time, the RAP team can evaluate and correct the aircraft position as the mission is executed. (authors)

  8. High-end aerial digital cameras and their impact on the automation and quality of the production workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparoditis, Nicolas; Souchon, Jean-Philippe; Martinoty, Gilles; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Marc

    The IGN digital camera project was established in the early 1990s. The first research surveys were carried out in 1996 and the digital camera was first used in production in 2000. In 2004 approximately 10 French departments (accounting for 10% of the territory) were covered with a four-head camera system and since summer 2005 all IGN imagery has been acquired digitally. Nevertheless the camera system is still evolving, with tests on new geometric configurations being continuously undertaken. The progressive integration of the system in IGN production workflows has allowed IGN to keep the system evolving in accordance with production needs. Remaining problems are due to specific camera characteristics such as CCD format, the optical quality of off-the-shelf lenses, and because some production tools are ill-adapted to digital images with a large dynamic range. However, when considering the pros and cons of integrating these images into production lines, the disadvantages are largely balanced by the numerous benefits this technology offers.

  9. Short-term to seasonal variability in factors driving primary productivity in a shallow estuary: Implications for modeling production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canion, Andy; MacIntyre, Hugh L.; Phipps, Scott

    2013-10-01

    The inputs of primary productivity models may be highly variable on short timescales (hourly to daily) in turbid estuaries, but modeling of productivity in these environments is often implemented with data collected over longer timescales. Daily, seasonal, and spatial variability in primary productivity model parameters: chlorophyll a concentration (Chla), the downwelling light attenuation coefficient (kd), and photosynthesis-irradiance response parameters (Pmchl, αChl) were characterized in Weeks Bay, a nitrogen-impacted shallow estuary in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Variability in primary productivity model parameters in response to environmental forcing, nutrients, and microalgal taxonomic marker pigments were analysed in monthly and short-term datasets. Microalgal biomass (as Chla) was strongly related to total phosphorus concentration on seasonal scales. Hourly data support wind-driven resuspension as a major source of short-term variability in Chla and light attenuation (kd). The empirical relationship between areal primary productivity and a combined variable of biomass and light attenuation showed that variability in the photosynthesis-irradiance response contributed little to the overall variability in primary productivity, and Chla alone could account for 53-86% of the variability in primary productivity. Efforts to model productivity in similar shallow systems with highly variable microalgal biomass may benefit the most by investing resources in improving spatial and temporal resolution of chlorophyll a measurements before increasing the complexity of models used in productivity modeling.

  10. Aerial Photographs and Satellite Images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1997-01-01

    Photographs and other images of the Earth taken from the air and from space show a great deal about the planet's landforms, vegetation, and resources. Aerial and satellite images, known as remotely sensed images, permit accurate mapping of land cover and make landscape features understandable on regional, continental, and even global scales. Transient phenomena, such as seasonal vegetation vigor and contaminant discharges, can be studied by comparing images acquired at different times. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which began using aerial photographs for mapping in the 1930's, archives photographs from its mapping projects and from those of some other Federal agencies. In addition, many images from such space programs as Landsat, begun in 1972, are held by the USGS. Most satellite scenes can be obtained only in digital form for use in computer-based image processing and geographic information systems, but in some cases are also available as photographic products.

  11. Risk evaluation of drift from 40 aerially-applied herbicides on fish production pond plankton and water quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Row crop herbicides were tested for possible adverse effects on pond plankton and water quality in triplicate 500-L outdoor, pool mesocosms. Treatments were drift at low (1% of full field rates) and high levels (10% of the full rate) to production ponds of 5 ha and large, and no drift (control). H...

  12. MODIS Ocean Color, SST and Primary Productivity Products at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences DAAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziana, J.; Leptoukh, G.; Savtchenko, A.; Serafino, G.; Sharma, A. K.

    2001-12-01

    The Goddard Earth Science (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) plays a major role in enabling basic scientific research and providing access to scientific data for the user community through the ingest, processing, archive and distribution of MODIS data. MODIS is part of the instrument package on the Terra (formally AM-1) satellite that was launched on December 18. 1999. Global scale ocean products are derived from many of the 36 different wavelengths measured by the MODIS/Terra instrument and are archived at a rate of about 230 GB/day. This paper will provide a description of the MODIS Ocean data products and associated geophysical parameters, data access, data availability and tools. The full suite of ocean products is grouped into three categories: ocean color, SST and primary productivity. The amount of MODIS ocean data being archived at the DAAC will increase dramatically in the near future when the data from the MODIS instrument onboard the Aqua (formally PM-1) spacecraft begins transmission. This will result in a significant increase in the volume of ocean data being ingested, archived and distributed at the GES DAAC. The current suite of products will be generated for both Terra and Aqua. In addition, joint Terra/Aqua ocean products will be derived. The challenge, to distribute such large volumes of data to the ocean community, is achieved through a combination of GES DAAC Hierarchical Search and Order Tool known as, WHOM, and EOS Data Gateway (EDG) World Wide Web (WWW) interfaces and an FTP site that contains samples of MODIS data. The MODIS Data Support Team (MDST) continues the tradition of quality support at the GES DAAC for the ocean color data from CZCS and SeaWiFS by providing expert assistance to users in accessing data products, information on visualization tools, documentation for data products and formats (HDF-EOS), information on the scientific content of products and metadata. Visit the MDST website at http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/CAMPAIGN_DOCS/MODIS/index.html

  13. Primary production in the Chukchi Sea with potential effects of freshwater content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, M. S.; Whitledge, T. E.; Stockwell, D.; Son, S. H.; Lee, J. H.; Park, J. W.; Lee, D. B.; Park, J.; Lee, S. H.

    2016-02-01

    The in situ primary production rates and various environmental variables were investigated in the Chukchi Sea during the RUSALCA expedition, which was conducted in 2012, to identify the current status of primary production. A 13C-15N dual-tracer technique was used to measure the daily primary production rates, which ranged from 0.02 to 1.61 g C m-2 d-1 (mean ±SD = 0.42 ± 0.52 g C m-2 d-1). The primary production rates showed large regional differences, with the southern region (0.66 ± 0.62 g C m-2 d-1) producing approximately 5 times as much as the northern region (0.14 ± 0.10 g C m-2 d-1), which was primarily due to the differences in phytoplankton biomasses induced by regional nutrient conditions. The primary production rates in the Chukchi Sea were averaged using data acquired during the three different RUSALCA expeditions (2004, 2009, and 2012) as 0.33 g C m-2 d-1 (SD = 0.40 g C m-2 d-1), which was significantly lower than previously reported rates. In addition to strong seasonal and interannual variations in primary production, recent decreases in the concentrations of major inorganic nutrients and chlorophyll a could be among the reasons for the recent low primary production in the Chukchi Sea because the primary production is mainly affected by nutrient concentration and phytoplankton biomass. The nutrient inventory and primary production appear to be largely influenced by the freshwater content (FWC) variability in the region due to the significant relationships between FWC, nitrate inventory (r = 0.54, p < 0.05), and primary production rates (r = 0.56, p < 0.05). Moreover, we found highly significant relationships between the nutrient inventory and the primary production rates (r = 0.75, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the primary production in the Chukchi Sea is primarily controlled by nutrient availability, which is strongly related to the FWC variability. Our results imply that the predicted increase in freshwater accumulation might cause a

  14. The Impact of Submesoscale Physics on Primary Productivity of Plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-01-01

    Life in the ocean relies on the photosynthetic production of phytoplankton, which is influenced by the availability of light and nutrients that are modulated by a host of physical processes. Submesoscale processes are particularly relevant to phytoplankton productivity because the timescales on which they act are similar to those of phytoplankton growth. Their dynamics are associated with strong vorticity and strain rates that occur on lateral scales of 0.1-10 km. They can support vertical velocities as large as 100 m d-1 and play a crucial role in transporting nutrients into the sunlit ocean for phytoplankton production. In regimes with deep surface mixed layers, submesoscale instabilities can cause stratification within days, thereby increasing light exposure for phytoplankton trapped close to the surface. These instabilities help to create and maintain localized environments that favor the growth of phytoplankton, contribute to productivity, and cause enormous heterogeneity in the abundance of phytoplankton, which has implications for interactions within the ecosystem.

  15. Primary production export flux in Marguerite Bay (Antarctic Peninsula): Linking upper water-column production to sediment trap flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Keith; Jickells, Timothy D.; Carson, Damien S.; Clarke, Andrew; Meredith, Michael P.; Brandon, Mark A.; Wallace, Margaret I.; Ussher, Simon J.; Hendry, Katharine R.

    2013-05-01

    A study was carried out to assess primary production and associated export flux in the coastal waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula at an oceanographic time-series site. New, i.e., exportable, primary production in the upper water-column was estimated in two ways; by nutrient deficit measurements, and by primary production rate measurements using separate 14C-labelled radioisotope and 15N-labelled stable isotope uptake incubations. The resulting average annual exportable primary production estimates at the time-series site from nutrient deficit and primary production rates were 13 and 16 mol C m-2, respectively. Regenerated primary production was measured using 15N-labelled ammonium and urea uptake, and was low throughout the sampling period. The exportable primary production measurements were compared with sediment trap flux measurements from 2 locations; the time-series site and at a site 40 km away in deeper water. Results showed ˜1% of the upper mixed layer exportable primary production was exported to traps at 200 m depth at the time-series site (total water column depth 520 m). The maximum particle flux rate to sediment traps at the deeper offshore site (total water column depth 820 m) was lower than the flux at the coastal time-series site. Flux of particulate organic carbon was similar throughout the spring-summer high flux period for both sites. Remineralisation of particulate organic matter predominantly occurred in the upper water-column (<200 m depth), with minimal remineralisation below 200 m, at both sites. This highly productive region on the Western Antarctic Peninsula is therefore best characterised as 'high recycling, low export'.

  16. Influence of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Primary Productivity in the Semi-Enclosed Bay in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, R.; Nishi, S.; Taniguchi, M.; Tominaga, O.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have shown that submarine groundwater discharge is an alternative nutrient pathway and can drive primary production in coastal seas. However, very little is known about an exact relationship between input of groundwater and response of primary production. To clarify the relationship, we conducted the field survey in the semi-enclosed coastal bay in Japan (Obama Bay). There are abundant amounts of groundwater resources in the basin. Firstly, we conducted 222Rn continuous measurement along the coast in March 2013 to obtain the spatial difference of groundwater impact. As a result, 222Rn activity clearly showed that groundwater discharge concentrates in the western part of the bay head. We thus conducted in-situ measurements of primary productivity using stable 13C tracer method and environmental parameters (ex. 222Rn activity, light intensity, temperature and nutrient concentrations) at 6 stations within the western bay head in July and August 2013. Primary productivity within the western bay head changed from 11.0 to 49.5 μg C L-1 hr-1 in July and from 9.3 to 32.4 μg C L-1 hr-1 in August. Moreover, there was significant relationship between primary productivity and 222Rn concentration in both months. Although light intensity and water temperature were different in each station and month, concentrations of nutrients limited primary productivity. These results showed that nutrient supply from SGD would affect crucial impact on primary productivity in Obama Bay.

  17. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-Specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile Severine; Gregg, Watson W.

    2014-01-01

    We used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. First we assessed the contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production at a global scale for the period 1998-2011. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (50, the equivalent of 20 PgC y-1. Coccolithophores and chlorophytes each contributed to 20 (7 PgC y-1 of the total primary production and cyanobacteria represented about 10 (4 PgC y(sub-1) of the total primary production. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (45) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We then assessed interannual variability of this group-specific primary production over the period 1998-2011. Globally the annual relative contribution of each phytoplankton groups to the total primary production varied by maximum 4 (1-2 PgC y-1. We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nio Index, MEI) and regional climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability as indicated by significant correlation (p 0.05) between the MEI and the class-specific primary production from all groups except coccolithophores. In the Atlantic, climate variability as indicated by NAO was significantly correlated to the primary production of 2 out of the 4 groups in the North Central Atlantic (diatomscyanobacteria) and in the North Atlantic (chlorophytes and coccolithophores). We found that climate variability as indicated by SAM had only a limited effect on the class-specific primary production in the Southern Ocean. These results provide a modeling and

  18. The use of cyclone modeling in the erection of precast segmental aerial construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, S.

    1983-06-01

    The intent of this work is to analyze two methods of obtaining activity duration data in the field for use in the CYCLONE modeling program for determining construction productivity. One method is the traditional stopwatch-type study while the other is utilization of time-lapse photography. The construction activity which will be observed is the erection of an aerial guideway for the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) rail line. The aerial guideway is being built using precast post-tensioned segmental concrete construction. This method of bridge construction or elevated span construction has proven to be more economical than more conventional methods of construction. One of the primary reasons for lower cost is the speed at which precast post-tensioned segmental concrete construction can be put in place. Field data for the erection procedure will be input into the CYCLONE model to obtain a production rate to be compared to actual field production.

  19. Mercury emission and behavior in primary ferrous metal production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Naomichi; Takaoka, Masaki; Doumoto, Shingo; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Morisawa, Shinsuke; Mizuno, Tadao

    2011-07-01

    Ferrous metal production is thought to be a major mercury emission source because it uses large amounts of coal and iron ore, which contain trace amounts of mercury impurities. However, there is limited information about mercury emissions during the production process. In this study, we focused on the coke-oven process, sintering furnace process, and blast furnace process. We measured the mercury concentration in the raw materials, products, and byproducts to estimate the amount of mercury emitted and to investigate the behavior of mercury during the processes. Average mercury concentrations were 30.8 μg kg -1 in 54 samples of iron ore and 59.9 μg kg -1 in 33 samples of coal. The total mercury used for ferrous metal production in Japan was estimated to be 8.45 tons in 2005, with 4.07 tons from iron ore, 3.76 tons from coal, and 0.478 tons from limestone. Emissions from the sintering process accounted for more than 90% of the total emissions, and mercury in the exhaust gas was reduced using an activated coke tower and desulfurization equipment installed downstream of an electrostatic precipitator. When byproduct gas generated from coke-oven and blast furnace processes were included, mercury emissions estimates based on actual measurements were 4.08 tons y -1 (in 2005). Thus, about 50% of the mercury input in ferrous metal production was emitted to the atmosphere. The emission factor was calculated as 0.0488 g Hg ton -1 for crude steel production. The introduction of activated coke tower or desulfurization equipment in sintering furnace facilities would reduce mercury emissions.

  20. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Class-specific Primary Production at a Global Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, Cecile; Gregg, Watson

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton is responsible for over half of the net primary production on earth. The knowledge on the contribution of various phytoplankton groups to the total primary production is still poorly understood. Data from satellite observations suggest that for upwelling regions, photosynthetic rates by microplankton is higher than that of nanoplankton but that when the spatial extent is considered, the production by nanoplankton is comparable or even larger than microplankton. Here, we used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) combined with remote sensing data via assimilation to evaluate the contribution of 4 phytoplankton groups to the total primary production. Globally, diatoms were the group that contributed the most to the total phytoplankton production (approx. 50%) followed by coccolithophores and chlorophytes. Primary production by diatoms was highest in high latitude (>45 deg) and in major upwelling systems (Equatorial Pacific and Benguela system). We assessed the effects of climate variability on the class-specific primary production using global (i.e. Multivariate El Nino Index, MEI) and 'regional' climate indices (e.g. Southern Annular Mode (SAM), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Most interannual variability occurred in the Equatorial Pacific and was associated with climate variability. These results provide a modeling and data assimilation perspective to phytoplankton partitioning of primary production and contribute to our understanding of the dynamics of the carbon cycle in the oceans at a global scale.

  1. Zika virus productively infects primary human placenta-specific macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Kellie Ann; Simoni, Michael K.; Tang, Zhonghua; Uraki, Ryuta; Hwang, Jesse; Householder, Sarah; Wu, Mingjie; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Abrahams, Vikki M.; Guller, Seth; Fikrig, Erol

    2016-01-01

    The strong association of Zika virus infection with congenital defects has led to questions of how a flavivirus is capable of crossing the placental barrier to reach the fetal brain. Here, we demonstrate permissive Zika virus infection of primary human placental macrophages, commonly referred to as Hofbauer cells, and placental villous fibroblasts. We also demonstrate Zika virus infection of Hofbauer cells within the context of the tissue ex vivo using term placental villous explants. In addition to amplifying infectious virus within a usually inaccessible area, the putative migratory activities of Hofbauer cells may aid in dissemination of Zika virus to the fetal brain. Understanding the susceptibility of placenta-specific cell types will aid future work around and understanding of Zika virus–associated pregnancy complications. PMID:27595140

  2. Fission Product Migration in Primary System and Containment

    2015-04-01

    Version 00 ART MOD2 aims at a comprehensive analysis for the FP behaviour in primary system and in containment during severe accidents and therefore the code considers the removal of radio-nuclides of up to 60 materials including chemical compounds by natural deposition and by the engineered safety features (ESF) such as spray systems. As for the natural deposition of radio-nuclides, the code can consider the phenomena such as gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, Brownian diffusion, diffusionmore » under laminar or turbulent flows, resuspension, condensation, chemisorption and revaporization. The code also models the aerosol growth by agglomeration of aerosols and condensation/evaporation of volatile material at the aerosol surface. Recently, the models for iodine chemistry in containment sump water was incorporated into ART MOD2 ART MOD2 was modified in January 2015 to correct coding errors and improve the vibration of the calculation result of water (H2O) vapor.« less

  3. Fission Product Migration in Primary System and Containment

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-01

    Version 00 ART MOD2 aims at a comprehensive analysis for the FP behaviour in primary system and in containment during severe accidents and therefore the code considers the removal of radio-nuclides of up to 60 materials including chemical compounds by natural deposition and by the engineered safety features (ESF) such as spray systems. As for the natural deposition of radio-nuclides, the code can consider the phenomena such as gravitational settling, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, Brownian diffusion, diffusion under laminar or turbulent flows, resuspension, condensation, chemisorption and revaporization. The code also models the aerosol growth by agglomeration of aerosols and condensation/evaporation of volatile material at the aerosol surface. Recently, the models for iodine chemistry in containment sump water was incorporated into ART MOD2 ART MOD2 was modified in January 2015 to correct coding errors and improve the vibration of the calculation result of water (H2O) vapor.

  4. Will Global Change Effect Primary Productivity in Coastal Ecosystems?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Algae are the base of coastal food webs because they provide the source of organic carbon for the remaining members of the community. Thus, the rate that they produce organic carbon to a large extent controls the productivity of the entire ecosystem. Factors that control algal productivity range from the physical (e.g., temperature, light), chemical (e.g., nutrient levels) to the biological (e.g., grazing). Currently, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide surficial fluxes of ultraviolet radiation are rising. Both of these environmental variables can have a profound effect on algal productivity. Atmospheric carbon dioxide may increase surficial levels of dissolved inorganic carbon. Our laboratory and field studies of algal mats and phytoplankton cultures under ambient and elevated levels of pCO2 show that elevated levels of inorganic carbon can cause an increase in photosynthetic rates. In some cases, this increase will cause an increase in phytoplankton numbers. There may be an increase in the excretion of fixed carbon, which in turn may enhance bacterial productivity. Alternatively, in analogy with studies on the effect of elevated pCO2 on plants, the phytoplankton could change their carbon to nitrogen ratios, which will effect the feeding of the planktonic grazers. The seasonal depletion of stratospheric ozone has resulted in elevated fluxes of UVB radiation superimposed on the normal seasonal variation. Present surface UV fluxes have a significant impact on phytoplankton physiology, including the inhibition of the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis, inhibition of nitrogenase activity, inhibition of heterocyst formation, reduction in motility, increased synthesis of the UV-screening pigment scytonemin, and mutation. After reviewing these issues, recent work in our lab on measuring the effect of UV radiation on phytoplankton in the San Francisco Bay Estuary will be presented.

  5. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Supplement: An evaluation of benthic habitat primary productivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Balcom, B.J.; Foster, M.A.; Fourqurean, J.J.; Heine, J.N.; Leonard, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Literature on current primary productivity was reviewed and evaluated for each of nine benthic communities or habitats, estimates of daily and annual benthic primary productivity were derived within each community, the benthic primary estimates were related to an estimate of areal extent of each community within or adjacent to each OCS planning area. Direct comparisons between habitats was difficult because of the varying measures and methodologies used. Coastal marshes were the most prevalent habitat type evaluated. Mangrove and coral reef habitats were highly productive but occur within few planning areas. Benthic diatoms and blue-green algae are less productive in terms of estimated annual productivity on a per square meter basis; these habitats have the potential to occur across wide areas of the OCS and should not be overlooked.

  6. Microscale Topographic Influence on Grassland Primary Productivity on Semiarid Hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travis, Jeffrey Todd

    Understanding the distribution of plant productivity is vital for understanding the spatial variability of ecosystem functions. This study evaluates microtopographic controls (1m-12m) on plant productivity on three rolling hills in Sedgwick Natural Reserve, located in south-central California. Specifically I evaluate the relationship between topographic metrics and plant biomass production through space and time. Biomass was measured using destructive harvests and seasonal Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. Eighty-three 1x0.5m2 quadrats of aboveground plant matter at peak biomass (ANPP) were harvested for the 2012 growing season. For the 2009 growing season, AVIRIS derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was used to estimate biomass at roughly monthly intervals from March to August. I evaluate whether seasonal changes in growing degree days (GDD) was a better predictor of plant phenological events than cumulative days since first soil moisture increase. To characterize topography, I used a 1m resolution digital elevation model derived from terrestrial lidar data to calculate curvature, aspect, and the Compound Topographic Index (CTI) - an index that integrates the flow accumulation area and slope. Using GDD, I found that ecosystem productivity was not temperature limited early in the growing season. Using webcam images I was able to remotely monitor phenological events quantitatively, but was not able to calculate NDVI because I lacked appropriate spectral bands. Plants growing on north facing slopes consistently had higher ANPP than those on south facing slopes, due to lower temperatures, hence greater preservation of soil moisture. No correlation was found between CTI or curvature and ANPP across the 83 sampled points in 2012, potentially because it was a dry year and there was limited water redistribution to lower positions in the landscape. Although a relationship between topography and soil moisture is probably valid

  7. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer for making in situ measurements of primary productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kolber, Z.S.; Falkowski, P.G.

    1992-10-01

    Understanding the ocean carbon cycle and predicting how climate-induced changes in ocean circulation will affect ocean productivity requires that (a) primary productivity be measured with high spatial and temporal resolution, and (b) natural variability in primary productivity be parameterized with regardto environmental factors such as nutrient availabuity, irradiance, and temperature. Instrumentation to measure primary productivity from the stimulated in vivo fluoresence of phytoplankton chlorophyll is currendy being developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The instrumentation is based on fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometry, and provides a robust technique for deriving the photosynthetic rates in situ. Moreover, the FRR methodology directly measures several photosynthetic parameters such as effective absorption cross- section, photo-conversion efficiency, and turnover time of photosynthesis, and relate them to primary productivity. Since photosynthetic parameters are affected by environmental factors such as fight and nutrient availability, the relationship between these parameters and primary productivity can be established. By understanding such relationships, prognostic models of primary productivity can be developed and parameterized.

  8. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer for making in situ measurements of primary productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kolber, Z.S.; Falkowski, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the ocean carbon cycle and predicting how climate-induced changes in ocean circulation will affect ocean productivity requires that (a) primary productivity be measured with high spatial and temporal resolution, and (b) natural variability in primary productivity be parameterized with regardto environmental factors such as nutrient availabuity, irradiance, and temperature. Instrumentation to measure primary productivity from the stimulated in vivo fluoresence of phytoplankton chlorophyll is currendy being developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The instrumentation is based on fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometry, and provides a robust technique for deriving the photosynthetic rates in situ. Moreover, the FRR methodology directly measures several photosynthetic parameters such as effective absorption cross- section, photo-conversion efficiency, and turnover time of photosynthesis, and relate them to primary productivity. Since photosynthetic parameters are affected by environmental factors such as fight and nutrient availability, the relationship between these parameters and primary productivity can be established. By understanding such relationships, prognostic models of primary productivity can be developed and parameterized.

  9. Energy and materials flows in the production of primary aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S.Y.

    1981-10-01

    The primary aluminum industry is one of the top five industrial energy users in the United States consuming about one quad annually. In 1980, for each ton of aluminum produced, an average smelting operation used about 157 million Btu of direct energy and another 70 million Btu were embodied in purchased materials. Producers employing the best practices used approximately 15% less energy per ton, or 132 million Btu of direct energy and 52 million Btu of embodied energy. These energy and materials flows are described in detail, using availability and input/output analyses and industry estimates. Energy consumption could be reduced further by developing (1) economical processes for using domestic nonbauxitic raw materials, a step that also would lessen the industry's present 94% dependence on foreign raw materials; (2) bulk alumina feeding equipment for handling more than one grade of alumina, thereby increasing the flexibility of smelting operations; (3) a reduction cell meter and temperature sensor for automatic control of alumina feeding and cell temperature; (4) a method for quickly and frequently measuring the NaF/AlF/sub 3/ ratio in a reduction cell for tighter control of electrolyte composition; and (5) a method for recovering waste heat.

  10. Effect of cobalt on the primary productivity of Spirulina platensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.M.; Panigrahi, S.; Azeez, P.A.

    1987-10-01

    Cobalt, a micronutrient for biological organisms, is a metal of wide use. Main sources of Co to the environment are combustion of fossil fuels, smelters, cobalt processing facilities, sewage and industrial wastes. Atomic power plants and nuclear weapon detonations form an important source of radioisotopes of this metal to the environment. Cobalt has been included in the 14 toxic trace elements of critical importance from the point of view of environmental pollution and health hazards. Cobalt deficiency leads to diseases like stunted growth. At toxic level, Co inhibits heme biosynthesis and enzyme activities. The present study reports the effect of cobalt on biomass productivity of blue-green alga Spirulina platensis.

  11. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in Stream Food Webs Declines with Increasing Primary Production.

    PubMed

    Walters, David M; Raikow, David F; Hammerschmidt, Chad R; Mehling, Molly G; Kovach, Amanda; Oris, James T

    2015-07-01

    Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for 16 artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production =0.048-0.71 mg O2 L(-1) d(-1)) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury concentrations in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems. PMID:26018982

  12. Methylmercury bioaccumulation in stream food webs declines with increasing primary production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, David; D.F. Raikow; C.R. Hammerschmidt; M.G. Mehling; A. Kovach; J.T. Oris

    2015-01-01

    Opposing hypotheses posit that increasing primary productivity should result in either greater or lesser contaminant accumulation in stream food webs. We conducted an experiment to evaluate primary productivity effects on MeHg accumulation in stream consumers. We varied light for 16 artificial streams creating a productivity gradient (oxygen production =0.048–0.71 mg O2 L–1 d–1) among streams. Two-level food webs were established consisting of phytoplankton/filter feeding clam, periphyton/grazing snail, and leaves/shredding amphipod (Hyalella azteca). Phytoplankton and periphyton biomass, along with MeHg removal from the water column, increased significantly with productivity, but MeHg concentrations in these primary producers declined. Methylmercury concentrations in clams and snails also declined with productivity, and consumer concentrations were strongly correlated with MeHg concentrations in primary producers. Heterotroph biomass on leaves, MeHg in leaves, and MeHg in Hyalella were unrelated to stream productivity. Our results support the hypothesis that contaminant bioaccumulation declines with stream primary production via the mechanism of bloom dilution (MeHg burden per cell decreases in algal blooms), extending patterns of contaminant accumulation documented in lakes to lotic systems.

  13. Aerial application methods for increasing spray deposition on wheat heads

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a major disease of wheat and barley in several small grain production areas in the United States and, as such, the development and evaluation of aerial application technologies that enhance the efficacy of fungicides with aerial spray applications is critical to its man...

  14. Interannual variability of primary production and dissolved organic nitrogen storage in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ya-Wei; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Church, Matthew J.; Karl, David M.; Doney, Scott C.

    2012-09-01

    The upper ocean primary production measurements from the Hawaii Ocean Time series (HOT) at Station ALOHA in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre showed substantial variability over the last two decades. The annual average primary production varied within a limited range over 1991-1998, significantly increased in 1999-2000 and then gradually decreased afterwards. This variability was investigated using a one-dimensional ecosystem model. The long-term HOT observations were used to constrain the model by prescribing physical forcings and lower boundary conditions and optimizing the model parameters against data using data assimilation. The model reproduced the general interannual pattern in the observed primary production, and mesoscale variability in vertical velocity was identified as a major contributing factor to the interannual variability in the simulation. Several strong upwelling events occurred in 1999, which brought up nitrate at rates several times higher than other years and elevated the model primary production. Our model results suggested a hypothesis for the observed interannual variability pattern of primary production at Station ALOHA: Part of the upwelled nitrate input in 1999 was converted to and accumulated as semilabile dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and subsequent recycling of this semilabile DON supported enhanced primary productivity for the next several years as the semilabile DON perturbation was gradually removed via export.

  15. Effects of oligotrophication on primary production in peri-alpine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finger, David; Wüest, Alfred; Bossard, Peter

    2013-08-01

    During the second half of the 20th century untreated sewage released from housing and industry into natural waters led to a degradation of many freshwater lakes and reservoirs worldwide. In order to mitigate eutrophication, wastewater treatment plants, including Fe-induced phosphorus precipitation, were implemented throughout the industrialized world, leading to reoligotrophication in many freshwater lakes. To understand and assess the effects of reoligotrophication on primary productivity, we analyzed 28 years of 14C assimilation rates, as well as other biotic and abiotic parameters, such as global radiation, nutrient concentrations and plankton densities in peri-alpine Lake Lucerne, Switzerland. Using a simple productivity-light relationship, we estimated continuous primary production and discussed the relation between productivity and observed limnological parameters. Furthermore, we assessed the uncertainty of our modeling approach based on monthly 14C assimilation measurements using Monte Carlo simulations. Results confirm that monthly sampling of productivity is sufficient for identifying long-term trends in productivity and that conservation management has successfully improved water quality during the past three decades via reducing nutrients and primary production in the lake. However, even though nutrient concentrations have remained constant in recent years, annual primary production varies significantly from year to year. Despite the fact that nutrient concentrations have decreased by more than an order of magnitude, primary production has decreased only slightly. These results suggest that primary production correlates well to nutrients availability but meteorological conditions lead to interannual variability regardless of the trophic status of the lake. Accordingly, in oligotrophic freshwaters meteorological forcing may reduce productivity impacting on the entire food chain of the ecosystem.

  16. Aerial Photography Summary Record System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1998-01-01

    The Aerial Photography Summary Record System (APSRS) describes aerial photography projects that meet specified criteria over a given geographic area of the United States and its territories. Aerial photographs are an important tool in cartography and a number of other professions. Land use planners, real estate developers, lawyers, environmental specialists, and many other professionals rely on detailed and timely aerial photographs. Until 1975, there was no systematic approach to locate an aerial photograph, or series of photographs, quickly and easily. In that year, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) inaugurated the APSRS, which has become a standard reference for users of aerial photographs.

  17. Tight coupling of primary production and marine mammal reproduction in the Southern Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, J. Terrill; Rotella, Jay J.; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Garrott, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Polynyas are areas of open water surrounded by sea ice and are important sources of primary production in high-latitude marine ecosystems. The magnitude of annual primary production in polynyas is controlled by the amount of exposure to solar radiation and sensitivity to changes in sea-ice extent. The degree of coupling between primary production and production by upper trophic-level consumers in these environments is not well understood, which prevents reliable predictions about population trajectories for species at higher trophic levels under potential future climate scenarios. In this study, we find a strong, positive relationship between annual primary production in an Antarctic polynya and pup production by ice-dependent Weddell seals. The timing of the relationship suggests reproductive effort increases to take advantage of high primary production occurring in the months after the birth pulse. Though the proximate causal mechanism is unknown, our results indicate tight coupling between organisms at disparate trophic levels on a short timescale, deepen our understanding of marine ecosystem processes, and raise interesting questions about why such coupling exists and what implications it has for understanding high-latitude ecosystems. PMID:25854885

  18. Production of primary mirror segments for the Giant Magellan Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, H. M.; Allen, R. G.; Burge, J. H.; Davis, J. M.; Davison, W. B.; Johns, M.; Kim, D. W.; Kingsley, J. S.; Law, K.; Lutz, R. D.; Strittmatter, P. A.; Su, P.; Tuell, M. T.; West, S. C.; Zhou, P.

    2014-07-01

    Segment production for the Giant Magellan Telescope is well underway, with the off-axis Segment 1 completed, off-axis Segments 2 and 3 already cast, and mold construction in progress for the casting of Segment 4, the center segment. All equipment and techniques required for segment fabrication and testing have been demonstrated in the manufacture of Segment 1. The equipment includes a 28 m test tower that incorporates four independent measurements of the segment's figure and geometry. The interferometric test uses a large asymmetric null corrector with three elements including a 3.75 m spherical mirror and a computer-generated hologram. For independent verification of the large-scale segment shape, we use a scanning pentaprism test that exploits the natural geometry of the telescope to focus collimated light to a point. The Software Configurable Optical Test System, loosely based on the Hartmann test, measures slope errors to submicroradian accuracy at high resolution over the full aperture. An enhanced laser tracker system guides the figuring through grinding and initial polishing. All measurements agree within the expected uncertainties, including three independent measurements of radius of curvature that agree within 0.3 mm. Segment 1 was polished using a 1.2 m stressed lap for smoothing and large-scale figuring, and a set of smaller passive rigid-conformal laps on an orbital polisher for deterministic small-scale figuring. For the remaining segments, the Mirror Lab is building a smaller, orbital stressed lap to combine the smoothing capability with deterministic figuring.

  19. Role of eddy pumping in enhancing primary production in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falkowski, Paul G.; Kolber, Zbigniew; Ziemann, David; Bienfang, Paul K.

    1991-01-01

    Eddy pumping is considered to explain the disparity between geochemical estimates and biological measurements of exported production. Episodic nutrient injections from the ocean into the photic zone can be generated by eddy pumping, which biological measurements cannot sample accurately. The enhancement of production is studied with respect to a cyclonic eddy in the subtropical Pacific. A pump-and-probe fluorimeter generates continuous vertical profiles of primary productivity from which the contributions of photochemical and nonphotochemical processes to fluorescence are derived. A significant correlation is observed between the fluorescence measurements and radiocarbon measurements. The results indicate that eddy pumping has an important effect on phytoplankton production and that this production is near the maximum relative specific growth rates. Based on the production enhancement observed in this case, eddy pumping increases total primary production by only 20 percent and does not account for all enhancement.

  20. ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON PRIMARY PRODUCTION AND SIZE AS DETERMINED REMOTELY FROM AIRCRAFT AND COASTAL OBSERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used remotely sensed estimates of chlorophyll a and sea surface temperature, incorporated into the Chesapeake Bay Productivity Model (Harding et al., 2002), to estimate the spatial and temporal variation of phytoplankton net primary production and species size in the Narragans...

  1. Patterns of new versus recycled primary production in the terrestrial biosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability regulate plant productivity throughout the terrestrial biosphere, influencing the patterns and magnitude of net primary production (NPP) by land plants both now and into the future. These nutrients enter ecosystems via geologic and atmospheric pathways, a...

  2. MODIS EVI as a Proxy for Net Primary Production across Precipitation Regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Above ground net primary production (ANPP) is a measure of the rate of photosynthesis in an ecosystem, and is indicative of its biomass productivity. Prior studies have reported a relationship between ANPP and annual precipitation which converged across biomes in dry years. This deserves further s...

  3. A reassessment of primary production and environmental change in the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Zachary W.; van Dijken, Gert L.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2011-08-01

    Regarded as one of the world's most productive marine environments, the Bering Sea is widely thought to be rapidly warming and losing sea ice. Such changes would be expected to have dramatic impacts on primary producers, with cascading effects on upper trophic levels, including this region's vast commercial fisheries resources. Here, we use satellite-derived sea ice concentration, sea surface temperature, and ocean color data as input to a primary productivity algorithm to take stock of environmental change and primary production in the Bering Sea. Results show that, rather than declining, mean annual sea ice extent in the Bering Sea has exhibited no significant change over the satellite sea ice record (1979-2009). Furthermore, significant warming during the satellite sea surface temperature record (1982-2009) is mainly limited to the summer months, when all regions of the Bering Sea warmed. This warming suggests increasing stratification during the phytoplankton growth season. Despite certain hot spots of primary production and a strong pulse in the spring, the rate of annual area-normalized primary production in the Bering Sea (124 g C m-2 yr-1) is below the global mean (140 g C m-2 yr-1). Between 1998 and 2007, basin-wide annual primary production ranged from 233 to 331 Tg C yr-1 under the influence of highly variable sea ice and temperature conditions. By comparing warm, low-ice years (2001-2005) with cold, high-ice years (1998-2000 and 2006-2007), we speculate that Bering Sea primary productivity is likely to rise under conditions of future warming and sea ice loss.

  4. Near infrared-red models for the remote estimation of chlorophyll- a concentration in optically complex turbid productive waters: From in situ measurements to aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurlin, Daniela

    Today the water quality of many inland and coastal waters is compromised by cultural eutrophication in consequence of increased human agricultural and industrial activities and remote sensing is widely applied to monitor the trophic state of these waters. This study explores near infrared-red models for the remote estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration in turbid productive waters and compares several near infrared-red models developed within the last 35 years. Three of these near infrared-red models were calibrated for a dataset with chlorophyll-a concentrations from 2.3 to 81.2 mg m -3 and validated for independent and statistically significantly different datasets with chlorophyll-a concentrations from 4.0 to 95.5 mg m-3 and 4.0 to 24.2 mg m-3 for the spectral bands of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The developed MERIS two-band algorithm estimated chlorophyll-a concentrations from 4.0 to 24.2 mg m-3, which are typical for many inland and coastal waters, very accurately with a mean absolute error 1.2 mg m-3. These results indicate a high potential of the simple MERIS two-band algorithm for the reliable estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration without any reduction in accuracy compared to more complex algorithms, even though more research seems required to analyze the sensitivity of this algorithm to differences in the chlorophyll-a specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton. Three near infrared-red models were calibrated and validated for a smaller dataset of atmospherically corrected multi-temporal aerial imagery collected by the hyperspectral airborne imaging spectrometer for applications (AisaEAGLE). The developed algorithms successfully captured the spatial and temporal variability of the chlorophyll-a concentrations and estimated chlorophyll- a concentrations from 2.3 to 81.2 mg m-3 with mean absolute errors from 4.4 mg m-3 for the AISA two band algorithm to 5.2 mg m-3

  5. Primary productivity, bacterial productivity and nitrogen uptake in response to iron enrichment during the SEEDS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Isao; Noiri, Yoshifumi; Cochlan, William P.; Suzuki, Koji; Aramaki, Takafumi; Ono, Tsuneo; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2009-12-01

    Primary productivity (PP), bacterial productivity (BP) and the uptake rates of nitrate and ammonium were measured using isotopic methods ( 13C, 3H, 15N) during a mesoscale iron (Fe)-enrichment experiment conducted in the western subarctic Pacific Ocean in 2004 (SEEDS II). PP increased following Fe enrichment, reached maximal rates 12 days after the enrichment, and then declined to the initial level on day 17. During the 23-day observation period, we observed the development and decline of the Fe-induced bloom. The surface mixed layer (SML) integrated PP increased by 3-fold, but was smaller than the 5-fold increase observed in the previous Fe-enrichment experiment conducted at almost the same location and season during 2001 (SEEDS). Nitrate uptake rates were enhanced by Fe enrichment but decreased after day 5, and became lower than ammonium uptake rates after day 17. The total nitrogenous nutrient uptake rate declined after the peak of the bloom, and accumulation of ammonium was obvious in the euphotic layer. Nitrate utilization accounted for all the requirements of N for the massive bloom development during SEEDS, whereas during SEEDS II, nitrate accounted for >90% of total N utilization on day 5, declining to 40% by the end of the observation period. The SML-integrated BP increased after day 2 and peaked twice on days 8 and 21. Ammonium accumulation and the delayed heterotrophic activity suggested active regeneration occurred after the peak of the bloom. The SML-integrated PP between days 0 and 23 was 19.0 g C m -2. The SML-integrated BP during the same period was 2.6 g C m -2, which was 14% of the SML-integrated PP. Carbon budget calculation for the whole experimental period indicated that 33% of the whole (particulate plus dissolved) PP (21.5 g C m -2) was exported below the SML and 18% was transferred to the meso-zooplankton (growth). The bacterial carbon consumption (43% of the whole PP) was supported by DOC or POC release from phytoplankton, zooplankton

  6. Metrically preserving the USGS aerial film archive

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moe, Donald; Longhenry, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Since 1972, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, has provided fi lm-based products to the public. EROS is home to an archive of 12 million frames of analog photography ranging from 1937 to the present. The archive contains collections from both aerial and satellite platforms including programs such as the National High Altitude Program (NHAP), National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP), U.S. Antarctic Resource Center (USARC), Declass 1(CORONA, ARGON, and LANYARD), Declass 2 (KH-7 and KH-9), and Landsat (1972 – 1992, Landsat 1–5).

  7. Aerial Explorers and Robotic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg

    2004-01-01

    A unique bio-inspired approach to autonomous aerial vehicle, a.k.a. aerial explorer technology is discussed. The work is focused on defining and studying aerial explorer mission concepts, both as an individual robotic system and as a member of a small robotic "ecosystem." Members of this robotic ecosystem include the aerial explorer, air-deployed sensors and robotic symbiotes, and other assets such as rovers, landers, and orbiters.

  8. Hot-spots of primary productivity: An Alternative interpretation to Conventional upwelling models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruth, Paul D.; Ganf, George G.; Ward, Tim M.

    2010-12-01

    The eastern Great Australian Bight (EGAB) forms part of the Southern and Indian Oceans and is an area of high ecological and economic importance. Although it supports a commercial fishery, quantitative estimates of the primary productivity underlying this industry are open to debate. Estimates range from <100 mg C m -2 day -1 to > 500 mg C m -2 day -1. Part of this variation may be due to the unique upwelling circulation of shelf waters in summer/autumn (November-April), which shares some similarities with highly productive eastern boundary current upwelling systems, but differs due to the influence of a northern boundary current, the Flinders current, and a wide continental shelf. This study examines spatial variations in primary productivity in the EGAB during the upwelling seasons of 2005 and 2006. Daily integral productivity calculated using the vertically generalised production model (VGPM) showed a high degree of spatial variation. Productivity was low (<800 mg C m -2 day -1) in offshore central and western regions of the EGAB. High productivities (1600-3900 mg C m -2 day -1) were restricted to hotspots in the east that were influenced by the upwelled water mass. There was a strong correlation between the depth of the euphotic zone and the depth of the mixed layer that suggested that ˜50% of the euphotic zone lay below the mixed layer depth. As a result, high rates of primary productivity did not require upwelled water to reach the surface. A significant proportion of total productivity in the euphotic zone (57% in 2005 and 65% in 2006) occurred in the upwelled water mass below the surface mixed layer. This result has implications for daily integral productivities modelled with the VGPM, which uses surface measures of phytoplankton biomass to calculate productivity. Macro-nutrient concentrations could not be used to explain the difference in the low and high productivities (silica > 1 μmol L -1, nitrate/nitrite > 0.4 μmol L -1, phosphate > 0.1 μmol L -1

  9. Distributions of pigments and primary production in a Gulf Stream meander

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Cullen, J.J.; Phinney, D.A.; Olson, D.B.; Yentsch, C.S.

    1993-08-15

    An investigation was made of physical effects of Gulf Stream meandering on the vertical and horizontal distributions of photosynthetic pigments and primary production. Cruises were conducted in the vicinity of a meander east of 73{degrees}W and north of 37{degrees}N from September 21 to October 5 (leg 1) and October 12-21, 1988 (leg 2), on the R/V Cape Hatteras. Relationships of photosynthesis (normalized to chlorophyll) to irradiance (P-I) did not show large horizontal variation, and water column composite P-I curves from leg 1 and leg 2 were similar. Therefore, a single P-I curve derived from pooled data was used to model distributions of primary production. Distributions of photosynthetic pigments were characterized on the basis of in vivo fluorescence profiles and empirical relationships with extracted pigment concentrations. Subsurface irradiance was described using a spectral irradiance model. Cross sections of the Gulf Stream revealed consistently higher pigment concentrations and primary production on the slope water side. Along-stream variations in pigment distributions and primary production were apparently related to density structure influenced by meander circulation. Such variations were less pronounced during leg 2, which came after a transition from a well-defined meander interacting with a warm-core ring (leg 1) to a more linear stream (leg 2). Higher water-column-integrated primary production during leg 2 was attributed to mixing-induced nutrient injection and redistribution of chlorophyll in the photic zone. 47 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Sanz-Martín, M.; Mesa, E.; Arrieta, J. M.; Chierici, M.; Hendriks, I. E.; García-Corral, L. S.; Regaudie-de-Gioux, A.; Delgado, A.; Reigstad, M.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145-2,099 μatm however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  11. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1971-01-01

    Geological Survey vertical aerial photography is obtained primarily for topographic and geologic mapping. Reproductions from this photography are usually satisfactory for general use. Because reproductions are not stocked, but are custom processed for each order, they cannot be returned for credit or refund.

  12. Aerial of the VAB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Even in this aerial view at KSC, the Vehicle Assembly Building is imposing. In front of it is the Launch Control Center. In the background is the Rotation/Processing Facility, next to the Banana Creek. In the foreground is the Saturn Causeway that leads to Launch Pads 39A and 39B.

  13. Aerial Perspective Artistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a lesson centering on aerial perspective artistry of students and offers suggestions on how art teachers should carry this project out. This project serves to develop students' visual perception by studying reproductions by famous artists. This lesson allows one to imagine being lured into a landscape capable of captivating…

  14. Evaluation of bio-optical algorithms to remotely sense marine primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthelot, Beatrice; Deschamps, Pierre-Yves

    1994-01-01

    In situ bio-optical measurements from several oceanographic campaigns were analyzed to derive a direct relationship between water column primary production P (sub t) ocean color as expressed by the ratio of reflectances R (sub 1) at 440 nm and R (sub 3) at 550 nm and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR). The study is restricted to the Morel case I waters for which the following algorithm is proposed: log (P(sub f)) = -4.286 - 1.390 log (R(sub 1)/R(sub3)) + 0.621 log (PAR), with P(sub t) in g C m(exp -2)/d and PAR in J m(exp -2)/d. Using this algorithm the rms accuracy of primary production estimate is 0.17 on a logarithmic scale, i.e., a factor of 1.5. Using spectral reflectance measurements in the entire visible spectral range, the central wavelength, spectral bandwidth, and radiometric noise level requirements are investigated for the channels to be used by an ocean color space mission dedicated to estimating global marine primary production and the associated carbon fluxes. Nearly all the useful information is provided by two channels centered at 440 nm and 550 nm, but the accuracy of primary production estimate appears weakly sensitive to spectral bandwidth, which, consequently, may be enlarged by several tens of nanometers. The sensitivity to radiometric noise, on the contrary, is strong, and a noise equivalent reflectance of 0.005 degraded the accuracy on the primary production estimate by a factor 2 (0.14-0.25 on a logarithmic scale). The results should be applicable to evaluating the primary production of oligotrophic and mesotrophic waters, which constitute most of the open ocean.

  15. Primary productivity and nitrogen assimilation with identifying the contribution of urea in Funka Bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Isao; Hisatoku, Takatsugu; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Maita, Yoshiaki

    2015-06-01

    Primary production is supported by utilization of several forms of nitrogen (N), such as nitrate, ammonium, and urea. Nevertheless, only few studies have measured the concentration and uptake of urea despite its importance as a nitrogenous nutrient for phytoplankton. We measured primary productivity monthly at four depths within the euphotic zone using a clean technique and the 13C method by a 24 h in situ mooring incubation over a year in Funka Bay, a subarctic coastal area in Japan, to make better updated estimates (re-evaluation) of annual primary production. Nitrogenous (N) nutrient assimilation rates (nitrate, ammonium and urea) were also measured to elucidate the relative contributions of these nutrients to autotrophic production and to distinguish between new and regenerated production. The estimated annual primary production was 164 g C m-2, which was 40-60% higher than the previously reported values in the bay. Use of a clean technique and more frequent measurement during the spring bloom may have contributed to the higher rates. The production during the spring bloom was 56.5 g C m-2, accounting for 35% of the annual production. The maximum daily productivity occurred in the bloom at 1.4 g C m-2 d-1, which is one of the highest values among the world embayments. The annual primary production in the bay was classified as mesotrophic state based on the classification by Cloern et al. (2014). The assimilation rate of nitrate was maximal at 54 nmol N L-1 h-1 during the bloom. During the post-bloom periods with nitrate depleted conditions, assimilation rates of ammonium and urea increased and accounted for up to 85% of the total N assimilation. The assimilation rate of urea was almost comparable to that of ammonium throughout the year. Taking urea into account, the f-ratio ranged from 0.15 under the nitrate-depleted conditions to 0.8 under the spring bloom conditions. These ratios were overestimated by 50% and 10%, respectively, if urea uptake was eliminated

  16. Primary productivity estimation in Liaodong Bay and Liaohe River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, S.; Ye, S.; Laws, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, primary productivities of phytoplankton in the areas of Liaodong Bay and Liaohe River Delta, China were investigated with chlorophyll contents and components, nutrient dynamics and all related environment parameters in July, 2013. Water samples collected from 14 typical sites were incubated under in situ or simulated in situ conditions by the 14C tracer method. Surface chl-a concentration in the coastal zone of Liaodong Bay ranged from 2.16 to 19.85 mg·m-3, and the corresponding primary productivity of particulate organic carbon (POC) ranged from 26.82 to 204.91 mg·m-3·h-1. Although both our chl-a and primary productivity measurements reveal significant spatial variability across the Liaodong Bay, the release rates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from phytoplankton cells into seawater accounts for 4.94±1.44% of the primary productivity of total organic carbon (TOC). Furthermore, the mean and standard deviation of photosynthetic assimilation numbers were 11.65±2.33 (range = 8.78 to 14.63; n=6) with specific maxima in two sites where transparency was better than others, comparatively. In the Liaohe River Delta, it is observed that chl-a concentration and the primary productivity of POC declined from 11.20 mg·m-3 and 89.03 mg·m-3·h-1 to be 1.54 mg·m-3 and 13.22 mg·m-3·h-1, separately, corresponding to the increasing of salinity from 1.0 to be 6.7 in the area dominated by the salinity gradient. The maxima primary productivity of TOC in the river (99.74 mg·m-3·h-1) was about ten times higher than the minima primary productivity (9.73 mg·m-3·h-1) in the coastal area of Liaodong Bay, probably because of the significant variation of nutrient dynamics, suspended particulate matter and transparency along the river discharge. The percentage of DOC release from phytoplankton cell in the river delta area was approximately 13.71±3.62%, much higher than that in the coastal area of Liaodong Bay. The possible effect of phytoplankton community on the

  17. Precision aerial application for site-specific rice crop management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Precision agriculture includes different technologies that allow agricultural professional to use information management tools to optimize agriculture production. The new technologies allow aerial application applicators to improve application accuracy and efficiency, which saves time and money for...

  18. The effects of temporal variability of mixed layer depth on primary productivity around Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissett, W. Paul; Meyers, Mark B.; Walsh, John J.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal variations in primary production and surface chlorophyll concentrations, as measured by ship and satellite around Bermuda, were simulated with a numerical model. In the upper 450 m of the water column, population dynamics of a size-fractionated phytoplankton community were forced by daily changes of wind, light, grazing stress, and nutrient availability. The temporal variations of production and chlorophyll were driven by changes in nutrient introduction to the euphotic zone due to both high- and low-frequency changes of the mixed layer depth within 32 deg-34 deg N, 62 deg-64 deg W between 1979 and 1984. Results from the model derived from high-frequency (case 1) changes in the mixed layer depth showed variations in primary production and peak chlorophyll concentrations when compared with results from the model derived from low-frequency (case 2) mixed layer depth changes. Incorporation of size-fractionated plankton state variables in the model led to greater seasonal resolution of measured primary production and vertical chlorophyll profiles. The findings of this study highlight the possible inadequacy of estimating primary production in the sea from data of low-frequency temporal resolution and oversimplified biological simulations.

  19. Impact of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter on UV Inhibition of Primary Productivity in the Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Brown, Christopher W.

    1996-01-01

    A model was developed to assess the impact of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) on phytoplankton production within the euphotic zone. The rate of depth-integrated daily gross primary productivity within the euphotic zone was evaluated as a function of date, latitude, CDONI absorption characteristics, chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration, vertical stratification, and phytoplankton sensitivity to UV radiation (UVR). Results demonstrated that primary production was enhanced in the upper 30 m of the water column by the presence of CDOM, where predicted increases in production due to the removal of damaging UVR more than offset its reduction resulting from the absorption of photosynthetically usable radiation. At greater depths, where little UVR remained, primary production was always reduced due to removal by CDOM of photosynthetically usable radiation. When CDOM was distributed homogeneously within the euphotic zone, the integral over z [(GPP)(sub ez)], was reduced under most bio-optical (i.e. solar zenith angle, and CDOM absorption, and ozone concentration) and photophysiological production at depth was greater than the enhancement of production at the surface.

  20. Primary productivity by phytoplankton in the tidal, fresh Potomac River, Maryland, May 1980 to August 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, R.R.; Pollock, S.O.

    1983-01-01

    Primary productivity by phytoplankton was measured on samples collected from the Potomac Tidal River, Maryland. The studies were performed monthly from May 1980 to September 1981. Additional studies were done once a week in August 1980, twice a week from August 4 to 8, 1980 and twice in September 1980. Depth-integrated samples were collected at five stations and incubated in boxes that were exposed to natural sunlight. The boxes were covered with neutral density filters transmitting 100 , 65, 32, 16, and 6 percent surface light. River water was pumped continuously over the samples. The extinction of light in the water column by phytoplankton was measured when samples were collected. Experiments were performed to select a method for routine productivity analysis. No difference was found between productivity: (1) determined in situ and in boxes; (2) measured in 300 ml and (4) calculated from short term (4 hours) and long term (10-24 hours) incubations. There were higher productivity differences in samples that were rotated among different light intensities every 15 minutes (simulating mixing) than those remaining stationary. Respiration was significantly less in samples pumped through a hose from those collected using a depth-integrating sampler. Depth-integrated primary productivity was determined from the productivity data using an equation modified from one reported in the literature. Depth-integrated gross primary productivity was highest in August 1980 and 1981 and lowest in January 1980. (USGS)

  1. Benthic primary production in an upwelling-influenced coral reef, Colombian Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktarov, Elisa; Hauffe, Torsten; Pizarro, Valeria; Wilke, Thomas; Wild, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In Tayrona National Natural Park (Colombian Caribbean), abiotic factors such as light intensity, water temperature, and nutrient availability are subjected to high temporal variability due to seasonal coastal upwelling. These factors are the major drivers controlling coral reef primary production as one of the key ecosystem services. This offers the opportunity to assess the effects of abiotic factors on reef productivity. We therefore quantified primary net (Pn) and gross production (Pg) of the dominant local primary producers (scleractinian corals, macroalgae, algal turfs, crustose coralline algae, and microphytobenthos) at a water current/wave-exposed and-sheltered site in an exemplary bay of Tayrona National Natural Park. A series of short-term incubations was conducted to quantify O2 fluxes of the different primary producers during non-upwelling and the upwelling event 2011/2012, and generalized linear models were used to analyze group-specific O2 production, their contribution to benthic O2 fluxes, and total daily benthic O2 production. At the organism level, scleractinian corals showed highest Pn and Pg rates during non-upwelling (16 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1), and corals and algal turfs dominated the primary production during upwelling (12 and 19 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area h−1, respectively). At the ecosystem level, corals contributed most to total Pn and Pg during non-upwelling, while during upwelling, corals contributed most to Pn and Pg only at the exposed site and macroalgae at the sheltered site, respectively. Despite the significant spatial and temporal differences in individual productivity of the investigated groups and their different contribution to reef productivity, differences for daily ecosystem productivity were only present for Pg at exposed with higher O2 fluxes during non-upwelling compared to upwelling. Our findings therefore indicate that total benthic primary productivity of local autotrophic reef communities is

  2. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-06-09

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

  3. Bacterial and primary production in the pelagic zone of the Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazhin, A. F.; Romanova, N. D.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2010-10-01

    Data on the bacterial and primary production, which were obtained simultaneously for the same water samples, are presented for three regions of the Kara Sea. The samples were collected for the transect westwards of the Yamal Peninsula, along the St. Anna Trough, and the transect in Ob Bay. Direct counts of the DAPI-stained bacterial cells were performed. The bacterial production and grazing rates were determined using a direct method when metabolic inhibitors vancomycin and penicillin were added. The primary production rates were estimated using the 14C method. The average primary production was 112.6, 58.5, and 28.7 mg C m-2 day-1, and the bacterial production was 12.8, 48.9, and 81.6 mg C m-2 day-1 along the Yamal Peninsula, the St. Anna Trough, and Ob Bay, respectively. The average bacterial carbon demand was 34.6, 134.5, and 220.4 mg C m-2 day-1 for these regions, respectively. The data obtained lead us to conclude that the phytoplankton-synthesized organic matter is generally insufficient to satisfy the bacterial carbon demand and may be completely assimilated via the heterotrophic processes in the marine ecosystems. Therefore, the bacterial activity and, consequently, the amount of the synthesized biomass (i.e., the production) both depend directly on the phytoplankton’s condition and activity. We consider these relationships to be characteristics of the Kara Sea’s biota.

  4. Global 4 km resolution monthly gridded Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) data set derived from FLUXNET2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Hargrove, William W.; Collier, Nathan

    2016-08-01

    This data set contain global gridded surfaces of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) at 2 arc minute (approximately 4 km) spatial resolution monthly for the period of 2000-2014 derived from FLUXNET2015 (released July 12, 2016) observations using a representativeness based upscaling approach.

  5. Aboveground net primary production responses to water availability in the Chihuhuan Desert: importance of legacy effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In arid ecosystems, current year precipitation explains a small proportion of annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Precipitation that occurred in previous years may be responsible for the observed difference between actual and expected ANPP, a concept that we called legacy. Thus, previo...

  6. Legacies of precipitation fluctuations on primary production: theory and data synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variability of above-ground net primary production (ANPP) of arid to sub-humid ecosystems displays a closer association with precipitation when considered across space (based on multiyear averages for different locations) than through time (based on year-to-year change at single locations). Here, we...

  7. Legacies of precipitation fluctuations on primary production: Theory and data synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variability of aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of arid to sub-humid ecosystems displays a closer association with precipitation when considered across space, based on multiyear averages for different locations, than through time, based on year to year change at single locations. Here, we p...

  8. Global Net Primary Production Predicted from Vegetation Class, Precipitation, and Temperature.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net Primary Production (NPP), the difference between CO2 fixed by photosynthesis and CO2 lost to autotrophic respiration, is one of the most important components of the carbon cycle. Our goal was to develop a simple regression model to estimate global NPP using climate and land cover data. Approxima...

  9. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  10. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  11. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  12. PHOSPHOROUS AND NITROGEN LIMITATION OF PRIMARY PRODUCTION IN A SIMULATED ESTUARINE GRADIENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transition between phosphorus limitation of primary production in freshwater and nitrogen limitation in seawater was examined along an estuarine gradient simulated in 4 large 13 M3 enclosures connected in a series and containing pelagic and benthic subsystems. ominal saliniti...

  13. Deconstructing Immigrant Girls' Identities through the Production of Visual Narratives in a Catalan Urban Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rifa-Valls, Montserrat

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the research findings of a deconstructive visual ethnography focused on the production of immigrant girls' identities will be analysed. This collaborative research project involved experimentation with a dialogic curriculum aimed at creating diverse identity narratives with immigrant girls at an urban primary school in Barcelona.…

  14. Modeling the Response of Nutrient Concentrations and Primary Productivity in Lake Michigan to Nutrient Loading Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality model, LM3 Eutro, will be used to estimate the response of nutrient concentrations and primary productivity in Lake Michigan to nutrient loading scenarios. This work is part of a larger effort, the Future Midwestern landscapes study, that will estimate the produc...

  15. Variability in light-use efficiency for gross primary productivity on Great Plains grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gross primary productivity (GPP) often is estimated at regional and global scales by multiplying the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by the plant canopy (PARa) by a light-use efficiency (eg) which is modeled as a function of air temperature (Ta) and other environmental c...

  16. The Potential of Carbonyl Sulfide as a Tracer for Gross Primary Productivity at Flux Tower Sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Regional/continental scale studies of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS) seasonal dynamics and leaf level studies of plant OCS uptake have shown a close relationship to CO2 dynamics and uptake, suggesting potential for OCS as a tracer for gross primary productivity (GPP). Canopy CO2 and OCS differen...

  17. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... comply with all of the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 61, subpart A. (b) You must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, that are specified... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment...

  18. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  19. 40 CFR 63.11164 - What General Provisions apply to primary zinc production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 63, subpart A, according to Table 1 to this subpart and paragraphs (a)(1) through (3) of this... the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as provided in Table 1 to this subpart and... primary zinc production facilities? 63.11164 Section 63.11164 Protection of Environment...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11166 - What General Provisions apply to primary beryllium production facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... comply with all of the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 61, subpart A. (b) You must comply with the requirements of the General Provisions in 40 CFR part 63, subpart A, that are specified... primary beryllium production facilities? 63.11166 Section 63.11166 Protection of Environment...

  1. 24 CFR 3282.362 - Production Inspection Primary Inspection Agencies (IPIAs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Production Inspection Primary Inspection Agencies (IPIAs). 3282.362 Section 3282.362 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  2. Variability in light-use efficiency for gross primary productivity on Great Plains grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gross primary productivity (GPP) often is estimated at regional scales by multiplying the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by the plant canopy (PARa) by light-use efficiency (eg; GPP/PARa). Mass flux techniques are being used to calculate eg. Flux-based estimates of eg ...

  3. A comparison of global estimates of marine primary production from ocean color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Mary-Elena; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Schmeltz, Marjorie; Noguchi Aita, Maki; Antoine, David; Arrigo, Kevin R.; Asanuma, Ichio; Aumont, Olivier; Barber, Richard; Behrenfeld, Michael; Bidigare, Robert; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Campbell, Janet; Ciotti, Aurea; Dierssen, Heidi; Dowell, Mark; Dunne, John; Esaias, Wayne; Gentili, Bernard; Gregg, Watson; Groom, Steve; Hoepffner, Nicolas; Ishizaka, Joji; Kameda, Takahiko; Le Quéré, Corinne; Lohrenz, Steven; Marra, John; Mélin, Frédéric; Moore, Keith; Morel, André; Reddy, Tasha E.; Ryan, John; Scardi, Michele; Smyth, Tim; Turpie, Kevin; Tilstone, Gavin; Waters, Kirk; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2006-03-01

    The third primary production algorithm round robin (PPARR3) compares output from 24 models that estimate depth-integrated primary production from satellite measurements of ocean color, as well as seven general circulation models (GCMs) coupled with ecosystem or biogeochemical models. Here we compare the global primary production fields corresponding to eight months of 1998 and 1999 as estimated from common input fields of photosynthetically-available radiation (PAR), sea-surface temperature (SST), mixed-layer depth, and chlorophyll concentration. We also quantify the sensitivity of the ocean-color-based models to perturbations in their input variables. The pair-wise correlation between ocean-color models was used to cluster them into groups or related output, which reflect the regions and environmental conditions under which they respond differently. The groups do not follow model complexity with regards to wavelength or depth dependence, though they are related to the manner in which temperature is used to parameterize photosynthesis. Global average PP varies by a factor of two between models. The models diverged the most for the Southern Ocean, SST under 10C, and chlorophyll concentration exceeding 1 mg Chl m-3. Based on the conditions under which the model results diverge most, we conclude that current ocean-color-based models are challenged by high-nutrient low-chlorophyll conditions, and extreme temperatures or chlorophyll concentrations. The GCM-based models predict comparable primary production to those based on ocean color: they estimate higher values in the Southern Ocean, at low SST, and in the equatorial band, while they estimate lower values in eutrophic regions (probably because the area of high chlorophyll concentrations is smaller in the GCMs). Further progress in primary production modeling requires improved understanding of the effect of temperature on photosynthesis and better parameterization of the maximum photosynthetic rate.

  4. Different contributions of riverine and oceanic nutrient fluxes supporting primary production in Ishikari Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agboola, Julius I.; Kudo, Isao

    2014-10-01

    We computed a ratio of riverine nutrient flux (RNF) to bottom nutrient flux (BNF) to determine the relative importance of oceanic and riverine nutrient fluxes on primary production dynamics in Ishikari Bay, which is composed of oligotrophic subarctic coastal water. Across spring, summer and autumn, the RNF:BNF ratio (R:B ratio) was significantly greater than 1.0, especially in spring and autumn for DIN and Si(OH)4, suggesting that riverine nutrients mostly supported primary production. A strong inverse relationship (r=-0.927) between Chl a and salinity in autumn and a corresponding increase in the apparent utilization of DIN and primary production indicated that the contribution of DIN from the Ishikari River on primary production was maximal in autumn. However the R:B ratio for PO4 was significantly less than 1.0, especially in summer (0.1) and autumn (0.3), suggesting a larger contribution of bottom upwelling nutrient sources. In spring, when the ratio was close to 1 (0.8), PO4 supply from both bottom (upwelling) and surface (river) was equivalent, since PO4 concentration of river end-member was the lowest. Although riverine nutrient fluxes were a major source of DIN and Si(OH)4 nutrient supply in the bay, oceanic nutrient contribution from bottom upwelling and horizontal advection was a major source of PO4. While riverine nutrients significantly fuel primary production, the estuarine circulation process may contribute significantly to compensating for the inadequate supply of riverine PO4 in an oligotrophic system like Ishikari Bay. Also, unlike the usual estuarine system in which nutrient concentration at a deeper layer is high due to the regeneration of nutrients at depth, concentration in Ishikari Bay was very low due to an influence of oligotrophic waters. We conclude that riverine nutrient flux contributes a large portion of the total flux in Ishikari Bay.

  5. Mapping net primary production and related biophysical variables with remote sensing: Application to the BOREAS region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Prince, Stephen D.; Goward, Samuel N.; Thawley, Michelle M.; Small, Jennifer; Johnston, Andrew

    1999-11-01

    Maps of net and gross primary production, autotrophic respiration, biomass, and other biophysical variables were generated for 106 km2 of boreal forest in central Canada (the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere (BOREAS) region) using a production efficiency model (PEM) driven with remotely sensed observations at 1 km2 spatial resolution. The PEM was based on carbon yields of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation for both gross and net primary production (GPP and NPP), accounting for environmental stress and autotrophic respiration (Ra). Physiological control was modeled using remotely sensed maps of air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, and soil moisture. The accuracy of the inferred variables was generally within 10-30% of point measurements at the surface and independent model results (both at the stand level). Biomass maps were derived from visible reflectance measurements and were also compared to independently derived maps. Area-averaged GPP was 604 g C m-2 yr-1 compared with average canopy respiration of 428 g C m-2 yr-1 and NPP of 235 g C m-2 yr-1. Net annual carbon uptake in net primary production for the region totaled 175 teragrams. Canopy carbon exchange (GPP and Ra) differed widely between land cover types even though the model does not use land cover information. Extensive areas of the least productive cover types (e.g., lowland needleleaf species) accounted for the greatest amount of NPP.

  6. Distribution of plankton lipids and their role in the biological transformation of Antarctic primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzaud, P.; Errhif, A.; Bedo, A.

    1998-11-01

    Production and transfer of lipid through the Antarctic food web is reviewed for the Indian Ocean sector. The slow settling fine particles showed a marked inter-annual variability in biochemical composition with an increase in lipid content as % organic carbon. Comparison of the fatty acid spectra of different size categories of organic particles indicated that fine particles are dominated by saturated, monoenoic and branched acids, while larger material (50-100 μm, 200-500 μm net collected fractions) displayed a signature dominated by polyunsaturated acids. Zooplankton taxa displayed different strategies of lipid accumulation. Lipid content was highest in Thysanoessa macrura females and copepodite stages of Calanus propinquus. Relatively low levels were recorded for juveniles and male stages of euphausiids. Reserve lipids varied with species: C. propinquus showed equal content of triglycerides and wax esters, T. macrura showed a dominance of wax esters and Euphausia superba and Themisto gaudichaudii accumulated only triglycerides. Computed as carbon equivalent and integrated over 200 m, lipids in slow settling particles represented 22.6% of annual primary production. Similar computation with mesozooplankton and E. superba data on biomass and population structure from several summer cruises indicated values of carbon accumulation as lipid reserves and egg production of 4.2 and 0.1% of annual primary production for copepods and 4.4 and 3.8% for E. superba. When all trophic levels are considered, the overall mean exceeded 30% of annual primary production.

  7. Potential consequences of climate change for primary production and fish production in large marine ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Julia L.; Jennings, Simon; Holmes, Robert; Harle, James; Merino, Gorka; Allen, J. Icarus; Holt, Jason; Dulvy, Nicholas K.; Barange, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Existing methods to predict the effects of climate change on the biomass and production of marine communities are predicated on modelling the interactions and dynamics of individual species, a very challenging approach when interactions and distributions are changing and little is known about the ecological mechanisms driving the responses of many species. An informative parallel approach is to develop size-based methods. These capture the properties of food webs that describe energy flux and production at a particular size, independent of species' ecology. We couple a physical–biogeochemical model with a dynamic, size-based food web model to predict the future effects of climate change on fish biomass and production in 11 large regional shelf seas, with and without fishing effects. Changes in potential fish production are shown to most strongly mirror changes in phytoplankton production. We project declines of 30–60% in potential fish production across some important areas of tropical shelf and upwelling seas, most notably in the eastern Indo-Pacific, the northern Humboldt and the North Canary Current. Conversely, in some areas of the high latitude shelf seas, the production of pelagic predators was projected to increase by 28–89%. PMID:23007086

  8. Release of primary microplastics from consumer products to wastewater in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Wezel, Annemarie; Caris, Inez; Kools, Stefan A E

    2016-07-01

    The authors estimate the release of primary microplastics from consumer products-cosmetics and personal care products, cleaning agents, and paint and coatings-via sewage effluent as an expected relevant route to the marine environment. Total estimated concentrations in the 3 scenarios are 0.2 μg/L, 2.7 μg/L, and 66 μg/L in sewage-treatment plant (STP) effluent, respectively. All product categories relevantly contribute. Predicted concentrations are compared with reported actual concentrations in STP effluents. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1627-1631. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26627661

  9. Trends in primary production in the California Current detected with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahru, Mati; Kudela, Raphael; Manzano-Sarabia, Marlenne; Mitchell, B. Greg

    2009-02-01

    Several ocean primary production algorithms using satellite data were evaluated on a large archive of net primary production (NPP) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) measurements collected by the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations program in the California Current. The best algorithm matching in situ data was found by empirically adjusting the Behrenfeld-Falkowski Vertically Generalized Production Model. Satellite-derived time series of NPP were calculated for the California Current area. Significant increase in NPP and Chl-a annual peak levels, i.e., the "bloom magnitude," were found along the coasts of the California Current as well as other major eastern boundary currents for the period of modern ocean color data (1997-2007). The reasons for this increase are not clear but are associated with various environmental conditions.

  10. Mechanisms behind primary production distribution during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mézo, Priscilla; Kageyama, Masa; Bopp, Laurent; Beaufort, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructions of past climates are possible through the analysis of organisms contained in marine and terrestrial sediments. Most of the paleorecords depend on biological processes, e.g. production of shells for coccolithophorids in the ocean, and these processes are sensitive to climate fluctuations from seasonal to orbital timescales. Consequently, depending on where and when the organisms that record climate conditions lived in the past, different factors may have influenced their abundance, their functioning, and thus it may bias interpretations of paleodata. In this context, it is necessary to evaluate the response of paleorecorders to climate variability at different timescales. In order to do so, we are using the coupled Earth System Model IPSLCM5A, which has a biogeochemical component PISCES that simulates primary production. We use 9 climate simulations of the IPSL-CM5A model, from -80kyr BP climate conditions to a preindustrial state. Thanks to different forcing conditions of these simulations we are able to disentangle the effects of precession changes from those of obliquity, sea level or gases concentrations. The objectives are to characterize the mechanisms behind the observed changes in primary production between the different time periods. The results of this modeling study will also be compared to reconstructed productions in the Indian, West and East Tropical Pacific Oceans obtained from core sediments with the method described in Beaufort et al. 1997. The early results on seasonal cycles show that, in the Indian Ocean, precession is not the main driver of changes in primary production. Indeed, we observe a grouping between simulations having the same sea level, which suggests that changes in primary production are more sensitive to parameters that define glacial-interglacial conditions such as ice sheets which affect oceanic circulation.

  11. Investigating the contribution of mussel N regeneration to coastal primary production using stable isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pather, S.; Altabet, M. A.; Pfister, C. A.; Post, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Determining the sources, pathways and sinks of inorganic nitrogen is integral to our understanding of one of the main determinants of primary productivity in the marine environment. The current view of rocky shore productivity is that it is largely fuelled by ‘new’ inorganic nitrogen brought to surface waters by the physical process of upwelling. However, along the rocky shores of the Washington State outer coast, the high densities of mussels (Mytilus californianus) colonizing these shores produce significant quantities of ‘regenerated’ inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium, a preferred nitrogen source for primary production. In this study, we seek to determine to what extent regenerated nitrogen is responsible for fueling primary production in these environments. To this end, we employed stable isotope tracers (15NH4 and 15NO3) to track the pathway of inorganic nitrogen in several rocky shore tidepools over the course of half a tidal cycle. Half of all the pools contained mussels in their natural abundance, while half were mussel control pools in which most of the mussels had been physically removed. Discrete water and algal tissue samples were taken at several time points within the study period for mass spectrometric stable isotope analysis. Preliminary results show isotope dilution of tidepool ammonium in pools containing mussels over half a tidal cycle, due to continued ammonium production by mussels. Combined concentration data, regeneration rates as well as removal rates due to autotrophic uptake and/or microbially-mediated ammonium oxidation (nitrification) will be calculated. Isotopic analysis of algal tissue samples and of the other nitrogen pools will shed further light on the contribution of regenerated ammonium to tidepool biogeochemical cycling and ultimately to coastal primary production.

  12. A multi-sensor remote sensing approach for measuring primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gautier, Catherine

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed to develop a multi-sensor remote sensing method for computing marine primary productivity from space, based on the capability to measure the primary ocean variables which regulate photosynthesis. The three variables and the sensors which measure them are: (1) downwelling photosynthetically available irradiance, measured by the VISSR sensor on the GOES satellite, (2) sea-surface temperature from AVHRR on NOAA series satellites, and (3) chlorophyll-like pigment concentration from the Nimbus-7/CZCS sensor. These and other measured variables would be combined within empirical or analytical models to compute primary productivity. With this proposed capability of mapping primary productivity on a regional scale, we could begin realizing a more precise and accurate global assessment of its magnitude and variability. Applications would include supplementation and expansion on the horizontal scale of ship-acquired biological data, which is more accurate and which supplies the vertical components of the field, monitoring oceanic response to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, correlation with observed sedimentation patterns and processes, and fisheries management.

  13. The Influence of Sea Ice on Primary Production in the Southern Ocean: A Satellite Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Walker O., Jr.; Comiso, Josefino C.

    2007-01-01

    Sea ice in the Southern Ocean is a major controlling factor on phytoplankton productivity and growth, but the relationship is modified by regional differences in atmospheric and oceanographic conditions. We used the phytoplankton biomass (binned at 7-day intervals), PAR and cloud cover data from SeaWiFS, ice concentrations data from SSM/I and AMSR-E, and sea-surface temperature data from AVHRR, in combination with a vertically integrated model to estimate primary productivity throughout the Southern Ocean (south of 60"s). We also selected six areas within the Southern Ocean and analyzed the variability of the primary productivity and trends through time, as well as the relationship of sea ice to productivity. We found substantial interannual variability in productivity from 1997 - 2005 in all regions of the Southern Ocean, and this variability appeared to be driven in large part by ice dynamics. The most productive regions of Antarctic waters were the continental shelves, which showed the earliest growth, the maximum biomass, and the greatest areal specific productivity. In contrast, no large, sustained blooms occurred in waters of greater depth (> 1,000 m). We suggest that this is due to the slightly greater mixed layer depths found in waters off the continental shelf, and that the interactive effects of iron and irradiance (that is, increased iron requirements in low irradiance environments) result in the limitation of phytoplankton biomass over large regions of the Southern Ocean.

  14. Studies of slow-positron production using low-energy primary electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E.

    1999-04-20

    Slow-positron beams produced from negative-work-function solid-state moderators have found numerous applications in condensed matter physics. There are potential advantages in using low-energy primary electron beams for positron production, including reduced radiation damage to single-crystal moderators and reduced activation of nearby components. We present numerical calculations of positron yields and other beam parameters for various target-moderator configurations using the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) [1] and Advanced Photon Source (APS) [2] electron linacs [3] as examples of sources for the primary electron beams. The status of experiments at these facilities is reviewed.

  15. Sea Ice Mapping using Unmanned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbø, S.; Storvold, R.

    2011-12-01

    Mapping of sea ice extent and sea ice features is an important task in climate research. Since the arctic coastal and oceanic areas have a high probability of cloud coverage, aerial platforms are superior to satellite measurements for high-resolution optical measurements. However, routine observations of sea ice conditions present a variety of problems using conventional piloted aircrafts. Specially, the availability of suitable aircrafts for lease does not cover the demand in major parts of the arctic. With the recent advances in unmanned aerial systems (UAS), there is a high possibility of establishing routine, cost effective aerial observations of sea ice conditions in the near future. Unmanned aerial systems can carry a wide variety of sensors useful for characterizing sea-ice features. For instance, the CryoWing UAS, a system initially designed for measurements of the cryosphere, can be equipped with digital cameras, surface thermometers and laser altimeters for measuring freeboard of ice flows. In this work we will present results from recent CryoWing sea ice flights on Svalbard, Norway. The emphasis will be on data processing for stitching together images acquired with the non-stabilized camera payload, to form high-resolution mosaics covering large spatial areas. These data are being employed to map ice conditions; including ice and lead features and melt ponds. These high-resolution mosaics are also well suited for sea-ice mechanics, classification studies and for validation of satellite sea-ice products.

  16. Dynamics of interleukin-21 production during the clinical course of primary and secondary dengue virus infections.

    PubMed

    Vivanco-Cid, H; Maldonado-Rentería, M J; Sánchez-Vargas, L A; Izaguirre-Hernández, I Y; Hernández-Flores, K G; Remes-Ruiz, R

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have revealed the clinical relevance of pro-inflammatory cytokine production during dengue virus (DENV) infections. In this study, we evaluated the production of interleukin-21 (IL-21), a key soluble mediator mainly produced by CD4+ T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of IL-21 production during the clinical course of primary and secondary DENV infections and the potential association of IL-21 serum levels with the disease pathogenesis. Blood samples from DENV-infected patients were collected on different days after the onset of symptoms. Patients were classified according to their phase of disease (acute vs. convalescent phases), the type of infection (primary vs. secondary), and the clinical severity of their disease (dengue fever (DF) vs. dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)). IL-21 levels were measured using a quantitative capture ELISA assay. The levels of IL-21 were significantly elevated in the disease group compared with the control group. IL-21 was detected in primary and secondary DENV infections, with a significantly higher concentration in the convalescent phase of primary infections. IL-21 levels were significantly higher in patients with secondary acute DHF infections when compared with those with secondary acute DF infection. There was a relationship between the elevated serum levels of IL-21 and the production of DENV-specific IgM and IgG antibodies. Taking together, our results show for the first time the involvement of IL-21 during the clinical course of DENV infections. We speculate that IL-21 may play a protective role in the context of the convalescent phase of primary infections and the acute phase of secondary infections. PMID:24858204

  17. Annual primary production: Patterns and mechanisms of change in a nutrient-rich tidal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Cole, B.E.

    2002-01-01

    Although nutrient supply often underlies long-term changes in aquatic primary production, other regulatory processes can be important. The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, a complex of tidal waterways forming the landward portion of the San Francisco Estuary, has ample nutrient supplies, enabling us to examine alternate regulatory mechanisms over a 21-yr period. Delta-wide primary productivity was reconstructed from historical water quality data for 1975–1995. Annual primary production averaged 70 g C m−2, but it varied by over a factor of five among years. At least four processes contributed to this variability: (1) invasion of the clam Potamocorbula amurensis led to a persistent decrease in phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a) after 1986; (2) a long-term decline in total suspended solids—probably at least partly because of upstream dam construction—increased water transparency and phytoplankton growth rate; (3) river inflow, reflecting climate variability, affected biomass through fluctuations in flushing and growth rates through fluctuations in total suspended solids; and (4) an additional pathway manifesting as a long-term decline in winter phytoplankton biomass has been identified, but its genesis is uncertain. Overall, the Delta lost 43% in annual primary production during the period. Given the evidence for food limitation of primary consumers, these findings provide a partial explanation for widespread Delta species declines over the past few decades. Turbid nutrient-rich systems such as the Delta may be inherently more variable than other tidal systems because certain compensatory processes are absent. Comparisons among systems, however, can be tenuous because conclusions about the magnitude and mechanisms of variability are dependent on length of data record.  

  18. Efficiency of chlorophyll in gross primary productivity: A proof of concept and application in crops.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Viña, Andrés; Arkebauer, Timothy; Schepers, James S

    2016-08-20

    One of the main factors affecting vegetation productivity is absorbed light, which is largely governed by chlorophyll. In this paper, we introduce the concept of chlorophyll efficiency, representing the amount of gross primary production per unit of canopy chlorophyll content (Chl) and incident PAR. We analyzed chlorophyll efficiency in two contrasting crops (soybean and maize). Given that they have different photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs. C4), leaf structures (dicot vs. monocot) and canopy architectures (a heliotrophic leaf angle distribution vs. a spherical leaf angle distribution), they cover a large spectrum of biophysical conditions. Our results show that chlorophyll efficiency in primary productivity is highly variable and responds to various physiological and phenological conditions, and water availability. Since Chl is accessible through non-destructive, remotely sensed techniques, the use of chlorophyll efficiency for modeling and monitoring plant optimization patterns is practical at different scales (e.g., leaf, canopy) and under widely-varying environmental conditions. Through this analysis, we directly related a functional characteristic, gross primary production with a structural characteristic, canopy chlorophyll content. Understanding the efficiency of the structural characteristic is of great interest as it allows explaining functional components of the plant system. PMID:27374843

  19. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  20. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C

    2015-01-13

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  1. Microbial primary production on an Arctic glacier is insignificant in comparison with allochthonous organic carbon input.

    PubMed

    Stibal, Marek; Tranter, Martyn; Benning, Liane G; Rehák, Josef

    2008-08-01

    Cryoconite holes are unique freshwater environments on glacier surfaces, formed when solar-heated dark debris melts down into the ice. Active photoautotrophic microorganisms are abundant within the holes and fix inorganic carbon due to the availability of liquid water and solar radiation. Cryoconite holes are potentially important sources of organic carbon to the glacial ecosystem, but the relative magnitudes of autochthonous microbial primary production and wind-borne allochthonous organic matter brought are unknown. Here, we compare an estimate of annual microbial primary production in 2006 on Werenskioldbreen, a Svalbard glacier, with the organic carbon content of cryoconite debris. There is a great disparity between annual primary production (4.3 mug C g(-1) year(-1)) and the high content of organic carbon within the debris (1.7-4.5%, equivalent to 8500-22 000 mug C g(-1) debris). Long-term accumulation of autochthonous organic matter is considered unlikely due to ablation dynamics and the surface hydrology of the glacier. Rather, it is more likely that the majority of the organic matter on Werenskioldbreen is allochthonous. Hence, although glacier surfaces can be a significant source of organic carbon for glacial environments on Svalbard, they may be reservoirs rather than oases of high productivity. PMID:18430008

  2. Relationships between primary production and irradiance in coral reef algal communities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    Shallow water algal turf communities are the major primary producers on coral reefs. High rates of primary production are maintained despite extremely high light intensities and exposure to ultraviolet wavelengths. The relationships between the light intensity and primary production in these assemblages are typical of algae adapted to a high light environment (low ..cap alpha.. (initial slope), high I/sub k/ (saturating light intensity), and high I/sub c/ (compensation point light intensity)). Seasonal variations in algal standing crop due to herbivory and daylength result in some characteristic photoadaptive changes in ..cap alpha.. I/sub k/, and I/sub c/ and changes in Pnet/sub max/ rates (maximum net photosynthetic rate achieved at light saturation) on both a chlorophyll ..cap alpha.. and an areal basis. Exposure to UV wavelength results in significantly higher respiration rates but no changes in ..cap alpha.., Pnet/sub max/, or I/sub k/, when compared with these parameters for the same algal communities incubated at the same light intensities without UV wavelengths. The apparent lack of photoinhibition in these algae allows calculation of the daily integrated production from the P vs. I parameters. This integrated production is highest in July (3.1 +/- 0.2 g C m/sup -2/d/sup -1/) and is reduced by 30% from this maximum in December (2.1 +/- 0.1 g C m/sup -2/d/sup -1/).

  3. Seasonality of oceanic primary production and its interannual variability from 1998 to 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Christopher W.; Schollaert Uz, Stephanie; Corliss, Bruce H.

    2014-08-01

    The seasonality of primary productivity plays an important role in nutrient and carbon cycling. We quantify the seasonality of satellite-derived, oceanic net primary production (NPP) and its interannual variability during the first decade of the SeaWiFS mission (1998 to 2007) using a normalized seasonality index (NSI). The NSI, which is based upon production half-time, t(1/2), generally becomes progressively more episodic with increasing latitude in open ocean waters, spanning from a relatively constant rate of primary productivity throughout the year (mean t(1/2) ~5 months) in subtropical waters to more pulsed events (mean t(1/2) ~3 months) in subpolar waters. This relatively gradual, poleward pattern in NSI differs from recent estimates of phytoplankton bloom duration, another measure of seasonality, at lower latitudes (~40°S-40°N). These differences likely reflect the temporal component of production assessed by each metric, with NSI able to more fully capture the irregular nature of production characteristic of waters in this zonal band. The interannual variability in NSI was generally low, with higher variability observed primarily in frontal and seasonal upwelling zones. The influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation on this variability was clearly evident, particularly in the equatorial Pacific, where primary productivity was anomalously episodic from the date line east to the coast of South America in 1998. Yearly seasonality and the magnitude of annual production were generally positively correlated at mid-latitudes and negatively correlated at tropical latitudes, particularly in a region bordering the Pacific equatorial divergence. This implies that increases of annual production in the former region are attained over the course of a year by shorter duration but higher magnitude NPP events, while in the latter areas it results from an increased frequency or duration of similar magnitude events. Statistically significant trends in the seasonality

  4. Estimating the Capacity of Gross Primary Production from Global Observation Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Kanako; Soyama, Noriko; Thanyaparaneedkul, Juthasinee; Furumi, Shinobu; Daigo, Motomasa

    2012-07-01

    Estimation of Gross Primary Production with high accuracy is important for understanding the carbon cycle. For estimating gross primary production, photosynthesis process was considers into two parts. One is the capacity and another is the reduction which is influenced by environmental conditions such as weather conditions of vapor pressure difference and soil moisture. The capacity estimation part is reported in this conference. For a leaf, it is well known photosynthesis capacity is mainly depend on amount of chlorophyll and enzyme. Chlorophyll contents reflect the color of a leaf. Since we focus on the chlorophyll contents for estimating the capacity of the gross primary production. It was reported by J. Thanyapraneedkul (2012) that vegetation index of the ratio of green band and near infrared was linear relationship with chlorophyll contents of a leaf, and was a linear relationship with the maximum photosynthesis at light saturation of light response curve with less stress conditions using flux data. The index is suitable for global observing satellite, because the spectral bands are available. Using the index and empirical relationship developed by J. Thanyapraneedkul, the light response curve with less stress can be estimated from the vegetation index. In this study, firstly, the global distribution of the index was studied. The regions of high index value in winter time were correspond to tropical rainforest. Next, the capacity of gross primary production was estimated using the light response curve using the index. The GPP capacity of the almost all regions was higher than MODIS GPP. For the tropical rain forest regions, the GPP capacity value was similar with MODIS GPP product.

  5. Microbial Primary Productivity in Hydrothermal Vent Chimneys at Middle Valley, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olins, H. C.; Rogers, D.; Frank, K. L.; Girguis, P. R.; Vidoudez, C.

    2012-12-01

    Chemosynthetic primary productivity supports hydrothermal vent ecosystems, but the extent of that productivity has not been well measured. To examine the role that environmental temperature plays in controlling carbon fixation rates, and to assess the degree to which microbial community composition, in situ geochemistry, and mineralogy influence carbon fixation, we conducted a series of shipboard incubations across a range of temperatures (4, 25, 50 and 90°C) and at environmentally relevant geochemical conditions using material recovered from three hydrothermal vent chimneys in the Middle Valley hydrothermal vent field (Juan de Fuca Ridge). Net rates of carbon fixation (CFX) were greatest at lower temperatures, and were similar among structures. Rates did not correlate with the mineralogy or the geochemical composition of the high temperature fluids at each chimney. No obvious patterns of association were observed between carbon fixation rates and microbial community composition. Abundance of selected functional genes related to different carbon fixation pathway exhibited striking differences among the three study sites, but did not correlate with rates. Natural carbon isotope ratios implicate the Calvin Benson Bassham Cycle as the dominant mechanism of primary production in these systems, despite the abundance of genes related to other pathways (and presumably some degree of activity). Together these data reveal that primary productivity by endolithic communities does not exhibit much variation among these chimneys, and further reveal that microbial activity cannot easily be related to mineralogical and geochemical assessments that are made at a coarser scale. Indeed, the relationships between carbon fixation rates and community composition/functional gene abundance were also likely obfuscated by differences in scale at which these measurements were made. Regardless, these data reveal the degree to which endolithic, anaerobic carbon fixation contributes to

  6. Aerial Video Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    When Michael Henry wanted to start an aerial video service, he turned to Johnson Space Center for assistance. Two NASA engineers - one had designed and developed TV systems in Apollo, Skylab, Apollo- Soyuz and Space Shuttle programs - designed a wing-mounted fiberglass camera pod. Camera head and angles are adjustable, and the pod is shaped to reduce vibration. The controls are located so a solo pilot can operate the system. A microprocessor displays latitude, longitude, and bearing, and a GPS receiver provides position data for possible legal references. The service has been successfully utilized by railroads, oil companies, real estate companies, etc.

  7. Primary production and nutrients in a tropical macrotidal estuary, Darwin Harbour, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burford, M. A.; Alongi, D. M.; McKinnon, A. D.; Trott, L. A.

    2008-09-01

    Tropical estuaries are under increasing pressure worldwide from human impacts, but are poorly studied compared with temperate systems. This study examined a tropical macrotidal estuary, Darwin Harbour, in northern Australia, using a combination of direct measurements and literature values to determine the main sources of primary production and the sources of nutrients supporting growth. The main source of primary production was calculated to be the extensive area of fringing mangroves and resulted in a net autotrophic system ( PG: R = 2.1). Much of the carbon in the mangrove forests appears to be retained within the forests or respired, as the water column was also net autotrophic despite the carbon inputs. Phytoplankton were the second largest primary producer on a whole-of-harbour basis, with low biomass constrained by light and nutrient availability. The phytoplankton were likely to be nitrogen (N) limited, based on low N:phosphorus (P) ratios, low dissolved bioavailable N concentrations (ammonium (NH 4+), nitrate (NO 3-), urea), and evidence that phytoplankton growth in bioassays was stimulated by NH 4+ addition. The largest new source of N to the system was from the ocean due to higher N concentrations in the incoming tides than the outgoing tides. Atmospheric inputs via N fixation on the intertidal mudflats and subtidal sediments were substantially lower. The rivers feeding into the harbour and sewage were minor N inputs. Nitrogen demand by primary producers was high relative to available N inputs, suggesting that N recycling within the water column and mangrove forests must be important processes. Darwin Harbour is adjacent to the rapidly growing urban area of Darwin city, but overall there is no evidence of anthropogenic nutrient inputs having substantial effects on primary production in Darwin Harbour.

  8. Oceanic primary production: estimation by remote sensing at local and regional scales.

    PubMed

    Platt, T; Sathyendranath, S

    1988-09-23

    Satellites provide the only avenue by which marine primary production can be studied at ocean-basin scales. With maps of chlorophyll distribution derived from remotely sensed data on ocean color as input, deduction of a suitable algorithm for primary production is a problem in applied plant physiology. An algorithm is proposed that combines a spectral and angular model of submarine light with a model of the spectral response of algal photosynthesis. To apply the algorithm at large horizontal scale, a dynamic biogeography is needed for the physiological rate parameters and the biological structure of the water column. Fieldwork to obtain this type of data should be undertaken so that the use of satellite data in modern biological oceanography may be optimized. PMID:17820892

  9. Comparing the impact of the 2003 and 2010 heatwaves on Net Primary Production in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, Ana; Gouveia, Célia M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Running, Steve W.

    2013-04-01

    Climate variability is known to influence primary productivity on land ecosystems (Nemani et al., 2003). In particular, extreme climatic events such as major droughts and heatwaves are known to have severe impact on primary productivity and, therefore, to affect significantly the carbon dioxide uptake by land ecosystems at regional (Ciais et al., 2005) or even global scale (Zhao and Running, 2010). In the last decade, Europe was struck by two outstanding heatwaves, the 2003 event in Western Europe and the recent 2010 episode over Eastern Europe. Both were characterised by record breaking temperatures at the daily, weekly, monthly and seasonal scales, although the amplitude and spatial extent of the 2010 mega-heatwave surpassed the 2003 event (Barriopedro et al., 2011). This work aims to assess the influence of both mega-heatwaves on yearly Net Primary Production (NPP) and seasonal Net Photosynthesis (NP), which corresponds to the difference between Gross Primary Production and maintenance respiration. The work relies on yearly NPP and monthly NP data derived from satellite imagery obtained from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor at 1km spatial resolution. Data were selected for the period between 2000 and 2011 over a region extending from 34.6N to 73.5N and 12.1W to 46.8E, covering Eurasia. In 2010 very low primary production anomalies are observed over a very large area in Eastern Europe, at the monthly, seasonal and yearly scale. In western Russia, yearly NPP anomalies fall below 50% of average. These widespread negative anomalous values of NP fields over the western Russia region match the patterns of very high temperature values combined with below-average precipitation, at the seasonal (summer) scale. Moreover, the impact of the heatwave is not only evident at the regional level but also at the wider continental (European) scale and is significantly more extensive and intense than the corresponding heatwave of 2003 in Western Europe

  10. Diffuse Parenchymal Diseases Associated With Aluminum Use and Primary Aluminum Production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum use and primary aluminum production results in the generation of various particles, fumes, gases, and airborne materials with the potential for inducing a wide range of lung pathology. Nevertheless, the presence of diffuse parenchymal or interstitial lung disease related to these processes remains controversial. The relatively uncommon occurrence of interstitial lung diseases in aluminum-exposed workers—despite the extensive industrial use of aluminum—the potential for concurrent exposure to other fibrogenic fibers, and the previous use of inhaled aluminum powder for the prevention of silicosis without apparent adverse respiratory effects are some of the reasons for this continuing controversy. Specific aluminum-induced parenchymal diseases described in the literature, including existing evidence of interstitial lung diseases, associated with primary aluminum production are reviewed. PMID:24806728

  11. Global human appropriation of net primary production doubled in the 20th century.

    PubMed

    Krausmann, Fridolin; Erb, Karl-Heinz; Gingrich, Simone; Haberl, Helmut; Bondeau, Alberte; Gaube, Veronika; Lauk, Christian; Plutzar, Christoph; Searchinger, Timothy D

    2013-06-18

    Global increases in population, consumption, and gross domestic product raise concerns about the sustainability of the current and future use of natural resources. The human appropriation of net primary production (HANPP) provides a useful measure of human intervention into the biosphere. The productive capacity of land is appropriated by harvesting or burning biomass and by converting natural ecosystems to managed lands with lower productivity. This work analyzes trends in HANPP from 1910 to 2005 and finds that although human population has grown fourfold and economic output 17-fold, global HANPP has only doubled. Despite this increase in efficiency, HANPP has still risen from 6.9 Gt of carbon per y in 1910 to 14.8 GtC/y in 2005, i.e., from 13% to 25% of the net primary production of potential vegetation. Biomass harvested per capita and year has slightly declined despite growth in consumption because of a decline in reliance on bioenergy and higher conversion efficiencies of primary biomass to products. The rise in efficiency is overwhelmingly due to increased crop yields, albeit frequently associated with substantial ecological costs, such as fossil energy inputs, soil degradation, and biodiversity loss. If humans can maintain the past trend lines in efficiency gains, we estimate that HANPP might only grow to 27-29% by 2050, but providing large amounts of bioenergy could increase global HANPP to 44%. This result calls for caution in refocusing the energy economy on land-based resources and for strategies that foster the continuation of increases in land-use efficiency without excessively increasing ecological costs of intensification. PMID:23733940

  12. Ocean Primary Production Estimates from Terra MODIS and Their Dependency on Satellite Chlorophyll Alpha Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Essias, Wayne E.; Abbott, Mark; Carder, Kendall; Campbell, Janet; Clark, Dennis; Evans, Robert; Brown, Otis; Kearns, Ed; Kilpatrick, Kay; Balch, W.

    2003-01-01

    Simplistic models relating global satellite ocean color, temperature, and light to ocean net primary production (ONPP) are sensitive to the accuracy and limitations of the satellite estimate of chlorophyll and other input fields, as well as the primary productivity model. The standard MODIS ONPP product uses the new semi-analytic chlorophyll algorithm as its input for two ONPP indexes. The three primary MODIS chlorophyll Q estimates from MODIS, as well as the SeaWiFS 4 chlorophyll product, were used to assess global and regional performance in estimating ONPP for the full mission, but concentrating on 2001. The two standard ONPP algorithms were examined with 8-day and 39 kilometer resolution to quantify chlorophyll algorithm dependency of ONPP. Ancillary data (MLD from FNMOC, MODIS SSTD1, and PAR from the GSFC DAO) were identical. The standard MODIS ONPP estimates for annual production in 2001 was 59 and 58 GT C for the two ONPP algorithms. Differences in ONPP using alternate chlorophylls were on the order of 10% for global annual ONPP, but ranged to 100% regionally. On all scales the differences in ONPP were smaller between MODIS and SeaWiFS than between ONPP models, or among chlorophyll algorithms within MODIS. Largest regional ONPP differences were found in the Southern Ocean (SO). In the SO, application of the semi-analytic chlorophyll resulted in not only a magnitude difference in ONPP (2x), but also a temporal shift in the time of maximum production compared to empirical algorithms when summed over standard oceanic areas. The resulting increase in global ONPP (6-7 GT) is supported by better performance of the semi-analytic chlorophyll in the SO and other high chlorophyll regions. The differences are significant in terms of understanding regional differences and dynamics of ocean carbon transformations.

  13. Latitudinal gradients in sea ice and primary production determine Arctic seabird colony size in Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Laidre, Kristin L; Heide-Jørgensen, Mads Peter; Nyeland, Jens; Mosbech, Anders; Boertmann, David

    2008-01-01

    Sea ice loss will indirectly alter energy transfer through the pelagic food web and ultimately impact apex predators. We quantified spring-time trends in sea ice recession around each of 46 thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia) colonies in west Greenland across 20° of latitude and investigated the magnitude and timing of the associated spring-time primary production. A geographical information system was used to extract satellite-based observations of sea ice concentration from the Nimbus-7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR, 1979–1987) and the Defence Meteorological Satellite Programs Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSMI, 1987–2004), and satellite-based observations of chlorophyll a from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS: EOS-Terra satellite) in weekly intervals in circular buffers around each colony site (150 km in radius). Rapid recession of high Arctic seasonal ice cover created a temporally predictable primary production bloom and associated trophic cascade in water gradually exposed to solar radiation. This pattern was largely absent from lower latitudes where little to no sea ice resulted in a temporally variable primary production bloom driven by nutrient cycling and upwelling uncoupled to ice. The relationship between the rate and variability of sea ice recession and colony size of thick-billed murres shows that periodical confinement of the trophic cascade at high latitudes determines the carrying capacity for Arctic seabirds during the breeding period. PMID:18713716

  14. Connectedness of land use, nutrients, primary production, and fish assemblages in oxbow lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Andrews, Caroline S.; Kroger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explored the strength of connectedness among hierarchical system components associated with oxbow lakes in the alluvial valley of the Lower Mississippi River. Specifically, we examined the degree of canonical correlation between land use (agriculture and forests), lake morphometry (depth and size), nutrients (total nitrogen and total phosphorus), primary production (chlorophyll-a), and various fish assemblage descriptors. Watershed (p < 0.01) and riparian (p = 0.02) land use, and lake depth (p = 0.05) but not size (p = 0.28), were associated with nutrient concentrations. In turn, nutrients were associated with primary production (p < 0.01), and primary production was associated with sunfish (Centrarchidae) assemblages (p < 0.01) and fish biodiversity (p = 0.08), but not with those of other taxa and functional guilds. Multiple chemical and biological components of oxbow lake ecosystems are connected to landscape characteristics such as land use and lake depth. Therefore, a top-down hierarchical approach can be useful in developing management and conservation plans for oxbow lakes in a region impacted by widespread landscape changes due to agriculture.

  15. The Primary and Secondary Production of Germanium: A Life-Cycle Assessment of Different Process Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertz, Benedicte; Verhelle, Jensen; Schurmans, Maarten

    2015-02-01

    Germanium is a semiconducting metalloid element used in optical fibers, catalysis, infrared optics, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. The need for Ge in these markets is considered to increase by a steady ~1% on a yearly basis. Its economic importance, coupled with the identified supply risks, has led to the classification of germanium as a critical raw material within Europe. Since the early 1950s, Umicore Electro-Optic Materials has supplied germanium-based materials solutions to its markets around the world. Umicore extracts germanium from a wide range of refining and recycling feeds. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the potential environmental impacts of the production of germanium from production scraps from the photovoltaic industry and to compare them with the potential impacts of the primary production of germanium from coal. The data related to the secondary production are Umicore-specific data. Environmental impact scores have been calculated for the impact categories recommended by the International reference life cycle data system. The comparison of the primary and secondary production highlights the benefit linked to the recycling of metals.

  16. Seasonal distribution of net primary production by functional groups in Chihuahuan Desert, and the role of seasonal precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In hot deserts, precipitation is the principal driver for net primary production.  This study tested two hypotheses regarding aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and the effects of precipitation on ANPP in the Chihuahuan Desert, with emphasis on differences among seasons and among functional g...

  17. Predicting tree diversity across the United States as a function of modeled gross primary production.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Joanne M; Fan, Weihong; Coops, Nicholas C; Waring, Richard H

    2008-01-01

    At the regional and continental scale, ecologists have theorized that spatial variation in biodiversity can be interpreted as a response to differences in climate. To test this theory we assumed that ecological constraints associated with current climatic conditions (2000-2004) might best be correlated with tree richness if expressed through satellite-derived measures of gross primary production (GPP), rather than the more commonly used, but less consistently derived, net primary production. To evaluate current patterns in tree diversity across the contiguous United States we acquired information on tree composition from the USDA Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program that represented more than 17,4000 survey plots. We selected 2693 cells of 1000 km2 within which a sufficient number of plots were available to estimate tree richness per hectare. Our estimates of forest productivity varied from simple vegetation indices indicative of the fraction of light intercepted by canopies at 16-d intervals, a product from the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer), to 8- and 10-d GPP products derived with minimal climatic data (MODIS) and SPOT-Vegetation (Systeme Pour l'Observation de la Terre), to 3-PGS (Physiological Principles Predicting Growth with Satellites), which requires both climate and soil data. Across the contiguous United States, modeled predictions of gross productivity accounted for between 51% and 77% of the recorded spatial variation in tree diversity, which ranged from 2 to 67 species per hectare. When the analyses were concentrated within nine broadly defined ecoregions, predictive relations largely disappeared. Only 3-PGS predictions fit a theorized unimodal function by being able to distinguish highly productive forests in the Pacific Northwest that support lower than expected tree diversity. Other models predicted a continuous steep rise in tree diversity with increasing productivity, and did so with generally better or

  18. Plankton distribution and the impact of copepod grazing on primary production in Fram Strait, Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirche, H.-J.; Baumann, M. E. M.; Kattner, G.; Gradinger, R.

    1991-08-01

    Two hydrobiological transects across the East Greenland Shelf and the open waters of Fram Strait in summer were chosen to illustrate the distribution and production of phyto- and zooplankton in relation to water masses and ice cover. The parameters used were temperature and salinity, inorganic nutrients, chlorophyll a, primary production, phytoplankton species composition, abundance of the dominant herbivorous copepods Calanus finmarchicus, C. glacialis, C. hyperboreus, Metridia longa and egg production of C. finmarchicus and C. glacialis. Grazing impact of copepodites and adults of these four species was modelled for each station by using egg production rates as an index of growth. Seasonal development of plankton communities was closely associated with the extent of the ice cover, hydrographic conditions and the water masses typical of the different hydrographic domains. Four regions were identified from their biological activities and physical environment: The Northeast Water polynya on the East Greenland Shelf, with a springbloom of diatoms and active reproduction of herbivorous copepods. The pack ice region, dominated by small flagellates and negligible grazing activities. The marginal ice zone, with high variability and strong gradients of autotroph production related to eddies and ice tongues, an active microbial loop and low egg production. The open water, with high station-to-station variability of most of the parameters, probably related to hydrographic mesoscale activities. Here, Phaeocystis pouchetii was a prominent species in the phytoplankton communities. Its presence may at least partly be responsible for the generally low egg production in the open waters. Grazing impact on primary production was always small, due to low zooplankton biomass in the polynya and due to low ingestion in the remaining regions.

  19. Infrared film for aerial photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, William H.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable interest has developed recently in the use of aerial photographs for agricultural management. Even the simplest hand-held aerial photographs, especially those taken with color infrared film, often provide information not ordinarily available through routine ground observation. When fields are viewed from above, patterns and variations become more apparent, often allowing problems to be spotted which otherwise may go undetected.

  20. AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY AND LEGAL APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerial photographic interpretation is the process of examining objects on aerial photographs and determining their significance. t is often defined as both art and science because the process, and the quality of the derived information, is often a qualitative nature and much depe...

  1. Aerial Terrain Mapping Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahar, K. N.

    2012-08-01

    This paper looks into the latest achievement in the low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology in their capacity to map the semi-development areas. The objectives of this study are to establish a new methodology or a new algorithm in image registration during interior orientation process and to determine the accuracy of the photogrammetric products by using UAV images. Recently, UAV technology has been used in several applications such as mapping, agriculture and surveillance. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the usage of UAV to map the semi-development areas. The performance of the low cost UAV mapping study was established on a study area with two image processing methods so that the results could be comparable. A non-metric camera was attached at the bottom of UAV and it was used to capture images at both sites after it went through several calibration steps. Calibration processes were carried out to determine focal length, principal distance, radial lens distortion, tangential lens distortion and affinity. A new method in image registration for a non-metric camera is discussed in this paper as a part of new methodology of this study. This method used the UAV Global Positioning System (GPS) onboard to register the UAV image for interior orientation process. Check points were established randomly at both sites using rapid static Global Positioning System. Ground control points are used for exterior orientation process, and check point is used for accuracy assessment of photogrammetric product. All acquired images were processed in a photogrammetric software. Two methods of image registration were applied in this study, namely, GPS onboard registration and ground control point registration. Both registrations were processed by using photogrammetric software and the result is discussed. Two results were produced in this study, which are the digital orthophoto and the digital terrain model. These results were analyzed by using the root mean square

  2. Partial decoupling of primary productivity from upwelling in the California Current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Lionel; Deutsch, Curtis; McWilliams, James C.; Frenzel, Hartmut; Liang, Jun-Hong; Colas, François

    2016-07-01

    Coastal winds and upwelling of deep nutrient-rich water along subtropical eastern boundaries yield some of the ocean's most productive ecosystems. Simple indices of coastal wind strength have been extensively used to estimate the timing and magnitude of biological productivity on seasonal and interannual timescales and underlie the prediction that anthropogenic climate warming will increase the productivity by making coastal winds stronger. The effect of wind patterns on regional net primary productivity is not captured by such indices and is poorly understood. Here we present evidence, using a realistic model of the California Current system and satellite measurements, that the observed slackening of the winds near the coast has little effect on near-shore phytoplankton productivity despite a large reduction in upwelling velocity. On the regional scale the wind drop-off leads to substantially higher production even when the total upwelling rate remains the same. This partial decoupling of productivity from upwelling results from the impact of wind patterns on alongshore currents and the eddies they generate. Our results imply that productivity in eastern boundary upwelling systems will be better predicted from indices of the coastal wind that account for its offshore structure.

  3. The puzzle of HCN in comets: Is it both a product and a primary species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, M.; Bonev, B.; Charnley, S.; Cordiner, M.; DiSanti, M.; Gibb, E.; Magee-Sauer, K.; Paganini, L.; Villanueva, G.

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular-cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: - HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H_2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. If much HCN is sometimes produced in the coma, its adoption as a water proxy could introduce unwanted bias to taxonomies based on composition. - HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing, with NH_3 being the dominant nitrile. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. - The stereoisomer HNC is regarded as a product species, thought to result from coma chemistry involving HCN. But, could another reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? - The production rate for CN greatly exceeds the possible production from HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN radicals in them. - The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets, but in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. Is prompt emission from vibrationally excited HCN responsible? - With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H_2O, CH_3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). We will present the

  4. Phytoplankton taxa in relation to primary production in the equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Francisco P.; Buck, Kurt R.; Barber, Richard T.

    1990-11-01

    Equatorial regions, especially the equatorial Pacific, are important to the global carbon and nitrogen cycle, yet little is known about the processes regulating phytoplankton dynamics in these areas. Here we report on the abundance of planktonic groups, in the picoplankton to netplankton range, estimated using epifluorescence microscopy, in samples collected in the equatorial Pacific from 110 to 140°W, and discuss their relation to primary production, chlorophyll, chemical and physical properties. Microscopic examination supports previous reports ( CHAVEZ, 1989, Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 3, 27-35), based on size separations of biomass and production, that the equatorial Pacific is dominated by small phytoplankton, most of them smaller then 5 μm. The phytoplankton in this region is dominated by relatively few taxa: Synechococcus spp., red fluorescing picoplankton, a small naked dinoflaellate (4 × 7 μm), small prymnesiophytes (on the order of 3-5 μm), and small single-celled pennate diatoms (2 × 15 μm). The spatial variability in phytoplankton biomass, composition and production could be clearly related to distinct physical features of the equatorial circulation, such as equatorial upwelling, Long or Legeckis waves and the Equatorial Front. During November 1988, a period of abnormally cool sea surface temperatures, changes in the abundance of pennate diatoms accounted for the largest proportion of the variability in chlorophyll and primary production even though this group was a relatively minor contributor to the total biomass of the phytoplankton community. Since primary production and particulate organic flux are well correlated in the equatorial Pacific ( BETZERet al., 1984, Deep-Sea Research, 31, 1-11), variations in the abundance of pennate diatoms also must have important consequences to variations in particulate organic flux. Before a predictive model for particulate organic flux in the equatorial Pacific can be established further understanding of

  5. A multi-sites analysis on the ozone effects on Gross Primary Production of European forests.

    PubMed

    Proietti, C; Anav, A; De Marco, A; Sicard, P; Vitale, M

    2016-06-15

    Ozone (O3) is both a greenhouse gas and a secondary air pollutant causing adverse impacts on forests ecosystems at different scales, from cellular to ecosystem level. Specifically, the phytotoxic nature of O3 can impair CO2 assimilation that, in turn affects forest productivity. This study aims to evaluate the effects of tropospheric O3 on Gross Primary Production (GPP) at 37 European forest sites during the time period 2000-2010. Due to the lack of carbon assimilation data at O3 monitoring stations (and vice-versa) this study makes a first attempt to combine high resolution MODIS Gross Primary Production (GPP) estimates and O3 measurement data. Partial Correlations, Anomalies Analysis and the Random Forests Analysis (RFA) were used to quantify the effects of tropospheric O3 concentration and its uptake on GPP and to evaluate the most important factors affecting inter-annual GPP changes. Our results showed, along a North-West/South-East European transect, a negative impact of O3 on GPP ranging from 0.4% to 30%, although a key role of meteorological parameters respect to pollutant variables in affecting GPP was found. In particular, meteorological parameters, namely air temperature (T), soil water content (SWC) and relative humidity (RH) are the most important predictors at 81% of test sites. Moreover, it is interesting to highlight a key role of SWC in the Mediterranean areas (Spanish, Italian and French test sites) confirming that, soil moisture and soil water availability affect vegetation growth and photosynthesis especially in arid or semi-arid ecosystems such as the Mediterranean climate regions. Considering the pivotal role of GPP in the global carbon balance and the O3 ability to reduce primary productivity of the forests, this study can help in assessing the O3 impacts on ecosystem services, including wood production and carbon sequestration. PMID:26971205

  6. Holocene primary productivity and the atmosphere/ocean linkage in the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addison, J. A.; Finney, B.; Anderson, L.; Barron, J. A.; Hayes, S. M.; Sliwinski, M.; Mix, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work in the temperate fjords of the Gulf of Alaska, located in the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean, has demonstrated a positive link between modern atmosphere/ocean dynamics and accumulation of biogenic sediments during the last 100 years, where intensified Aleutian Low atmospheric pressure cell regimes correspond to peaks in export primary productivity (Addison et al., 2013). Here, this work is extended by examining the last 7500 years of biogenic sedimentation from marine sediment core EW0408-33JC (57.16°N, 135.36°W, 144 m water depth), which is constrained by 17 age-control points spaced every ~500 years. We use bromine (Br) intensities measured by core-scanning XRF with a 2-mm sampling resolution as a geochemical proxy for past primary productivity. These Br intensities are calibrated to organic Br concentrations using a combination of quantitative WD-XRF methods and synchrotron-radiation Br speciation studies, with cross-verification provided by low-resolution analyses of other productivity proxies, including biogenic silica (opal), total organic carbon (TOC), and organic matter δ13C ratios. Our findings indicate distinct centennial-to-millennial changes, with positive productivity excursions between 7500-7000, 6500-6000, 5000-3500, 2500-1500, and 1000-500 INTCAL13 yr BP. We compare the timing of these excursions against a compilation of marine and terrestrial paleoclimate records sensitive to forcing by the Aleutian Low to determine if the positive relationship between atmosphere/ocean dynamics and marine primary productivity has remained consistent over the last 7500 years. Other potential forcing mechanisms (e.g., solar insolation, irradiance) are also considered. Reference: Addison, J.A., Finney, B., Jaeger, J., Stoner, J., Norris, R., & Hangsterfer, A., 2013, Integrating satellite observations and modern climate measurements with the recent sedimentary record: an example from Southeast Alaska. JGR-Oceans, v. 118, 18 pgs.

  7. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchard, C.; Engel, A.

    2014-11-01

    Extracellular release (ER) by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady state conditions in phosphorus controlled chemostats (N : P = 29, growth rate of μ = 0.2 d-1). 14C incubations were accomplished to determine primary production (PP), comprised by particulate (PO14C) and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C), and the concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO), and of high molecular weight (>1 kDa, HMW) dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO) as major components of ER. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (<0.40 μm, <1000 kDa, <100 kDa and <10 kDa) of DO14C and HMW-dCCHO. Our results revealed relatively low ER during steady state growth, corresponding to ∼4.5% of primary production, and similar ER rates for all size classes. Acidic sugars had a significant share on freshly produced pCCHO as well as on HMW-dCCHO. While pCCHO and the smallest size (<10 kDa) fraction of HMW-dCCHO exhibited a similar sugar composition, dominated by high percentages of glucose (74-80 Mol%), the composition of HMW-dCCHO size-classes >10 kDa was significantly different with higher Mol% of arabinose. Mol% of acidic sugars increased and Mol% glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  8. Fission product plateout and liftoff in the MHTGR primary system: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Wichner, R.P. )

    1991-04-01

    A review is presented of the technical basis for predicting radioactivity release resulting from depressurization of an MHTGR primary system. Consideration is restricted to so called dry events with no involvement of the steam system. The various types of deposition mechanisms effective for iodine, cesium, strontium, and silver are discussed in terms of their chemical characteristics and the nature of the materials in the primary system. Emphasis is given to iodine behavior, including means for estimating the quantity available for release, the types of plateout locations in the primary system, and the effect of dust on distribution and release. The behavior of fission products cesium, strontium, and silver in such accidents is presented qualitatively. A major part of the review deals with expected dust levels, types, and transport. Available information on the level and nature of dust in the HTGR primary system is reviewed. A summary is presented of dust deposition and liftoff mechanisms. It was concluded that recent approaches to dust liftoff modeling, based on turbulent burst concepts for removal from surfaces, probably offer advantages over the current shear ratio approach. This study concludes that iodine releases from dry depressurization events are likely to be extremely low, on the order of millicuries, due to a predictably low degree of chemical desorption, a low degree of dust liftoff, and a low involvement of iodine with dust. It was also concluded that deposition mechanisms controlling the distribution of fission product material in the primary system, and hence also controlling the degree of liftoff, depend strongly on the chemical nature of the individual elements. Therefore contrary to the current practice, both plateout and liftoff models should reflect those unique chemical and physical properties. 56 refs., 16 figs., 23 tabs.

  9. Modeling ocean primary production: Sensitivity to spectral resolution of attenuation and absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, Helen; Merchant, Chris J.

    2008-08-01

    Modeling the vertical penetration of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) through the ocean, and its utilization by phytoplankton, is fundamental to simulating marine primary production. The variation of attenuation and absorption of light with wavelength suggests that photosynthesis should be modeled at high spectral resolution, but this is computationally expensive. To model primary production in global 3d models, a balance between computer time and accuracy is necessary. We investigate the effects of varying the spectral resolution of the underwater light field and the photosynthetic efficiency of phytoplankton ( α∗), on primary production using a 1d coupled ecosystem ocean turbulence model. The model is applied at three sites in the Atlantic Ocean (CIS (∼60°N), PAP (∼50°N) and ESTOC (∼30°N)) to include the effect of different meteorological forcing and parameter sets. We also investigate three different methods for modeling α∗ - as a fixed constant, varying with both wavelength and chlorophyll concentration [Bricaud, A., Morel, A., Babin, M., Allali, K., Claustre, H., 1998. Variations of light absorption by suspended particles with chlorophyll a concentration in oceanic (case 1) waters. Analysis and implications for bio-optical models. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 31033-31044], and using a non-spectral parameterization [Anderson, T.R., 1993. A spectrally averaged model of light penetration and photosynthesis. Limnol. Oceanogr. 38, 1403-1419]. After selecting the appropriate ecosystem parameters for each of the three sites we vary the spectral resolution of light and α∗ from 1 to 61 wavebands and study the results in conjunction with the three different α∗ estimation methods. The results show modeled estimates of ocean primary productivity are highly sensitive to the degree of spectral resolution and α∗. For accurate simulations of primary production and chlorophyll distribution we recommend a spectral resolution of at least six wavebands

  10. Physical-biological oceanographic coupling influencing phytoplankton and primary production in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, X.; Chai, F.; Xue, H.; Cai, Y.; Liu, C.; Shi, J.

    2004-10-01

    Two cruises were carried out in the summer and winter of 1998 to study coupled physical-chemical-biological processes in the South China Sea and their effects on phytoplankton stock and production. The results clearly show that the seasonal distributions of phytoplankton were closely related to the coupled processes driven by the East Asian Monsoon. Summer southwesterly monsoon induced upwelling along the China and Vietnam coasts. Several mesoscale cyclonic cold eddies and anticyclonic warm pools were identified in both seasons. In the summer, the upwelling and cold eddies, both associated with rich nutrients, low dissolved oxygen (DO), high chlorophyll a (Chl a) and primary production (PP), were found in the areas off the coast of central Vietnam, southeast of Hainan Island and north of the Sunda shelf, whereas in the winter they form a cold trough over the deep basin aligning from southwest to northeast. The warm pools with poor nutrients, high DO, low Chl a, and PP were found in the areas southeast of Vietnam, east of Hainan, and west of Luzon during the summer, and a northwestward warm jet from the Sulu Sea with properties similar to the warm pools was encountered during the winter. The phytoplankton stock and primary production were lower in summer due to nutrient depletion near the surface, particularly PO4. This phosphorus depletion resulted in phytoplankton species succession from diatoms to dinoflagellates and cyanophytes. A strong subsurface Chl a maximum, dominated by photosynthetic picoplankton, was found to contribute significantly to phytoplankton stocks and production.

  11. The role of mesoscale eddies for primary production along the ice edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsen, Annette

    2016-04-01

    The ice-edge is a favorable area for the generation of mesoscale eddies. Because of the high latitudes, these eddies are often order of 10 km, but have been observed up to 50 km. The physical surface manifestation can be remotely observed by SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar), but the corresponding patterns of phytoplankton are hard to observe by ocean color because of the presence of ice and clouds. Because these eddies will transport fresh-water it is likely that they influence the stratification and thus the local blooming conditions. A regional model for the Fram Strait with resolution 3.5 km has been set up as a coupled physical-biogeochemical model, HYCOM-NORWECOM, nested into a 15-km basin-scale model for the North Atlantic and Arctic. The biogeochemical model represents nutrients, phytoplankton and zooplankton. The 3.5 km resolution model is adequate to resolve the largest eddies in the region, while smaller eddies and submesoscale processes are not resolved. Patches of higher primary production are present close to the ice edge, despite nutrient availability being comparable to adjacent regions. During late summer the biomass and primary production close to the ice edge is dominated by diatoms and closely follows the mesoscale structures. Here we investigate whether theses eddies play a role primarily in redistributing the water with high production and if the eddies themselves contribute to enhancement or reduction in the production.

  12. Influence of the Orinoco River on the primary production of eastern Caribbean surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Ramón; López, José M.; Morell, Julio; Corredor, Jorge E.; Castillo, Carlos E.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of the Orinoco River on the primary production in eastern Caribbean waters was investigated using fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF) and ocean color remote sensing. FRRF-based carbon fixation rates significantly correlated with independent estimates based on the 14C uptake method (r = 0.92, n = 9). Satellite-derived estimates of primary production, using the Carbon Based Productivity Method (CbPM), moderately correlated with in situ FRRF-based measurements. These estimates varied with river plume dilution gradients, with the highest rates associated with waters under river plume influence (CbPM 631 mg C m-2 d-1 and FRRF 570 mg C m-2 d-1). A time series of satellite-derived estimates (2002-2011) revealed seasonal variations associated with river discharge and climate driven fluctuations. Regional integrated productivity of about 2.80 Tg C yr-1 was calculated based on the average spatial coverage of the Orinoco River plume over the last decade.

  13. The Puzzle of HCN in Comets: Is it both a Product and a Primary Species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, Michael J.; Bonev, Boncho P.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Gibb, Erika L.; Magee-Sauer, Karen; Paganini, Lucas; Villanueva, Geronimo L.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide has long been regarded as a primary volatile in comets, stemming from its presence in dense molecular cloud cores and its supposed storage in the cometary nucleus. Here, we examine the observational evidence for and against that hypothesis, and argue that HCN may also result from near-nucleus chemical reactions in the coma. The distinction (product vs. primary species) is important for multiple reasons: 1. HCN is often used as a proxy for water when the dominant species (H2O) is not available for simultaneous measurement, as at radio wavelengths. 2. HCN is one of the few volatile carriers of nitrogen accessible to remote sensing. If HCN is mainly a product species, its precursor becomes the more important metric for compiling a taxonomic classification based on nitrogen chemistry. 3. The stereoisomer HNC is now confirmed as a product species. Could reaction of a primary precursor (X-CN) with a hydrocarbon co-produce both HNC and HCN? 4. The production rate for CN greatly exceeds that of HCN in some comets, demonstrating the presence of another (more important) precursor of CN. Several puzzling lines of evidence raise issues about the origin of HCN: a. The production rates of HCN measured through rotational (radio) and vibrational (infrared) spectroscopy agree in some comets - in others the infrared rate exceeds the radio rate substantially. b. With its strong dipole moment and H-bonding character, HCN should be linked more strongly in the nuclear ice to other molecules with similar properties (H2O, CH3OH), but instead its spatial release in some comets seems strongly coupled to volatiles that lack a dipole moment and thus do not form H-bonds (methane, ethane). c. The nucleus-centered rotational temperatures measured for H2O and other species (C2H6, CH3OH) usually agree within error, but those for HCN are often slightly smaller. d. In comet ISON, ALMA maps of HCN and the dust continuum show a slight displacement 80 km) in the centroids. We will

  14. Ontogeny of aerial righting and wing flapping in juvenile birds.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Dennis; Cam, Sharlene; Huynh, Tony; Krivitskiy, Igor; Dudley, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Mechanisms of aerial righting in juvenile chukar partridge (Alectoris chukar) were studied from hatching to 14 days-post-hatching (dph). Asymmetric movements of the wings were used from 1 to 8 dph to effect progressively more successful righting behaviour via body roll. Following 8 dph, wing motions transitioned to bilaterally symmetric flapping that yielded aerial righting via nose-down pitch, along with substantial increases in vertical force production during descent. Ontogenetically, the use of such wing motions to effect aerial righting precedes both symmetric flapping and a previously documented behaviour in chukar (i.e. wing-assisted incline running) hypothesized to be relevant to incipient flight evolution in birds. These findings highlight the importance of asymmetric wing activation and controlled aerial manoeuvres during bird development and are potentially relevant to understanding the origins of avian flight. PMID:25165451

  15. Modelling the seasonality of subsurface light and primary production in the Arabian Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor

    1993-01-01

    Seasonal changes in mixed-layer depth and phytoplankton biomass in the Arabian Sea are assessed with climatologies of ship-based hydrographic measurements and ocean-color observations from satellite.  At the close of the intermonsoons in November and especially May, the open Arabian Sea resembles the stereotypic, unperturbed tropical ocean, with a thin oligotrophic mixed layer and a pronounced subsurface chlorophyll maximum.  Both the northeast and southwest monsoons disrupt this typical tropical hydrography through mixed-layer deepening and eutrophication in the central and northern Arabian Sea.  Computations using a spectral model of light penetration suggest that seasonal changes in mixed-layer thickness and phytoplankton concentration result in pronounced fluctuations through the annual cycle in the radiant flux reaching the base of the mixed layer.  At the close of the fall and spring intermonsoons the base of the model euphotic zone is in the thermocline across all of the open Arabian Sea.  The euphotic zone appears to rise into the mixed layer of the northern Arabian Sea during both the winter and summer monsoons.  Strong seasonality in total primary production and its partitioning between the mixed layer and thermocline is predicted byb a photo-synthesis-irradiance model for a site in the western Arabian Sea (14.36° N, 57.38° E).  Modeled mixed-layer primary production depicts an intense peak for the southwest monsoon and a secondary northeast monsoon peak separated by intermonsoon period of low production.  During the fall and spring intermonsoons, in the presence of a subsurface clorophyll maximum, the model estimate of primary production in the thermocline exceeds that in the mixed layer.  Our model calculations suggest that the subsurface clorophyll maximum present in the Arabian Sea during the spring intermonsoon is a precursor of the regional, summer, phytoplankton bloom.

  16. Cadmium-isotopic evidence for increasing primary productivity during the Late Permian anoxic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Svetoslav V.; Horner, Tristan J.; Stein, Holly J.; Hannah, Judith L.; Bingen, Bernard; Rehkämper, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Earth's most extreme extinction event near the end of the Late Permian decimated more than 90% of all extant marine species. Widespread and intensive oceanic anoxia almost certainly contributed to the catastrophe, though the driving mechanisms that sustained such conditions are still debated. Of particular interest is whether water column anoxia was a consequence of a 'stagnant ocean', or if it was controlled by increases in nutrient supply, primary productivity, and subsequent heterotrophic respiration. Testing these competing hypotheses requires deconvolving sedimentary/bottom water redox conditions from changes in surface water productivity in marine sediments. We address this issue by studying marine shales from East Greenland and the mid-Norwegian shelf and combining sedimentary redox proxies with cadmium-isotopic analyses. Sedimentary nitrogen-isotopic data, pyrite framboid analyses, and organic and inorganic shale geochemistry reveal sulfidic conditions with vigorous upwelling, and increasingly anoxic conditions with a strengthening upwelling in the Greenland and Norwegian sections, respectively. Detailed analysis of sedimentary metal budgets illustrates that Cd is primarily associated with organic carbon and records primary geochemical signatures, thus enabling reconstruction of surface water nutrient utilization. Cadmium-isotopic analyses of the authigenic shale fraction released by inverse aqua regia digestion yield an average δ114Cd110 of + 0.15 ± 0.01 ‰ (2 SE, n = 12; rel. NIST SRM 3108), indicative of incomplete surface water nutrient utilization up-section. The constant degree of nutrient utilization combined with strong upwelling requires increasing primary productivity - and not oceanic stagnation - to balance the larger nutrient fluxes to both study sites during the development of the Late Permian water column anoxia. Overall, our data illustrate that if bottom water redox and upwelling can be adequately constrained, Cd-isotopic analyses of

  17. Estimation of primary productivity in Banda Sea using the vertical distribution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemili, Putri; Putri, Mutiara R.

    2014-03-01

    To estimate Net Primary Productivity (NPP) which more represent nature condition, it is important to know both horizontal and vertical distribution. Carbon-based Productivity Model (CbPM) used to calculate NPP in 15 layers of depth. Gauss equation and Lambert Beer Law used to estimate chlorophyll-a and light intensity in each layer from satellite-derived data, whereas the temperature data obtained from model result of HAMburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM). This model is being applied to verified and describe how the NPP had been distributed in Banda Sea on 2006. Verification results show that CbPM algorithm has clearly give less error in data observation than what Vertically Generalized Production Model (VGPM) algorithm did, which stand on the error average approximately 33%. The results also show that the vertical distribution of NPP in Banda Sea indicate a seasonal variation.

  18. Scale-up and economic analysis of biodiesel production from municipal primary sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Olkiewicz, Magdalena; Torres, Carmen M; Jiménez, Laureano; Font, Josep; Bengoa, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    Municipal wastewater sludge is a promising lipid feedstock for biodiesel production, but the need to eliminate the high water content before lipid extraction is the main limitation for scaling up. This study evaluates the economic feasibility of biodiesel production directly from liquid primary sludge based on experimental data at laboratory scale. Computational tools were used for the modelling of the process scale-up and the different configurations of lipid extraction to optimise this step, as it is the most expensive. The operational variables with a major influence in the cost were the extraction time and the amount of solvent. The optimised extraction process had a break-even price of biodiesel of 1232 $/t, being economically competitive with the current cost of fossil diesel. The proposed biodiesel production process from waste sludge eliminates the expensive step of sludge drying, lowering the biodiesel price. PMID:27131292

  19. Marine foods sourced from farther as their use of global ocean primary production increases

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Reg A.; Nowara, Gabrielle B.; Hartmann, Klaas; Green, Bridget S.; Tracey, Sean R.; Carter, Chris G.

    2015-01-01

    The growing human population must be fed, but historic land-based systems struggle to meet expanding demand. Marine production supports some of the world's poorest people but increasingly provides for the needs of the affluent, either directly by fishing or via fodder-based feeds for marine and terrestrial farming. Here we show the expanding footprint of humans to utilize global ocean productivity to feed themselves. Our results illustrate how incrementally each year, marine foods are sourced farther from where they are consumed and moreover, require an increasing proportion of the ocean's primary productivity that underpins all marine life. Though mariculture supports increased consumption of seafood, it continues to require feeds based on fully exploited wild stocks. Here we examine the ocean's ability to meet our future demands to 2100 and find that even with mariculture supplementing near-static wild catches our growing needs are unlikely to be met without significant changes. PMID:26079714

  20. Impact of naled on honey bee Apis mellifera L. survival and productivity: aerial ULV application using a flat-fan nozzle system.

    PubMed

    Zhong, H; Latham, M; Hester, P G; Frommer, R L; Brock, C

    2003-08-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the impact of naled on honey bees as a result of their exposure to aerial ULV applications of this insecticide during three routine mosquito spray missions by Manatee County Mosquito Control District in Florida during the summer of 1999. Naled deposits were collected on filter paper and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography. Mortality of adult honey bees Apis mellifera L. was estimated based on numbers from dead bee collectors placed in front of the entrance of the beehives. We found that honey bees clustering outside of the beehives were subject to naled exposure. Bee mortality increased when higher naled residues were found around the hives. The highest average naled deposit was 6,227 +/- 696 microg/m2 at the site 1 forest area following the mosquito spray mission on July 15, 1999. The range of naled deposition for this application was 2,818-7,101 microg/m2. The range of dead bees per hive was 0-39 prior to spraying and 9-200 within 24 h following this spray mission. The average yield of honey per hive was significantly lower (p < 0.05) for naled-exposed hives compared with unexposed hives. Because reduction of honey yield also may be affected by other factors, such as location of the hives relative to a food source and vigor of the queen bee, the final assessment of honey yield was complicated. PMID:14565579

  1. Mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in primary disorders of ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Vojtísková, Alena; Jesina, Pavel; Kalous, Martin; Kaplanová, Vilma; Houstek, Josef; Tesarová, Markéta; Fornůsková, Daniela; Zeman, Jirí; Dubot, Audrey; Godinot, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Studies of fibroblasts with primary defects in mitochondrial ATP synthase (ATPase) due to heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations in the ATP6 gene, affecting protonophoric function or synthesis of subunit a, show that at high mutation loads, mitochondrial membrane potential DeltaPsi(m) at state 4 is normal, but ADP-induced discharge of DeltaPsi(m) is impaired and ATP synthesis at state 3-ADP is decreased. Increased DeltaPsi(m) and low ATP synthesis is also found when the ATPase content is diminished by altered biogenesis of the enzyme complex. Irrespective of the different pathogenic mechanisms, elevated DeltaPsi(m) in primary ATPase disorders could increase mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species and decrease energy provision. PMID:20021115

  2. Landscape level influence: aquatic primary production in the Colorado River of Glen and Grand canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yard, M. D.; Kennedy, T.; Yackulic, C. B.; Bennett, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Irregular features common to canyon-bound regions intercept solar incidence (photosynthetic photon flux density [PPFD: μmol m-2 s-1]) and can affect ecosystem energetics. The Colorado River in Grand Canyon is topographically complex, typical of most streams and rivers in the arid southwest. Dam-regulated systems like the Colorado River have reduced sediment loads, and consequently increased water transparency relative to unimpounded rivers; however, sediment supply from tributaries and flow regulation that affects erosion and subsequent sediment transport, interact to create spatial and temporal variation in optical conditions in this river network. Solar incidence and suspended sediment loads regulate the amount of underwater light available for aquatic photosynthesis in this regulated river. Since light availability is depth dependent (Beer's law), benthic algae is often exposed to varying levels of desiccation or reduced light conditions due to daily flow regulation, additional factors that further constrain aquatic primary production. Considerable evidence suggests that the Colorado River food web is now energetically dependent on autotrophic production, an unusual condition since large river foodwebs are typically supported by allochthonous carbon synthesized and transported from terrestrial environments. We developed a mechanistic model to account for these regulating factors to predict how primary production might be affected by observed and alternative flow regimes proposed as part of ongoing adaptive management experimentation. Inputs to our model include empirical data (suspended sediment and temperature), and predictive relationships: 1) solar incidence reaching the water surface (topographic complexity), 2) suspended sediment-light extinction relationships (optical properties), 3) unsteady flow routing model (stage-depth relationship), 4) channel morphology (photosynthetic area), and 5) photosynthetic-irradiant response for dominant algae (Cladophora

  3. Primary productivity and the prospects for biofuels in the United Kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, G. J.; Callaghan, T. V.

    1983-09-01

    Estimates of land use and plant productivity are combined to predict total annual primary production in the UK as 252 million tonnes dry matter (10.5 t ha-1yr-1). Annual above ground production is predicted to be 165 Mt (6.9 t ha-1yr-1). Within these totals, intensive agriculture contributes 60%, productive woodland 8%, natural vegetation 26% and urban vegetation 5%. However, only 25% of total plant production is cropped by man and animals, and most of this is subsequently discarded as wastes and residues. 2112 PJ of organic material is available for fuel without reducing food or fibre production, but since much of this could not be economically collected, 859 PJ is calculated as a more realistic biofuel contribution by the year 2000. After deducting 50% conversion losses, this could save P1 billion (1979 prices) in oil imports. Short rotation energy plantations, forest residues, coppice woodlands, animal and crop wastes, industrial and domestic wastes, catch crops, natural vegetation and urban vegetation all have immediate or short term potential as biofuel sources. Sensitive planning is required to reduce environmental impact, but in some cases more diverse wildlife habitats may be created.

  4. Monitoring Agricultural Production in Primary Export Countries within the framework of the GEOGLAM Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Reshef, I.; Justice, C. O.; Vermote, E.

    2012-12-01

    Up to date, reliable, global, information on crop production prospects is indispensible for informing and regulating grain markets and for instituting effective agricultural policies. The recent price surges in the global grain markets were in large part triggered by extreme weather events in primary grain export countries. These events raise important questions about the accuracy of current production forecasts and their role in market fluctuations, and highlight the deficiencies in the state of global agricultural monitoring. Satellite-based earth observations are increasingly utilized as a tool for monitoring agricultural production as they offer cost-effective, daily, global information on crop growth and extent and their utility for crop production forecasting has long been demonstrated. Within this context, the Group on Earth Observations developed the Global Agricultural Monitoring (GEOGLAM) initiative which was adopted by the G20 as part of the action plan on food price volatility and agriculture. The goal of GEOGLAM is to enhance agricultural production estimates through the use of Earth observations. This talk will explore the potential contribution of EO-based methods for improving the accuracy of early production estimates of main export countries within the framework of GEOGLAM.

  5. Time Series Analysis Of Primary Productivity Along The East Coast Of India Using Oceansat-2 Ocean Colour Monitor (O cm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, E.; Pratap, D.; Nagamani, P. V.; Rao, K. H.; Preethi Latha, T.; Choudhury, S. B.

    2014-11-01

    Primary Productivity is the ultimate source of energy for all organisms in an ecosystem. It is associated with the food production and the global carbon cycle. Sensors on remote platforms (satellites) are capable of estimating the Chlorophyll-a concentration in surface waters by measurement of spectral changes of the upwelling light. From these data, which connected with other remotely sensed data, it is possible to use algorithms to estimate the primary production. In this paper, an initial attempt is made to estimate the Primary Productivity along the east coast of India. Vertically Generalized Productivity Model (VGPM) which is a depth (euphotic depth) integrated model is used for the estimation. The common input variables or geophysical parameters used for the model are chlorophyll-a concentration (chl-a), vertically diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd-490), Photosynthetically Available Radiation (PAR), and Sea Surface Temperature (SST). The chlorophyll-a and Kd-490 parameters were estimated using Oceansat-2 OCM data whereas PAR and SST were taken from MODIS-aqua data. Oceansat-2 Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM) data for the year 2013 is used in the analysis to compute the primary productivity using the weekly (8-day) data products of all the parameters as mentioned above. These products were inter compared with the MODIS Weekly (8-day) Primary Productivity products which were estimated at a global scale using the modified Vertically Generalized Productivity Model (VGPM) with which uses the exponential function of Sea surface temperature (SST).

  6. Ozone Effects on Global Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Biogeochemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felzer, B. S.; Kicklighter, D. W.; Melillo, J. M.; Wang, C.; Zhuang, Q.; Prinn, R. G.

    2002-12-01

    The effects of air pollution on vegetation may provide another important control on the carbon cycle that has not yet been widely considered. Prolonged exposure to high levels of ozone, in particular, has been observed to inhibit photosynthesis by direct cellular damage within the leaves and through changes in stomatal conductance. We have incorporated simple empirical equations derived for hardwoods, pines, and crops into the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.3) to explore spatial and temporal variations of ozone effects on net primary productivity (NPP) and carbon sequestration across the globe. Although our results show up to a 2% reduction in annual NPP as a result of historical ozone levels during the late 1980s-early 1990s, regionally this reduction is much larger. The largest decreases (up to 39% in some locations) occur in the eastern U.S., Europe, and China, during months with high ozone levels and substantial production. Carbon sequestration during the early 1990s is reduced by as much as 0.43 PgC/yr, or 15%, with the presence of ozone. Thus the effects of ozone on net primary production and carbon sequestration should be factored into future calculations of the global carbon budget.

  7. Ethanol production from spent sulfite liquor fortified by hydrolysis of pulp mill primary clarifier sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, J.W.; Duff, S.J.B.

    1996-12-31

    Some low-yield sulfite pulping operations ferment spent sulfite liquor (SSL) to remove biochemical oxygen demand associated with dissolved sugars while at the same time generating ethanol as a salable product. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of primary clarifier sludge in a medium of SSL was proposed as a means of reducing the amount of sludge to be disposed of while at the same time increasing ethanol productivity. In this article, the option of fortifying existing SSL fermenting processes with the sugars produced via in situ enzymatic hydrolysis of sulfite primary clarifier sludge (PCS) has been explored. In 100% SSL PCS hydrolysis rates as high as 3.4 g/(L{center_dot}h) were observed at an initial enzyme loading of 10 filter paper units (FPU)/g PCS. To reduce the deleterious effects of glucose inhibition, single-stage SSF was carried out using cellulose enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The production rate of ethanol in SSL was increased by as much as 25% through the SSF process. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Modelled effects of primary and secondary production enhancement by seamounts on local fish stocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morato, Telmo; Bulman, Cathy; Pitcher, Tony J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses how large aggregations of fish found on many seamounts are sustained. We used a generic seamount ecosystem model from the Northeast Atlantic to examine the impact of a potential increase of local primary production on higher trophic levels, to quantify the immigration of allochthonous micronekton that would be required to maintain a "typical" seamount community, and to quantify if the necessary immigration ratios could be supported by local oceanographic conditions. Our simulation predictions indicate a lack of autochthonous resources in the system to support large amounts of seamount aggregating fish. In other words, autochthonous seamount production may be responsible for sustaining only a small amount of its total biomass. Additionally, our study supports the idea that enhancement of primary productivity also cannot sustain large aggregations of seamount fish. Our seamount model, which took into account high abundances of fish, marine mammals, seabirds and tuna, required a total immigration of allochthonous micronekton of 95.2 t km -2 yr -1 less than the potential available biomass after considering the immigration of prey based upon average current velocities and prey standing stocks in oceanic waters. Our model predicted that the horizontal flux of prey would be sufficient to sustain the rich communities living on seamounts.

  9. Net primary productivity of forest stands in New Hampshire estimated from Landsat and MODIS satellite data

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Christopher; Gross, Peggy; Genovese, Vanessa; Smith, Marie-Louise

    2007-01-01

    Background A simulation model that relies on satellite observations of vegetation cover from the Landsat 7 sensor and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate net primary productivity (NPP) of forest stands at the Bartlett Experiment Forest (BEF) in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Results Net primary production (NPP) predicted from the NASA-CASA model using 30-meter resolution Landsat inputs showed variations related to both vegetation cover type and elevational effects on mean air temperatures. Overall, the highest predicted NPP from the NASA-CASA model was for deciduous forest cover at low to mid-elevation locations over the landscape. Comparison of the model-predicted annual NPP to the plot-estimated values showed a significant correlation of R2 = 0.5. Stepwise addition of 30-meter resolution elevation data values explained no more than 20% of the residual variation in measured NPP patterns at BEF. Both the Landsat 7 and the 250-meter resolution MODIS derived mean annual NPP predictions for the BEF plot locations were within ± 2.5% of the mean of plot estimates for annual NPP. Conclusion Although MODIS imagery cannot capture the spatial details of NPP across the network of closely spaced plot locations as well as Landsat, the MODIS satellite data as inputs to the NASA-CASA model does accurately predict the average annual productivity of a site like the BEF. PMID:17941989

  10. Increased Primary Production from an Exotic Invader Does Not Subsidize Native Rodents.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Jacob E; Allen, Phil S; McMillan, Brock R

    2015-01-01

    Invasive plants have tremendous potential to enrich native food webs by subsidizing net primary productivity. Here, we explored how a potential food subsidy, seeds produced by the aggressive invader cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is utilized by an important guild of native consumers--granivorous small mammals--in the Great Basin Desert, USA. In a series of field experiments we examined 1) how cheatgrass invasion affects the density and biomass of seed rain at the ecosystem-level; 2) how seed resources from cheatgrass numerically affect granivorous small mammals; and 3) how the food preferences of native granivores might mediate the trophic integration of cheatgrass seeds. Relative to native productivity, cheatgrass invasion increased the density and biomass of seed rain by over 2000% (P < 0.01) and 3500% (P < 0.01), respectively. However, granivorous small mammals in native communities showed no positive response in abundance, richness, or diversity to experimental additions of cheatgrass seeds over one year. This lack of response correlated with a distinct preference for seeds from native grasses over seeds from cheatgrass. Our experiments demonstrate that increased primary productivity associated with exotic plant invasions may not necessarily subsidize consumers at higher trophic levels. In this context, cheatgrass invasion could disrupt native food webs by providing less-preferred resources that fail to enrich higher trophic levels. PMID:26244345

  11. Increased Primary Production from an Exotic Invader Does Not Subsidize Native Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Jacob E.; Allen, Phil S.; McMillan, Brock R.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive plants have tremendous potential to enrich native food webs by subsidizing net primary productivity. Here, we explored how a potential food subsidy, seeds produced by the aggressive invader cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is utilized by an important guild of native consumers – granivorous small mammals – in the Great Basin Desert, USA. In a series of field experiments we examined 1) how cheatgrass invasion affects the density and biomass of seed rain at the ecosystem-level; 2) how seed resources from cheatgrass numerically affect granivorous small mammals; and 3) how the food preferences of native granivores might mediate the trophic integration of cheatgrass seeds. Relative to native productivity, cheatgrass invasion increased the density and biomass of seed rain by over 2000% (P < 0.01) and 3500% (P < 0.01), respectively. However, granivorous small mammals in native communities showed no positive response in abundance, richness, or diversity to experimental additions of cheatgrass seeds over one year. This lack of response correlated with a distinct preference for seeds from native grasses over seeds from cheatgrass. Our experiments demonstrate that increased primary productivity associated with exotic plant invasions may not necessarily subsidize consumers at higher trophic levels. In this context, cheatgrass invasion could disrupt native food webs by providing less-preferred resources that fail to enrich higher trophic levels. PMID:26244345

  12. Phytoplankton absorption, photosynthetic parameters, and primary production off Baja California: summer and autumn 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Hernández, Elsa; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Nájera-Martínez, Sila; Baumgartner, Timothy; Kahru, Mati; Greg Mitchell, B.

    2004-03-01

    To estimate ocean primary production at large space and time scales, it is necessary to use models combined with ocean-color satellite data. Detailed estimates of primary production are typically done at only a few representative stations. To get survey-scale estimates of primary production, one must introduce routinely measured Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) into models. For best precision, models should be based on accurate parameterizations developed from optical and photosynthesis data collected in the region of interest. To develop regional model parameterizations 14C-bicarbonate was used to estimate in situ primary production and photosynthetic parameters (α* ,Pm* , and Ek) derived from photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments from IMECOCAL cruises to the southern California Current during July and October 1998. The P-E experiments were done for samples collected from the 50% surface light depth for which we also determined particle and phytoplankton absorption coefficients (ap, aφ, and aφ*). Physical data collected during both surveys indicated that the 1997-1998 El Niño was abating during the summer of 1998, with a subsequent transition to the typical California Current circulation and coastal upwelling conditions. Phytoplankton chl-a and in situ primary production were elevated at coastal stations for both surveys, with the highest values during summer. Phytoplankton specific absorption coefficients in the blue peak (aφ* (440)) ranged from 0.02 to 0.11 m2 (mg Chl-a)-1 with largest values in offshore surface waters. In general aφ* was lower at depth compared to the surface. P-E samples were collected at the 50% light level that was usually in the surface mixed layer. Using α* and spectral absorption, we estimated maximum photosynthetic quantum yields (φmax; mol C/mol quanta). φmax values were lowest in offshore surface waters, with a total range of 0.01-0.07. Mean values of φmax for July and October were 0.011 and 0.022, respectively. In July Pm* was

  13. Aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal infrared scanning from an aircraft is a convenient and commercially available means for determining relative rates of energy loss from building roofs. The need to conserve energy as fuel costs makes the mass survey capability of aerial thermography an attractive adjunct to community energy awareness programs. Background information on principles of aerial thermography is presented. Thermal infrared scanning systems, flight and environmental requirements for data acquisition, preparation of thermographs for display, major users and suppliers of thermography, and suggested specifications for obtaining aerial scanning services were reviewed.

  14. Cellular microenvironment dictates androgen production by murine fetal Leydig cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen M; Muszynski, Jessica L; Strotman, Lindsay N; Lewis, Samantha R; O'Connell, Rachel L; Beebe, David J; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Jorgensen, Joan S

    2014-10-01

    Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3-5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  15. Cellular Microenvironment Dictates Androgen Production by Murine Fetal Leydig Cells in Primary Culture1

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Colleen M.; Muszynski, Jessica L.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Lewis, Samantha R.; O'Connell, Rachel L.; Beebe, David J.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Jorgensen, Joan S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the fact that fetal Leydig cells are recognized as the primary source of androgens in male embryos, the mechanisms by which steroidogenesis occurs within the developing testis remain unclear. A genetic approach was used to visualize and isolate fetal Leydig cells from remaining cells within developing mouse testes. Cyp11a1-Cre mice were bred to mT/mG dual reporter mice to target membrane-tagged enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) within steroidogenic cells, whereas other cells expressed membrane-tagged tandem-dimer tomato red. Fetal Leydig cell identity was validated using double-labeled immunohistochemistry against GFP and the steroidogenic enzyme 3beta-HSD, and cells were successfully isolated as indicated by qPCR results from sorted cell populations. Because fetal Leydig cells must collaborate with neighboring cells to synthesize testosterone, we hypothesized that the fetal Leydig cell microenvironment defined their capacity for androgen production. Microfluidic culture devices were used to measure androstenedione and testosterone production of fetal Leydig cells that were cultured in cell-cell contact within a mixed population, were isolated but remained in medium contact via compartmentalized co-culture with other testicular cells, or were isolated and cultured alone. Results showed that fetal Leydig cells maintained their identity and steroidogenic activity for 3–5 days in primary culture. Microenvironment dictated proficiency of testosterone production. As expected, fetal Leydig cells produced androstenedione but not testosterone when cultured in isolation. More testosterone accumulated in medium from mixed cultures than from compartmentalized co-cultures initially; however, co-cultures maintained testosterone synthesis for a longer time. These data suggest that a combination of cell-cell contact and soluble factors constitute the ideal microenvironment for fetal Leydig cell activity in primary culture. PMID:25143354

  16. Benthic Primary Production Budget of a Caribbean Reef Lagoon (Puerto Morelos, Mexico)

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Malik S.; Jantzen, Carin; Haas, Andreas F.; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    High photosynthetic benthic primary production (P) represents a key ecosystem service provided by tropical coral reef systems. However, benthic P budgets of specific ecosystem compartments such as macrophyte-dominated reef lagoons are still scarce. To address this, we quantified individual and lagoon-wide net (Pn) and gross (Pg) primary production by all dominant functional groups of benthic primary producers in a typical macrophyte-dominated Caribbean reef lagoon near Puerto Morelos (Mexico) via measurement of O2 fluxes in incubation experiments. The photosynthetically active 3D lagoon surface area was quantified using conversion factors to allow extrapolation to lagoon-wide P budgets. Findings revealed that lagoon 2D benthic cover was primarily composed of sand-associated microphytobenthos (40%), seagrasses (29%) and macroalgae (27%), while seagrasses dominated the lagoon 3D surface area (84%). Individual Pg was highest for macroalgae and scleractinian corals (87 and 86 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area d−1, respectively), however seagrasses contributed highest (59%) to the lagoon-wide Pg. Macroalgae exhibited highest individual Pn rates, but seagrasses generated the largest fraction (51%) of lagoon-wide Pn. Individual R was highest for scleractinian corals and macroalgae, whereas seagrasses again provided the major lagoon-wide share (68%). These findings characterise the investigated lagoon as a net autotrophic coral reef ecosystem compartment revealing similar P compared to other macrophyte-dominated coastal environments such as seagrass meadows and macroalgae beds. Further, high lagoon-wide P (Pg: 488 and Pn: 181 mmol O2 m−2 lagoon area d−1) and overall Pg:R (1.6) indicate substantial benthic excess production within the Puerto Morelos reef lagoon and suggest the export of newly synthesised organic matter to surrounding ecosystems. PMID:24367570

  17. Estimating crop net primary production using inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2013-06-03

    National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale and over national and continental extents. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. A new Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn and soybean crops in Iowa and Illinois in years 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), shortwave radiation data estimated using Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that correspond to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. The modeling framework represented well the gradient of NPP across Iowa and Illinois, and also well represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 980 g C m-2 yr-1 and 420 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Estimated gross primary productivity (GPP) derived from AgI-LUE were in close agreement with eddy flux tower estimates. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

  18. Algal pigments record shifts in dominant primary productivity through the Holocene in an arctic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian, C.; Miller, G. H.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The character and magnitude of primary productivity in arctic lakes is largely controlled by climate. Organic compounds derived from pigments and preserved in lake sediments allow reconstruction of past abundances of algae that do not leave silicious microfossils. Fossil algal pigments are abundant in lake sediment and can be accurately quantified using High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Several groups of algae produce unique pigments that can be used to reconstruct their past abundance. In Qivitu Highlands Lake, eastern central Baffin Island, the ratio of pigments diatoxantin and lutein exhibits coherent changes through the Holocene. Diatoxanthin is produced by diatoms and chrysophytes, whereas lutein is produced by green algae and higher plants. Because these pigments are the dominant carotenoids in the sediment, they serve as proxies for the dominant group of primary producers. During the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the past century, lutein is much more abundant than diatoxanthin. During Neoglacial cooling and into the Little Ice Age, diatoxanthin becomes the dominant carotenoid. This shift reveals that there was a change in not only the magnitude of algal production, but also the most abundant type. The adaptation of aquatic algal assemblages to changing climate suggests that gross changes in primary productivity may not be suitable to track the abundance of one type of algal microfossil (such as diatoms) without considering the other algal groups. Higher plants also produce lutein, and its abundance is additionally influenced by the presence of terrestrial organic matter as well as aquatic macrophyte plants. We hypothesize that the prevalence of lutein during warm summers is due to a longer ice-free season, allowing the development of a greater biomass of green algae and macrophyte plants as well as possible increases of terrestrial higher plant communities. This is part of a larger study where the lutein to diatoxanthin ratio is compared to organic

  19. Toward Describing the Effects of Ozone Depletion on Marine Primary Productivity and Carbon Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.

    1995-01-01

    This project was aimed at improved predictions of the effects of UVB and ozone depletion on marine primary productivity and carbon flux. A principal objective was to incorporate a new analytical description of photosynthesis as a function of UV and photosynthetically available radiation (Cullen et. al., Science 258:646) into a general oceanographic model. We made significant progress: new insights into the kinetics of photoinhibition were used in the analysis of experiments on Antarctic phytoplankton to generate a general model of UV-induced photoinhibition under the influence of ozone depletion and vertical mixing. The way has been paved for general models on a global scale.

  20. Worldwide estimates and bibliography of net primary productivity derived from pre-1982 publications

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, G.; Lieth, H.F.H.; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Olson, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    An extensive compilation of more than 700 field estimates of net primary productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems worldwide was synthesized in Germany in the 1970s and early 1980s. Although the Osnabrueck data set has not been updated since the 1980s, it represents a wealth of information for use in model development and validation. This report documents the development of this data set, its contents, and its recent availability on the Internet from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics. Caution is advised in using these data, which necessarily include assumptions and conversions that may not be universally applicable to all sites.

  1. Global land-surface primary productivity based upon Nimbus-7 37 GHz data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1988-01-01

    Accumulation and renewal of organic matter as quantified through net primary productivity (NPP) is considered a very major function of the biosphere, and its estimation is crucial in understanding the carbon cycle. A physically-based model relating NPP to the difference of vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures (Delta T) observed at 37 GHz frequency of the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer on board the Nimbus-7 satellite is used for fitting areally averaged values of NPP and Delta T for five biomes. The land-surface NPP within 80 deg N to 55 deg S is then calculated using the Delta T data and compared with other estimates.

  2. Comparing global models of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP): Global pattern and differentiation by major biomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kicklighter, D.W.; Bondeau, A.; Schloss, A.L.; Kaduk, J.; McGuire, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    Annual and seasonal net primary productivity estimates (NPP) of 15 global models across latitudinal zones and biomes are compared. The models simulated NPP for contemporary climate using common, spatially explicit data sets for climate, soil texture, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Differences among NPP estimates varied over space and time. The largest differences occur during the summer months in boreal forests (50??to 60??N) and during the dry seasons of tropical evergreen forests. Differences in NPP estimates are related to model assumptions about vegetation structure, model parameterizations, and input data sets.

  3. Nutrient dynamics and primary production in a pristine coastal mangrove ecosystem: Andaman Islands, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, E. N.; Nickodem, K.; Siemann, A. L.; Hoeher, A.; Sundareshwar, P. V.; Ramesh, R.; Purvaja, R.; Banerjee, K.; Manickam, S.; Haran, H.

    2012-12-01

    Mangrove ecosystems play a key role in supporting coastal food webs and nutrient cycles in the coastal zone. Their strategic position between the land and the sea make them important sites for land-ocean interaction. As part of an Indo-US summer field course we investigated changes in the water chemistry in a pristine mangrove creek located at Wright Myo in the Andaman Islands, India. This study was conducted during the wet season (June 2012) to evaluate the influence of the coastal mangrove wetlands on the water quality and productivity in adjoining pelagic waters. Over a full tidal cycle spanning approximately 24 hrs, we measured nutrient concentrations and other ancillary parameters (e.g. dissolved oxygen, turbidity, salinity, etc.) hourly to evaluate water quality changes in incoming and ebbing tides. Nutrient analyses had the following concentration ranges (μM): nitrite 0.2-0.9, nitrate 2.0-11.5, ammonium 1.3-7.5, dissolved inorganic phosphate 0.7-2.8. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen to dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIN/DIP) ratio was very low relative to an optimal ratio, suggesting growth is nitrogen limited. In addition, we conducted primary production assays to investigate the factors that controlled primary production in this pristine creek. The experiment was carried out in situ using the Winkler method at low and high tide. Four-hour incubation of light and dark bottles representing a fixed control, non-fertilized, fertilized with nitrate, and fertilized with phosphate enabled the measurement of both net oxygen production and dark respiration. The low tide experiment suggests the ecosystem is heterotrophic because the oxygen measured in the light bottles was consistently less than that of the dark bottles. This result may be an experimental artifact of placing the glass bottles in the sun for too long prior to incubation, potentially leading to photolysis of large organic molecules in the light bottles. The high tide experiment also displayed

  4. Hydrologic remediation for the Deepwater Horizon incident drove ancillary primary production increase in coastal swamps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.; Johnson, Darren; Roberts, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    As coastal wetlands subside worldwide, there is an urgency to understand the hydrologic drivers and dynamics of plant production and peat accretion. One incidental test of the effects of high rates of discharge on forested wetland production occurred in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident, in which all diversions in Louisiana were operated at or near their maximum discharge level for an extended period to keep offshore oil from threatened coastal wetlands. Davis Pond Diversion was operated at six times the normal discharge levels for almost 4 months, so that Taxodium distichum swamps downstream of the diversion experienced greater inundation and lower salinity. After this remediation event in 2010, above-ground litter production increased by 2.7 times of production levels in 2007–2011. Biomass of the leaf and reproductive tissues of several species increased; wood litter was minimal and did not change during this period. Root production decreased in 2010 but subsequently returned to pre-remediation values in 2011. Both litter and root production remained high in the second growing season after hydrologic remediation. Annual tree growth (circumference increment) was not significantly altered by the remediation. The potential of freshwater pulses for regulating tidal swamp production is further supported by observations of higher T. distichum growth in lower salinity and/or pulsed environments across the U.S. Gulf Coast. Usage of freshwater pulses to manage altered estuaries deserves further consideration, particularly because the timing and duration of such pulses could influence both primary production and peat accretion.

  5. Uncertainty analysis of terrestrial net primary productivity and net biome productivity in China during 1901-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junjiong; Zhou, Xuhui; Luo, Yiqi; Zhang, Guodong; Yan, Wei; Li, Jiaxuan; Li, Bo; Dan, Li; Fisher, Joshua B.; Gao, Zhiqiang; He, Yong; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jain, Atul K.; Mao, Jiafu; Meng, Jihua; Michalak, Anna M.; Parazoo, Nicholas C.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Sun, Rui; Tao, Fulu; Tian, Hanqin; Wei, Yaxing; Zeng, Ning; Zhu, Qiuan; Zhu, Wenquan

    2016-05-01

    Despite the importance of net primary productivity (NPP) and net biome productivity (NBP), estimates of NPP and NBP for China are highly uncertain. To investigate the main sources of uncertainty, we synthesized model estimates of NPP and NBP for China from published literature and the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). The literature-based results showed that total NPP and NBP in China were 3.35 ± 1.25 and 0.14 ± 0.094 Pg C yr-1, respectively. Classification and regression tree analysis based on literature data showed that model type was the primary source of the uncertainty, explaining 36% and 64% of the variance in NPP and NBP, respectively. Spatiotemporal scales, land cover conditions, inclusion of the N cycle, and effects of N addition also contributed to the overall uncertainty. Results based on the MsTMIP data suggested that model structures were overwhelmingly important (>90%) for the overall uncertainty compared to simulations with different combinations of time-varying global change factors. The interannual pattern of NPP was similar among diverse studies and increased by 0.012 Pg C yr-1 during 1981-2000. In addition, high uncertainty in China's NPP occurred in areas with high productivity, whereas NBP showed the opposite pattern. Our results suggest that to significantly reduce uncertainty in estimated NPP and NBP, model structures should be substantially tested on the basis of empirical results. To this end, coordinated distributed experiments with multiple global change factors might be a practical approach that can validate specific structures of different models.

  6. Quantifying subtropical North Pacific gyre mixed layer primary productivity from Seaglider observations of diel oxygen cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David P.; Wilson, Samuel T.; Doney, Scott C.; Karl, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Using autonomous underwater gliders, we quantified diurnal periodicity in dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and temperature in the subtropical North Pacific near the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Station ALOHA during summer 2012. Oxygen optodes provided sufficient stability and precision to quantify diel cycles of average amplitude of 0.6 µmol kg-1. A theoretical diel curve was fit to daily observations to infer an average mixed layer gross primary productivity (GPP) of 1.8 mmol O2 m-3 d-1. Cumulative net community production (NCP) over 110 days was 500 mmol O2 m-2 for the mixed layer, which averaged 57 m in depth. Both GPP and NCP estimates indicated a significant period of below-average productivity at Station ALOHA in 2012, an observation confirmed by 14C productivity incubations and O2/Ar ratios. Given our success in an oligotrophic gyre where biological signals are small, our diel GPP approach holds promise for remote characterization of productivity across the spectrum of marine environments.

  7. Net primary production of a temperate deciduous forest exhibits a threshold response to increasing disturbance severity.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Haëntjens, Ellen J; Curtis, Peter S; Fahey, Robert T; Vogel, Christoph S; Gough, Christopher M

    2015-09-01

    The global carbon (C) balance is vulnerable to disturbances that alter terrestrial C storage. Disturbances to forests occur along a continuum of severity, from low-intensity disturbance causing the mortality or defoliation of only a subset of trees to severe stand- replacing disturbance that kills all trees; yet considerable uncertainty remains in how forest production changes across gradients of disturbance intensity. We used a gradient of tree mortality in an upper Great Lakes forest ecosystem to: (1) quantify how aboveground wood net primary production (ANPP,) responds to a range of disturbance severities; and (2) identify mechanisms supporting ANPPw resistance or resilience following moderate disturbance. We found that ANPPw declined nonlinearly with rising disturbance severity, remaining stable until >60% of the total tree basal area senesced. As upper canopy openness increased from disturbance, greater light availability to the subcanopy enhanced the leaf-level photosynthesis and growth of this formerly light-limited canopy stratum, compensating for upper canopy production losses and a reduction in total leaf area index (LAI). As a result, whole-ecosystem production efficiency (ANPPw/LAI) increased with rising disturbance severity, except in plots beyond the disturbance threshold. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for a nonlinear relationship between ANPPw, and disturbance severity, in which the physiological and growth enhancement of undisturbed vegetation is proportional to the level of disturbance until a threshold is exceeded. Our results have important ecological and management implications, demonstrating that in some ecosystems moderate levels of disturbance minimally alter forest production. PMID:26594704

  8. A conceptual model of primary productivity in shallow streams using biomass simulation. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.C.; McDonnell, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    A conceptual model for primary productivity was developed for application to rooted aquatic macrophytes in streams to assist studies of eutrophication and control of water quality in supplementing outputs of dissolved oxygen (DO) models of pollution loads. This model included a first-order differential equation of biomass, with specific rates for photosynthesis, respiration, and death. A model component was developed to describe available light spatially/temporally in the weed bed, as reduced from extraterrestrial solar radiation. A DO model component included terms for photosynthetic production, plant respiration, and a benthal sink due to dead plant matter decay. The latter, a first-order exponential oxygen sink, had not been previously included in DO models.

  9. Oceanic primary production: 2. Estimation at global scale from satellite (coastal zone color scanner) chlorophyll

    SciTech Connect

    Antione, D.; Andre, J.M.; Morel, A.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the oceanic seasonal evolution and spatial distribution of photosynthetic carbon fixation. Computation of primary production from the upper ocean chlorophyll-like pigment concentrations were made from monthly global maps from the coastal zone color scanner data archive. Relative contributions of various oceans and zonal belts were identified. Depending on the ratio used for active pigments to total pigments, the calculated global annual production ranges from 36.5 and 45.6 G tons (metric) carbon per year. These values are among the highest estimates proposed to date; although the absolute values may be somewhat questionable, the relative contribution of the various zonal belts and oceans are considered to have a high degree of accuracy. 33 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Observation and simulation of net primary productivity in Qilian Mountain, western China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Zhu, Q; Chen, J M; Wang, Y Q; Liu, J; Sun, R; Tang, S

    2007-11-01

    We modeled net primary productivity (NPP) at high spatial resolution using an advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (ASTER) image of a Qilian Mountain study area using the boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS). Two key driving variables of the model, leaf area index (LAI) and land cover type, were derived from ASTER and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Other spatially explicit inputs included daily meteorological data (radiation, precipitation, temperature, humidity), available soil water holding capacity (AWC), and forest biomass. NPP was estimated for coniferous forests and other land cover types in the study area. The result showed that NPP of coniferous forests in the study area was about 4.4 tCha(-1)y(-1). The correlation coefficient between the modeled NPP and ground measurements was 0.84, with a mean relative error of about 13.9%. PMID:17129660

  11. The whale pump: marine mammals enhance primary productivity in a coastal basin.

    PubMed

    Roman, Joe; McCarthy, James J

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that microbes, zooplankton, and fish are important sources of recycled nitrogen in coastal waters, yet marine mammals have largely been ignored or dismissed in this cycle. Using field measurements and population data, we find that marine mammals can enhance primary productivity in their feeding areas by concentrating nitrogen near the surface through the release of flocculent fecal plumes. Whales and seals may be responsible for replenishing 2.3×10(4) metric tons of N per year in the Gulf of Maine's euphotic zone, more than the input of all rivers combined. This upward "whale pump" played a much larger role before commercial harvest, when marine mammal recycling of nitrogen was likely more than three times atmospheric N input. Even with reduced populations, marine mammals provide an important ecosystem service by sustaining productivity in regions where they occur in high densities. PMID:20949007

  12. The Whale Pump: Marine Mammals Enhance Primary Productivity in a Coastal Basin

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Joe; McCarthy, James J.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that microbes, zooplankton, and fish are important sources of recycled nitrogen in coastal waters, yet marine mammals have largely been ignored or dismissed in this cycle. Using field measurements and population data, we find that marine mammals can enhance primary productivity in their feeding areas by concentrating nitrogen near the surface through the release of flocculent fecal plumes. Whales and seals may be responsible for replenishing 2.3×104 metric tons of N per year in the Gulf of Maine's euphotic zone, more than the input of all rivers combined. This upward “whale pump” played a much larger role before commercial harvest, when marine mammal recycling of nitrogen was likely more than three times atmospheric N input. Even with reduced populations, marine mammals provide an important ecosystem service by sustaining productivity in regions where they occur in high densities. PMID:20949007

  13. High Primary Production Contrasts with Intense Carbon Emission in a Eutrophic Tropical Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rafael M.; Nóbrega, Gabriel N.; Junger, Pedro C.; Figueiredo, Aline V.; Andrade, Anízio S.; de Moura, Caroline G. B.; Tonetta, Denise; Oliveira, Ernandes S.; Araújo, Fabiana; Rust, Felipe; Piñeiro-Guerra, Juan M.; Mendonça, Jurandir R.; Medeiros, Leonardo R.; Pinheiro, Lorena; Miranda, Marcela; Costa, Mariana R. A.; Melo, Michaela L.; Nobre, Regina L. G.; Benevides, Thiago; Roland, Fábio; de Klein, Jeroen; Barros, Nathan O.; Mendonça, Raquel; Becker, Vanessa; Huszar, Vera L. M.; Kosten, Sarian

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies from temperate lakes indicate that eutrophic systems tend to emit less carbon dioxide (CO2) and bury more organic carbon (OC) than oligotrophic ones, rendering them CO2 sinks in some cases. However, the scarcity of data from tropical systems is critical for a complete understanding of the interplay between eutrophication and aquatic carbon (C) fluxes in warm waters. We test the hypothesis that a warm eutrophic system is a source of both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere, and that atmospheric emissions are larger than the burial of OC in sediments. This hypothesis was based on the following assumptions: (i) OC mineralization rates are high in warm water systems, so that water column CO2 production overrides the high C uptake by primary producers, and (ii) increasing trophic status creates favorable conditions for CH4 production. We measured water-air and sediment-water CO2 fluxes, CH4 diffusion, ebullition and oxidation, net ecosystem production (NEP) and sediment OC burial during the dry season in a eutrophic reservoir in the semiarid northeastern Brazil. The reservoir was stratified during daytime and mixed during nighttime. In spite of the high rates of primary production (4858 ± 934 mg C m-2 d-1), net heterotrophy was prevalent due to high ecosystem respiration (5209 ± 992 mg C m-2 d-1). Consequently, the reservoir was a source of atmospheric CO2 (518 ± 182 mg C m-2 d-1). In addition, the reservoir was a source of ebullitive (17 ± 10 mg C m-2 d-1) and diffusive CH4 (11 ± 6 mg C m-2 d-1). OC sedimentation was high (1162 mg C m-2 d-1), but our results suggest that the majority of it is mineralized to CO2 (722 ± 182 mg C m-2 d-1) rather than buried as OC (440 mg C m-2 d-1). Although temporally resolved data would render our findings more conclusive, our results suggest that despite being a primary production and OC burial hotspot, the tropical eutrophic system studied here was a stronger CO2 and CH4 source than a C sink, mainly because of high

  14. Size-fractionated dissolved primary production and carbohydrate composition of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchard, C.; Engel, A.

    2015-02-01

    Extracellular release (ER) by phytoplankton is the major source of fresh dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in marine ecosystems and accompanies primary production during all growth phases. Little is known, so far, on size and composition of released molecules, and to which extent ER occurs passively, by leakage, or actively, by exudation. Here, we report on ER by the widespread and bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi grown under steady-state conditions in phosphorus-controlled chemostats (N:P = 29, growth rate of μ = 0.2 d-1) at present-day and high-CO2 concentrations. 14C incubations were performed to determine primary production (PP), comprised of particulate (PO14C) and dissolved organic carbon (DO14C). Concentration and composition of particulate combined carbohydrates (pCCHO) and high-molecular-weight (>1 kDa, HMW) dissolved combined carbohydrates (dCCHO) were determined by ion chromatography. Information on size distribution of ER products was obtained by investigating distinct size classes (<0.4 μm (DO14C), <0.45 μm (HMW-dCCHO), <1000, <100 and <10 kDa) of DO14CC and HMW-dCCHO. Our results revealed relatively low ER during steady-state growth, corresponding to ~4.5% of primary production, and similar ER rates for all size classes. Acidic sugars had a significant share on freshly produced pCCHO as well as on HMW-dCCHO. While pCCHO and the smallest size fraction (<10 kDa) of HMW-dCCHO exhibited a similar sugar composition, dominated by high percentage of glucose (74-80 mol%), the composition of HMW-dCCHO size classes >10 kDa was significantly different, with a higher mol% of arabinose. The mol% of acidic sugars increased and that of glucose decreased with increasing size of HMW-dCCHO. We conclude that larger polysaccharides follow different production and release pathways than smaller molecules, potentially serving distinct ecological and biogeochemical functions.

  15. High Primary Production Contrasts with Intense Carbon Emission in a Eutrophic Tropical Reservoir.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rafael M; Nóbrega, Gabriel N; Junger, Pedro C; Figueiredo, Aline V; Andrade, Anízio S; de Moura, Caroline G B; Tonetta, Denise; Oliveira, Ernandes S; Araújo, Fabiana; Rust, Felipe; Piñeiro-Guerra, Juan M; Mendonça, Jurandir R; Medeiros, Leonardo R; Pinheiro, Lorena; Miranda, Marcela; Costa, Mariana R A; Melo, Michaela L; Nobre, Regina L G; Benevides, Thiago; Roland, Fábio; de Klein, Jeroen; Barros, Nathan O; Mendonça, Raquel; Becker, Vanessa; Huszar, Vera L M; Kosten, Sarian

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies from temperate lakes indicate that eutrophic systems tend to emit less carbon dioxide (CO2) and bury more organic carbon (OC) than oligotrophic ones, rendering them CO2 sinks in some cases. However, the scarcity of data from tropical systems is critical for a complete understanding of the interplay between eutrophication and aquatic carbon (C) fluxes in warm waters. We test the hypothesis that a warm eutrophic system is a source of both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere, and that atmospheric emissions are larger than the burial of OC in sediments. This hypothesis was based on the following assumptions: (i) OC mineralization rates are high in warm water systems, so that water column CO2 production overrides the high C uptake by primary producers, and (ii) increasing trophic status creates favorable conditions for CH4 production. We measured water-air and sediment-water CO2 fluxes, CH4 diffusion, ebullition and oxidation, net ecosystem production (NEP) and sediment OC burial during the dry season in a eutrophic reservoir in the semiarid northeastern Brazil. The reservoir was stratified during daytime and mixed during nighttime. In spite of the high rates of primary production (4858 ± 934 mg C m(-2) d(-1)), net heterotrophy was prevalent due to high ecosystem respiration (5209 ± 992 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). Consequently, the reservoir was a source of atmospheric CO2 (518 ± 182 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). In addition, the reservoir was a source of ebullitive (17 ± 10 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) and diffusive CH4 (11 ± 6 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). OC sedimentation was high (1162 mg C m(-2) d(-1)), but our results suggest that the majority of it is mineralized to CO2 (722 ± 182 mg C m(-2) d(-1)) rather than buried as OC (440 mg C m(-2) d(-1)). Although temporally resolved data would render our findings more conclusive, our results suggest that despite being a primary production and OC burial hotspot, the tropical eutrophic system studied here was a stronger CO2 and CH4 source than a C

  16. Mask degradation monitoring with aerial mask inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Wen-Jui; Fu, Yung-Ying; Lu, Shih-Ping; Jiang, Ming-Sian; Lin, Jeffrey; Wu, Clare; Lifschitz, Sivan; Tam, Aviram

    2013-06-01

    As design rule continues to shrink, microlithography is becoming more challenging and the photomasks need to comply with high scanner laser energy, low CDU, and ever more aggressive RETs. This give rise to numerous challenges in the semiconductor wafer fabrication plants. Some of these challenges being contamination (mainly haze and particles), mask pattern degradation (MoSi oxidation, chrome migration, etc.) and pellicle degradation. Fabs are constantly working to establish an efficient methodology to manage these challenges mainly using mask inspection, wafer inspection, SEM review and CD SEMs. Aerial technology offers a unique opportunity to address the above mask related challenges using one tool. The Applied Materials Aera3TM system has the inherent ability to inspect for defects (haze, particles, etc.), and track mask degradation (e.g. CDU). This paper focuses on haze monitoring, which is still a significant challenge in semiconductor manufacturing, and mask degradation effects that are starting to emerge as the next challenge for high volume semiconductor manufacturers. The paper describes Aerial inspector (Aera3) early haze methodology and mask degradation tracking related to high volume manufacturing. These will be demonstrated on memory products. At the end of the paper we take a brief look on subsequent work currently conducted on the more general issue of photo mask degradation monitoring by means of an Aerial inspector.

  17. Metrology requirements for the serial production of ELT primary mirror segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Paul C. T.; Gray, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    The manufacture of the next generation of large astronomical telescopes, the extremely large telescopes (ELT), requires the rapid manufacture of greater than 500 1.44m hexagonal segments for the primary mirror of each telescope. Both leading projects, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), have set highly demanding technical requirements for each fabricated segment. These technical requirements, when combined with the anticipated construction schedule for each telescope, suggest that more than one optical fabricator will be involved in the delivery of the primary mirror segments in order to meet the project schedule. For one supplier, the technical specification is challenging and requires highly consistent control of metrology in close coordination with the polishing technologies used in order to optimize production rates. For production using multiple suppliers, however the supply chain is structured, consistent control of metrology along the supply chain will be required. This requires a broader pattern of independent verification than is the case of a single supplier. This paper outlines the metrology requirements for a single supplier throughout all stages of the fabrication process. We identify and outline those areas where metrology accuracy and duration have a significant impact on production efficiency. We use the challenging ESO E-ELT technical specification as an example of our treatment, including actual process data. We further develop this model for the case of a supply chain consisting of multiple suppliers. Here, we emphasize the need to control metrology throughout the supply chain in order to optimize net production efficiency.

  18. Assessing the uncertainties of model estimates of primary productivity in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Carr, Mary-Elena; Barber, Richard T.; Scardi, Michele; Antoine, David; Armstrong, Robert A.; Asanuma, Ichio; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Chai, Fei; Christian, James R.; Ciotti, Aurea M.; Doney, Scott C.; Dowell, Mark; Dunne, John; Gentili, Bernard; Gregg, Watson; Hoepffner, Nicolas; Ishizaka, Joji; Kameda, Takahiko; Lima, Ivan; Marra, John; Mélin, Frédéric; Moore, J. Keith; Morel, André; O'Malley, Robert T.; O'Reilly, Jay; Saba, Vincent S.; Schmeltz, Marjorie; Smyth, Tim J.; Tjiputra, Jerry; Waters, Kirk; Westberry, Toby K.; Winguth, Arne

    2009-02-01

    Depth-integrated primary productivity (PP) estimates obtained from satellite ocean color-based models (SatPPMs) and those generated from biogeochemical ocean general circulation models (BOGCMs) represent a key resource for biogeochemical and ecological studies at global as well as regional scales. Calibration and validation of these PP models are not straightforward, however, and comparative studies show large differences between model estimates. The goal of this paper is to compare PP estimates obtained from 30 different models (21 SatPPMs and 9 BOGCMs) to a tropical Pacific PP database consisting of ˜ 1000 14C measurements spanning more than a decade (1983-1996). Primary findings include: skill varied significantly between models, but performance was not a function of model complexity or type (i.e. SatPPM vs. BOGCM); nearly all models underestimated the observed variance of PP, specifically yielding too few low PP (< 0.2 g C m - 2 d - 1 ) values; more than half of the total root-mean-squared model-data differences associated with the satellite-based PP models might be accounted for by uncertainties in the input variables and/or the PP data; and the tropical Pacific database captures a broad scale shift from low biomass-normalized productivity in the 1980s to higher biomass-normalized productivity in the 1990s, which was not successfully captured by any of the models. This latter result suggests that interdecadal and global changes will be a significant challenge for both SatPPMs and BOGCMs. Finally, average root-mean-squared differences between in situ PP data on the equator at 140°W and PP estimates from the satellite-based productivity models were 58% lower than analogous values computed in a previous PP model comparison 6 years ago. The success of these types of comparison exercises is illustrated by the continual modification and improvement of the participating models and the resulting increase in model skill.

  19. Modeling aerial refueling operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Allen B., III

    Aerial Refueling (AR) is the act of offloading fuel from one aircraft (the tanker) to another aircraft (the receiver) in mid flight. Meetings between tanker and receiver aircraft are referred to as AR events and are scheduled to: escort one or more receivers across a large body of water; refuel one or more receivers; or train receiver pilots, tanker pilots, and boom operators. In order to efficiently execute the Aerial Refueling Mission, the Air Mobility Command (AMC) of the United States Air Force (USAF) depends on computer models to help it make tanker basing decisions, plan tanker sorties, schedule aircraft, develop new organizational doctrines, and influence policy. We have worked on three projects that have helped AMC improve its modeling and decision making capabilities. Optimal Flight Planning. Currently Air Mobility simulation and optimization software packages depend on algorithms which iterate over three dimensional fuel flow tables to compute aircraft fuel consumption under changing flight conditions. When a high degree of fidelity is required, these algorithms use a large amount of memory and CPU time. We have modeled the rate of aircraft fuel consumption with respect to AC GrossWeight, Altitude and Airspeed. When implemented, this formula will decrease the amount of memory and CPU time needed to compute sortie fuel costs and cargo capacity values. We have also shown how this formula can be used in optimal control problems to find minimum costs flight plans. Tanker Basing Demand Mismatch Index. Since 1992, AMC has relied on a Tanker Basing/AR Demand Mismatch Index which aggregates tanker capacity and AR demand data into six regions. This index was criticized because there were large gradients along regional boundaries. Meanwhile tankers frequently cross regional boundaries to satisfy the demand for AR support. In response we developed continuous functions to score locations with respect to their proximity to demand for AR support as well as their

  20. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Malhi, Y.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Jiménez, E.; Navarrete, D.; Almeida, S.; Costa, A. C. L.; Salinas, N.; Phillips, O. L.; . Anderson, L. O.; Baker, T. R.; Goncalvez, P. H.; Huamán-Ovalle, J.; Mamani-Solórzano, M.; Meir, P.; Monteagudo, A.; Peñuela, M. C.; Prieto, A.; Quesada, C. A.; Rozas-Dávila, A.; Rudas, A.; Silva Junior, J. A.; Vásquez, R.

    2009-02-01

    The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1) How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2) How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (mean±standard error), at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  1. Above- and below-ground net primary productivity across ten Amazonian forests on contrasting soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragão, L. E. O. C.; Malhi, Y.; Metcalfe, D. B.; Silva-Espejo, J. E.; Jiménez, E.; Navarrete, D.; Almeida, S.; Costa, A. C. L.; Salinas, N.; Phillips, O. L.; Anderson, L. O.; Alvarez, E.; Baker, T. R.; Goncalvez, P. H.; Huamán-Ovalle, J.; Mamani-Solórzano, M.; Meir, P.; Monteagudo, A.; Patiño, S.; Peñuela, M. C.; Prieto, A.; Quesada, C. A.; Rozas-Dávila, A.; Rudas, A.; Silva, J. A., Jr.; Vásquez, R.

    2009-12-01

    The net primary productivity (NPP) of tropical forests is one of the most important and least quantified components of the global carbon cycle. Most relevant studies have focused particularly on the quantification of the above-ground coarse wood productivity, and little is known about the carbon fluxes involved in other elements of the NPP, the partitioning of total NPP between its above- and below-ground components and the main environmental drivers of these patterns. In this study we quantify the above- and below-ground NPP of ten Amazonian forests to address two questions: (1) How do Amazonian forests allocate productivity among its above- and below-ground components? (2) How do soil and leaf nutrient status and soil texture affect the productivity of Amazonian forests? Using a standardized methodology to measure the major elements of productivity, we show that NPP varies between 9.3±1.3 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 (mean±standard error), at a white sand plot, and 17.0±1.4 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 at a very fertile Terra Preta site, with an overall average of 12.8±0.9 Mg C ha-1 yr-1. The studied forests allocate on average 64±3% and 36±3% of the total NPP to the above- and below-ground components, respectively. The ratio of above-ground and below-ground NPP is almost invariant with total NPP. Litterfall and fine root production both increase with total NPP, while stem production shows no overall trend. Total NPP tends to increase with soil phosphorus and leaf nitrogen status. However, allocation of NPP to below-ground shows no relationship to soil fertility, but appears to decrease with the increase of soil clay content.

  2. Control by A-Factor of a Metalloendopeptidase Gene Involved in Aerial Mycelium Formation in Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Jun-ya; Suzuki, Ayano; Yamazaki, Haruka; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2002-01-01

    In Streptomyces griseus, A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-γ-butyrolactone) switches on aerial mycelium formation and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. An A-factor-dependent transcriptional activator, AdpA, activates multiple genes required for morphological development and secondary metabolism in a programmed manner. A region upstream of a zinc-containing metalloendopeptidase gene (sgmA) was found among the DNA fragments that had been isolated as AdpA-binding sites. The primary product of sgmA consisted of N-terminal pre, N-terminal pro, mature, and C-terminal pro regions. sgmA was transcribed in an AdpA-dependent manner, and its transcription was markedly enhanced at the timing of aerial mycelium formation. AdpA bound two sites in the region upstream of the sgmA promoter; one was at about nucleotide position −60 (A site) with respect to the transcriptional start point of sgmA, and the other was at about position −260 (B site), as determined by DNase I footprinting. Transcriptional analysis with mutated promoters showed that the A site was essential for the switching on of sgmA transcription and that the B site was necessary for the marked enhancement of transcription at the timing of aerial mycelium formation. Disruption of the chromosomal sgmA gene resulted in a delay in aerial hypha formation by half a day. SgmA is therefore suggested to be associated with the programmed morphological development of Streptomyces, in which this peptidase, perhaps together with other hydrolytic enzymes, plays a role in the degradation of proteins in substrate hyphae for reuse in aerial hypha formation. PMID:12374836

  3. Control by A-factor of a metalloendopeptidase gene involved in aerial mycelium formation in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Kato, Jun-ya; Suzuki, Ayano; Yamazaki, Haruka; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2002-11-01

    In Streptomyces griseus, A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone) switches on aerial mycelium formation and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. An A-factor-dependent transcriptional activator, AdpA, activates multiple genes required for morphological development and secondary metabolism in a programmed manner. A region upstream of a zinc-containing metalloendopeptidase gene (sgmA) was found among the DNA fragments that had been isolated as AdpA-binding sites. The primary product of sgmA consisted of N-terminal pre, N-terminal pro, mature, and C-terminal pro regions. sgmA was transcribed in an AdpA-dependent manner, and its transcription was markedly enhanced at the timing of aerial mycelium formation. AdpA bound two sites in the region upstream of the sgmA promoter; one was at about nucleotide position -60 (A site) with respect to the transcriptional start point of sgmA, and the other was at about position -260 (B site), as determined by DNase I footprinting. Transcriptional analysis with mutated promoters showed that the A site was essential for the switching on of sgmA transcription and that the B site was necessary for the marked enhancement of transcription at the timing of aerial mycelium formation. Disruption of the chromosomal sgmA gene resulted in a delay in aerial hypha formation by half a day. SgmA is therefore suggested to be associated with the programmed morphological development of Streptomyces, in which this peptidase, perhaps together with other hydrolytic enzymes, plays a role in the degradation of proteins in substrate hyphae for reuse in aerial hypha formation. PMID:12374836

  4. Quantitative estimates of changes in marine and terrestrial primary productivity over the past 300 million years

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in marine primary production over geological time have influenced a network of global biogeochemical cycles with corresponding feedbacks on climate. However, these changes continue to remain largely unquantified because of uncertainties in calculating global estimates from sedimentary palaeoproductivity indicators. I therefore describe a new approach to the problem using a mass balance analysis of the stable isotopes (18O/16O) of oxygen with modelled O2 fluxes and isotopic exchanges by terrestrial vegetation for 300, 150, 100 and 50 million years before present, and the treatment of the Earth as a closed system, with respect to the cycling of O2. Calculated in this way, oceanic net primary productivity was low in the Carboniferous but high (up to four times that of modern oceans) during the Late Jurassic, mid-Cretaceous and early Eocene greenhouse eras with a greater requirement for key nutrients. Such a requirement would be compatible with accelerated rates of continental weathering under the greenhouse conditions of the Mesozoic and early Tertiary. These results indicate possible changes in the strength of a key component of the oceanic carbon (organic and carbonate) pump in the geological past, with a corresponding feedback on atmospheric CO2 and climate, and provide an improved framework for understanding the role of ocean biota in the evolution of the global biogeochemical cycles of C, N and P.

  5. Primary production of coral ecosystems in the Vietnamese coastal and adjacent marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tac-An, Nguyen; Minh-Thu, Phan; Cherbadji, I. I.; Propp, M. V.; Odintsov, V. S.; Propp, L. H.

    2013-11-01

    Coral reef ecosystems in coastal waters and islands of Vietnam have high primary production. Average gross primary production (GPP) in coral reef waters was 0.39 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of corals ranged from 3.12 to 4.37 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of benthic microalgae in coral reefs ranged from 2 to 10 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of macro-algae was 2.34 g C m-2 day-1. Therefore, the total of GPP of whole coral reef ecosystems could reach 7.85 to 17.10 g C m-2 day-1. Almost all values of the ratio of photosynthesis to respiration in the water bodies are higher than 1, which means these regions are autotrophic systems. Wire variation of GPP in coral reefs was contributed by species abundance of coral and organisms, nutrient supports and environmental characteristics of coral ecosystems. Coral reefs play an important ecological role of biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in waters around the reefs. These results contribute valuable information for the protection, conservation and sustainable exploitation of the natural resources in coral reef ecosystems in Vietnam.

  6. Re-evaluating Primary Biotic Resource Use for Marine Biomass Production: A New Calculation Framework.

    PubMed

    Luong, Anh D; Schaubroeck, Thomas; Dewulf, Jo; De Laender, Frederik

    2015-10-01

    The environmental impacts of biomass harvesting can be quantified through the amount of net primary production required to produce one unit of harvested biomass (SPPR-specific primary production required). This paper presents a new calculation framework that explicitly takes into account full food web complexity and shows that the resulting SPPR for toothed whales in the Icelandic marine ecosystem is 2.8 times higher than the existing approach based on food web simplification. In addition, we show that our new framework can be coupled to food web modeling to examine how uncertainty on ecological data and processes can be accounted for while estimating SPPR. This approach reveals that an increase in the degree of heterotrophy by flagellates from 0% to 100% results in a two-fold increase in SPPR estimates in the Barents Sea. It also shows that the estimated SPPR is between 3.9 (herring) and 5.0 (capelin) times higher than that estimated when adopting food chain theory. SPPR resulting from our new approach is only valid for the given time period for which the food web is modeled and cannot be used to infer changes in SPPR when the food web is altered by changes in human exploitation or environmental changes. PMID:26348118

  7. Does Autocthonous Primary Production Influence Oviposition by Aedes japonicus japonicus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Container Habitats?

    PubMed Central

    LORENZ, AMANDA R.; WALKER, EDWARD D.; KAUFMAN, MICHAEL G.

    2014-01-01

    Aedes (Finlaya) japonicus japonicus (Theobald) (Diptera: Culicidae) is recently invasive in North America and has expanded its range rapidly since 1998. Throughout its native and expanded range, Ae. j. japonicus larvae are commonly observed in many types of natural and artificial water-filled containers that vary in organic matter content and exposure to sunlight. Larvae are most often found in containers with decaying leaf material or algae, and we postulated that the added autocthonous primary production from algae could be both an important food source for larvae and an influential oviposition attractant to adult Ae. j. japonicus. We tested this hypothesis by placing plastic containers with varied levels of shading to manipulate algal density in the field, and then monitored oviposition by natural populations of Ae. j. japonicus. Over 99% of larvae hatching from eggs laid on the walls of our containers were Ae. j. japonicus, indicating that this species is a dominant colonizer of artificial containers in the study areas. Although full shading treatments effectively reduced algal biomass (significant reduction in chlorophyll a levels), at only one of three sites did this appear to affect Ae. j. japonicus oviposition. We conclude that algae in larval habitats are not a major factor in oviposition choices of adult Ae. j. japonicus females except when in situ primary production is high enough to substantially alter overall organic matter content cues. PMID:23427654

  8. The Dependence of the Distortion Product 2f1-f2 on Primary Levels in Non-Impaired Human Ears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahr, Sumit; Long, Glenis R.; Culpepper, N. Brandt

    1998-01-01

    The ILO92 was used to determine the level of Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAEs) at 2f1-f2 for 16 combinations of primary levels in the range of 40 to 80 dB SPL from 40 unimpaired adult ears. An overall increase of DPOAE amplitude with increase in primary level was observed. (Author/CR)

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... NESHAP General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. Citation Subject... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt....

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... NESHAP General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. Citation Subject... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt....

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... NESHAP General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. Citation Subject... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Primary Nonferrous Metals Area Sources-Zinc, Cadmium, and Beryllium Pt. 63, Subpt....

  12. Productive Lytic Replication of a Recombinant Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus in Efficient Primary Infection of Primary Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shou-Jiang; Deng, Jian-Hong; Zhou, Fu-Chun

    2003-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a vascular spindle cell tumor primarily consisting of proliferating endothelial cells. Although KSHV has been shown to infect primary human endothelial cells and convert them into spindle shapes, KSHV infection is largely latent, and efforts to establish a highly efficient and sustainable infection system have been unsuccessful. A recombinant KSHV, BAC36, that has high primary-infection efficiency in 293 cells has been obtained (F. C. Zhou, Y. J. Zhang, J. H. Deng, X. P. Wang, H. Y. Pan, E. Hettler, and S. J. Gao, J. Virol. 76:6185-6196, 2002). BAC36 contains a green fluorescent protein cassette which can be used to conveniently monitor viral infection. Here, we describe the establishment of a KSHV lytic-replication-permissive infection cell model using BAC36 virions to infect primary human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures. BAC36 infection of HUVEC cultures has as high as 90% primary-infection efficiency and consists of two phases: a permissive phase, in which the cultures undergo active viral lytic replication, producing a large number of virions and concomitantly resulting in large-scale cell death, and a latent phase, in which the surviving cells from the permissive phase switch into latent infection, with a small number of cells undergoing spontaneous viral lytic replication, and proliferate into bundles of spindle cells with KS slit-like spaces. An assay for determining the KSHV titer in a virus preparation has also been developed. The cell model should be useful for examining KSHV infection and replication, as well as for understanding the development of KS. PMID:12941882

  13. MVE1, encoding the velvet gene product homolog in Mycosphaerella graminicola, is associated with aerial mycelium formation, melanin biosynthesis, hyphal swelling, and light signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola is an important pathogen of wheat causing economically significant losses. The primary nutritional mode of this fungus is thought to be hemibiotrophic. This pathogenic lifestyle is associated with an early biotrophic stage of nutrient uptake followed ...

  14. Net primary productivity of some aquatic macrophytes in sewage-sullage mixture.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, V K; Sinha, S; Naik, M L

    2001-07-01

    Sewage-sullage mixture from Raipur city is spread over a vast area surrounding the city. This mixture has a pH always above neutrality with high turbidity. Transparency was nil with the absence of phenolphthalein alkalinity and dissolved oxygen. Hardness was high with low nitrogen and phosphorus concentration. Human consumable. acquatic macrophytes are cultivated in such waste water. Net primary productivity of three macrophytes: Ipomoea aquatica, Marsilea quadrifolia and Nelumbo nucifera were evaluated while being cultivated in such sewage-sullage mixture. Productivity was determined either with periodic biomass removal (I. aquatica and M. quadrifolia) or through removing the biomass only once at the time of growing season (N. nucifera). Growing season productivity of up to 27.48. 19.81 and 9.49 g m(-2) and day(-1) and extrapolated productivity of up to 100.30, 72.31 and 34.64 mt. ha(-1) yr(-1) was recorded for I. aquatica. M. quadrifolia and N. nucifera respectively. Thus, these macrophytes are yielding a high amount of human consumable biomass from an area which neither be a useless wetland. PMID:12017265

  15. Assessment of the Impact of Urban Sprawl on Net Primary Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milesi, C.; Elvidge, C. D.; Nemani, R. R.; Running, S. W.

    2002-12-01

    While urban areas are generally thought to reduce the photosynthetic capacity of the land, little research has been devoted to quantifying the net effect of urbanization on net primary productivity (NPP). The southeastern United States has undergone one of the highest rates of landscape change and urban sprawl in the country, representing an ideal study area in which to develop a remote sensing based methodology for a regional assessment of the impact or urbanization on ecosystem productivity. We used a combination of MODIS and nighttime Defense Meteorological Satellite Program / Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) data to estimate the extent of recent urban sprawl and its impact on regional NPP in the southeastern United States. The analysis based on the nighttime data indicated that in 1992/93 urban areas amount to 4.5 % of the total surface in the region. In the year 2000, the nighttime data revealed an increase in urban developed land by 1.9 %. Estimates derived from the MODIS data indicated that land cover changes due to urban development that took place during the analyzed period reduced annual NPP of the southeastern United States by 0.4 %. Results from this study indicated that the combination of MODIS products such as NPP with nighttime data could provide rapid assessment of urban land cover changes and their impact on ecosystem productivity.

  16. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2014-10-01

    Residential wood burning contributes significantly to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming significant quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle and gas phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings, however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ± 2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in

  17. Characterization of primary and secondary wood combustion products generated under different burner loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, E. A.; Krapf, M.; Orasche, J.; Huang, Y.; Zimmermann, R.; Drinovec, L.; Močnik, G.; El-Haddad, I.; Slowik, J. G.; Dommen, J.; Baltensperger, U.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-03-01

    Residential wood burning contributes to the total atmospheric aerosol burden; however, large uncertainties remain in the magnitude and characteristics of wood burning products. Primary emissions are influenced by a variety of parameters, including appliance type, burner wood load and wood type. In addition to directly emitted particles, previous laboratory studies have shown that oxidation of gas-phase emissions produces compounds with sufficiently low volatility to readily partition to the particles, forming considerable quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, relatively little is known about wood burning SOA, and the effects of burn parameters on SOA formation and composition are yet to be determined. There is clearly a need for further study of primary and secondary wood combustion aerosols to advance our knowledge of atmospheric aerosols and their impacts on health, air quality and climate. For the first time, smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of wood loading on both primary and secondary wood combustion products. Products were characterized using a range of particle- and gas-phase instrumentation, including an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). A novel approach for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) quantification from AMS data was developed and results were compared to those from GC-MS analysis of filter samples. Similar total particle mass emission factors were observed under high and average wood loadings; however, high fuel loadings were found to generate significantly higher contributions of PAHs to the total organic aerosol (OA) mass compared to average loadings. PAHs contributed 15 ± 4% (mean ±2 sample standard deviations) to the total OA mass in high-load experiments, compared to 4 ± 1% in average-load experiments. With aging, total OA concentrations increased by a factor of 3 ± 1 for high load experiments compared to 1.6 ± 0.4 for average-load experiments. In the AMS, an increase in PAH and

  18. Calcium ion dependency of ethylene production in segments of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Ca2+ on ethylene production in 2-cm long apical segments from primary roots of corn (Zea mays L., B73 x Missouri 17) seedlings. The seedlings were raised under different conditions of Ca2+ availability. Low-Ca and high-Ca seedlings were raised by soaking the grains and watering the seedlings with distilled water or 10 mM CaCl2, respectively. Segments from high-Ca roots produced more than twice as much ethylene as segments from low-Ca roots. Indoleacetic acid (IAA; 1 micromole) enhanced ethylene production in segments from both low-Ca and high-Ca roots but auxin-induced promotion of ethylene production was consistently higher in segments from high-Ca roots. Addition of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) to root segments from low-Ca seedlings doubled total ethylene production and the rate of production remained fairly constant during a 24 h period of monitoring. In segments from high-Ca seedlings ACC also increased total ethylene production but most of the ethylene was produced within the first 6 h. The data suggest that Ca2+ enhances the conversion of ACC to ethylene. The terminal 2 mm of the root tip were found to be especially important to ethylene biosynthesis by apical segments and, experiments using 45Ca2+ as tracer indicated that the apical 2 mm of the root is the region of strongest Ca2+ accumulation. Other cations such as Mn2+, Mg2+, and K+ could largely substitute for Ca2+. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to recent evidence for gravity-induced Ca2+ redistribution and its relationship to the establishment of asymmetric growth during gravitropic curvature.

  19. Benthic-planktonic coupling, regime shifts, and whole-lake primary production in shallow lakes.

    PubMed

    Genkai-Kato, Motomi; Vadeboncoeur, Yvonne; Liboriussen, Lone; Jeppesen, Erik

    2012-03-01

    Alternative stable states in shallow lakes are typically characterized by submerged macrophyte (clear-water state) or phytoplankton (turbid state) dominance. However, a clear-water state may occur in eutrophic lakes even when macrophytes are absent. To test whether sediment algae could cause a regime shift in the absence of macrophytes, we developed a model of benthic (periphyton) and planktonic (phytoplankton) primary production using parameters derived from a shallow macrophyte-free lake that shifted from a turbid to a clear-water state following fish removal (biomanipulation). The model includes a negative feedback effect of periphyton on phosphorus (P) release from sediments. This in turn induces a positive feedback between phytoplankton production and P release. Scenarios incorporating a gradient of external P loading rates revealed that (1) periphyton and phytoplankton both contributed substantially to whole-lake production over a broad range of external P loading in a clear-water state; (2) during the clear-water state, the loss of benthic production was gradually replaced by phytoplankton production, leaving whole-lake production largely unchanged; (3) the responses of lakes to biomanipulation and increased external P loading were both dependent on lake morphometry; and (4) the capacity of periphyton to buffer the effects of increased external P loading and maintain a clear-water state was highly sensitive to relationships between light availability at the sediment surface and the of P release. Our model suggests a mechanism for the persistence of alternative states in shallow macrophyte-free lakes and demonstrates that regime shifts may trigger profound changes in ecosystem structure and function. PMID:22624216

  20. Seasonality of Ecosystem Respiration and Gross Primary Production as Derived from Fluxnet Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falge, E.; Baldocchi, D.; Tenhunen, J.

    2001-12-01

    Differences in the seasonal pattern of assimilatory and respiratory processes are responsible for divergences in seasonal net carbon exchange among ecosystems. Using FLUXNET data (http://www-eosdis.ornl.gov/FLUXNET) we have analyzed seasonal patterns of gross primary productivity (GPP), and ecosystem respiration (RE) of boreal and temperate, deciduous and coniferous forests, mediterranean evergreen systems, rainforest, temperate grasslands, and C3 and C4 crops. Based on generalized seasonal patterns classifications of ecosystems into vegetation functional types can be evaluated for use in global productivity and climate change models. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of respiratory costs of assimilated carbon in various ecosystems. Seasonal variability of GPP and RE increased in the order tropical, Mediterranean, temperate coniferous, temperate deciduous, boreal forests. Together with boreal forests, managed grasslands and crops show the largest seasonal variability. In temperate coniferous forests, seasonal patterns of GPP and RE are in phase, in temperate deciduous and boreal coniferous forests RE was delayed compared to GPP, resulting in the greatest imbalance between respiratory and assimilatory fluxes early in the growing season. Gross primary productivity adjusted for the length of the growing season decreased across functional types in the order C4 crops, and temperate and boreal deciduous forests (7.5-8.3 g C m-2 d-1), temperate conifers, C3 grassland and crops (5.7-6.9 g C m-2 d-1), rainforest and boreal conifers (4.6-4.9 g C m-2 d-1). Annual GPP and NEP decreased across climate zones in the order tropical, temperate, boreal. However, the decrease in NEP was greater than the decrease in GPP, indicating a larger contribution of respiratory (especially heterotrophic) processes in boreal systems.

  1. Changes in Nutrients and Primary Production in Barrow Tundra Ponds Over the Past 40 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lougheed, V.; Andresen, C.; Hernandez, C.; Miller, N.; Reyes, F.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic tundra ponds at the International Biological Program (IBP) site in Barrow, Alaska were studied extensively in the 1970's; however, very little research has occurred there since that time. Due to the sensitivity of this region to climate warming, understanding any changes in the ponds' structure and function over the past 40 years can help identify any potential climate-related impacts. The goal of this study was to determine if the structure and function of primary producers had changed through time, and the association between these changes, urban encroachment and nutrient limitation. Nutrient levels, as well as the biomass of aquatic graminoids (Carex aquatilis and Arctophila fulva), phytoplankton and periphyton were determined in the IBP tundra ponds in both 1971-3 and 2010-12, and in 2010-11 from nearby ponds along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient. Uptake of 14C was also used to measure algal primary production in both time periods and nutrient addition experiments were performed to identify the nutrients limiting algal growth. Similar methods were utilized in the past and present studies. Overall, biomass of graminoids, phytoplankton and periphyton was greater in 2010-12 than that observed in the 1970s. This increased biomass was coincident with warmer water temperatures, increased water column nutrients and deeper active layer depth. Biomass of plants and algae was highest in the ponds closest to the village of Barrow, but no effect of urban encroachment was observed at the IBP ponds. Laboratory incubations indicated that nutrient release from thawing permafrost can explain part of these increases in nutrients and has likely contributed to changes in the primary limiting nutrient. Further studies are necessary to better understand the implications of these trends in primary production to nutrient budgets in the Arctic. The Barrow IBP tundra ponds represent one of the very few locations in the Arctic where long-term data are available on

  2. Review: phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2013-11-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year-to-year (but we only found 8 APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of APPP, 958 come from sites

  3. Influence of hydroperiod on aquatic primary productivity between short- and long-hydroperiod Florida Everglades marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, J.; Olivas, P. C.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Malone, S. L.; Starr, G.

    2014-12-01

    Everglades National Park (ENP) represents one of the largest wetlands in the United States, where carbon cycling and primary productivity are closely linked to hydroperiod. Only recently has an integrative assessment of the CO2balance been undertaken in ENP. Previous periphyton and marcrophyte clipping experiments suggest that aquatic primary productivity (APP) is generally low in the Everglades freshwater marsh ecosystems. However, few studies have quantified aquatic metabolism in ENP, which may have significant influence on the entire ecosystem carbon dynamics. Eddy covariance towers were installed at a long- and short-hydroperiod marsh (Shark River Slough, SRS and Taylor Slough; TS, respectively) within ENP and have been running since 2008 . Net ecosystem exchange of CO2, H2O, and energy between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured along with meteorological data. To address how interannual and habitat variations in APP influences overall CO2 flux dynamics, we installed a D-Opto dissolved oxygen sensor (Zebra-Tech LTD) at each site in March of 2011, which allowed us to collect percent dissolved oxygen (DO%), dissolved oxygen concentration (DO ppm), and water temperature (oC) data at half hourly intervals from March of 2011 until present. We calculated gross and net aquatic primary productivity (ANPP), and night time aquatic respiration (AR), and compare interannual and inter site variation in APP between SRS and TS from October 2011 through December 2013. Our results reveal that across all three years (2011 - 2013) ANPP and AR were significantly higher at TS. ANPP was 15%, 16%, and 20% higher, and AR was 96%, 55%, and 7% higher at TS than at SRS. These results indicate that APP is contributing to the ecosystem carbon dynamics and differs with hydroperiod. Along with meteorological and data collected at the flux towers, we were also able to relate APP to changes in water level, photosynthetically active radiation and water temperature. This is the first

  4. Does primary productivity modulate the indirect effects of large herbivores? A global meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Daskin, Joshua H; Pringle, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    Indirect effects of large mammalian herbivores (LMH), while much less studied than those of apex predators, are increasingly recognized to exert powerful influences on communities and ecosystems. The strength of these effects is spatiotemporally variable, and several sets of authors have suggested that they are governed in part by primary productivity. However, prior theoretical and field studies have generated conflicting results and predictions, underscoring the need for a synthetic global analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of the direction and magnitude of large mammalian herbivore-initiated indirect interactions using 67 published studies comprising 456 individual responses. We georeferenced 41 of these studies (comprising 253 responses from 33 locations on five continents) to a satellite-derived map of primary productivity. Because predator assemblages might also influence the impact of large herbivores, we conducted a similar analysis using a global map of large carnivore species richness. In general, LMH reduced the abundance of other consumer species and also tended to reduce consumer richness, although the latter effect was only marginally significant. There was a pronounced reduction in the strength of negative (i.e. suppressive, due e.g., to competition) indirect effects of LMH on consumer abundance in more productive ecosystems. In contrast, positive (facilitative) indirect effects were not significantly correlated with productivity, likely because these comprised a more heterogeneous array of mechanisms. We found no effect of carnivore species richness on herbivore-initiated indirect effect strength. Our findings help to resolve the fundamental problem of ecological contingency as it pertains to the strength of an understudied class of multitrophic interactions. Moreover, these results will aid in predicting the indirect effects of anthropogenic wildlife declines and irruptions, and how these effects might be mediated by climatically driven shifts

  5. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    PubMed

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor. PMID:21526144

  6. Late Byzantine Mineral Soda High Alumina Glasses from Asia Minor: A New Primary Glass Production Group

    PubMed Central

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor. PMID:21526144

  7. Optimizing selection of controllable variables to minimize downwind drift from aerially applied sprays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drift of aerially applied crop protection and production materials is studied using a novel simulation-based approach. This new approach first studies many factors that can potentially contribute to downwind deposition from aerial spray application to narrow down the major contributing factors. An o...

  8. DOE/NNSA Aerial Measuring System (AMS): Flying the 'Real' Thing

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Lyons

    2011-06-24

    This slide show documents aerial radiation surveys over Japan. Map product is a compilation of daily aerial measuring system missions from the Fukushima Daiichi power plant to 80 km radius. In addition, other flights were conducted over US military bases and the US embassy.

  9. Microencapsuling aerial conidia of Trichoderma harzianum through spray drying at elevated temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichoderma conidia are mostly produced by solid fermentation systems. Inoculum is produced by liquid culturing, and then transferred to solid substrate for aerial conidial production. Aerial conidia of T. harzianum are hydrophilic in nature, and it is difficult to separate them from the solid subst...

  10. Heterogeneity in Primary Productivity Influences Competitive Interactions between Red Deer and Alpine Chamois

    PubMed Central

    Anderwald, Pia; Haller, Rudolf M.; Filli, Flurin

    2016-01-01

    Habitat heterogeneity can promote coexistence between herbivores of different body size limited to different extents by resource quantity and quality. Red deer (Cervus elaphus) are known as superior competitors to smaller species with similar diets. We compared competitive interactions and habitat use between red deer and Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) in two adjacent valleys in a strictly protected area in the Central Alps. Red deer density was higher in the valley with higher primary productivity. Only here was horn growth in kid and yearling chamois (as a measure for body condition) negatively correlated with red deer population size, suggesting interspecific competition, and chamois selected meadows with steeper slopes and lower productivity than available on average. Conversely, red deer selected meadows of high productivity, particularly in the poorer area. As these were located mainly at lower elevations, this led to strong altitudinal segregation between the two species here. Local differences in interspecific competition thus coincided with differences in habitat preference and–segregation between areas. This suggests that spatial habitat and resource heterogeneity at the scale of adjacent valleys can provide competition refuges for competitively inferior mountain ungulates which differ from their superior competitor in their metabolic requirements. PMID:26824867

  11. The utility of estimating net primary productivity over Alaska using baseline AVHRR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, C.J.; Peterson, K.M.

    2002-01-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is a fundamental ecological variable that provides information about the health and status of vegetation communities. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI, derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is increasingly being used to model or predict NPP, especially over large remote areas. In this article, seven seasonally based metrics calculated from a seven-year baseline NDVI dataset were used to model NPP over Alaska, USA. For each growing season, they included maximum, mean and summed NDVI, total days, product of total days and maximum NDVI, an integral estimate of NDVI and a summed product of NDVI and solar radiation. Field (plot) derived NPP estimates were assigned to 18 land cover classes from an Alaskan statewide land cover database. Linear relationships between NPP and each NDVI metric were analysed at four scales: plot, 1-km, 10-km and 20-km pixels. Results show moderate to poor relationship between any of the metrics and NPP estimates for all data sets and scales. Use of NDVI for estimating NPP may be possible, but caution is required due to data seasonality, the scaling process used and land surface heterogeneity.

  12. Subcutaneous immunoglobulins: product characteristics and their role in primary immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Isaac; Testori, Alessandro; Spirer, Zvi

    2012-12-01

    Research on the role of subcutaneous immunoglobulin in primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD) is ongoing. We analyzed pivotal studies for four subcutaneous immunoglobulin products: IGSC 10% (Gammagard(®) Liquid), IGIV-C 10% (Gamunex(®)-C), IGSC 16% (Vivaglobin(®)) and IGSC 20% (Hizentra(®)). To identify similarities and differences between products, we examined infusion parameters, adverse event profiles and improvements in tolerability over time. Maximum volume infused was 30 mL/site for IGSC 10%, 34 mL/site for IGIV-C 10%, 15 mL/site for IGSC 16% and 25 mL/site for IGSC 20%. Maximum number of simultaneous infusion sites was 10 for IGSC 10%, 8 for IGIV-C 10%, 6 for IGSC 16% and 4 for IGSC 20%. Local adverse reaction rate per infusion was 0.02 for IGSC 10%, 0.59 for IGIV-C, 0.49 for IGSC 16% and 0.58 for IGSC 20%. IGSC products have similar efficacy profiles; however, their tolerability profiles vary. Reasons for these differences are unknown and warrant further research. PMID:23215767

  13. Genetic manipulation of a primary metabolic pathway for L-ornithine production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Joon; Cho, Jae-Yong

    2006-11-01

    Metabolic engineering has been used to improve L-ornithine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli W3110. L-Ornithine production increased from 0.3 to 3.2 mg/g (dry cell weight) when the primary L-ornithine biosynthetic pathway was optimized by disrupting the pathway transcription repressor, thereby increasing the expression of the genes involved in the pathway, and by preventing conversion of L-ornithine into citrulline. When a feedback-resistant N-acetylglutamate synthetase gene (argA214) was placed under the control of the arabinose-inducible promoter, either in the chromosome or on a multicopy plasmid in the cell, the combination of overexpression of argA214 with an argF argI argR triple knockout mutation had an additive effect on L-ornithine production but only when exogenous glutamate was present. When speF (which encodes ornithine decarboxylase) and proB (which encodes gamma-glutamyl kinase) were inactivated to prevent the conversion of L-ornithine to putrescine and to block the biosynthesis of a side branch of L-ornithine, respectively, L-ornithine production was further enhanced approx. 140% from 5.5 to 13.2 mg/g (dry cell weight). PMID:16933036

  14. Heterogeneity in Primary Productivity Influences Competitive Interactions between Red Deer and Alpine Chamois.

    PubMed

    Anderwald, Pia; Haller, Rudolf M; Filli, Flurin

    2016-01-01

    Habitat heterogeneity can promote coexistence between herbivores of different body size limited to different extents by resource quantity and quality. Red deer (Cervus elaphus) are known as superior competitors to smaller species with similar diets. We compared competitive interactions and habitat use between red deer and Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) in two adjacent valleys in a strictly protected area in the Central Alps. Red deer density was higher in the valley with higher primary productivity. Only here was horn growth in kid and yearling chamois (as a measure for body condition) negatively correlated with red deer population size, suggesting interspecific competition, and chamois selected meadows with steeper slopes and lower productivity than available on average. Conversely, red deer selected meadows of high productivity, particularly in the poorer area. As these were located mainly at lower elevations, this led to strong altitudinal segregation between the two species here. Local differences in interspecific competition thus coincided with differences in habitat preference and-segregation between areas. This suggests that spatial habitat and resource heterogeneity at the scale of adjacent valleys can provide competition refuges for competitively inferior mountain ungulates which differ from their superior competitor in their metabolic requirements. PMID:26824867

  15. The effects of urbanization on net primary productivity in southeastern China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dengsheng; Xu, Xiaofeng; Tian, Hanqin; Moran, Emilio; Zhao, Maosheng; Running, Steven

    2010-09-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is one of the major ecosystem products on which human societies rely heavily. However, rapid urban sprawl and its associated dense population and economic conditions have generated great pressure on natural resources, food security, and environments. It is valuable to understand how urban expansion and associated demographic and economic conditions affect ecosystem functions. This research conducted a case study in Southeastern China to examine the impacts of urban expansion and demographic and economic conditions on NPP. The data sources used in research include human settlement developed through a combination of MODIS, DMSP-OLS and Landsat ETM+ images, the annual NPP from MODIS, and the population and gross domestic product (GDP) from the 2000 census data. Multiple regression analysis and nonlinear regression analysis were used to examine the relationships of NPP with settlement, population and GDP. This research indicates that settlement, population and GDP have strongly negative correlation with NPP in Southeastern China, but the outcomes were nonlinear when population or GDP reached certain thresholds. PMID:20703877

  16. The Effects of Urbanization on Net Primary Productivity in Southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dengsheng; Xu, Xiaofeng; Tian, Hanqin; Moran, Emilio; Zhao, Maosheng; Running, Steven

    2010-09-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is one of the major ecosystem products on which human societies rely heavily. However, rapid urban sprawl and its associated dense population and economic conditions have generated great pressure on natural resources, food security, and environments. It is valuable to understand how urban expansion and associated demographic and economic conditions affect ecosystem functions. This research conducted a case study in Southeastern China to examine the impacts of urban expansion and demographic and economic conditions on NPP. The data sources used in research include human settlement developed through a combination of MODIS, DMSP-OLS and Landsat ETM+ images, the annual NPP from MODIS, and the population and gross domestic product (GDP) from the 2000 census data. Multiple regression analysis and nonlinear regression analysis were used to examine the relationships of NPP with settlement, population and GDP. This research indicates that settlement, population and GDP have strongly negative correlation with NPP in Southeastern China, but the outcomes were nonlinear when population or GDP reached certain thresholds.

  17. Climatic controls on aboveground net primary production of tropical lowland rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofhansl, F.; Drage, S.; Poelz, E.; Richter, A.; Wanek, W.

    2012-12-01

    Aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of tropical forests is driven by soil fertility and climate, the latter receiving special attention as recent projections of global circulation models predict Mesoamerican tropics to become drier and warmer. Given the scarcity of manipulative experiments, interannual climate variations caused by El Nino Southern Oscillation have been used to assess the potential responses of tropical ANPP to projected climate change. The focus of this study was (1) to investigate how seasonal and interannual climate variations affect ANPP and the partitioning between litterfall and stem increment on three forest sites differing in soil fertility and disturbance regime in SW Costa Rica, and (2) to identify major drivers of tropical forest ANPP by integrating our results into a dataset provided by the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). While forest productivity was reported to decline in areas with high precipitation and temperature, we measured among the highest stem increments and litterfall rates published to date at a site with >6000 mm mean annual precipitation (MAP) and a mean annual temperature (MAT) of 28 °C. Based on the full dataset MAP was inversely correlated with litterfall, while MAT and soil fertility promoted stem increment. Therefore the percentage of litterfall and stem increment to ANPP shifted from 80:20 in low productive tropical forests to 40:60 at forest sites with high biomass production. Our results suggest that there is a shift in the allocation of biomass towards greater nutrient conservation (i.e. production of wood biomass) in more productive tropical forests while litterfall is sustaining nutrient recycling processes in less productive forests and that this relationship is driven by climate. We finally demonstrate that both ANPP components are sensitive to seasonal and interannual climate variation at the three forest sites studied, but that the controls differ for litterfall and stem

  18. Developing a gross primary production model for coniferous forests of northeastern USA from MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan, Nasreen; Gan, Thian Yew

    2013-12-01

    Accurate estimation of ecosystem carbon fluxes is crucial for understanding the feedbacks between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere and for making climate-policy decisions. A statistical model is developed to estimate the gross primary production (GPP) of coniferous forests of northeastern USA using remotely sensed (RS) radiation (land surface temperature and near-infra red albedo) and ecosystem variables (enhanced vegetation index and global vegetation moisture index) acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. This GPP model (called R-GPP-Coni), based only on remotely sensed data, was first calibrated with GPP estimates derived from the eddy covariance flux tower of the Howland forest main tower site and then successfully transferred and validated at three other coniferous sites: the Howland forest west tower site, Duke pine forest and North Carolina loblolly pine site, which demonstrate its transferability to other coniferous ecoregions of northeastern USA. The proposed model captured the seasonal dynamics of the observed 8-day GPP successfully by explaining 84-94% of the observed variations with a root mean squared error (RMSE) ranging from 1.10 to 1.64 g C/m2/day over the 4 study sites and outperformed the primary RS-based GPP algorithm of MODIS.

  19. Ocean acidification and rising temperatures may increase biofilm primary productivity but decrease grazer consumption

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Bayden D.; Connell, Sean D.; Findlay, Helen S.; Tait, Karen; Widdicombe, Stephen; Mieszkowska, Nova

    2013-01-01

    Climate change may cause ecosystems to become trophically restructured as a result of primary producers and consumers responding differently to increasing CO2 and temperature. This study used an integrative approach using a controlled microcosm experiment to investigate the combined effects of CO2 and temperature on key components of the intertidal system in the UK, biofilms and their consumers (Littorina littorea). In addition, to identify whether pre-exposure to experimental conditions can alter experimental outcomes we explicitly tested for differential effects on L. littorea pre-exposed to experimental conditions for two weeks and five months. In contrast to predictions based on metabolic theory, the combination of elevated temperature and CO2 over a five-week period caused a decrease in the amount of primary productivity consumed by grazers, while the abundance of biofilms increased. However, long-term pre-exposure to experimental conditions (five months) altered this effect, with grazing rates in these animals being greater than in animals exposed only for two weeks. We suggest that the structure of future ecosystems may not be predictable using short-term laboratory experiments alone owing to potentially confounding effects of exposure time and effects of being held in an artificial environment over prolonged time periods. A combination of laboratory (physiology responses) and large, long-term experiments (ecosystem responses) may therefore be necessary to adequately predict the complex and interactive effects of climate change as organisms may acclimate to conditions over the longer term. PMID:23980241

  20. Ocean acidification and rising temperatures may increase biofilm primary productivity but decrease grazer consumption.

    PubMed

    Russell, Bayden D; Connell, Sean D; Findlay, Helen S; Tait, Karen; Widdicombe, Stephen; Mieszkowska, Nova

    2013-01-01

    Climate change may cause ecosystems to become trophically restructured as a result of primary producers and consumers responding differently to increasing CO2 and temperature. This study used an integrative approach using a controlled microcosm experiment to investigate the combined effects of CO2 and temperature on key components of the intertidal system in the UK, biofilms and their consumers (Littorina littorea). In addition, to identify whether pre-exposure to experimental conditions can alter experimental outcomes we explicitly tested for differential effects on L. littorea pre-exposed to experimental conditions for two weeks and five months. In contrast to predictions based on metabolic theory, the combination of elevated temperature and CO2 over a five-week period caused a decrease in the amount of primary productivity consumed by grazers, while the abundance of biofilms increased. However, long-term pre-exposure to experimental conditions (five months) altered this effect, with grazing rates in these animals being greater than in animals exposed only for two weeks. We suggest that the structure of future ecosystems may not be predictable using short-term laboratory experiments alone owing to potentially confounding effects of exposure time and effects of being held in an artificial environment over prolonged time periods. A combination of laboratory (physiology responses) and large, long-term experiments (ecosystem responses) may therefore be necessary to adequately predict the complex and interactive effects of climate change as organisms may acclimate to conditions over the longer term. PMID:23980241

  1. Beta-carotene breakdown products enhance genotoxic effects of oxidative stress in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Alija, A J; Bresgen, N; Sommerburg, O; Langhans, C D; Siems, W; Eckl, P M

    2006-06-01

    Since it has to be expected that individuals exposed to oxidative stress who take supplements of beta-carotene are simultaneously exposed to both beta-carotene cleavage products (CPs) and oxidative stress, and both exposures have been demonstrated to cause genotoxic effects in primary rat hepatocytes, cyto- and genotoxic effects on primary rat hepatocytes after supplementation of the medium with increasing concentrations of a CP mixture during exposure to oxidative stress by treatment with either DMNQ (2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) or hypoxia/reoxygenation (Hy/Reox) was investigated. The cytological endpoints analysed were the mitotic indices, the percentages of apoptotic and necrotic cells, the percentages of micronucleated (MN) cells and the number of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). The results obtained clearly demonstrate that the CP mixture enhances the genotoxic effects of oxidative stress exposure, whereas it had no effect at all on the endpoints of cytotoxicity studied. These results further support the hypothesis that CP might be responsible for the reported carcinogenic response in the beta-CArotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) and Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-carotene Cancer prevention (ATBC) chemoprevention trials. PMID:16418177

  2. Modeling gross primary production of deciduous forest using remotely sensed radiation and ecosystem variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahan, Nasreen; Gan, Thian Yew

    2009-12-01

    We explored the potential application of two remotely sensed (RS) variables, the Global Vegetation Moisture Index (GVMI) and the near-infrared albedo (AlbedoNIR), in modeling the gross primary production (GPP) of three deciduous forests. For the Harvard Forest (deciduous) of Massachusetts, it was found that GPP is strongly correlated with GVMI (coefficient of determination, R2 = 0.60) during the growing season, and with AlbedoNIR (R2 = 0.82) throughout the year. Subsequently, a statistical model called the Remotely Sensed GPP (R-GPP) model was developed to estimate GPP using remotely sensed radiation (land surface temperature (LST), AlbedoNIR) and ecosystem variables (enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and GVMI). The R-GPP model, calibrated and validated against the GPP estimates derived from the eddy covariance flux tower of the Harvard Forest, could explain 95% and 92% of the observed GPP variability for the study site during the calibration (2000-2003) and the validation (2004-2005) periods, respectively. It outperformed the primary RS-based GPP algorithm of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which explained 80% and 77% of the GPP variability during 2000-2003 and 2004-2005, respectively. The calibrated R-GPP model also explained 93% and 94% of the observed GPP variation for two other independent validation sites, the Morgan Monroe State Forest and the University of Michigan Biological Station, respectively, which demonstrates its transferability to other deciduous ecoregions of northeastern United States.

  3. Effects of fire and CO2 on biogeography and primary production in glacial and modern climates.

    PubMed

    Martin Calvo, Maria; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) can disentangle causes and effects in the control of vegetation and fire. We used a DGVM to analyse climate, CO2 and fire influences on biome distribution and net primary production (NPP) in last glacial maximum (LGM) and pre-industrial (PI) times. The Land surface Processes and eXchanges (LPX) DGVM was run in a factorial design with fire 'off' or 'on', CO2 at LGM (185 ppm) or PI (280 ppm) concentrations, and LGM (modelled) or recent climates. Results were analysed by Stein-Alpert decomposition to separate primary effects from synergies. Fire removal causes forests to expand and global NPP to increase slightly. Low CO2 greatly reduces forest area (dramatically in a PI climate; realistically under an LGM climate) and global NPP. NPP under an LGM climate was reduced by a quarter as a result of low CO2 . The reduction in global NPP was smaller at low temperatures, but greater in the presence of fire. Global NPP is controlled by climate and CO2 directly through photosynthesis, but also through biome distribution, which is strongly influenced by fire. Future vegetation simulations will need to consider the coupled responses of vegetation and fire to CO2 and climate. PMID:26033154

  4. Modeling fossil energy demands of primary nonferrous metal production: the case of copper.

    PubMed

    Swart, Pilar; Dewulf, Jo

    2013-12-17

    The methodologies for life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) of metal resources are rather diverse. Some LCIA methods are based on ore grade changes, but they typically do not consider the impact of changes in primary metal extraction technology. To characterize the impact of technology changes for copper, we modeled and analyzed energy demand, expressed in fossil energy equivalents (FEE) per kilogram of primary copper, taking into account the applied mining method and processing technology. The model was able to capture variations in reported energy demands of selected mining sites (FEE: 0.07 to 0.84 MJ-eq/kg ore) with deviations of 1 to 30%. Applying the model to a database containing global mine production data resulted in energy demand median values of around 50 MJ/kg Cu irrespective of the processing route, even though median values of ore demands varied between processing routes from ca. 35 (underground, conventional processing) to 200 kg ore/kg Cu (open pit, solvent-extraction, and electrowinning), as high specific ore demands are typically associated with less energy intensive extraction technologies and vice versa. Thus, only considering ore grade in LCIA methods without making any differentiation with regard to employed technology can produce misleading results. PMID:24266773

  5. Contrasted Saharan dust events in LNLC environments: impact on nutrient dynamics and primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridame, C.; Dekaezemacker, J.; Guieu, C.; Bonnet, S.; L'Helguen, S.; Malien, F.

    2014-09-01

    The response of the phytoplanktonic community (primary production and algal biomass) to contrasted Saharan dust events (wet and dry deposition) was studied in the framework of the DUNE ("a DUst experiment in a low-Nutrient, low-chlorophyll Ecosystem") project. We simulated realistic dust deposition events (10 g m-2) into large mesocosms (52 m3). Three distinct dust addition experiments were conducted in June 2008 (DUNE-1-P: simulation of a wet deposition; DUNE-1-Q: simulation of a dry deposition) and 2010 (DUNE-2-R1 and DUNE-2-R2: simulation of two successive wet depositions) in the northwestern oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea. No changes in primary production (PP) and chlorophyll a concentrations (Chl a) were observed after a dry deposition event, while a wet deposition event resulted in a rapid (24 h after dust addition), strong (up to 2.4-fold) and long (at least a week in duration) increase in PP and Chl a. We show that, in addition to being a source of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP), simulated wet deposition events were also a significant source of nitrate (NO3-) (net increases up to +9.8 μM NO3- at 0.1 m in depth) to the nutrient-depleted surface waters, due to cloud processes and mixing with anthropogenic species such as HNO3. The dry deposition event was shown to be a negligible source of NO3-. By transiently increasing DIP and NO3- concentrations in N-P starved surface waters, wet deposition of Saharan dust was able to relieve the potential N or NP co-limitation of the phytoplanktonic activity. Due to the higher input of NO3- relative to DIP, and taking into account the stimulation of the biological activity, a wet deposition event resulted in a strong increase in the NO3-/DIP ratio, from initially less than 6, to over 150 at the end of the DUNE-2-R1 experiment, suggesting a switch from an initial N or NP co-limitation towards a severe P limitation. We also show that the contribution of new production to PP strongly increased after wet dust

  6. Can we predict the direction of marine primary production change under global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taucher, J.; Oschlies, A.

    2011-01-01

    A global Earth System model is employed to investigate the role of direct temperature effects in the response of marine ecosystems to climate change. While model configurations with and without consideration of explicit temperature effects can reproduce observed current biogeochemical tracer distributions and estimated carbon export about equally well, carbon flow through the model ecosystem reveals strong temperature sensitivities. Depending on whether biological processes are assumed temperature sensitive or not, simulated marine net primary production (NPP) increases or decreases under projected climate change driven by a business-as-usual CO2 emission scenario for the 21st century. This suggests that indirect temperature effects such as changes in the supply of nutrients and light are not the only relevant factors to be considered when modeling the response of marine ecosystems to climate change. A better understanding of direct temperature effects on marine ecosystems is required before even the direction of change in NPP can be reliably predicted.

  7. Age of riverine carbon suggests rapid export of terrestrial primary production in tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Erin E.; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Richey, Jeffrey E.; Keil, Richard G.; Santos, Guaciara M.; Truxal, Laura T.; Alin, Simone R.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2013-11-01

    balance between the storage of vascular plant carbon in soils, oxidation to carbon dioxide, and export via rivers affects calculations of the strength of terrestrial ecosystems as carbon sinks. The magnitude and timescale of the riverine export pathway are not well constrained. Here we use radiocarbon dating of lignin phenols to show that plant-derived carbon carried by suspended sediment of the Mekong River is very young, having been produced within the last 18 years. Further, this plant-derived carbon remains young during times of the year when bulk carbon varies from modern to over 3000 radiocarbon years old. Our results demonstrate that primary-production derivatives are exported rapidly and suggest that the age of riverine lignin is similar to estimates of the residence time of terrestrial organic carbon in tropical catchments. These results are relevant for modeling predictions of the influence of the terrestrial biosphere on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels.

  8. What causes the inverse relationship between primary production and export efficiency in the Southern Ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Henson, Stephanie A.; Cavan, Emma; Georges, Clément; Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Achterberg, Eric P.; Ceballos-Romero, Elena; Zubkov, Mike; Sanders, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    The ocean contributes to regulating atmospheric CO2 levels, partly via variability in the fraction of primary production (PP) which is exported out of the surface layer (i.e., the e ratio). Southern Ocean studies have found that contrary to global-scale analyses, an inverse relationship exists between e ratio and PP. This relationship remains unexplained, with potential hypotheses being (i) large export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in high PP areas, (ii) strong surface microbial recycling in high PP regions, and/or (iii) grazing-mediated export that varies inversely with PP. We find that the export of DOC has a limited influence in setting the negative e ratio/PP relationship. However, we observed that at sites with low PP and high e ratios, zooplankton-mediated export is large and surface microbial abundance low suggesting that both are important drivers of the magnitude of the e ratio in the Southern Ocean.

  9. Hyaluronan production and chondrogenic properties of primary human chondrocyte on gelatin based hematostatic spongostan scaffold

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autologous chondrocyte transplantation is a promising technique for treatment of cartilage defects. Three dimensional chondrocyte cultures on a scaffold are widely used to retain the chondrogenic phenotype. Using a biodegradable gelatin scaffold is one option for the cell delivery system, but molecular and histological studies of the method have not yet been done. Methods We evaluated the chondrogenic property of the primary human chondrocyte on a gelatin scaffold as compared to a collagen scaffold over a period of 21 days. We examined the production of glycosaminoglycan by quantitative and histological analysis. Gene expression of cartilage-associated molecules was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. Results The gelatin scaffold showed the ability to promote chondrocyte expansion, chondrogenic phenotype retention at molecular and mRNA levels. Conclusions This scaffold is thus suitable for use as an in vitro model for chondrocyte 3D culture. PMID:23253362

  10. Transverse momentum dependence of inclusive primary charged-particle production in p-Pb collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnello, M.; Agostinelli, A.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Ahn, S. A.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belmont, R.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Berger, M. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Böhmer, F. V.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, K.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dørheim, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Hilden, T. E.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Esposito, M.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gumbo, M.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Khan, K. H.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.

    2014-09-01

    The transverse momentum ($p_{\\mathrm T}$) distribution of primary charged particles is measured at midrapidity in minimum-bias p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=5.02$ TeV with the ALICE detector at the LHC in the range $0.15production in pp collisions, leading to a nuclear modification factor consistent with unity for $p_{\\mathrm T}$ larger than 2 GeV/$c$, with a weak indication of a Cronin-like enhancement for $p_{\\rm T}$ around 4 GeV/$c$. The measurement is compared to theoretical calculations and to data in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76$ TeV.

  11. Early and sustained expression of latent and host modulating genes in coordinated transcriptional program of KSHV productive primary infection of human primary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seung Min; Zhou, Fu-Chun; Ye, Feng-Chun; Pan, Hong-Yi; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Coordinated expression of viral genes in primary infection is essential for successful infection of host cells. We examined the expression profiles of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) transcripts in productive primary infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells by whole-genome reverse-transcription real-time quantitative PCR. The latent transcripts were expressed early and sustained at high levels throughout the infection while the lytic transcripts were expressed in the order of immediate early, early, and lytic transcripts, all of which culminated before the production of infectious virions. Significantly, transcripts encoding genes with host modulating functions, including mitogenic and cell cycle-regulatory, immune-modulating, and anti-apoptotic genes, were expressed before those encoding viral structure and replication genes, and sustained at high levels throughout the infection, suggesting KSHV manipulation of host environment to facilitate infection. The KSHV transcriptional program in a primary infection defined in this study should provide a basis for further investigation of virus–cell interactions. PMID:16154170

  12. BOREAS Level-0 C-130 Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Dominguez, Roseanne; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    For BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS), C-130 and other aerial photography was collected to provide finely detailed and spatially extensive documentation of the condition of the primary study sites. The NASA C-130 Earth Resources aircraft can accommodate two mapping cameras during flight, each of which can be fitted with 6- or 12-inch focal-length lenses and black-and-white, natural-color, or color-IR film, depending upon requirements. Both cameras were often in operation simultaneously, although sometimes only the lower resolution camera was deployed. When both cameras were in operation, the higher resolution camera was often used in a more limited fashion. The acquired photography covers the period of April to September 1994. The aerial photography was delivered as rolls of large format (9 x 9 inch) color transparency prints, with imagery from multiple missions (hundreds of prints) often contained within a single roll. A total of 1533 frames were collected from the C-130 platform for BOREAS in 1994. Note that the level-0 C-130 transparencies are not contained on the BOREAS CD-ROM set. An inventory file is supplied on the CD-ROM to inform users of all the data that were collected. Some photographic prints were made from the transparencies. In addition, BORIS staff digitized a subset of the tranparencies and stored the images in JPEG format. The CD-ROM set contains a small subset of the collected aerial photography that were the digitally scanned and stored as JPEG files for most tower and auxiliary sites in the NSA and SSA. See Section 15 for information about how to acquire additional imagery.

  13. Can product water footprints indicate the hydrological impact of primary production? - A case study of New Zealand kiwifruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deurer, M.; Green, S. R.; Clothier, B. E.; Mowat, A.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryWater footprints have been discussed as indicators for the influence of primary products on water scarcity and water quality. We assessed the impact of New Zealand kiwifruit on the scarcity and quality of freshwater resources and evaluated how the green-, blue- and grey-water footprints represented this impact. Water scarcity relates to the freshwater stored in soil and groundwater over a yearly timeframe. We found a negligible net change in soil water, as the freshwater in the soil is replenished every year by rain. The dynamics of freshwater in soil is indicated by the green-water footprint. Kiwifruit production has no impact on freshwater scarcity in soils, and we suggest, therefore, discarding the green-water footprint in this and similar studies. The groundwater recharge below kiwifruit orchards showed a large regional variation. A net depletion of groundwater resources occurs only in two kiwifruit growing regions, and only when the orchards are over-irrigated. The blue-water footprint indicates the status of the freshwater resources stored in the groundwater. We compared two different concepts. Our hydrologically based concept (Approach 1) quantifies the net change in the resources, whereas the Water Footprint Network (Approach 2) only accounts for the consumption. The blue-water footprint calculated by Approach 1 could explain 97% and by Approach 2 only 63% of the regional variation of net groundwater recharge below kiwifruit orchards. The values of the blue-water footprints are, on a regional average, about -500 L and 100 L per tray of kiwifruit with Approaches 1 and 2, respectively. According to Approach 1, a tray of kiwifruit delivers a net groundwater recharge of 500 L per tray, whereas according to Approach 2 the production of a tray of kiwifruit consumes 100 L of groundwater. Only Approach 1 contains all the hydrological processes making up the water balance that relates to groundwater. We assessed the impact of regional kiwifruit production on

  14. Pelagic metabolism of the Douro estuary (Portugal) - Factors controlling primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, Isabel C.; Duarte, Pedro M.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2006-08-01

    The pelagic metabolism of the Douro estuary (Portugal) and the factors influencing primary production (PP) and community respiration (CR) in this system were studied during an annual cycle (December 2002-December 2003). Sampling surveys were conducted twice a month during ebb and flood spring tides and water samples were collected for PP and CR assessments at three stations along the estuary (lower, middle and upper stretches). During the study period, PP values were in the range of 4.7-1878.5 mg C m -2 d -1 (average, 319.9 mg C m -2 d -1). River discharge controlled phytoplankton biomass inputs into the estuary as well as residence time. A decreasing trend in water column PP from the upper to the lower estuary related to higher nitrogen concentrations and phytoplankton biomass from riverine origin was observed. An inverse trend was found for CR, i.e., higher values were found in the lower, more urbanized stretch. During the study period, averaged CR values reached 1154 mg C m -2 d -1. In general, heterotrophy dominated the entire estuary, except in the upper stretch from May through July, when increased PP, but also lower CR values were recorded. A positive correlation between chlorophyll a and Pmax was found which is unusual in coastal ecosystems, where a decreasing trend of the P/ B ratio as a function of net primary production is generally observed. This could be explained by the relatively low phytoplankton biomass, preventing intraspecific competition from lowering photosynthetic capacity, on one hand, and the physiology of phytoplankton related to their origin in a semi-lotic (reservoir) ecosystem. No significant differences between tides were observed for all variables, except for the water light extinction coefficient ( k) values, reflecting higher turbidity during the ebb.

  15. Primary productivity and its variability in the equatorial South China Sea during the northeast monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, S. H.; Samah, A. A.; Braesicke, P.

    2013-08-01

    Near coastal areas of the equatorial South China Sea (SCS) are one of the world's regions with highest primary productivity (phytoplankton growth). Concentrations of phytoplankton in the SCS depend significantly on atmospheric forcings and the oceanic state, in particular during the northeast (winter) monsoon season from November to March. Aided by new ocean-observing satellite data, we present a climatological overview of recent surface atmospheric and oceanic features in the equatorial SCS during the northeast monsoon to identify the dominant air-sea processes influencing and modulating the primary productivity of the region. Measured chlorophyll a concentrations are used as a proxy for phytoplankton amounts and the spatial and temporal variations are characterized according to meteorological conditions. Converging northeasterly surface winds support high chlorophyll a concentrations along East Malaysia's coastline in conjunction with a continual nutrient supply from the bottom of the continental shelf by vertical mixing. The mixing can be enhanced due to increased turbulence by wind-generated high waves when they approach shallow water from the deep basin during strong cold surges and monsoon disturbances. Intraseasonal variability during the winter monsoon is characterized by a coastal increase of chlorophyll a starting in November and peaking in January. A general decrease is observed in March. Interannual variability of chlorophyll a concentrations is influenced by ENSO (due to the known modulation of cold surge occurrences), with decreases during El Niño and increases during La Niña in early winter along the shore of East Malaysia. As an example, we discuss an enhanced phytoplankton growth event that occurred due to a typical cold surge-induced Borneo vortex event in January 2010.

  16. From Miami to Madison: Investigating the Relationship Between Climate and Terrestrial Net Primary Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaks, D.; Foley, J.; Ramankutty, N.; Barford, C.

    2005-12-01

    The ``Miami Model'' (Lieth, 1975) was the first global scale empirical model of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP). This model used sparse observations to calibrate NPP based on the minimum of temperature and precipitation functions. The simplicity and relative accuracy of this model has led to its continued use. The development of improved techniques to measure NPP in the field (Gower et al. 1999, 2001; Malhi et al. 2002, Clark et al., 2001), and the expanded spatial and temporal range of observations have prompted this study, which reexamines the relationship of ecophysiological variables to NPP. A large reference dataset (n = 2268) of NPP field observations, including many from the Global Primary Production Data Initiative (Olson et al., 2001), were compiled for calibration and parameter optimization. We developed a rigorous statistical test for several paired climatic variables in order to investigate their relationship to terrestrial NPP. In addition to temperature and precipitation, we chose more robust pairs of independent climatic variables based on their ability to represent plant stressors such as heat and water stress. These variables included growing degree-days base 0, a water stress index, and average incident photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) for each day the average temperature is greater then 0°C. The water stress and PAR indices used in the study were calculated using a simple surface energy and water balance model (Prentice et al., 1993; Foley, 1994; Haxeltine and Prentice, 1996) using climate data from New (2002). Both linear and sigmoidal functional forms were chosen to relate the climatic variables to NPP. The model coefficients were determined by minimizing the least squared error between the observations and simulations. Calculated annual global NPP ranged from 50 - 60 Pg, well within the estimates of previous studies (i.e. Cramer et al. 1999). Spatial patterns of NPP were compared using biome averages as well as latitudinal

  17. Primary Productivity and Precipitation-Use Efficiency in Temperate Grassland in the Loess Plateau of China

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaoxu; Xie, Baoni; Shao, Ming’an; Zhao, Chunlei

    2015-01-01

    Clarifying spatial variations in aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and precipitation-use efficiency (PUE) of grasslands is critical for effective prediction of the response of terrestrial ecosystem carbon and water cycle to future climate change. Though the combination use of remote sensing products and in situ ANPP measurements, we quantified the effects of climatic [mean annual precipitation (MAP) and precipitation seasonal distribution (PSD)], biotic [leaf area index (LAI)] and abiotic [slope gradient, aspect, soil water storage (SWS) and other soil physical properties] factors on the spatial variations in ANPP and PUE across different grassland types (i.e., meadow steppe, typical steppe and desert steppe) in the Loess Plateau. Based on the study, ANPP increased exponentially with MAP for the entire temperate grassland; suggesting that PUE increased with increasing MAP. Also PSD had a significant effect on ANPP and PUE; where more even PSD favored higher ANPP and PUE. Then MAP, more than PSD, explained spatial variations in typical steppe and desert steppe. However, PSD was the dominant driving factor of spatial variations in ANPP of meadow steppe. This suggested that in terms of spatial variations in ANPP of meadow steppe, change in PSD due to climate change was more important than that in total annual precipitation. LAI explained 78% of spatial PUE in the entire Loess Plateau temperate grassland. As such, LAI was the primary driving factor of spatial variations in PUE. Although the effect of SWS on ANPP and PUE was significant, it was nonetheless less than that of precipitation and vegetation. We therefore concluded that changes in vegetation structure and consequently in LAI and/or altered pattern of seasonal distribution of rainfall due to global climate change could significantly influence ecosystem carbon and water cycle in temperate grasslands. PMID:26295954

  18. Constraining geochemistry and biological primary productivity in hydrothermal systems via in situ mass spectrometric geochemical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidoudez, Charles; Marcon, Yann; Bach, Wolfgang; Lebris, Nadine; Dubilier, Nicole; Girguis, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Hydrothermal vent ecosystems are biological hot spots, supported by chemoautotrophic primary productivity and achieving densities comparable to rainforests. Nevertheless, our understanding of the geochemical factors that govern the distribution of animals and microbes within vents is limited. It is well known that vent endemic organisms are found in specific vent "microenvironments", and that these microenvironments are distributed -coarsely speaking- in predictable patterns within a vent field. However, the relative differences in activity among these faunal patches, and their role in influencing geochemical flux remains largely unknown due to historical limitations in our ability to sample and quantify geochemical constituents with fine spatial resolution. In particular, the distribution of biologically important volatiles around vent fields is poorly constrained, as is the degree to which their distribution influences the destiny and distribution of organisms. To characterize the relationship between the distribution of volatiles, chemosynthetic microbes, and chemosynthetic symbioses, we generated detailed geo-referenced maps of methane, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and oxygen (four of the key volatiles that are both vent- and seawater derived) using an in situ mass spectrometer (ISMS). We characterized these concentrations in over 130 spots across three vent sites associated with the mid-Atlantic ridge in the Menez Gwen vent field. We quantified gases in sites ranging from hot fluids to mussel beds, and found notable relationships between the distribution and consumption of hydrogen sulfide and methane and the animal and microbial communities. Finally, we also developed a metabolic energy "map", which enables us to constrain both the potential energy that is available to these communities as well as the extent to which it is being used, and places constraints on the extent of primary production that can be supported by the realized use of these volatiles.

  19. Phosphates at the Surface of Mars: Primary Deposits and Alteration Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Albert S.; Gellert, Ralf; Clark, Benton C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Schroder, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element in terrestrial organisms and thus characterizing the occurrences of phosphate phases at the martian surface is crucial in the assessment of habitability. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometers onboard Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity discovered a variety of primary and secondary phosphate phases allowing direct comparisons across the three landing sites. The Spirit rover at Gusev Crater encountered the "Wishstone/Watchtower" class of P-rich (up to 5.2 wt% P2O5) rocks interpreted to be alkaline volcanic rocks with a physical admixture of approximately 10 to 20% merrillite [Usui et al 2008]. These rocks are characterized by elevated Ti and Y and anomalously low Cr and Ni, which could largely reflect the nature of the protoliths: Evolved magmatic rocks. Many of these chemical signatures are also found in pyroclastic deposits at nearby "Home Plate" and in phosphate precipitates derived from fluid interactions with these rocks ("Paso Robles" soils). The Opportunity rover at Meridiani Planum recently analyzed approximately 4 cm clast in a fine-grained matrix, one of numerous rocks of similar appearance at the rim of Endeavour Crater. This clast, "Sarcobatus," has minor enrichments in Ca and P relative to the matrix, and like the P-rich rocks at Gusev, Sarcobatus also shows elevated Al and Ti. On the same segment of the Endeavour rim, subsurface samples were found with exceptional levels of Mn (approximately 3.5 wt% MnO). These secondary and likely aqueous deposits contain strong evidence for associated Mg-sulfate and Ca-phosphate phases. Finally, the Curiosity traverse at Gale crater encountered P-rich rocks compositionally comparable to Wishstone at Gusev, including elevated Y. Phosphorous-rich rocks with similar chemical characteristics are prevalent on Mars, and the trace and minor element signatures provide constraints on whether these are primary deposits, secondary products of physical weathering or secondary products of chemical

  20. Phosphates at the Surface of Mars: Primary Deposits and Alteration Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, A. S.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B. C.; Ming, D. W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; McSween, H. Y., Jr.; Schröder, C.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element in terrestrial organisms and thus characterizing the occurrences of phosphate phases at the martian surface is crucial in the assessment of habitability. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometers onboard Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity discovered a variety of primary and secondary phosphate phases allowing direct comparisons across the three landing sites. The Spirit rover at Gusev Crater encountered the "Wishstone/Watchtower" class of P-rich (up to 5.2 wt% P2O5) rocks interpreted to be alkaline volcanic rocks with a physical admixture of ~10 to 20% merrillite [Usui et al 2008]. These rocks are characterized by elevated Ti and Y and anomalously low Cr and Ni, which could largely reflect the nature of the protoliths: Evolved magmatic rocks. Many of these chemical signatures are also found in pyroclastic deposits at nearby "Home Plate" and in phosphate precipitates derived from fluid interactions with these rocks ("Paso Robles" soils). The Opportunity rover at Meridiani Planum recently analyzed a ~4 cm clast in a fine-grained matrix, one of numerous rocks of similar appearance at the rim of Endeavour Crater. This clast, "Sarcobatus," has minor enrichments in Ca and P relative to the matrix, and like the P-rich rocks at Gusev, Sarcobatus also shows elevated Al and Ti. On the same segment of the Endeavour rim, subsurface samples were found with exceptional levels of Mn (~3.5 wt% MnO). These secondary and likely aqueous deposits contain strong evidence for associated Mg-sulfate and Ca-phosphate phases. Finally, the Curiosity traverse at Gale crater encountered P-rich rocks compositionally comparable to Wishstone at Gusev, including elevated Y. Phosphorous-rich rocks with similar chemical characteristics are prevalent on Mars, and the trace and minor element signatures provide constraints on whether these are primary deposits, secondary products of physical weathering, or secondary products of chemical weathering.

  1. Interpretation of tree-ring data with a model for primary production, carbon allocation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Wang, H.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.

    2013-12-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called ';T'. This model accepts input from a generic light-use efficiency model which is known to provide good simulations of terrestrial carbon exchange. The light-use efficiency model provides values for Gross Primary Production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport-tissue, and fine-root production and respiration, in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional relationships. The result is a model that can represent both ontogenetic effects and the effects of environmental variations and trends on growth. The model has been applied to simulate ring-width series from multiple individual trees in temperature- and drought-limited contexts. Each tree is initialized at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. These records are used to drive the trees' subsequent growth. Realistic simulations of the pattern of interannual variability of ring-width are generated, and shown to relate statistically to climate. An upward trend in ring-width during 1958-2007 is shown to be present in the primary observations, and in the simulations; but not in the standard, detrended ring-width series. This approach combines two modelling approaches previously developed in the global carbon cycle and forest science literature respectively. Neither has been widely applied in the context of tree-ring based climate reconstruction. This combination of methods offers promise, however, because it could provide a way to sidestep several known problems. These include: reliance on correlations for the interpretation of ring-width variations in terms of climate; the necessity of detrending using empirical functions (which can remove trends caused by variations in the environment as well as those that are ontogenetic); and the difficulty of assessing effects of extrinsic, non

  2. Effect of thermal power effluents on the community structure and primary production of phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, N.K.; Ambasht, R.S.; Kumar, R. )

    1993-01-01

    Effluents discharged by the coal-fired thermal power plant at Obra (22[degrees] 52[prime] N lat. and 83[degrees] 5[prime]E long.) reach into the nearby flowing Rihand river and alter the ecological features of the river ecosystem. The temperature and pH of the receiving river water increased while the transparency, dissolved oxygen, chloride, NO[sub 3]-N, and PO[sub 4]-P decreased. In the effluent zone of the river, no phytoplankton existed during a one-year study period (January to December 1987). Chlorophycean members like Spirogyra and Scenedesmus which were present in the unaffected upstream (control site) were replaced by Bacillariophycean members like Pinnularia and Nitzschia with reduced phytoplankton density in the downstream-affected water. At the control site (average of 12 months), Chlorophyta density contributed 335 unit L[sup [minus]1] to the total phytoplankton density (774 unit L[sup [minus]1]) followed by Cyanophyta (260 unit L[sup [minus]1]) and Bacillariophyta (188 unit L[sup [minus]1]). At the affected site maximum of 112, the unit L[sup [minus]1] contribution was by Bacillariophyta followed by 90 unit L[sup [minus]1] of Chlorophyta and 60 unit L[sup [minus]1] of Cyanophyta to the total phytoplankton density (221 unit L[sup [minus]1]). Phytoplankton diversity indices and primary production were reduced in the affected zone. Chloride and PO[sub 4]-P together accounted for 54% (p<0.01) of the variability of the Bacillariophyta density, while no clear influence on Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta density was observed. Total phytoplankton density was changed by 28% (p<0.05) by chloride itself. Gross and net primary productivities were significantly (p<0.01) influenced by alteration of the NO[sub 3]-N concentrations of the water. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Miocene ungulates and terrestrial primary productivity: Where have all the browsers gone?

    PubMed Central

    Janis, Christine M.; Damuth, John; Theodor, Jessica M.

    2000-01-01

    Progressive changes are observed in both the composition of mammal faunas and vegetation during the Miocene epoch [24–5 mega-annum (Ma)]. These changes are usually interpreted as a response to climatic changes. In the traditional view, forests or woodlands gradually gave way to more open habitats, with grazing (grass-eating) ungulate (hoofed) mammal species replacing the browsing (leafy-vegetation-eating) species as grasslands expanded. However, data from fossil assemblages in the Great Plains region of North America show that this faunal change was not a one-for-one replacement of browsers by grazers, as usually thought. Typical late early Miocene (17 Ma) fossil communities included extraordinarily high numbers of browsing ungulate species, comprising a fauna that cannot be directly analogized with any present-day community. Both maximum species richness of all ungulates and the proportion of browsers declined steadily in ungulate communities through the middle Miocene, to levels comparable to those of the present by the late Miocene. The resulting dramatic, cumulative loss of browsing species constitutes one of the strongest faunal signals of the late Tertiary (but was not a single “event”). We suggest that the early Miocene browser-rich communities may reflect higher levels of primary productivity in Miocene vegetation, compared with equivalent present-day vegetation types. The observed decline in species richness may represent a gradual decline in primary productivity, which would be consistent with one current hypothesis of a mid-Miocene decrease in atmospheric CO2 concentrations from higher mid-Cenozoic values. PMID:10884422

  4. Characterising primary productivity measurements across a dynamic western boundary current region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Jason D.; Doblin, Martina A.

    2015-06-01

    Determining the magnitude of primary production (PP) in a changing ocean is a major research challenge. Thousands of estimates of marine PP exist globally, but there remain significant gaps in data availability, particularly in the Southern Hemisphere. In situ PP estimates are generally single-point measurements and therefore we rely on satellite models of PP in order to scale up over time and space. To reduce the uncertainty around the model output, these models need to be assessed against in situ measurements before use. This study examined the vertically-integrated productivity in four water-masses associated with the East Australian Current (EAC), the major western boundary current (WBC) of the South Pacific. We calculated vertically integrated PP from shipboard 14C PP estimates and then compared them to estimates from four commonly used satellite models (ESQRT, VGPM, VGPM-Eppley, VGPM-Kameda) to assess their utility for this region. Vertical profiles of the water-column show each water-mass had distinct temperature-salinity signatures. The depth of the fluorescence-maximum (fmax) increased from onshore (river plume) to offshore (EAC) as light penetration increased. Depth integrated PP was highest in river plumes (792±181 mg C m-2 d-1) followed by the EAC (534±116 mg C m-2 d-1), continental shelf (140±47 mg C m-2 d-1) and cyclonic eddy waters (121±4 mg C m-2 d-1). Surface carbon assimilation efficiency was greatest in the EAC (301±145 mg C (mg Chl-a)-1 d-1) compared to other water masses. All satellite primary production models tested underestimated EAC PP and overestimated continental shelf PP. The ESQRT model had the highest skill and lowest bias of the tested models, providing the best first-order estimates of PP on the continental shelf, including at a coastal time-series station, Port Hacking, which showed considerable inter-annual variability (155-2957 mg C m-2 d-1). This work provides the first estimates of depth integrated PP associated with the

  5. Synthesis of integrated primary production in the Arctic Ocean: II. In situ and remotely sensed estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Victoria J.; Matrai, Patricia A.; Olson, Elise; Suttles, S.; Steele, Mike; Codispoti, L. A.; Zimmerman, Richard C.

    2013-03-01

    Recent warming of surface waters, accompanied by reduced ice thickness and extent may have significant consequences for climate-driven changes of primary production (PP) in the Arctic Ocean (AO). However, it has been difficult to obtain a robust benchmark estimate of pan-Arctic PP necessary for evaluating change. This paper provides an estimate of pan-Arctic PP prior to significant warming from a synthetic analysis of the ARCSS-PP database of in situ measurements collected from 1954 to 2007 and estimates derived from satellite-based observations from 1998 to 2007. Vertical profiles of in situ chlorophyll a (Chl a) and PP revealed persistent subsurface peaks in biomass and PP throughout the AO during most of the summer period. This was contradictory with the commonly assumed exponential decrease in PP with depth on which prior satellite-derived estimates were based. As remotely sensed Chl a was not a good predictor of integrated water column Chl a, accurate satellite-based modeling of vertically integrated primary production (IPPsat), requires knowledge of the subsurface distribution of phytoplankton, coincident with the remotely sensed ocean color measurements. We developed an alternative approach to modeling PP from satellite observations by incorporating climatological information on the depths of the euphotic zone and the mixed layer that control the distribution of phytoplankton that significantly improved the fidelity of satellite derived PP to in situ observations. The annual IPP of the Arctic Ocean combining both in situ and satellite based estimates was calculated here to be a minimum of 466 ± 94 Tg C yr-1 and a maximum of 993 ± 94 Tg C yr-1, when corrected for subsurface production. Inflow shelf seas account for 75% of annual IPP, while the central basin and Beaufort northern sea were the regions with the lowest annual integrated productivity, due to persistently stratified, oligotrophic and ice-covered conditions. Although the expansion of summertime

  6. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of beta-carotene breakdown products on primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Alija, A J; Bresgen, N; Sommerburg, O; Siems, W; Eckl, P M

    2004-05-01

    According to Siems and colleagues, free radical attack on beta-carotene results in the formation of high amounts of cleavage products with prooxidant activities towards subcellular organelles such as mitochondria. This finding may be an explanation for the contradictory results obtained with beta-carotene in clinical efficacy and cancer prevention trials. Since primary hepatocytes proved to be very sensitive indicators of the genotoxic action of suspect mutagens/carcinogens we therefore investigated a beta-carotene cleavage products mixture (CP), apo8'- carotenal (apo8') and beta-carotene utilizing primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. The end-points tested were: the mitotic index, the percentage of necrotic and apoptotic cells, micronucleated cells, chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE). Our results indicate a genotoxic potential of both CP and apo8' already at the concentrations 100 nM and 1 microM, i.e. at pathophysiologically relevant levels of beta-carotene and beta-carotene breakdown products. A 3 h treatment with CP induced statistically significant levels of micronuclei at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 microM and chromosomal aberrations at concentrations of 1, 5 and 10 microM. Apo8' induced statistically significant levels of micronuclei at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 5 microM and chromosomal aberrations at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 microM. Statistically significant increases in SCE induction were only observed at a concentration of 10 microM CP and apo8'. In contrast, no significant cytotoxic effects of these substances were observed. Since beta-carotene induced neither significant cytotoxic nor genotoxic effects at concentrations ranging from 0.01 up to 10 microM, these observations indicate that most likely beta-carotene breakdown products are responsible for the occurrence of carcinogenic effects found in the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study and the Beta-CArotene and RETinol Efficacy Trial

  7. Improving the estimation of terrestrial gross primary productivity by downscaling global sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cescatti, A.; Duveiller, G.

    2015-12-01

    The synoptic nature of satellite remote sensing makes this technique a key tool to contribute to estimating the amount of Carbon fixed by vegetation at global scale. From the various types of information that can be derived from space, the recent capacity to create global datasets of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) may prove to be a game-changer. SIF is a signal emitted by the photosynthetic machinery itself that, under the illumination conditions in which it can be estimated by satellite, has been shown to be proportional to gross primary productivity (GPP). However, this relationship is dependent on vegetation types that are typically spatially mixed at the coarse spatial resolution of SIF datasets (at best 0.5°), which in turn is a consequence of the complexity of the SIF retrieval itself. This study demonstrates how 0.5° SIF derived from GOME-2 data can be downscaled to a more adequate spatial resolution of 0.05° by combining 3 explanatory biophysical variables derived from the MODIS sensor (NDVI, land surface temperature and evapotranspiration) under a semi-empirical light-use efficiency framework. The finer spatial resolution results in a cleaner signal when aggregating it per land cover type. The signal is also better correlated in time with GPP estimated from flux towers, reaching the same level of performance than global GPP products calibrated on such flux towers and driven by meteorological and remote sensing variables (other than SIF). Establishing linear relationships between SIF and flux-tower GPP at vegetation type level allows to estimate values of global terrestrial vegetation gross productivity that have different magnitude but similar temporal patterns as other GPP products. Based on downscaled SIF, the mean global GPP values over the period 2007 to 2013 are (for deciduous broadleaf and mixed forests) 13.7, (for evergreen needleleaf forests) 2.5, (for grasslands) 12.5 and (savannahs and woody savannas) 36.8 Pg of Carbon per year.

  8. Estimating crop net primary production using national inventory data and MODIS-derived parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; César Izaurralde, R.

    2013-06-01

    National estimates of spatially-resolved cropland net primary production (NPP) are needed for diagnostic and prognostic modeling of carbon sources, sinks, and net carbon flux between land and atmosphere. Cropland NPP estimates that correspond with existing cropland cover maps are needed to drive biogeochemical models at the local scale as well as national and continental scales. Existing satellite-based NPP products tend to underestimate NPP on croplands. An Agricultural Inventory-based Light Use Efficiency (AgI-LUE) framework was developed to estimate individual crop biophysical parameters for use in estimating crop-specific NPP over large multi-state regions. The method is documented here and evaluated for corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in Iowa and Illinois in 2006 and 2007. The method includes a crop-specific Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), shortwave radiation data estimated using the Mountain Climate Simulator (MTCLIM) algorithm, and crop-specific LUE per county. The combined aforementioned variables were used to generate spatially-resolved, crop-specific NPP that corresponds to the Cropland Data Layer (CDL) land cover product. Results from the modeling framework captured the spatial NPP gradient across croplands of Iowa and Illinois, and also represented the difference in NPP between years 2006 and 2007. Average corn and soybean NPP from AgI-LUE was 917 g C m-2 yr-1 and 409 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. This was 2.4 and 1.1 times higher, respectively, for corn and soybean compared to the MOD17A3 NPP product. Site comparisons with flux tower data show AgI-LUE NPP in close agreement with tower-derived NPP, lower than inventory-based NPP, and higher than MOD17A3 NPP. The combination of new inputs and improved datasets enabled the development of spatially explicit and reliable NPP estimates for individual crops over large regional extents.

  9. The Nitrogen Budget of a Northern Hardwood Forest: Sources and net Primary Productivity Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, L. E.; Vogel, C. S.; Gough, C. M.; Curtis, P. S.

    2006-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) limits net primary productivity (NPP) in most forests. Nearly all N required for NPP comes from decomposing organic matter, and is continuously recycled within the forest. However, atmospheric N deposition may augment forest N supply, increasing NPP. To quantify internal N cycling, atmospheric N inputs, and NPP, we developed an ecosystem-scale nitrogen (N) budget for a mixed deciduous forest in northern lower Michigan, USA. Sources of N were net N-mineralization (Nmin), wet (Dw) and bulk (Db) atmospheric N deposition, and canopy retention of bulk N deposition (CRN). We also quantified the N requirement of NPP, which was measured by biometric inventory of annual leaf, above- and belowground wood, and fine root mass production. Nmin supplied 44.3 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (88% of total annual N supply), while inorganic Dw supplied 4.8 kg N ha-1yr-1 (9% of total). Bulk organic N deposition contributed 1.5 kg N ha-1, or 3% of the total annual N supply. The forest canopy retained 2.2 kg N ha-1 of total Db, suggesting that 4% of the annual NPP N requirement could be met through canopy N uptake, if all N retained by the canopy was assimilated. Of the 53.5 kg N ha-1 yr-1 required for NPP, 61% was for fine root production, 32% was for leaf production, and 7% was for wood. Our N supply and forest NPP N requirement estimates were very close, with quantified N sources supplying 94% of the annual NPP N requirement. At our site, where Dw and organic Db provide 12% of the annual NPP N requirement, atmospheric N deposition makes a small but significant contribution to NPP. However, the minor contribution of CRN to the annual NPP N requirement indicates that N retained by the canopy has little effect on forest growth.

  10. Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in a Riparian Wetland Following Restoration of Hydrology

    PubMed Central

    Koontz, Melissa; Lundberg, Christopher; Lane, Robert; Day, John; Pezeshki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This research presents the initial results of the effects of hydrological restoration on forested wetlands in the Mississippi alluvial plain near Memphis, Tennessee. Measurements were carried out in a secondary channel, the Loosahatchie Chute, in which rock dikes were constructed in the 1960s to keep most flow in the main navigation channel. In 2008–2009, the dikes were notched to allow more flow into the secondary channel. Study sites were established based on relative distance downstream of the notched dikes. Additionally, a reference site was established north of the Loosahatchie Chute where the dikes remained unnotched. We compared various components of vegetation composition and productivity at sites in the riparian wetlands for two years. Salix nigra had the highest Importance Value at every site. Species with minor Importance Values were Celtis laevigata, Acer rubrum, and Plantanus occidentalis. Productivity increased more following the introduction of river water in affected sites compared to the reference. Aboveground net primary productivity was highest at the reference site (2926 ± 458.1 g·m−2·year−1), the intact site; however, there were greater increase at the sites in the Loosahatchie Chute, where measurements ranged from 1197.7 ± 160.0 g m−2·year−1·to 2874.2 ± 794.0 g·m−2·year−1. The site furthest from the notching was the most affected. Pulsed inputs into these wetlands may enhance forested wetland productivity. Continued monitoring will quantify impacts of restored channel hydrology along the Mississippi River. PMID:26861409

  11. Effects of organic matter amendments on net primary productivity and greenhouse gas emissions in annual grasslands.

    PubMed

    Ryals, Rebecca; Silver, Whendee L

    2013-01-01

    Most of the world's grasslands are managed for livestock production. A critical component of the long-term sustainability and profitability of rangelands (e.g., grazed grassland ecosystems) is the maintenance of plant production. Amending grassland soils with organic waste has been proposed as a means to increase net primary productivity (NPP) and ecosystem carbon (C) storage, while mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from waste management. Few studies have evaluated the effects of amendments on the C balance and greenhouse gas dynamics of grasslands. We used field manipulations replicated within and across two rangelands (a valley grassland and a coastal grassland) to determine the effects of a single application of composted green waste amendments on NPP and greenhouse gas emissions over three years. Amendments elevated total soil respiration by 18% +/- 4% at both sites but had no effect on nitrous oxide or methane emissions. Carbon losses were significantly offset by greater and sustained plant production. Amendments stimulated both above- and belowground NPP by 2.1 +/- 0.8 Mg C/ha to 4.7 +/- 0.7 Mg C/ha (mean +/- SE) over the three-year study period. Net ecosystem C storage increased by 25-70% without including the direct addition of compost C. The estimated magnitude of net ecosystem C storage was sensitive to estimates of heterotrophic soil respiration but was greater than controls in five out of six fields that received amendments. The sixth plot was the only one that exhibited lower soil moisture than the control, suggesting an important role of water limitation in these seasonally dry ecosystems. Treatment effects persisted over the course of the study, which were likely derived from increased water-holding capacity in most plots, and slow-release fertilization from compost decomposition. We conclude that a single application of composted organic matter can significantly increase grassland C storage, and that effects of a single application are likely to

  12. Aboveground Net Primary Productivity in a Riparian Wetland Following Restoration of Hydrology.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Melissa; Lundberg, Christopher; Lane, Robert; Day, John; Pezeshki, Reza

    2016-01-01

    This research presents the initial results of the effects of hydrological restoration on forested wetlands in the Mississippi alluvial plain near Memphis, Tennessee. Measurements were carried out in a secondary channel, the Loosahatchie Chute, in which rock dikes were constructed in the 1960s to keep most flow in the main navigation channel. In 2008-2009, the dikes were notched to allow more flow into the secondary channel. Study sites were established based on relative distance downstream of the notched dikes. Additionally, a reference site was established north of the Loosahatchie Chute where the dikes remained unnotched. We compared various components of vegetation composition and productivity at sites in the riparian wetlands for two years. Salix nigra had the highest Importance Value at every site. Species with minor Importance Values were Celtis laevigata, Acer rubrum, and Plantanus occidentalis. Productivity increased more following the introduction of river water in affected sites compared to the reference. Aboveground net primary productivity was highest at the reference site (2926 ± 458.1 g·m(-2)·year(-1)), the intact site; however, there were greater increase at the sites in the Loosahatchie Chute, where measurements ranged from 1197.7 ± 160.0 g m(-2)·year(-1)·to 2874.2 ± 794.0 g·m(-2)·year(-1). The site furthest from the notching was the most affected. Pulsed inputs into these wetlands may enhance forested wetland productivity. Continued monitoring will quantify impacts of restored channel hydrology along the Mississippi River. PMID:26861409

  13. Interactions between atmospheric circulation, nutrient deposition, and tropical forest primary production (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.; van der Werf, G.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical forests influence regional and global climate by means of several pathways, including by modifying surface energy exchange and by forming clouds. High levels of precipitation, leaching, and soil weathering limit nutrient availability in these ecosystems. Phosphorus (P) is a key element limiting net primary production, and in some areas, including forests recovering from prior disturbance, nitrogen (N) also may limit some components of production. Here we quantified atmospheric P and N inputs to these forests from fires using satellite-derived estimates of emissions and atmospheric models. In Africa and South America, cross-biome transport of fire-emitted aerosols and reactive N gases from savannas and areas near the deforestation frontier increased deposition of P and N in interior forests. Equatorward atmospheric transport during the dry (fire) season in one hemisphere was linked with surface winds moving toward the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) in the other hemisphere. Deposition levels were higher in tropical forests in Africa than in South America because of large savanna areas with high levels of fire emissions in both southern and northern Africa. We conclude by describing a potential feedback loop by which equatorward transport of fire emissions, dust, and spores sustains the productivity of tropical forests. We specifically assessed evidence that savanna-to-forest atmospheric transport of nutrients increases forest productivity, height, and rates of evapotranspiration (ET). In parallel, we examined the degree to which increases in ET and surface roughness in tropical forests have the potential to strengthen several components of the Hadley circulation, including deep convection, equatorward return flow (near the surface), and the intensity of seasonal drought in the subtropics (thereby increasing fires). These interactions are important for understanding biogeochemical - climate interactions on millennial timescales and for quantifying how

  14. Interplay of drought and tropical cyclone activity in SE U.S. gross primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowman, Lauren E. L.; Barros, Ana P.

    2016-06-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs), often associated with massive flooding and landslides in the Southeast U.S. (SE U.S.), provide a significant input of freshwater to the hydrologic system, and their timing and trajectory significantly impact drought severity and persistence. This manuscript investigates the sensitivity of gross primary productivity (GPP) in the SE U.S. to TC activity using the 1-D column implementation of the Duke Coupled Hydrology Model with Vegetation (DCHM-V) including coupled water and energy cycles and a biochemical representation of photosynthesis. Decadal-scale simulations of water, energy, and carbon fluxes were conducted at high temporal (30 min) and spatial (4 km) resolution over the period 2002-2012. At local scales, model results without calibration compare well against AmeriFlux tower data. At regional scales, differences between the DCHM-V estimates and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer GPP product reflect the spatial organization of soil hydraulic properties and soil moisture dynamics by physiographic region, highlighting the links between the water and carbon cycles. To isolate the contribution of TC precipitation to SE U.S. productivity, control forcing simulations are contrasted with simulations where periods of TC activity in the atmospheric forcing data were replaced with climatology. During wet years, TC activity impacts productivity in 40-50% of the SE U.S. domain and explains a regional GPP increase of 3-5 Mg C/m2 that is 9% of the warm season total. In dry years, 23-34% of the domain exhibits a smaller positive response that corresponds to 4-8% of the seasonal carbon uptake, depending on TC timing and trajectory.

  15. Final Technical Report Microwave Assisted Electrolyte Cell for Primary Aluminum Production

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodi Huang; J.Y. Hwang

    2007-04-18

    This research addresses the high priority research need for developing inert anode and wetted cathode technology, as defined in the Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap and Inert Anode Roadmap, with the performance targets: a) significantly reducing the energy intensity of aluminum production, b) ultimately eliminating anode-related CO2 emissions, and c) reducing aluminum production costs. This research intended to develop a new electrometallurgical extraction technology by introducing microwave irradiation into the current electrolytic cells for primary aluminum production. This technology aimed at accelerating the alumina electrolysis reduction rate and lowering the aluminum production temperature, coupled with the uses of nickel based superalloy inert anode, nickel based superalloy wetted cathode, and modified salt electrolyte. Michigan Technological University, collaborating with Cober Electronic and Century Aluminum, conducted bench-scale research for evaluation of this technology. This research included three sub-topics: a) fluoride microwave absorption; b) microwave assisted electrolytic cell design and fabrication; and c) aluminum electrowinning tests using the microwave assisted electrolytic cell. This research concludes that the typically used fluoride compound for aluminum electrowinning is not a good microwave absorbing material at room temperature. However, it becomes an excellent microwave absorbing material above 550°C. The electrowinning tests did not show benefit to introduce microwave irradiation into the electrolytic cell. The experiments revealed that the nickel-based superalloy is not suitable for use as a cathode material; although it wets with molten aluminum, it causes severe reaction with molten aluminum. In the anode experiments, the chosen superalloy did not meet corrosion resistance requirements. A nicked based alloy without iron content could be further investigated.

  16. Forest fuel treatment detection using multi-temporal airborne Lidar data and high resolution aerial imagery ---- A case study at Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Guo, Q.; Collins, B.; Fry, D.; Kelly, M.

    2014-12-01

    Forest fuel treatments (FFT) are often employed in Sierra Nevada forest (located in California, US) to enhance forest health, regulate stand density, and reduce wildfire risk. However, there have been concerns that FFTs may have negative impacts on certain protected wildlife species. Due to the constraints and protection of resources (e.g., perennial streams, cultural resources, wildlife habitat, etc.), the actual FFT extents are usually different from planned extents. Identifying the actual extent of treated areas is of primary importance to understand the environmental influence of FFTs. Light detection and ranging (Lidar) is a powerful remote sensing technique that can provide accurate forest structure measurements, which provides great potential to monitor forest changes. This study used canopy height model (CHM) and canopy cover (CC) products derived from multi-temporal airborne Lidar data to detect FFTs by an approach combining a pixel-wise thresholding method and a object-of-interest segmentation method. We also investigated forest change following the implementation of landscape-scale FFT projects through the use of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and standardized principle component analysis (PCA) from multi-temporal high resolution aerial imagery. The same FFT detection routine was applied on the Lidar data and aerial imagery for the purpose of comparing the capability of Lidar data and aerial imagery on FFT detection. Our results demonstrated that the FFT detection using Lidar derived CC products produced both the highest total accuracy and kappa coefficient, and was more robust at identifying areas with light FFTs. The accuracy using Lidar derived CHM products was significantly lower than that of the result using Lidar derived CC, but was still slightly higher than using aerial imagery. FFT detection results using NDVI and standardized PCA using multi-temporal aerial imagery produced almost identical total accuracy and kappa coefficient

  17. Aerial camera auto focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Lan, Gongpu; Gao, Xiaodong; Liang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    Before the aerial photographic task, the cameras focusing work should be performed at first to compensate the defocus caused by the changes of the temperature, pressure etc. A new method of aerial camera auto focusing is proposed through traditional photoelectric self-collimation combined with image processing method. Firstly, the basic principles of optical self-collimation and image processing are introduced. Secondly, the limitations of the two are illustrated and the benefits of the new method are detailed. Then the basic principle, the system composition and the implementation of this new method are presented. Finally, the data collection platform is set up reasonably and the focus evaluation function curve is draw. The results showed that: the method can be used in the Aerial camera focusing field, adapt to the aviation equipment trends of miniaturization and lightweight .This paper is helpful to the further work of accurate and automatic focusing.

  18. Joint control of terrestrial gross primary productivity by plant phenology and physiology.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jianyang; Niu, Shuli; Ciais, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A; Chen, Jiquan; Ammann, Christof; Arain, Altaf; Blanken, Peter D; Cescatti, Alessandro; Bonal, Damien; Buchmann, Nina; Curtis, Peter S; Chen, Shiping; Dong, Jinwei; Flanagan, Lawrence B; Frankenberg, Christian; Georgiadis, Teodoro; Gough, Christopher M; Hui, Dafeng; Kiely, Gerard; Li, Jianwei; Lund, Magnus; Magliulo, Vincenzo; Marcolla, Barbara; Merbold, Lutz; Montagnani, Leonardo; Moors, Eddy J; Olesen, Jørgen E; Piao, Shilong; Raschi, Antonio; Roupsard, Olivier; Suyker, Andrew E; Urbaniak, Marek; Vaccari, Francesco P; Varlagin, Andrej; Vesala, Timo; Wilkinson, Matthew; Weng, Ensheng; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Yan, Liming; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-03-01

    Terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) varies greatly over time and space. A better understanding of this variability is necessary for more accurate predictions of the future climate-carbon cycle feedback. Recent studies have suggested that variability in GPP is driven by a broad range of biotic and abiotic factors operating mainly through changes in vegetation phenology and physiological processes. However, it is still unclear how plant phenology and physiology can be integrated to explain the spatiotemporal variability of terrestrial GPP. Based on analyses of eddy-covariance and satellite-derived data, we decomposed annual terrestrial GPP into the length of the CO2 uptake period (CUP) and the seasonal maximal capacity of CO2 uptake (GPPmax). The product of CUP and GPPmax explained >90% of the temporal GPP variability in most areas of North America during 2000-2010 and the spatial GPP variation among globally distributed eddy flux tower sites. It also explained GPP response to the European heatwave in 2003 (r(2) = 0.90) and GPP recovery after a fire disturbance in South Dakota (r(2) = 0.88). Additional analysis of the eddy-covariance flux data shows that the interbiome variation in annual GPP is better explained by that in GPPmax than CUP. These findings indicate that terrestrial GPP is jointly controlled by ecosystem-level plant phenology and photosynthetic capacity, and greater understanding of GPPmax and CUP responses to environmental and biological variations will, thus, improve predictions of GPP over time and space. PMID:25730847

  19. Future Arctic Primary Productivity from CMIP5 Simulations: Uncertain Outcome, but Consistent Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vancoppenolle, Martin; Bopp, Laurent; Madec, Gurvan; Dunne, John; Ilyina, Tatiana; Halloran, Paul; Steiner, Nadja

    2013-04-01

    Net primary production (PP) in the Arctic should increase over this century, due to sea ice retreat, inducing an increase in available light, but could decrease if nitrate renewal is insufficient. Here, simulations performed with 11 Earth System Models from the CMIP5 exercise, covering 1900-2100, are analyzed using Arctic PP, surface nitrate and sea ice concentrations. Whereas the mean model well simulates Arctic-integrated PP at 511 TgC/yr for 1998-2005 and projects a 58 TgC/yr increase by 2080-2099, models neither agree on what limits PP today, nor on the sign of future PP change. However, the same mechanisms operate in all models. First, both sea ice and nitrate decrease over the 21st century. Depending on the model, the strengthening nitrate stress is sufficient to overcome the effect of light increase. The inter-model spread stems from present nitrate stocks, poorly constrained by observations and characterized by an inter-model uncertainty of >50% of the mean. Second, virtually all models agree in the open ocean zones on more spatially-integrated PP and less PP per unit area. Where models disagree is the sea ice zone, where a subtle balance between light and nutrient limitations determines the change in productivity. Hence, it is argued that reducing uncertainty on present Arctic nitrate would render Arctic PP projections much more consistent. That is definitely required to understand the impact of climate change on the Arctic food webs and carbon cycle.

  20. The Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary marine extinction and global primary productivity collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachos, J. C.; Arthus, M. A.; Dean, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    The extinction of marine phyto-and zoo-plankton across the K-T boundary has been well documented. Such an event may have resulted in decreased photosynthetic fixation of carbon in surface waters and a collapse of the food chain in the marine biosphere. Because the vertical and horizontal distribution of the carbon isotopic composition of total dissolved carton (TDC) in the modern ocean is controlled by the transfer of organic carbon from the surface to deep reservoirs, it follows that a major disruption of the marine biosphere would have had a major effect on the distribution of carbon isotopes in the ocean. Negative carbon isotope excursions have been identified at many marine K-T boundary sequences worldwide and are interpreted as a signal of decreased oceanic primary productivity. However, the magnitude, duration and consequences of this productivity crisis have been poorly constrained. On the basis of planktonic and benthic calcareous microfossil carbon isotope and other geochemical data from DSDP Site 577 located on the Shatsky Rise in the north-central Pacific, as well as other sites, researchers have been able to provide a reasonable estimate of the duration and magnitude of this event.

  1. Assessment of Primary Production of Horticultural Safety Management Systems of Mushroom Farms in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dzingirayi, Garikayi; Korsten, Lise

    2016-07-01

    Growing global consumer concern over food safety in the fresh produce industry requires producers to implement necessary quality assurance systems. Varying effectiveness has been noted in how countries and food companies interpret and implement food safety standards. A diagnostic instrument (DI) for global fresh produce industries was developed to measure the compliancy of companies with implemented food safety standards. The DI is made up of indicators and descriptive grids for context factors and control and assurance activities to measure food safety output. The instrument can be used in primary production to assess food safety performance. This study applied the DI to measure food safety standard compliancy of mushroom farming in South Africa. Ten farms representing almost half of the industry farms and more than 80% of production were independently assessed for their horticultural safety management system (HSMS) compliance via in-depth interviews with each farm's quality assurance personnel. The data were processed using Microsoft Office Excel 2010 and are represented in frequency tables. The diagnosis revealed that the mushroom farming industry had an average food safety output. The farms were implementing an average-toadvanced HSMS and operating in a medium-risk context. Insufficient performance areas in HSMSs included inadequate hazard analysis and analysis of control points, low specificity of pesticide assessment, and inadequate control of suppliers and incoming materials. Recommendations to the industry and current shortcomings are suggested for realization of an improved industry-wide food safety assurance system. PMID:27357039

  2. Influences of seasonality, geomorphology, and hydrology on primary production and respiration in Arctic stream ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herstand, M. R.; Bowden, W. B.; Gooseff, M. N.; Whittinghill, K. A.; Wlostowski, A. N.; Wollheim, W. M.

    2011-12-01

    Stream ecosystem processes in the Arctic are poorly understood in the spring and fall 'shoulder' seasons. We hypothesize that seasonal changes in solar radiation, hydrologic conditions, and landscape inputs are all reflected in the seasonal patterns of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Community Respiration (CR). We continuously monitored the GPP and CR of three streams with different geomorphic characteristics (alluvial lake inlet, alluvial lake outlet, and beaded peat) near Toolik Lake Field Station, Alaska from breakup to freeze-up during 2011. We used open-system whole stream metabolism (WSM) methods, with dissolved oxygen estimates every five minutes. Dissolved and particulate nutrient chemistry, benthic chlorophyll, and nutrient uptake rates from solute injections were also measured across the seasons, and had correlations with GPP and CR. The fall freeze-up season was especially productive, as the well-developed benthic community responded to either lower flows (preventing sloughing) and/or increasing dissolved nutrient loads during landscape plant senescence. Storm events and high flow conditions (observed throughout seasons) decreased the GPP:CR ratio. Average monthly air temperatures have increased on the North Slope, especially during the shoulder seasons, increasing the duration of the ice-free stream season. Increasing the fall shoulder season may increase the annual stream GPP and nutrient uptake, with uncertain impacts on nutrient loading to the Arctic Ocean.

  3. Estimation of water quality and plant primary production in Arctic wetlands using ground based spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, C.; Lougheed, V.; Tweedie, C.

    2010-12-01

    Wetlands represent a significant portion of the Arctic tundra landscape, which is experiencing warming at an unprecedented rate. Understanding of primary production in these ecosystems is essential for assessing carbon fluxes and climate change effects. Remote sensing techniques are known to be accurate and cost effective to monitor aquatic vegetation and water quality parameters; however, their utility in mapping these ecosystems is unknown. We used a handheld hyperspectral radiometer (Unispec, PP Systems) to measure reflectance across the visible and near-infrared spectrum (400-1100nm) of two predominant aquatic graminoid species (Carex aquatilis and Arctophila fulva) along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient in tundra ponds of Barrow, Alaska. Spectral measurements were validated with in situ biomass harvest and water quality monitoring (e.g DOC, nutrients, algal chlorophyll). Reflectance of the two plant species exhibited spectral differences in the near-infrared portion of the spectrum. These reflectance measurements were also associated with water quality and plant biomass. Future efforts will involve the extrapolation of these ground based observations to a regional level using airborne and satellite imagery. This study advances large scale quantification and monitoring of water quality and aquatic plant production in the Arctic tundra and aids understanding of anthropogenic and climate effects in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

  4. Joint control of terrestrial gross primary productivity by plant phenology and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianyang; Niu, Shuli; Ciais, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A.; Chen, Jiquan; Ammann, Christof; Arain, Altaf; Blanken, Peter D.; Cescatti, Alessandro; Bonal, Damien; Buchmann, Nina; Curtis, Peter S.; Chen, Shiping; Dong, Jinwei; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Frankenberg, Christian; Georgiadis, Teodoro; Gough, Christopher M.; Hui, Dafeng; Kiely, Gerard; Li, Jianwei; Lund, Magnus; Magliulo, Vincenzo; Marcolla, Barbara; Merbold, Lutz; Olesen, Jørgen E.; Piao, Shilong; Raschi, Antonio; Roupsard, Olivier; Suyker, Andrew E.; Vaccari, Francesco P.; Varlagin, Andrej; Vesala, Timo; Wilkinson, Matthew; Weng, Ensheng; Yan, Liming; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) varies greatly over time and space. A better understanding of this variability is necessary for more accurate predictions of the future climate–carbon cycle feedback. Recent studies have suggested that variability in GPP is driven by a broad range of biotic and abiotic factors operating mainly through changes in vegetation phenology and physiological processes. However, it is still unclear how plant phenology and physiology can be integrated to explain the spatiotemporal variability of terrestrial GPP. Based on analyses of eddy–covariance and satellite-derived data, we decomposed annual terrestrial GPP into the length of the CO2 uptake period (CUP) and the seasonal maximal capacity of CO2 uptake (GPPmax). The product of CUP and GPPmax explained >90% of the temporal GPP variability in most areas of North America during 2000–2010 and the spatial GPP variation among globally distributed eddy flux tower sites. It also explained GPP response to the European heatwave in 2003 (r2 = 0.90) and GPP recovery after a fire disturbance in South Dakota (r2 = 0.88). Additional analysis of the eddy–covariance flux data shows that the interbiome variation in annual GPP is better explained by that in GPPmax than CUP. These findings indicate that terrestrial GPP is jointly controlled by ecosystem-level plant phenology and photosynthetic capacity, and greater understanding of GPPmax and CUP responses to environmental and biological variations will, thus, improve predictions of GPP over time and space. PMID:25730847

  5. Offshore Windfarm Impact on Pelagic Primary Production in the Southern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavik, Kaela; Zhang, Wenyan; Lemmen, Carsten; Wirtz, Kai

    2016-04-01

    As society struggles to find solutions to mitigate global warming, the demand for renewable energy technology has increased. Especially investment in offshore wind energy has proliferated in the European Union, with projections over the next 15 years estimating an over 40 fold increase in total offshore wind electricity. Though built with the goal of reducing the environmental impacts associated with traditional energy production, the long-term ecological impacts of offshore windfarm structures is not yet well understood. The consequences are of particular importance in the southern North Sea, where the expansion of offshore windfarms is focused. Our study investigates how the gradual accumulation of epifaunal biomass on submerged substrate at offshore windfarms impacts ecosystem services in the southern North Sea. Biofouling is governed predominately by the filter feeder Mytilus edulis, which, as an ecological engineer, will further alter the surrounding benthic and pelagic environment. We reconstruct the distribution of benthic filter feeders in the SNS and generate scenarios of increased potential distribution based on available information of Mytilus edulis settlement at turbines and of turbine locations. These maps are coupled through the MOSSCO (Modular Coupling System for Shelves and Coasts) to state-of-the-art and high resolution hydrodynamic and ecosystem models. We find a substantial change in pelagic primary production as a result of additional Mytilus edulis growth at offshore windfarms.

  6. Impact of intensive dust outbreaks on marine primary production as seen by satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimas, Christos; Hatzianastassiou, Nikos; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Kanakidou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The impact of intensive dust outbreaks from the African continent on the marine primary production of the Mediterranean sea is here investigated using MODIS satellite observations of atmospheric aerosol optical depth and chlorophyll-a in the seawater. Dust outbreak episodes in the area are detected based on aerosol relevant satellite observations over a 12-year period from 2003 to 2014. For a total of 167 identified episodes, correlations between aerosol optical depth and chlorophyll-a are investigated both on regional and on a pixel by pixel basis as well as for simultaneous or time-lagged satellite observations. The identified co-variations are thoroughly discussed in view of the impact of nutrient atmospheric deposition on the marine biology in the Mediterranean Sea ecosystem. This research has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: ARISTEIA - PANOPLY (Pollution Alters Natural Aerosol Composition: implications for Ocean Productivity, cLimate and air qualitY) grant.

  7. Evidences of increasing primary production in the ocean by Stommel's perpetual salt fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Shigenao; Yabuki, Takashi; Sato, Tetsuya; Tsubaki, Koutaro; Komiya, Atsuki; Watanabe, Mikihito; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Tsukamoto, Katsumi

    2011-05-01

    The American physical oceanographer Henry Stommel and co-workers proposed "the perpetual salt fountain" and suggested the possibility of upwelling deep seawater without an energy source. In the open ocean, deep seawater containing rich nutrients becomes a source of primary production. Previously, we have tested Stommel's hypothesis by numerical simulations and in ocean experiments, and confirmed the upwelling of a perpetual salt fountain. In the present study, we conducted an open-ocean experiment in the Philippines Sea, and succeeded to demonstrate an increase in chlorophyll concentration. The chlorophyll concentration at the pipe outlet was much greater than that in the surrounding seawater. Satellite ocean-color image around the pipe was analyzed, and the signal of artificial upwelling is investigated. Composite analysis of satellite chlorophyll image indicates an increased surface chlorophyll distribution in the vicinity of pipe position, in which the increasing signal is much larger than the expected production based on nutrient supply. Although the problem must be further discussed, this increased signal is shown to be statistically significant. This mechanism may contribute to effective utilization of fishery resources in subtropical oligotrophic region.

  8. Avian reovirus triggers autophagy in primary chicken fibroblast cells and Vero cells to promote virus production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Songshu; Jiang, Ke; Zhang, Xiaorong; Zhang, Miao; Zhou, Zhizhi; Hu, Maozhi; Yang, Rui; Sun, Chenli; Wu, Yantao

    2012-04-01

    Avian reovirus (ARV) is an important cause of disease in poultry. Although ARV is known to induce apoptosis in infected cells, the interaction between ARV and its target cells requires further elucidation. In this report, we show that the ARV isolate strain GX/2010/1 induces autophagy in both Vero and primary chicken embryonic fibroblast (CEF) cells based on the appearance of an increased number of double-membrane vesicles, the presence of GFP-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) dot formation, and the elevated production of LC3II. We further demonstrate that the class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR pathway contributes to autophagic induction by ARV infection. Moreover, treatment of ARV-infected cells with the autophagy inducer rapamycin increased viral yields, while inhibition of the autophagosomal pathway using chloroquine led to a decrease in virus production. Altogether, our studies strongly suggest that autophagy may play a critical role in determining viral yield during ARV infection. PMID:22241622

  9. Legacies of precipitation fluctuations on primary production: theory and data synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Osvaldo E.; Gherardi, Laureano A.; Reichmann, Lara; Jobbágy, Esteban; Peters, Debra

    2012-01-01

    Variability of above-ground net primary production (ANPP) of arid to sub-humid ecosystems displays a closer association with precipitation when considered across space (based on multiyear averages for different locations) than through time (based on year-to-year change at single locations). Here, we propose a theory of controls of ANPP based on four hypotheses about legacies of wet and dry years that explains space versus time differences in ANPP–precipitation relationships. We tested the hypotheses using 16 long-term series of ANPP. We found that legacies revealed by the association of current- versus previous-year conditions through the temporal series occur across all ecosystem types from deserts to mesic grasslands. Therefore, previous-year precipitation and ANPP control a significant fraction of current-year production. We developed unified models for the controls of ANPP through space and time. The relative importance of current-versus previous-year precipitation changes along a gradient of mean annual precipitation with the importance of current-year PPT decreasing, whereas the importance of previous-year PPT remains constant as mean annual precipitation increases. Finally, our results suggest that ANPP will respond to climate-change-driven alterations in water availability and, more importantly, that the magnitude of the response will increase with time. PMID:23045711

  10. MVE1 Encoding the velvet gene product homolog in Mycosphaerella graminicola is associated with aerial mycelium formation, melanin biosynthesis, hyphal swelling, and light signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ascomycete fungus Mycosphaerella graminicola is an important pathogen of wheat that causes the disease septoria tritici blotch. Despite the serious impact of M. graminicola on wheat production worldwide, knowledge about its molecular biology is limited. The velvet gene, veA, is one of the key re...

  11. Sensitivity of Crop Gross Primary Production Simulations to In-situ and Reanalysis Meteorological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C.; Xiao, X.; Wagle, P.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate estimation of crop Gross Primary Production (GPP) is important for food securityand terrestrial carbon cycle. Numerous publications have reported the potential of the satellite-based Production Efficiency Models (PEMs) to estimate GPP driven by in-situ climate data. Simulations of the PEMs often require surface reanalysis climate data as inputs, for example, the North America Regional Reanalysis datasets (NARR). These reanalysis datasets showed certain biases from the in-situ climate datasets. Thus, sensitivity analysis of the PEMs to the climate inputs is needed before their application at the regional scale. This study used the satellite-based Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM), which is driven by solar radiation (R), air temperature (T), and the satellite-based vegetation indices, to quantify the causes and degree of uncertainties in crop GPP estimates due to different meteorological inputs at the 8-day interval (in-situ AmeriFlux data and NARR surface reanalysis data). The NARR radiation (RNARR) explained over 95% of the variability in in-situ RAF and TAF measured from AmeriFlux. The bais of TNARR was relatively small. However, RNARR had a systematical positive bias of ~3.5 MJ m-2day-1 from RAF. A simple adjustment based on the spatial statistic between RNARR and RAF produced relatively accurate radiation data for all crop site-years by reducing RMSE from 4 to 1.7 MJ m-2day-1. The VPM-based GPP estimates with three climate datasets (i.e., in-situ, and NARR before and after adjustment, GPPVPM,AF, GPPVPM,NARR, and GPPVPM,adjNARR) showed good agreements with the seasonal dynamics of crop GPP derived from the flux towers (GPPAF). The GPPVPM,AF differed from GPPAF by 2% for maize, and -8% to -12% for soybean on the 8-day interval. The positive bias of RNARR resulted in an overestimation of GPPVPM,NARR at both maize and soybean systems. However, GPPVPM,adjNARR significantly reduced the uncertainties of the maize GPP from 25% to 2%. The results from this

  12. Manufacture of immunoglobulin products for patients with primary antibody deficiencies - the effect of processing conditions on product safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Albert; Quinti, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Early preparations of immunoglobulin (Ig) manufactured from human plasma by ethanol (Cohn) fractionation were limited in their usefulness for substitution therapy in patients with primary antibody deficiencies (PAD), as Ig aggregates formed during manufacture resulted in severe systemic reactions in patients when given intravenously. Developments in manufacturing technology obviated this problem through the capacity to produce concentrated solutions of intact monomeric Ig, revolutionizing PAD treatment and improving patient life expectancy and quality of life. As the need for Ig has grown, manufacturers have refined further manufacturing technologies to improve yield from plasma and produce therapies, which are easier and less expensive to deliver. This has led to the substitution, partly or wholly, of ethanol precipitation by other techniques such as chromatography, and has also stimulated the production of highly concentrated solutions capable of rapid infusion. Ig products have been associated, since their inception, with certain adverse events, including infectious disease transmission, hemolysis, and thromboembolism. The introduction of standardized manufacturing processes and dedicated pathogen elimination steps has removed the risk of infectious disease, and the focus of attention has shifted to other problems, which appear to have increased over the past 5 years. These include hemolysis and thromboembolism, both the cause for substantial concern and the subject of recent regulatory scrutiny and actions. We review the development of manufacturing technology and the emerging evidence that changes for the optimization of yield and convenience has contributed to the recent incidents in certain adverse events. Industry measures under development will be discussed in terms of their potential to improve safety and optimize care for patients with PAD. PMID:25566269

  13. Primary production in the Strait of Gibraltar: Carbon fixation rates in relation to hydrodynamic and phytoplankton dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Diego; Navarro, Gabriel; Bartual, Ana; Echevarría, Fidel; Huertas, I. Emma

    2009-06-01

    Primary production was studied at nine sites distributed within the Strait of Gibraltar (Southern Spain) and North-Western (NW) Alboran Sea by analyzing photosynthesis-irradiance (P-I) relationships and integrated primary production rates in relation to the different types of Deep Chlorophyll Maxima (DCM) detected in the area. The characteristics of the DCM were examined by several methods, including flow cytometry, quantification of transparent expolymer particles and fluorimetric measurements that were applied in order to assess the photo-physiological state of the phytoplankton assemblages with respect to their species composition and water column structure (hydrology). The photosynthetic parameters (derived from P-I relationships) and integrated primary production (range 6-644 mg m -2 d -1) responded greatly to the diverse DCM identified and thereby the spatial variability of the primary production observed in the region was found to depend upon the occurrence of the different types of phytoplankton accumulations, which were themselves indicative of the previous history of the water column. The net contribution of the primary production to the air-sea CO 2 exchange process was also evaluated in the area. Results indicated that this region behaved as a net sink for the atmospheric CO 2, with the intensity of the flux being strongly modulated by the wind intensity.

  14. Dynamics of aerial target pursuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, S.

    2015-12-01

    During pursuit and predation, aerial species engage in multitasking behavior that involve simultaneous target detection, tracking, decision-making, approach and capture. The mobility of the pursuer and the target in a three dimensional environment during predation makes the capture task highly complex. Many researchers have studied and analyzed prey capture dynamics in different aerial species such as insects and bats. This article focuses on reviewing the capture strategies adopted by these species while relying on different sensory variables (vision and acoustics) for navigation. In conclusion, the neural basis of these capture strategies and some applications of these strategies in bio-inspired navigation and control of engineered systems are discussed.

  15. Terrestrial gross primary production inferred from satellite fluorescence and vegetation models.

    PubMed

    Parazoo, Nicholas C; Bowman, Kevin; Fisher, Joshua B; Frankenberg, Christian; Jones, Dylan B A; Cescatti, Alessandro; Pérez-Priego, Oscar; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Montagnani, Leonardo

    2014-10-01

    Determining the spatial and temporal distribution of terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) is a critical step in closing the Earth's carbon budget. Dynamical global vegetation models (DGVMs) provide mechanistic insight into GPP variability but diverge in predicting the response to climate in poorly investigated regions. Recent advances in the remote sensing of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) opens up a new possibility to provide direct global observational constraints for GPP. Here, we apply an optimal estimation approach to infer the global distribution of GPP from an ensemble of eight DGVMs constrained by global measurements of SIF from the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). These estimates are compared to flux tower data in N. America, Europe, and tropical S. America, with careful consideration of scale differences between models, GOSAT, and flux towers. Assimilation of GOSAT SIF with DGVMs causes a redistribution of global productivity from northern latitudes to the tropics of 7-8 Pg C yr(-1) from 2010 to 2012, with reduced GPP in northern forests (~3.6 Pg C yr(-1) ) and enhanced GPP in tropical forests (~3.7 Pg C yr(-1) ). This leads to improvements in the structure of the seasonal cycle, including earlier dry season GPP loss and enhanced peak-to-trough GPP in tropical forests within the Amazon Basin and reduced growing season length in northern croplands and deciduous forests. Uncertainty in predicted GPP (estimated from the spread of DGVMs) is reduced by 40-70% during peak productivity suggesting the assimilation of GOSAT SIF with models is well-suited for benchmarking. We conclude that satellite fluorescence augurs a new opportunity to quantify the GPP response to climate drivers and the potential to constrain predictions of carbon cycle evolution. PMID:24909755

  16. Modeling Gross Primary Production in North America with MODIS Images and Reanalysis Climate Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xiao, X.; Jin, C.; Dong, J.; Zhou, S.; Wagle, P.; Joiner, J.; Guanter, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, G.; Qin, Y.; Wang, J.; Moore, B., III

    2015-12-01

    Accurate estimation of gross primary production (GPP) of terrestrial ecosystems is vital for a better understanding of the spatial-temporal patterns of the global carbon cycle. In this study we estimated GPP in North America (NA), using the satellite-based Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM), MODIS images at 8-day temporal and 500 m spatial resolution, and NCEP-NARR reanalysis climate data. The simulated GPP (GPPVPM) agreed well with the flux tower derived GPP (GPPEC) at 39 AmeriFlux sites (155 site-years). The GPPVPM in 2010 was spatially aggregated to 0.5 by 0.5 degree grid cell, and then evaluated with solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) data from GOME-2, which is often regarded as the proxy of direct measurement of vegetation photosynthesis. There were good agreements in spatial distribution and seasonal dynamics between GPPVPM and SIF. At biome scale, the relationship between GPPVPM and SIF showed strong linear correlations (R2 > 0.95) and small variations of slopes (4.60 - 5.55 g C m-2 year-1 / (mW m-2 nm-1 sr-1)). The total annual GPPVPM in NA in 2010 was approximately 13.53 Pg C year-1, which accounted for ~11.0% of the global terrestrial GPP and was within the range of annual GPP estimates from several other process-based and data-driven models (11.35 - 22.23 Pg C year-1). Forests contributed most (4.17 Pg C year-1) to the annual GPP in NA. Evergreen broadleaf forests were most productive with an average annual GPP exceeding 2000 g C m-2 year-1. The results from this study has demonstrated the reliable performance of VPM at the continental scale, and the resultant GPP product at 500-m spatial resolution provides more opportunities to improve the studies of carbon cycle, model inter-comparison, and benchmarking.

  17. Subsurface fracture mapping using microearthquakes detected during primary oil production, Clinton County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, J.T.; Phillips, W.S.; Roff, A.; Albright, J.N.; Hamilton-Smith, T.; Jones, S.K.; Kimmich, K.C.

    1994-09-01

    Downhole microseismic monitoring tests were conducted in Clinton County, Kentucky to determine if microearthquakes associated with primary production could be detected on a scale of interwell distances ({>=}400 ft) and to determine if such microearthquakes could be used to map reservoir fractures. The oil reservoirs occur in shallow (750 to 2400 ft), low-porosity (< 2%), carbonate rocks of Ordovician age. The reservoir system controlling the occurrence and flow of off and its relationship to the local and regional geology is poorly understood. Discrete reservoir microearthquakes were detected at an average rate of 11 events per week and at distances up to 4000 ft in an initial monitoring test using a single, triaxial downhole geophone receiver. In a second monitoring test 2 downhole, triaxial geophone tools were placed in a monitor well 800 ft from a new, high-volume oil well. Over a 6-month period of continuous monitoring 165 discrete, high-quality, microearthquake waveforms were recorded. Approximately 11,000 barrels of fluid were extracted in the monitor area during the 6-month period. Presently, it is unknown whether or not the microseismicity is induced by production. Hypocenters computed for 121 events delineate 4 extensive (up to 0.15 square-miles), low-angle, planar features striking approximately N65{degrees}E within the Ordovician reservoir depth interval. A composite fault-plane solution indicates a thrust focal mechanism. Such thrust structures are not observed in the surface-exposed Mississippian section, which lies above and is separated from the Ordovician section by a major unconformity of Devonian age. General relationships between the fractures revealed by the microseismicity and oil occurrence have yet to be demonstrated in the study area. The observed microseismicity occurs away from production wells, and to date, no new wells have been drilled into the mapped fracture along which shear displacement was detected.

  18. An Evaluation of the MOD17 Gross Primary Production Algorithm in a Mangrove Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, H.; Najjar, R.; Herrmann, M.; Fuentes, J. D.; Ruiz-Plancarte, J.

    2015-12-01

    Though coastal wetlands occupy a small fraction of the Earth's surface, they are extremely active ecosystems and play a significant role in the global carbon budget. However, coastal wetlands are still poorly understood, especially when compared to open-ocean and terrestrial ecosystems. This is partly due to the limited in situ observations in these areas. One of the ways around the limited in situ data is to use remote sensing products. Here we present the first evaluation of the MOD17 remote sensing algorithm of gross primary productivity (GPP) in a mangrove forest using data from a flux tower in the Florida Everglades. MOD17 utilizes remote sensing products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and meteorological fields from the NCEP/DOE Reanalysis 2. MOD17 is found to capture the long-term mean and seasonal amplitude of GPP but has significant errors describing the interannual variability, intramonthly variability, and the phasing of the annual cycle in GPP. Regarding the latter, MOD17 overestimates GPP when salinity is high and underestimates it when it is low, consistent with the fact that MOD17 ignores salinity and salinity tends to decrease GPP. Including salinity in the algorithm would then most likely improve its accuracy. MOD17 also assumes that GPP is linear with respect to PAR (photosynthetically active radiation), which does not hold true in the mangroves. Finally, the estimated PAR and air temperature inputs to MOD17 were found to be significantly lower than observed. In summary, while MOD17 captures some aspects of GPP variability at this mangrove site, it appears to be doing so for the wrong reasons.

  19. AERIAL OF VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING & SURROUNDING AREA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    AERIAL OF VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING & SURROUNDING AREA KSC-377C-0082.41 116-KSC-377C-82.41, P-15877, ARCHIVE-04151 Aerial view - Shuttle construction progress - VAB and Orbiter Processing Facilities - direction northwest.

  20. Phytoplankton class-specific primary production in the world's oceans: Seasonal and interannual variability from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uitz, Julia; Claustre, Hervé; Gentili, Bernard; Stramski, Dariusz

    2010-09-01

    We apply an innovative approach to time series data of surface chlorophyll from satellite observations with SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) to estimate the primary production associated with three major phytoplankton classes (micro-, nano-, and picophytoplankton) within the world's oceans. Statistical relationships, determined from an extensive in situ database of phytoplankton pigments, are used to infer class-specific vertical profiles of chlorophyll a concentration from satellite-derived surface chlorophyll a. This information is combined with a primary production model and class-specific photophysiological parameters to compute global seasonal fields of class-specific primary production over a 10-year period from January 1998 through December 2007. Microphytoplankton (mostly diatoms) appear as a major contributor to total primary production in coastal upwelling systems (70%) and temperate and subpolar regions (50%) during the spring-summer season. The contribution of picophytoplankton (e.g., prokaryotes) reaches maximum values (45%) in subtropical oligotrophic gyres. Nanophytoplankton (e.g., prymnesiophytes) provide a ubiquitous, substantial contribution (30-60%). Annual global estimates of class-specific primary production amount to 15 Gt C yr-1 (32% of total), 20 Gt C yr-1 (44%) and 11 Gt C yr-1 (24%) for micro-, nano-, and picophytoplankton, respectively. The analysis of interannual variations revealed large anomalies in class-specific primary production as compared to the 10-year mean cycle in both the productive North Atlantic basin and the more stable equatorial Pacific upwelling. Microphytoplankton show the largest range of variability of the three phytoplankton classes on seasonal and interannual time scales. Our results contribute to an understanding and quantification of carbon cycle in the ocean.

  1. The effect of primary productivity and seasonality on the distribution of deep-sea benthic foraminifera in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xichun; Corliss, Bruce H.; Brown, Christopher W.; Showers, William J.

    2006-01-01

    Deep-sea benthic foraminifera from 43 Holocene core tops in the North Atlantic were studied to evaluate the influence of primary productivity and the seasonality of primary productivity on the distributional patterns of species, faunal assemblages, and microhabitat groups. Two faunal assemblages, Epistominella exigua- Alabaminella weddellensis assemblage and Globocassidulina subglobosa- Epistominella umbonifera assemblage, were found to correlate with seasonality of primary productivity. The E. exigua- A. weddellensis assemblage is found at high latitudes and positively correlates with seasonality, while the G. subglobosa- E. umbonifera assemblage is generally found at low latitudes and has a negative correlation. Correlation analysis indicates that the relative abundance of one species alone ( E. exigua or A. weddellensis) is not a strong indicator of either primary productivity or seasonality. No significant relationships are found between benthic foraminiferal species, faunal assemblages, or microhabitat groups and bottom water properties, which suggests that the deep-sea fauna may not be used to reconstruct bottom water properties in this region. Based on microhabitat preferences of individual species, the fauna is categorized into epifaunal, infaunal, and phytodetrital groups and is compared with primary productivity of the overlying surface waters and seasonality. No significant relationship was found between the relative abundance of the infaunal group and primary productivity or its seasonality, and only a weak correlation was found between these variables and the epifaunal group ( r2=0.33; 0.46). However, the relative abundances of the phytodetrital group correlate relatively well with seasonal variability (r2=0.63), reflecting the association of these species with phytodetritus in regions marked by high seasonal variation in organic carbon flux. These results indicate that the relative abundance of the phytodetrital group may be used to reconstruct

  2. Primary production in an impounded baldcypress swamp (Taxodium distichum) at the northern limit of the range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, B.A.; McKee, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum)swamps to maintain themselves near the northern limit of their range depends on their levels of production, which is not only are response to climate but also to local environmental factors(e.g., impoundment). We asked if primary production was reduced under impounded conditions and if species' responses to impoundment were individualistic or more generalized. To examine long-term production trends in a permanently impounded baldcypress swamp, a 6-year study of leaf litterfall was conducted in Buttonland Swamp, Illinois, which had been impounded for 10 years before the beginning of the study. Buttonland Swamp is at the northern boundary of the baldcypress swamp region along the Cache River, Illinois, in the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley of the United States. When the litter production of impounded sites was compared to those with natural hydrology in the same region, impounded sites had about half of the total litterfall of natural sites. Overall, leaf litterfall rates declined during the study(201 vs. 113 gm-2 yr-1), but the pattern was negatively correlated with water depth, which explained 97% of the variation in the data. Along the transect with the lowest mean minimum water depth(<0.5 cm), leaf litterfall decreased linearly over 6 years from 377 to 154gm-2 yr-1. Total leaf litterfall rates were lower at the other three depths(5, 43, and 49 cm mean minimum water depths)and remained below 200 gm-2 yr -1 throughout the study. Acer saccharinum, Nyssa aquatica, and Salix nigra were most responsible for the decline in total leaf litterfall. Amounts of leaf litterfall of T. distichum and Liquidambar styraciflua also generally decreased, while that of Cephalanthus occidentalis increased overtime. Because species' responses to environmental factors such as impoundment are individualistic, models should be based on the responses of individual species, rather than on communities. Our study further suggests that the

  3. Review of the SAFARI 2000 RC-10 Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Jeff; Shelton, Gary; Annegarn, Harrold; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This presentation will review the aerial photography collected by the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the SAFARI (Southern African Regional Science Initiative) year 2000 campaign. It will include specifications on the camera and film, and will show examples of the imagery. It will also detail the extent of coverage, and the procedures to obtain film products from the South African government. Also included will be some sample applications of aerial photography for various environmental applications, and its use in augmenting other SAFARI data sets.

  4. Towards a universal trait-based model of terrestrial primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Prentice, I. C.; Cornwell, W.; Keenan, T. F.; Davis, T.; Wright, I. J.; Evans, B. J.; Peng, C.

    2015-12-01

    Systematic variations of plant traits along environmental gradients have been observed for decades. For example, the tendencies of leaf nitrogen per unit area to increase, and of the leaf-internal to ambient CO2 concentration ratio (ci:ca) to decrease, with aridity are well established. But ecosystem models typically represent trait variation based purely on empirical relationships, or on untested conjectures, or not at all. Neglect of quantitative trait variation and its adapative significance probably contributes to the persistent large uncertainties among models in predicting the response of the carbon cycle to environmental change. However, advances in ecological theory and the accumulation of extensive data sets during recent decades suggest that theoretically based and testable predictions of trait variation could be achieved. Based on well-established ecophysiological principles and consideration of the adaptive significance of traits, we propose universal relationships between photosynthetic traits (ci:ca, carbon fixation capacity, and the ratio of electron transport capacity to carbon fixation capacity) and primary environmental variables, which capture observed trait variations both within and between plant functional types. Moreover, incorporating these traits into the standard model of C3photosynthesis allows gross primary production (GPP) of natural vegetation to be predicted by a single equation with just two free parameters, which can be estimated from independent observations. The resulting model performs as well as much more complex models. Our results provide a fresh perspective with potentially high reward: the possibility of a deeper understanding of the relationships between plant traits and environment, simpler and more robust and reliable representation of land processes in Earth system models, and thus improved predictability for biosphere-atmosphere interactions and climate feedbacks.

  5. Increasing precipitation event size increases aboveground net primary productivity in a semi-arid grassland.

    PubMed

    Heisler-White, Jana L; Knapp, Alan K; Kelly, Eugene F

    2008-11-01

    Water availability is the primary constraint to aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) in many terrestrial biomes, and it is an ecosystem driver that will be strongly altered by future climate change. Global circulation models predict a shift in precipitation patterns to growing season rainfall events that are larger in size but fewer in number. This "repackaging" of rainfall into large events with long intervening dry intervals could be particularly important in semi-arid grasslands because it is in marked contrast to the frequent but small events that have historically defined this ecosystem. We investigated the effect of more extreme rainfall patterns on ANPP via the use of rainout shelters and paired this experimental manipulation with an investigation of long-term data for ANPP and precipitation. Experimental plots (n = 15) received the long-term (30-year) mean growing season precipitation quantity; however, this amount was distributed as 12, six, or four events applied manually according to seasonal patterns for May-September. The long-term mean (1940-2005) number of rain events in this shortgrass steppe was 14 events, with a minimum of nine events in years of average precipitation. Thus, our experimental treatments pushed this system beyond its recent historical range of variability. Plots receiving fewer, but larger rain events had the highest rates of ANPP (184 +/- 38 g m(-2)), compared to plots receiving more frequent rainfall (105 +/- 24 g m(-2)). ANPP in all experimental plots was greater than long-term mean ANPP for this system (97 g m(-2)), which may be explained in part by the more even distribution of applied rain events. Soil moisture data indicated that larger events led to greater soil water content and likely permitted moisture penetration to deeper in the soil profile. These results indicate that semi-arid grasslands are capable of responding immediately and substantially to forecast shifts to more extreme precipitation patterns. PMID

  6. On Extrapolating Nighttime Ecosystem Respiration To Daytime Conditions and Implications for Gross Primary Productivity Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvagno, M.; Wohlfahrt, G.

    2015-12-01

    Gross primary productivity (GPP) is a key term in the carbon cycle science. Being difficult or even impossible, at the ecosystem scale to directly quantify, various methods are used to estimate GPP, such as: eddy covariance CO2 flux partitioning, carbonyl sulfide exchange, sun-induced fluorescence, isotopes of CO2, and the photochemical reflectance index. The primary source of global GPP estimates is the FLUXNET project within which GPP is estimated in a consistent fashion through eddy covariance flux partitioning at more than 700 sites globally. Since the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) reflects net uptake during daytime, when photosynthesis exceeds respiration, and net emission during nighttime due to ecosystem respiration (RECO), the eddy covariance flux partitioning is based on the idea that daytime RECO may be inferred from nighttime NEE direct measurements, and consequently GPP can be obtained by subtracting RECO from NEE. However, the main assumption underlying this approach, which is that a temperature-dependent model of RECO parametrised based on nighttime temperatures may be extrapolated to daytime temperatures, has not been conclusively tested. This study investigates whether nighttime measurements of RECO provide unbiased estimates of daytime RECO. To this end we used ecosystem respiration chambers in a mountain grassland which, by keeping the vegetation in the dark during the measurement, allowed us to directly quantify RECO during both day and night. These data, pooled by day, night or day and night, were then used to parametrise temperature dependent models of RECO. Results show that day and night RECO do not follow the same relationship with temperature and that RECO inferred by using the nighttime parametrisation overestimates the true respiration. Potential reasons of this observed bias, like the overestimation of daytime mitochondrial respiration and implications for the quantification of GPP are discussed.

  7. Large-scale estimation and uncertainty analysis of gross primary production in Tibetan alpine grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Honglin; Liu, Min; Xiao, Xiangming; Ren, Xiaoli; Zhang, Li; Sun, Xiaomin; Yang, Yuanhe; Li, Yingnian; Zhao, Liang; Shi, Peili; Du, Mingyuan; Ma, Yaoming; Ma, Mingguo; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Guirui

    2014-03-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) is an important parameter for carbon cycle and climate change research. Previous estimations of GPP on the Tibetan Plateau were usually reported without quantitative uncertainty analyses. This study sought to quantify the uncertainty and its partitioning in GPP estimation across Tibetan alpine grasslands during 2003-2008 with the modified Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM). Monte Carlo analysis was used to provide a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in model simulations, and Sobol' variance decomposition method was applied to determine the relative contribution of each source of uncertainty to the total uncertainty. The results showed that the modified VPM successfully reproduced the seasonal dynamics and magnitude of GPP of 10 flux tower sites on the plateau (R2 = 0.77 - 0.95, p < 0.001). The 6 year mean GPP in Tibetan alpine grasslands was estimated at 223.3 Tg C yr-1 (312.3 g C m-2 yr-1). The mean annual GPP increased from western to eastern plateau, with the increase of annual temperature and precipitation and the decrease of elevation, while the decrease of GPP from southern to northern plateau was primarily driven by air temperature. Furthermore, the mean relative uncertainty of the annual GPP was 18.30%, with larger uncertainty occurring in regions with lower GPP. Photosynthetic active radiation, enhanced vegetation index, and the maximum light use efficiency (LUE) are the primary sources of uncertainty in GPP estimation, contributing 36.84%, 26.86%, and 21.99%, respectively. This emphasizes the importance of uncertainty in driving variables as well as that of maximum LUE in LUE model simulation.

  8. AERIAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING WEST TOWARD PRATT CITY, WITH EXTRACTION OPERATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL OVERVIEW, LOOKING WEST TOWARD PRATT CITY, WITH EXTRACTION OPERATIONS (BOTTOM LEFT AND CENTER), COKE BY-PRODUCT PLANT (CENTER), AND THE FORMER THOMAS FURNACE COMMUNITY, NOW THE THOMAS NATIONAL REGISTER HISTORIC DISTRICT (CENTER RIGHT). - Wade Sand & Gravel Company, AL 78, Thomas, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Dissolved organic carbon concentration controls benthic primary production: results from in situ chambers in north-temperate lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godwin, Sean C.; Jones, Stuart E.; Weidel, Brian C.; Solomon, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated several potential drivers of primary production by benthic algae (periphyton) in north-temperate lakes. We used continuous dissolved oxygen measurements from in situ benthic chambers to quantify primary production by periphyton at multiple depths across 11 lakes encompassing a broad range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total phosphorous (TP) concentrations. Light-use efficiency (primary production per unit incident light) was inversely related to average light availability (% of surface light) in 7 of the 11 study lakes, indicating that benthic algal assemblages exhibit photoadaptation, likely through physiological or compositional changes. DOC alone explained 86% of the variability in log-transformed whole-lake benthic production rates. TP was not an important driver of benthic production via its effects on nutrient and light availability. This result is contrary to studies in other systems, but may be common in relatively pristine north-temperate lakes. Our simple empirical model may allow for the prediction of whole-lake benthic primary production from easily obtained measurements of DOC concentration.

  10. Climate forcing, primary production and the distribution of Holocene biogenic sediments in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Robert; Gonzalez-Yajimovich, Oscar; Ledesma-Vazquez, Jorge; Staines-Urias, Francisca

    2007-01-01

    The Gulf of California is a marginal seaway under the influence of a monsoon climate that produces cool, dry winters and warm, humid summers. Winds, tidal mixing and coastal-trapped waves forced by climate and the Pacific Ocean control nutrient advection and primary productivity (PP). Strong northwest winds from the subtropical East Pacific High Pressure system begin in November and last until April and drive coastal upwelling along the mainland margin, especially in the central and southern Gulf. In the northern Gulf, particularly around the midrift island, tidal mixing and turbulence occurs year round, advecting nutrients into the mixed layer and high productivity. During summer and early fall months, winds are variable, of less intensity and mainly blow cross-basin except in the most northern Gulf. Summer PP is generally low in the central and southern Gulf except along the mainland where coastal-trapped waves associated with tropical surges and hurricanes generate mixing over the continental shelf. Mesoscale eddies or gyres often associated with jets and filaments extend to depths of 1000 m and transport nutrient-enriched upwelled waters and plankton detritus across the Gulf. The largest and most persistent gyres rotate in an anti-cyclonic direction (east to west) and are a principal source of the plankton export to the peninsula margin. Two major biogenic sediment patterns are present in core-top sediments. Hemipelagic biosiliceous-rich muds are accumulating beneath upwelling areas of high productivity in the central Gulf and along the mainland margin. Calcium carbonate- and organic carbon-rich (OC) sediments are concentrated along the peninsula margin, generally beneath lower productivity waters with the highest OC content in areas with the lowest productivity. The high, uniform biosiliceous content in Guaymas basin, extending southward into Carmen basin reflects the redistribution by mesoscale gyres of phytoplankon debris produced in mainland coastal

  11. Temporal and spatial variation of factors controlling metabolism and primary productivity in headwater streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. L.; Argerich, A.; Ashkenas, L.

    2013-12-01

    Headwater streams account for 60-80 percent of stream-channel length in river networks, yet the variability among these streams is often simplified or neglected. Better understanding of the drivers and ways to characterize this variability are crucial as we evaluate the contributions of headwaters to downstream ecosystems. Metrics of ecosystem processes, such as whole stream metabolism, incorporate numerous factors across trophic levels and are considered fundamental descriptors of ecosystem function. Because metabolism integrates the activity of all organisms carrying out photosynthesis and aerobic respiration, it has been proposed as useful in evaluating contributions from multiple headwaters to downstream sites as well as measuring how stream communities respond to environmental changes. Here we explore the spatial and temporal variation in ecosystem metabolism and primary productivity across multiple forested headwater streams and their cumulative downstream sites. We also quantify the environmental factors that most influence these processes, including stream chemistry, temperature, chlorophyll a, benthic and algal biomass, fine sediment, forest cover and shading in 14 headwater streams and four downstream sites. This study occurred as part of the pre-treatment research in the Trask River Watershed Study, which is a multi-disciplinary, multi-year research project designed to evaluate the impacts of current forest management practices on headwater and downstream aquatic ecosystems in NW Oregon. Over the four years, we consistently found the headwater and downstream reaches to be highly heterotrophic with P:R ratios less than 0.05. However nutrient concentrations were not good predictors of metabolism rates or the biomass and activity of primary producers. Even though all sites were within a 3000 ha catchment and had similar amounts of forest cover and riparian shading, we observed high spatial variability in concentrations of stream nutrients (C, N, P) and

  12. 29 CFR 1926.453 - Aerial lifts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lift, except in case of emergency. (x) Climbers shall not be worn while performing work from an aerial... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aerial lifts. 1926.453 Section 1926.453 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Scaffolds § 1926.453 Aerial lifts. (a)...

  13. Net primary productivity, upwelling and coastal currents in the Gulf of Ulloa, Baja California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rodríguez, E.; Trasviña-Castro, A.; Gaxiola-Castro, G.; Zamudio, L.; Cervantes-Duarte, R.

    2012-08-01

    The Gulf of Ulloa, a highly productive area off the western coast of the Baja California Peninsula, is examined for five successive years (2003-2007) by using satellite data and seasonal net primary productivity (NPP) estimates obtained from a vertical generalised production model. The results identify that northwestern winds blow parallel to the coast throughout the year. However, highest NPP occurs from March to June. During this period, an equatorward coastal current transports water from neighbouring upwelling areas to the northern Gulf of Ulloa and in combination with local upwelling, which injects nutrients into the euphotic zone, produce the observed increase in NPP. The opposite situation occurs in late summer when a warm poleward current of tropical characteristics arrives and inhibits the productivity in the whole region and generates the yearly lowest NPP levels. Our findings reveal the importance of lateral advection in the modulation of the primary productivity in this subtropical upwelling region.

  14. Effect of an acid mine drainage effluent on phytoplankton biomass and primary production at Britannia Beach, Howe Sound, British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Levings, C D; Varela, D E; Mehlenbacher, N M; Barry, K L; Piercey, G E; Guo, M; Harrison, P J

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the effect of acid mine drainage (AMD) from an abandoned copper mine at Britannia Beach (Howe Sound, BC, Canada) on primary productivity and chlorophyll a levels in the receiving waters of Howe Sound before, during, and after freshet from the Squamish River. Elevated concentrations of copper (integrated average through the water column >0.050 mgl(-1)) in nearshore waters indicated that under some conditions a small gyre near the mouth of Britannia Creek may have retained the AMD from Britannia Creek and from a 30-m deep water outfall close to shore. Regression and correlation analyses indicated that copper negatively affected primary productivity during April (pre-freshet) and November (post-freshet). Negative effects of copper on primary productivity were not supported statistically for July (freshet), possibly because of additional effects such as turbidity from the Squamish River. Depth-integrated average and surface chlorophyll a were correlated to copper concentrations in April. During this short study we demonstrated that copper concentrations from the AMD discharge can negatively affect both primary productivity and the standing stock of primary producers in Howe Sound. PMID:16038945

  15. Aerial photography for sensing plant anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Cardenas, R.; Hart, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    Changes in the red tonal response of Kodak Ektrachrome Infrared Aero 8443 film (EIR) are often incorrectly attributed solely to variations in infrared light reflectance of plant leaves, when the primary influence is a difference in visible light reflectance induced by varying chlorophyll contents. Comparisons are made among aerial photographic images of high- and low-chlorophyll foliage. New growth, foot rot, and boron and chloride nutrient toxicites produce low-chlorophyll foliage, and EIR transparency images of light red or white compared with dark-red images of high-chlorophyll foliage. Deposits of the sooty mold fungus that subsists on the honeydew produced by brown soft scale insects, obscure the citrus leaves' green color. Infected trees appear as black images on EIR film transparencies compared with red images of healthy trees.

  16. An aerial 3D printing test mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Michael; McGuire, Thomas; Parsons, Michael; Leake, Skye; Straub, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of an aerial 3D printing technology, its development and its testing. This technology is potentially useful in its own right. In addition, this work advances the development of a related in-space 3D printing technology. A series of aerial 3D printing test missions, used to test the aerial printing technology, are discussed. Through completing these test missions, the design for an in-space 3D printer may be advanced. The current design for the in-space 3D printer involves focusing thermal energy to heat an extrusion head and allow for the extrusion of molten print material. Plastics can be used as well as composites including metal, allowing for the extrusion of conductive material. A variety of experiments will be used to test this initial 3D printer design. High altitude balloons will be used to test the effects of microgravity on 3D printing, as well as parabolic flight tests. Zero pressure balloons can be used to test the effect of long 3D printing missions subjected to low temperatures. Vacuum chambers will be used to test 3D printing in a vacuum environment. The results will be used to adapt a current prototype of an in-space 3D printer. Then, a small scale prototype can be sent into low-Earth orbit as a 3-U cube satellite. With the ability to 3D print in space demonstrated, future missions can launch production hardware through which the sustainability and durability of structures in space will be greatly improved.

  17. Endangered Right Whales Enhance Primary Productivity in the Bay of Fundy.

    PubMed

    Roman, Joe; Nevins, John; Altabet, Mark; Koopman, Heather; McCarthy, James

    2016-01-01

    , and recognizing the fact that the additional nitrogen released in whale urine would be difficult to measure in a field study, the results of this study support the idea that the distinctive isotopic signature of the released NH4+ could be used to provide a conservative estimate of the contribution of the whale pump to primary productivity in coastal regions where whales congregate. PMID:27331902

  18. Endangered Right Whales Enhance Primary Productivity in the Bay of Fundy

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Joe; Nevins, John; Altabet, Mark; Koopman, Heather; McCarthy, James

    2016-01-01

    , and recognizing the fact that the additional nitrogen released in whale urine would be difficult to measure in a field study, the results of this study support the idea that the distinctive isotopic signature of the released NH4+ could be used to provide a conservative estimate of the contribution of the whale pump to primary productivity in coastal regions where whales congregate. PMID:27331902

  19. Predicting gross primary production with high spatio-temporal resolution remote sensing datasets at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Chen, B.

    2012-04-01

    Remote sensing has great potential for estimating gross primary production (GPP) without resorting to interpolation of many surface observations. Meanwhile, it can be applied to analyzing the variation of GPP at different ecosystems across a wide range of spatial, temporal, and spectral resolutions. However, the availability of input data for remote-sensing-based GPP models is the bottleneck. The input data of remote-sensing-based greenness and radiation (GR) model is more independent on climate or ground-based observations, and the result is promising. Previous work using this modeling approach only used coarse spatial resolution data (e.g. MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, MODIS), the estimated spatio-temporal distributions of GPP with higher resolution remains unclear. To overcome this limitation, a modified image fusion method was developed based on Enhanced Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (mESTARFM), producing images with high spatial and temporal resolutions based on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) / Enhanced TM Plus (ETM+) (high spatial resolution, low temporal resolution) and MODIS (low spatial resolution, high temporal resolution). Meanwhile, the Simple Analytical Footprint model on Eulerian coordinates (SAFE) model to estimate the flux tower's footprint, which will be helpful for GR model's calibration, and improve the accuracy of GPP estimate. In the study, twelve flux sites belonging to Fluxnet-Canada Research Network (FCRN)/Canadian Carbon Program (CCP) were selected, covering grassland, forest, and wetland biomes. The remote sensing dataset acquired in this study for each site include MODIS reflectance product (MOD09A1, 500 m), Landsat TM /ETM+ (30 m), MODIS BRDF/ Albedo model parameter product (MCD43A1, 500 m), MODIS BRDF/ Albedo quality product (MCD43A2, 500 m). The steps are as follows:: (i) Landsat TM /ETM+ and MODIS data were used as mESTARFM inputs to produce reflectance datasets with high spatio

  20. Disturbance severity and net primary production resilience of a Great Lakes forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich-Stuart, E. J.; Fahey, R.; De La Cruz, A.; Gough, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    As many Eastern deciduous forests of North America transition from early to mid-succession, the future of regional terrestrial carbon (C) storage is uncertain. The gradual, patchy senescence of early-successional trees accompanying this transition is comparable in severity to moderate disturbances such as silvicultural thinnings or insect outbreaks. While stand-replacing disturbance causes forests to temporarily become C sources, more moderate disturbances may inflict little to no decline in C sequestration. Identifying the disturbance severity at which net primary production (NPP) declines and the underlying mechanisms that drive forest C storage resistance to disturbance is increasingly important as moderate disturbances increase in frequency and extent across the region. The Forest Accelerated Succession ExperimenT (FASET) at the University of Michigan Biological Station subjected 39 ha of forest to moderate disturbance in 2008 by advancing age-related tree mortality through the stem girdling of early successional aspen and birch. Stand-scale disturbance severity, expressed as relative basal area of girdled aspen and birch, was 39% but plot-scale severity varied substantially within the experimental area (9 to 66% in 0.1 ha plots) because of the heterogeneous distribution of aspen and birch. We used this disturbance severity gradient to examine: 1) the relationship between NPP resilience and disturbance severity; 2) the disturbance severity at which NPP resilience prompts a shift in dominance from canopy to subcanopy vegetation; 3) how NPP resilience relates to disturbance-driven changes in resource-use efficiency, and 4) how disturbance severity shapes emerging forest communities We found that NPP is highly resilient to low to moderate levels of disturbance, but that production declines once a higher disturbance threshold is exceeded. Several complementary mechanisms, including canopy structural reorganization and the reallocation of growth-limiting light and

  1. Reconnaissance mapping from aerial photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeden, H. A.; Bolling, N. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Engineering soil and geology maps were successfully made from Pennsylvania aerial photographs taken at scales from 1:4,800 to 1:60,000. The procedure involved a detailed study of a stereoscopic model while evaluating landform, drainage, erosion, color or gray tones, tone and texture patterns, vegetation, and cultural or land use patterns.

  2. Estimation of net primary productivity using a process-based model in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peijuan; Xie, Donghui; Zhou, Yuyu; E, Youhao; Zhu, Qijiang

    2014-01-16

    The ecological structure in the arid and semi-arid region of Northwest China with forest, grassland, agriculture, Gobi, and desert, is complex, vulnerable, and unstable. It is a challenging and sustaining job to keep the ecological structure and improve its ecological function. Net primary productivity (NPP) modeling can help to improve the understanding of the ecosystem, and therefore, improve ecological efficiency. The boreal ecosystem productivity simulator (BEPS) model provides the possibility of NPP modeling in terrestrial ecosystem, but it has some limitations for application in arid and semi-arid regions. In this paper we improve the BEPS model, in terms of its water cycle by adding the processes of infiltration and surface runoff, to be applicable in arid and semi-arid regions. We model the NPP of forest, grass, and crop in Gansu Province as an experimental area in Northwest China in 2003 using the improved BEPS model, parameterized with moderate resolution remote sensing imageries and meteorological data. The modeled NPP using improved BEPS agrees better with the ground measurements in Qilian Mountain than that with original BEPS, with a higher R2 of 0.746 and lower root mean square error (RMSE) of 46.53 gC/m2 compared to R2 of 0.662 and RMSE of 60.19 gC/m2 from original BEPS. The modeled NPP of three vegetation types using improved BEPS show evident differences compared to that using original BEPS, with the highest difference ratio of 9.21% in forest and the lowest value of 4.29% in crop. The difference ratios between different vegetation types lie on the dependence on natural water sources. The modeled NPP in five geographic zones using improved BEPS are higher than those with original BEPS, with higher difference ratio in dry zones and lower value in wet zones.

  3. Global evidence on nitrogen saturation of terrestrial ecosystem net primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Dashuan; Wang, Hong; Sun, Jian; Niu, Shuli

    2016-02-01

    The continually increasing nitrogen (N) deposition is expected to increase ecosystem aboveground net primary production (ANPP) until it exceeds plant N demand, causing a nonlinear response and N saturation for ANPP. However, the nonlinear response of ANPP to N addition gradient and the N saturation threshold have not been comprehensively quantified yet for terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we compiled a global dataset of 44 experimental studies with at least three levels of N treatment. Nitrogen response efficiency (NRE, ANPP response per unit N addition) and the difference in NRE between N levels (ΔNRE) were quantified to test the nonlinearity in ANPP response. We found a universal response pattern of N saturation for ANPP with N addition gradient across all the studies and in different ecosystems. An averaged N saturation threshold for ANPP nonlinearity was found at the N addition rates of 5-6 g m-2 yr-1. The extent to which ANPP approaches N saturation varied with ecosystem type, N addition rate and environmental factors. ANPP in grasslands had lower NRE than those in forests and wetlands. Plant NRE decreased with reduced soil C:N ratio, and was the highest at intermediate levels of rainfall and temperature. These findings suggest that ANPP in grassland or the ecosystems with low soil C:N ratio (or low and high rainfall or temperature) is easier to be saturated with N enrichment. Overall, these results indicate that the beneficial effect of N deposition on plant productivity likely diminishes with continuous N enrichment when N loading surpasses the N saturation threshold for ANPP nonlinearity.

  4. Estimating net primary production of natural grassland and its spatio-temporal distribution in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiling; Lal, Rattan; Zhao, Youyi; Jiang, Wenlan; Chen, Quangong

    2016-05-15

    The net primary production (NPP) of grassland largely determines terrestrial carbon (C) sinks, and thus plays an important role in the global C cycle. Comprehensive and sequential classification system of grasslands (CSCS) is a unique vegetation classification system (mainly for grassland) that is dependent on quantitative measurement indices [>0°C annual cumulative temperature (Σθ) and moisture index (K-value)]. Based on the relationship of the quantitative classification of CSCS and grassland NPP, a modified model of Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) was used to predict the grassland NPP and its temporal and spatial distribution in China from 2004 to 2008. The scatter plot of the estimated NPP and the observed NPP showed that the estimated data can be accepted with correlation coefficient of 0.896 (P<0.05). The average annual NPP of grassland from 2004 to 2008 in China ranged from 443.23 to 554.40 g Cm(-2)yr.(-)(1). The NPP also showed spatial-temporal variations. There existed an increasing trend of NPP from the northwest to southeast due to the zonal distribution of vegetation. From the trend of monthly variations, it can be drawn that the NPP accumulation primarily occurred between April and October. The average NPP over seven months from April to October was 482.19 g Cm(-2), or about 88.78% of the annual total. The spatial-temporal trend suggests the importance of water and thermal regimes in determining the grassland NPP (i.e. water and thermal are key limited factors for the grassland production), which is also confirmed by a cluster analysis. The mean annual NPP and the total annual NPP differed significantly among grassland classes corresponding with different Σθ and K-value. The results demonstrate that the grassland NPP and the classes/super-classes in CSCS achieve the optimum coupling. PMID:26925730

  5. Controls of vegetation structure and net primary production in restored grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    1. Vegetation structure and net primary production (NPP) are fundamental properties of ecosystems. Understanding how restoration practices following disturbance interact with environmental factors to control these properties can provide insight on how ecosystems recover and guide management efforts. 2. We assessed the relative contribution of environmental and restoration factors in controlling vegetation structure, above- and below-ground investment in production across a chronosequence of semiarid Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields recovering from dryland wheat cropping relative to undisturbed grassland. Importantly, we determined the role of plant diversity and how seeding either native or introduced perennial grasses influenced the recovery of vegetation properties. 3. Plant basal cover increased with field age and was highest in CRP fields seeded with native perennial grasses. In contrast, fields seeded with introduced perennial grasses had tall-growing plants with relatively low basal cover. These vegetation structural characteristics interacted with precipitation, but not soil characteristics, to influence above-ground NPP (ANPP). Fields enrolled in the CRP program for >7 years supported twice as much ANPP as undisturbed shortgrass steppe in the first wet year of the study, but all CRP fields converged on a common low amount of ANPP in the following dry year and invested less than half as much as the shortgrass steppe in below-ground biomass. 4. ANPP in CRP fields seeded with native perennial grasses for more than 7 years was positively related to species richness, whereas ANPP in CRP fields seeded with introduced perennial grasses were controlled more by dominant species. 5. Synthesis and applications. Seeding with introduced, instead of native, perennial grasses had a strong direct influence on vegetation structure, including species richness, which indirectly affected NPP through time. However, the effects of restoring either native or introduced

  6. Estimation and Analysis of Gross Primary Production of Soybean Under Various Management Practices and Drought Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, P.; Xiao, X.; Suyker, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) of croplands may be used to quantify crop productivity and evaluate a range of management practices. Eddy flux data from three soybean (Glycine max L.) fields under different management practices (no-till vs till; rainfed vs irrigated) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived vegetation indices (VIs) were used to evaluate the biophysical performance of VIs and crop phenology, and to model GPP using a satellite-based vegetation photosynthesis model (VPM). The VIs tracked soybean phenology well and delineated the growing season length. The results show that the carbon uptake period and seasonal sums of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and GPP can be inferred from the length of the vegetation activity period from satellite remote sensing data. Land surface water index (LSWI) tracked drought-impacted vegetation well. On a seasonal scale, NEE of the soybean sites ranged from -37 to -264 g C m-2. The result suggests that rainfed soybean fields needed about 450-500 mm of well-distributed seasonal rainfall to maximize the net carbon sink. During non-drought conditions, VPM accurately estimated seasonal dynamics and interannual variation of GPP of soybean under different management practices. However, some large discrepancies between GPPVPM and GPPEC were observed under drought conditions as the VI did not reflect the corresponding decrease in GPP. Diurnal GPP dynamics showed a bimodal distribution with a pronounced midday depression at the period of higher water vapor pressure deficit (> 1.2 kPa). A modified Wscalar based on LSWI, to account for the water stress, in VPM helped quantify the reduction in GPP during severe drought and the model's performance improved substantially. The results of this study demonstrate the potential use of remotely sensed VIs for better understanding of carbon dynamics and extrapolation of GPP of soybean croplands.

  7. Simulation of the effects of bottom topography on net primary production induced by riverine input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshiba, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Riverine input often leads to high biological productivity in coastal areas. In coastal areas termed as region of freshwater influence (ROFI), horizontal anticyclonic gyres and vertical circulation form by density differences between buoyant river water and sea water. Previous physical oceanography studies have shown that the horizontal pattern of anticyclonic gyres and the strength of vertical circulation are dependent on the bottom topography of ROFI. However, the dependencies of biogeochemical cycles such as the net primary production (NPP) on the bottom topography have not been verified. In order to clarify how the bottom topography affects the NPP in phytoplankton blooms caused by riverine input through the physical processes in ROFI, we used an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) including a simple ecosystem model and conducted several case studies varying the bottom slope angle in the ideal settings. We estimated NPP categorized into three nutrients supplied from the river, the sea-subsurface layer and via regeneration: RI-NPP, S-NPP and RE-NPP. S-NPP and RE-NPP are larger and smaller with a steeper slope, respectively, while RI-NPP is not affected by the slope angle. As a result, total NPP is weakly dependent on the slope angle, i.e., because S- and RE-NPPs cancel each other out through two physical processes, (1) S-NPP is controlled by the strength of the vertical circulation and (2) RE-NPP is controlled by the shape of the horizontal gyre, which both vary with the bottom slope angle. We also conducted realistic simulations for Ishikari Bay, Japan and confirmed a similar dependency to that in the above ideal settings. That is, the simulation results are consistent with the regime of ideal settings and show that RI- and RE-NPPs are important variables for Ishikari Bay which has a gentle slope.

  8. Sea Surface Temperature Influence on Terrestrial Gross Primary Production along the Southern California Current.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Janet J; Vargas, Rodrigo; Rivas, David; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Hernandez-Ayon, J Martin; Lara-Lara, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Some land and ocean processes are related through connections (and synoptic-scale teleconnections) to the atmosphere. Synoptic-scale atmospheric (El Niño/Southern Oscillation [ENSO], Pacific Decadal Oscillation [PDO], and North Atlantic Oscillation [NAO]) decadal cycles are known to influence the global terrestrial carbon cycle. Potentially, smaller scale land-ocean connections influenced by coastal upwelling (changes in sea surface temperature) may be important for local-to-regional water-limited ecosystems where plants may benefit from air moisture transported from the ocean to terrestrial ecosystems. Here we use satellite-derived observations to test potential connections between changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in regions with strong coastal upwelling and terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) across the Baja California Peninsula. This region is characterized by an arid/semiarid climate along the southern California Current. We found that SST was correlated with the fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (fPAR; as a proxy for GPP) with lags ranging from 0 to 5 months. In contrast ENSO was not as strongly related with fPAR as SST in these coastal ecosystems. Our results show the importance of local-scale changes in SST during upwelling events, to explain the variability in GPP in coastal, water-limited ecosystems. The response of GPP to SST was spatially-dependent: colder SST in the northern areas increased GPP (likely by influencing fog formation), while warmer SST at the southern areas was associated to higher GPP (as SST is in phase with precipitation patterns). Interannual trends in fPAR are also spatially variable along the Baja California Peninsula with increasing secular trends in subtropical regions, decreasing trends in the most arid region, and no trend in the semi-arid regions. These findings suggest that studies and ecosystem process based models should consider the lateral influence of local-scale ocean processes that could

  9. Impact of modern battery design and the implications for primary and secondary lead production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, M. W.; Manders, J. E.; Eckfeld, S.; Prengaman, R. D.

    The emerging change in the automobile industry with the advent of the 42 V electrical operating system will impose a revolutionary change not only on the car industry, but also on the battery industry overall. The implications of this change will be felt by the battery producers, most of whom will require new or advanced production techniques for 36 V batteries, and subsequently by their suppliers of raw material. The demand for batteries of higher quality—in particular, the valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) battery, which is the battery of choice for the new automotive system—will place much higher demands upon the quality of the raw materials used in battery manufacture. It has been well documented that high-quality raw materials, such as lead, acid and separators, are a requirement in order to guarantee battery performance. The presence of impurities (antimony, arsenic, tellurium, etc.) in the enclosed system of the VRLA battery will impart problems such as dry-out, self-discharge and negative-plate capacity loss which will result in premature failure of the battery. One major problem for both primary and secondary lead producers is the presence of these impurities in their metal streams. Of particular interest to the smelters are the levels of antimony and silver. The latter element is increasing to alarming levels. With changing battery technology, both elements will pose serious problems to the lead producers in maintaining high-quality lead under the present cost structure. Some of the challenges that face the lead industry in meeting the demands of VRLA battery producers for product of higher quality are examined in this paper.

  10. Ecosystem model intercomparison of under-ice and total primary production in the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Meibing; Popova, Ekaterina E.; Zhang, Jinlun; Ji, Rubao; Pendleton, Daniel; Varpe, Øystein; Yool, Andrew; Lee, Younjoo J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous observational studies have found increasing primary production (PP) in response to declining sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean. In this study, under-ice PP was assessed based on three coupled ice-ocean-ecosystem models participating in the Forum for Arctic Modeling and Observational Synthesis (FAMOS) project. All models showed good agreement with under-ice measurements of surface chlorophyll-a concentration and vertically integrated PP rates during the main under-ice production period, from mid-May to September. Further, modeled 30-year (1980-2009) mean values and spatial patterns of sea ice concentration compared well with remote sensing data. Under-ice PP was higher in the Arctic shelf seas than in the Arctic Basin, but ratios of under-ice PP over total PP were spatially correlated with annual mean sea ice concentration, with higher ratios in higher ice concentration regions. Decreases in sea ice from 1980 to 2009 were correlated significantly with increases in total PP and decreases in the under-ice PP/total PP ratio for most of the Arctic, but nonsignificantly related to under-ice PP, especially in marginal ice zones. Total PP within the Arctic Circle increased at an annual rate of between 3.2 and 8.0 Tg C/yr from 1980 to 2009. This increase in total PP was due mainly to a PP increase in open water, including increases in both open water area and PP rate per unit area, and therefore much stronger than the changes in under-ice PP. All models suggested that, on a pan-Arctic scale, the fraction of under-ice PP declined with declining sea ice cover over the last three decades.

  11. Sea Surface Temperature Influence on Terrestrial Gross Primary Production along the Southern California Current

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Janet J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Rivas, David; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Hernandez-Ayon, J. Martin; Lara-Lara, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Some land and ocean processes are related through connections (and synoptic-scale teleconnections) to the atmosphere. Synoptic-scale atmospheric (El Niño/Southern Oscillation [ENSO], Pacific Decadal Oscillation [PDO], and North Atlantic Oscillation [NAO]) decadal cycles are known to influence the global terrestrial carbon cycle. Potentially, smaller scale land-ocean connections influenced by coastal upwelling (changes in sea surface temperature) may be important for local-to-regional water-limited ecosystems where plants may benefit from air moisture transported from the ocean to terrestrial ecosystems. Here we use satellite-derived observations to test potential connections between changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in regions with strong coastal upwelling and terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) across the Baja California Peninsula. This region is characterized by an arid/semiarid climate along the southern California Current. We found that SST was correlated with the fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (fPAR; as a proxy for GPP) with lags ranging from 0 to 5 months. In contrast ENSO was not as strongly related with fPAR as SST in these coastal ecosystems. Our results show the importance of local-scale changes in SST during upwelling events, to explain the variability in GPP in coastal, water-limited ecosystems. The response of GPP to SST was spatially-dependent: colder SST in the northern areas increased GPP (likely by influencing fog formation), while warmer SST at the southern areas was associated to higher GPP (as SST is in phase with precipitation patterns). Interannual trends in fPAR are also spatially variable along the Baja California Peninsula with increasing secular trends in subtropical regions, decreasing trends in the most arid region, and no trend in the semi-arid regions. These findings suggest that studies and ecosystem process based models should consider the lateral influence of local-scale ocean processes that could

  12. Simulation of tree ring-widths with a model for primary production, carbon allocation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Falster, D.

    2014-07-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called "T". This model accepts input from a first-principles light-use efficiency model (the P model). The P model provides values for Gross Primary Production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport-tissue, and fine root production and respiration, in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional and functional relationships. Our approach thereby integrates two modelling approaches separately developed in the global carbon-cycle and forest-science literature. The T model can represent both ontogenetic effects (impact of ageing) and the effects of environmental variations and trends (climate and CO2) on growth. Driven by local climate records, the model was applied to simulate ring widths during 1958-2006 for multiple trees of Pinus koraiensis from the Changbai Mountain, northeastern China. Each tree was initialised at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. The model produces realistic simulations of the interannual variability in ring width for different age cohorts (young, mature, old). Both the simulations and observations show a significant positive response of tree-ring width to growing-season total photosynthetically active radiation (PAR0) and the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration (α), and a significant negative response to mean annual temperature (MAT). The slopes of the simulated and observed relationships with PAR0 and α are similar; the negative response to MAT is underestimated by the model. Comparison of simulations with fixed and changing atmospheric CO2 concentration shows that CO2 fertilization over the past 50 years is too small to be distinguished in the ring-width data given ontogenetic trends and interannual variability in climate.

  13. Simulation of tree-ring widths with a model for primary production, carbon allocation, and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Falster, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple, generic model of annual tree growth, called "T". This model accepts input from a first-principles light-use efficiency model (the "P" model). The P model provides values for gross primary production (GPP) per unit of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR is estimated from the current leaf area. GPP is allocated to foliage, transport tissue, and fine-root production and respiration in such a way as to satisfy well-understood dimensional and functional relationships. Our approach thereby integrates two modelling approaches separately developed in the global carbon-cycle and forest-science literature. The T model can represent both ontogenetic effects (the impact of ageing) and the effects of environmental variations and trends (climate and CO2) on growth. Driven by local climate records, the model was applied to simulate ring widths during the period 1958-2006 for multiple trees of Pinus koraiensis from the Changbai Mountains in northeastern China. Each tree was initialised at its actual diameter at the time when local climate records started. The model produces realistic simulations of the interannual variability in ring width for different age cohorts (young, mature, and old). Both the simulations and observations show a significant positive response of tree-ring width to growing-season total photosynthetically active radiation (PAR0) and the ratio of actual to potential evapotranspiration (α), and a significant negative response to mean annual temperature (MAT). The slopes of the simulated and observed relationships with PAR0 and α are similar; the negative response to MAT is underestimated by the model. Comparison of simulations with fixed and changing atmospheric CO2 concentration shows that CO2 fertilisation over the past 50 years is too small to be distinguished in the ring-width data, given ontogenetic trends and interannual variability in climate.

  14. Remote estimation of gross primary productivity in crops: from close range to satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.; Gitelson, A. A.; Sakamoto, T.; Masek, J. G.; Rundquist, D.; Nguy-Robertson, A. L.; Verma, S.; Suyker, A.

    2013-12-01

    An accurate estimation of crop gross primary productivity (GPP) is essential for monitoring regional and global carbon exchanges. In this study, with ten-year observations throughout 2001 to 2010 at three irrigated and rainfed AmerFlux sites in Mead, Nebraska, a simple model was tested to estimate crop GPP using a product of chlorophyll-related vegetation index and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Vegetation indices (VI), a proxy of canopy chlorophyll, were calculated from canopy reflectance at various spatial and temporal resolution, including daily observations of four-band radiance 6 m above the ground, weekly in-situ measurements of hyperspectral reflectance, and satellite data (Landsat and MODIS). This model was able to estimate GPP accurately in croplands with different crop species, field managements and climatic conditions. It showed that the used VI was quite sensitive to detect daily GPP variation in crops even under stressed conditions when total Chl content is closely tied to seasonal dynamic of GPP. To minimize the uncertainty of GPP variations, which do not follow fluctuations of incoming PAR, potential PAR was introduced into the model as a better representative of radiation absorbed by canopy for photosynthesis. The model using satellite data and potential PAR is entirely based on remotely sensed data not requiring any ground-based observation. The indices using green and NIR Landsat bands were found to be the most accurate in GPP estimation with coefficients of variation below 13% for maize and 15% for soybean. Using MODIS 250 m data, EVI2 and WDRVI were accurate estimating GPP with coefficient of variation below 20% in maize and 25% in soybean.

  15. Modeling and spatially distributing forest net primary production at the regional scale.

    PubMed

    Mickler, Robert A; Earnhardt, Todd S; Moore, Jennifer A

    2002-04-01

    Forest, agricultural, rangeland, wetland, and urban landscapes have different rates of carbon sequestration and total carbon sequestration potential under alternative management options. Changes in the proportion and spatial distribution of land use could enhance or degrade that area's ability to sequester carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. As the ecosystems within a landscape change due to natural or anthropogenic processes, they may go from being a carbon sink to a carbon source or vice versa. Satellite image analysis has been tested for timely and accurate measurement of spatially explicit land use change and is well suited for use in inventory and monitoring of terrestrial carbon. The coupling of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data with a physiologically based forest productivity model (PnET-II) and historic climatic data provides an opportunity to enhance field plot-based forest inventory and monitoring methodologies. We use periodic forest inventory data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program to obtain estimates of forest area and type and to generate estimates of carbon storage for evergreen, deciduous, and mixed-forest classes. The area information is used in an accuracy assessment of remotely sensed forest cover at the regional scale. The map display of modeled net primary production (NPP) shows a range of forest carbon storage potentials and their spatial relationship to other landscape features across the southern United States. This methodology addresses the potential for measuring and projecting forest carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere of the southern United States. PMID:12002186

  16. Regulation of nitrogen uptake and assimilation: Effects of nitrogen source, root-zone pH, and aerial CO2 concentration on growth and productivity of soybeans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D.; Tolley-Henry, L.

    1989-01-01

    An important feature of controlled-environment crop production systems such as those to be used for life support of crews during space exploration is the efficient utilization of nitrogen supplies. Making decisions about the best sources of these supplies requires research into the relationship between nitrogen source and the physiological processes which regulate vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Work done in four areas within this research objective is reported: (1) experiments on the effects of root-zone pH on preferential utilization of NO3(-) versus NH4(+) nitrogen; (2) investigation of processes at the whole-plant level that regulate nitrogen uptake; (3) studies of the effects of atmospheric CO2 and NO3(-) supply on the growth of soybeans; and (4) examination of the role of NO3(-) uptake in enhancement of root respiration.

  17. Productivity, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and light use efficiency in crops: implications for remote sensing of crop primary production.

    PubMed

    Gitelson, Anatoly A; Peng, Yi; Arkebauer, Timothy J; Suyker, Andrew E

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation productivity metrics such as gross primary production (GPP) at the canopy scale are greatly affected by the efficiency of using absorbed radiation for photosynthesis, or light use efficiency (LUE). Thus, close investigation of the relationships between canopy GPP and photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation is the basis for quantification of LUE. We used multiyear observations over irrigated and rainfed contrasting C3 (soybean) and C4 (maize) crops having different physiology, leaf structure, and canopy architecture to establish the relationships between canopy GPP and radiation absorbed by vegetation and quantify LUE. Although multiple LUE definitions are reported in the literature, we used a definition of efficiency of light use by photosynthetically active "green" vegetation (LUE(green)) based on radiation absorbed by "green" photosynthetically active vegetation on a daily basis. We quantified, irreversible slowly changing seasonal (constitutive) and rapidly day-to-day changing (facultative) LUE(green), as well as sensitivity of LUE(green) to the magnitude of incident radiation and drought events. Large (2-3-fold) variation of daily LUE(green) over the course of a growing season that is governed by crop physiological and phenological status was observed. The day-to-day variations of LUE(green) oscillated with magnitude 10-15% around the seasonal LUE(green) trend and appeared to be closely related to day-to-day variations of magnitude and composition of incident radiation. Our results show the high variability of LUE(green) between C3 and C4 crop species (1.43 g C/MJ vs. 2.24 g C/MJ, respectively), as well as within single crop species (i.e., maize or soybean). This implies that assuming LUE(green) as a constant value in GPP models is not warranted for the crops studied, and brings unpredictable uncertainties of remote GPP estimation, which should be accounted for in LUE models. The uncertainty of GPP estimation due to facultative and

  18. Evaluation of terrestrial primary production using biosphere models and space-based measurements of fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parazoo, N.; Bowman, K. W.; Frankenberg, C.; Sitch, S.; Fisher, J. B.; Jones, D. B.; Friedlingstein, P.; Poulter, B.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in the processes that control terrestrial carbon uptake are highly uncertain but likely to have a significant influence on future atmospheric CO2 levels. RECCAP aims to improve process understanding by reconciling fluxes from top-down CO2 inversions and bottom-up estimates from an ensemble of dynamical global vegetation models (DGVMs). As these models are typically used in projections of climate change a key part of this effort is evaluating drivers of net carbon exchange within the current climate. Of particular importance are the spatial distribution and time rate of change of gross primary productivity (GPP). Recent advances in the remote sensing of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence opens up a new possibility to directly measure planetary photosynthesis on spatially resolved scales. Here, we discuss a new methodology for estimating GPP from an optimal combination of an ensemble of DGVMs from the TRENDY project with satellite-based observations of chlorophyll fluorescence from GOSAT. We evaluate optimized fluxes against flux tower and semi-empirical data in N. America, Europe, and S. America, then examine the period 2009-2010 to identify critical regions (i.e., regions with high annual GPP) where optimized and model fluxes diverge.

  19. Responses of Terrestrial Ecosystems’ Net Primary Productivity to Future Regional Climate Change in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongsheng; Wu, Shaohong; Yin, Yunhe

    2013-01-01

    The impact of regional climate change on net primary productivity (NPP) is an important aspect in the study of ecosystems’ response to global climate change. China’s ecosystems are very sensitive to climate change owing to the influence of the East Asian monsoon. The Lund–Potsdam–Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model for China (LPJ-CN), a global dynamical vegetation model developed for China’s terrestrial ecosystems, was applied in this study to simulate the NPP changes affected by future climate change. As the LPJ-CN model is based on natural vegetation, the simulation in this study did not consider the influence of anthropogenic activities. Results suggest that future climate change would have adverse effects on natural ecosystems, with NPP tending to decrease in eastern China, particularly in the temperate and warm temperate regions. NPP would increase in western China, with a concentration in the Tibetan Plateau and the northwest arid regions. The increasing trend in NPP in western China and the decreasing trend in eastern China would be further enhanced by the warming climate. The spatial distribution of NPP, which declines from the southeast coast to the northwest inland, would have minimal variation under scenarios of climate change. PMID:23593325

  20. Occupational exposure to inhalable and total aerosol in the primary nickel production industry.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, P J; Vincent, J H; Wahl, G; Maldonado, G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--This paper describes a study that was carried out in the primary nickel production industry to investigate the levels of personal exposure to aerosols containing nickel and the impact on exposure assessment of introducing new personal sampling techniques with performance consistent with the latest particle size-selective criteria. METHODS--Experiments were carried out at workplaces in mining, milling, smelting, and refining works to investigate the effect of changing from the current method of total aerosol (with the widely used 37 mm filter holder) to the new method of measuring inhalable aerosol (with the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable aerosol sampler). RESULTS--The results show that inhalable aerosol exposure concentrations--for both overall aerosol and for total nickel--were consistently and significantly higher than the corresponding total aerosol concentrations. Weighted least squares linear regression yielded IOM/37 mm factors ranging from about 1.2 to 4.0. The exposure data for each company process were found to be log-normally distributed. CONCLUSIONS--The results suggest the possibility of generating a single pragmatic factor for each company process for converting current total aerosol exposures to new exposures based on the inhalability concept contained in the latest particle size-selective criteria for aerosol exposure assessment. Such data may be important in determining new occupational exposure limits for nickel. PMID:8563841

  1. [Sensitivity of parameters in net primary productivity model of broadleaf-Korean pine mixed forest].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chun-Hua; Hao, Zhan-Qing; He, Hong-Shi; Zhou, Dan-Hui

    2008-05-01

    PnET-II (photosynthesis and evapotranspiration) model is an ecosystem process model, which requires extensive input parameters, including vegetation parameters, soil parameters and climate parameters, to simulate net primary productivity (NPP). This study estimated the total and wood (stem and branch) NPPs of Korean pine and broadleaf species in Fenglin Natural Reserve, and examined the responses of the NPPs to the variations of the input parameters in PnET-II model. The simulation results indicated that among the vegetation parameters in PnET-II model, the variation of canopy parameters, had greater effects on the simulated NPPs of Korean pine and broadleaf species, and the response of Korean pine's total NPP to vegetation parameters was larger than that of broadleaf species'. The variation of soil water holding capacity (WHC) had smaller effects on the NPPs of Korean pine and broadleaf species, and the response of Korean pine's NPP to the WHC was somewhat smaller than that of broadleaf trees'. In climate scenarios, the variation of air temperature had the greatest effects on the simulated NPP of Korean pine and broadleaf trees, followed by precipitation and radiation. Different climate scenarios had different effects on the predicted results. The total and wood NPPs of Korean pine and broadleaf trees had different responses to the input parameters. PMID:18655573

  2. Integration of radiative transfer into satellite models of ocean primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, T. J.; Tilstone, G. H.; Groom, S. B.

    2005-10-01

    A major goal of ocean color observations from space is the determination of phytoplankton primary productivity (PP) and hence oceanic carbon uptake. Results of a PP model implemented to use satellite-derived fields of chlorophyll, photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and sea-surface temperature (SST) are presented. The model gave a global estimate of PP of around 57 Gt C yr-1 and gives a low RMS (0.16) when compared with in situ data. However, as the model's in-water light field parameterization only considers attenuation by pure water and chlorophyll, PP is overestimated in case II waters where other optically important constituents such as colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) are also present. This paper develops a novel technique to determine PP by coupling a radiative transfer code, which allows the inclusion of CDOM and SPM, to the original photosynthesis model. For the global calculations, a look-up table has been generated using chlorophyll, CDOM, SST, PAR and day length as inputs. The resultant 364,500 element look-up table has been applied to data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). PP retrievals are improved in case II waters and global estimates are reduced to between 52 and 55 Gt C yr-1.

  3. How stratification changes affect primary production in the California Current System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Miller, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Warming of the California Current for the recent several decades was observed and buoyancy frequency increased by the warming, which might alter the upwelling cell and nutrient supply in the California Current System (CCS). Coastal upwelling plays an important role in bringing nutrients into euphotic zone for photosynthesis in the CCS. It is well known that bottom stress plays a significant role for the coastal upwelling. However, Lentz and Chapman (2004) proposed a new theory that nonlinear cross-shelf momentum flux can be more important than the bottom stress so onshore returning flow in the bottom boundary layer is less than interior cross-shelf momentum flux. The importance of interior flow depends on Burger number, which is a function of buoyancy frequency. Thus, we hypothesized that intensified stratification observed in the CCS, consequently increased Burger number can result in stronger interior return flow, which has less nutrient than bottom boundary return flow, and presumably less primary production and zooplankton biomass. To address this hypothesis modeling effort has been conducted using Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) with biological tracers.

  4. Sensitivity of Vegetation Index and Gross Primary Productivity to Drought and Heat Waves in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Xiao, X.

    2014-12-01

    Drought and heat waves greatly influenced vegetation growth and photosynthesis. With an increasing frequency, these extreme climate events could alter the carbon cycle at regional and continental scales. To better understand the impacts of drought and heat wave on vegetation and carbon fluxes in temperate terrestrial ecosystems, we first evaluated three vegetation indices (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), and Land Surface Water Index (LSWI)) during 2000-2013 to determine the sensitivity of these vegetation indices to drought and heat waves in 2003 at 14 CO2 eddy covariance flux tower sites in Europe. We then ran the satellite-based Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM) at these sites and compared gross primary production (GPP) estimates from the VPM model (GPPVPM) with estimates from the eddy covariance measurements (GPPEC). The VPM model is driven by climate data (air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation) and two vegetation indices (EVI and LSWI). The comparison shows that the VPM model has a good capability in predicting vegetation photosynthesis in both normal and drought periods. The results from this research work not only reveals the various sensitivity of NDVI, EVI and LSWI to drought and heat wave in 2003, in Europe, but also shows that the VPM model is a robust tool for modeling GPP in terrestrial ecosystems in Europe.

  5. Linking aboveground net primary productivity to soil carbon and dissolved organic carbon in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Fox S.; Lajtha, Kate J.

    2013-07-01

    Factors influencing soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content in complex terrain, where vegetation, climate, and topography vary over the scale of a few meters, are not well understood. We examined the spatial correlations of lidar and geographic information system-derived landscape topography, empirically measured soil characteristics, and current and historical vegetation composition and structure versus SOM fractions and DOC pools and leaching on a small catchment (WS1) in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, located in the western Cascades Range of Oregon, USA. We predicted that aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), litter fall, and nitrogen mineralization would be positively correlated with SOM, DOC, and carbon (C) content of the soil based on the principle that increased C inputs cause C stores in and losses from in the soil. We expected that in tandem, certain microtopographical and microclimatic characteristics might be associated with elevated C inputs and correspondingly, soil C stores and losses. We confirmed that on this site, positive relationships exist between ANPP, C inputs (litter fall), and losses (exportable DOC), but we did not find that these relationships between ANPP, inputs, and exports were translated to SOM stores (mg C/g soil), C content of the soil (% C/g soil), or DOC pools (determined with salt and water extractions). We suggest that the biogeochemical processes controlling C storage and lability in soil may relate to longer-term variability in aboveground inputs that result from a heterogeneous and evolving forest stand.

  6. Assessment of nutrient limitation on the primary production and N2 fixation across the tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridame, C.; Mills, M. M.; Davey, M.; Laroche, J.; Geider, R.

    2003-04-01

    In the surface layer of the Tropical North Atlantic, Saharan dust inputs, as a source of iron and phosphate, might preferentially stimulate the growth of diazotrophs. The availability of iron, essential for the synthesis of the nitrogenase enzyme, and/or phosphorus through dust inputs is suspected to impose additional control on N_2 fixation in these waters chronically low in dissolved inorganic nitrogen. Here, we present results from the cruise M-55 (October--November 2002, SOLAS Program) in the tropical Atlantic (11^oN) between Curacao and Cameroon that address this hypothesis. The studied area was particularly interesting because it is characterized by a nutrient gradient from oligotrophic waters (Caribbean Sea) to upwelling dominated regions (NW Africa) and is also subject to a strong lateral gradient of inputs from Saharan mineral aerosol. Using trace metal clean methods, nutrient addition bioassays were used to asses which nutrient (N, P, and Fe) most likely limits of phytoplankton biomass, primary productivity and dinitrogen fixation in incubation experiments along the transect. An additional Saharan dust treatment, considered as a proxy for Saharan aerosol, was used to simulate an atmospheric Saharan dust input into the surface layer.

  7. Community structure and primary productivity of forested wetlands in western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Community structure and net primary productivity were measured in five forested wetlands in western Kentucky and compared with hydrologic information. A bottomland hardwood forest (H1), cypress-ash swamp (H2), and deep cypress swamp (H3) were located on the floodplain of the Ohio River and were subject to annual spring flooding. The other two sites were adjacent to a smaller, channelized stream that floods frequently, but for short periods. Only a young riparian forest (C3) is directly affected by the stream unless an unusually severe flood exceeds the levee that hydrologically isolates the stagnant cypress swamp (C4). Community structure indices were lowest in the two permanently-flooded cypress swamps. Tree biomass was 9.4 kg/m/sup 2/ at C4 and 10.2 kg/m/sup 2/ at H3. High biomass was found at H1 and H2 (30.3 and 31.2 kg/m/sup 2/) while C3 was intermediate at 18.4 kg/m/sup 2/. Other structural measures, notably stem density and mean height were closely related to biomass estimates. Low leaf to wood biomass ratios were found at H2 and C4 which suggests low nutrient availability. Nutrients are abundant at H2 due to agricultural runoff but physiological stress and aquatic macrophyte competition may limit tree uptake.

  8. Environmental control requirements for the Weapons Production Primary Standards Laboratory (WPPSL)

    SciTech Connect

    Braudaway, D.W.

    1990-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Weapons Production Primary Standards Laboratory (WPPSL) for the Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex. The present facility is housed principally in a three story building shared with other organizations but has some functions located in other buildings. The building has been occupied for 30 years and the environmental control equipment, while functional, shows the ravages of time. This facility was quite advanced for its time but does not meet current needs. Replacement of obsolete measuring equipment, extension of measurement capability to additional disciplines and to higher precision levels have made the facility inadequate for current and future needs. Accordingly, plans have been under way for a new updated facility which is planned to meet today's requirements and to be sufficiently flexible to cover changes in the near future. Where practical in this set of requirements, reference has been made to existing documents on standards laboratory environments. Because of the history of the facility and because of the advanced features, interest has been expressed in the requirements developed for the new facility. Accordingly, this document has been prepared so that these requirements are published. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Remote Estimation of Gross Primary Production in Crops at Field and Regional Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitelson, A. A.; Vina, A.; Verma, S. B.; Rundquist, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate estimation of spatially distributed CO2 fluxes is of great importance for regional and global studies of carbon balance. We have found that in irrigated and rainfed crops (maize and soybean), GPP is closely related to total crop chlorophyll content. The finding allowed development of a new technique for remote estimation of crop chlorophyll specifically for assessing gross primary production. The technique is based on reflectance in two spectral channels: the near-infrared and either the green or the red-edge. The technique provided accurate estimations of daily GPP in both crops. Validation using independent datasets for irrigated and rainfed maize and soybean documented the robustness of the technique. We report also about applying the developed technique for GPP retrieval from data acquired by both an airborne imaging spectrometer (AISA-Eagle) and Landsat ETM+. The Chlorophyll Index, retrieved from Landsat ETM+ data, was found to be an accurate surrogate measure for daily crop GPP with a root mean square error of GPP prediction of less than 1.58 g C m-2d-1 in a GPP range of 1.88 g C m-2d-1 to 23.1 g C m-2d-1. These results suggest new possibilities for analyzing the spatio-temporal variation of the GPP of crops using not only the extensive archive of Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery acquired since the early 1980s but also the 500-m/pixel data currently being acquired by MODIS.

  10. Estimating Daytime Ecosystem Respiration to Improve Estimates of Gross Primary Production of a Temperate Forest

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jinwei; Wu, Jiabing; Guan, Dexin; Yao, Fuqi; Yuan, Fenghui; Wang, Anzhi; Jin, Changjie

    2014-01-01

    Leaf respiration is an important component of carbon exchange in terrestrial ecosystems, and estimates of leaf respiration directly affect the accuracy of ecosystem carbon budgets. Leaf respiration is inhibited by light; therefore, gross primary production (GPP) will be overestimated if the reduction in leaf respiration by light is ignored. However, few studies have quantified GPP overestimation with respect to the degree of light inhibition in forest ecosystems. To determine the effect of light inhibition of leaf respiration on GPP estimation, we assessed the variation in leaf respiration of seedlings of the dominant tree species in an old mixed temperate forest with different photosynthetically active radiation levels using the Laisk method. Canopy respiration was estimated by combining the effect of light inhibition on leaf respiration of these species with within-canopy radiation. Leaf respiration decreased exponentially with an increase in light intensity. Canopy respiration and GPP were overestimated by approximately 20.4% and 4.6%, respectively, when leaf respiration reduction in light was ignored compared with the values obtained when light inhibition of leaf respiration was considered. This study indicates that accurate estimates of daytime ecosystem respiration are needed for the accurate evaluation of carbon budgets in temperate forests. In addition, this study provides a valuable approach to accurately estimate GPP by considering leaf respiration reduction in light in other ecosystems. PMID:25419844

  11. [Variation trends of natural vegetation net primary productivity in China under climate change scenario].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-sheng; Wu, Shao-hong; Yin, Yun-he

    2011-04-01

    Based on the widely used Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (LPJ) for climate change study, and according to the features of natural environment in China, the operation mechanism of the model was adjusted, and the parameters were modified. With the modified LPJ model and taking 1961-1990 as baseline period, the responses of natural vegetation net primary productivity (NPP) in China to climate change in 1991-2080 were simulated under the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) B2 scenario. In 1961-1990, the total NPP of natural vegetation in China was about 3.06 Pg C a(-1); in 1961-2080, the total NPP showed a fluctuant decreasing trend, with an accelerated decreasing rate. Under the condition of slight precipitation change, the increase of mean air temperature would have definite adverse impact on the NPP. Spatially, the NPP decreased from southeast coast to northwest inland, and this pattern would have less variation under climate change. In eastern China with higher NPP, especially in Northeast China, east of North China, and Loess Plateau, the NPP would mainly have a decreasing trend; while in western China with lower NPP, especially in the Tibetan Plateau and Tarim Basin, the NPP would be increased. With the intensive climate change, such a variation trend of NPP would be more obvious. PMID:21774310

  12. Dynamic changes in terrestrial net primary production and their effects on evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Chen, Yaning; Wang, Yang; Fang, Gonghuan

    2016-06-01

    The dramatic increase of global temperature since the year 2000 has a considerable impact on the global water cycle and vegetation dynamics. Little has been done about recent feedback of vegetation to climate in different parts of the world, and land evapotranspiration (ET) is the means of this feedback. Here we used the global 1 km MODIS net primary production (NPP) and ET data sets (2000-2014) to investigate their temporospatial changes under the context of global warming. The results showed that global NPP slightly increased in 2000-2014 at a rate of 0.06 PgC yr-2. More than 64 % of vegetated land in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) showed increased NPP (at a rate of 0.13 PgC yr-2), while 60.3 % of vegetated land in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) showed a decreasing trend (at a rate of -0.18 PgC yr-2). Vegetation greening and climate change promote rises of global ET. Specially, the increased rate of land ET in the NH (0.61 mm yr-2) is faster than that in the SH (0.41 mm yr-2). Over the same period, global warming and vegetation greening accelerate evaporation in soil moisture, thus reducing the amount of soil water storage. Continuation of these trends will likely exacerbate regional drought-induced disturbances and point to an increased risk of ecological drought, especially during regional dry climate phases.

  13. Nitrogen limitation of net primary productivity in terrestrial ecosystems is globally distributed.

    PubMed

    LeBauer, David S; Treseder, Kathleen K

    2008-02-01

    Our meta-analysis of 126 nitrogen addition experiments evaluated nitrogen (N) limitation of net primary production (NPP) in terrestrial ecosystems. We tested the hypothesis that N limitation is widespread among biomes and influenced by geography and climate. We used the response ratio (R approximately equal ANPP(N)/ANPP(ctrl)) of aboveground plant growth in fertilized to control plots and found that most ecosystems are nitrogen limited with an average 29% growth response to nitrogen (i.e., R = 1.29). The response ratio was significant within temperate forests (R = 1.19), tropical forests (R = 1.60), temperate grasslands (R = 1.53), tropical grasslands (R = 1.26), wetlands (R = 1.16), and tundra (R = 1.35), but not deserts. Eight tropical forest studies had been conducted on very young volcanic soils in Hawaii, and this subgroup was strongly N limited (R = 2.13), which resulted in a negative correlation between forest R and latitude. The degree of N limitation in the remainder of the tropical forest studies (R = 1.20) was comparable to that of temperate forests, and when the young Hawaiian subgroup was excluded, forest R did not vary with latitude. Grassland response increased with latitude, but was independent of temperature and precipitation. These results suggest that the global N and C cycles interact strongly and that geography can mediate ecosystem response to N within certain biome types. PMID:18409427

  14. Ozone vegetation damage effects on gross primary productivity in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, X.; Unger, N.

    2014-09-01

    We apply an off-line process-based vegetation model (the Yale Interactive Terrestrial Biosphere model) to assess the impacts of ozone (O3) vegetation damage on gross primary productivity (GPP) in the United States during the past decade (1998-2007). The model's GPP simulation is evaluated at 40 sites of the North American Carbon Program (NACP) synthesis. The ecosystem-scale model version reproduces interannual variability and seasonality of GPP at most sites, especially in croplands. Inclusion of the O3 damage impact decreases biases of simulated GPP at most of the NACP sites. The simulation with the O3 damage effect reproduces 64% of the observed variance in summer GPP and 42% on the annual average. Based on a regional gridded simulation over the US, summertime average O3-free GPP is 6.1 g C m-2 day-1 (9.5 g C m-2 day-1 in the east of 95° W and 3.9 g C m-2 day-1 in the west). O3 damage decreases GPP by 4-8% on average in the eastern US and leads to significant decreases of 11-17% in east coast hot spots. Sensitivity simulations show that a 25% decrease in surface O3 concentration halves the average GPP damage to only 2-4%, suggesting the substantial co-benefits to ecosystem health that may be achieved via O3 air pollution control.

  15. Forecasting global urban expansion and its effect on terrestrial net primary productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuecao; Yu, Le; Liu, Xiaoping; Gong, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is of great importance to global terrestrial carbon cycle and global climate change. Although many relevant studies have been carried out, attempts on its consequence caused by urban expansion are still limited. In this study, we quantified the NPP loss after urbanization by 2100, through linking a global land use/cover dynamic (GLCD) model and a neighborhood proxy method. Finer resolution (30m) global land cover map as well as detailed land demand dataset (half degree) were adopted for urban growth modeling and NPP quantification. Our results indicate that (1) by 2100, the global urban area will reach 125.15×104 km2, with a growth rate of 2,892 km2/year; (2) the NPP loss due to urbanization during period of 2010-2100 is 9×10^(-3) PgC, which accounts more than 3% of the total urban NPP in 2010. In addition, by the end of this century, most urbanized land is estimated to happen in developing countries, e.g. China and India. Overall, global urban expansion results a neglect impact to NPP. Therefore, more attentions should be paid to cope with urban development in future, such as urban planning or managements.

  16. Temperature sensitivity of stream gross primary production and respiration from the tropics to the arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, C.; Argerich, A.; Baker, C.; Bowden, W. B.; Dodds, W. K.; Douglas, M.; Farrell, K.; Flinn, M. B.; Garcia, E.; Gido, K. B.; Harms, T.; Jones, J.; Koenig, L.; Kominoski, J. S.; McDonald, K. S.; McDowell, W. H.; McMaster, D.; Parker, S.; Rosemond, A.; Rüegg, J.; Sheehan, K.; Trentman, M. T.; Wollheim, W. M.; Ballantyne, F.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the temperature dependence of gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) in streams is critical to predict the carbon balance in stream ecosystems under global warming. We collected dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), channel hydrology and geomorphology, and temperature from multiple locations throughout stream networks in seven sites across six biomes, specifically tropical forest, temperate deciduous forest, temperate coniferous forest, tallgrass prairie, boreal forest, and arctic tundra. We estimated the activation energy (Ea) of GPP and ER from diel changes in DO, temperature and PAR for each stream reach. We showed the relationship between Ea and environmental variables, such as temperature, light availability and discharge. In addition, we found that Ea of GPP and ER were highly variable from reach to reach within each biome. The estimated Ea of GPP and ER was generally higher than predicted by metabolic theory. Ea of GPP ranges from 20 to 140 KJ/mol and Ea of ER ranges from 50 to 150 KJ/mol. There was no consistent trend of larger Ea for GPP or ER. This suggests that the changes in carbon balance in streams caused directly by warming is likely to be site specific.

  17. In situ inhibition of primary production due to ultraviolet radiation in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Helbling, E.W.; Villafane, V.E.; Holm-Hansen, O.

    1994-12-31

    Inhibition of photosynthesis due to ultra radiation (UVR) in antarctic phytoplankton has been documented by many authors. Most of these studies have used temperature-controlled incubators in which phytoplankton are exposed to either solar radiation or to UV-visible radiation provided by lamps. Although such experiments are invaluable for determining the effects of solar radiation on the metabolic activity of phytoplankton, they suffer from the fact that the cells will not be exposed to the same spectral irradiance that they would experience at various depths in the water column. The use of in situ incubations of natural phytoplankton assemblages provides the most direct and most realistic procedure to determine the effect of solar UVR on rates of primary production. In this paper, preliminary data obtained from such in situ incubations carried out from October through December 1993 at Palmer Station (64.7{degrees}S 64.1{degrees}W) on Anvers Island, Antarctica is reported. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Ground-based grasslands data to support remote sensing and ecosystem modeling of terrestrial primary production

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S.; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Jennings, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    Estimating terrestrial net primary production (NPP) using remote- sensing tools and ecosystem models requires adequate ground-based measurements for calibration, parameterization, and validation. These data needs were strongly endorsed at a recent meeting of ecosystem modelers organized by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme`s (IGBP`s) Data and Information System (DIS) and its Global Analysis, Interpretation, and Modelling (GAIM) Task Force. To meet these needs, a multinational, multiagency project is being coordinated by the IGBP DIS to compile existing NPP data from field sites and to regionalize NPP point estimates to various-sized grid cells. Progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on compiling NPP data for grasslands as part of the IGBP DIS data initiative is described. Site data and associated documentation from diverse field studies are being acquired for selected grasslands and are being reviewed for completeness, consistency, and adequacy of documentation, including a description of sampling methods. Data are being compiled in a database with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to remote sensing and global modeling. NPP data are available from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics. The ORNL DAAC is part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System, of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Ground-based grasslands data to support remote sensing and ecosystem modeling of terrestrial primary production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, R. J.; Scurlock, J. M. O.; Turner, R. S.; Jennings, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    Estimating terrestrial net primary production (NPP) using remote-sensing tools and ecosystem models requires adequate ground-based measurements for calibration, parameterization, and validation. These data needs were strongly endorsed at a recent meeting of ecosystem modelers organized by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program's (IGBP's) Data and Information System (DIS) and its Global Analysis, Interpretation, and Modelling (GAIM) Task Force. To meet these needs, a multinational, multiagency project is being coordinated by the IGBP DIS to compile existing NPP data from field sites and to regionalize NPP point estimates to various-sized grid cells. Progress at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on compiling NPP data for grasslands as part of the IGBP DIS data initiative is described. Site data and associated documentation from diverse field studies are being acquired for selected grasslands and are being reviewed for completeness, consistency, and adequacy of documentation, including a description of sampling methods. Data are being compiled in a database with spatial, temporal, and thematic characteristics relevant to remote sensing and global modeling. NPP data are available from the ORNL Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics. The ORNL DAAC is part of the Earth Observing System Data and Information System, of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Effects of Stream Fishes on Benthic Primary Productivity: A Mechanistic Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrave, C. W.

    2005-05-01

    I simultaneously tested three alternative hypotheses (the trophic cascade, nutrient enhancement via terrestrial nutrient translocation, and nutrient enhancement via bioturbation) for consumer regulation of primary productivity (PPR) by three widely distributed stream fish species (Orangethroat Darter, Western Mosquitofish, and Bullhead Minnow). I used stream mesocosms fitted with fish and terrestrial input barriers to address relative importance of localized fish predation versus access to terrestrial inputs for fish consumer effects. Orangethroat Darter, a benthic invertivore, increased PPR through an apparent trophic cascade, by localized reduction of benthic grazing invertebrate densities. Western mosquitofish, a surface feeding insectivore, increased PPR by enhancing nutrients through terrestrial nutrient translocation, and had no effect on benthic grazer invertebrate density. Bullhead Minnow, a benthic omnivore that disturbed sediments during foraging, increased PPR through nutrient enhancement via bioturbation, but within specific stream mesocosm areas two which the fish was restricted it also reduced benthic grazing invertebrates. Thus, suggesting this species may have affected PPR through a combination bioturbation and trophic cascade mechanisms. These mechanistic pathways are likely common processes by which fish affect food web structure and ecosystem function in many stream ecosystems.

  1. Interannual variation in climate-potential net primary productivity relationships in differing ecosystems of California

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, G.W.; Randerson, J.T. )

    1994-06-01

    The seasonality and interannual variation in potential net primary production (NPP) were examined in differing vegetation types in California over three years of contrasting precipitation using co-registered maps of climate, vegetation, and 1km biweekly NDVI derived from high resolution satellite AVHRR data. Differences in seasonality of the vegetation types (annual grassland, chamise chaparral, deciduous oak woodland, and evergreen oak) were clearly evident and corresponded well to patterns observed in field studies. In years and locations having high precipitation the annual peak in NDVI occurred later in all vegetation classes. The annual sum of biweekly NDVI was correlated with annual precipitation in all vegetation types, although the slopes and intercepts of the regressions differed among types. Annual grassland showed the largest increase in sumNDVI per unit increase in total precipitation and most of the variation in grassland sumNDVI was explained by variation in autumn precipitation. In general the ratio of sumNDVI to annual precipitation was dependent on the temporal distribution of precipitation with respect to the long-term average pattern. Published relationships between precipitation and NPP were used to develop equations relating annual NDVI sum to NPP.

  2. Marginal Lands Gross Primary Production Dominate Atmospheric CO2 Interannual Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlström, A.; Raupach, M. R.; Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Jung, M.; Reichstein, M.; Smith, B.

    2014-12-01

    Since the 1960s terrestrial ecosystems have acted as a substantial sink for atmospheric CO2, sequestering about one quarter of anthropogenic emissions in an average year. Variations in this land carbon sink are also responsible for most of the large interannual variability in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. While most evidence places the majority of the sink in highly productive forests and at high latitudes experiencing warmer and longer growing seasons, the location and the processes governing the interannual variations are still not well characterised. Here we evaluate the hypothesis that the long-term trend and the variability in the land CO2 sink are respectively dominated by geographically distinct regions: the sink by highly productive lands, mainly forests, and the variability by semi-arid or "marginal" lands where vegetation activity is strongly limited by water and therefore responds strongly to climate variability. Using novel analysis methods and data from both upscaled flux-tower measurements and a dynamic global vegetation model, we show that (1) the interannual variability in the terrestrial CO2 sink arises mainly from variability in terrestrial gross primary production (GPP); (2) most of the interannual variability in GPP arises in tropical and subtropical marginal lands, where negative anomalies are driven mainly by warm, dry conditions and positive anomalies by cool, wet conditions; (3) the variability in the GPP of high-latitude marginal lands (tundra and shrublands) is instead controlled by temperature and light, with warm bright conditions resulting in positive anomalies. The influence of ENSO (El Niño-Southern Oscillation) on the growth rate of atmospheric CO2 concentrations is mediated primarily through climatic effects on GPP in marginal lands, with opposite signs in subtropical and higher-latitude regions. Our results show that the land sink of CO2 (dominated by forests) and its interannual variability (dominated by marginal lands) are

  3. Diatom Transfer Functions for Sea Surface Temperature and Primary Productivity in Upwelling Areas: the Cupex Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, C.; Abrantes, F.; Mix, A. C.

    2008-12-01

    environmental reconstructions comprise past nutrients content, sea surface temperature (SST) and primary productivity (PP), and the first results refer to the American coastal upwelling systems (the California and the Humboldt systems) and the Arabian Sea monsoon related upwelling system.

  4. Phytoplankton taxonomic variability in nutrient utilization and primary production in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; DiTullio, Giacomo R.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Robinson, Dale H.; VanWoert, Michael; Worthen, Denise L.; Lizotte, Michael P.

    2000-04-01

    Patterns of nutrient utilization and primary productivity (PP) in late austral spring and early summer in the southwestern Ross Sea were characterized with respect to phytoplankton taxonomic composition, polynya dynamics, and upper ocean hydrography during the 1996-1997 oceanographic program Research on Ocean-Atmosphere Variability and Ecosystem Response in the Ross Sea. Phytoplankton biomass in the upper 150 m of the water column ranged from 40 to 540 mg chlorophyll a (Chl a) m-2, exceeding 200 mg Chl a m-2 everywhere except the extreme northern and eastern boundaries of the Ross Sea polynya. Diatom biomass was greatest in the shallow mixed layers of Terra Nova Bay, while the more deeply mixed waters of the Ross Sea polynya were dominated by Phaeocystis antarctica. Daily production computed from the disappearance of NO3(1.14gCm-2d-1) and total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC, 1.29 g C m-2 d-1) is consistent with estimates made from an algorithm forced with satellite measurements of Chl a (1.25 g C m-2 d-1) and from measurements of 14C uptake (1.33 g C m-2 d-1). Phytoplankton PP in the Ross Sea averaged 100 g C m-2 yr-1 during 1996-1997. Despite the early formation of the Terra Nova Bay polynya the diatom bloom there did not reach its peak PP until middle to late January 1997 (most likely because of more intense wind mixing in November), ~6 weeks after the P. antarctica bloom in the Ross Sea polynya had reached the same stage of development. From 70 to 100% of the C and N deficits in the upper 150 m could be accounted for by particulate organic matter, indicating that there had been little dissolved organic matter production or export of particulate material prior to our cruise. This suggests that early in the season, PP and zooplankton grazing are decoupled in the southwestern Ross Sea. The NO3:PO4 disappearance ratio in waters dominated by P. antarctica (19.0+/-0.61) was significantly greater than in waters where diatoms were most common (9.52+/-0.33), and both

  5. Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Redalje, Donald G.; Lohrenz, Stevern E.

    2001-02-12

    In this project we determined primary production and optical variability in the shelf and slope waters off of Cape Hatteras, N.C. These processes were addressed in conjunction with other Ocean Margins Program investigators, during the Spring Transition period and during Summer. We found that there were significant differences in measured parameters between Spring and Summer, enabling us to develop seasonally specific carbon production and ecosystem models as well as seasonal and regional algorithm improvements for use in remote sensing applications.

  6. Annual primary production in Antarctic sea ice during 2005-2006 from a sea ice state estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Benjamin T.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2014-06-01

    Using the data-bounded Sea Ice Ecosystem State (SIESTA) model, we estimate total Antarctic sea ice algal primary production to be 23.7 Tg C a-1 for the period July 2005-June 2006, of which 80% occurred in the bottom 0.2 m of ice. Simulated sea ice primary production would constitute 12% of total annual primary production in the Antarctic sea ice zone, and ˜1% of annual Southern Ocean primary production. Model sea ice algal growth was net nutrient limited, rather than light limited, for the vast majority of the sunlit season. The seasonal distribution of integrated ice algal biomass matches available observations. The vertical algal distribution was weighted toward the ice bottom compared to observations, indicating that interior ice algal communities may be under-predicted in the model, and that nutrient delivery via gravity-induced convection is not sufficient to sustain summertime algal biomass. Bottom ice algae were most productive in ice of 0.36 m thickness, whereas interior algal communities were most productive in ice of 1.10 m thickness. Sensitivity analyses that tested different atmospheric forcing inputs, sea ice parameterizations, and nutrient availability caused mean and regional shifts in sea ice state and ice algal production even when sea extent and motion was specified. The spatial heterogeneity of both ice state and algal production highlight the sensitivity of the sea ice ecosystem to physical perturbation, and demonstrate the importance of quality input data and appropriate parameterizations to models of sea ice and associated biology.

  7. Contrasting impacts of different-sized herbivores on species richness of Mediterranean annual pastures differing in primary productivity.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Marta; Rebollo, Salvador; García-Salgado, Gonzalo

    2013-06-01

    Vertebrate herbivores can be key determinants of grassland plant species richness, although the magnitude of their effects can largely depend on ecosystem and herbivore characteristics. It has been demonstrated that the combined effect of primary productivity and body size is critical when assessing the impact of herbivores on plant richness of perennial-dominated grasslands; however, the interaction of site productivity and herbivore size as determinants of plant richness in annual-dominated pastures remains unknown. We experimentally partitioned primary productivity and herbivore body size (sheep and wild rabbits) to study the effect of herbivores on the plant species richness of a Mediterranean semiarid annual plant community in central Spain over six years. We also analyzed the effect of grazing and productivity on the evenness and species composition of the plant community, and green cover, litter, and plant height. We found that plant richness was higher where the large herbivore was present at high-productivity sites but barely changed at low productivity. The small herbivore did not affect species richness at either productivity site despite its large effects on species composition. We propose that adaptations to resource scarcity and herbivory prevented plant richness changes at low-productivity sites, whereas litter accumulation in the absence of herbivores decreased plant richness at high productivity. Our results are consistent with predictions arising from a long history of grazing and highlight the importance of both large and small herbivores to the maintenance of plant diversity of Mediterranean annual-dominated pastures. PMID:23090759

  8. Primary productivity of angiosperm and macroalgae dominated habitats in a New England salt marsh: a comparative analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roman, C.T.; Able, K.W.; Lazzari, M.A.; Heck, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Net primary productivity estimates were made for the major macrophyte dominated habitats of the Nauset Marsh system, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Above-ground primary productivity of short form Spartina alterniflora, the dominant habitat of the system, was 664 g m-2 y-1. Productivity of the other dominant angiosperm (Zostera marina) was estimated to range from 444?987 g m-2 y-1. The marsh creekbank habitat was dominated by an intertidal zone of fucoid algae (Ascophyllum nodosum ecad. scorpioides, 1179 g m-2 y-1; Fucus vesiculosus, 426 g m-2 y-1), mixed intertidal filamentous algae (91 g m-2 y-1), and a subtidal zone of assorted macroalgae (68 g m-2 y-1). Intertidal mudflats were dominated by Cladophora gracilis, with net production ranging from 59?637 g m-2 y-1. These angiosperm and macrophyte and macrophyte dominated habitats produce over 3 ? 106 kg y-1 of biomass (1?2 ? 106 kg carbon y-1). Twenty-eight per cent (28%) of this carbon production is derived from the Zostera and macroalgae habitats. Although S. alterniflora is considered the major macrophyte primary producer in Nauset Marsh and other north temperate salt marshes, it is concluded that other habitats also contribute significantly to total system carbon production.

  9. Aerospace toxicology overview: aerial application and cabin air quality.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    Aerospace toxicology is a rather recent development and is closely related to aerospace medicine. Aerospace toxicology can be defined as a field of study designed to address the adverse effects of medications, chemicals, and contaminants on humans who fly within or outside the atmosphere in aviation or on space flights. The environment extending above and beyond the surface of the Earth is referred to as aerospace. The term aviation is frequently used interchangeably with aerospace. The focus of the literature review performed to prepare this paper was on aerospace toxicology-related subject matters, aerial application and aircraft cabin air quality. Among the important topics addressed are the following: · Aerial applications of agricultural chemicals, pesticidal toxicity, and exposures to aerially applied mixtures of chemicals and their associated formulating solvents/surfactants The safety of aerially encountered chemicals and the bioanalytical methods used to monitor exposures to some of them · The presence of fumes and smoke, as well as other contaminants that may generally be present in aircraft/space vehicle cabin air · And importantly, the toxic effects of aerially encountered contaminants, with emphasis on the degradation products of oils, fluids, and lubricants used in aircraft, and finally · Analytical methods used for monitoring human exposure to CO and HCN are addressed in the review, as are the signs and symptoms associated with exposures to these combustion gases. Although many agricultural chemical monitoring studies have been published, few have dealt with the occurrence of such chemicals in aircraft cabin air. However, agricultural chemicals do appear in cabin air; indeed, attempts have been made to establish maximum allowable concentrations for several of the more potentially toxic ones that are found in aircraft cabin air. In this article, I emphasize the need for precautionary measures to be taken to minimize exposures to aerially

  10. Parameterizing ecosystem light use efficiency and water use efficiency to estimate maize gross primary production and evapotranspiration using MODIS EVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying global carbon and water balances requires accurate estimation of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET), respectively, across space and time. Models that are based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE) and water use efficiency (WUE) have emerged as efficient met...

  11. Drivers of variation in aboveground net primary productivity and plant community composition differe across a broad precipitation gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has long been a goal of ecology to determine what factors drive variation in aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Total annual precipitation has been shown to be a strong predictor of ANPP across broad spatial scales, but a poor predictor at local scales. Here we aim to determine the amount...

  12. Catastrophic shifts in the aquatic primary production revealed by a small low-flow section of tropical downstream after dredging.

    PubMed

    Marotta, H; Enrich-Prast, A

    2015-11-01

    Dredging is a catastrophic disturbance that directly affects key biological processes in aquatic ecosystems, especially in those small and shallow. In the tropics, metabolic responses could still be enhanced by the high temperatures and solar incidence. Here, we assessed changes in the aquatic primary production along a small section of low-flow tropical downstream (Imboassica Stream, Brazil) after dredging. Our results suggested that these ecosystems may show catastrophic shifts between net heterotrophy and autotrophy in waters based on three short-term stages following the dredging: (I) a strongly heterotrophic net primary production -NPP- coupled to an intense respiration -R- likely supported by high resuspended organic sediments and nutrients from the bottom; (II) a strongly autotrophic NPP coupled to an intense gross primary production -GPP- favored by the high nutrient levels and low solar light attenuation from suspended solids or aquatic macrophytes; and (III) a NPP near to the equilibrium coupled to low GPP and R rates following, respectively, the shading by aquatic macrophytes and high particulate sedimentation. In conclusion, changes in aquatic primary production could be an important threshold for controlling drastic shifts in the organic matter cycling and the subsequent silting up of small tropical streams after dredging events. PMID:26602334

  13. Integrating solar induced flourescence and the photochemical reflectance index for estimating gross primary production in a cornfield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utilization of remotely sensed observations for light use efficiency (LUE) and tower-based gross primary production (GPP) estimates was studied in a USDA cornfield. Nadir hyperspectral reflectance measurements were acquired at canopy level during a collaborative field campaign conducted in four ...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... NESHAP General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. Citation Subject... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous...

  15. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Gggggg... - Applicability of General Provisions to Primary Zinc Production Area Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... NESHAP General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. Citation Subject... Primary Zinc Production Area Sources 1 Table 1 to Subpart GGGGGG of Part 63 Protection of Environment... AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous...

  16. A modeling study examining the impact of nutrient boundaries on primary production on the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mass balance eutrophication model, Gulf of Mexico Dissolved Oxygen Model (GoMDOM), has been developed and applied to describe nitrogen, phosphorus and primary production in the Louisiana shelf of the Gulf of Mexico. Features of this model include bi-directional boundary exchan...

  17. Allelopathic compound production influences fungal endophyte community assembly and establishment of a seed-borne primary colonizer in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize was used to assess the influence of three biotic factors on fungal endophyte community assembly: production of host allelopathic compounds, proximity of a host to a neighboring plant producing allelopathic compounds, and presence of a primary colonizer tolerant to these compounds. Maize has b...

  18. Spatial heterogeneity in aboveground net primary production and species richness at multiple scales in the Chihuahuan Desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We analyzed patterns in spatial heterogeneity and the processes driving these patterns in two ecosystem properties, aboveground net primary production (ANPP) and species richness, at multiple scales in the Chihuahuan Desert. We used long-term data (1990-2009) to examine the importance of a suite of...

  19. Modeling the Sensitivity of Primary Production in Lake Michigan to Nutrient Loads with and without Dreissenid Mussels

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dreissenid (quagga) mussels became established in large numbers in Lake Michigan beginning around 2004. Since then, significant changes have been observed in Lake Michigan open-water chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations, and in primary production. We updated the LM3-Eutro mode...

  20. Uncertainty analysis of gross primary production partitioned from net ecosystem exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Rahul; Hamm, Nicholas Alexander Samuel; van der Tol, Christiaan; Stein, Alfred

    2016-03-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) can be separated from flux tower measurements of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. This is used increasingly to validate process-based simulators and remote-sensing-derived estimates of simulated GPP at various time steps. Proper validation includes the uncertainty associated with this separation. In this study, uncertainty assessment was done in a Bayesian framework. It was applied to data from the Speulderbos forest site, The Netherlands. We estimated the uncertainty in GPP at half-hourly time steps, using a non-rectangular hyperbola (NRH) model for its separation from the flux tower measurements. The NRH model provides a robust empirical relationship between radiation and GPP. It includes the degree of curvature of the light response curve, radiation and temperature. Parameters of the NRH model were fitted to the measured NEE data for every 10-day period during the growing season (April to October) in 2009. We defined the prior distribution of each NRH parameter and used Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation to estimate the uncertainty in the separated GPP from the posterior distribution at half-hourly time steps. This time series also allowed us to estimate the uncertainty at daily time steps. We compared the informative with the non-informative prior distributions of the NRH parameters and found that both choices produced similar posterior distributions of GPP. This will provide relevant and important information for the validation of process-based simulators in the future. Furthermore, the obtained posterior distributions of NEE and the NRH parameters are of interest for a range of applications.

  1. Modeling iron limitation of primary production in the coastal Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, Jerome; Moore, Andrew M.; Edwards, Christopher A.; Bruland, Kenneth W.; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Lewis, Craig V. W.; Powell, Thomas M.; Curchitser, Enrique N.; Hedstrom, Kate

    2009-12-01

    A lower trophic level NPZD ecosystem model with explicit iron limitation on nutrient uptake is coupled to a three-dimensional coastal ocean circulation model to investigate the regional ecosystem dynamics of the northwestern coastal Gulf of Alaska (CGOA). Iron limitation is included in the NPZD model by adding governing equations for two micro-nutrient compartments: dissolved iron and phytoplankton-associated iron. The model has separate budgets for nitrate (the limiting macro-nutrient in the standard NPZD model) and for iron, with iron limitation on nitrate uptake being imposed as a function of the local phytoplankton realized Fe:C ratio. While the ecosystem model represents a simple approximation of the complex lower trophic level ecosystem of the northwestern CGOA, simulated chlorophyll concentrations reproduce the main characteristics of the spring bloom, high shelf primary production, and "high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll" (HNLC) environment offshore. Over the 1998-2004 period, model-data correlations based on spatially averaged, monthly mean chlorophyll concentrations are on average 0.7, with values as high as 0.9 and as low as 0.5 for individual years. The model also provides insight on the importance of micro- and macro-nutrient limitation on the shelf and offshore, with the shelfbreak region acting as a transition zone where both nitrate and iron availability significantly impact phytoplankton growth. Overall, the relative simplicity of the ecosystem model provides a useful platform to perform long-term simulations to investigate the seasonal and interannual CGOA ecosystem variability, as well as to conduct sensitivity studies to evaluate the robustness of simulated fields to ecosystem model parameterization and forcing. The ability of the model to differentiate between