Science.gov

Sample records for aerial thermal infrared

  1. Thermal Infrared Inspection of Roof Insulation Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Jung, J.; Sohn, G.; Cohen, M.

    2015-08-01

    UAVs equipped with high-resolution thermal cameras provide an excellent investigative tool used for a multitude of building-specific applications, including roof insulation inspection. We have presented in this study a relative thermographic calibration algorithm and a superpixel Markov Random Field model to address problems in thermal infrared inspection of roof insulation using UAVs. The relative thermographic radiometric calibration algorithm is designed to address the autogain problem of the thermal camera. Results show the algorithm can enhance the contrast between warm and cool areas on the roof surface in thermal images, and produces more constant thermal signatures of different roof insulations or surfaces, which could facilitate both visual interpretation and computer-based thermal anomaly detection. An automatic thermal anomaly detection algorithm based on superpixel Markov Random Field is proposed, which is more computationally efficient than pixel based MRF, and can potentially improve the production throughput capacity and increase the detection accuracy for thermal anomaly detection. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Infrared Surveys of Hawaiian Volcanoes: Aerial surveys with infrared imaging radiometer depict volcanic thermal patterns and structural features.

    PubMed

    Fisher, W A; Moxham, R M; Polcyn, F; Landis, G H

    1964-11-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain. Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities. Approximately 25 large springs issuing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected. Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  3. New interpretations of the Fort Clark State Historic Site based on aerial color and thermal infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Andrew Roland

    The Fort Clark State Historic Site (32ME2) is a well known site on the upper Missouri River, North Dakota. The site was the location of two Euroamerican trading posts and a large Mandan-Arikara earthlodge village. In 2004, Dr. Kenneth L. Kvamme and Dr. Tommy Hailey surveyed the site using aerial color and thermal infrared imagery collected from a powered parachute. Individual images were stitched together into large image mosaics and registered to Wood's 1993 interpretive map of the site using Adobe Photoshop. The analysis of those image mosaics resulted in the identification of more than 1,500 archaeological features, including as many as 124 earthlodges.

  4. Infrared film for aerial photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, William H.

    1979-01-01

    Considerable interest has developed recently in the use of aerial photographs for agricultural management. Even the simplest hand-held aerial photographs, especially those taken with color infrared film, often provide information not ordinarily available through routine ground observation. When fields are viewed from above, patterns and variations become more apparent, often allowing problems to be spotted which otherwise may go undetected.

  5. Thermal features at some Cascade volcanoes as observed by aerial infrared surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, R.M.

    1970-01-01

    There have been no substantial changes in the thermal patterns at the summit of Mount Rainier in the period September 1964–September 1966, within the detection limits of the infrared instrumentation. Some differences in radiance are attributed to differences in snow cover. The highest apparent temperature is at a snow-free area on the west flank of the summit cone, several hundred feet below the west crater rim. An anomaly at this site was recorded on both infrared surveys, but no prior reports of thermal activity here have been made by ground parties. Other anomalous thermal zones at the summit are on the northern quadrants of both crater rims. A very small, low-temperature fumarole reported on Mount Adams was not detected, nor were any other thermal manifestations recorded. One anomaly consisting of a close-spaced cluster of thermal spots was detected at The Boot on Mount St. Helens and corresponds to a known fumarole area. The only thermal feature seen on Mount Shasta is near the summit at a thermal spring that has been observed by many climbers. Two anomalies were found on the north flank of Lassen Peak. Thermal activity had not been previously reported at either site, though one is in a known solfatarized area. No ground investigation has been made at the other location. Much of the other thermal activity in the Lassen Peak area is in the northeast quadrant of Brokeoff Caldera. Most of these features are well documented in the literature; others not previously described are in fairly accessible areas and doubtless result from springs and fumaroles related to Brokeoff Caldera.

  6. Thermal features at Volcanoes in the cascade range, as observed by aerial infrared surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moxham, R.M.

    1970-01-01

    There have been no substantial changes in the thermal patterns at the summit of Mount Rainier in the period September 1964-September 1966, within the detection limits of the infrared instrumentation. Some differences in radiance are attributed to differences in snow cover. The highest apparent temperature is at a snow-free area on the west flank of the summit cone, several hundred feet below the west crater rim. An anomaly at this site was recorded on both infrared surveys, but no prior reports of thermal activity here have been made by ground parties. Other anomalous thermal zones at the summit are on the northern quadrants of both crater rims. A very small, low-temperature fumarole reported on Mount Adams was not detected, nor were any other thermal manifestations recorded. One anomaly consisting of a close-spaced cluster of thermal spots was detected at The Boot on Mount St. Helens and corresponds to a known fumarole area. The only thermal feature seen on Mount Shasta is near the summit at a thermal spring that has been observed by many climbers. Two anomalies were found on the north flank of Lassen Peak. Thermal activity had not been previously reported at either site, though one is in a known solfatarized area. No ground investigation has been made at the other location. Much of the other thermal activity in the Lassen Peak area is in the northeast quadrant of Brokeoff Caldera. Most of these features are well documented in the literature; others not previously described are in fairly accessible areas and doubtless result from springs and fumaroles related to Brokeoff Caldera. ?? 1970 Stabilimento Tipografico Francesco Giannini & Figli.

  7. Wildlife Multispecies Remote Sensing Using Visible and Thermal Infrared Imagery Acquired from AN Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (uav)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrétien, L.-P.; Théau, J.; Ménard, P.

    2015-08-01

    Wildlife aerial surveys require time and significant resources. Multispecies detection could reduce costs to a single census for species that coexist spatially. Traditional methods are demanding for observers in terms of concentration and are not adapted to multispecies censuses. The processing of multispectral aerial imagery acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) represents a potential solution for multispecies detection. The method used in this study is based on a multicriteria object-based image analysis applied on visible and thermal infrared imagery acquired from a UAV. This project aimed to detect American bison, fallow deer, gray wolves, and elks located in separate enclosures with a known number of individuals. Results showed that all bison and elks were detected without errors, while for deer and wolves, 0-2 individuals per flight line were mistaken with ground elements or undetected. This approach also detected simultaneously and separately the four targeted species even in the presence of other untargeted ones. These results confirm the potential of multispectral imagery acquired from UAV for wildlife census. Its operational application remains limited to small areas related to the current regulations and available technology. Standardization of the workflow will help to reduce time and expertise requirements for such technology.

  8. Surface Temperature Mapping of the University of Northern Iowa Campus Using High Resolution Thermal Infrared Aerial Imageries

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexander; Sugumaran, Ramanathan

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this project was to map the surface temperature of the University of Northern Iowa campus using high-resolution thermal infrared aerial imageries. A thermal camera with a spectral bandwidth of 3.0-5.0 μm was flown at the average altitude of 600 m, achieving ground resolution of 29 cm. Ground control data was used to construct the pixel- to-temperature conversion model, which was later used to produce temperature maps of the entire campus and also for validation of the model. The temperature map then was used to assess the building rooftop conditions and steam line faults in the study area. Assessment of the temperature map revealed a number of building structures that may be subject to insulation improvement due to their high surface temperatures leaks. Several hot spots were also identified on the campus for steam pipelines faults. High-resolution thermal infrared imagery proved highly effective tool for precise heat anomaly detection on the campus, and it can be used by university facility services for effective future maintenance of buildings and grounds.

  9. Mass and heat flux balance of La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe) from aerial infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Beauducel, François; Coutant, Olivier; Delacourt, Christophe; Richon, Patrick; de Chabalier, Jean-Bernard; Hammouya, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    La Soufrière of Guadeloupe is an active volcano of Lesser Antilles that is closely monitored due to a high eruptive hazard potential. Since 1992 it exhibits a medium-level but sustained background hydrothermal activity with low-energy and shallow seismicity, hot springs temperature increase and high flux acidic gas fumaroles at the summit. The problem of estimating the heat balance and quantifying the evolution of hydrothermal activity has become a key challenge for surveillance. This work is the first attempt of a global mapping and quantification of La Soufrière thermal activity performed in February 2010 using aerial thermal infrared imagery. After instrument calibration and data processing, we present a global map of thermal anomalies allowing to spot the main active sites: the summit area (including the fumaroles of Tarissan Pit and South Crater), the Ty Fault fumarolic zone, and the hot springs located at the vicinity of the dome. In a second step, we deduce the mass and the energy fluxes released by the volcano. In particular, we propose a simple model of energy balance to estimate the mass flux of the summit fumaroles from their brightness temperature and size. In February 2010, Tarissan Pit had a 22.8 ± 8.1 kg s -1 flux (1970 ± 704 tons day -1), while South Crater vents had a total of 19.5 ± 4.0 kg s -1 (1687 ± 348 tons day -1). Once converted into energy flux, summit fumaroles represent 98% of the 106 ± 30 MW released by the volcano, the 2% remaining being split between the hot springs and the thermal anomalies at the summit and at the Ty Fault fumarolic zone. These values are in the high range of the previous estimations, highlighting the short-term variability of the expelled fluxes. Such a heat flux requires the cooling of 1500 m 3 of magma per day, in good agreement with previous geochemical studies.

  10. Aerial infrared surveys of Reykjanes and Torfajökull thermal areas, Iceland, with a section on cost of exploration surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pálmason, G.; Friedman, J.D.; Williams, R.S.; Jónsson, J.; Saemundsson, K.

    1970-01-01

    In 1966 and 1968 aerial infrared surveys were conducted over 10 of 13 high-temperature thermal areas in Iceland. The surveys were made with an airborne scanner system, utilizing radiation in the 4.5–5.5 μm wavelength band. Supplementary ground geological studies were made in the Reykjanes and Torfajökull thermal areas to interpret features depicted on the infrared imagery and to relate zones of high heat flux to tectonic structure. In the Reykjanes area in southwestern Iceland a shallow ground temperature map was prepared for temperatures at a depth of 0.5 meters; comparison of this map with the infrared imagery reveals some striking similarities. It appears that aerial infrared surveys outline the surface thermal patterns of high-temperature areas and aid in relating these patterns to possible geological structures controlling the upflow of hot water. Amplitude-slicing techniques applied to the magnetically taped airborne scanner data permit an estimate to be made of the natural heat output on the basis of size of area and specific radiance. In addition to their value in preliminary studies of high-temperature areas, infrared surveys conducted at regular intervals over thermal area under exploitation can provide valuable data on changes that occur in surface manifestations with time.

  11. Evaluation of aerial thermal infrared remote sensing to identify groundwater-discharge zones in the Meduxnekeag River, Houlton, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culbertson, Charles W.; Huntington, Thomas G.; Caldwell, James M.; O'Donnell, Cara

    2014-01-01

    Residents of the area near Houlton, Maine, have observed seasonal episodic blooms of algae and documented elevated concentrations of fecal-coliform bacteria and inorganic nutrients and low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Meduxnekeag River. Although point and nonpoint sources of urban and agricultural runoff likely contribute to water-quality impairment, the role of shallow groundwater inflows in delivering such contaminants to the Meduxnekeag River has not been well understood. To provide information about possible groundwater inflows to the river, airborne thermal infrared videography was evaluated as a means to identify and classify thermal anomalies in a 25-mile reach of the mainstem and tributaries of the Meduxnekeag River near Houlton, Maine. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, collected thermal infrared images from a single-engine, fixed-wing aircraft during flights on December 3–4, 2003, and November 26, 2004. Eleven thermal anomalies were identified on the basis of data from the December 2003 flight and 17 from the November 2004 flight, which covered the same reaches of stream. Following image analysis, characterization, and prioritization, the georeferenced infrared images of the thermal anomalies were compared to features on topographic maps of the study area. The mapped anomalies were used to direct observations on the ground to confirm discharge locations and types of inflow. The variations in grayscale patterns on the images were thus confirmed as representing shallow groundwater-discharge zones (seeps), outfalls of treated wastewater, or ditches draining runoff from impervious surfaces.

  12. Aerial Infrared Photos for Citrus Growers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blazquez, C. H.; Horn, F. W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Handbook advises on benefits and methods of aerial photography with color infrared film. Interpretation of photographs is discussed in detail. Necessary equipment for interpretation is described--light table, magnifying lenses, and microfiche viewers, for example. Advice is given on rating tree condition; identifying effects of diseases, insects, and nematodes; and evaluating effects of soil, water, and weather.

  13. Aerial color infrared photography applications to citriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blazquez, C. H.; Horn, F. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Results of a one-year experimental study on the use of aerial color infrared photography in citrus grove management are presented. It is found that the spring season, when trees are in flush (have young leaves), is the best season to photograph visible differences between healthy and diseased trees. It is also shown that the best photography can be obtained with a 12-in. focal length lens. The photographic scale that allowed good photo interpretation with simple inexpensive equipment was 1 in. = 330 ft. The use of a window-overlay transparency method allowed rapid photo interpretation and data recording in computer-compatible forms. Aerial color infrared photography carried out during the spring season revealed a more accurate status of tree condition than visual inspection.

  14. D Surface Generation from Aerial Thermal Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaei, B.; Samadzadegan, F.; Dadras Javan, F.; Hasani, H.

    2015-12-01

    Aerial thermal imagery has been recently applied to quantitative analysis of several scenes. For the mapping purpose based on aerial thermal imagery, high accuracy photogrammetric process is necessary. However, due to low geometric resolution and low contrast of thermal imaging sensors, there are some challenges in precise 3D measurement of objects. In this paper the potential of thermal video in 3D surface generation is evaluated. In the pre-processing step, thermal camera is geometrically calibrated using a calibration grid based on emissivity differences between the background and the targets. Then, Digital Surface Model (DSM) generation from thermal video imagery is performed in four steps. Initially, frames are extracted from video, then tie points are generated by Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm. Bundle adjustment is then applied and the camera position and orientation parameters are determined. Finally, multi-resolution dense image matching algorithm is used to create 3D point cloud of the scene. Potential of the proposed method is evaluated based on thermal imaging cover an industrial area. The thermal camera has 640×480 Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) sensor, equipped with a 25 mm lens which mounted in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The obtained results show the comparable accuracy of 3D model generated based on thermal images with respect to DSM generated from visible images, however thermal based DSM is somehow smoother with lower level of texture. Comparing the generated DSM with the 9 measured GCPs in the area shows the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) value is smaller than 5 decimetres in both X and Y directions and 1.6 meters for the Z direction.

  15. Landsat and Thermal Infrared Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Terry; Barsi, Julia; Jhabvala, Murzy; Reuter, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the collection of thermal images by Landsat sensors already on orbit and to introduce the new thermal sensor to be launched in 2013. The chapter describes the thematic mapper (TM) and enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+) sensors, the calibration of their thermal bands, and the design and prelaunch calibration of the new thermal infrared sensor (TIRS).

  16. Aerial infrared surveys in the investigation of geothermal and volcanic heat sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    This factsheet briefly summarizes and clarifies the application of aerial infrared surveys in geophysical exploration for geothermal energy sources and environmental monitoring for potential volcanic hazards.

  17. Applications of thermal infrared imagery for energy conservation and environmental surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carney, J. R.; Vogel, T. C.; Howard, G. E., Jr.; Love, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    The survey procedures, developed during the winter and summer of 1976, employ color and color infrared aerial photography, thermal infrared imagery, and a handheld infrared imaging device. The resulting imagery was used to detect building heat losses, deteriorated insulation in built-up type building roofs, and defective underground steam lines. The handheld thermal infrared device, used in conjunction with the aerial thermal infrared imagery, provided a method for detecting and locating those roof areas that were underlain with wet insulation. In addition, the handheld infrared device was employed to conduct a survey of a U.S. Army installation's electrical distribution system under full operating loads. This survey proved to be cost effective procedure for detecting faulty electrical insulators and connections that if allowed to persist could have resulted in both safety hazards and loss in production.

  18. Using aerial infrared thermography to detect utility theft of service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Gregory R.; Lucas, R. Gillem

    2012-06-01

    Natural gas and electric utility companies, public utility commissions, consumer advocacy groups, city governments, state governments and the federal government United States continue to turn a blind eye towards utility energy theft of service which we conservatively estimate is in excess of 10 billion a year. Why? Many in the United States have exhausted their unemployment benefits. The amounts for federal funding for low income heating assistance programs (LIHEAP) funds were cut by nearly 40% for 2012 to 3.02 billion. "At peak funding ($5.1 billion in 2009), the program was national in scale but still only had enough resources to support roughly 1/4 of the eligible households.i" Contributions to charities are down and the number of families below the poverty line who are unable to pay to heat their houses continues to rise. Many of the less fortunate in our society now consider theft and fraud to be an attractive option for their supply of natural gas and/or electricity. A record high mild winter in 2011-2012 coupled with 10-year low natural gas prices temporarily obscured the need for low income heating assistance programs (LIHEAPs) from the news and federal budgets, but cold winters will return. The proliferation of smart meters and automated meter infrastructures across our nation can do little to detect energy theft because the thieves can simply by-pass the meters, jumper around the meters and/or steal meters from abandoned houses and use them. Many utility systems were never set-up to stop these types of theft. Even with low-cost per identified thief method using aerial infrared thermography, utilities continue to ignore theft detection.

  19. A Thermal Infrared Cloud Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallama, A.; Degnan, J. J.

    2001-12-01

    A thermal infrared imager for mapping the changing cloud cover over a ground based observing site has been developed. There are two main components to our instrument. One is a commercially made uncooled 10 micron thermal infrared detector that outputs a 120x120 pixel thermogram. The other is a convex electroplated reflector, which is situated beneath the detector and in its field of view. The resulting image covers the sky from zenith down to about 10 degrees elevation. The self-reflection of the camera and supporting vanes is removed by interpolation. Atmospheric transparency is distinguished by the difference between the sky temperature and the ambient air temperature. Clear sky is indicated by pixels having a difference of about 20 degrees C or more. The qualitative results 'clear, haze and cloud' have proven to be very reliable during two years of development and testing. Quantitative information, such as the extinction coefficient, is also available though it is not exact. The uncertainty is probably due to variability of the lapse rate under different atmospheric conditions. Software has been written for PC/DOS and VME/LynxOS (similar to Linux) systems in the C programming language. Functionality includes serial communication with the detector, analysis of the thermogram, mapping of cloud cover, data display, and file I/O. The main elements of cost in this system were for the thermal infrared detector and for the machining of an 18-inch diameter stainless steel mandrel. The latter is needed to produce an electroplated reflector. We have had good success with the gold and rhodium reflectors that have been generated. The reflectors themselves are relatively inexpensive now that the mandrel is available.

  20. Can reliable sage-grouse lek counts be obtained using aerial infrared technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, Gifford L.; Coates, Peter S.; Petersen, Steven; Romero, John P.

    2013-01-01

    More effective methods for counting greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are needed to better assess population trends through enumeration or location of new leks. We describe an aerial infrared technique for conducting sage-grouse lek counts and compare this method with conventional ground-based lek count methods. During the breeding period in 2010 and 2011, we surveyed leks from fixed-winged aircraft using cryogenically cooled mid-wave infrared cameras and surveyed the same leks on the same day from the ground following a standard lek count protocol. We did not detect significant differences in lek counts between surveying techniques. These findings suggest that using a cryogenically cooled mid-wave infrared camera from an aerial platform to conduct lek surveys is an effective alternative technique to conventional ground-based methods, but further research is needed. We discuss multiple advantages to aerial infrared surveys, including counting in remote areas, representing greater spatial variation, and increasing the number of counted leks per season. Aerial infrared lek counts may be a valuable wildlife management tool that releases time and resources for other conservation efforts. Opportunities exist for wildlife professionals to refine and apply aerial infrared techniques to wildlife monitoring programs because of the increasing reliability and affordability of this technology.

  1. Locating inputs of freshwater to Lynch Cove, Hood Canal, Washington, using aerial infrared photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Josberger, Edward G.; Chickadel, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The input of freshwater and associated nutrients into Lynch Cove and lower Hood Canal (fig. 1) from sources such as groundwater seeps, small streams, and ephemeral creeks may play a major role in the nutrient loading and hydrodynamics of this low dissolved-oxygen (hypoxic) system. These disbursed sources exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. However, few in-situ measurements of groundwater seepage rates and nutrient concentrations are available and thus may not represent adequately the large spatial variability of groundwater discharge in the area. As a result, our understanding of these processes and their effect on hypoxic conditions in Hood Canal is limited. To determine the spatial variability and relative intensity of these sources, the U.S. Geological Survey Washington Water Science Center collaborated with the University of Washington Applied Physics Laboratory to obtain thermal infrared (TIR) images of the nearshore and intertidal regions of Lynch Cove at or near low tide. In the summer, cool freshwater discharges from seeps and streams, flows across the exposed, sun-warmed beach, and out on the warm surface of the marine water. These temperature differences are readily apparent in aerial thermal infrared imagery that we acquired during the summers of 2008 and 2009. When combined with co-incident video camera images, these temperature differences allow identification of the location, the type, and the relative intensity of the sources.

  2. Thermal soaring flight of birds and unmanned aerial vehicles.

    PubMed

    Akos, Zsuzsa; Nagy, Máté; Leven, Severin; Vicsek, Tamás

    2010-12-01

    Thermal soaring saves much energy, but flying large distances in this form represents a great challenge for birds, people and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The solution is to make use of the so-called thermals, which are localized, warmer regions in the atmosphere moving upward with a speed exceeding the descent rate of birds and planes. Saving energy by exploiting the environment more efficiently is an important possibility for autonomous UAVs as well. Successful control strategies have been developed recently for UAVs in simulations and in real applications. This paper first presents an overview of our knowledge of the soaring flight and strategy of birds, followed by a discussion of control strategies that have been developed for soaring UAVs both in simulations and applications on real platforms. To improve the accuracy of the simulation of thermal exploitation strategies we propose a method to take into account the effect of turbulence. Finally, we propose a new GPS-independent control strategy for exploiting thermal updrafts.

  3. Thermal soaring flight of birds and unmanned aerial vehicles.

    PubMed

    Akos, Zsuzsa; Nagy, Máté; Leven, Severin; Vicsek, Tamás

    2010-12-01

    Thermal soaring saves much energy, but flying large distances in this form represents a great challenge for birds, people and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The solution is to make use of the so-called thermals, which are localized, warmer regions in the atmosphere moving upward with a speed exceeding the descent rate of birds and planes. Saving energy by exploiting the environment more efficiently is an important possibility for autonomous UAVs as well. Successful control strategies have been developed recently for UAVs in simulations and in real applications. This paper first presents an overview of our knowledge of the soaring flight and strategy of birds, followed by a discussion of control strategies that have been developed for soaring UAVs both in simulations and applications on real platforms. To improve the accuracy of the simulation of thermal exploitation strategies we propose a method to take into account the effect of turbulence. Finally, we propose a new GPS-independent control strategy for exploiting thermal updrafts. PMID:21098957

  4. NEAR INFRARED AERIAL PHOTO-DETECTION OF ZOSTERA JAPONICA COMMUNITIES IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARINE INTERTIDAL HABITATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Near infrared color aerial photography (-1:7200) of Yaquina Bay, Oregon, flown at minus tides during summer months of 1997 was used to produce digital stereo ortho-photographs covering tidally exposed eelgrass habitat. GIS analysis coupled with GPS positioning of ground-truth da...

  5. Infrared thermal imaging figures of merit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Herbert

    1989-01-01

    Commercially available types of infrared thermal imaging instruments, both viewers (qualitative) and imagers (quantitative) are discussed. The various scanning methods by which thermal images (thermograms) are generated will be reviewed. The performance parameters (figures of merit) that define the quality of performance of infrared radiation thermometers will be introduced. A discussion of how these parameters are extended and adapted to define the performance of thermal imaging instruments will be provided. Finally, the significance of each of the key performance parameters of thermal imaging instruments will be reviewed and procedures currently used for testing to verify performance will be outlined.

  6. Thermal infrared radiometer calibration and experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, JiAn; Wang, Difeng; Gong, Fang; Yan, Bai; He, Xianqiang

    2015-08-01

    Thermal infrared radiometers play a vital role in obtaining information in field measurements and also in verifying information from remote sensing satellite sensor data. However, the calibration precision of the thermal infrared radiometers directly affects the accuracy of the remote sensing data analysis and application. It is therefore necessary to ensure that the calibration of thermal infrared radiometers is of sufficient and reliable precision. In this paper, the theory of a six-band thermal infrared radiometer (CE 312-2 ASTER) calibration method was introduced, with the calibration being conducted by using a blackbody source in the laboratory. The sources of error during the calibration procedure were analyzed, and the results of the calibration were provided. Then, laboratory experiments using the radiometer were described. The measurements of the surface temperature of a water sample that was contained in a thermostatic water bath, performed by using the radiometer, were compared to the water sample's temperature controlled by another device. These experiments were used to evaluate the calibration precision of the CE 312-2 ASTER radiometer, by means of assessing the measurement accuracy of the experiments. The results demonstrated that the calibration coefficients of the CE 312-2 ASTER thermal infrared radiometer displayed a very good performance, with highly accurate measurements, and could be used to detect phenomena related to a thermal infrared target.

  7. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting. PMID:24222728

  8. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  9. Low-thermal expansion infrared glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Philip

    2009-05-01

    L2 Tech, Inc. is in development of an innovative infrared-transparent glass ceramic material with low-thermal expansion (<0.5 ppm/°C) and high thermal-shock resistance to be used as windows and domes for high speed flight. The material is an inorganic, non-porous glass ceramic, characterized by crystalline phases of evenly distributed nano-crystals in a residual glass phase. The major crystalline phase is zirconium tungstate (ZrW2O8) which has Negative Thermal Expansion (NTE). The glass phase is the infrared-transparent germanate glass which has positive thermal expansion (PTE). Then glass ceramic material has a balanced thermal expansion of near zero. The crystal structure is cubic and the thermal expansion of the glass ceramic is isotropic or equal in all directions.

  10. Cropping management using color and color infrared aerial photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, K. M.; Morris-Jones, D. R.; Lee, G. B.; Kiefer, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) is a widely accepted tool for erosion prediction and conservation planning. Solving this equation yields the long-term average annual soil loss that can be expected from rill and inter-rill erosion. In this study, manual interpretation of color and color infrared 70 mm photography at the scale of 1:60,000 is used to determine the cropping management factor in the USLE. Accurate information was collected about plowing practices and crop residue cover (unharvested vegetation) for the winter season on agricultural land in Pheasant Branch Creek watershed in Dane County, Wisconsin.

  11. Interpreting Michigan forest cover types from color infrared aerial photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of 17 cover types (13 forest types or tree species and 4 nonforest cover types) in Michigan are discussed as well as their interpretation from medium scale color infrared photography. The occurrence of each type is described by region and site requirements. Those attributes of a tree or stand which are helpful when attempting to interpret the type from a vertical perspective are discussed as well as common crown types. The identification of the forest type or tree species by using image characteristics (size, shape, shadow, color, texture, pattern, or association) is discussed. Ground photographs and sketches of individual trees are included. Stereograms of typical stands are available.

  12. Quantitative wildlife habitat evaluation using high-altitude color infrared aerial photographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pettinger, Lawrence R.; Farmer, Adrian; Schamberger, Mel

    1978-01-01

    The habitat value for elk and sage grouse of two proposed phosphate strip mine sites was determined using habitat parameter measurements from high-altitude color infrared aerial photographs. Habitat suitability was assessed using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures being developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Similar results were obtained from two approaches--a remote-sensing-only approach and a mix of measurements from photo interpretation and conventional field surveys.

  13. Provisional maps of thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, based on satellite thermal infrared imaging and field observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Heasler, Henry; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Maps that define the current distribution of geothermally heated ground are useful toward setting a baseline for thermal activity to better detect and understand future anomalous hydrothermal and (or) volcanic activity. Monitoring changes in the dynamic thermal areas also supports decisions regarding the development of Yellowstone National Park infrastructure, preservation and protection of park resources, and ensuring visitor safety. Because of the challenges associated with field-based monitoring of a large, complex geothermal system that is spread out over a large and remote area, satellite-based thermal infrared images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were used to map the location and spatial extent of active thermal areas, to generate thermal anomaly maps, and to quantify the radiative component of the total geothermal heat flux. ASTER thermal infrared data acquired during winter nights were used to minimize the contribution of solar heating of the surface. The ASTER thermal infrared mapping results were compared to maps of thermal areas based on field investigations and high-resolution aerial photos. Field validation of the ASTER thermal mapping is an ongoing task. The purpose of this report is to make available ASTER-based maps of Yellowstone’s thermal areas. We include an appendix containing the names and characteristics of Yellowstone’s thermal areas, georeferenced TIFF files containing ASTER thermal imagery, and several spatial data sets in Esri shapefile format.

  14. Infrared Detector System with Controlled Thermal Conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal infrared detector system includes a heat sink, a support member, a connection support member connecting the support member to the heat sink and including a heater unit is reviewed. An infrared detector element is mounted on the support member and a temperature signal representative of the infrared energy contacting the support member can then be derived by comparing the temperature of the support member and the heat sink. The temperature signal from a support member and a temperature signal from the connection support member can then be used to drive a heater unit mounted on the connection support member to thereby control the thermal conductance of the support member. Thus, the thermal conductance can be controlled so that it can be actively increased or decreased as desired.

  15. Aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal infrared scanning from an aircraft is a convenient and commercially available means for determining relative rates of energy loss from building roofs. The need to conserve energy as fuel costs makes the mass survey capability of aerial thermography an attractive adjunct to community energy awareness programs. Background information on principles of aerial thermography is presented. Thermal infrared scanning systems, flight and environmental requirements for data acquisition, preparation of thermographs for display, major users and suppliers of thermography, and suggested specifications for obtaining aerial scanning services were reviewed.

  16. Thermal surveillance of active volcanoes. [infrared scanner recordings of thermal anomalies of Mt. Baker volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. By the end of 1973, aerial infrared scanner traverses for thermal anomaly recordings of all Cascade Range volcanoes were essentially completed. Amplitude level slices of the Mount Baker anomalies were completed and compiled at a scale of 1:24,000, thus producing, for the first time, an accurate map of the distribution and intensity of thermal activity on Mount Baker. The major thermal activity is concentrated within the crater south of the main summit and although it is characterized by intensive solfataric activity and warm ground, it is largely subglacial, causing the development of sizable glacier perforation features. The outgoing radiative flux from the east breach anomalies is sufficient to account for the volume of ice melted to form the glacier perforations. DCP station 6251 has been monitoring a thermally anomalous area on the north slope of Mount Baker. The present thermal activity of Mount Baker accounts for continuing hydrothermal alteration in the crater south of the main summit and recurrent debris avalanches from Sherman Peak on its south rim. The infrared anomalies mapped as part of the experiment SR 251 are considered the basic evidence of the subglacial heating which was the probable triggering mechanism of an avalanche down Boulder Glacier on August 20-21, 1973.

  17. Flight vehicle thermal testing with infrared lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Roger A.

    1992-01-01

    The verification and certification of new structural material concepts for advanced high speed flight vehicles relies greatly on thermal testing with infrared quartz lamps. The basic quartz heater system characteristics and design considerations are presented. Specific applications are illustrated with tests that were conducted for the X-15, the Space Shuttle, and YF-12 flight programs.

  18. Discrimination of basic silicate rocks by recognition maps processed from aerial infrared data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K.; Thomson, F. J.

    1971-01-01

    A method is presented which can be used to map silicate rock-type from aerial infrared data. The method has been partially tested over a sand quarry at Mill Creek, Oklahoma, in which highly siliceous targets were discriminated from nonsilicates in the scene. The technique is currently being tested experimentally on basic silicates. On the basis of the Mill Creek results and theoretical considerations, percent SiO2 differences as small as 14% should be detectable with the University of Michigan's currently available detectors.

  19. Detection and damage assessment of citrus tree losses with aerial color infrared photography /ACIR/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blazquez, C. H.; Horn, F. W., Jr.; Edwards, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Detection and disease damage assessment of citrus tree losses in a Florida citrus grove were made by establishing a registration (grove site location) coordinate system, developing a damage assessment system, and testing sequential aerial color infrared (ACIR) photography at the scale of 1 in. = 333 ft (2.5 cm = 100 m) during the winter, spring, and summer seasons of 1978 and spring of 1979. Spring photography was the easiest to photo interpret, showed the greatest differences between healthy and diseased trees, and had the least shadow and background interference for photo interpretation. Trees showing slight disease damage were detected in ACIR before they were found in ground surveys.

  20. Pedestrian Detection and Tracking from Low-Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Thermal Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yalong; Wu, Xinkai; Yu, Guizhen; Xu, Yongzheng; Wang, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the prominent thermal signature of humans and following the growing availability of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), more and more research efforts have been focusing on the detection and tracking of pedestrians using thermal infrared images recorded from UAVs. However, pedestrian detection and tracking from the thermal images obtained from UAVs pose many challenges due to the low-resolution of imagery, platform motion, image instability and the relatively small size of the objects. This research tackles these challenges by proposing a pedestrian detection and tracking system. A two-stage blob-based approach is first developed for pedestrian detection. This approach first extracts pedestrian blobs using the regional gradient feature and geometric constraints filtering and then classifies the detected blobs by using a linear Support Vector Machine (SVM) with a hybrid descriptor, which sophisticatedly combines Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) features in order to achieve accurate detection. This research further proposes an approach for pedestrian tracking. This approach employs the feature tracker with the update of detected pedestrian location to track pedestrian objects from the registered videos and extracts the motion trajectory data. The proposed detection and tracking approaches have been evaluated by multiple different datasets, and the results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. This research is expected to significantly benefit many transportation applications, such as the multimodal traffic performance measure, pedestrian behavior study and pedestrian-vehicle crash analysis. Future work will focus on using fused thermal and visual images to further improve the detection efficiency and effectiveness. PMID:27023564

  1. Pedestrian Detection and Tracking from Low-Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Thermal Imagery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yalong; Wu, Xinkai; Yu, Guizhen; Xu, Yongzheng; Wang, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    Driven by the prominent thermal signature of humans and following the growing availability of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), more and more research efforts have been focusing on the detection and tracking of pedestrians using thermal infrared images recorded from UAVs. However, pedestrian detection and tracking from the thermal images obtained from UAVs pose many challenges due to the low-resolution of imagery, platform motion, image instability and the relatively small size of the objects. This research tackles these challenges by proposing a pedestrian detection and tracking system. A two-stage blob-based approach is first developed for pedestrian detection. This approach first extracts pedestrian blobs using the regional gradient feature and geometric constraints filtering and then classifies the detected blobs by using a linear Support Vector Machine (SVM) with a hybrid descriptor, which sophisticatedly combines Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) features in order to achieve accurate detection. This research further proposes an approach for pedestrian tracking. This approach employs the feature tracker with the update of detected pedestrian location to track pedestrian objects from the registered videos and extracts the motion trajectory data. The proposed detection and tracking approaches have been evaluated by multiple different datasets, and the results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. This research is expected to significantly benefit many transportation applications, such as the multimodal traffic performance measure, pedestrian behavior study and pedestrian-vehicle crash analysis. Future work will focus on using fused thermal and visual images to further improve the detection efficiency and effectiveness. PMID:27023564

  2. Thermal analysis of a linear infrared lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Nakos, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of an infrared lamp is presented based on radiant heat transfer theory. The analysis is performed on a specific type of linear lamp which has a coiled tungsten filament surrounded by a fused quartz envelope. The purpose of the study was to model the lamp thermally, not electrically, to arrive at a better understanding of the operation of the lamp.

  3. Estimation of walrus populations on sea ice with infrared imagery and aerial photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, M.S.; Burn, D.M.; Webber, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Population sizes of ice-associated pinnipeds have often been estimated with visual or photographic aerial surveys, but these methods require relatively slow speeds and low altitudes, limiting the area they can cover. Recent developments in infrared imagery and its integration with digital photography could allow substantially larger areas to be surveyed and more accurate enumeration of individuals, thereby solving major problems with previous survey methods. We conducted a trial survey in April 2003 to estimate the number of Pacific walruses (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) hauled out on sea ice around St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. The survey used high altitude infrared imagery to detect groups of walruses on strip transects. Low altitude digital photography was used to determine the number of walruses in a sample of detected groups and calibrate the infrared imagery for estimating the total number of walruses. We propose a survey design incorporating this approach with satellite radio telemetry to estimate the proportion of the population in the water and additional low-level flights to estimate the proportion of the hauled-out population in groups too small to be detected in the infrared imagery. We believe that this approach offers the potential for obtaining reliable population estimates for walruses and other ice-associated pinnipeds. ?? 2007 by the Society for Marine Mammalogy.

  4. Thermal infrared sensing applied to energy conservation in building envelopes (Thermosense IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Grot, R.A.; Wood, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Thermography applications in industrial plants and utility systems are considered. Topics discussed include aerial thermographic data interpretation, aerial infrared survey field evaluations for residential applications, and infrared thermography applications in relation to the Low-Cost Solar Array Program. Also considered are new trends in infrared technology, and training and standards regarding thermography.

  5. Assessing Drought Responses Using Thermal Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Prashar, Ankush; Jones, Hamlyn G

    2016-01-01

    Canopy temperature, a surrogate for stomatal conductance, is shown to be a good indicator of plant water status and a potential tool for phenotyping and irrigation scheduling. Measurement of stomatal conductance and leaf temperature has traditionally been done by using porometers or gas exchange analyzers and fine-wire thermocouples attached to the leaves, which are labor intensive and point measurements. The advent of remote or proximal thermal sensing technologies has provided the potential for scaling up to leaves, plants, and canopies. Thermal cameras with a temperature resolution of <0.1 K now allow one to study the temperature variation within and between plants. This chapter discusses some applications of infrared thermography for assessing drought and other abiotic and biotic stress and outlines some of the main factors that need to be considered when applying this to the study of leaf or canopy temperature whether in controlled environments or in the field. PMID:26867626

  6. Assessing Drought Responses Using Thermal Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Prashar, Ankush; Jones, Hamlyn G

    2016-01-01

    Canopy temperature, a surrogate for stomatal conductance, is shown to be a good indicator of plant water status and a potential tool for phenotyping and irrigation scheduling. Measurement of stomatal conductance and leaf temperature has traditionally been done by using porometers or gas exchange analyzers and fine-wire thermocouples attached to the leaves, which are labor intensive and point measurements. The advent of remote or proximal thermal sensing technologies has provided the potential for scaling up to leaves, plants, and canopies. Thermal cameras with a temperature resolution of <0.1 K now allow one to study the temperature variation within and between plants. This chapter discusses some applications of infrared thermography for assessing drought and other abiotic and biotic stress and outlines some of the main factors that need to be considered when applying this to the study of leaf or canopy temperature whether in controlled environments or in the field.

  7. A DECADE OF MAPPING SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION USING COLOR INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY: METHODS USED AND LESSONS LEARNED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Annual color infrared aerial photographs acquired annually between 1997 and 2007 were used to classify distributions of intertidal and shallow subtidal native eelgrass Zostera marina and non-indigenous dwarf eelgrass Z. japonica in lower Yaquina estuary, Oregon. The use of digit...

  8. Thermal Infrared Spectra of Experimentally Shocked Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.

    2003-12-01

    We acquired thermal infrared (3-40 microns) emissivity and hemispherical reflectance spectra of experimentally shocked samples of a fine-grained basalt from Grand Falls, AZ to document the spectral effects of shock as a function of increasing shock pressures (17-57 GPa). This sample contains 25% pyroxene, 20% olivine, and 45% feldspar, making it a suitable analog to the Surface Type 1 (basalt) observed in Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data of Mars. Reflectance data (3-14 microns) were acquired using a Nexus 470 FTIR spectrometer at the HIGP, University of Hawaii, and emission spectra (5-40 microns) were acquired using a Nicolet Nexus 670 emission spectrometer at Arizona State University. These data complement similar previous measurements of experimentally shocked plagioclase and pyroxene relevant to interpreting spectra provided by TES. The samples were shocked using the 25-mm barrel gun at Johnson Space Center and provided ~400 mg per sample. Large (2-10 mm) chips of recovered material were separated from the samples and washed to remove clinging fines, and the residual was powdered to provide a consistent grain size ( ˜20 microns). Spectra were obtained of both the chips and the powder samples. Results for the chips show a shift in band positions in the 900-1200 wavenumber (wn) region compared to unshocked samples, consistent with the structural degradation of feldspar and subsequent formation of maskelynite and glass. The development of a band near 460 wn at high pressures is also consistent with glass formation in feldspars. Conversely, absorptions related to pyroxene remain present even at high pressures, consistent with previous work. Results for the powders show little variations with increasing pressure except for the loss of minor transparency features in the 800-900 wn region. Additional visible/near-infrared (0.35-2.50 microns) measurements of the powdered basalt samples also will be acquired at the RELAB facility. Future work will include

  9. The use of color infrared aerial photography in determining salt marsh vegetation and delimiting man-made structures of Lynnhaven Bay, Virginia. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, R. E., III

    1974-01-01

    Color infrared aerial photography was found to be superior to color aerial photography in an ecological study of Lynnhaven Bay, Virginia. The research was divided into three phases: (1) Determination of the feasibility of correlating color infrared aerial photography with saline wetland species composition and zonation patterns, (2) determination of the accuracy of the aerial interpretation and problems related to the aerial method used; and (3) comparison of developed with undeveloped areas along Lynnhaven Bay's shoreline. Wetland species composition and plant community zonation bands were compared with aerial infrared photography and resulted in a high degree of correlation. Problems existed with changing physical conditions; time of day, aircraft angle and sun angle, making it necessary to use several different characteristics in wetland species identification. The main characteristics used were known zonation patterns, textural signatures and color tones. Lynnhaven Bay's shoreline was 61.5 percent developed.

  10. Thermal Infrared Spectral Imager for Airborne Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Wilson, Daniel W.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Hill, Cory J.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2009-01-01

    An airborne thermal hyperspectral imager is under development which utilizes the compact Dyson optical configuration and quantum well infrared photo detector (QWIP) focal plane array. The Dyson configuration uses a single monolithic prism-like grating design which allows for a high throughput instrument (F/1.6) with minimal ghosting, stray-light and large swath width. The configuration has the potential to be the optimal imaging spectroscopy solution for lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) due to its small form factor and relatively low power requirements. The planned instrument specifications are discussed as well as design trade-offs. Calibration testing results (noise equivalent temperature difference, spectral linearity and spectral bandwidth) and laboratory emissivity plots from samples are shown using an operational testbed unit which has similar specifications as the final airborne system. Field testing of the testbed unit was performed to acquire plots of apparent emissivity for various known standard minerals (such as quartz). A comparison is made using data from the ASTER spectral library.

  11. Producing Mosaiced Infrared Data on Natural Hazards for Real-time Emergency Management using UAS and Thermal Infrared Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, M. C.; Webley, P. W.; Saiet, E., II

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) provide a unique capability for emergency management and real-time hazard assessment with access to hazardous environments that maybe off limits for manned aircraft while reducing the risk to personnel and loss of ground assets. When dealing with hazards, such as forest fires and volcanic eruptions, there is a need to assess the location of the fire/flow front and where best to assign ground personnel to reduce the risk to local populations and infrastructure. Thermal infrared cameras provide the ideal tool to detect subtle changes in the developing fire/flow front while providing data 24/7. There are limits to the detecting capabilities of these cameras given the wavelengths used and image resolution available. Given the large thermal contrast between the hot flow front and surrounding landscape then the data can be used to map out the location and changes seen as the front of the flow/fire advances. To map the complete hazard then either the UAS has to be flown at an altitude to capture the event in one image or the data has to be mosaiced together. Higher altitudes lead to coarser resolution imagery and therefore we will show how thermal infrared data can be mosaiced to provide the highest spatial resolution map of the hazard. We will present results using different UAS and thermal cameras including adding neutral density filters to detect hotter thermal targets. Timely generation of these mosaiced maps in a real-time environment is critical for those assessing the ongoing event and we will show how these maps can be generated quickly with the necessary spatial and thermal accuracy while discussing the requirements needed to generate thermal infrared maps of the hazardous events that are both useful for quick real-time assessment and also for further investigation in research projects.

  12. Spring census of mid-continent sandhill cranes using aerial infrared videography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinzel, P.J.; Nelson, J.M.; Parker, R.S.; Davis, L.R.

    2006-01-01

    Aerial infrared videography was used to map spatial distributions of nocturnal sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) flocks and determine crane densities within roosts as an alternative to the currently used diurnal photo-corrected ocular transect method to estimate the size of the mid-continental population. The densities determined from samples taken over the course of a night show variability. Densities measured early in the night (2100 to 2300 hrs) were generally lower than those measured in the time period after midnight and up until cranes prepared to depart their roosts before sunrise. This suggests that cranes may be more active early in the night and possibly still settling into their roosts at this time. For this reason, densities and areas measured later at night and into the early morning were used to estimate population size. Our methods estimated that the annual crane populations along the central Platte River in Nebraska were higher than estimates from the ocular transect method; however both methods showed a similar trend with time. Our population size estimates likely were higher because our methodology provided synoptic imagery of crane roosts along the entire study reach when all cranes had returned to the river, and the nocturnal densities were higher than previous estimates using observations from late evening or early morning. In addition to providing a tool for estimating annual population size, infrared videography can be utilized over time to identify spatial changes in the roosting patterns that may occur as a result of riverine management activities.

  13. Identification of irrigated crop types from ERTS-1 density contour maps and color infrared aerial photography. [Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, R. W.; Evans, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The crop types of a Great Plains study area were mapped from color infrared aerial photography. Each field was positively identified from field checks in the area. Enlarged (50x) density contour maps were constructed from three ERTS-1 images taken in the summer of 1973. The map interpreted from the aerial photography was compared to the density contour maps and the accuracy of the ERTS-1 density contour map interpretations were determined. Changes in the vegetation during the growing season and harvest periods were detectable on the ERTS-1 imagery. Density contouring aids in the detection of such charges.

  14. Thermal Infrared Spectra of Experimentally Shocked Albitite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Lucey, P.; Christensen, P.

    2002-12-01

    We have acquired thermal infrared (3-40 microns) hemispherical reflectance and emissivity spectra of shocked samples of a fine-grained (1-5 mm) albitite from Szklary, Poland to determine the spectral degradation effects of shocked albite as a function of increasing shock pressures (17-56 GPa). Reflectance data were acquired using a Nicolet 5SXC FTIR spectrometer at the HIGP, University of Hawaii, and emission spectra were acquired using a Nicolet Nexus 670 emission spectrometer at Arizona State University. These data complement similar previous measurements of experimentally shocked anorthosite relevant to interpreting spectra provided by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on Mars Global Surveyor. The samples were shocked using the 25-mm barrel gun at Johnson Space Center and provided ~400 mg per sample. Large (2-10 mm) chips of recovered material were separated from the samples and washed to remove clinging fines, and the residual was powdered to provide a consistent grain size (~20 microns). Spectra were obtained of both the chips and the powder samples. Results for the chips show a progressive loss of spectral features and contrast compared to unshocked samples, while results for the powders show a reduction in the depth of the transparency feature located near 855 wavenumbers (11.7 microns) with increasing pressure. The albite structure retains its crystalline state to higher pressures than anorthosites, consistent with previous transmission spectra. Additional visible/near-infrared (0.35-2.50 microns) measurements of the powdered albitite and anorthosite samples also were acquired at the RELAB facility. These spectra show a decrease in albedo and a loss of water bands near 1.4 and 1.9 microns with increasing pressure. The broad feldspar absorption near 1.25 microns was not present in the albitite sample (possibly due to its fine original grain size) but was present in the anorthosite sample, where its band depth decreased with increasing shock pressures.

  15. The Visualization of Infrared Radiation Using Thermal Sensitive Foils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a set of demonstration school experiments where infrared radiation is detected using thermal sensitive foils. The possibility of using standard glass lenses for infrared imaging is discussed in detail. It is shown that with optic components made from glass, infrared radiation up to 2.5 µm of wavelength can be detected. The…

  16. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-03

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a material (16, 42) by applying a cooling medium (20, 54) to cool a thin surface layer portion of the material and to transiently generate a temperature differential between the thin surface layer portion and the lower portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material. The altered thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material is detected by a spectrometer/detector (28, 50) while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of the emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation, so that the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of the characteristics relating to the molecular composition of the material.

  17. Development of practical thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianyu; Li, Chunlai; Lv, Gang; Yuan, Liyin; Liu, Enguang; Jin, Jian; Ji, Hongzhen

    2014-11-01

    As an optical remote sensing equipment, the thermal infrared hyperspectral imager operates in the thermal infrared spectral band and acquires about 180 wavebands in range of 8.0~12.5μm. The field of view of this imager is 13° and the spatial resolution is better than 1mrad. Its noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) is less than 0.2K@300K(average). 1 The influence of background radiation of the thermal infrared hyperspectral imager,and a simulation model of simplified background radiation is builded. 2 The design and implementationof the Cryogenic Optics. 3 Thermal infrared focal plane array (FPA) and special dewar component for the thermal infrared hyperspectral imager. 4 Parts of test results of the thermal infrared hyperspectral imager.The hyperspectral imaging system is China's first success in developing this type of instrument, whose flight validation experiments have already been embarked on. The thermal infrared hyperspectral data acquired will play an important role in fields such as geological exploration and air pollutant identification.

  18. Determining in-season nitrogen requirements for corn using aerial color-infrared photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripada, Ravi Prakash

    Fast, accurate methods to determine in-season corn (Zea mays L.) nitrogen (N) requirements are needed to provide more precise and economical management and potentially decrease groundwater N contamination. The objectives of this study were to: (i) develop a methodology for predicting in-season N requirement for corn at the V7 and VT stages using aerial color infrared (CIR) photography; (ii) validate the RGDVI-based remote sensing technique for determining in-season N requirements for corn at VT; (iii) determine the relationships between corn agronomic parameters and spectral parameters that influence the prediction of optimum NV7 and NVT rates. Field studies were conducted for four years over a wide range of soil conditions and water regimes in the North Carolina Coastal Plain. A two-way factorial experimental design was implemented as a split-plot in randomized complete blocks with NPL as the main plot factor and NV7 or NVT as the sub-plot factor. Corn agronomic parameters were measured and aerial CIR photographs were obtained for each site at V7 or VT prior to N application. Spectral radiation of corn measured using the Green Difference Vegetation Index (GDVI) relative to high-N reference strips using a linear-plateau model was the best predictor of optimum NVT (R2 = 0.67). Very weak correlations were observed between optimum rates of N V7 and band combinations with significant correlations for relative G, RGDVI, and relative difference vegetation index (RDVI). In the VT validation study, the difference between predicted and observed optimum NVT rates ranged from -30 to 90 kg N ha-1. Overall, the remote sensing technique was successful (r2 = 0.85) in predicting optimum NVT rates despite the inherent constraints of predicting yield potential in any particular year. The spectral index RGDVI showed consistently significant relationships with corn agronomic parameters measured at VT. By assessing corn N requirements late in the season during the period of maximum N

  19. Jupiter's atmospheric composition from the Cassini thermal infrared spectroscopy experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.; Flasar, F. M.; Jennings, D. E.; Bezard, B.; Strobel, D. F.; Conrath, B. J.; Nixon, C. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Romani, P. N.; Achterberg, R. K.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Irwin, P.; Brasunas, J. C.; Pearl, J. C.; Smith, M. D.; Orton, G. S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Spilker, L. J.; Carlson, R. C.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Calcutt, S. B.; Read, P. L.; Taylor, F. W.; Fouchet, T.; Parrish, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer observed Jupiter in the thermal infrared during the swing-by of the Cassini spacecraft. Results include the detection of two new stratospheric species, the methyl radical and diacetylene, gaseous species present in the north and south auroral infrared hot spots; determination of the variations with latitude of acetylene and ethane, the latter a tracer of atmospheric motion; observations of unexpected spatial distributions of carbon dioxide and hydrogen cyanide, both considered to be products of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 impacts; characterization of the morphology of the auroral infrared hot spot acetylene emission; and a new evaluation of the energetics of the northern auroral infrared hot spot.

  20. Digital infrared thermal imaging following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lauren E; Markowski, Alycia M; Henneman, Kimberly

    2012-03-01

    This case describes the selective use of digital infrared thermal imaging for a 48-year-old woman who was being treated by a physical therapist following left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a semitendinosus autograft. PMID:22383168

  1. Payette National Forest aerial survey project using the Kodak digital color infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Jerry D.

    1997-11-01

    Staff of the Payette National Forest located in central Idaho used the Kodak Digital Infrared Camera to collect digital photographic images over a wide variety of selected areas. The objective of this aerial survey project is to collect airborne digital camera imagery and to evaluate it for potential use in forest assessment and management. The data collected from this remote sensing system is being compared with existing resource information and with personal knowledge of the areas surveyed. Resource specialists are evaluating the imagery to determine if it may be useful for; identifying cultural sites (pre-European settlement tribal villages and camps); recognizing ecosystem landscape pattern; mapping recreation areas; evaluating the South Fork Salmon River road reconstruction project; designing the Elk Summit Road; assessing the impact of sediment on anadramous fish in the South Fork Salmon River; assessing any contribution of sediment to the South Fork from the reconstructed road; determining post-wildfire stress development in conifer timber; in assessing the development of insect populations in areas initially determined to be within low intensity wildfire burn polygons; and to search for Idaho Ground Squirrel habitat. Project sites include approximately 60 linear miles of the South Fork of the Salmon River; a parallel road over about half that distance; 3 archaeological sites; two transects of about 6 miles each for landscape patterns; 3 recreation areas; 5 miles of the Payette River; 4 miles of the Elk Summit Road; a pair of transects 4.5 miles long for stress assessment in timber; a triplet of transects about 3 miles long for the assessment of the identification of species; and an area of about 640 acres to evaluate habitat for the endangered Idaho Ground Squirrel. Preliminary results indicate that the imagery is an economically viable way to collect site specific resource information that is of value in the management of a national forest.

  2. Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance above and within plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawu, Kyaw Tha

    1991-01-01

    Any significant angular dependence of the emitted long wave radiation could result in errors in remotely estimated energy budgets or evapotranspiration. Empirical data and thermal infrared radiation models are reviewed in reference to anisotropic emissions from the plant canopy. The biometeorological aspects of linking longwave models with plant canopy energy budgets and micrometeorology are discussed. A new soil plant atmosphere model applied to anisotropic longwave emissions from a canopy is presented. Time variation of thermal infrared emission measurements is discussed.

  3. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    The work mainly focuses on the study of thermal infrared (IR) properties of atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the estimation of the aerosol-induced direct longwave (LW) radiative forcing in the spectral region 5-20 mum at the Earth's surface (BOA; bottom of the atmosphere) and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in cloud-free atmospheric conditions. These objectives were accomplished by conducting case studies on clear sky, smoky, and dusty conditions that took place in the Great Basin of the USA in 2013. Both the solar and thermal IR measurements and a state-of-the-science radiative transfer model, the LBLDIS, a combination of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model and the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) solver were employed for the study. The LW aerosol forcing is often not included in climate models because the aerosol effect on the LW is often assumed to be negligible. We lack knowledge of aerosol characteristics in the LW region, and aerosol properties exhibit high variability. We have found that the LW TOA radiative forcing due to fine mode aerosols, mainly associated with small biomass burning smoke particles, is + 0.4 W/m2 which seems to be small, but it is similar to the LW radiative forcing due to increase in CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere since the preindustrial era of 1750 (+ 1.6 W/m 2). The LW radiative forcing due to coarse mode aerosols, associated with large airborne mineral dust particles, was found to be as much as + 5.02 W/m2 at the surface and + 1.71 W/m2 at the TOA. All of these significant positive values of the aerosol radiative forcing both at the BOA and TOA indicate that the aerosols have a heating effect in the LW range, which contributes to counterbalancing the cooling effect associated with the aerosol radiative forcing in the shortwave (SW) spectral region. In the meantime, we have found that LW radiative forcing by aerosols is highly sensitive to particle size and complex refractive indices of

  4. Thermal Imaging Using Small-Aerial Platforms for Assessment of Crop Water Stress in Humid Subtropical Climates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaf- or canopy-to-air temperature difference (hereafter called CATD) can provide information on crop energy status. Thermal imagery from agricultural aircraft or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) have the potential of providing thermal data for calculation of CATD and visual snapshots that can guide ...

  5. Colored three-dimensional reconstruction of vehicular thermal infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shaoyuan; Leung, Henry; Shen, Zhenyi

    2015-06-01

    Enhancement of vehicular night vision thermal infrared images is an important problem in intelligent vehicles. We propose to create a colorful three-dimensional (3-D) display of infrared images for the vehicular night vision assistant driving system. We combine the plane parameter Markov random field (PP-MRF) model-based depth estimation with classification-based infrared image colorization to perform colored 3-D reconstruction of vehicular thermal infrared images. We first train the PP-MRF model to learn the relationship between superpixel features and plane parameters. The infrared images are then colorized and we perform superpixel segmentation and feature extraction on the colorized images. The PP-MRF model is used to estimate the superpixel plane parameter and to analyze the structure of the superpixels according to the characteristics of vehicular thermal infrared images. Finally, we estimate the depth of each pixel to perform 3-D reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can give a visually pleasing and daytime-like colorful 3-D display from a monochromatic vehicular thermal infrared image, which can help drivers to have a better understanding of the environment.

  6. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1991-12-24

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a solid material (16, 42) by applying energy from an energy source (20, 70) top a surface region of the solid material sufficient to cause transient heating in a thin surface layer portion of the solid material (16, 42) so as to enable transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion, and by detecting with a spectrometer/detector (28, 58) substantially only the transient thermal emission of infrared radiation from the thin surface layer portion of the solid material. The detected transient thermal emission of infrared radiation is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the solid material of emitted infrared radiation, so as to be indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the solid material.

  7. Infrared Thermal Imaging as a Tool in University Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollmann, Klaus-Peter; Vollmer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a valuable tool in physics education at the university level. It can help to visualize and thereby enhance understanding of physical phenomena from mechanics, thermal physics, electromagnetism, optics and radiation physics, qualitatively as well as quantitatively. We report on its use as lecture demonstrations, student…

  8. Factors affecting thermal infrared images at selected field sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, J.B.; Ferguson, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    A thermal infrared (TIR) survey was conducted to locate surface ordnance in and around the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, and a thermal anomaly was found. This report documents studies conducted to identify the position of cause of the thermal anomaly. Also included are results of a long path Fourier transform infrared survey, soil sampling activities, soil gas surveys, and buried heater studies. The results of these studies indicated that the thermal anomaly was caused by a gravel pad, which had thermal properties different than those of the surrounding soil. Results from this investigation suggest that TIR is useful for locating surface objects having a high thermal inertia compared to the surrounding terrain, but TIR is of very limited use for characterizing buried waste or other similar buried objects at the INEL.

  9. Thermal Infrared Imaging-Based Computational Psychophysiology for Psychometrics.

    PubMed

    Cardone, Daniela; Pinti, Paola; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-01-01

    Thermal infrared imaging has been proposed as a potential system for the computational assessment of human autonomic nervous activity and psychophysiological states in a contactless and noninvasive way. Through bioheat modeling of facial thermal imagery, several vital signs can be extracted, including localized blood perfusion, cardiac pulse, breath rate, and sudomotor response, since all these parameters impact the cutaneous temperature. The obtained physiological information could then be used to draw inferences about a variety of psychophysiological or affective states, as proved by the increasing number of psychophysiological studies using thermal infrared imaging. This paper presents therefore a review of the principal achievements of thermal infrared imaging in computational physiology with regard to its capability of monitoring psychophysiological activity.

  10. Thermal Infrared Imaging-Based Computational Psychophysiology for Psychometrics.

    PubMed

    Cardone, Daniela; Pinti, Paola; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-01-01

    Thermal infrared imaging has been proposed as a potential system for the computational assessment of human autonomic nervous activity and psychophysiological states in a contactless and noninvasive way. Through bioheat modeling of facial thermal imagery, several vital signs can be extracted, including localized blood perfusion, cardiac pulse, breath rate, and sudomotor response, since all these parameters impact the cutaneous temperature. The obtained physiological information could then be used to draw inferences about a variety of psychophysiological or affective states, as proved by the increasing number of psychophysiological studies using thermal infrared imaging. This paper presents therefore a review of the principal achievements of thermal infrared imaging in computational physiology with regard to its capability of monitoring psychophysiological activity. PMID:26339284

  11. Thermal-infrared spectral observations of geologic materials in emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Luth, Sharon J.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal-infrared spectra of geologic materials in emission were studied using the prototype Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). A variety of of processes and surface modifications that may influence or alter the spectra of primary rock materials were studied. It was confirmed that thermal emission spectra contain the same absorption features as those observed in transmission and reflection spectra. It was confirmed that the TES instrument can be used to obtain relevant spectra for analysis of rock and mineral composition.

  12. Filter-free nondispersive infrared sensing using narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takuya; De Zoysa, Menaka; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate filter-free nondispersive infrared (NDIR) sensing of organic solvents using single-peak narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters. Our emitters are based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) slabs, and show a single thermal emission peak with a quality factor of over 100 at the fingerprint wavelength (around 9 µm) of the target organic solvents. Using these narrow-bandwidth thermal emitters and commercial pyroelectric sensors without any optical bandpass filters, we successfully distinguish and determine the concentration of the target solvents among other solvents.

  13. Thermal-Infrared Pedestrian ROI Extraction through Thermal and Motion Information Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María T.; Serrano-Cuerda, Juan

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the robustness of a new thermal-infrared pedestrian detection system under different outdoor environmental conditions. In first place the algorithm for pedestrian ROI extraction in thermal-infrared video based on both thermal and motion information is introduced. Then, the evaluation of the proposal is detailed after describing the complete thermal and motion information fusion. In this sense, the environment chosen for evaluation is described, and the twelve test sequences are specified. For each of the sequences captured from a forward-looking infrared FLIR A-320 camera, the paper explains the weather and light conditions under which it was captured. The results allow us to draw firm conclusions about the conditions under which it can be affirmed that it is efficient to use our thermal-infrared proposal to robustly extract human ROIs. PMID:24727500

  14. Thermal-infrared pedestrian ROI extraction through thermal and motion information fusion.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María T; Serrano-Cuerda, Juan

    2014-04-10

    This paper investigates the robustness of a new thermal-infrared pedestrian detection system under different outdoor environmental conditions. In first place the algorithm for pedestrian ROI extraction in thermal-infrared video based on both thermal and motion information is introduced. Then, the evaluation of the proposal is detailed after describing the complete thermal and motion information fusion. In this sense, the environment chosen for evaluation is described, and the twelve test sequences are specified. For each of the sequences captured from a forward-looking infrared FLIR A-320 camera, the paper explains the weather and light conditions under which it was captured. The results allow us to draw firm conclusions about the conditions under which it can be affirmed that it is efficient to use our thermal-infrared proposal to robustly extract human ROIs.

  15. Thermal/structural/optical integrated design for optical sensor mounted on unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaopeng; Yang, Hongtao; Mei, Chao; Wu, Dengshan; Shi, Kui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of science and technology and the promotion of many local wars in the world, altitude optical sensor mounted on unmanned aerial vehicle is more widely applied in the airborne remote sensing, measurement and detection. In order to obtain high quality image of the aero optical remote sensor, it is important to analysis its thermal-optical performance on the condition of high speed and high altitude. Especially for the key imaging assembly, such as optical window, the temperature variation and temperature gradient can result in defocus and aberrations in optical system, which will lead to the poor quality image. In order to improve the optical performance of a high speed aerial camera optical window, the thermal/structural/optical integrated design method is developed. Firstly, the flight environment of optical window is analyzed. Based on the theory of aerodynamics and heat transfer, the convection heat transfer coefficient is calculated. The temperature distributing of optical window is simulated by the finite element analysis software. The maximum difference in temperature of the inside and outside of optical window is obtained. Then the deformation of optical window under the boundary condition of the maximum difference in temperature is calculated. The optical window surface deformation is fitted in Zernike polynomial as the interface, the calculated Zernike fitting coefficients is brought in and analyzed by CodeV Optical Software. At last, the transfer function diagrams of the optical system on temperature field are comparatively analyzed. By comparing and analyzing the result, it can be obtained that the optical path difference caused by thermal deformation of the optical window is 138.2 nm, which is under PV ≤1 4λ . The above study can be used as an important reference for other optical window designs.

  16. Radiometric cloud imaging with an uncooled microbolometer thermal infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Pust, Nathan; Thurairajah, Brentha; Mizutani, Kohei

    2005-07-25

    An uncooled microbolometer-array thermal infrared camera has been incorporated into a remote sensing system for radiometric sky imaging. The radiometric calibration is validated and improved through direct comparison with spectrally integrated data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). With the improved calibration, the Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) system routinely obtains sky images with radiometric uncertainty less than 0.5 W/(m(2 )sr) for extended deployments in challenging field environments. We demonstrate the infrared cloud imaging technique with still and time-lapse imagery of clear and cloudy skies, including stratus, cirrus, and wave clouds. PMID:19498585

  17. Radiometric cloud imaging with an uncooled microbolometer thermal infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Pust, Nathan; Thurairajah, Brentha; Mizutani, Kohei

    2005-07-25

    An uncooled microbolometer-array thermal infrared camera has been incorporated into a remote sensing system for radiometric sky imaging. The radiometric calibration is validated and improved through direct comparison with spectrally integrated data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). With the improved calibration, the Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) system routinely obtains sky images with radiometric uncertainty less than 0.5 W/(m(2 )sr) for extended deployments in challenging field environments. We demonstrate the infrared cloud imaging technique with still and time-lapse imagery of clear and cloudy skies, including stratus, cirrus, and wave clouds.

  18. Thermal Design for Infrared Sensor Pixel Operated at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiokawa, Yuya; Nakano, Tatsuya; Maeda, Naoki; Kimata, Masafumi; Takahata, Akihiro

    This paper discusses the effect of thermal conduction through the air on the sensitivity of thermal infrared detectors fabricated in a bulk micro-machining process from the device's front side. ANSYS analysis shows that the thermal conduction from the edge of the freestanding detector structure to the heat sink (Si substrate) considerably impacts the sensitivity. To confirm this phenomenon experimentally, we fabricated a TEG that includes thermopile infrared sensors with various distances between the edge of the freestanding detector structure and the Si substrate. TEG evaluation shows that the ANSYS analysis is quantitatively in good agreement with the experiment. The results obtained in this study suggest an optimum design from the viewpoint of thermal conduction through the air and the fill factor of the sensitive area.

  19. Thermal Analysis on Cryogenic Liquid Hydrogen Tank on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Harpster, George; Hunter, James

    2007-01-01

    Thermal analyses are performed on the liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank designed for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) powered by solar arrays and a regenerative proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. A 14-day cruise mission at a 65,000 ft altitude is considered. Thermal analysis provides the thermal loads on the tank system and the boiling-off rates of LH2. Different approaches are being considered to minimize the boiling-off rates of the LH2. It includes an evacuated multilayer insulation (MLI) versus aerogel insulation on the LH2 tank and aluminum versus stainless steel spacer rings between the inner and outer tank. The resulting boil-off rates of LH2 provided by the one-dimensional model and three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) on the tank system are presented and compared to validate the results of the three-dimensional FEA. It concludes that heat flux through penetrations by conduction is as significant as that through insulation around the tank. The tank system with MLI insulation and stainless steel spacer rings result in the lowest boiling-off rate of LH2.

  20. High speed heterodyne infrared thermography applied to thermal diffusivity identification.

    PubMed

    Pradere, C; Clerjaud, L; Batsale, J C; Dilhaire, S

    2011-05-01

    We have combined InfraRed thermography and thermal wave techniques to perform microscale, ultrafast (microsecond) temperature field measurements. The method is based on an IR camera coupled to a microscope and synchronized to the heat source by means of phase locked function generators. The principle is based on electronic stroboscopic sampling where the low IR camera acquisition frequency f(acq) (25 Hz) undersamples a high frequency thermal wave. This technique permits the measurement of the emissive thermal response at a (microsecond) short time scale (microsecond) with the full frame mode of the IR camera with a spatial thermal resolution of 7 μm. Then it becomes possible to study 3D transient heat transfer in heterogeneous and high thermal conductive thin layers. Thus it is possible for the first time in our knowledge to achieve temperature field measurements in heterogeneous media within a wide range of time domains. The IR camera is now a suitable instrument for multiscale thermal analysis.

  1. LONGWAVE THERMAL INFRARED SPECTRAL VARIABILITY IN INDIVIDUAL ROCKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6 - 11.6 µm) with a spatial resolution less than 5 mm at a range of 10 m was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra of individual rock surfaces. The rocks were obtained commercially, were ...

  2. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Saturn and Titan from Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Brasunas, J. C.; Carlson, R. C.; Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. G.; Mamoutkine, A. A.; Nixon, A.; Pearl, J. C.; Romani, P. N.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft completed its nominal mission at Saturn in 2008 and began its extended mission. Cassini carries the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS); a Fourier transform spectrometer that measures the composition, thermal structure and dynamics of the atmospheres of Saturn and Titan, and also the temperatures of other moons and the rings.

  3. Soil moisture inferences from thermal infrared measurements of vegetation temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Thermal infrared measurements of wheat (Triticum durum) canopy temperatures were used in a crop water stress index to infer root zone soil moisture. Results indicated that one time plant temperature measurement cannot produce precise estimates of root zone soil moisture due to complicating plant factors. Plant temperature measurements do yield useful qualitative information concerning soil moisture and plant condition.

  4. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Experimentally Shocked Anorthosite and Pyroxenite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Hoerz, F.; Christensen, P.; Lucey, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    We performed shock recovery experiments at JSC (17-63 GPa) on samples of Stillwater pyroxenite and anorthosite and acquired their thermal infrared spectra (3-50 micron) to investigate the degradation of spectral features at high pressures. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Infrared lens thermal effect: equivalent focal shift and calculating model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng-shuo; Shi, Zelin; Feng, Bin; Xu, Bao-shu

    2014-11-01

    It's well-know that the focal shift of infrared lens is the major factor in degeneration of imaging quality when temperature change. In order to figure out the connection between temperature change and focal shift, partial differential equations of thermal effect on light path are obtained by raytrace method, to begin with. The approximately solution of the PDEs show that focal shift is proportional to temperature change. And a formula to compute the proportional factor is given. In order to understand infrared lens thermal effect deeply, we use defocus by image plane shift at constant temperature to equivalently represent thermal effect on infrared lens. So equivalent focal shift (EFS) is defined and its calculating model is proposed at last. In order to verify EFS and its calculating model, Physical experimental platform including a motorized linear stage with built-in controller, blackbody, target, collimator, IR detector, computer and other devices is developed. The experimental results indicate that EFS make the image plane shift at constant temperature have the same influence on infrared lens as thermal effect and its calculating model is correct.

  6. Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Imagery for Irrigation Water Resource Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nellis, M. Duane

    1985-01-01

    Water resources play a major role in the character of agricultural development in the arid western United States. This case study shows how thermal infrared imagery, which is sensitive to radiant or heat energy, can be used to interpret crop moisture content and associated stress in irrigated areas. (RM)

  7. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy. PMID:26698997

  8. BOOK REVIEW: Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planinsic, Gorazd

    2011-09-01

    Ten years ago, a book with a title like this would be interesting only to a narrow circle of specialists. Thanks to rapid advances in technology, the price of thermal imaging devices has dropped sharply, so they have, almost overnight, become accessible to a wide range of users. As the authors point out in the preface, the growth of this area has led to a paradoxical situation: now there are probably more infrared (IR) cameras sold worldwide than there are people who understand the basic physics behind them and know how to correctly interpret the colourful images that are obtained with these devices. My experience confirms this. When I started using the IR camera during lectures on the didactics of physics, I soon realized that I needed more knowledge, which I later found in this book. A wide range of potential readers and topical areas provides a good motive for writing a book such as this one, but it also represents a major challenge for authors, as compromises in the style of writing and choice of topics are required. The authors of this book have successfully achieved this, and indeed done an excellent job. This book addresses a wide range of readers, from engineers, technicians, and physics and science teachers in schools and universities, to researchers and specialists who are professionally active in the field. As technology in this area has made great progress in recent times, this book is also a valuable guide for those who opt to purchase an infrared camera. Chapters in this book could be divided into three areas: the fundamentals of IR thermal imaging and related physics (two chapters); IR imaging systems and methods (two chapters) and applications, including six chapters on pedagogical applications; IR imaging of buildings and infrastructure, industrial applications, microsystems, selected topics in research and industry, and selected applications from other fields. All chapters contain numerous colour pictures and diagrams, and a rich list of relevant

  9. Agricultural applications for thermal infrared multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Ochoa, M. C.; Hajek, B. F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data in agricultural landscapes is discussed. The TIMS allows for narrow-band analysis in the 8.2-11.6 micron range at spatial resolutions down to 5 meters in cell size. A coastal plain region in SE Alabama was studied using the TIMS. The crop/plant vigor, canopy density, and thermal response changes for soils obtained from thermal imagery are examined. The application of TIMS data to hydrologic and topographic issues, inventory and conservation monitoring, and the enhancement and extraction of cartographic features is described.

  10. Infrared characterization of thermal gradients on disc brakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panier, Stephane; Dufrenoy, Philippe; Bremond, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    The heat generated in frictional organs like brakes and clutches induces thermal distortions which may lead to localized contact areas and hot spots developments. Hot spots are high thermal gradients on the rubbing surface. They count among the most dangerous phenomena in frictional organs leading to damage, early failure and unacceptable braking performances such as brake fade or undesirable low frequency vibrations called hot judder. In this paper, an experimental study of hot spots occurrence in railway disc brakes is reported on. The aim of this study was to better classify and to explain the thermal gradients appearance on the surface of the disc. Thermograph measurements with an infrared camera have been carried out on the rubbing surface of brake discs on a full-scale test bench. The infrared system was set to take temperature readings in snap shot mode precisely synchronized with the rotation of the disc. Very short integration time allows reducing drastically haziness of thermal images. Based on thermographs, a classification of hot-spots observed in disc brakes is proposed. A detailed investigation of the most damaging thermal gradients, called macroscopic hot spots (MHS) is given. From these experimental researches, a scenario of hot spots occurrence is suggested step by step. Thanks to infrared measurements at high frequency with high resolution, observations give new highlights on the conditions of hot spots appearance. Comparison of the experimental observations with the theoretical approaches is finally discussed.

  11. Unveiling in Vivo Subcutaneous Thermal Dynamics by Infrared Luminescent Nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Ximendes, Erving Clayton; Santos, Weslley Queiroz; Rocha, Uéslen; Kagola, Upendra Kumar; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Fernández, Nuria; Gouveia-Neto, Artur da Silva; Bravo, David; Domingo, Agustín Martín; del Rosal, Blanca; Brites, Carlos D S; Carlos, Luís Dias; Jaque, Daniel; Jacinto, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of core/shell engineering of rare earth doped luminescent nanoparticles has ushered a new era in fluorescence thermal biosensing, allowing for the performance of minimally invasive experiments, not only in living cells but also in more challenging small animal models. Here, the potential use of active-core/active-shell Nd(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped nanoparticles as subcutaneous thermal probes has been evaluated. These temperature nanoprobes operate in the infrared transparency window of biological tissues, enabling deep temperature sensing into animal bodies thanks to the temperature dependence of their emission spectra that leads to a ratiometric temperature readout. The ability of active-core/active-shell Nd(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped nanoparticles for unveiling fundamental tissue properties in in vivo conditions was demonstrated by subcutaneous thermal relaxation monitoring through the injected core/shell nanoparticles. The reported results evidence the potential of infrared luminescence nanothermometry as a diagnosis tool at the small animal level. PMID:26845418

  12. Unveiling in Vivo Subcutaneous Thermal Dynamics by Infrared Luminescent Nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Ximendes, Erving Clayton; Santos, Weslley Queiroz; Rocha, Uéslen; Kagola, Upendra Kumar; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Fernández, Nuria; Gouveia-Neto, Artur da Silva; Bravo, David; Domingo, Agustín Martín; del Rosal, Blanca; Brites, Carlos D S; Carlos, Luís Dias; Jaque, Daniel; Jacinto, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of core/shell engineering of rare earth doped luminescent nanoparticles has ushered a new era in fluorescence thermal biosensing, allowing for the performance of minimally invasive experiments, not only in living cells but also in more challenging small animal models. Here, the potential use of active-core/active-shell Nd(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped nanoparticles as subcutaneous thermal probes has been evaluated. These temperature nanoprobes operate in the infrared transparency window of biological tissues, enabling deep temperature sensing into animal bodies thanks to the temperature dependence of their emission spectra that leads to a ratiometric temperature readout. The ability of active-core/active-shell Nd(3+)- and Yb(3+)-doped nanoparticles for unveiling fundamental tissue properties in in vivo conditions was demonstrated by subcutaneous thermal relaxation monitoring through the injected core/shell nanoparticles. The reported results evidence the potential of infrared luminescence nanothermometry as a diagnosis tool at the small animal level.

  13. Thermal analysis of nanofluids in microfluidics using an infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Yi, Pyshar; Kayani, Aminuddin A; Chrimes, Adam F; Ghorbani, Kamran; Nahavandi, Saeid; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2012-07-21

    We present the thermal analysis of liquid containing Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles in a microfluidic platform using an infrared camera. The small dimensions of the microchannel along with the low flow rates (less than 120 μl min(-1)) provide very low Reynolds numbers of less than 17.5, reflecting practical parameters for a microfluidic cooling platform. The heat analysis of nanofluids has never been investigated in such a regime, due to the deficiencies of conventional thermal measurement systems. The infrared camera allows non-contact, three dimensional and high resolution capability for temperature profiling. The system was studied at different w/w concentrations of thermally conductive Al(2)O(3) nanoparticles and the experiments were in excellent agreement with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

  14. A DECADE OF MAPPING SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION USING COLOR INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY: METHODS USED AND LESSONS LEARNED - 5-14-2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    Annual color infrared (CIR) aerial photographs acquired annually between 1997 and 2007 were used to classify distributions of intertidal and shallow subtidal native eelgrass Zostera marina and non-indigenous dwarf eelgrass Z. japonica in lower Yaquina estuary, Oregon. The use of...

  15. In vitro attenuation of thermal-induced protein denaturation by aerial parts of Artemisia scoparia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murad Ali; Khan, Haroon; Tariq, Shafiq Ahmad; Pervez, Samreen

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the aerial parts of Artemisia scoparia (crude extract, total flavonoid contents, and aqueous fraction) for protein denaturation potential. The crude extract provoked marked attenuation of thermal-induced denatured protein in a concentration-dependent manner with maximum inhibition of 54.05 μg/mL at 500 μg/mL and IC50 of 449.66 μg/mL. When total flavonoid contents were studied, it illustrated most dominant activity concentration dependently with maximum amelioration of 62.16 μg/mL at 500 μg/mL and IC50 of 378.35 μg/mL. The aqueous fraction also exhibited significant activity with maximum of 56.75% inhibition at 500 μg/mL and IC50 of 445.10 μg/mL. It can be concluded on the basis of the results that the crude extract, flavonoid contents, and aqueous fraction of the plant possessed significant inhibition on thermal-induced denatured protein. PMID:25183498

  16. A novel technique to monitor thermal discharges using thermal infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Muthulakshmi, A L; Natesan, Usha; Ferrer, Vincent A; Deepthi, K; Venugopalan, V P; Narasimhan, S V

    2013-09-01

    Coastal temperature is an important indicator of water quality, particularly in regions where delicate ecosystems sensitive to water temperature are present. Remote sensing methods are highly reliable for assessing the thermal dispersion. The plume dispersion from the thermal outfall of the nuclear power plant at Kalpakkam, on the southeast coast of India, was investigated from March to December 2011 using thermal infrared images along with field measurements. The absolute temperature as provided by the thermal infrared (TIR) images is used in the Arc GIS environment for generating a spatial pattern of the plume movement. Good correlation of the temperature measured by the TIR camera with the field data (r(2) = 0.89) make it a reliable method for the thermal monitoring of the power plant effluents. The study portrays that the remote sensing technique provides an effective means of monitoring the thermal distribution pattern in coastal waters. PMID:23839171

  17. A novel technique to monitor thermal discharges using thermal infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Muthulakshmi, A L; Natesan, Usha; Ferrer, Vincent A; Deepthi, K; Venugopalan, V P; Narasimhan, S V

    2013-09-01

    Coastal temperature is an important indicator of water quality, particularly in regions where delicate ecosystems sensitive to water temperature are present. Remote sensing methods are highly reliable for assessing the thermal dispersion. The plume dispersion from the thermal outfall of the nuclear power plant at Kalpakkam, on the southeast coast of India, was investigated from March to December 2011 using thermal infrared images along with field measurements. The absolute temperature as provided by the thermal infrared (TIR) images is used in the Arc GIS environment for generating a spatial pattern of the plume movement. Good correlation of the temperature measured by the TIR camera with the field data (r(2) = 0.89) make it a reliable method for the thermal monitoring of the power plant effluents. The study portrays that the remote sensing technique provides an effective means of monitoring the thermal distribution pattern in coastal waters.

  18. Understanding coal using thermal decomposition and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, P. R.; Hamblen, D. G.

    1981-02-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) is being used to provide understanding of the organic structure of coals and coal thermal decomposition products. The research has developed a relationship between the coal organic structure and the products of thermal decomposition. The work has also led to the discovery that many of the coal structural elements are preserved in the heavy molecular weight products (tar) released in thermal decomposition and that careful analysis of these products in relation to the parent coal can supply clues to the original structure. Quantitative FTIR spectra for coals, tars and chars are used to determine concentrations of the hydroxyl, aliphatic and aromatic hydrogen. Concentrations of aliphatic carbon are computed using an assumed aliphatic stoichiometry; aromatic carbon concentrations are determined by difference. The values are in good agreement with date determined by 13C and proton NMR. Analysis of the solid produ ts produced by successive stages in the thermal decomposition provides information on the changes in the chemical bonds occurring during the process. Time resolved infrared scans (129 msec/scan) taken during the thermal decomposition provide data on the amount, composition and rate of evolution of light gas species. The relationship between the evolved light species and their sources in the coal is developed by comparing the rate of evolution with the rate of change in the chemical bonds. With the application of these techniques, a general kinetic model has been developed which relates the products of thermal decomposition to the organic structure of the parent coal.

  19. Infrared thermal imaging system on a mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fu-Feng; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jing

    2015-04-30

    A novel concept towards pervasively available low-cost infrared thermal imaging system lunched on a mobile phone (MTIS) was proposed and demonstrated in this article. Through digestion on the evolutional development of milestone technologies in the area, it can be found that the portable and low-cost design would become the main stream of thermal imager for civilian purposes. As a representative trial towards this important goal, a MTIS consisting of a thermal infrared module (TIM) and mobile phone with embedded exclusive software (IRAPP) was presented. The basic strategy for the TIM construction is illustrated, including sensor adoption and optical specification. The user-oriented software was developed in the Android environment by considering its popularity and expandability. Computational algorithms with non-uniformity correction and scene-change detection are established to optimize the imaging quality and efficiency of TIM. The performance experiments and analysis indicated that the currently available detective distance for the MTIS is about 29 m. Furthermore, some family-targeted utilization enabled by MTIS was also outlined, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention, etc. This work suggests a ubiquitous way of significantly extending thermal infrared image into rather wide areas especially health care in the coming time.

  20. Infrared Thermal Imaging System on a Mobile Phone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Fu-Feng; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A novel concept towards pervasively available low-cost infrared thermal imaging system lunched on a mobile phone (MTIS) was proposed and demonstrated in this article. Through digestion on the evolutional development of milestone technologies in the area, it can be found that the portable and low-cost design would become the main stream of thermal imager for civilian purposes. As a representative trial towards this important goal, a MTIS consisting of a thermal infrared module (TIM) and mobile phone with embedded exclusive software (IRAPP) was presented. The basic strategy for the TIM construction is illustrated, including sensor adoption and optical specification. The user-oriented software was developed in the Android environment by considering its popularity and expandability. Computational algorithms with non-uniformity correction and scene-change detection are established to optimize the imaging quality and efficiency of TIM. The performance experiments and analysis indicated that the currently available detective distance for the MTIS is about 29 m. Furthermore, some family-targeted utilization enabled by MTIS was also outlined, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention, etc. This work suggests a ubiquitous way of significantly extending thermal infrared image into rather wide areas especially health care in the coming time. PMID:25942639

  1. Infrared thermal facial image sequence registration analysis and verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Jian, Bo-Lin

    2015-03-01

    To study the emotional responses of subjects to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), infrared thermal facial image sequence is preprocessed for registration before further analysis such that the variance caused by minor and irregular subject movements is reduced. Without affecting the comfort level and inducing minimal harm, this study proposes an infrared thermal facial image sequence registration process that will reduce the deviations caused by the unconscious head shaking of the subjects. A fixed image for registration is produced through the localization of the centroid of the eye region as well as image translation and rotation processes. Thermal image sequencing will then be automatically registered using the two-stage genetic algorithm proposed. The deviation before and after image registration will be demonstrated by image quality indices. The results show that the infrared thermal image sequence registration process proposed in this study is effective in localizing facial images accurately, which will be beneficial to the correlation analysis of psychological information related to the facial area.

  2. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, Bogdan; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe Gurlui, Silviu Octavian; Cazacu, Marius Mihai; Timofte, Adrian

    2014-11-24

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270–320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  3. Infrared thermal imaging system on a mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fu-Feng; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A novel concept towards pervasively available low-cost infrared thermal imaging system lunched on a mobile phone (MTIS) was proposed and demonstrated in this article. Through digestion on the evolutional development of milestone technologies in the area, it can be found that the portable and low-cost design would become the main stream of thermal imager for civilian purposes. As a representative trial towards this important goal, a MTIS consisting of a thermal infrared module (TIM) and mobile phone with embedded exclusive software (IRAPP) was presented. The basic strategy for the TIM construction is illustrated, including sensor adoption and optical specification. The user-oriented software was developed in the Android environment by considering its popularity and expandability. Computational algorithms with non-uniformity correction and scene-change detection are established to optimize the imaging quality and efficiency of TIM. The performance experiments and analysis indicated that the currently available detective distance for the MTIS is about 29 m. Furthermore, some family-targeted utilization enabled by MTIS was also outlined, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) prevention, etc. This work suggests a ubiquitous way of significantly extending thermal infrared image into rather wide areas especially health care in the coming time. PMID:25942639

  4. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albina, Bogdan; Cazacu, Marius Mihai; Timofte, Adrian; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe; Gurlui, Silviu Octavian

    2014-11-01

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270-320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  5. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  6. The thermal infrared radiance properties of dust aerosol over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Zengzhou; Pan, Delu; Tu, Qianguang; Gong, Fang; Chen, Jianyu

    2015-10-01

    Asian dust storms, which can long-range transport to ocean, often occur on spring. The present of Asian dust aerosols over ocean makes some difficult for other studies, such as cloud detection, and also take some advantage for ocean, such as take nutrition into the ocean by dry or wet deposition. Therefore, it is important to study the dust aerosol and retrieve the properties of dust from satellite observations that is mainly from the thermal infrared radiance. In this paper, the thermal infrared radiance properties of dust aerosol over ocean are analyzed from MODIS and MTSAT2 observations and Streamer model simulations. By analyzing some line samples and a series of dust aerosol region, it shows that the dust aerosol brightness temperature at 12μm (BT12) is always greater than BT11 and BT8.5, and BT8.5 is general greater than BT11. The brightness temperature different between 11μm and 12μm (BTD11-12) increases with the dust intensity. And the BTD11-12 will become positive when the atmospheric relative humidity is greater than 70%. The BTD11-12 increases gradually with the surface temperature while the effect on BTD11-12 of dust layer temperature is not evident. Those are caused by the transmission of the dust aerosol is different at the two thermal infrared channels. During daytime, dust infrared brightness temperature at mid-infrared bands should reduce the visual radiance, which takes about 25K or less. In general, BT3.7 is greater than BT11 for dust aerosol. Those results are helpful to monitor or retrieve dust aerosol physical properties over ocean from satellite.

  7. Human suspicious activity recognition in thermal infrared video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, Jakir; Jacobs, Eddie; Chowdhury, Fahmida K.

    2014-10-01

    Detecting suspicious behaviors is important for surveillance and monitoring systems. In this paper, we investigate suspicious activity detection in thermal infrared imagery, where human motion can be easily detected from the background regardless of the lighting conditions and colors of the human clothing and surfaces. We use locally adaptive regression kernels (LARK) as patch descriptors, which capture the underlying local structure of the data exceedingly well, even in the presence of significant distortions. Patch descriptors are generated for each query patch and for each database patch. A statistical approach is used to match the query activity with the database to make the decision of suspicious activity. Human activity videos in different condition such as, walking, running, carrying a gun, crawling, and carrying backpack in different terrains were acquired using thermal infrared camera. These videos are used for training and performance evaluation of the algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves good performance in suspicious activity recognition.

  8. Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance in sunflower canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tha Paw u, Kyaw; Ustin, Susan L.; Zhang, Chang-An

    1989-01-01

    Anisotropy of thermal infrared exitance above and within a relatively closed fully irrigated sunflower canopy is detailed. Azimuthal variation in thermal infrared exitance above canopies was weakly (statistically) related to solar position and was comparable to or larger than errors in satellite-based canopy estimates. Anisotropy within canopies was significantly lower and decreased with canopy closure and depth into the canopy. Measured azimuthal isotropy within canopies supports the use of this assumption in radiative transfer models. Significant differences in canopy temperature measurements were found depending upon whether the instruments were within or above the canopy. These differences could produce errors of 20-35 percent in latent energy estimates during periods of high evapotranspiration (ET) and greater errors in periods of restricted ET.

  9. Design study for Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanich, C. G.; Osterwisch, F. G.; Szeles, D. M.; Houtman, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of dividing the 8-12 micrometer thermal infrared wavelength region into six spectral bands by an airborne line scanner system was investigated. By combining an existing scanner design with a 6 band spectrometer, a system for the remote sensing of Earth resources was developed. The elements in the spectrometer include an off axis reflective collimator, a reflective diffraction grating, a triplet germanium imaging lens, a photoconductive mercury cadmium telluride sensor array, and the mechanical assembly to hold these parts and maintain their optical alignment across a broad temperature range. The existing scanner design was modified to accept the new spectrometer and two field filling thermal reference sources.

  10. Buildings Research using Infrared Imaging Radiometers with Laboratory Thermal Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Brent; Arasteh, Dariush

    1999-01-12

    Infrared thermal imagers are used at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to study heat transfer through components of building thermal envelopes. Two thermal chambers maintain steady-state heat flow through test specimens under environmental conditions for winter heating design. Infrared thermography is used to map surface temperatures on the specimens' warm side. Features of the quantitative thermography process include use of external reference emitters, complex background corrections, and spatial location markers. Typical uncertainties in the data are {+-} 0.5 C and 3 mm. Temperature controlled and directly measured external reference emitters are used to correct data from each thermal image. Complex background corrections use arrays of values for background thermal radiation in calculating temperatures of self-viewing surfaces. Temperature results are used to validate computer programs that predict heat flow including Finite-Element Analysis (FEA) conduction simulations and conjugate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. Results are also used to study natural convection surface heat transfer. Example data show the distribution of temperatures down the center line of an insulated window.

  11. The Thermal Infrared Sensor on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Dennis; Richardson, Cathy; Irons, James; Allen, Rick; Anderson, Martha; Budinoff, Jason; Casto, Gordon; Coltharp, Craig; Finneran, Paul; Forsbacka, Betsy; Hale, Taylor; Jennings, Tom; Jhabvala, Murzy; Lunsford, Allen; Magnuson, Greg; Mills, Rick; Morse, Tony; Otero, Veronica; Rohrbach, Scott; Smith, Ramsey; Sullivan, Terry; Tesfaye, Zelalem; Thome, Kurtis; Unger, Glenn; Whitehouse, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), a joint NASA and USGS mission, is scheduled for launch in December, 2012. The LDCM instrument payload will consist of the Operational Land Imager (OLI), provided by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation (BATC} under contract to NASA and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This paper outlines the design of the TIRS instrument and gives an example of its application to monitoring water consumption by measuring evapotranspiration.

  12. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  13. Systems Analysis for Thermal Infrared ` THz Torch' Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Sun, Jingye; Brindley, Helen E.; Liang, Xiaoxin; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2015-05-01

    The ` THz Torch' concept was recently introduced by the authors for providing secure wireless communications over short distances within the thermal infrared (10-100 THz). Unlike conventional systems, thermal infrared can exploit front-end thermodynamics with engineered blackbody radiation. For the first time, a detailed power link budget analysis is given for this new form of wireless link. The mathematical modeling of a short end-to-end link is provided, which integrates thermodynamics into conventional signal and noise power analysis. As expected from the Friis formula for noise, it is found that the noise contribution from the pyroelectric detector dominates intrinsic noise. From output signal and noise voltage measurements, experimental values for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are obtained and compared with calculated predictions. As with conventional communications systems, it is shown for the first time that the measured SNR and measured bit error rate found with this thermodynamics-based system resembles classical empirical models. Our system analysis can serve as an invaluable tool for the development of thermal infrared systems, accurately characterizing each individual channel and, thus, enables the performance of multi-channel ` THz Torch' systems to be optimized.

  14. Thermal infrared anomaly indicating unformed strong earthquake sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qinglin; Qiang, Zuji

    2015-01-01

    By processing and analyzing many satellite remote sensing images in infrared channels, we found visual evidence indicating earthquake sequences. In a sequence, large earthquakes could migrate thousands of kilometers along a linear route from one land mass to another, and infrared anomalies also cover these land masses. The sequence has at least two types: (1) quakes alternately occurring at two ends of a belt, or (2) quakes progressively migrating along a far-flung route. The former can be foreshowed in a single infrared belt with a legible directed structure and higher brightness temperature; the latter can be identified in advance from the shift, veer, and deformation of more areas with a higher brightness temperature. The thermal infrared anomalies with a shorter duration are used to predict the quake-sequence evolving in a longer period. Two sorts of sequences can meet and form a more complex structure that can also be shown in advance by an anomalous infrared area. These studies on the seismic sequences will provide a potent means for analyzing earthquake-pregnant fields and estimating the location of unformed earthquake sequences.

  15. Mapping and Measuring Thermal Areas in Yellowstone using ASTER and Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    ASTER thermal infrared (TIR) data, combined with field observations and pre-existing maps have been used to map Yellowstone's thermal areas. Thermal anomaly maps and estimates of the radiant geothermal heat flux are important for establishing the baseline thermal activity to better detect and understand future anomalous hydrothermal and/or volcanic activity, and also for monitoring changes in the geothermal system to support decisions regarding infrastructure development, preservation and protection of Yellowstone's resources, and ensuring visitor safety. One of the critical measurement parameters in the use of spaceborne TIR for studying subtle (sub-pixel, sub-boiling) thermal features is the acquisition of TIR data at night. Acquisition of night time data reduces the influence of solar radiance and increases the temperature difference between thermal targets and the cooler background, thus improving estimates of the geothermal component of heat flux. ASTER night time TIR data (90-m pixels) are acquired too infrequently and irregularly for regular monitoring purposes. However, the new Landsat 8 platform with the Thermal Infrared Sensor (100-m pixels) has been tasked to regularly collect night time TIR imagery (every 16 days). These data show promise for continued satellite-based thermal monitoring at Yellowstone, and could also be useful in monitoring subtle thermal activity at other volcanic/geothermal systems around the world. This presentation will highlight results of a comparative analysis of Landsat 8 TIRS and ASTER TIR data for measuring and mapping Yellowstone's thermal areas.

  16. Advances in photo-thermal infrared imaging microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, Chris; Papantonakis, Michael; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    There is a growing need for chemical imaging techniques in many fields of science and technology: forensics, materials science, pharmaceutical and chemical industries, just to name a few. While FTIR micro-spectroscopy is commonly used, its practical resolution limit of about 20 microns or more is often insufficient. Raman micro-spectroscopy provides better spatial resolution (~1 micron), but is not always practical because of samples exhibiting fluorescence or low Raman scattering efficiency. We are developing a non-contact and non-destructive technique we call photo-thermal infrared imaging spectroscopy (PT-IRIS). It involves photo-thermal heating of the sample with a tunable quantum cascade laser and measuring the resulting increase in thermal emission with an infrared detector. Photo-thermal emission spectra resemble FTIR absorbance spectra and can be acquired in both stand-off and microscopy configurations. Furthermore, PT-IRIS allows the acquisition of absorbance-like photo-thermal spectra in a reflected geometry, suitable for field applications and for in-situ study of samples on optically IR-opaque substrates (metals, fabrics, paint, glass etc.). Conventional FTIR microscopes in reflection mode measure the reflectance spectra which are different from absorbance spectra and are usually not catalogued in FTIR spectral libraries. In this paper, we continue developing this new technique. We perform a series of numerical simulations of the laser heating of samples during photo-thermal microscopy. We develop parameterized formulas to help the user pick the appropriate laser illumination power. We also examine the influence of sample geometry on spectral signatures. Finally, we measure and compare photo-thermal and reflectance spectra for two test samples.

  17. Advanced electro-mechanical micro-shutters for thermal infrared night vision imaging and targeting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, David; Johnson, Walter; McLeod, Scott

    2007-04-01

    Un-cooled microbolometer sensors used in modern infrared night vision systems such as driver vehicle enhancement (DVE) or thermal weapons sights (TWS) require a mechanical shutter. Although much consideration is given to the performance requirements of the sensor, supporting electronic components and imaging optics, the shutter technology required to survive in combat is typically the last consideration in the system design. Electro-mechanical shutters used in military IR applications must be reliable in temperature extremes from a low temperature of -40°C to a high temperature of +70°C. They must be extremely light weight while having the ability to withstand the high vibration and shock forces associated with systems mounted in military combat vehicles, weapon telescopic sights, or downed unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Electro-mechanical shutters must have minimal power consumption and contain circuitry integrated into the shutter to manage battery power while simultaneously adapting to changes in electrical component operating parameters caused by extreme temperature variations. The technology required to produce a miniature electro-mechanical shutter capable of fitting into a rifle scope with these capabilities requires innovations in mechanical design, material science, and electronics. This paper describes a new, miniature electro-mechanical shutter technology with integrated power management electronics designed for extreme service infra-red night vision systems.

  18. Development of a portable multispectral thermal infrared camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osterwisch, Frederick G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this research and development effort was to design and build a prototype instrument designated the 'Thermal Infrared Multispectral Camera' (TIRC). The Phase 2 effort was a continuation of the Phase 1 feasibility study and preliminary design for such an instrument. The completed instrument designated AA465 has application in the field of geologic remote sensing and exploration. The AA465 Thermal Infrared Camera (TIRC) System is a field-portable multispectral thermal infrared camera operating over the 8.0 - 13.0 micron wavelength range. Its primary function is to acquire two-dimensional thermal infrared images of user-selected scenes. Thermal infrared energy emitted by the scene is collected, dispersed into ten 0.5 micron wide channels, and then measured and recorded by the AA465 System. This multispectral information is presented in real time on a color display to be used by the operator to identify spectral and spatial variations in the scenes emissivity and/or irradiance. This fundamental instrument capability has a wide variety of commercial and research applications. While ideally suited for two-man operation in the field, the AA465 System can be transported and operated effectively by a single user. Functionally, the instrument operates as if it were a single exposure camera. System measurement sensitivity requirements dictate relatively long (several minutes) instrument exposure times. As such, the instrument is not suited for recording time-variant information. The AA465 was fabricated, assembled, tested, and documented during this Phase 2 work period. The detailed design and fabrication of the instrument was performed during the period of June 1989 to July 1990. The software development effort and instrument integration/test extended from July 1990 to February 1991. Software development included an operator interface/menu structure, instrument internal control functions, DSP image processing code, and a display algorithm coding program. The

  19. Thermal Imaging of Subsurface Coal Fires by means of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in the Autonomous Province Xinjiang, PRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasterling, Margarete; Schloemer, Stefan; Fischer, Christian; Ehrler, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    Spontaneous combustion of coal and resulting coal fires lead to very high temperatures in the subsurface. To a large amount the heat is transferred to the surface by convective and conductive transport inducing a more or less pronounced thermal anomaly. During the past decade satellite-based infrared-imaging (ASTER, MODIS) was the method of choice for coal fire detection on a local and regional scale. However, the resolution is by far too low for a detailed analysis of single coal fires which is essential prerequisite for corrective measures (i.e. fire fighting) and calculation of carbon dioxide emission based on a complex correlation between energy release and CO2 generation. Consequently, within the framework of the Sino-German research project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in Northern China", a new concept was developed and successfully tested. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was equipped with a lightweight camera for thermografic (resolution 160 by 120 pixel, dynamic range -20 to 250°C) and for visual imaging. The UAV designed as an octocopter is able to hover at GPS controlled waypoints during predefined flight missions. The application of a UAV has several advantages. Compared to point measurements on the ground the thermal imagery quickly provides the spatial distribution of the temperature anomaly with a much better resolution. Areas otherwise not accessible (due to topography, fire induced cracks, etc.) can easily be investigated. The results of areal surveys on two coal fires in Xinjiang are presented. Georeferenced thermal and visual images were mosaicked together and analyzed. UAV-born data do well compared to temperatures measured directly on the ground and cover large areas in detail. However, measuring surface temperature alone is not sufficient. Simultaneous measurements made at the surface and in roughly 15cm depth proved substantial temperature gradients in the upper soil. Thus the temperature

  20. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Bryan J.; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  1. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-08-21

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

  2. Combined use of visible, reflected infrared, and thermal infrared images for mapping Hawaiian lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Michael; Abbott, Elsa; Kahle, Anne

    1991-01-01

    The weathering of Hawaiian basalts is accompanied by chemical and physical changes of the surfaces. These changes have been mapped using remote sensing data from the visible and reflected infrared and thermal infrared wavelength regions. They are related to the physical breakdown of surface chill coats, the development and erosion of silica coatings, the oxidation of mafic minerals, and the development of vegetation cover. These effects show systematic behavior with age and can be mapped using the image data and related to relative ages of pahoehoe and aa flows. The thermal data are sensitive to silica rind development and fine structure of the scene; the reflectance data show the degree of oxidation and differentiate vegetation from aa and cinders. Together, data from the two wavelength regions show more than either separately. The combined data potentially provide a powerful tool for mapping basalt flows in arid to semiarid volcanic environments.

  3. Use of thermal infrared and colour infrared imagery to detect crop moisture stress. [Alberta, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. C.; Clark, N. F.; Cihlar, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In the presence of variable plant cover (primarily percent cover) and variable available water content, the remotely sensed apparent temperatures correlate closely with plant cover and poorly with soil water. To the extent that plant cover is not systematically related to available soil water, available water in the root zone values may not be reliably predicted from the thermal infrared data. On the other hand, if plant cover is uniform and the soil surface is shown in a minor way, the thermal data indicate plant stress and consequently available water in the soil profile.

  4. A thermal model for analysis of infrared images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, K.

    1970-01-01

    A mathematical model derived from the equation of heat conduction was developed to assist in interpreting thermal infrared images acquired from aircraft and spacecraft. The model assumes steady state boundary conditions. It contains parameters of rock and soil properties, atmospheric effects, site location, and season. The results predicted provide an explanation for the thermal differences among granite, limestone, and dolomite recorded in the December 1968 daytime and predawn flights over the Mill Creek, Oklahoma test site, during which representative thermal inertia and albedo values were used. A second test of the model made use of data acquired during the June 1970 predawn overflight of Mill Creek. A simple model of transient heating of the ground was constructed as an extension of the overall model, in order to examine the effects of atmospheric perturbations. The results obtained are consistent with those of ground observations made at the time of the overflight.

  5. Thermal infrared imaging in psychophysiology: Potentialities and limits

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Stephanos; Gallese, Vittorio; Merla, Arcangelo

    2014-01-01

    Functional infrared thermal imaging (fITI) is considered an upcoming, promising methodology in the emotional arena. Driven by sympathetic nerves, observations of affective nature derive from muscular activity subcutaneous blood flow as well as perspiration patterns in specific body parts. A review of 23 experimental procedures that employed fITI for investigations of affective nature is provided, along with the adopted experimental protocol and the thermal changes that took place on selected regions of interest in human and nonhuman subjects. Discussion is provided regarding the selection of an appropriate baseline, the autonomic nature of the thermal print, the experimental setup, methodological issues, limitations, and considerations, as well as future directions. PMID:24961292

  6. Intercomparison of Near Infrared SCIAMACHY and Thermal Infrared Nadir Vertical Column Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Gimeno-Garcia, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Gunter; Hess, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Nadir infrared (IR) sounding can be used to derive information on trace gases relevant for climate and air quality. For vertical column density retrievals using SCIAMACHY near IR nadir observations, the BIRRA (Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) code has recently been implemented in the operational level 1 - 2 processor. For analysis of thermal IR nadir observations of AIRS, GOSAT, IASI, or TES, a closely related code CERVISA (Column EstimatoR Vertical Infrared Sounding of the Atmosphere) has been developed. Both codes share a large portion of modules, e.g., for line-by-line absorption and the nonlinear least squares solver. The essential difference is the part of the forward model devoted to radiative transfer through the atmosphere, i.e., Beer's law for the near IR versus Schwarzschild's equation for the thermal IR. For the ongoing validation of the BIRRA carbon monoxide CO and methane CH4 products inter-comparisons with thermal IR sounding data are performed. CERVISA retrieval results are compared both to the operational products of the IR sounder considered and to SCIAMACHY products retrieved with BIRRA.

  7. Microdensitometry to identify saline rangelands on 70-mm color-infrared aerial film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Alaniz, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Many of the world's rangelands are affected by salinity. The detection of these areas is important to range and resource managers who are concerned with productivity, condition, and animal carrying capacity. The reported study was conducted along a north-to-south flight line 24 km long and 1.6 wide in Starr County, TX. Everitt et al. (1977) described seven different native range sites (four nonsaline and three saline) along this flight line. The study showed that photointerpretation by microdensitometry could be used to identify saline range sites quantitatively on CIR (0.50 to 0.90 micrometers) aerial film (scales 1:19,000, 1:42,000, and 1:80,000) exposed in May 1976, June 1976, and June 1979. Microdensitometer readings made on CIR film using white or blue light generally gave the best separation between saline and nonsaline range sites. The differences in microdensitometry readings among saline and nonsaline range sites were caused by less plant cover on the saline sites.

  8. Roof heat loss detection using airborne thermal infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, K.; Bauer, C.; Sulzer, W.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Austrian and European attempt to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, thermal rehabilitation and the improvement of the energy efficiency of buildings became an important topic in research as well as in building construction and refurbishment. Today, in-situ thermal infrared measurements are routinely used to determine energy loss through the building envelope. However, in-situ thermal surveys are expensive and time consuming, and in many cases the detection of the amount and location of waste heat leaving building through roofs is not possible with ground-based observations. For some years now, a new generation of high-resolution thermal infrared sensors makes it possible to survey heat-loss through roofs at a high level of detail and accuracy. However, to date, comparable studies have mainly been conducted on buildings with uniform roof covering and provided two-dimensional, qualitative information. This pilot study aims to survey the heat-loss through roofs of the buildings of the University of Graz (Austria) campus by using high-resolution airborne thermal infrared imagery (TABI 1800 - Thermal Airborne Broadband imager). TABI-1800 acquires data in a spectral range from 3.7 - 4.8 micron, a thermal resolution of 0.05 °C and a spatial resolution of 0.6 m. The remote sensing data is calibrated to different roof coverings (e.g. clay shingle, asphalt shingle, tin roof, glass) and combined with a roof surface model to determine the amount of waste heat leaving the building and to identify hot spots. The additional integration of information about the conditions underneath the roofs into the study allows a more detailed analysis of the upward heat flux and is a significant improvement of existing methods. The resulting data set provides useful information to the university facility service for infrastructure maintenance, especially in terms of attic and roof insulation improvements. Beyond that, the project is supposed to raise public

  9. Airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over disseminated gold deposits, Osgood Mountains, Humboldt County, Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over several disseminated gold deposits in northern Nevada in 1983. The aerial surveys were flown to determine whether TIMS data could depict jasperoids (siliceous replacement bodies) associated with the gold deposits. The TIMS data were collected over the Pinson and Getchell Mines in the Osgood Mountains, the Carlin, Maggie Creek, Bootstrap, and other mines in the Tuscarora Mountains, and the Jerritt Canyon Mine in the Independence Mountains. The TIMS data seem to be a useful supplement to conventional geochemical exploration for disseminated gold deposits in the western United States. Siliceous outcrops are readily separable in the TIMS image from other types of host rocks. Different forms of silicification are not readily separable, yet, due to limitations of spatial resolution and spectral dynamic range. Features associated with the disseminated gold deposits, such as the large intrusive bodies and fault structures, are also resolvable on TIMS data. Inclusion of high-resolution thermal inertia data would be a useful supplement to the TIMS data.

  10. Infrared-spectroscopic nanoimaging with a thermal source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, F.; Schnell, M.; Wittborn, J.; Ocelic, N.; Hillenbrand, R.

    2011-05-01

    Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a widely used analytical tool for chemical identification of inorganic, organic and biomedical materials, as well as for exploring conduction phenomena. Because of the diffraction limit, however, conventional FTIR cannot be applied for nanoscale imaging. Here we demonstrate a novel FTIR system that allows for infrared-spectroscopic nanoimaging of dielectric properties (nano-FTIR). Based on superfocusing of thermal radiation with an infrared antenna, detection of the scattered light, and strong signal enhancement employing an asymmetric FTIR spectrometer, we improve the spatial resolution of conventional infrared spectroscopy by more than two orders of magnitude. By mapping a semiconductor device, we demonstrate spectroscopic identification of silicon oxides and quantification of the free-carrier concentration in doped Si regions with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm. We envisage nano-FTIR becoming a powerful tool for chemical identification of nanomaterials, as well as for quantitative and contact-free measurement of the local free-carrier concentration and mobility in doped nanostructures.

  11. Thermal Infrared Observations and Thermophysical Modeling of Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan Michael; Edwards, Christopher Scott; Mommert, Michael; Trilling, David E.; Glotch, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    Mars-observing spacecraft have the opportunity to study Phobos from Mars orbit, and have produced a sizeable record of observations using the same instruments that study the surface of the planet below. However, these observations are generally infrequent, acquired only rarely over each mission.Using observations gathered by Mars Global Surveyor's (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), we can investigate the fine layer of regolith that blankets Phobos' surface, and characterize its thermal properties. The mapping of TES observations to footprints on the Phobos surface has not previously been undertaken, and must consider the orientation and position of both MGS and Phobos, and TES's pointing mirror angle. Approximately 300 fully resolved observations are available covering a significant subset of Phobos' surface at a variety of scales.The properties of the surface regolith, such as grain size, density, and conductivity, determine how heat is absorbed, transferred, and reradiated to space. Thermophysical modeling allows us to simulate these processes and predict, for a given set of assumed parameters, how the observed thermal infrared spectra will appear. By comparing models to observations, we can constrain the properties of the regolith, and see how these properties vary with depth, as well as regionally across the Phobos surface. These constraints are key to understanding how Phobos formed and evolved over time, which in turn will help inform the environment and processes that shaped the solar system as a whole.We have developed a thermophysical model of Phobos adapted from a model used for unresolved observations of asteroids. The model has been modified to integrate thermal infrared flux across each observed portion of Phobos. It will include the effects of surface roughness, temperature-dependent conductivity, as well as radiation scattered, reflected, and thermally emitted from the Martian surface. Combining this model with the newly-mapped TES

  12. Exploration of geothermal systems using hyperspectral thermal infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, Kevin A.; Ramsey, Michael S.

    2013-09-01

    Visible near infrared (VNIR), short-wave infrared (SWIR), and thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing has long been used for geothermal exploration. Specific focus on the TIR region (8-12 μm) has resulted in major-rock-forming mineral classes being identified and their areal percentages to be more easily mapped due in part to the linear mixing behavior of TIR emission. To understand the mineral compositional and thermal distribution of active geothermal surfaces systems, hyperspectral TIR data from the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEBASS) airborne sensor were acquired over the Salton Sea, CA geothermal fields by The Aerospace Corporation on March 26, 2009 and April 6, 2010. SEBASS collects 128 wavelength channels at ~ 1 m spatial resolution. Such high resolution data are rarely available for this type of scientific analysis and enabled the identification of rare mineral assemblages associated with the geothermally-active areas. One surface unit with a unique spectrum, believed to be a magnesium sulfate of unknown hydration state, was identified for the first time in the SEBASS data. The abundance and distribution of this mineral varied between 2009 and 2010 likely due to the precipitation conditions. Data obtained by the SEBASS sensor were also regressed to the 32 channel spectral resolution of the Mineral and Gas Identifier (MAGI) airborne sensor in order to test sensitivity limits. At this lower spectral resolution, all surface minerals were still effectively identified and therefore validated data at MAGI resolution are still very effective for accurate surface compositional mapping. A similar approach used at active geothermal areas in other semi-arid regions around the world has the potential to better characterize transient mineralogy, identify "indicators minerals", understand the influence of surface and ground water, and ultimately to locate new geothermal targets for future exploration. Furthermore, new Mineral and Gas

  13. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Staid, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal infrared emission and reflectance spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7???40 ??m) of experimentally shocked albite- and anorthite-rich rocks (17-56 GPa) demonstrate that plagioclase feldspars exhibit characteristic degradations in spectral features with increasing pressure. New measurements of albite (Ab98) presented here display major spectral absorptions between 1000-1250 cm-1 (8-10 ??m) (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) and weaker absorptions between 350-700 cm-1 (14-29 ??m) (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations). Many of these features persist to higher pressures compared to similar features in measurements of shocked anorthite, consistent with previous thermal infrared absorption studies of shocked feldspars. A transparency feature at 855 cm-1 (11.7 ??m) observed in powdered albite spectra also degrades with increasing pressure, similar to the 830 cm-1 (12.0 ??m) transparency feature in spectra of powders of shocked anorthite. Linear deconvolution models demonstrate that combinations of common mineral and glass spectra can replicate the spectra of shocked anorthite relatively well until shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation. Albite deconvolutions exhibit higher errors overall but do not change significantly with pressure, likely because certain clay minerals selected by the model exhibit absorption features similar to those in highly shocked albite. The implication for deconvolution of thermal infrared spectra of planetary surfaces (or laboratory spectra of samples) is that the use of highly shocked anorthite spectra in end-member libraries could be helpful in identifying highly shocked calcic plagioclase feldspars.

  14. Thermal infrared exploration in the Carlin trend, northern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.; Kruse, F.A.; Hummer-Miller, S.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) aircraft data have been acquired for the Rodeo Creek NE 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Eureka County, northern Nevada, covering the Carlin gold mine. A simple model has been developed to extract spectral emissivities for mapping surface lithology and alteration based on the physical properties of geologic materials. Emissivity-ratio images were prepared that allow generalized lithologic discrimination, identification of areas with high silica content, and the first reported detection of the carbonate secondary rest-strahlen feature. -from Authors

  15. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  16. Chemical detection using the airborne thermal infrared imaging spectrometer (TIRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gat, N.; Subramanian, S.; Sheffield, M.; Erives, H.; Barhen, J.

    1997-04-01

    A methodology is described for an airborne, downlooking, longwave infrared imaging spectrometer based technique for the detection and tracking of plumes of toxic gases. Plumes can be observed in emission or absorption, depending on the thermal contrast between the vapor and the background terrain. While the sensor is currently undergoing laboratory calibration and characterization, a radiative exchange phenomenology model has been developed to predict sensor response and to facilitate the sensor design. An inverse problem model has also been developed to obtain plume parameters based on sensor measurements. These models, the sensors, and ongoing activities are described.

  17. Land use inventory of Salt Lake County, Utah from color infrared aerial photography 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, K. P.; Willie, R. D.; Wheeler, D. J.; Ridd, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    The preparation of land use maps of Salt Lake County, Utah from high altitude color infrared photography is described. The primary purpose of the maps is to aid in the assessment of the effects of urban development on the agricultural land base and water resources. The first stage of map production was to determine the categories of land use/land cover and the mapping unit detail. The highest level of interpretive detail was given to the land use categories found in the agricultural or urbanized portions of the county; these areas are of primary interest with regard to the consumptive use of water from surface streams and wells. A slightly lower level of mapping detail was given to wetland environments; areas to which water is not purposely diverted by man but which have a high consumptive rate of water use. Photos were interpreted on the basis of color, tone, texture, and pattern, together with features of the topographic, hydrologic, and ecological context.

  18. Infrared thermal imaging for detection of peripheral vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bagavathiappan, S; Saravanan, T; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T; Raj, Baldev; Karunanithi, R; Panicker, T M R; Korath, M Paul; Jagadeesan, K

    2009-01-01

    Body temperature is a very useful parameter for diagnosing diseases. There is a definite correlation between body temperature and diseases. We have used Infrared Thermography to study noninvasive diagnosis of peripheral vascular diseases. Temperature gradients are observed in the affected regions of patients with vascular disorders, which indicate abnormal blood flow in the affected region. Thermal imaging results are well correlated with the clinical findings. Certain areas on the affected limbs show increased temperature profiles, probably due to inflammation and underlying venous flow changes. In general the temperature contrast in the affected regions is about 0.7 to 1 degrees C above the normal regions, due to sluggish blood circulation. The results suggest that the thermal imaging technique is an effective technique for detecting small temperature changes in the human body due to vascular disorders.

  19. Terrestrial Applications of the Thermal Infrared Sensor, TIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ramsey L.; Thome, Kurtis; Richardson, Cathleen; Irons, James; Reuter, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Landsat satellites have acquired single-band thermal images since 1978. The next satellile in the heritage, Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), is scheduled to launch in December 2012. LDCM will contain the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), where TIRS operates in concert with, but independently of OLI. This paper will provide an overview of the remote sensing instrument TIRS. The T1RS instrument was designed at National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) where it will be fabricated and calibrated as well. Protecting the integrity of the Scientific Data that will be collected from TIRS played a strong role in definition of the calibration test equipment and procedures used for the optical, radiometric, and spatial calibration. The data that will be produced from LCDM will continue to be used world wide for environment monitoring and resource management.

  20. Remote Sensing of Almond and Walnut Tree Canopy Temperatures Using an Inexpensive Infrared Sensor on a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Kellen Ethan

    the needs of a given field for more precise monitoring. The goal of this study was to explore the feasibility of using an inexpensive temperature sensor (Melexis MLX90614; NV Melexis SA, Rozendaalstraat 12, 8900 Ieper, Belgium) on a small UAV (Mikrokopter OktoXL; Hisystems GmbH Flachsmeerstrasse 2, 26802 Moormerland, Germany) to sense the canopy temperatures of almond and walnut trees. To accomplish this goal, we installed an infrared temperature sensor and a digital camera on a small UAV. The camera provided a spatial awareness of the IR temperature measurements which would otherwise require a very expensive thermal imager to obtain. The UAV was flown above almond and walnut trees recording images and temperatures, which were aligned temporally in post-processing. The pixels of each image were classified in to four classes: sunlit leaves, shaded leaves, sunlit soil, and shaded soil. Assuming that the measured temperature could be described as a weighted sum of each class in the field of view of the IR sensor, a linear system of equations was established to estimate the temperature of each class using at least several measurements of the same tree. Results indicated a good correlation between the temperatures estimated from the linear system of equations and the temperatures of those classes sampled on the ground immediately following each flight. With leaf temperatures ranging from about 12 to 40 degrees Celsius between 23 flights over two years, the linear solver was able to estimate the temperature of the sunlit and shaded leaves to within several degrees Celsius of the sampled temperature in most cases, with a coefficient of determination (r2 value) of 0.96 during the first year, and 0.73 during the second year. An additional study was undertaken to detect spatial temperature distribution within the orchard. Ground measurements were taken of every other tree in two walnut rows and one almond row using the handheld sensor, and the UAV was flown over those rows

  1. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing of the Yellowstone Geothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Heasler, H.; Jaworowski, C.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Schneider, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Yellowstone National Park (YNP) geothermal system is one of the largest in the world, with thousands of individual thermal features ranging in size from a few centimeters to tens of meters across, (e.g., fumaroles, geysers, mud pots and hot spring pools). Together, large concentrations of these thermal features make up dozens of distinct thermal areas, characterized by sparse vegetation, hydrothermally altered rocks, and usually either sinter, travertine, or acid sulfate alteration. The temperature of these thermal features generally ranges from ~30 to ~93 oC, which is the boiling temperature of water at the elevation of Yellowstone. In-situ temperature measurements of various thermal features are sparse in both space and time, but they show a dynamic time-temperature relationship. For example, as geysers erupt and send pulses of warm water down slope, the warm water cools rapidly and is then followed by another pulse of warm water, on time scales of minutes. The total heat flux from the Park’s thermal features has been indirectly estimated from chemical analysis of Cl- flux in water flowing from Yellowstone’s rivers. We are working to provide a more direct measurement, as well as estimates of time variability, of the total heat flux using satellite multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data. Over the last 10 years, NASA’s orbiting ASTER and MODIS instruments have acquired hundreds and thousands of multispectral TIR images, respectively, over the YNP area. Compared with some volcanoes, Yellowstone is a relatively low-temperature geothermal system, with low thermal contrast to the non-geothermal surrounding areas; therefore we are refining existing techniques to extract surface temperature and thermal flux information. This task is complicated by issues such as, during the day, solar heated surfaces may be warmer than nearby geothermal features; and there is some topographic (elevation) influence on surface temperatures, even at night. Still

  2. Thermal infrared remote sensing of crude oil slicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; D'Aria, Dana M.; Sabins, Floyd F., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Unambiguous detection of oil slicks by remote sensing techniques has proven an elusive goal. This article presents new thermal infrared spectra of oil slicks made from five different crude oil samples with a wide range of API gravities and compositions. After a brief outgassing phase, all oil slick spectra are quite similar and little affected by thickness, extended exposure to air or sunlight, and even by emulsification with seawater (mousse formation). Thus, oil slicks provide a remarkably unvarying spectral signature as remote sensing targets in the thermal infrared compared to other regions of the spectrum. This spectral signature in the 8-14 micron atmospheric window is flat, with an average reflectance of 4 percent. Seawater, on the other hand, has a spectrum that varies in reflectance with wavelength in the 8-14 micron window from 0.90 to 3.65 percent. In addition, we show that sea foam displays a reflectance spectrum quite similar to that of seawater in the 8-14 micron region. This results in a relatively uniform spectral background, against which oil slicks can be detected, based on their different spectral signature.

  3. Thermal Infrared Hot Spot and Dependence on Canopy Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.; Ballard, Jerrell R., Jr.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We perform theoretical calculations of the canopy thermal infrared (TIR) hot spot using a first principles 3-D model described earlier. Various theoretical canopies of varying leaf size and for differing canopy height are used to illustrate the magnitude of the TIR effect. Our results are similar to predicted behavior in the reflective hot spot as a function of canopy geometry and comparable to TIR measurements from the literature and our own simple ground experiments. We apply the MODTRAN atmospheric code to estimate the at-sensor variation in brightness temperature with view direction in the solar principal plane. For simple homogeneous canopies, we predict canopy thermal infrared hot spot variations of 2 degrees C at the surface with respect to nadir viewing. Dependence on leaf size is weak as long as the ratio of leaf size to canopy height is maintained. However, the angular width of the hot spot increases as the ratio of leaf diameter to canopy height increases. Atmospheric effects minimize but do not eliminate the TIR hot spot at satellite altitudes.

  4. Thermal Infrared Exposure of Cryogenic Indirect Drive ICF Targets

    SciTech Connect

    London, R A; Moody, J D; Sanchez, J J; Sater, J D; Haid, B J; Bittner, D N

    2005-07-08

    Cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets at the National Ignition Facility and the Laser Megajoule will be protected from thermal infrared radiation by a cold shroud. As the shroud is removed just before the laser pulse, infrared radiation will heat and possibly degrade the symmetry of the solid hydrogen fuel layer. A lumped component mathematical model has been constructed to calculate how long an indirect drive target can be exposed to thermal radiation before the fuel layer degrades. The allowed exposure time sets the maximum shroud removal time and therefore has important implications for the design of the cryogenic shroud systems. The model predicts that the maximum exposure time is approximately 0.18 s for plastic capsules inside hohlraums with transparent laser entrance holes. By covering the laser entrance holes with a partially reflective coating, the exposure time can be increased to approximately 1 s. The exposure time can be increased to about 2 s by using beryllium capsules. Several other design concepts could increase the exposure time even further. Lengthening of the allowed exposure time to 1 s or longer could allow a significant cost savings for the shroud system.

  5. Multispectral glass transparent from visible to thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehault, A.; Calvez, L.; Pain, T.; Adam, P.; Rollin, J.; Zhang, X. H.

    2014-06-01

    The thermal imaging market has experienced a strong growth during the recent years due to continued cost reduction of night vision devices. The development of uncooled focal plane detector arrays is the major reason for the cost reduction. Another reason is the continuous improvement of the optical solution. In this paper, we present a new multispectral material which responds to the increasing demand for optics operating simultaneously in the visible/SWIR (Short Wave InfraRed) and the thermal infrared region. The most important properties of some glasses from the GeS2-Ga2S3- CsCl system are highlighted in this study. A stable composition 15Ga2S3-75GeS2-10CsCl allowed the synthesis of a large glass without crystallization. The refractive index of this glass was precisely measured from 0.6 to 10.4μm by using the Littrow method. The chromatic dispersion was then calculated and compared with other multispectral materials.

  6. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20–40 THz and 60–100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The ‘THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25–50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel ‘THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10−6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links. PMID:24912871

  7. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-06-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20-40 THz and 60-100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The `THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25-50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel `THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10-6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links.

  8. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20-40 THz and 60-100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The 'THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25-50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel 'THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10(-6) are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links. PMID:24912871

  9. Landsat 8 thermal infrared sensor geometric characterization and calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storey, James C.; Choate, Michael J.; Moe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    The Landsat 8 spacecraft was launched on 11 February 2013 carrying two imaging payloads: the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS). The TIRS instrument employs a refractive telescope design that is opaque to visible wavelengths making prelaunch geometric characterization challenging. TIRS geometric calibration thus relied heavily on on-orbit measurements. Since the two Landsat 8 payloads are complementary and generate combined Level 1 data products, the TIRS geometric performance requirements emphasize the co-alignment of the OLI and TIRS instrument fields of view and the registration of the OLI reflective bands to the TIRS long-wave infrared emissive bands. The TIRS on-orbit calibration procedures include measuring the TIRS-to-OLI alignment, refining the alignment of the three TIRS sensor chips, and ensuring the alignment of the two TIRS spectral bands. The two key TIRS performance metrics are the OLI reflective to TIRS emissive band registration accuracy, and the registration accuracy between the TIRS thermal bands. The on-orbit calibration campaign conducted during the commissioning period provided an accurate TIRS geometric model that enabled TIRS Level 1 data to meet all geometric accuracy requirements. Seasonal variations in TIRS-to-OLI alignment have led to several small calibration parameter adjustments since commissioning.

  10. A Thermal Infrared Emission Spectra Library for Unpowdered Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, J. W.; Christensen, P. R.

    2007-12-01

    Mid-infrared thermal emission spectra have been obtained for whole-rock (unpowdered) samples of the following 25 meteorites: Abee, Admire, Allende, Bondoc, Brahin, Bruderheim, Canyon Diablo, Carichic, Clover Springs, Dhofar 007, Estherville, Holbrook, Juancheng, Kapoeta, Long Island, Marion, Modoc, ALH77225, ALH77233, ALH84082, LEW85322, ALH85025, ALH79029, ALH77004, and LEW86015. Meteorites were provided through the Center for Meteorite Studies at ASU, Johnson Space Center and the NASA Antarctic Meteorite Working Group, and from private collections. The database was prepared to aid in the on-going detection and interpretation of meteorites on Mars using the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) instruments on both Mars Exploration Rovers. It therefore includes several specimens of low, moderate, and high weathering intensities, reflecting different levels of water exposure in desert and non-desert environments. Unweathered falls are also considered. Samples represent all three chondrite classes, stony irons (mesosiderites and pallasites), and select achondrites. Special consideration is given to dust-covered iron-nickel meteorites as part of a separate study designed to evaluate the Mini-TES spectra of iron-nickel meteorites on Mars. All samples were analyzed at or near a temperature of 80° C using a modified Nicolet Nexus 670 FT-IR spectrometer at the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University. Data were collected within the 2000 to 200 wavenumber (5 to 50 microns) mid-infrared range. The results show that many meteorite types display moderate to wide variability in the depth and position of prominent absorption features, making them easily distinguishable from each other. Most previous meteorite spectroscopy studies have either focused on near-infrared reflectance spectra [e.g. 1], and/or involved powdered samples to represent asteroid regoliths in the mid-infrared [e.g. 2 & 3]. Particle size- related issues are often at the heart of

  11. The research on the effect of atmospheric transmittance for the measuring accuracy of infrared thermal imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-cun; Chen, Yi-ming; Fu, Xian-bin; Luo, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    The effect of atmospheric transmittance on infrared thermal imager temperature measuring accuracy cannot be ignored when the object is far from infrared thermal imager. In this paper, a method of reducing the influence of atmospheric transmittance is proposed for the infrared thermal imager. Firstly, the temperature measuring formula of infrared thermal imager and the effect of atmospheric transmittance on temperature measuring accuracy is analyzed. According to the composition of the atmosphere, the main factors influencing the atmosphere transmittance are determined. Secondly, the temperature measuring model of infrared thermal imager in sea level is established according to the absorption of water vapor and carbon dioxide, the scattering of air molecules and aerosol particulate, and the attenuation effects of weather conditions such as rain and snow. Finally, the correctness and feasibility of the proposed model is verified by the comparison experiments of four different environmental conditions. According to the experiments, the temperature measuring accuracy of the infrared thermal imager is improved.

  12. Estimating chlorophyll with thermal and broadband multispectral high resolution imagery from an unmanned aerial system using relevance vector machines for precision agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elarab, Manal; Ticlavilca, Andres M.; Torres-Rua, Alfonso F.; Maslova, Inga; McKee, Mac

    2015-12-01

    Precision agriculture requires high-resolution information to enable greater precision in the management of inputs to production. Actionable information about crop and field status must be acquired at high spatial resolution and at a temporal frequency appropriate for timely responses. In this study, high spatial resolution imagery was obtained through the use of a small, unmanned aerial system called AggieAirTM. Simultaneously with the AggieAir flights, intensive ground sampling for plant chlorophyll was conducted at precisely determined locations. This study reports the application of a relevance vector machine coupled with cross validation and backward elimination to a dataset composed of reflectance from high-resolution multi-spectral imagery (VIS-NIR), thermal infrared imagery, and vegetative indices, in conjunction with in situ SPAD measurements from which chlorophyll concentrations were derived, to estimate chlorophyll concentration from remotely sensed data at 15-cm resolution. The results indicate that a relevance vector machine with a thin plate spline kernel type and kernel width of 5.4, having LAI, NDVI, thermal and red bands as the selected set of inputs, can be used to spatially estimate chlorophyll concentration with a root-mean-squared-error of 5.31 μg cm-2, efficiency of 0.76, and 9 relevance vectors.

  13. Near-surface Thermal Infrared Imaging of a Mixed Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, D. M.; Helliker, B. R.; Richardson, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Measurement of an organism's temperature is of basic physiological importance and therefore necessary for ecosystem modeling, yet most models derive leaf temperature from energy balance arguments or assume it is equal to air temperature. This is because continuous, direct measurement of leaf temperature outside of a controlled environment is difficult and rarely done. Of even greater challenge is measuring leaf temperature with the resolution required to understand the underlying energy balance and regulation of plant processes. To measure leaf temperature through the year, we have mounted a high-resolution, thermal infrared camera overlooking the canopy of a temperate deciduous forest. The camera is co-located with an eddy covariance system and a suite of radiometric sensors. Our camera measures longwave thermal infrared (λ = 7.5-14 microns) using a microbolometer array. Suspended in the canopy within the camera FOV is a matte black copper plate instrumented with fine wire thermocouples that acts as a thermal reference for each image. In this presentation, I will discuss the challenges of continuous, long-term field operation of the camera, as well as measurement sensitivity to physical and environmental parameters. Based on this analysis, I will show that the uncertainties in converting radiometric signal to leaf temperature are well constrained. The key parameter for minimizing uncertainty is the emissivity of the objects being imaged: measuring the emissivity to within 0.01 enables leaf temperature to be calculated to within 0.5°C. Finally, I will present differences in leaf temperature observed amongst species. From our two-year record, we characterize high frequency, daily, and seasonal thermal signatures of leaves and crowns, in relation to environmental conditions. Our images are taken with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to quantify the preferential heating of sunlit portions of the canopy and the cooling effect of wind gusts. Future work will

  14. PHyTIR - A Prototype Thermal Infrared Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Hook, Simon J.; Johnson, William R.; Foote, Marc C.; Paine, Christopher G.; Pannell, Zack W.; Smythe, Robert F.; Kuan, Gary M.; Jakoboski, Julie K.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the PHyTIR (Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer) instrument, which is the engineering model for the proposed HyspIRI (Hyperspectral Infrared Imager) earth observing instrument. The HyspIRI mission would be comprised of the HyspIRI TIR (Thermal Infrared Imager), and a VSWIR (Visible Short-Wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer). Both instruments would be used to address key science questions related to the earth's carbon cycle, ecosystems, climate, and solid earth properties. Data gathering of volcanic activities, earthquakes, wildfires, water use and availability, urbanization, and land surface compositions and changes, would aid the predictions and evaluations of such events and the impact they create. Even though the proposed technology for the HyspIRI imager is mature, the PHyTIR prototype is needed to advance the technology levels for several of the instrument's key components, and to reduce risks, in particular to validate 1) the higher sensitivity, spatial resolution, and higher throughput required for this focal plane array, 2) the pointing accuracy, 2) the characteristics of several spectral channels, and 4) the use of ambient temperature optics. The PHyTIR telescope consists of the focal plane assembly that is housed within a cold housing located inside a vacuum enclosure; all mounted to a bulkhead, and an optical train that consists of 3 powered mirrors; extending to both sides of the bulkhead. A yoke connects the telescope to a scan mirror. The rotating mirror enables to scan- a large track on the ground. This structure is supported by kinematic mounts, linking the telescope assembly to a base plate that would also become the spacecraft interface for HyspIRI. The focal plane's cooling units are also mounted to the base plate, as is an overall enclosure that has two viewing ports with large exterior baffles, shielding the focal plane from incoming stray light. PHyTIR's electronics is distributed inside and near the vacuum

  15. The MAMBA Thermal Infrared All-Sky Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pier, Edward Alan; Tinn Chee Jim, Kevin; Lewis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We are developing a system to continually and simultaneously monitor infrared atmospheric extinction along all lines of sight. This system combines a next generation radiometrically calibrated thermal all-sky camera, a weather station, and a neural net trained on historic Radiosonde profiles. Oceanit Laboratories, Inc. will market this system as an off the shelf unit. Custom-built thermal all sky cameras have previously been used on Haleakala, Cerro Tololo, and elsewhere. Except for RASICAM on Cerro Tololo, they have not been radiometrically calibrated and have been used only for qualitative cloud monitoring. The new system will have improved sky coverage, resolution, and noise properties with respect to RASICAM, and simulations show it will be able to infer atmospheric transmittance to within a few percent. The all sky camera will combine an equiresolution optical design with an off-the-shelf thermal detector and in field blackbody calibration sources to provide uniform sensitivity and radiometric accuracy across the sky at relatively low cost. Our goal is to make such systems ubiqitous at observatories around the world.

  16. Neural networks for identifying drunk persons using thermal infrared imagery.

    PubMed

    Koukiou, Georgia; Anastassopoulos, Vassilis

    2015-07-01

    Neural networks were tested on infrared images of faces for discriminating intoxicated persons. The images were acquired during controlled alcohol consumption by forty-one persons. Two different experimental approaches were thoroughly investigated. In the first one, each face was examined, location by location, using each time a different neural network, in order to find out those regions that can be used for discriminating a drunk from a sober person. It was found that it was mainly the face forehead that changed thermal behaviour with alcohol consumption. In the second procedure, a single neural structure was trained on the whole face. The discrimination performance of this neural structure was tested on the same face, as well as on unknown faces. The neural networks presented high discrimination performance even on unknown persons, when trained on the forehead of the sober and the drunk person, respectively. Small neural structures presented better generalisation performance.

  17. Thermal infrared reflectance and emission spectroscopy of quartzofeldspathic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrnes, J.M.; Ramsey, M.S.; King, P.L.; Lee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks to better understand the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral characteristics of naturally-occurring amorphous materials through laboratory synthesis and analysis of glasses. Because spectra of glass phases differ markedly from their mineral counterparts, examination of glasses is important to accurately determine the composition of amorphous surface materials using remote sensing datasets. Quantitatively characterizing TIR (5-25 ??m) spectral changes that accompany structural changes between glasses and mineral crystals provides the means to understand natural glasses on Earth and Mars. A suite of glasses with compositions analogous to common terrestrial volcanic glasses was created and analyzed using TIR reflectance and emission techniques. Documented spectral characteristics provide a basis for comparison with TIR spectra of other amorphous materials (glasses, clays, etc.). Our results provide the means to better detect and characterize glasses associated with terrestrial volcanoes, as well as contribute toward understanding the nature of amorphous silicates detected on Mars. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. A method for accurate temperature measurement using infrared thermal camera.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Narushima, Takashi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Sudo, Takayuki; Okubo, Shuichi; Komatsubara, Shigeyuki; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-08-01

    The temperature distribution on a centre-holed thin foil of molybdenum, used as a sample and heated using a sample-heating holder for electron microscopy, was measured using an infrared thermal camera. The temperature on the heated foil area located near the heating stage of the heating holder is almost equal to the temperature on the heating stage. However, during the measurement of the temperature at the edge of the hole of the foil located farthest from the heating stage, a drop in temperature should be taken into consideration; however, so far, no method has been developed to locally measure the temperature distribution on the heated sample. In this study, a method for the accurate measurement of temperature distribution on heated samples for electron microscopy is discussed.

  19. Longwave thermal infrared spectral variability in individual rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Balick, Lee K; Gillespie, Alan; French, Andrew; Danilina, Iryna

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging spectrometer measuring in the longwave thermal infrared (7.6-11.6 {micro}m) with a spatial resolution less than 4 mm was used in the field to observe the variability of emissivity spectra within individual rocks. The rocks were obtained commercially, were on the order of 20 cm in size and were selected to have distinct spectral features: they include alabaster (gypsum), soapstone (steatite with talc), obsidian (volcanic glass), norite (plagioclase and orthopyroxene), and 'jasper' (silica with iron oxides). The advantages of using an imaging spectrometer to spectrally characterize these rocks are apparent. Large spectral variations were observed within individual rocks that may be attributed to roughness, surface geometry, and compositional variation. Non-imaging spectrometers would normally miss these variations as would small samples used in laboratory measurements, spatially averaged spectra can miss the optimum spectra for identification materials and spatially localized components of the rock can be obscured.

  20. Early detection of plant disease using infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huirong; Zhu, Shengpan; Ying, Yibin; Jiang, Huanyu

    2006-10-01

    By using imaging techniques, plant physiological parameters can be assessed without contact with the plant and in a non-destructive way. During plant-pathogen infection, the physiological state of the infected tissue is altered, such as changes in photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance, accumulation of Salicylic acid (SA) and even cell death. In this study, the different temperature distribution between the leaves infected by tobacco mosaic virus strain-TMV-U1 and the noninfected leaves was visualized by digital infrared thermal imaging with the microscopic observations of the different structure within different species tomatoes. Results show a presymptomatic decrease in leaf temperature about 0.5-1.3 °C lower than the healthy leaves. The temperature difference allowed the discrimination between the infected and healthy leaves before the appearance of visible necrosis on leaves.

  1. The new airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) with six bands between 8 and 12 microns is briefly characterized, and some results of remote sensing experiments are reported. The instrument has an instantaneous field of view of 2.5 milliradians, a total field of view of 80 deg, and a NE Delta T of approximately 0.1-0.3 C depending on the band. In the TIMS image of Death Valley, silica-rich rocks were easily separable from the nonsilicates. The Eureka Quartzite stood out in sharp contrast to other Ordovician and Cambrian metasediments, and Tertiary volcanic rocks were easily separable from both. Also distinguishable were various units in the fan gravels.

  2. Development of Thermal Infrared Sensor to Supplement Operational Land Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Peter; Waczynski, Augustyn; Kan, Emily; Wen, Yiting; Rosenberry, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) is a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP)-based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The TIRS instrument is a far-infrared imager operating in the pushbroom mode with two IR channels: 10.8 and 12 m. The focal plane will contain three 640 512 QWIP arrays mounted onto a silicon substrate. The readout integrated circuit (ROIC) addresses each pixel on the QWIP arrays and reads out the pixel value (signal). The ROIC is controlled by the focal plane electronics (FPE) by means of clock signals and bias voltage value. The means of how the FPE is designed to control and interact with the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA) is the basis for this work. The technology developed under the FPE is for the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA). The FPE must interact with the FPA to command and control the FPA, extract analog signals from the FPA, and then convert the analog signals to digital format and send them via a serial link (USB) to a computer. The FPE accomplishes the described functions by converting electrical power from generic power supplies to the required bias power that is needed by the FPA. The FPE also generates digital clocking signals and shifts the typical transistor-to-transistor logic (TTL) to }5 V required by the FPA. The FPE also uses an application- specific integrated circuit (ASIC) named System Image, Digitizing, Enhancing, Controlling, And Retrieving (SIDECAR) from Teledyne Corp. to generate the clocking patterns commanded by the user. The uniqueness of the FPE for TIRS lies in that the TIRS FPA has three QWIP detector arrays, and all three detector arrays must be in synchronization while in operation. This is to avoid data skewing while observing Earth flying in space. The observing scenario may be customized by uploading new control software to the SIDECAR.

  3. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Perception Using Thermal Infrared Cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry; Bajracharya, Max; Assad, Christopher; Brennan, Shane; Bellutta, Paolo; Sherwin, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform off-road autonomous navigation at any time of day or night is a requirement for some unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) programs. Because there are times when it is desirable for military UGVs to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, a passive only terrain perception mode of operation is also often a requirement. Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras can be used to provide day and night passive terrain perception. TIR cameras have a detector sensitive to either mid-wave infrared (MWIR) radiation (3-5?m) or long-wave infrared (LWIR) radiation (8-12?m). With the recent emergence of high-quality uncooled LWIR cameras, TIR cameras have become viable passive perception options for some UGV programs. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has used a stereo pair of TIR cameras under several UGV programs to perform stereo ranging, terrain mapping, tree-trunk detection, pedestrian detection, negative obstacle detection, and water detection based on object reflections. In addition, we have evaluated stereo range data at a variety of UGV speeds, evaluated dual-band TIR classification of soil, vegetation, and rock terrain types, analyzed 24 hour water and 12 hour mud TIR imagery, and analyzed TIR imagery for hazard detection through smoke. Since TIR cameras do not currently provide the resolution available from megapixel color cameras, a UGV's daytime safe speed is often reduced when using TIR instead of color cameras. In this paper, we summarize the UGV terrain perception work JPL has performed with TIR cameras over the last decade and describe a calibration target developed by General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GDRS) for TIR cameras and other sensors.

  4. Unmanned ground vehicle perception using thermal infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry; Bajracharya, Max; Assad, Christopher; Brennan, Shane; Bellutta, Paolo; Sherwin, Gary W.

    2011-05-01

    The ability to perform off-road autonomous navigation at any time of day or night is a requirement for some unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) programs. Because there are times when it is desirable for military UGVs to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, a passive only terrain perception mode of operation is also often a requirement. Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras can be used to provide day and night passive terrain perception. TIR cameras have a detector sensitive to either mid-wave infrared (MWIR) radiation (3-5μm) or long-wave infrared (LWIR) radiation (7-14μm). With the recent emergence of high-quality uncooled LWIR cameras, TIR cameras have become viable passive perception options for some UGV programs. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has used a stereo pair of TIR cameras under several UGV programs to perform stereo ranging, terrain mapping, tree-trunk detection, pedestrian detection, negative obstacle detection, and water detection based on object reflections. In addition, we have evaluated stereo range data at a variety of UGV speeds, evaluated dual-band TIR classification of soil, vegetation, and rock terrain types, analyzed 24 hour water and 12 hour mud TIR imagery, and analyzed TIR imagery for hazard detection through smoke. Since TIR cameras do not currently provide the resolution available from megapixel color cameras, a UGV's daytime safe speed is often reduced when using TIR instead of color cameras. In this paper, we summarize the UGV terrain perception work JPL has performed with TIR cameras over the last decade and describe a calibration target developed by General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GDRS) for TIR cameras and other sensors.

  5. Infrared Observations Of Saturn's Rings : Azimuthal Variations And Thermal Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyrat, C.; Spilker, L. J.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S. G.; Wallis, B. D.; Nugent, C.; Flasar, M.

    2007-12-01

    Saturn's rings represent a collection of icy centimeter to meter size particles with their local dynamic dictated by self gravity, mutual collisions, surface roughness and thickness of the rings themselves. The infrared observations obtained by the CIRS infrared spectrometer on board Cassini over the last 3.5 year contain informations on the local dynamic, as the thermal signature of planetary rings is influenced both by the ring structure and the particle properties. The ring temperature is very dependent on the solar phase angle (Spilker et al., this issue), and on the local hour angle around Saturn, depending on whether or not particles' visible hemispheres are heated by the Sun. The geometric filling factor, which can be estimated from CIRS spectra, is less dependent on the local hour angle, suggesting that the non isothermal behavior of particles' surfaces have low impact, but it is very dependent on the spacecraft elevation for the A and C rings. The ring small scale structure can be explored using CIRS data. Variations of the filling factor with the local hour angle relative to the spacecraft azimuth reveals self-gravity wakes. We derive morphological parameters of such wakes in both A and B rings assuming that wakes can be modeled either by regularly spaced bars with infinite or finite optical depth. Our results indicates that wakes in the A ring are almost flat, with a ratio height/width ≈ 0.44 ± 0.16 and with a pitch angle relative to the orbital motion direction of ≍ 27deg. This is consistent with UVIS (Colwell et al., 2006) and VIMS data (Hedman et al., 2007). Such models are more difficult to constrain in the B ring, but small variations of the filling factor indicate that the pitch angle decreases drastically in this ring. We also present a new thermal bar model to explain azimuthal variations of temperatures in the A ring. We compare results with previous ring thermal models of spherical particles. The Cassini/CIRS azimuthal scans data set is

  6. Thermal modeling of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gier, H. L.; Taylor, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    The Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is a cryogenically cooled telescope in the one-meter aperture class designed for sensing in the infrared from 2-200 microns. This facility is currently planned for multiple missions onboard the Space Shuttle with varying instrument complements. All components of the SIRTF within the field of view of the optics are cryogenically cooled. The baseline primary coolant is supercritical helium which is stored in an external tank and routed through the telescope-cooling the instruments, the optical components and the baffles. For detector cooling below 6 K, small reservoirs of superfluid helium (HeII) are provided. The SIRTF was thermally modeled on the SINDA computer program both for steady state and transient solutions. The analysis shows that the baseline configuration has a large capacity for growth in cryogen requirements. A proportional controller model was developed for transient operations. The control system maintained the optics within all prescribed temperature limits except for certain combinations of transients involving a large step change in the power dissipation in the secondary mirror assembly and/or when the primary mirror was assumed to be constructed of quartz. The baseline SIRTF will perform the mission for which it was designed.

  7. Effect of halite coatings on thermal infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jeff A.; King, Penelope L.; Green, Andy; Craig, Michael A.; Spilde, Michael N.; Wright, Shawn P.; Kunkel, Tara S.; Lee, Rachel J.

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing the occurrence and distribution of soluble salts on planetary surfaces allows us to model or monitor aqueous and geochemical conditions. Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing is useful for identifying some types of salt deposits; however, mineral abundance determinations are based on the interaction of infrared with only the top few hundred micrometers of the surface. Thus, distinguishing massive deposits from coatings presents a challenge to TIR remote sensing. To better understand the TIR properties of spectrally transmissive halite coatings, we investigated the effects of coating thickness and texture on the TIR reflectance spectra of halite-coated glasses. We analyzed two coating textures with variable thickness: (1) continuous and (2) discontinuous particulate coatings. As halite coating thickness increases, the intensity of substrate absorption bands decreases nonlinearly. The substrate is not detected with halite coatings >150 µm thick. Therefore, when coatings are present, it is not possible to apply TIR models of mineral abundances using linear deconvolution algorithms. We show that continuous and coarse particulate halite coatings increase the reflectance minimum (emissivity maximum), making them potentially detectable on planetary surfaces by the methods of Osterloo et al. (2008). However, the reflectance minimum does not change if coatings have low areal coverage (<50%) or are composed of fine particles (<5 µm). Thus, halite that forms as efflorescent coatings or has been redistributed as fine dust is not detected using TIR spectroscopy. Our results explain why Cl salts are not detected with TIR spectroscopy at many locations on Mars despite high Cl contents.

  8. Thermal detection of embedded tumors using infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Mital, Manu; Scott, E P

    2007-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Thermography, also known as thermal or infrared imaging, is a procedure to determine if an abnormality is present in the breast tissue temperature distribution. This abnormality in temperature distribution might indicate the presence of an embedded tumor. Although thermography is currently used to indicate the presence of an abnormality, there are no standard procedures to interpret these and determine the location of an embedded tumor. This research is a first step towards this direction. It explores the relationship between the characteristics (location and power) of an embedded heat source and the resulting temperature distribution on the surface. Experiments were conducted using a resistance heater that was embedded in agar in order to simulate the heat produced by a tumor in the biological tissue. The resulting temperature distribution on the surface was imaged using an infrared camera. In order to estimate the location and heat generation rate of the source from these temperature distributions, a genetic algorithm was used as the estimation method. The genetic algorithm utilizes a finite difference scheme for the direct solution of the Pennes bioheat equation. It was determined that a genetic algorithm based approach is well suited for the estimation problem since both the depth and the heat generation rate of the heat source were accurately predicted.

  9. Exploring the Saturn System in the Thermal Infrared: The Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Kunde, V. g.; Abbas, M. M.; Achterberg, R. K.; Ade, P.; Barucci, A.; Bezard, B.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Brasunas, J. C.; Calcutt, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Composite Inbred Spectrometer (CIRS) is a remote-sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer on the Cassini orbiter that measures thermal radiation over two decades in wave number, from 10 to 1400 cm (1 mm to 7pm), with a spectral resolution that can be set from 0.5 to 20 cm. The far in portion of the spectrum (10 - 600 cm) is measured with a polarizing interferometer having thermopile detectors with a common 4-mrad field of view. The middle infrared portion is measured with a traditional Michelson interferometer having two focal planes (600 - 1100cm, 1100-1400 cm). Each focal plane is composed of a 1x10 array of HgCdTe detectors, each detector having a 0.3-mrad field of view. CIRS observations will provide three-dimensional maps of temperature, gas composition, and aerosols/condensates of the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn with good vertical and horizontal resolution, from deep in their tropospheres to high in their mesospheres. CIRS ability to observe atmospheres in the limb viewing mode (in addition to nadir) offers the opportunity to provide accurate and highly resolved vertical profiles of these atmospheric variables. The ability to observe with high-spectral resolution should facilitate the identification of new constituents. CIRS will also map the thermal and compositional properties of the surfaces of Saturn's icy satellites. It will similarly map Saturn's rings, characterizing their formation and evolution. The combination of broad spectral range, programmable spectral resolution, the small detector fields of view, and an orbiting spacecraft platform will allow CIRS to observe the Saturnian system in the thermal infrared at a level of detail not previously achieved.

  10. A low cost thermal infrared hyperspectral imager for small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, S. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Wright, R.; Garbeil, H.; Horton, K. A.

    2011-06-01

    The traditional model for space-based earth observations involves long mission times, high cost, and long development time. Because of the significant time and monetary investment required, riskier instrument development missions or those with very specific scientific goals are unlikely to successfully obtain funding. However, a niche for earth observations exploiting new technologies in focused, short lifetime missions is opening with the growth of the small satellite market and launch opportunities for these satellites. These low-cost, short-lived missions provide an experimental platform for testing new sensor technologies that may transition to larger, more long-lived platforms. The low costs and short lifetimes also increase acceptable risk to sensors, enabling large decreases in cost using commercial off the shelf (COTS) parts and allowing early-career scientists and engineers to gain experience with these projects. We are building a low-cost long-wave infrared spectral sensor, funded by the NASA Experimental Project to Stimulate Competitive Research program (EPSCOR), to demonstrate the ways in which a university's scientific and instrument development programs can fit into this niche. The sensor is a low-mass, power efficient thermal hyperspectral imager with electronics contained in a pressure vessel to enable the use of COTS electronics, and will be compatible with small satellite platforms. The sensor, called Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI), is based on a Sagnac interferometer and uses an uncooled 320x256 microbolometer array. The sensor will collect calibrated radiance data at long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-14 microns) wavelengths in 230-meter pixels with 20 wavenumber spectral resolution from a 400-km orbit.

  11. Thermal conductivity of a film of single walled carbon nanotubes measured with infrared thermal imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ya; Inoue, Taiki; Xiang, Rong; Chiashi, Shohei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    Heat dissipation has restricted the modern miniaturization trend with the development of electronic devices. Theoretically proven to be with high axial thermal conductivity, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have long been expected to cool down the nanoscale world. Even though the tube-tube contact resistance limits the capability of heat transfer of the bulk film, the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of SWNT still glorify the application of films of SWNT network as a thermal interface material. In this work, we proposed a new method to straightly measure the thermal conductivity of SWNT film. We bridged two cantilevered Si thin plate with SWNT film, and kept a steady state heat flow in between. With the infrared camera to record the temperature distribution, the Si plates with known thermal conductivity can work as a reference to calculate the heat flux going through the SWNT film. Further, the thermal conductivity of the SWNT film can be obtained through Fourier's law after deducting the effect of thermal radiation. The sizes of the structure, the heating temperature, the vacuum degree and other crucial impact factors are carefully considered and analyzed. The author Y. F. was supported through the Advanced Integration Science Innovation Education and Research Consortium Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sport, Science and Technology.

  12. Apparatus and method for transient thermal infrared spectrometry of flowable enclosed materials

    DOEpatents

    McClelland, John F.; Jones, Roger W.

    1993-03-02

    A method and apparatus for enabling analysis of a flowable material enclosed in a transport system having an infrared transparent wall portion. A temperature differential is transiently generated between a thin surface layer portion of the material and a lower or deeper portion of the material sufficient to alter the thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material from the black-body thermal infrared emission spectrum of the material, and the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is detected through the infrared transparent portion of the transport system while the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. The detection is effected prior to the temperature differential propagating into the lower or deeper portion of the material to an extent such that the altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is no longer sufficiently free of self-absorption by the material of emitted infrared radiation. By such detection, the detected altered thermal infrared emission spectrum is indicative of characteristics relating to molecular composition of the material.

  13. Thermal interpretation of infrared dynamics in de Sitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigopoulos, Gerasimos

    2016-07-01

    The infrared dynamics of a light, minimally coupled scalar field in de Sitter spacetime with Ricci curvature R = 12H2, averaged over horizon sized regions of physical volume VH = (4π/3)(1/H)3, can be interpreted as Brownian motion in a medium with de Sitter temperature TDS = hbarH/2π. We demonstrate this by directly deriving the effective action of scalar field fluctuations with wavelengths larger than the de Sitter curvature radius and generalizing Starobinsky's seminal results on stochastic inflation. The effective action describes stochastic dynamics and the fluctuating force drives the field to an equilibrium characterized by a thermal Gibbs distribution at temperature TDS which corresponds to a de Sitter invariant state. Hence, approach towards this state can be interpreted as thermalization. We show that the stochastic kinetic energy of the coarse-grained description corresponds to the norm of ∂μphi and takes a well defined value per horizon volume ½langle(∇phi)2rangle = - ½TDS/VH. This approach allows for the non-perturbative computation of the de Sitter invariant stress energy tensor langleTμνrangle for an arbitrary scalar potential.

  14. An improved wire grid polarizer for thermal infrared applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Matthew C.; Bergquist, Jonathan; Wang, Bin; Petrova, Rumyana; Li, Hua; Gardner, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Moxtek has developed a high contrast IR polarizer on silicon suitable for long wavelength thermal IR applications using our aluminum nanowire, large area patterning capabilities. Between 7 and 15 microns, our 144 nm pitch polarizers transmit better than 70% of the passing polarization state and have a contrast ratio better than 40 dB. Transmission and reflectance measurements were made using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with instrument accuracy verified using silicon and germanium reference standards. Results were compared to RCWA modeling of the wire grid polarizer (WGP) performance on antireflection-coated wafers. The FTIR instrument noise floor limited the maximum contrast measurement to about 40 dB, but high polarizer contrast was verified at 10.6 μm using a CO2 laser and pyroelectric detector. A continuous wave Gaussian beam from a CO2 laser was used for Laser Damage Threshold (LDT) testing and showed LDT values of 110 kW/cm2 and 10 kW/cm2 in the blocking and passing states respectively. Analysis of laser damage threshold test samples shows the damage propagating from defects in the anti-reflection (AR) coating. Removing these AR coating defects should improve LDT performance and transmission in the thermal IR.

  15. Detection of salmonid thermal refugia from airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugdale, S. J.; Bergeron, N.; Rousseau, M.

    2010-12-01

    During elevated summer temperatures, salmonid species seek out areas of cool, well-oxygenated river water to alleviate thermal stress. Collectively known as ‘thermal refugia’, these are of great significance to the ability of salmonids to survive increased water temperatures, and a better understanding of their spatial and temporal characteristics may aid mitigation strategies against the possible effects of climate change on rivers. However, thermal refugia are traditionally hard to detect, and their in-river abundance and spatial patterns are largely unknown. Although previous research has examined TIR imaging as a means to sense river temperatures, few have achieved a resolution amenable to the detection of small thermal anomalies typically used by salmonids, with the majority of literature focusing on the general application of thermal imaging to river temperature detection and analysis. From preliminary research, we note that riverine thermal anomalies (as viewed from TIR imagery) can comprise a number of different forms resulting from a diverse range of sources. Given that the structural, spatial and temporal dynamics of thermal refugia in gravel bed rivers are a presumably a function of the complex geomorphological processes within a catchment, the ability to discriminate multi-scale thermal refugia may aid our comprehension not only of the behaviour of salmonids during high temperature events, but also of the geomorphological phenomena that are fundamental in governing river temperature heterogeneity. Initial thermal infrared imagery acquired in August 2009 suggested that while it is possible to manually detect riverine temperature anomalies, the creation of a dedicated remote sensing platform capable of obtaining both TIR and RGB photography easily and with a resolution amenable to refugia detection would greatly aid our ability to discriminate true refugia from other thermal anomalies (false positives). To this end, we have developed a system able to

  16. Thermal Infrared Imager on Hayabusa2: Science and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsuaki

    2015-04-01

    Thermal Infrared Imager TIR was developed and calibrated for Haya-busa2 asteroid explorer, aiming at the investigation of thermo-physical properties of C-class near-Earth sub-km sized asteroid (162173) 1999JU3. TIR is based on the 2D micro-bolometer array with germani-um lens to image the surface of asteroid in 8 to 12 μm wavelength (1), measuring the thermal emission off the asteroid surface. Its field of view is 16° x 12° with 328 x 248 pixels. At least 40 (up to 100) images will be taken during asteroid rotation once a week, mainly from the Home Position which is about 20km sunward from asteroid surface. Therefore TIR will image the whole asteroid with spatial resolution of < 20m per pixel, and the temperature profile of each site on the asteroid will be traced from dawn to dusk regions by asteroid rotation. The scien-tific objectives of TIR include the mapping of asteroid surface condi-tions (regional distribution of thermal inertia), since the surface physical conditions are strongly correlated with thermal inertia. It is so informa-tive on understanding the re-accretion or surface sedimentation process-es of the asteroid to be the current form. TIR data will be used for searching for those sites having the typical particle size of 1mm for best sample collection, and within the proper thermal condition for space-craft safe operation. After launch of Hayabusa2, TIR has been tested successfully, covering from -100 to 150 °C using a single parameter settings (2). This implies that TIR is actually able to map the surface other than the sunlit areas. Performance of TIR was found basically the same as those in the pre-launch test, when the temperature of TIR is well controlled. References: (1) Fukuhara T. et al., (2011) Earth Planet. Space 63, 1009-1018; (2) Okada T. et al., (2015) Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 46, #1331.

  17. Land surface temperature retrieved from airborne multispectral scanner mid-infrared and thermal-infrared data.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong-Gang; Wang, Ning; Ma, Ling-Ling; Liu, Yao-Kai; Wu, Hua; Tang, Bo-Hui; Tang, Ling-Li; Li, Chuan-Rong

    2016-01-25

    Land surface temperature (LST) is one of the key parameters in the physics of land surface processes at local/global scales. In this paper, a LST retrieval method was proposed from airborne multispectral scanner data comparing one mid-infrared (MIR) channel and one thermal infrared (TIR) channel with the land surface emissivity given as a priori knowledge. To remove the influence of the direct solar radiance efficiently, a relationship between the direct solar radiance and water vapor content and the view zenith angle and solar zenith angle was established. Then, LST could be retrieved with a split-window algorithm from MIR/TIR data. Finally, the proposed algorithm was applied to the actual airborne flight data and validated with in situ measurements of land surface types in the Baotou site in China on 17 October 2014. The results demonstrate that the difference between the retrieved and in situ LST was less than 1.5 K. The bais, RMSE, and standard deviation of the retrieved LST were 0.156 K, 0.883 K, and 0.869 K, respectively, for samples. PMID:26832579

  18. Thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging from vehicle-carried instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Adams, Paul M.; McAfee, John; Salisbury, John

    2002-09-01

    Stand-off identification in the field using thermal infrared spectrometers (hyperspectral) is a maturing technique for gases and aerosols. However, capabilities to identify solid-phase materials on the surface lag substantially, particularly for identification in the field without benefit of ground truth (e.g. for "denied areas"). Spectral signatures of solid phase materials vary in complex and non-intuitive ways, including non-linear variations with surface texture, particle size, and intimate mixing. Also, in contrast to airborne or satellite measurements, reflected downwelling radiance strongly affects the signature measured by field spectrometers. These complex issues can confound interpretations or cause a misidentification in the field. Problems that remain particularly obstinate are (1) low ambiguity identification when there is no accompanying ground truth (e.g. measurements of denied areas, or Mars surface by the 2003 Mars lander spectrometer); (2) real- or near real-time identification, especially when a low ambiguity answer is critical; (3) identification of intimate mixtures (e.g. two fine powders mixed together) and targets composed of very small particles (e.g. aerosol fallout dust, some tailings); and (4) identification of non-diffuse targets (e.g. smooth coatings such as paint and desert varnish), particularly when measured at a high emission angle. In most studies that focus on gas phase targets or specific manmade targets, the solid phase background signatures are called "clutter" and are thrown out. Here we discuss our field spectrometer images measured of test targets that were selected to include a range of particle sizes, diffuse, non-diffuse, high, and low reflectance materials. This study was designed to identify and improve understanding of the issues that complicate stand-off identification in the field, with a focus on developing identification capabilities to proceed without benefit of ground truth. This information allows both improved

  19. Photogeologic and thermal infrared reconnaissance surveys of the Los Negritos-Ixtlan de los Hervores geothermal area, Michoacan, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomez, Valle R.; Friedman, J.D.; Gawarecki, S.J.; Banwell, C.J.

    1970-01-01

    New techniques, involving interpretation of panchromatic, ektachrome and ektachrome infrared aerographic photogaphs and thermographic infrared imagery recording emission from the earth's surface in middle and far infrared wavelengths (3-5??m and 8-14??m), are being introduced in geothermal investigations in Mexico to identify outstanding structural and geologic features in a rapid and economical manner. The object of this work is to evaluate the new airborne infrared techniques and equipment as a complement to the data obtained from panchromatic aerial photography. This project is part of the Mexican remote sensing program of natural resources carried out under the auspices of the Comision Nacional del Espacio Exterior and in which the Research Institute (Instituto de Investigaciones de la Industria Electrica) is actively participating. The present study was made cooperatively with the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the U.S. Geological Survey. The Los Negritos-Ixtlan de los Hervores geothermal fields are located east of Lake Chapala at the intersection of the Sierra Madre occidental and the west-central segment of the neovolcanic axis of Mexico. The two principal zones of hydrothermal activity occur in a tectonic trench filled with lake sediments of the Quaternary intercalated with Quaternary and Holocene volcanic rocks and characterized by an intricate system of block-fault tectonics, part of the Chapala-Acambay tectonic system, along which there has been volcanic activity in modern time. Surface manifestations of geothermal activity consist of relatively high heat flow and hot springs, small geysers and small steam vents aligned along an E-W axis at Ixtlan, possibly at the intersection of major fault trends and mud volcanoes and hot pools aligned NE-SW at Los Negritos. More than 20 exit points of thermal waters are shown on infrared imagery to be aligned along an extension of the Ixtlan fault between Ixtlan and El Salitre. A narrow zone of

  20. Measuring glacier surface temperatures with ground-based thermal infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry-Wake, Caroline; Baraer, Michel; McKenzie, Jeffrey M.; Mark, Bryan G.; Wigmore, Oliver; Hellström, Robert È.; Lautz, Laura; Somers, Lauren

    2015-10-01

    Spatially distributed surface temperature is an important, yet difficult to observe, variable for physical glacier melt models. We utilize ground-based thermal infrared imagery to obtain spatially distributed surface temperature data for alpine glaciers. The infrared images are used to investigate thermal microscale processes at the glacier surface, such as the effect of surface cover type and the temperature gradient at the glacier margins on the glacier's temperature dynamics. Infrared images were collected at Cuchillacocha Glacier, Cordillera Blanca, Peru, on 23-25 June 2014. The infrared images were corrected based on ground truth points and local meteorological data. For the control points, the Pearson's correlation coefficient between infrared and station temperatures was 0.95. The ground-based infrared camera has the potential for greatly improving glacier energy budget studies, and our research shows that it is critical to properly correct the thermal images to produce robust, quantifiable data.

  1. Greenhouse Observations of the Stratosphere and Troposphere (GHOST): a novel shortwave infrared spectrometer developed for the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpage, Neil; Boesch, Hartmut; Palmer, Paul; Parr-Burman, Phil; Vick, Andy; Bezawada, Naidu; Black, Martin; Born, Andy; Pearson, David; Strachan, Jonathan; Wells, Martyn

    2014-05-01

    The tropospheric distribution of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is dependent on surface flux variations, atmospheric chemistry and transport processes over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Errors in assumed atmospheric transport can adversely affect surface flux estimates inferred from surface, aircraft or satellite observations of greenhouse gas concentrations using inverse models. We present a novel, compact shortwave infrared spectrometer (GHOST) for installation on the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle to provide tropospheric column observations of CO2, CO, CH4, H2O and HDO over the ocean to address the need for large-scale, simultaneous, finely resolved measurements of key GHGs. These species cover a range of lifetimes and source processes, and measurements of their tropospheric columns will reflect the vertically integrated signal of their vertical and horizontal transport within the troposphere. The primary science objectives of GHOST are to: 1) provide observations which can be used to test atmospheric transport models; 2) validate satellite observations of GHG column observations over oceans, thus filling a critical gap in current validation capabilities; and 3) complement in-situ tropopause transition layer tracer observations from other instrumentation on board the Global Hawk to provide a link between upper and lower troposphere concentration measurements. The GHOST spectrometer system comprises a target acquisition module (TAM), a fibre slicer and feed system, and a multiple order spectrograph. The TAM design utilises a gimbal behind an optical dome, which is programmed to direct solar radiation reflected by the ocean surface into a fibre optic bundle. The fibre slicer and feed system then splits the light into the four spectral bands using order sorting filters. The fibres corresponding to each band are arranged with a small sideways offset to correctly centre each spectrum on the detector array. The spectrograph design is unique in that a

  2. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked basalts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Kraft, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    New measurements of thermal infrared emission spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7-40 ??m) of experimentally shocked basalt and basaltic andesite (17-56 GPa) exhibit changes in spectral features with increasing pressure consistent with changes in the structure of plagioclase feldspars. Major spectral absorptions in unshocked rocks between 350-700 cm-1 (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations) and between 1000-1250 cm-1 (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) transform at pressures >20-25 GPa to two broad spectral features centered near 950-1050 and 400-450 cm-1. Linear deconvolution models using spectral libraries composed of common mineral and glass spectra replicate the spectra of shocked basalt relatively well up to shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation in plagioclase. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the libraries improves fits for more highly shocked basalt. However, deconvolution models of the basaltic andesite select shocked feldspar end-members even for unshocked samples, likely caused by the higher primary glass content in the basaltic andesite sample.

  3. Estimating Clothing Thermal Insulation Using an Infrared Camera

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm for estimating clothing insulation is proposed to assess thermal comfort, based on the non-contact and real-time measurements of the face and clothing temperatures by an infrared camera. The proposed method can accurately measure the clothing insulation of various garments under different clothing fit and sitting postures. The proposed estimation method is investigated to be effective to measure its clothing insulation significantly in different seasonal clothing conditions using a paired t-test in 99% confidence interval. Temperatures simulated with the proposed estimated insulation value show closer to the values of actual temperature than those with individual clothing insulation values. Upper clothing’s temperature is more accurate within 3% error and lower clothing’s temperature is more accurate by 3.7%~6.2% error in indoor working scenarios. The proposed algorithm can reflect the effect of air layer which makes insulation different in the calculation to estimate clothing insulation using the temperature of the face and clothing. In future, the proposed method is expected to be applied to evaluate the customized passenger comfort effectively. PMID:27005625

  4. Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for Unidentified Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Salisbury, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra recorded by airborne or satellite spectrometers can be searched for spectral features to determine the composition of rocks on planetary surfaces. Surface materials are identified by detections of characteristic spectral bands. We show how to define whether to accept an observed spectral feature as a detection when the target material is unknown. We also use remotely sensed spectra measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System to illustrate the importance of instrument parameters and surface properties on band detection limits and how the variation in signal-to-noise ratio with wavelength affects the bands that are most detectable for a given instrument. The spectrometer's sampling interval, spectral resolution, signal-to-noise ratio as a function of wavelength, and the sample's surface properties influence whether the instrument can detect a spectral feature exhibited by a material. As an example, in the 6-13 micrometer wavelength region, massive carbonates exhibit two bands: a very strong, broad feature at approximately 6.5 micrometers and a less intense, sharper band at approximately 11.25 micrometers. Although the 6.5-micrometer band is stronger and broader in laboratory-measured spectra, the 11.25-micrometer band will cause a more detectable feature in TES spectra.

  5. A Thermal Infrared Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J.; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Yan, Michael M.-H.; Cote, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This technical memorandum documents the longwave radiation parameterization developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for a wide variety of weather and climate applications. Based on the 1996-version of the Air Force Geophysical Laboratory HITRAN data, the parameterization includes the absorption due to major gaseous absorption (water vapor, CO2, O3) and most of the minor trace gases (N2O, CH4, CFCs), as well as clouds and aerosols. The thermal infrared spectrum is divided into nine bands. To achieve a high degree of accuracy and speed, various approaches of computing the transmission function are applied to different spectral bands and gases. The gaseous transmission function is computed either using the k-distribution method or the table look-up method. To include the effect of scattering due to clouds and aerosols, the optical thickness is scaled by the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. The parameterization can accurately compute fluxes to within 1% of the high spectral-resolution line-by-line calculations. The cooling rate can be accurately computed in the region extending from the surface to the 0.01-hPa level.

  6. Estimating Clothing Thermal Insulation Using an Infrared Camera.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kim, Young-Keun; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2016-03-09

    In this paper, a novel algorithm for estimating clothing insulation is proposed to assess thermal comfort, based on the non-contact and real-time measurements of the face and clothing temperatures by an infrared camera. The proposed method can accurately measure the clothing insulation of various garments under different clothing fit and sitting postures. The proposed estimation method is investigated to be effective to measure its clothing insulation significantly in different seasonal clothing conditions using a paired t-test in 99% confidence interval. Temperatures simulated with the proposed estimated insulation value show closer to the values of actual temperature than those with individual clothing insulation values. Upper clothing's temperature is more accurate within 3% error and lower clothing's temperature is more accurate by 3.7%~6.2% error in indoor working scenarios. The proposed algorithm can reflect the effect of air layer which makes insulation different in the calculation to estimate clothing insulation using the temperature of the face and clothing. In future, the proposed method is expected to be applied to evaluate the customized passenger comfort effectively.

  7. Thermal Intertias of Main-Belt Asteroids from Wise Thermal Infrared Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Josef; Delbo', Marco; Durech, Josef; Alí-Lagoa, Victor

    2014-11-01

    By means of a modified thermophysical model (TPM) that takes into account asteroid shape and pole uncertainties, we analyze the thermal infrared data acquired by the NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) of about 300 asteroids with derived convex shape models. We adopt convex shape models from the DAMIT database (Durech et al., 2010, A&A 513, A46) and present new determinations based on optical disk-integrated photometry and the lightcurve inversion method (Kaasalainen & Torppa, 2001, Icarus 153, 37). This work more than double the number of asteroids with determined thermophysical properties. We also discuss cases in which shape uncertainties prevent the determination of reliable thermophysical properties. This is per-se a novel result, as the effect of shape has been often neglected in thermophysical modeling of asteroids.We also present the main results of the statistical study of derived thermophysical parameters within the whole population of MBAs and within few asteroid families. The thermal inertia increases with decreasing size, but a large range of thermal inertia values is observed within the similar size ranges between 10-100 km. Surprisingly, we derive low (<20J m^{-2} s^{-1/2} K^{-1}) thermal inertia values for several asteroids with sizes D>10 km, indicating a very fine and mature regolith on these small bodies. The work of JH and MD was carried under the contract 11-BS56-008 (SHOCKS) of the French Agence National de la Recherche (ANR), and JD has been supported by the grant GACR P209/10/0537 of the Czech Science Foundation.

  8. Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Shott, John R.; Raqueno, Nina G.; Markham, Brian L.; Radocinski, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Launched in February 2013, the Landsat-8 carries on-board the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), a two-band thermal pushbroom imager, to maintain the thermal imaging capability of the Landsat program. The TIRS bands are centered at roughly 10.9 and 12 micrometers (Bands 10 and 11 respectively). They have 100 m spatial resolution and image coincidently with the Operational Land Imager (OLI), also on-board Landsat-8. The TIRS instrument has an internal calibration system consisting of a variable temperature blackbody and a special viewport with which it can see deep space; a two point calibration can be performed twice an orbit. Immediately after launch, a rigorous vicarious calibration program was started to validate the absolute calibration of the system. The two vicarious calibration teams, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), both make use of buoys deployed on large water bodies as the primary monitoring technique. RIT took advantage of cross-calibration opportunity soon after launch when Landsat-8 and Landsat-7 were imaging the same targets within a few minutes of each other to perform a validation of the absolute calibration. Terra MODIS is also being used for regular monitoring of the TIRS absolute calibration. The buoy initial results showed a large error in both bands, 0.29 and 0.51 W/sq m·sr·micrometers or -2.1 K and -4.4 K at 300 K in Band 10 and 11 respectively, where TIRS data was too hot. A calibration update was recommended for both bands to correct for a bias error and was implemented on 3 February 2014 in the USGS/EROS processing system, but the residual variability is still larger than desired for both bands (0.12 and 0.2 W/sq m·sr·micrometers or 0.87 and 1.67 K at 300 K). Additional work has uncovered the source of the calibration error: out-of-field stray light. While analysis continues to characterize the stray light contribution, the vicarious calibration work proceeds. The additional data have

  9. Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) Instrument Thermal Subsystem Design and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otero, Veronica; Mosier, Carol; Neuberger, David

    2013-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is one of two instruments on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), which is scheduled to launch in February of 2013. The TIRS instrument was officially added to the mission later in the flow, which led to a highly aggressive schedule that became one of the main drivers during instrument development. The thermal subsystem design of the TIRS Sensor Unit is comprised of five thermal zones which range in temperature from less than 43 Kelvin to 330 Kelvin. Most zones are proportional heater controlled, and all are within a volume of 35 cu.ft. A two-stage cryocooler is used to cool the "cold stage" including three QWIP detectors to less than 43 Kelvin, and cool the "warm stage" to 105 Kelvin. The excess power dissipation from the cryocooler is rejected via ammonia transport heat pipes to a dedicated Cryocooler Radiator with embedded ammonia heat pipes. The cryogenic subsystem includes a series of shells used to radiatively and conductively isolate the cold stage from the warmer surroundings. The Optical System (telescope) is passively cooled to 180-190 Kelvin using a "thermal link" (comprised of a Flexible Conductive Thermal Strap and an APG Bar) which couples the telescope stage to a dedicated radiator with embedded ethane heat pipes. The Scene Select Mechanism, which is responsible for moving the Scene Select Mirror to three distinct positions (including Nadir, Space, and On-board Black Body Calibrator pointing), runs nominally at 278 Kelvin and is thermally isolated from the cryogenic thermal zones. The On-board Black Body Calibrator requires a dedicated radiator which allows for a temperature range of 260-330 Kelvin at the Source. The detectors are powered by the FPE Box, which is mounted to the nadir external surface of the composite honeycomb structure. There are two additional electronics boxes which are wet-mounted directly to the spacecraft shear panel, the Main Electronics Box and Cryocooler Electronics Box; thermal

  10. Spectral characterization of surface emissivities in the thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niclòs, Raquel; Mira, Maria; Valor, Enric; Caselles, Diego; García-Santos, Vicente; Caselles, Vicente; Sánchez, Juan M.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing trends to hyperspectral sensors on board satellites in the last decades, e.g., the current EOS-MODIS and EOS-ASTER and future missions like HyspIRI, ECOSTRESS, THIRSTY and MISTIGRI. This study aims to characterize spectrally the emissive properties of several surfaces, mostly soils. A spectrometer ranging from 2 to 16 μm, D&P Model 102, has been used to measure samples with singular spectral features, e.g. a sandy soil rich in gypsum sampled in White Sands (New Mexico, USA), salt samples, powdered quartz, and powdered calcite. These samples were chosen for their role in the assessment of thermal emissivity of soils, e.g., the calcite and quartz contents are key variables for modeling TIR emissivities of bare soils, along with soil moisture and organic matter. Additionally, the existence of large areas in the world with abundance of these materials, some of them used for calibration/validation activities of satellite sensors and products, makes the chosen samples interesting. White Sands is the world's largest gypsum dune field encompassing 400 km^2; the salt samples characterize the Salar of Uyuni (Bolivia), the largest salt flat in the world (up to 10,000 km^2), as well as the Jordanian and Israeli salt evaporation ponds at the south end of the Dead Sea, or the evaporation lagoons in Aigües-Mortes (France); and quartz is omnipresent in most of the arid regions of the world such as the Algodones Dunes or Kelso Dunes (California, USA), with areas around 700 km2 and 120 km^2, respectively. Measurements of target leaving radiance, hemispherical radiance reflected by a diffuse reflectance panel, and the radiance from a black body at different temperatures were taken to obtain thermal spectra with the D&P spectrometer. The good consistency observed between our measurements and laboratory spectra of similar samples (ASTER and MODIS spectral libraries) indicated the validity of the measurement protocol. Further, our study showed the

  11. Stratospheric Trace Gas Distributions from Far Infrared Thermal Emission Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing

    1987-09-01

    An inversion algorithm has been developed to retrieve stratospheric trace gas distributions from high resolution far infrared limb thermal emission spectral data. The algorithm follows an onion peel approach and employs a non-linear least-square-fit spectral analysis technique. The infrared radiative transfer model used to compute the spectrum is based on full line-by-line and layer-by-layer calculations and includes curvature and refraction effects. Finite instrument field of view effects have been studied. An inversion algorithm has also been developed to correct observation angles. The spectral measurements were made in the Balloon Intercomparison Campaign (BIC), October, 1982, using a Fourier transform spectrometer. The observed spectra have an unapodized spectral resolution of 0.0033 cm ^{-1}, and cover the spectral region between 20-100 cm^{-1}. Spectral data for selected limb sequences have been calibrated. The instrument line shape function has been empirically determined. The observation angles of the spectra have been corrected from spectral lines of O_2 in the 23 -84 cm^{-1} region to have an accuracy within 4 arc minutes. The vertical profiles of O_3, H_2O, HDO, HCN, ^ {16}O^{16}O ^{18}O, and ^ {16}O^{18}O ^{16}O in the stratosphere have been retrieved with an altitude resolution of about 4-5 km in the 20-37 km range. The results are compared with available measurements in literature. The vertical profiles of O_3, H_2 O, and HDO are retrieved from spectral lines in the 20-100 cm^{-1} region. The variation of the D/H ratio of water vapor is derived. The vertical profile of HCN is retrieved from spectral lines in the 32-56 cm^{-1} region. The volume mixing ratio of HCN is found to be 139 pptv at 20 km, 127 pptv at 25 km, and increasing to 172 pptv at 37 km. The vertical profiles of stratospheric ^ {16}O^{16}O ^{18}O and ^ {16}O^{18}O ^{16}O are retrieved from spectral lines in the 39-76 cm^{-1 } region. The ratio of total heavy isotopic ozone ^{50}O_3 to

  12. Spatial and Temporal Scaling of Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Goel, Narendra S.

    1995-01-01

    Although remote sensing has a central role to play in the acquisition of synoptic data obtained at multiple spatial and temporal scales to facilitate our understanding of local and regional processes as they influence the global climate, the use of thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data in this capacity has received only minimal attention. This results from some fundamental challenges that are associated with employing TIR data collected at different space and time scales, either with the same or different sensing systems, and also from other problems that arise in applying a multiple scaled approach to the measurement of surface temperatures. In this paper, we describe some of the more important problems associated with using TIR remote sensing data obtained at different spatial and temporal scales, examine why these problems appear as impediments to using multiple scaled TIR data, and provide some suggestions for future research activities that may address these problems. We elucidate the fundamental concept of scale as it relates to remote sensing and explore how space and time relationships affect TIR data from a problem-dependency perspective. We also describe how linearity and non-linearity observation versus parameter relationships affect the quantitative analysis of TIR data. Some insight is given on how the atmosphere between target and sensor influences the accurate measurement of surface temperatures and how these effects will be compounded in analyzing multiple scaled TIR data. Last, we describe some of the challenges in modeling TIR data obtained at different space and time scales and discuss how multiple scaled TIR data can be used to provide new and important information for measuring and modeling land-atmosphere energy balance processes.

  13. Fourier domain target transformation analysis in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing uses of principal component analysis (PCA) of multispectral images include band selection and optimal color selection for display of information content. PCA has also been used for quantitative determination of mineral types and abundances given end member spectra. The preliminary results of the investigation of target transformation PCA (TTPCA) in the fourier domain to both identify end member spectra in an unknown spectrum, and to then calculate the relative concentrations of these selected end members are presented. Identification of endmember spectra in an unknown sample has previously been performed through bandmatching, expert systems, and binary classifiers. Both bandmatching and expert system techniques require the analyst to select bands or combinations of bands unique to each endmember. Thermal infrared mineral spectra have broad spectral features which vary subtly with composition. This makes identification of unique features difficult. Alternatively, whole spectra can be used in the classification process, in which case there is not need for an expert to identify unique spectra. Use of binary classifiers on whole spectra to identify endmember components has met with some success. These techniques can be used, along with a least squares fit approach on the endmembers identified, to derive compositional information. An alternative to the approach outlined above usese target transformation in conjunction with PCA to both identify and quantify the composition of unknown spectra. Preprocessing of the library and unknown spectra into the fourier domain, and using only a specific number of the components, allows for significant data volume reduction while maintaining a linear relationship in a Beer's Law sense. The approach taken here is to iteratively calculate concentrations, reducing the number of endmember components until only non-negative concentrations remain.

  14. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Jia; Liu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  15. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ran E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Jia

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  16. Space Weathering Effects in the Thermal Infrared: Lessons from LRO Diviner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Song, E.; Arnold, J. A.; Lemelin, M.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Glotch, T. D.; Paige, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    We quantify the degree to which space weathering affects the thermal infrared Christiansen Feature measured by LRO Diviner, and presents techniques to normalize space weathering effects and enable examination of the underlying composition.

  17. In-Flight Calibration of the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, K.; Reuter, D.; Montanaro, M.; Hook, S.; Markham, B.

    2011-01-01

    Describe in-flight calibration for the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) (1) Overview of TIRS (2) On-orbit radiometric calibration (2a) Onboard calibrator (2b) Terrestrial sites (3) On-orbit geometric and spatial calibration

  18. Phase Retrieval on Undersampled Data from the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Mentzell, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Phase retrieval was applied to under-sampled data from a thermal infrared imaging system to estimate defocus across the field of view (FOV). We compare phase retrieval estimated values to those obtained using an independent technique.

  19. Incorporation of thermal shadows into real-time infrared three-dimensional image generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Andreas; Nischwitz, Alfred; Schätz, Peter; Obermeier, Paul

    2014-05-01

    In the infrared spectrum, two contributions to shadows exist: one part is reflective shadows resulting from occlusion of instantly reflected infrared rays, and the other part is thermal (IR) shadows occurring through occlusion of irradiance in the past. The realization of thermal shadows requires a thermal balance calculation in four-dimensions (three-dimensional geometry in one-dimensional time), which is computationally expensive, and therefore mostly used for nonreal-time simulations. We present an approximation of thermal shadows resulting from the occlusion of direct rays from IR emitters. Our approach uses programmable graphics cards to achieve real-time frame rates in scenes with dynamic geometry.

  20. Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS): An investigator's guide to TIMS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palluconi, F. D.; Meeks, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) is a NASA aircraft scanner providing six channel spectral capability in the thermal infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Operating in the atmospheric window region (8 to 12 micrometers) with a channel sensitivity of approximately 0.1 C, TIMS may be used whenever an accurate measure of the Earth's surface is needed. A description of this scanner is provided as well as a discussion of data acquisition and reduction.

  1. Development of models for thermal infrared radiation above and within plant canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paw u, Kyaw T.

    1992-01-01

    Any significant angular dependence of the emitted longwave radiation could result in errors in remotely estimated energy budgets or evapotranspiration. Empirical data and thermal infrared radiation models are reviewed in reference to anisotropic emissions from the plant canopy. The biometeorological aspects of linking longwave models with plant canopy energy budgets and micrometeorology are discussed. A new soil plant atmosphere model applied to anisotropic longwave emissions from a canopy is presented. Time variation of thermal infrared emission measurements is discussed.

  2. Thermal Infrared Geologic Remote Sensing Research at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartholomew, M. J.; Kahle, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    Remotely sensed thermal infrared spectral data have great potential to improve rock type discrimination if the factors that control thermal infrared spectral reflection and emission can be better understood. Improved rock type discrimination in turn leads to better and more efficient geologic mapping which is carried out in the exploration, assessment and documentation of mineral resources and geologic hazards. Geologic maps also contribute significantly to the understanding of the natural history of the Earth and neighboring planetary bodies.

  3. Thermal infrared spectrometry of Venus: thermal structure, upper clouds, composition and dynamics of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasova, L.; Moroz, L.; Khatuntsev, V.; Ignatiev, N.

    Middle atmosphere of Venus (50 - 100km) is a very important part of its atmosphere. More than 70 % of the absorbed solar energy deposits there, creating an essential source of energy to support thermal structure and dynamics. Thermal infrared spectrometry in the range 6 - 40 μm, which allows to investigate the middle atmosphere, was realized by Fourier spectrometer onboard Venera-15 with spectral resolution of 4.5-6.5 cm- 1. This method enables to retrieve and analyze the 3-D temperature and zonal wind fields (h, lat, LT) in the range 55-100 km and the 3-D aerosol field (h, lat, LT) in the range 55-70 km, to find the solar related waves at isobaric levels, which are generated by the absorbed solar energy. The retrieved spectral dependence of the aerosol extinction cross section shows that the mode 3 (3- 4 μm) particles exist in the upper clouds in the cold collar. In the thermal IR spectral range the1,2 and 3 SO 2 and the H2O rotational ( 40 μm) and vibro-rotational (6.3 μm) absorption bands were observed. An advantage of the thermal infrared spectrometry method is that both the temperature and aerosol profiles, needed for retrieval of the vertical profiles of minor compounds, are evaluated fro m the same spectrum. The SO 2 vertical profiles are obtained using three fundamental bands. The H2O abundance in the range 55-65 km is also determined. The time and spatial variations of the water vapour concentration were found. The behavior of the wind speed in the mid-latitude jet reveals the correlation with its position ( latitude and altitude), which agrees with the laws of the conservation of momentum and flux. The Fourier spectrometer on Venera-15 may be considered as a precursor of the instrument of this kind for the future missions. The Planetary Fourier Specrtometer, proposed for Venus Express mission has a spectral range 1-50 μm and a spectral resolution of 1 2 cm-1 . A functioning of this instrument on the polar orbit with a- good coverage in local time and

  4. Tree Canopy Characterization for EO-1 Reflective and Thermal Infrared Validation Studies: Rochester, New York

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Jerrell R., Jr.; Smith, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The tree canopy characterization presented herein provided ground and tree canopy data for different types of tree canopies in support of EO-1 reflective and thermal infrared validation studies. These characterization efforts during August and September of 2001 included stem and trunk location surveys, tree structure geometry measurements, meteorology, and leaf area index (LAI) measurements. Measurements were also collected on thermal and reflective spectral properties of leaves, tree bark, leaf litter, soil, and grass. The data presented in this report were used to generate synthetic reflective and thermal infrared scenes and images that were used for the EO-1 Validation Program. The data also were used to evaluate whether the EO-1 ALI reflective channels can be combined with the Landsat-7 ETM+ thermal infrared channel to estimate canopy temperature, and also test the effects of separating the thermal and reflective measurements in time resulting from satellite formation flying.

  5. Agricultural Applications and Requirements for Thermal Infrared Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the applications of thermal scanner data in agriculture are presented along with illustrations of some of the factors affecting the temperature of plants, soil, and water. Examples of thermal imagery are included.

  6. MAPPING NON-INDIGENOUS EELGRASS ZOSTERA JAPONICA, ASSOCIATED MACROALGAE AND EMERGENT AQUATIC VEGETARIAN HABITATS IN A PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARY USING NEAR-INFRARED COLOR AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY AND A HYBRID IMAGE CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted aerial photographic surveys of Oregon's Yaquina Bay estuary during consecutive summers from 1997 through 2001. Imagery was obtained during low tide exposures of intertidal mudflats, allowing use of near-infrared color film to detect and discriminate plant communitie...

  7. MAPPING EELGRASS SPECIES ZOSTERA ZAPONICA AND Z. MARINA, ASSOCIATED MACROALGAE AND EMERGENT AQUATIC VEGETATION HABITATS IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARIES USING NEAR-INFRARED COLOR AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY AND A HYBRID IMAGE CLASSIFICATION TECHNIQUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerial photographic surveys of Oregon's Yaquina Bay estuary were conducted during consecutive summers from 1997 through 2000. Imagery was obtained during low tide exposures of intertidal mudflats, allowing use of near-infrared color film to detect and discriminate plant communit...

  8. Thermal/structural/optical integrated design for optical window of a high-speed aerial optical camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaopeng; Yang, Hongtao; Mei, Chao; Shi, Kui; Wu, Dengshan; Qiao, Mingrui

    2015-10-01

    In order to obtain high quality image of the aero optical remote sensor, it is important to analysis its thermal-optical performance on the condition of high speed and high altitude. Especially for the key imaging assembly, such as optical window, the temperature variation and temperature gradient can result in defocus and aberrations in optical system, which will lead to the poor quality image. In order to improve the optical performance of a high speed aerial camera optical window, the thermal/structural/optical integrated design method is developed. Firstly, the flight environment of optical window is analyzed. Based on the theory of aerodynamics and heat transfer, the convection heat transfer coefficient is calculated. The temperature distributing of optical window is simulated by the finite element analysis software. The maximum difference in temperature of the inside and outside of optical window is obtained. Then the deformation of optical window under the boundary condition of the maximum difference in temperature is calculated. The optical window surface deformation is fitted in Zernike polynomial as the interface, the calculated Zernike fitting coefficients is brought in and analyzed by CodeV Optical Software. At last, the transfer function diagrams of the optical system on temperature field are comparatively analyzed. By comparing and analyzing the result, it can be obtained that the optical path difference caused by thermal deformation of the optical window is 149.6 nm, which is under PV <=1 4λ .The simulation result meets the requirements of optical design very well. The above study can be used as an important reference for other optical window designs.

  9. Mapping bare soil in South West Wales, UK, using high resolution colour infra-red aerial photography for water quality and flood risk management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Helena; Neale, Simon; Coe, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Natural Resources Wales is a UK government body responsible for environmental regulation, among other areas. River walks in Water Framework Directive (WFD) priority catchments in South West Wales, UK, identified soil entering water courses due to poaching and bank erosion, leading to deterioration in the water quality and jeopardising the water quality meeting legal minimum standards. Bare soil has also been shown to cause quicker and higher hydrograph peaks in rural catchments than if those areas were vegetated, which can lead to flooding of domestic properties during peak storm flows. The aim was to target farm visits by operational staff to advise on practices likely to improve water quality and to identify areas where soft engineering solutions such as revegetation could alleviate flood risk in rural areas. High resolution colour-infrared aerial photography, 25cm in the three colour bands and 50cm in the near infrared band, was used to map bare soil in seven catchments using supervised classification of a five band stack including the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Mapping was combined with agricultural land use and field boundary data to filter out arable fields, which are supposed to bare soil for part of their cycle, and was very successful when compared to ground truthing, with the exception of silage fields which contained sparse, no or unproductive vegetation at the time the imagery was acquired leading to spectral similarity to bare soil. A raindrop trace model was used to show the path sediment from bare soil areas would take when moving through the catchment to a watercourse, with hedgerows inserted as barriers following our observations from ground truthing. The findings have been used to help farmers gain funding for improvements such as fencing to keep animals away from vulnerable river banks. These efficient and automated methods can be rolled out to more catchments in Wales and updated using aerial imagery acquired more recently to

  10. The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on Landsat 8: Design overview and pre-launch characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) on Landsat 8 is the latest thermal sensor in that series of missions. Unlike the previous single channel sensors, TIRS uses two channels to cover the 10-12 micron band. It is also a pushbroom imager; a departure from the previous whiskbroom approach. Nevertheles...

  11. An infrared thermal image processing framework based on superpixel algorithm to detect cracks on metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Changhang; Xie, Jing; Chen, Guoming; Huang, Weiping

    2014-11-01

    Infrared thermography has been used increasingly as an effective non-destructive technique to detect cracks on metal surface. Due to many factors, infrared thermal image has low definition compared to visible image. The contrasts between cracks and sound areas in different thermal image frames of a specimen vary greatly with the recorded time. An accurate detection can only be obtained by glancing over the whole thermal video, which is a laborious work. Moreover, experience of the operator has a great important influence on the accuracy of detection result. In this paper, an infrared thermal image processing framework based on superpixel algorithm is proposed to accomplish crack detection automatically. Two popular superpixel algorithms are compared and one of them is selected to generate superpixels in this application. Combined features of superpixels were selected from both the raw gray level image and the high-pass filtered image. Fuzzy c-means clustering is used to cluster superpixels in order to segment infrared thermal image. Experimental results show that the proposed framework can recognize cracks on metal surface through infrared thermal image automatically.

  12. Heterodyne Spectroscopy in the Thermal Infrared Region: A Window on Physics and Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor

    2004-01-01

    The thermal infrared region contains molecular bands of many of the most important species in gaseous astronomical sources. True shapes and frequencies of emission and absorption spectral lines from these constituents of planetary and stellar atmospheres contain unique information on local temperature and abundance distribution, non-thermal effects, composition, local dynamics and winds. Heterodyne spectroscopy in the thermal infrared can remotely measure true line shapes in relatively cool and thin regions and enable the retrieval of detailed information about local physics and chemistry. The concept and techniques for heterodyne detection will be discussed including examples of thermal infrared photomixers and instrumentation used in studies of several astronomical sources. Use of heterodyne detection to study non-LTE phenomena, planetary aurora, minor planetary species and gas velocities (winds) will be discussed. A discussion of future technological developments and relation to space flight missions will be addressed.

  13. Detection of two intermixed invasive woody species using color infrared aerial imagery and the support vector machine classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirik, Mustafa; Chaudhuri, Sriroop; Surber, Brady; Ale, Srinivasulu; James Ansley, R.

    2013-01-01

    Both the evergreen redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii Sudw.) and deciduous honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) are destructive and aggressive invaders that affect rangelands and grasslands of the southern Great Plains of the United States. However, their current spatial extent and future expansion trends are unknown. This study was aimed at: (1) exploring the utility of aerial imagery for detecting and mapping intermixed redberry juniper and honey mesquite while both are in full foliage using the support vector machine classifier at two sites in north central Texas and, (2) assessing and comparing the mapping accuracies between sites. Accuracy assessments revealed that the overall accuracies were 90% with the associated kappa coefficient of 0.86% and 89% with the associated kappa coefficient of 0.85 for sites 1 and 2, respectively. Z-statistics (0.102<1.96) used to compare the classification results for both sites indicated an insignificant difference between classifications at 95% probability level. In most instances, juniper and mesquite were identified correctly with <7% being mistaken for the other woody species. These results indicated that assessment of the current infestation extent and severity of these two woody species in a spatial context is possible using aerial remote sensing imagery.

  14. Robust pedestrian detection by combining visible and thermal infrared cameras.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Choi, Jong-Suk; Jeon, Eun Som; Kim, Yeong Gon; Le, Toan Thanh; Shin, Kwang Yong; Lee, Hyeon Chang; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2015-05-05

    With the development of intelligent surveillance systems, the need for accurate detection of pedestrians by cameras has increased. However, most of the previous studies use a single camera system, either a visible light or thermal camera, and their performances are affected by various factors such as shadow, illumination change, occlusion, and higher background temperatures. To overcome these problems, we propose a new method of detecting pedestrians using a dual camera system that combines visible light and thermal cameras, which are robust in various outdoor environments such as mornings, afternoons, night and rainy days. Our research is novel, compared to previous works, in the following four ways: First, we implement the dual camera system where the axes of visible light and thermal cameras are parallel in the horizontal direction. We obtain a geometric transform matrix that represents the relationship between these two camera axes. Second, two background images for visible light and thermal cameras are adaptively updated based on the pixel difference between an input thermal and pre-stored thermal background images. Third, by background subtraction of thermal image considering the temperature characteristics of background and size filtering with morphological operation, the candidates from whole image (CWI) in the thermal image is obtained. The positions of CWI (obtained by background subtraction and the procedures of shadow removal, morphological operation, size filtering, and filtering of the ratio of height to width) in the visible light image are projected on those in the thermal image by using the geometric transform matrix, and the searching regions for pedestrians are defined in the thermal image. Fourth, within these searching regions, the candidates from the searching image region (CSI) of pedestrians in the thermal image are detected. The final areas of pedestrians are located by combining the detected positions of the CWI and CSI of the thermal

  15. Topographic slope correction for analysis of thermal infrared images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, K. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A simple topographic slope correction using a linearized thermal model and assuming slopes less than about 20 degrees is presented. The correction can be used to analyzed individual thermal images or composite products such as temperature difference or thermal inertia. Simple curves are provided for latitudes of 30 and 50 degrees. The form is easily adapted for analysis of HCMM images using the DMA digital terrain data.

  16. Thermal Infrared Airborne Field Studies: Applications to the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, K.; Kirkland, L.; Keim, E.; Hackwell, J.

    2002-12-01

    A primary goal of the Mars exploration program is to reconnoiter the planet from orbit using infrared remote sensing. Currently the Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the 2001 Mars Odyssey 9-band radiometer THEMIS provide this capability. Landing site selection and modeling of the geologic and climate history depend on accurate interpretations of these data sets. Interpretations use terrestrial analog remote sensing and laboratory studies. Until recently, there have been no airborne thermal infrared spectrometer ("hyspectral") data sets available to NASA researchers that are comparable to TES. As a result, studies relied on airborne multi-channel radiometer ("multispectral") measurements (e.g. TIMS, MASTER). A radiometer has the advantage that measurement of broad bands makes it easier to measure with higher sensitivity. However, radiometers lack the spectral resolution to investigate details of spectral signatures. This gap may be partially addressed using field samples collected and measured in the laboratory. However, that leaves questions unanswered about the field environment and potentially leaves important complicating issues undiscovered. Two questions that haunt thermal infrared remote sensing investigations of Mars are: (1) If a mineral is not detected in a given data set, how definitively should we state that it is not there? (2) When does the method provide quantitative mineral mapping? In order to address these questions, we began collaborating with Department of Defense (DoD) oriented researchers and drawing on the unique instrumentation they developed. Both Mars and DoD researchers have a common need to identify materials without benefit of ground truth. Such collaborations provide a fresh perspective as well as unique data. Our work addresses uncertainties in stand-off identification of solid phase surface materials when the identification must proceed without benefit of ground truth. We will report on the results applied to TES

  17. Non-thermal DNA damage of cancer cells using near-infrared irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yohei; Tatewaki, Naoto; Nishida, Hiroshi; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Ikekawa, Nobuo; Nakayama, Jun

    2012-08-01

    Previously, we reported that near-infrared irradiation that simulates solar near-infrared irradiation with pre- and parallel-irradiational cooling can non-thermally induce cytocidal effects in cancer cells. To explore these effects, we assessed cell viability, DNA damage response pathways, and the percentage of mitotic cancer cells after near-infrared treatment. Further, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects of near-infrared irradiation compared with doxorubicin in xenografts in nude mice by measuring tumor volume and assessing protein phosphorylation by immunoblot analysis. The cell viability of A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells was significantly decreased after three rounds of near-infrared irradiation at 20 J/cm(2). Apoptotic cells were observed in near-infrared treated cells. Moreover, near-infrared treatment increased the phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at Ser(1981), H2AX at Ser(139), Chk1 at Ser(317), structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) 1 at Ser(966), and p53 at Ser(15) in A549 cells compared with control. Notably, near-infrared treatment induced the formation of nucleic foci of γH2AX. The percentage of mitotic A549 cells, as measured by histone H3 phosphorylation, decreased significantly after three rounds of near-infrared irradiation at 20 J/cm(2). Both near-infrared and doxorubicin inhibited the tumor growth of MDA-MB435 melanoma cell xenografts in nude mice and increased the phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(15), Chk1 at Ser(317), SMC1 at Ser(966), and H2AX at Ser(139) compared with control mice. These results indicate that near-infrared irradiation can non-thermally induce cytocidal effects in cancer cells as a result of activation of the DNA damage response pathway. The near-infrared irradiation schedule used here reduces discomfort and side effects. Therefore, this strategy may have potential application in the treatment of cancer.

  18. Thermal profiles for selected river reaches in the Stillaguamish River basin, Washington, August 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gandaszek, Andrew S.

    2011-01-01

    Watershed Sciences, LLC, 2002, Aerial surveys in the Stillaguamish and Skagit River Basins-Thermal infrared and color videography: Corvallis, Oreg., Water Sciences, for Washington Department of Ecology, 28 p.

  19. A reappraisal of the use of infrared thermal image analysis in medicine.

    PubMed

    Jones, B F

    1998-12-01

    Infrared thermal imaging of the skin has been used for several decades to monitor the temperature distribution of human skin. Abnormalities such as malignancies, inflammation, and infection cause localized increases in temperature which show as hot spots or as asymmetrical patterns in an infrared thermogram. Even though it is nonspecific, infrared thermology is a powerful detector of problems that affect a patient's physiology. While the use of infrared imaging is increasing in many industrial and security applications, it has declined in medicine probably because of the continued reliance on first generation cameras. The transfer of military technology for medical use has prompted this reappraisal of infrared thermology in medicine. Digital infrared cameras have much improved spatial and thermal resolutions, and libraries of image processing routines are available to analyze images captured both statically and dynamically. If thermographs are captured under controlled conditions, they may be interpreted readily to diagnose certain conditions and to monitor the reaction of a patient's physiology to thermal and other stresses. Some of the major areas where infrared thermography is being used successfully are neurology, vascular disorders, rheumatic diseases, tissue viability, oncology (especially breast cancer), dermatological disorders, neonatal, ophthalmology, and surgery.

  20. Imaging spectroscopy of Venus in the thermal infrared: daily variations of the thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, Therese; Greathouse, Thomas; Richter, Matthew; DeWitt, Curtis; Lacy, John; Widemann, Thomas; Fouchet, Thierry; Bézard, Bruno; Atreya, Sushil

    2015-04-01

    Since 2012, we have been monitoring the lower mesosphere of Venus using high-resolution imaging spectroscopy with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) at the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Mauna Kea Observatory (Hawaii). Four campaigns took place in January and October 2012, then in February and July 2014. In January 2012, the evening terminator was observed, while the morning terminator was observed during the three following runs. The main objective of our study was a cartography of the abundances of SO2 and H2O (through HDO) over the H2SO4 cloud deck. High-resolution hyper-spectral maps of Venus were recorded at 7μm (SO2, HDO, CO2), 19 μm (SO2, CO2) and in two CO2 bands at 10.5 μm and 12.6 μm. Measuring CO2 transitions of different intensities allows us to retrieve information about the thermal structure above the clouds as a function of latitude and local hour. At high latitudes (around 70° N and S), our data show the isothermal or inversion layer just above the cloud associated with the polar collar. This effect is clearly stronger around the morning terminator than at the evening terminator. In addition, data recorded in the CO2 hot band at 10.5 μm show at the limb a non-thermal emission on the dayside, consistent with previous heterodyne spectroscopy observations at the same wavelength. We will present maps of the mesospheric temperature at different pressure levels above the cloud top. These data will be compared with other datasets obtained from Venus Express and from ground-based observations.

  1. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  2. Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) design and thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    The design and performance characteristics of an observatory are compared with those of a storage dewar. The critical design technologies required to increase cryogen dewar lifetime are discussed. In particular, outer shell temperature, vapor cooled shields, multilayer insulation performance, and tank support systems are analyzed to assess their impact on cryogen lifetime for both the observatory and the storage dewar. The cryogen lifetime and cryogen mass loss rate of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are compared with that of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite and the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite. A 0.1 percent mass loss per day of superfluid helium dewar can be designed using current state-of-the-art dewar technology. Space-based liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks can be designed for a 5-year lifetime.

  3. Thermal infrared pushbroom imagery acquisition and processing. [of NASA's Advanced Land Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. J.; Corbett, F. J.; Spera, T. J.; Andrada, T.

    1982-01-01

    A 9-element focal plane detector array and signal processing electronics was developed and delivered in December 1977. It was integrated into a thermal infrared imaging system using LSI microprocessor image processing and CRT display. After three years of laboratory operation, the focal plane has demonstrated high reliability and performance. On the basis of the 9-channel breadboard, the 90-element Aircraft Pushbroom IR/CCD Focal Plane Development Program was funded in October 1977. A follow-on program was awarded in July 1979, for the construction of a field test instrument and image processing facility. The objective of this project was to demonstrate thermal infrared pushbroom hard-copy imagery. It is pointed out that the successful development of the 9-element and 90-element thermal infrared hybrid imaging systems using photoconductive (Hg,Cd)Te has verified the operational concept of 8 to 14 micrometer pushbroom scanners.

  4. Evaluation of Methods for Coregistration and Fusion of Rpas-Based 3d Point Clouds and Thermal Infrared Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoegner, L.; Tuttas, S.; Xu, Y.; Eder, K.; Stilla, U.

    2016-06-01

    This paper discusses the automatic coregistration and fusion of 3d point clouds generated from aerial image sequences and corresponding thermal infrared (TIR) images. Both RGB and TIR images have been taken from a RPAS platform with a predefined flight path where every RGB image has a corresponding TIR image taken from the same position and with the same orientation with respect to the accuracy of the RPAS system and the inertial measurement unit. To remove remaining differences in the exterior orientation, different strategies for coregistering RGB and TIR images are discussed: (i) coregistration based on 2D line segments for every single TIR image and the corresponding RGB image. This method implies a mainly planar scene to avoid mismatches; (ii) coregistration of both the dense 3D point clouds from RGB images and from TIR images by coregistering 2D image projections of both point clouds; (iii) coregistration based on 2D line segments in every single TIR image and 3D line segments extracted from intersections of planes fitted in the segmented dense 3D point cloud; (iv) coregistration of both the dense 3D point clouds from RGB images and from TIR images using both ICP and an adapted version based on corresponding segmented planes; (v) coregistration of both image sets based on point features. The quality is measured by comparing the differences of the back projection of homologous points in both corrected RGB and TIR images.

  5. How Many Hippos (homhip): Algorithm for Automatic Counts of Animals with Infra-Red Thermal Imagery from Uav

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhoest, S.; Linchant, J.; Quevauvillers, S.; Vermeulen, C.; Lejeune, P.

    2015-08-01

    The common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius L.) is part of the animal species endangered because of multiple human pressures. Monitoring of species for conservation is then essential, and the development of census protocols has to be chased. UAV technology is considering as one of the new perspectives for wildlife survey. Indeed, this technique has many advantages but its main drawback is the generation of a huge amount of data to handle. This study aims at developing an algorithm for automatic count of hippos, by exploiting thermal infrared aerial images acquired from UAV. This attempt is the first known for automatic detection of this species. Images taken at several flight heights can be used as inputs of the algorithm, ranging from 38 to 155 meters above ground level. A Graphical User Interface has been created in order to facilitate the use of the application. Three categories of animals have been defined following their position in water. The mean error of automatic counts compared with manual delineations is +2.3% and shows that the estimation is unbiased. Those results show great perspectives for the use of the algorithm in populations monitoring after some technical improvements and the elaboration of statistically robust inventories protocols.

  6. Thermal infrared emissivity spectrum and its characteristics of crude oil slick covered seawater.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Pan; Gu, Xing-Fai; Yu, Taol; Meng, Qing-Yan; Li, Jia-Guoi; Shi, Ji-xiang; Cheng, Yang; Wang, Liang; Liu, Wen-Song; Liu, Qi-Yuei; Zhao, Li-Min

    2014-11-01

    Detecting oil slick covered seawater surface using the thermal infrared remote sensing technology exists the advantages such as: oil spill detection with thermal infrared spectrum can be performed in the nighttime which is superior to visible spectrum, the thermal infrared spectrum is superior to detect the radiation characteristics of both the oil slick and the seawater compared to the mid-wavelength infrared spectrum and which have great potential to detect the oil slick thickness. And the emissivity is the ratio of the radiation of an object at a given temperature in normal range of the temperature (260-320 K) and the blackbody radiation under the same temperature , the emissivity of an object is unrelated to the temperature, but only is dependent with the wavelength and material properties. Using the seawater taken from Bohai Bay and crude oil taken from Gudao oil production plant of Shengli Oilfield in Dongying city of Shandong Province, an experiment was designed to study the characteristics and mechanism of thermal infrared emissivity spectrum of artificial crude oil slick covered seawater surface with its thickness. During the experiment, crude oil was continuously dropped into the seawater to generate artificial oil slick with different thicknesses. By adding each drop of crude oil, we measured the reflectivity of the oil slick in the thermal infrared spectrum with the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (102F) and then calculated its thermal infrared emissivity. The results show that the thermal infrared emissivity of oil slick changes significantly with its thickness when oil slick is relatively thin (20-120 μm), which provides an effective means for detecting the existence of offshore thin oil slick In the spectrum ranges from 8 to 10 μm and from 13. 2 to 14 μm, there is a steady emissivity difference between the seawater and thin oil slick with thickness of 20 μm. The emissivity of oil slick changes marginally with oil slick thickness and

  7. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  8. Detection of leaks in buried rural water pipelines using thermal infrared images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.

    1985-01-01

    Leakage is a major problem in many pipelines. Minor leaks called 'seeper leaks', which generally range from 2 to 10 m3 per day, are common and are difficult to detect using conventional ground surveys. The objective of this research was to determine whether airborne thermal-infrared remote sensing could be used in detecting leaks and monitoring rural water pipelines. This study indicates that such leaks can be detected using low-altitude 8.7- to 11.5. micrometer wavelength, thermal infrared images collected under proper conditions.

  9. A new method to inverse soil moisture based on thermal infrared and passive microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuang; Kou, Xiaokang; Zhao, Shaojie; Jiang, Lingmei

    2014-11-01

    Soil moisture is one of the main factors in the water, energy and carbon cycles. It constitutes a major uncertainty in climate and hydrological models. By now, passive microwave remote sensing and thermal infrared remote sensing technology have been used to obtain and monitor soil moisture. However, as the resolution of passive microwave remote sensing is very low and the thermal infrared remote sensing method fails to provide soil temperature on cloudy days, it is hard to monitor the soil moisture accurately. To solve the problem, a new method has been tried in this research. Thermal infrared remote sensing and passive microwave remote sensing technology have been combined based on the delicate experiment. Since the soil moisture retrieved by passive microwave in general represents surface centimeters deep, which is different from deeper soil moisture estimated by thermal inertia method, a relationship between the two depths soil moisture has been established based on the experiment. The results show that there is a good relationship between the soil moisture estimated by passive microwave and thermal infrared remote sensing method. The correlation coefficient is 0.78 and RMSE (root mean square error) is 0.0195 · ?. This research provides a new possible method to inverse soil moisture.

  10. Long and short-term spatial processes analysis of an acacia tree population using a single aerial photograph with near infra-red band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Sivan; Blumberg, Dan G.; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Ephrath, Jhonathan E.

    2014-05-01

    Hyper-arid zones are characterized by highly sparse vegetation cover. Monitoring vegetation dynamics in hyper-arid zones is important because any reduction in the vegetation cover in these areas can lead to a considerable reduction in the carrying capacity of the ecological system. Remote sensing expands the spatial and temporal database and is thus a powerful tool for long-term monitoring in arid zones, where access is limited and long-term ground data are rarely available. The main goal of this research was to study both the long-term and short-term spatial processes affecting the acacia population, by using information from a single, three bands color infrared (CIR) aerial photograph (green, red and near infrared). CIR images enable us to obtain information about photosynthetically active biomass by using vegetation indices such as NDVI. A map of individual acacia trees that was extracted from a CIR aerial photograph of Wadi Ktora allowed us to examine the distribution pattern of the trees size and foliage health status (NDVI). Tree size distribution was used as an indicator of long-term (decades) geo-hydrologic spatial processes effecting the acacia population. The tree health status distribution was used as an indicator for short-term (months to a few years) geo-hydrologic spatial processes, such as the paths of recent flashfloods events. Comparison of the tree size distribution and NDVI values distribution enabled us to differentiate between long-term and short-term processes that brought the population to its present state. The spatial analysis revealed that both the tree size and NDVI distribution patterns were significantly clustered, suggesting that the processes responsible for tree size and tree health status do have a spatial expression. Furthermore, each of the attributes has a different distribution and unique clustering location. We suggest that the lack of spatial correlation between tree size and health status is a result of spatial

  11. Representation of thermal infrared imaging data in the DICOM using XML configuration files.

    PubMed

    Ruminski, Jacek

    2007-01-01

    The DICOM standard has become a widely accepted and implemented format for the exchange and storage of medical imaging data. Different imaging modalities are supported however there is not a dedicated solution for thermal infrared imaging in medicine. In this article we propose new ideas and improvements to final proposal of the new DICOM Thermal Infrared Imaging structures and services. Additionally, we designed, implemented and tested software packages for universal conversion of existing thermal imaging files to the DICOM format using XML configuration files. The proposed solution works fast and requires minimal number of user interactions. The XML configuration file enables to compose a set of attributes for any source file format of thermal imaging camera.

  12. Drone with thermal infrared camera provides high resolution georeferenced imagery of the Waikite geothermal area, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Luketina, K. M.

    2016-10-01

    Drones are now routinely used for collecting aerial imagery and creating digital elevation models (DEM). Lightweight thermal sensors provide another payload option for generation of very high-resolution aerial thermal orthophotos. This technology allows for the rapid and safe survey of thermal areas, often present in inaccessible or dangerous terrain. Here we present a 2.2 km2 georeferenced, temperature-calibrated thermal orthophoto of the Waikite geothermal area, New Zealand. The image represents a mosaic of nearly 6000 thermal images captured by drone over a period of about 2 weeks. This is thought by the authors to be the first such image published of a significant geothermal area produced by a drone equipped with a thermal camera. Temperature calibration of the image allowed calculation of heat loss (43 ± 12 MW) from thermal lakes and streams in the survey area (loss from evaporation, conduction and radiation). An RGB (visible spectrum) orthomosaic photo and digital elevation model was also produced for this area, with ground resolution and horizontal position error comparable to commercially produced LiDAR and aerial imagery obtained from crewed aircraft. Our results show that thermal imagery collected by drones has the potential to become a key tool in geothermal science, including geological, geochemical and geophysical surveys, environmental baseline and monitoring studies, geotechnical studies and civil works.

  13. Stream temperature estimated in situ from thermal-infrared images: best estimate and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iezzi, F.; Todisco, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    The paper aims to show a technique to estimate in situ the stream temperature from thermal-infrared images deepening its best estimate and uncertainty. Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality and nowadays its assessment is important particularly for thermal pollution monitoring in water bodies. Stream temperature changes are especially due to the anthropogenic heat input from urban wastewater and from water used as a coolant by power plants and industrial manufacturers. The stream temperatures assessment using ordinary techniques (e.g. appropriate thermometers) is limited by sparse sampling in space due to a spatial discretization necessarily punctual. Latest and most advanced techniques assess the stream temperature using thermal-infrared remote sensing based on thermal imagers placed usually on aircrafts or using satellite images. These techniques assess only the surface water temperature and they are suitable to detect the temperature of vast water bodies but do not allow a detailed and precise surface water temperature assessment in limited areas of the water body. The technique shown in this research is based on the assessment of thermal-infrared images obtained in situ via portable thermal imager. As in all thermographic techniques, also in this technique, it is possible to estimate only the surface water temperature. A stream with the presence of a discharge of urban wastewater is proposed as case study to validate the technique and to show its application limits. Since the technique analyzes limited areas in extension of the water body, it allows a detailed and precise assessment of the water temperature. In general, the punctual and average stream temperatures are respectively uncorrected and corrected. An appropriate statistical method that minimizes the errors in the average stream temperature is proposed. The correct measurement of this temperature through the assessment of thermal- infrared images obtained in situ via portable

  14. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    'Infrared' is a very wide field in physics and the natural sciences which has evolved enormously in recent decades. It all started in 1800 with Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel's discovery of infrared (IR) radiation within the spectrum of the Sun. Thereafter a few important milestones towards widespread use of IR were the quantitative description of the laws of blackbody radiation by Max Planck in 1900; the application of quantum mechanics to understand the rotational-vibrational spectra of molecules starting in the first half of the 20th century; and the revolution in source and detector technologies due to micro-technological breakthroughs towards the end of the 20th century. This has led to much high-quality and sophisticated equipment in terms of detectors, sources and instruments in the IR spectral range, with a multitude of different applications in science and technology. This special issue tries to focus on a few aspects of the astonishing variety of different disciplines, techniques and applications concerning the general topic of infrared radiation. Part of the content is based upon an interdisciplinary international conference on the topic held in 2012 in Bad Honnef, Germany. It is hoped that the information provided here may be useful for teaching the general topic of electromagnetic radiation in the IR spectral range in advanced university courses for postgraduate students. In the most general terms, the infrared spectral range is defined to extend from wavelengths of 780 nm (upper range of the VIS spectral range) up to wavelengths of 1 mm (lower end of the microwave range). Various definitions of near, middle and far infrared or thermal infrared, and lately terahertz frequencies, are used, which all fall in this range. These special definitions often depend on the scientific field of research. Unfortunately, many of these fields seem to have developed independently from neighbouring disciplines, although they deal with very similar topics in respect of the

  15. Near infrared-red models for the remote estimation of chlorophyll- a concentration in optically complex turbid productive waters: From in situ measurements to aerial imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurlin, Daniela

    Today the water quality of many inland and coastal waters is compromised by cultural eutrophication in consequence of increased human agricultural and industrial activities and remote sensing is widely applied to monitor the trophic state of these waters. This study explores near infrared-red models for the remote estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration in turbid productive waters and compares several near infrared-red models developed within the last 35 years. Three of these near infrared-red models were calibrated for a dataset with chlorophyll-a concentrations from 2.3 to 81.2 mg m -3 and validated for independent and statistically significantly different datasets with chlorophyll-a concentrations from 4.0 to 95.5 mg m-3 and 4.0 to 24.2 mg m-3 for the spectral bands of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The developed MERIS two-band algorithm estimated chlorophyll-a concentrations from 4.0 to 24.2 mg m-3, which are typical for many inland and coastal waters, very accurately with a mean absolute error 1.2 mg m-3. These results indicate a high potential of the simple MERIS two-band algorithm for the reliable estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration without any reduction in accuracy compared to more complex algorithms, even though more research seems required to analyze the sensitivity of this algorithm to differences in the chlorophyll-a specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton. Three near infrared-red models were calibrated and validated for a smaller dataset of atmospherically corrected multi-temporal aerial imagery collected by the hyperspectral airborne imaging spectrometer for applications (AisaEAGLE). The developed algorithms successfully captured the spatial and temporal variability of the chlorophyll-a concentrations and estimated chlorophyll- a concentrations from 2.3 to 81.2 mg m-3 with mean absolute errors from 4.4 mg m-3 for the AISA two band algorithm to 5.2 mg m-3

  16. Infrared Thermal Imaging During Ultrasonic Aspiration of Bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, D. J.; Woodworth, G.; Gupta, S. V.; Manandhar, P.; Schwartz, T. H.

    Ultrasonic surgical aspirator tips target removal of bone in approaches to tumors or aneurysms. Low profile angled tips provide increased visualization and safety in many high risk surgical situations that commonly were approached using a high speed rotary drill. Utilization of the ultrasonic aspirator for bone removal raised questions about relative amount of local and transmitted heat energy. In the sphenoid wing of a cadaver section, ultrasonic bone aspiration yielded lower thermal rise in precision bone removal than rotary mechanical drills, with maximum temperature of 31 °C versus 69 °C for fluted and 79 °C for diamond drill bits. Mean ultrasonic fragmentation power was about 8 Watts. Statistical studies using tenacious porcine cranium yielded mean power levels of about 4.5 Watts to 11 Watts and mean temperature of less than 41.1 °C. Excessively loading the tip yielded momentary higher power; however, mean thermal rise was less than 8 °C with bone removal starting at near body temperature of about 37 °C. Precision bone removal and thermal management were possible with conditions tested for ultrasonic bone aspiration.

  17. The Status of the Mercury Thermal Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) for BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Helbert, Jörn; Peter, Gisbert; Walter, Ingo; D'Amore, Mario; Säuberlich, Thomas; Weber, Iris

    2014-05-01

    The Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) is one of the selected payloads of the ESA/JAXA BepiColombo mission, to be launched in 2016. The scientific objectives of MERTIS are to 1.) Study Mercury's surface composition, 2.) Identify rock-forming minerals, 3.) Map the surface mineralogy, and 4.) Study surface temperature variations and thermal inertia. The instrument consists of an uncooled grating push-broom IR-spectrometer (TIS) and a radiometer (TIR), which will operate in the wavelength regions of 7-14 µm and 7-40 µm, respectively [1,2]. From its nominal orbit, MERTIS will map the surface globally at a spatial resolution of about 500 m and for approximately 5-10% of the surface at a resolution of up to 280 m. MERTIS consists of more than 10 miniaturized, highly integrated subsystems, including mirror optics, two IR detectors (bolometer and radiometer) with read-out electronics, two actuators (pointing unit and shutter), two on-board blackbody calibration targets at 300 and 700 K, two baffles (planet, space), heater, temperature sensors, and two cold redundant instrument controllers and power supplies. We have built, calibrated, and delivered the MERTIS instrument to ESA. The Flight Model of the instrument is now fully functional and integrated on the spacecraft. In its flight configuration, MERTIS has a mass of less than 3.1 kg and during nominal science operations has a power consumption of 7.9 - 9.9 W. After calibration, the SNR of MERTIS is 266 at 8 μm wavelength and a temperature of the scene of 700 K and a dwell time of 100 ms [3,4]. With additional data processing on-board a higher SNR is expected. This is much better than the required SNR of >100, which is necessary to resolve mineral bands with low spectral contrast [1,5,6]. To alleviate the problem of limited downlink capabilities of BepiColombo, we have created a highly optimized operational scenario to reduce the MERTIS data rate by about 60% from the original plan. We also

  18. Plasmonic light harvesting for multicolor infrared thermal detection.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feilong; Xie, Jinjin; Xiao, Shiyi; Komiyama, Susumu; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Lei; An, Zhenghua

    2013-01-14

    Here we combined experiments and theory to study the optical properties of a plasmonic cavity consisting of a perforated metal film and a flat metal sheet separated by a semiconductor spacer. Three different types of optical modes are clearly identified-the propagating and localized surface plasmons on the perforated metal film and the Fabry-Perot modes inside the cavity. Interactions among them lead to a series of hybridized eigenmodes exhibiting excellent spectral tunability and spatially distinct field distributions, making the system particularly suitable for multicolor infrared light detections. As an example, we design a two-color detector protocol with calculated photon absorption efficiencies enhanced by more than 20 times at both colors, reaching ~42.8% at f1 = 20.0THz (15μm in wavelength) and ~46.2% at f2 = 29.5THz (~10.2μm) for a 1μm total thickness of sandwiched quantum wells.

  19. Infrared Emission and Thermal Processes in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundy, Lee; Wolfire, Mark

    1999-01-01

    In this research we constructed theoretical models of the infrared and submillimeter line and continuum emission from the neutral interstellar medium in the Milky Way and external galaxies. The model line intensities were compared to observations of the Galactic disk and several galaxies to determine the average physical properties of the neutral gas including the density, temperature, and ultraviolet radiation field which illuminates the gas. In addition we investigated the heating mechanisms in the Galactic disk and estimated the emission rate of the [C 11] 158 micrometer line as a function of position in the Galaxy. We conclude that the neutral gas is heated mainly by the grain photoelectric effect and that a two phase (CNM+WNM) is possible between Galactic radii R = 3 kpc and R = 18 kpc. Listings of meeting presentations and publications are included.

  20. Infra-red lamp panel study and assessment application to thermal vacuum testing of sigma telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauduyt, Jacques; Merlet, Joseph; Poux, Christiane

    1986-01-01

    A research and development program of the Infra-Red Test has been conducted by the French Space Agency (CNES). A choice, after characterization, among several possibilities has been made on the type of methods and facilities for the I.R. test. An application to the Thermal Vacuum Test of the SIGMA Telescope is described.

  1. Mapping Acid Sulfate Alteration of Basaltic Andesite with Thermal Infrared Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Calvin, W. M.; Hook, S. J.; Taranik, J. V.

    2002-01-01

    Airborne thermal infrared multi- and hyperspectral data sets are used to map sulfate alteration of basaltic andesites near Reno, NV. Alteration includes quartz-alunite, jarosite and a number of clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Phase composition analysis of hydrous aluminium oxides by thermal analysis and infrared spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Z; Kántor, E; Bélafi, K; Péterfy, L; Farkas, L P

    1992-12-01

    A general method for determination of the phase composition of hydrous aluminium oxides by thermal analysis and infrared spectrometry, and determination of the transformation temperature of mixtures of Al(OH)(3) and AlOOH into alpha-Al(2)O(3) are described.

  3. Thermal infrared imaging of the temporal variability in stomatal conductance for fruit trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struthers, Raymond; Ivanova, Anna; Tits, Laurent; Swennen, Rony; Coppin, Pol

    2015-07-01

    Repeated measurements using thermal infrared remote sensing were used to characterize the change in canopy temperature over time and factors that influenced this change on 'Conference' pear trees (Pyrus communis L.). Three different types of sensors were used, a leaf porometer to measure leaf stomatal conductance, a thermal infrared camera to measure the canopy temperature and a meteorological sensor to measure weather variables. Stomatal conductance of water stressed pear was significantly lower than in the control group 9 days after stress began. This decrease in stomatal conductance reduced transpiration, reducing evaporative cooling that increased canopy temperature. Using thermal infrared imaging with wavelengths between 7.5 and13 μm, the first significant difference was measured 18 days after stress began. A second order derivative described the average rate of change of the difference between the stress treatment and control group. The average rate of change for stomatal conductance was 0.06 (mmol m-2 s-1) and for canopy temperature was -0.04 (°C) with respect to days. Thermal infrared remote sensing and data analysis presented in this study demonstrated that the differences in canopy temperatures between the water stress and control treatment due to stomata regulation can be validated.

  4. Postdispersion system for astronomical observations with Fourier transform spectrometers in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedermann, Guenter; Jennings, D. E.; Hanel, R. H.; Kunde, V. G.; Moseley, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    A postdispersion system for astronomical observations with Fourier transform spectrometers in the thermal infrared has been developed which improves the sensitivity of radiation noise limited observations by reducing the spectral range incident on the detector. Special attention is given to the first-generation blocked impurity band detector. Planetary, solar, and stellar observations are reported.

  5. An international conference on thermal infrared sensing for diagnostics and control (Thermosense VIII)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, H.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on infrared thermography. Topics considered at the conference included professionalism and standards, industrial processes, electronics and microelectronics applications, power generation and distribution, quality aspects of electric utility inspections, thermal imaging for the nuclear power industry, thermographic imaging and computer image processing of defects in building materials, and fraud in the energy conservation field.

  6. Comparison of P/Brorsen-Metcalf and P/Halley in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, David K.; Russell, Ray W.; Hanner, Martha S.; Lien, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Of the periodic comets, only comets Halley and Brorsen-Metcalf have periods of the order of 75 years and are bright enough to study spectroscopically in the infrared. Thermal IR spectroscopy of comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf near perihelion are presented and the results are compared to comet P/Halley.

  7. Rapid microplate, green method for high-throughput evaluation of vinegar acidity using thermal infrared enthalpimetry.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Bruna; Oliveira, Alessandra Stangherlin; Ferreira, Daniele de Freitas; Menezes, Cristiano Ragagnin; Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Wagner, Roger; Barin, Juliano Smanioto

    2017-01-15

    Infrared thermal imaging was combined with disposable microplates to perform enthalpimetric analysis using an infrared camera to monitor temperature without contact. The proposed thermal infrared enthalpimetry (TIE) method was used to determine the total, fixed and volatile acidities of vinegars. Sample preparation and analysis were performed in the same vessel, avoiding excessive sample handling and reducing energy expenditure by more than ten times. The results agreed with those of the conventional method for different kinds of vinegars, with values of 1.7%, and 2.3% for repeatability and intermediate precision, respectively. A linear calibration curve was obtained from 0.040 to 1.30molL(-1). The proposed method provided rapid results (within 10s) for four samples simultaneously, a sample throughput of up to 480 samples per hour. In addition, the method complies with at least eight of twelve recommendations for green analytical chemistry, making TIE a promising tool for routine vinegar analysis.

  8. Rapid microplate, green method for high-throughput evaluation of vinegar acidity using thermal infrared enthalpimetry.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Bruna; Oliveira, Alessandra Stangherlin; Ferreira, Daniele de Freitas; Menezes, Cristiano Ragagnin; Duarte, Fábio Andrei; Wagner, Roger; Barin, Juliano Smanioto

    2017-01-15

    Infrared thermal imaging was combined with disposable microplates to perform enthalpimetric analysis using an infrared camera to monitor temperature without contact. The proposed thermal infrared enthalpimetry (TIE) method was used to determine the total, fixed and volatile acidities of vinegars. Sample preparation and analysis were performed in the same vessel, avoiding excessive sample handling and reducing energy expenditure by more than ten times. The results agreed with those of the conventional method for different kinds of vinegars, with values of 1.7%, and 2.3% for repeatability and intermediate precision, respectively. A linear calibration curve was obtained from 0.040 to 1.30molL(-1). The proposed method provided rapid results (within 10s) for four samples simultaneously, a sample throughput of up to 480 samples per hour. In addition, the method complies with at least eight of twelve recommendations for green analytical chemistry, making TIE a promising tool for routine vinegar analysis. PMID:27542445

  9. GreenHouse Observations of the Stratosphere and Troposphere (GHOST): a novel shortwave infrared spectrometer developed for the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humpage, Neil; Bösch, Hartmut; Palmer, Paul I.; Parr-Burman, Phil M.; Vick, Andrew J. A.; Bezawada, Naidu N.; Black, Martin; Born, Andrew J.; Pearson, David; Strachan, Jonathan; Wells, Martyn

    2014-10-01

    The tropospheric distribution of greenhouse gases (GHGs) depends on surface flux variations, atmospheric chemistry and transport processes over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Accurate and precise atmospheric concentration observations of GHGs can be used to infer surface flux estimates, though their interpretation relies on unbiased atmospheric transport models. GHOST is a novel, compact shortwave infrared spectrometer which will observe tropospheric columns of CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O (along with the HDO/H2O ratio) during deployment on board the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle. The primary science objectives of GHOST are to: 1) test atmospheric transport models; 2) evaluate satellite observations of GHG column observations over oceans; and 3) complement in-situ tropopause transition layer observations from other Global Hawk instruments. GHOST comprises a target acquisition module (TAM), a fibre slicer and feed system, and a multiple order spectrograph. The TAM is programmed to direct solar radiation reflected by the ocean surface into a fibre optic bundle. Incoming light is then split into four spectral bands, selected to optimise remote observations of GHGs. The design uses a single grating and detector for all four spectral bands. We summarise the GHOST concept and its objectives, and describe the instrument design and proposed deployment aboard the Global Hawk platform.

  10. Aerial Explorers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Pisanich, Greg; Ippolito, Corey

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents recent results from a mission architecture study of planetary aerial explorers. In this study, several mission scenarios were developed in simulation and evaluated on success in meeting mission goals. This aerial explorer mission architecture study is unique in comparison with previous Mars airplane research activities. The study examines how aerial vehicles can find and gain access to otherwise inaccessible terrain features of interest. The aerial explorer also engages in a high-level of (indirect) surface interaction, despite not typically being able to takeoff and land or to engage in multiple flights/sorties. To achieve this goal, a new mission paradigm is proposed: aerial explorers should be considered as an additional element in the overall Entry, Descent, Landing System (EDLS) process. Further, aerial vehicles should be considered primarily as carrier/utility platforms whose purpose is to deliver air-deployed sensors and robotic devices, or symbiotes, to those high-value terrain features of interest.

  11. Infrared near-field imaging and spectroscopy based on thermal or synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Peragut, Florian; De Wilde, Yannick; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate the coupling of a scattering near-field scanning optical microscope combined with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The set-up operates using either the near-field thermal emission from the sample itself, which is proportional to the electromagnetic local density of states, or with an external infrared synchrotron source, which is broadband and highly brilliant. We perform imaging and spectroscopy measurements with sub-wavelength spatial resolution in the mid-infrared range on surfaces made of silicon carbide and gold and demonstrate the capabilities of the two configurations for super-resolved near-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging and that the simple use of a properly chosen bandpass filter on the detector allows one to image the spatial distribution of materials with sub-wavelength resolution by studying the contrast in the near-field images.

  12. Clinical Trial on the Characteristics of Zheng Classification of Pulmonary Diseases Based on Infrared Thermal Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jin-xia; Gao, Si-hua; Li, Yu-hang; Ma, Shi-lei; Tian, Tian; Mo, Fang-fang; Wang, Liu-qing; Zhu, Wen-zeng

    2013-01-01

    Zheng classification study based on infrared thermal imaging technology has not been reported before. To detect the relative temperature of viscera and bowels of different syndromes patients with pulmonary disease and to summarize the characteristics of different Zheng classifications, the infrared thermal imaging technology was used in the clinical trial. The results showed that the infrared thermal images characteristics of different Zheng classifications of pulmonary disease were distinctly different. The influence on viscera and bowels was deeper in phlegm-heat obstructing lung syndrome group than in cold-phlegm obstructing lung syndrome group. It is helpful to diagnose Zheng classification and to improve the diagnosis rate by analyzing the infrared thermal images of patients. The application of infrared thermal imaging technology provided objective measures for medical diagnosis and treatment in the field of Zheng studies and provided a new methodology for Zheng classification. PMID:23606873

  13. Clinical trial on the characteristics of zheng classification of pulmonary diseases based on infrared thermal imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jin-Xia; Gao, Si-Hua; Li, Yu-Hang; Ma, Shi-Lei; Tian, Tian; Mo, Fang-Fang; Wang, Liu-Qing; Zhu, Wen-Zeng

    2013-01-01

    Zheng classification study based on infrared thermal imaging technology has not been reported before. To detect the relative temperature of viscera and bowels of different syndromes patients with pulmonary disease and to summarize the characteristics of different Zheng classifications, the infrared thermal imaging technology was used in the clinical trial. The results showed that the infrared thermal images characteristics of different Zheng classifications of pulmonary disease were distinctly different. The influence on viscera and bowels was deeper in phlegm-heat obstructing lung syndrome group than in cold-phlegm obstructing lung syndrome group. It is helpful to diagnose Zheng classification and to improve the diagnosis rate by analyzing the infrared thermal images of patients. The application of infrared thermal imaging technology provided objective measures for medical diagnosis and treatment in the field of Zheng studies and provided a new methodology for Zheng classification.

  14. Thermal Evaluation of Scorched Graphite-Epoxy Panels by Infrared Scanning

    PubMed Central

    Slifka, A. J.; Hall, T.; Boltz, E. S.

    2003-01-01

    A simple measurement system is described for evaluating damage to graphite-epoxy panels, such as those used in high-performance aircraft. The system uses a heating laser and infrared imaging system to measure thermal performance. Thermal conductivity or diffusivity is a sensitive indicator of damage in materials, allowing this thermal measurement to show various degrees of damage in graphite-epoxy composites. Our measurements track well with heat-flux damage to graphite epoxy panels. This measurement system, including analysis software, could easily be used in the field, such as on the deck of an aircraft carrier or at remote air strips. PMID:27413602

  15. Thermal Imaging with Novel Infrared Focal Plane Arrays and Quantitative Analysis of Thermal Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, S. D.; Rafol, S. B.; Bandara, S. V.; Liu, J. K.; Mumolo, J. M.; Soibel, A.; Ting, D. Z.; Tidrow, Meimei

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a single long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) camera for thermography. This camera has been used to measure the temperature profile of patients. A pixel coregistered simultaneously reading mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR)/LWIR dual-band QWIP camera was developed to improve the accuracy of temperature measurements especially with objects with unknown emissivity. Even the dualband measurement can provide inaccurate results due to the fact that emissivity is a function of wavelength. Thus we have been developing a four-band QWIP camera for accurate temperature measurement of remote object.

  16. Estimation of spectral emissivity in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kryskowski, David; Maxwell, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    A number of algorithms are available in the literature that attempt to remove most of the effects of temperature from thermal multispectral data where the final goal is to extract emissivity differences. Early approaches include adjacent spectral band ratioing, broad band radiance normalization and the use of one band where emissivities are generally high (e.g., 11 to 12 micrometers) to determine the temperature. More recent work has produced two techniques that use data averaging to extract temperature to leave a quantity related to emissivity changes. These two techniques have been investigated and compared and appear to provide reasonable results. The analysis presented in this paper develops a thermal IR multispectral temperature/emissivity estimation procedure based on formal estimation theory, Gaussian statistics, and a stochastic radiance signal model including the effects of both temperature and emissivity. The importance of this work is that this is an optimal estimation procedure which will provide minimum variance estimates of temperature and emissivity changes directly. Section 2 discusses optimal linear spectral emissivity estimation and Section 3 is a summary.

  17. Uncooled infrared thermal imaging systems for law enforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, Robert J. S.; Van Dover, Douglas K.

    1995-05-01

    For over 18 years, Texas Instruments (TI) has been developing low cost uncooled thermal imaging technology for night vision applications. Using technology developed with support from several government agencies, TI is offering this dual-use technology in a low cost system for police cruisers and other surveillance applications. TI has teamed with Highes Aircraft to provide NIGHTSIGHTTM, now being marketed jointly. Because NIGHSIGHT is a passive thermal image, it gives law enforcement officers the ability to see in total darkness. This capability gives the uncooled system distinct advantages over image intensifiers which require some degree of visible light. It also differs from typical cryogenic or cooled IR systems because it does not contain a cryogenic cooler mechanism or a scanner which lowers the complexity, costs, size, weight, and power consumption. Police across the US have tested prototype sensors with positive results. Police officers often praise the ability to see in total darkness and report the many advantages of the system and how it changes their perspective on law enforcement. Systems have also been provided to the Drug Enforcement Agency, INS border patrol, prison security staff, Baltimore-Washington International Airport security, Texas Parks and Wildlife Service and the Los Angeles Harbor Patrol and have been used in a variety of security and surveillance situations. The paper will address the implementation of the technology; discuss barriers to use such as cost, awareness, and system understanding, and examine the impact of the technology on the effectiveness of law enforcement at night.

  18. Thermal physical property-based fusion of geostationary meteorological satellite visible and infrared channel images.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Shi, Lu; Yang, Yiling; Song, Dalei

    2014-06-10

    Geostationary meteorological satellite infrared (IR) channel data contain important spectral information for meteorological research and applications, but their spatial resolution is relatively low. The objective of this study is to obtain higher-resolution IR images. One common method of increasing resolution fuses the IR data with high-resolution visible (VIS) channel data. However, most existing image fusion methods focus only on visual performance, and often fail to take into account the thermal physical properties of the IR images. As a result, spectral distortion occurs frequently. To tackle this problem, we propose a thermal physical properties-based correction method for fusing geostationary meteorological satellite IR and VIS images. In our two-step process, the high-resolution structural features of the VIS image are first extracted and incorporated into the IR image using regular multi-resolution fusion approach, such as the multiwavelet analysis. This step significantly increases the visual details in the IR image, but fake thermal information may be included. Next, the Stefan-Boltzmann Law is applied to correct the distortion, to retain or recover the thermal infrared nature of the fused image. The results of both the qualitative and quantitative evaluation demonstrate that the proposed physical correction method both improves the spatial resolution and preserves the infrared thermal properties.

  19. Demonstration of dual-band infrared thermal imaging for bridge inspection. Phase II, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Schaich, P.C.

    1996-03-01

    Developing and implementing methods of effective bridge rehabilitation is a major issue for the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The nation spends $5 billion annually to replace, rehabilitate or construct new bridges. According to the National Bridge Inventory, over 100,000 U.S. bridges are structurally deficient. About 40,000 of these bridges have advanced deck deterioration. The most common causes of serious deck deterioration is delamination. Delaminations result when steel reinforcements within the bridge deck corrode, creating gaps that separate the concrete into layers. A reliable inspection technology, capable of identifying delaminations, would represent a power new tool in bridge maintenance. To date, most bridge inspections rely on human interpretation of surface visual features of chain dragging. These methods are slow, disruptive, unreliable and raise serious safety concerns. Infrared thermal imaging detects subsurface delaminations and surface clutter, which is introduced by foreign material on the roadway. Typically, foreign material which is not always evident on a video tape image, produces a unique IR reflectance background unlike the thermal response of a subsurface delamination. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging to identify and remove nonthermal IR reflectance backgrounds from foreign material on the roadway. DBIR methods improve the performance of IR thermal imaging by a factor of ten, compared to single-band infrared (SBIR) methods. DBIR thermal imaging allows precise temperature measurement to reliably locate bridge deck delaminations and remove wavelength-dependent emissivity variations due to foreign material on the roadway.

  20. Low cost infrared and near infrared sensors for UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aden, S. T.; Bialas, J. P.; Champion, Z.; Levin, E.; McCarty, J. L.

    2014-11-01

    Thermal remote sensing has a wide range of applications, though the extent of its use is inhibited by cost. Robotic and computer components are now widely available to consumers on a scale that makes thermal data a readily accessible resource. In this project, thermal imagery collected via a lightweight remote sensing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) was used to create a surface temperature map for the purpose of providing wildland firefighting crews with a cost-effective and time-saving resource. The UAV system proved to be flexible, allowing for customized sensor packages to be designed that could include visible or infrared cameras, GPS, temperature sensors, and rangefinders, in addition to many data management options. Altogether, such a UAV system could be used to rapidly collect thermal and aerial data, with a geographic accuracy of less than one meter.

  1. In Situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study of the thermal degradation of isotactic poly(propylene).

    PubMed

    He, Peng; Xiao, Yan; Zhang, Puming; Zhu, Na; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2005-01-01

    The conformational change of isotactic poly(propylene) (iPP) during the thermal degradation process has been carefully studied by in situ Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. This new method of studying thermal degradation of iPP not only shows the conventional kinetic parameter information of thermal degradation such as the degradation activation energy DeltaE and the degradation factor n, which are in accord with the results of traditional thermogravimetry experiments, but also indicates that many significant molecular structure changes occur during the thermal degradation process that come from some characteristic absorption band changes of in situ FT-IR. A multivariate approach, principal components analysis (PCA), is applied to the analysis of infrared (IR) data, and the results further confirm the multi-step processes of the thermal degradation of iPP. Above all, this is a new application to polymer thermal degradation by in situ FT-IR that connects the intermediate conformational change with final results during thermal degradation.

  2. Status of thermal imaging technology as applied to conservation-update 1

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, F.J.; Wood, J.T.; Barthle, R.C.

    1980-07-01

    This document updates the 1978 report on the status of thermal imaging technology as applied to energy conservation in buildings. Thermal imaging technology is discussed in terms of airborne surveys, ground survey programs, and application needs such as standards development and lower cost equipment. Information on the various thermal imaging devices was obtained from manufacturer's standard product literature. Listings are provided of infrared projects of the DOE building diagnostics program, of aerial thermographic firms, and of aerial survey programs. (LCL)

  3. Nighttime reactive nitrogen measurements from stratospheric infrared thermal emission observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Kunde, Virgil G.; Brasunas, J. C.; Herman, J. R.; Massie, Steven T.

    1991-01-01

    IR thermal emission spectra of the earth's atmosphere in the 700-2000/cm region were obtained with a cryogenically cooled high-resolution interferometer spectrometer on a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, on September 15-16, 1986. The observations exhibit spectral features of a number of stratospheric constituents, including important species of the reactive nitrogen family. An analysis of the observed data for simultaneously measured vertical distributions of O3, H2O, N2O, NO2, N2O5, HNO3, and ClONO2 is presented. These measurements permit the first direct determination of the nighttime total reactive nitrogen concentrations, and the partitioning of the important elements of the NO(x) family. Comparisons of the total reactive nitrogen budget are made with the measurements by the ATMOS experiment and with the predictions of one-dimensional and two-dimensional photochemical models.

  4. Thermal infrared remote sensing and Kirchhoff's law: 1. Laboratory measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, J. W.; Wald, A.; Daria, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Kirchoff's Law, as originally conceived, applies only to samples in thermal equilibrium with their surroundings. Most laboratory measurements of emissivity only approach this condition and it never applies in remote sensing applications. In particular, the background is often much cooler than the radiating sample, and this has led to a long controversy about the applicability of Kirchhoff's Law under such conditions. It has also led to field and laboratory measurement techniques that use some form of the 'emissivity box' approach, which surrounds the sample with a background as close as possible to the sample temperature. In our experiments, we have heated soil samples in air on a hot plate in the laboratory to a much higher temperature than the room temperature background. Spectral emissivity was measured, except the known emissivities of both the primary and secondary Christiansen features were used, instead of assuming an emissivity of unity at these wavelengths. The results from this investigation are discussed in brief.

  5. Mid and thermal infrared remote sensing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William R.; Hook, Simon J.

    2016-05-01

    The mid and thermal infrared (MTIR) for the Earth surface is defined between 3 and 14µm. In the outer solar system, objects are colder and their Planck response shifts towards longer wavelengths. Hence for these objects (e.g. icy moons, polar caps, comets, Europa), the thermal IR definition usually stretches out to 50µm and beyond. Spectroscopy has been a key part of this scientific exploration because of its ability to remotely determine elemental and mineralogical composition. Many key gas species such as methane, ammonia, sulfur, etc. also have vibrational bands which show up in the thermal infrared spectrum above the background response. Over the past few decades, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been building up a portfolio of technology to capture the MTIR for various scientific applications. Three recent sensors are briefly reviewed: The airborne Hyperspectral thermal emission spectrometer (HyTES), the ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) and Mars Climate Sounder (MCS)/DIVINER. Each of these sensors utilize a different technology to provide a remote sensing product based on MTIR science. For example, HyTES is a push-brooming hyperspectral imager which utilizes a large format quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP). The goal is to transition this to a new complementary barrier infrared photodetector (CBIRD) with a similar long wave cut-off and increased sensitivity. ECOSTRESS is a push-whisk Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) based high speed, multi-band, imager which will eventually observe and characterize plant/vegetation functionality and stress index from the International Space Station (ISS) across the contiguous United States (CONUS). MCS/DIVINER utilizes thermopile technology to capture the thermal emission from the polar caps and shadow regions of the moon. Each sensor utilizes specific JPL technology to capture unique science.

  6. Water Through Life, A New Technique for Mapping Shallow Water Tables in Arid and Semi-Arid Climates using Color Infrared Aerial Photographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, G.

    2003-04-01

    Two of the fundamental issues in water resources in arid regions are (1) the ability to accurately predict the presence of groundwater shallow enough to support riparian ecosystems and (2) the ability to assess the vulnerability of those ecosystems to withdrawals by an ever-increasing human population. A new technique for finding areas of shallow groundwater in arid and semi-arid environments has been developed that addresses both of these concerns by using the relative health of natural vegetation as an indicator of perennial shallow groundwater in environments where water is the main biolimiting factor to growth. The technique revolves around the differences in the spectral response between: actively transpiring vegetation; dormant vegetation; and dry, bare soil in the 400-900nm range as recorded by color infrared film in the dry pre-monsoon months. Distilling out only the active vegetation from aerial photographs was achieved through the creation of an index-based filter using readily available, inexpensive photo processing software. The output of the filter was carefully designed to maximize the qualitative interpretability by an analyst through the careful selection of display colors that are tuned to the maximum sensitivity range of the human vision system. When the analyst combines the qualitative interpretation of the spatial distribution of active vegetation with an understanding of the rooting depth of the native species it becomes possible to extrapolate a quantitative, basin-scale reconnaissance level map which defines the lateral extent of areas of shallow <20m(+/-5m) groundwater with a spatial accuracy of just a few meters. The research plan for the development of this technique also explored the potential for conducting the entire analysis procedure in three dimensions by projecting the filtered aerial photographs onto 10m resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). When this is done and the geomorphology of the region is carefully considered the

  7. Thermal compensator for closed-cycle helium refrigerator. [assuring constant temperature for an infrared laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Hillman, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The wave length of an infrared, semiconductor laser diode having an output frequency that is dependent on the diode temperature is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the diode temperature constant. The diode is carried by a cold tip of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. The refrigerator has a tendency to cause the temperature of the cold tip to oscillate. A heater diode and a sensor diode are placed on a thermal heat sink that is the only highly conductive thermal path between the laser diode and the cold tip. The heat sink has a small volume and low thermal capacitance so that the sensing diode is at substantially the same temperature as the heater diode and substantially no thermal lag exists between them. The sensor diode is connected in a negative feedback circuit with the heater diode so that the tendency of the laser diode to thermally oscillate is virtually eliminated.

  8. Evaluation of thermal stability of indinavir sulphate using diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parul; Premkumar, L; Mehrotra, Ranjana; Kandpal, H C; Bakhshi, A K

    2008-06-01

    Indinavir sulphate is a potent and specific protease inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is used for the treatment of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). At elevated temperature the drug which otherwise remains crystalline undergoes a phase transition to an amorphous phase to form degradation products. In the present study, thermal stability of indinavir sulphate is evaluated using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Infrared spectra of the drug before and after the exposure to thermal radiation at different temperatures were acquired in the diffuse reflectance mode using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometer. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were used as complimentary techniques to adequately implement and assist the interpretation of the infrared spectroscopy results. The DRIFT spectra reveal that the drug remains stable up to 100 degrees C, degrades slightly at 125 degrees C and undergoes complete degradation at about 150 degrees C to produce degradation products. The degradation products can easily be characterized using the infrared spectra.

  9. Analysis of urban regions using AVHRR thermal infrared data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Using 1-km AVHRR satellite data, relative temperature difference caused by conductivity and inertia were used to distinguish urban and non urban land covers. AVHRR data that were composited on a biweekly basis and distributed by the EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, were used for the classification process. These composited images are based on the maximum normalized different vegetation index (NDVI) of each pixel during the 2-week period using channels 1 and 2. The resultant images are nearly cloud-free and reduce the need for extensive reclassification processing. Because of the physiographic differences between the Eastern and Western United States, the initial study was limited to the eastern half of the United States. In the East, the time of maximum difference between the urban surfaces and the vegetated non urban areas is the peak greenness period in late summer. A composite image of the Eastern United States for the 2-weel time period from August 30-Septmeber 16, 1991, was used for the extraction of the urban areas. Two channels of thermal data (channels 3 and 4) normalized for regional temperature differences and a composited NDVI image were classified using conventional image processing techniques. The results compare favorably with other large-scale urban area delineations.

  10. New dust opacity mapping from Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. Z.; Richardson, M. I.

    1993-06-01

    Global dust opacity mapping for Mars has been carried forward using the approach described by Martin (1986) for Viking IR Thermal Mapper data. New maps are presented for the period from the beginning of Viking observations, until Ls 210 deg in 1979 (1.36 Mars years). This range includes the second and more extensive planet-encircling dust storm observed by Viking, known as storm 1977b. Improvements in approach result in greater time resolution and smaller noise than in the earlier work. A strong local storm event filled the Hellas basin at Ls 170 deg, prior to the 1977a storm. Dust is retained in equatorial regions following the 1977b storm far longer than in mid-latitudes. Minor dust events appear to raise the opacity in northern high latitudes during northern spring. Additional mapping with high time resolution has been done for the periods of time near the major storm origins in order to search for clues to the mechanism of storm initiation. The first evidence of the start of the 1977b storm is pushed back to Ls 274.2 deg, preceding signs of the storm in images by about 15 hours.

  11. Thermal infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welker, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The subjects of infrared remote sensing of surface features for renewable resource applications is reviewed with respect to the basic physical concepts involved at the Earth's surface and up through the atmosphere, as well as the historical development of satellite systems which produce such data at increasingly greater spatial resolution. With this general background in hand, the growth of a variety of specific renewable resource applications using the developing thermal infrared technology are discussed, including data from HCMM investigators. Recommendations are made for continued growth in this field of applications.

  12. Spectral Analysis of the Primary Flight Focal Plane Arrays for the Thermal Infrared Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montanaro, Matthew; Reuter, Dennis C.; Markham, Brian L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Gerace, Aaron D.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is a (1) New longwave infrared (10 - 12 micron) sensor for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, (2) 185 km ground swath; 100 meter pixel size on ground, (3) Pushbroom sensor configuration. Issue of Calibration are: (1) Single detector -- only one calibration, (2) Multiple detectors - unique calibration for each detector -- leads to pixel-to-pixel artifacts. Objectives are: (1) Predict extent of residual striping when viewing a uniform blackbody target through various atmospheres, (2) Determine how different spectral shapes affect the derived surface temperature in a realistic synthetic scene.

  13. Thermal radiation characteristics of silicon inverse opal in mid infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Xie, Kai

    2015-03-01

    A binary solvent with large density was used as dispersant for silica spheres, in which silica spheres with large diameter can suspend steadily and disperse very well. With this suspension, fine opals with 2100 nm SiO2 mono-disperse spheres were successfully prepared by solvent evaporation method. Low pressure vapor deposition method was then used to fill the voids of the silica opals with Si, and silicon inverse opal with photonic band gaps in mid infrared region was obtained. The infrared radiation characteristic of resulted sample was examined. It is shown that silicon inverse opal structure is effective in suppressing silicon thermal radiation in the photonic band gap spectral region.

  14. [Study on estimation of deserts soil total phosphorus content from thermal-infrared emissivity].

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-jun; Tiyip, Tashpolat; Zhang, Fei; Sawut, Mamat; Nurmemet, Ilyas

    2015-02-01

    Soil phosphorus provides nutrient elements for plants, is one of important parameters for evaluating soil quality. The traditional method for soil total phosphorus content (STPC) measurement is not effective and time-consuming. However, remote sensing (RS) enables us to determine STPC in a fast and efficient way. Studies on the estimation of STPC in near-infrared spectroscopy have been developed by scholars, but model accuracy is still poor due to the low absorption coefficient and unclear absorption peak of soil phosphorus in near-infrared. In order to solve the deficiency which thermal-infrared emissivity estimate desert soil total phosphorus content, and could improve precision of estimation deserts soil total phosphorus. In this paper, characteristics of soil thermal-infrared emissivity are analyzed on the basis of laboratory processing and spectral measurement of deserts soil samples from the eastern Junggar Basin. Furthermore, thermal-infrared emissivity based RS models for STPC estimation are established and accuracy assessed. Results show that: when STPC is higher than 0.200 g x kg(-1), the thermal-infrared emissivity increases with the increase of STPC on the wavelength between 8.00 microm and 13 microm, and the emissivity is more sensitive to STPC on the wavelength between 9.00 and 9.6 microm; the estimate mode based on multiple stepwise regression was could not to estimate deserts soil total phosphorus content from thermal-infrared emissivity because the estimation effects of them were poor. The estimation accuracy of model based on partial least squares regression is higher than the model based on multiple stepwise regression. However, the accuracy of second-order differential estimation model based on partial least square regression is higher than based on multiple stepwise regression; The first differential of continuous remove estimation model based on partial least squares regression is the best model with R2 of correction and verification are up to

  15. Thermal cycling reliability of indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; He, Kai; Wang, Jian-xin; Zhang, Qin-yao

    2013-09-01

    Thermal cycling reliability is one of the most important issues whether the HgCdTe infrared focal plane array detectors can be applied to both military and civil fields. In this paper, a 3D finite element model for indirect hybrid HgCdTe infrared detectors is established. The thermal stress distribution and thermally induced warpage of the detector assembly as a function of the distance between the detector chip and Si-ROIC, the thickness and the materials properties of electrical lead board in cryogenic temperature are analyzed. The results show that all these parameters have influences on the thermal stress distribution and warpage of the detector assembly, especially the coefficient of thermal expansion(CTE) of electrical lead board. The thermal stress and warpage in the assembly can be avoided or minimized by choosing the appropriate electrical lead board. Additionally, the warpage of some indirect hybrid detectors assembly samples is measured in experiment. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation results, which verifies that the results are calculated by finite element method are reasonable.

  16. Thermal removal from near-infrared imaging spectroscopy data of the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Pieters, C.M.; Green, R.O.; Boardman, J.W.; Petro, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    In the near-infrared from about 2 ??m to beyond 3 ??m, the light from the Moon is a combination of reflected sunlight and emitted thermal emission. There are multiple complexities in separating the two signals, including knowledge of the local solar incidence angle due to topography, phase angle dependencies, emissivity, and instrument calibration. Thermal emission adds to apparent reflectance, and because the emission's contribution increases over the reflected sunlight with increasing wavelength, absorption bands in the lunar reflectance spectra can be modified. In particular, the shape of the 2 ??m pyroxene band can be distorted by thermal emission, changing spectrally determined pyroxene composition and abundance. Because of the thermal emission contribution, water and hydroxyl absorptions are reduced in strength, lowering apparent abundances. It is important to quantify and remove the thermal emission for these reasons. We developed a method for deriving the temperature and emissivity from spectra of the lunar surface and removing the thermal emission in the near infrared. The method is fast enough that it can be applied to imaging spectroscopy data on the Moon. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. [Thermal infrared spectral variation and sensitive waveband of quartzy sandstone under pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan-jun; Wu, Li-xin; Feng, Zhe; Xu, Zhong-yin

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper the thermal infrared spectral variation of quartz sandstone under uniaxial compression was detected by a spectroradiometer to study the sensitively responding waveband of infrared radiation excited by the pressure. The experimental result shows that the infrared spectrum varies with the load, and the variation feature is different in different wavebands. The infrared radiation intensity increases with the increase in the load within the waveband 8.0-11.5 microm (specially in 8.6-9.1 microm), and there is a quadratic correlation between them, meanwhile the signal-to-noise ratio of spectrum radiation is also higher in the waveband. But in other wavebands the correlation is worse and the signal-to-noise is also lower. This indicates that the waveband 8.0-11.5 microm is the sensitive waveband of infrared radiation to the pressure, and it is also the superior waveband for infrared remote sensing monitoring the stress and catastrophe of rock. The optimum waveband is 8.6-9.1 microm.

  18. Thermal response of large area high temperature superconducting YBaCuO infrared bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, Ali E.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal analysis of large area high temperature superconducting infrared detector operating in the equilibrium mode (bolometer) was performed. An expression for the temperature coefficient beta=1/R(dR/dT) in terms of the thermal conductance and the thermal time constant of the detector were derived. A superconducting transition edge bolometer is a thermistor consisting of a thin film superconducting YBaCuO evaporated into a suitable thermally isolated substrate. The operating temperature of the bolometer is maintained close to the midpoint of the superconducting transition region where the resistance R has a maximum dynamic range. A detector with a strip configuration was analyzed and an expression for the temperature rise (delta T) above the ambient due to a uniform illumination with a source of power density P(sub i) was calculated. An expression for the thermal responsivity of the detector was derived using the thermal diffusion analysis with appropriate boundary conditions. It was found that the thermal responsibility depends upon the spatial modulation frequency and the angular frequency of the incoming radiation. The problem of the thermal cross talk between different detector elements was addressed. In the case of monolithic HTS detector array with a row of square elements of dimensions 2a and CCD or CID readout electronics the thermal spread function was derived for different spacing between elements. This analysis can be critical for future design and applications of large area focal plane arrays as broad band optical detectors made of granular thin films HTS YBaCuO.

  19. Lossless image compression technique for infrared thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Lloyd G.; Kelly, Gary E.

    1992-07-01

    The authors have achieved a 6.5-to-one image compression technique for thermal images (640 X 480, 1024 colors deep). Using a combination of new and more traditional techniques, the combined algorithm is computationally simple, enabling `on-the-fly' compression and storage of an image in less time than it takes to transcribe the original image to or from a magnetic medium. Similar compression has been achieved on visual images by virtue of the feature that all optical devices possess a modulation transfer function. As a consequence of this property, the difference in color between adjacent pixels is a usually small number, often between -1 and +1 graduations for a meaningful color scheme. By differentiating adjacent rows and columns, the original image can be expressed in terms of these small numbers. A simple compression algorithm for these small numbers achieves a four to one image compression. By piggy-backing this technique with a LZW compression or a fixed Huffman coding, an additional 35% image compression is obtained, resulting in a 6.5-to-one lossless image compression. Because traditional noise-removal operators tend to minimize the color graduations between adjacent pixels, an additional 20% reduction can be obtained by preprocessing the image with a noise-removal operator. Although noise removal operators are not lossless, their application may prove crucial in applications requiring high compression, such as the storage or transmission of a large number or images. The authors are working with the Air Force Photonics Technology Application Program Management office to apply this technique to transmission of optical images from satellites.

  20. Thermal infrared remote sensing of water temperature in riverine landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handcock, Rebecca N.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Gillespie, Alan R.; Klement, Tockner; Faux, Russell N.; Tan, Jing; Carbonneau, Patrice E.; Piegay, Herve

    2012-01-01

    Water temperature in riverine landscapes is an important regional indicator of water quality that is influenced by both ground- and surface-water inputs, and indirectly by land use in the surrounding watershed (Brown and Krygier, 1970; Beschta et al., 1987; Chen et al., 1998; Poole and Berman, 2001).Coldwater fishes such as salmon and trout are sensitive to elevated water temperature; therefore, water temperature must meet management guidelines and quality standards, which aim to create a healthy environment for endangered populations (McCullough et al., 2009). For example, in the USA, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established water quality standards to identify specific temperature criteria to protect coldwater fishes (Environmental Protection Agency, 2003). Trout and salmon can survive in cool-water refugia even when temperatures at other measurement locations are at or above the recommended maximums (Ebersole et al., 2001; Baird and Krueger, 2003; High et al., 2006). Spatially extensive measurements of water temperature are necessary to locate these refugia, to identify the location of ground- and surface-water inputs to the river channel, and to identify thermal pollution sources. Regional assessment of water temperature in streams and rivers has been limited by sparse sampling in both space and time. Water temperature has typically been measured using a network of widely distributed instream gages, which record the temporal change of the bulk, or kinetic, temperature of the water (Tk) at specific locations. For example, the State of Washington (USA) recorded water quality conditions at 76 stations within the Puget Lowlands eco region, which contains 12,721 km of streams and rivers (Washington Department of Ecology, 1998). Such gages are sparsely distributed, are typically located only in larger streams and rivers, and give limited information about the spatial distribution of water temperature.

  1. Method for measuring thermal properties using a long-wavelength infrared thermal image

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Charles L.; Costin, Laurence S.; Smith, Jody L.; Moya, Mary M.; Mercier, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-30

    A method for estimating the thermal properties of surface materials using long-wavelength thermal imagery by exploiting the differential heating histories of ground points in the vicinity of shadows. The use of differential heating histories of different ground points of the same surface material allows the use of a single image acquisition step to provide the necessary variation in measured parameters for calculation of the thermal properties of surface materials.

  2. Temperature relations of aerial and aquatic physiological performance in a mid-intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma: adaptation to rapid changes in thermal stress during emersion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiongwei; Wang, Tifeng; Ye, Ziwen; Han, Guodong; Dong, Yunwei

    2015-01-01

    The physiological performance of a mid-intertidal limpet Cellana toreuma was determined to study the physiological adaptation of intertidal animals to rapid changes and extreme temperatures during emersion. The relationship between the Arrhenius breakpoint temperature (ABT) and in situ operative body temperature was studied to predict the possible impact of climate change on the species. The temperature coefficient (Q10) of emersed animals was higher than that of submersed animals and the ratio of aerial: aquatic heart rate rose with increasing temperature. The ABTs of submersed and emersed animals were 30.2 and 34.2°C, respectively. The heart rate and levels of molecular biomarkers (hsps, ampkα, ampkβ and sirt1 mRNA) were determined in 48 h simulated semi-diurnal tides. There were no obvious changes of heart rate and gene expression during the transition between emersion and submersion at room temperature, although expressions of hsp70 and hsp90 were induced significantly after thermal stress. These results indicate that C. toreuma can effectively utilize atmospheric oxygen, and the higher Q10 and ABT of emersed animals are adaptations to the rapid change and extreme thermal stress during emersion. However, the in situ operative body temperature frequently exceeds the aerial ABT of C. toreuma, indicating the occurrence of large-scale mortality of C. toreuma in summer, and this species should be sensitive to increasing temperature in the scenario of climate change.

  3. LATERAL HEAT FLOW INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY FOR THICKNESS INDEPENDENT DETERMINATION OF THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY IN CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Tralshawala, Nilesh; Howard, Don; Knight, Bryon; Plotnikov, Yuri; Ringermacher, Harry

    2008-02-28

    In conventional infrared thermography, determination of thermal diffusivity requires thickness information. Recently GE has been experimenting with the use of lateral heat flow to determine thermal diffusivity without thickness information. This work builds on previous work at NASA Langley and Wayne State University but we incorporate thermal time of flight (tof) analysis rather than curve fitting to obtain quantitative information. We have developed appropriate theoretical models and a tof based data analysis framework to experimentally determine all components of thermal diffusivity from the time-temperature measurements. Initial validation was carried out using finite difference simulations. Experimental validation was done using anisotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. We found that in the CFRP samples used, the in-plane component of diffusivity is about eight times larger than the through-thickness component.

  4. Infrared thermal mapping of the Martian surface and atmosphere - First results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, H. H.; Martin, T. Z.; Chase, S. C., Jr.; Miner, E. D.; Palluconi, F. D.; Muench, G.; Neugebauer, G.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking infrared thermal mapper measures the thermal emission of the Martian surface and atmosphere and the total reflected sunlight. With the high resolution and dense coverage being achieved, planetwide thermal structure is apparent at large and small scales. The thermal behavior of the best-observed areas, the landing sites, cannot be explained by simple homogeneous models. The data contain clear indications for the relevance of additional factors such as detailed surface texture and the occurrence of clouds. Areas in the polar night have temperatures distinctly lower than the CO2 condensation point at the surface pressure. This observation implies that the annual atmospheric condensation is less than previously assumed and that either thick CO2 clouds exist at the 20-kilometer level or that the polar atmosphere is locally enriched by noncondensable gases.

  5. Infrared thermal mapping of the martian surface and atmosphere: first results.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, H H; Chase, S C; Miner, E D; Palluconi, F D; Münch, G; Neugebauer, G; Martin, T Z

    1976-08-27

    The Viking infrared thermal mapper measures the thermal emission of the martian surface and atmosphere and the total reflected sunlight. With the high resolution and dense coverage being achieved, planetwide thermal structure is apparent at large and small scales. The thermal behavior of the best-observed areas, the landing sites, cannot be explained by simple homogeneous models. The data contain clear indications for the relevance of additional factors such as detailed surface texture and the occurrence of clouds. Areas in the polar night have temperatures distinctly lower than the CO(2) condensation point at the surface pressure. This observation implies that the annual atmospheric condensation is less than previously assumed and that either thick CO(2) clouds exist at the 20-kilometer level or that the polar atmosphere is locally enriched by noncondensable gases.

  6. Surfaces of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto: an investigation using Voyager IRIS thermal infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, the IRIS infrared spectrometers on the two Voyager spacecraft obtained over 1000 disk-resolved thermal emission spectra of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, Jupiter's three large icy satellites. This dissertation describes the first detailed analysis of this data set. Ganymede and Callisto subsolar temperatures are 10 and 5/sup 0/K, respectively, below equilibrium values. Equatorial nighttime temperatures are between 100 and 75/sup 0/K, Callisto and Europa being colder than Ganymede. The diurnal temperature profiles can be matched by 2-layer surfaces that are also consistent with the eclipse cooling observed from earth, though previous eclipse models underestimated thermal inertias by about 50%. Substrate thermal inertias in the 2-layer models are a factor of several lower than for solid ice. These are cold spots on Ganymede and Callisto that are not high-albedo regions, which may indicate large thermal inertia anomalies.

  7. Infrared Thermography as Applied to Thermal Testing of Power Systems Circuit Boards.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jonathan James

    All operational electronic equipment dissipates some amount of energy in the form of infrared radiation. Faulty electronic components on a printed circuit board can be categorized as hard (functional) or soft (latent functional). Hard faults are those which are detected during a conventional manufacturing electronic test process. Soft failures, in contrast, are those which are undetectable through conventional testing, but which manifest themselves after a product has been placed into service. Such field defective modules ultimately result in operational failure and subsequently enter a manufacturer's costly repair process. While thermal imaging systems are being used increasingly in the electronic equipment industry as a product-testing tool, applications have primarily been limited to product design or repair processes, with minimal use in a volume manufacturing environment. Use of thermal imaging systems in such an environment has mostly been limited to low-volume products or random screening of high-volume products. Thermal measurements taken in a manufacturing environment are often taken manually, thus defeating their capability of rapid data acquisition and constraining their full potential in a high-volume manufacturing process. Integration of a thermal measurement system with automated testing equipment is essential for optimal use of expensive infrared measurement tools in a high-volume manufacturing environment. However, such a marriage presents problems with respect to both existing manufacturing test processes and infrared measurement techniques. Methods are presented in this dissertation to test automatically for latent faults, those which elude detection during conventional electronic testing, on printed circuit boards. These methods are intended for implementation in a volume manufacturing environment and involve the application of infrared imaging tools. Successful incorporation of infrared testing into existing test processes requires that: PASS

  8. Efficient far-infrared thermal bremsstrahlung radiation from a heterojunction bipolar transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Pei-Kang; Yen, Shun-Tung

    2015-08-28

    We investigate the far-infrared thermal radiation properties of a heterojunction bipolar transistor. The device conveniently provides a high electric field for electrons to heat the lattice and the electron gas in a background with ions embedded. Because of very high effective temperature of the electron gas in the collector, the electron-ion bremsstrahlung makes efficient the thermal radiation in the far-infrared region. The transistor can yield a radiation power of 0.1 mW with the spectral region between 2 and 75 THz and a power conversion efficiency of 6 × 10{sup −4}. Such output contains a power of 20 μW in the low-frequency part (2–20 THz) of the spectrum.

  9. Use of infrared thermography in detection, remediation, and commissioning of thermal comfort problems in office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantonio, Antonio

    2001-03-01

    Thermal comfort complaints within work places are one of the leading causes of workforce productivity loss within office environments. Generally, mechanical systems are relied on to provide adequate indoor environments. In many situations, these systems cannot provide suitable work environments due to unacceptable asymmetrical radiant temperature conditions found in exterior zones of building interiors. Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) has developed methodologies using infrared technology to assist building and office managers in reducing thermal comfort complaints and improve workforce productivity. Detection, verification, remediation and commissioning of solutions are easily and effectively carried out with the assistance of infrared radiometers and proper inspection and analysis procedures. This paper will outline two case studies and detail methodologies used in each case.

  10. CENTAURS AND SCATTERED DISK OBJECTS IN THE THERMAL INFRARED: ANALYSIS OF WISE/NEOWISE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, James M.; Grav, Tommy; Blauvelt, Erin; Collaboration: WISE Team; PTF Team; and others

    2013-08-10

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) observed 52 Centaurs and scattered disk objects (SDOs) in the thermal infrared, including 15 new discoveries. We present analyses of these observations to estimate sizes and mean optical albedos. We find mean albedos of 0.08 {+-} 0.04 for the entire data set. Thermal fits yield average beaming parameters of 0.9 {+-} 0.2 that are similar for both SDO and Centaur sub-classes. Biased cumulative size distributions yield size-frequency distribution power law indices of {approx}-1.7 {+-} 0.3. The data also reveal a relation between albedo and color at the 3{sigma} level. No significant relation between diameter and albedos is found.

  11. Face Recognition in Low-Light Environments Using Fusion of Thermal Infrared and Intensified Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolinsky, Diego A.; Wolff, Lawrence B.

    This chapter presents a study of face recognition performance as a function of light level using intensified near infrared imagery in conjunction with thermal infrared imagery. Intensification technology is the most prevalent in both civilian and military night vision equipment and provides enough enhancement for human operators to perform standard tasks under extremely low light conditions. We describe a comprehensive data collection effort undertaken to image subjects under carefully controlled illumination and quantify the performance of standard face recognition algorithms on visible, intensified, and thermal imagery as a function of light level. Performance comparisons for automatic face recognition are reported using the standardized implementations from the Colorado State University Face Identification Evaluation System, as well as Equinox's algorithms. The results contained in this chapter should constitute the initial step for analysis and deployment of face recognition systems designed to work in low-light conditions.

  12. Face recognition in low-light environments using fusion of thermal infrared and intensified imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socolinsky, Diego A.; Wolff, Lawrence B.; Lundberg, Andrew J.

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a study of face recognition performance as a function of light level using intensified near infrared imagery in conjunction with thermal infrared imagery. Intensification technology is the most prevalent in both civilian and military night vision equipment, and provides enough enhancement for human operators to perform standard tasks under extremely low-light conditions. We describe a comprehensive data collection effort undertaken by the authors to image subjects under carefully controlled illumination and quantify the performance of standard face recognition algorithms on visible, intensified and thermal imagery as a function of light level. Performance comparisons for automatic face recognition are reported using the standardized implementations from the CSU Face Identification Evaluation System, as well as Equinox own algorithms. The results contained in this paper should constitute the initial step for analysis and deployment of face recognition systems designed to work in low-light level conditions.

  13. Demonstration of dual-band infrared thermal imaging at Grass Valley Creek bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Del Grande, N. K.; Durbin, P.F.; Logan, C.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Schich, P.C.

    1996-11-01

    We demonstrated dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermal imaging at the Grass Valley Creek Bridges near Redding CA. DBIR thermal imaging is an enabling technology for rapid, reliable, bridge deck inspections while minimizing lane closures. bridge-deck inspections were conducted from a mobile DBIR bridge inspection laboratory during November 2-3, 1995. We drove this self-contained unit at limited highway speeds over 0.4 lane miles of bridge deck. Using two thermal IR bands, we distinguished delaminations from clutter. Clutter, or unwanted thermal detail, occurs from foreign materials or uneven shade on the bridge deck surface. By mapping the DBIR spectral- response differences at 3-5 {mu}m and 8-12 {mu}m, we removed foreign material clutter. By mapping the deck diurnal thermal inertia variations, we removed clutter from uneven shade. Thermal inertia is a bulk deck property, the square root of thermal conductivity x density x heat capacity. Delaminated decks have below-average thermal inertias, or above-average day-night temperature excursions. Compared to normal decks areas, delaminated deck areas were typically 2 or 3 {degrees}C warmer at noon, and 0.5{degrees}C cooler at night. The mobile DBIR bridge inspection laboratory is currently undergoing extensive testing to examine bridges by the Federal Highway Administration.

  14. NOAA-10 AVHRR thermal-infrared image of the Colorado Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, Kevin P.; Quirk, Bruce K.; Hood, Joy J.

    1988-01-01

    This month we demonstrate an example of the use of thermal infrared imagery to produce a relatively sharp surrogate shaded-relief image. The image shows one aspect of the drama and usefulness of calibrated thermal imagery that (because of compatible projection and pixel size) can be easily combined with other spectral bands of a satellite image. Such data can be enhanced in yet another way by stereoscopically combining two similar images with different orbital paths, such as was shown in the AVHRR column for January 1988.

  15. Physical properties (particle size, rock abundance) from thermal infrared remote observations: Implications for Mars landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, P. R.; Edgett, Kenneth S.

    1994-01-01

    Critical to the assessment of potential sites for the 1997 Pathfinder landing is estimation of general physical properties of the martian surface. Surface properties have been studied using a variety of spacecraft and earth-based remote sensing observations, plus in situ studies at the Viking lander sites. Because of their value in identifying landing hazards and defining scientific objectives, we focus this discussion on thermal inertia and rock abundance derived from middle-infrared (6 to 30 microns) observations. Used in conjunction with other datasets, particularly albedo and Viking orbiter images, thermal inertia and rock abundance provide clues about the properties of potential Mars landing sites.

  16. Evaluation of high temperature superconductive thermal bridges for space-borne cryogenic infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Elaine P.

    1993-01-01

    The focus of this research is on the reduction of the refrigeration requirements for infrared sensors operating in space through the use of high temperature superconductive (HTS) materials as electronic leads between the cooled sensors and the relatively warmer data acquisition components. Specifically, this initial study was directed towards the design of an experiment to quantify the thermal performance of these materials in the space environment. First, an intensive review of relevant literature was undertaken, and then, design requirements were formulated. From this background information, a preliminary experimental design was developed. Additional studies will involve a thermal analysis of the experiment and further modifications of the experimental design.

  17. Advances in Front-end Enabling Technologies for Thermal Infrared ` THz Torch' Wireless Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2016-09-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands (typically 20-40 and 60-100 THz) are best known for remote sensing applications that include temperature measurement (e.g. non-contacting thermometers and thermography), night vision and surveillance (e.g. ubiquitous motion sensing and target acquisition). This unregulated part of the electromagnetic spectrum also offers commercial opportunities for the development of short-range secure communications. The ` THz Torch' concept, which fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation by partitioning thermally generated spectral radiance into pre-defined frequency channels, was recently demonstrated by the authors. The thermal radiation within each channel can be independently pulse-modulated, transmitted and detected, to create a robust form of short-range secure communications within the thermal infrared. In this paper, recent progress in the front-end enabling technologies associated with the THz Torch concept is reported. Fundamental limitations of this technology are discussed; possible engineering solutions for further improving the performance of such thermal-based wireless links are proposed and verified either experimentally or through numerical simulations. By exploring a raft of enabling technologies, significant enhancements to both data rate and transmission range can be expected. With good engineering solutions, the THz Torch concept can exploit nineteenth century physics with twentieth century multiplexing schemes for low-cost twenty-first century ubiquitous applications in security and defence.

  18. A comparison of techniques for extracting emissivity information from thermal infrared data for geologic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon J.; Gabell, A. R.; Green, A. A.; Kealy, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    This article evaluates three techniques developed to extract emissivity information from multispectral thermal infrared data. The techniques are the assumed Channel 6 emittance model, thermal log residuals, and alpha residuals. These techniques were applied to calibrated, atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) data acquired over Cuprite, Nevada in September 1990. Results indicate that the two new techniques (thermal log residuals and alpha residuals) provide two distinct advantages over the assumed Channel 6 emittance model. First, they permit emissivity information to be derived from all six TIMS channels. The assumed Channel 6 emittance model only permits emissivity values to be derived from five of the six TIMS channels. Second, both techniques are less susceptible to noise than the assumed Channel 6 emittance model. The disadvantage of both techniques is that laboratory data must be converted to thermal log residuals or alpha residuals to facilitate comparison with similarly processed image data. An additional advantage of the alpha residual technique is that the processed data are scene-independent unlike those obtained with the other techniques.

  19. The calibration stand for thermal camera module with infrared focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowski, Tomasz; Bieszczad, Grzegorz; Madura, Henryk; Kastek, Mariusz; Firmanty, Krzysztof

    2010-04-01

    In areas like military systems, surveillance systems, or industrial process control, more and more often there is a need to operate in limited visibility conditions or even in complete darkness. In such conditions vision systems can benefit by using thermal vision cameras. In thermal imaging an infrared radiation detector arrays are used. Contemporary infrared detector arrays suffers from technological imprecision which causes that the response to uniform radiation results in nonuniform image with superimposed fixed pattern noise (FPN). In order to compensate this noise there is a need to evaluate detectors characteristics like responsivity and offset of every detector in array. Some of the detectors in cooled detector arrays can be also defective. Signal from defective pixels has to be in such system replaced. In order to replace defective pixels, there is a need to detect them. Identification of so-called blinking pixels needs long time measurement, which in designed calibration stand is also possible. The paper presents the design of infrared detector array measurement stand allowing measurement of mentioned parameters. Measurement stand was also used to evaluate temporal noise of infrared detection modules. In article there is a description of optical system design and parameters of used reference blackbodies. To capture images from camera modules a specially designed digital image interface was used. Measurement control and calculations were made in specially written IRDiag software. Stand was used to measure parameters for cameras based on cooled focal plane arrays from Sofradir. Results of two-point nonuniformity correction are also presented.

  20. Objective assessment of biomagnetic devices and alternative clinical therapies using infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockley, Graham J.

    2001-03-01

    The overwhelming introduction of magnetic devices and other alternative therapies into the health care market prompts the need for objective evaluation of these techniques through the use of infrared thermal imaging. Many of these therapies are reported to promote the stimulation of blood flow or the relief of pain conditions. Infrared imaging is an efficient tool to assess such changes in the physiological state. Therefore, a thermal imager can help document and substantiate whether these therapies are in fact providing an effective change to the local circulation. Thermal images may also indicate whether the change is temporary or sustained. As a specific case example, preliminary findings will be presented concerning the use of magnets and the effect they have on peripheral circulation. This will include a discussion of the recommended protocols for this type of infrared testing. This test model can be applied to the evaluation of other devices and therapeutic procedures which are reputed to affect circulation such as electro acupuncture, orthopedic footwear and topical ointments designed to relieve pain or inflammation.

  1. M-type asteroids in the mid-infrared: thermal inertias and emissivity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Zoe A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Campins, Humberto

    2016-10-01

    The M-type asteroid taxon has been inferred to contain metallic asteroids. This inference comes mainly from spectral analogy to iron meteorites and from the observation of high radar albedos among M-types. There is, nevertheless, evidence for significant compositional diversity within the M-type population. Spectral signatures of both high-temperature silicates (λ~0.9 μm) and hydrated minerals (λ~3 μm) are common in this group. The nature of the M-types is, therefore, still not well understood. In order to further test the hypothesis that many M-types are metallic, we have undertaken an observational study at mid-infrared wavelengths (5.2 – 38 μm). Our aim is to characterize the silicate composition and the thermal properties of a sample of M-type asteroids. If metallic, we expect relatively high thermal inertia and an absence of silicate emissivity features. The spectra we analyze were measured with the InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We present emissivity spectra and the initial results of thermophysical modeling, including derived thermal inertias. We chose our sample because these asteroids have also been observed at complementary wavelengths, such as visible, near-infrared and radar, which places further constraints on the interpretation of our results.

  2. Modeling thermal infrared (2-14 micrometer) reflectance spectra of frost and snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Andrew E.

    1994-01-01

    Existing theories of radiative transfer in close-packed media assume that each particle scatters independently of its neighbors. For opaque particles, such as are common in the thermal infrared, this assumption is not valid, and these radiative transfer theories will not be accurate. A new method is proposed, called 'diffraction subtraction', which modifies the scattering cross section of close-packed large, opaque spheres to account for the effect of close packing on the diffraction cross section of a scattering particle. This method predicts the thermal infrared reflectance of coarse (greater than 50 micrometers radius), disaggregated granular snow. However, such coarse snow is typically old and metamorphosed, with adjacent grains welded together. The reflectance of such a welded block can be described as partly Fresnel in nature and cannot be predicted using Mie inputs to radiative transfer theory. Owing to the high absorption coefficient of ice in the thermal infrared, a rough surface reflectance model can be used to calculate reflectance from such a block. For very small (less than 50 micrometers), disaggregated particles, it is incorrect in principle to treat diffraction independently of reflection and refraction, and the theory fails. However, for particles larger than 50 micrometers, independent scattering is a valid assumption, and standard radiative transfer theory works.

  3. The remote sensing of aquatic macrophytes Part 1: Color-infrared aerial photography as a tool for identification and mapping of littoral vegetation. Part 2: Aerial photography as a quantitative tool for the investigation of aquatic ecosystems. [Lake Wingra, Wisconsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, T. D.; Adams, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Research was initiated to use aerial photography as an investigative tool in studies that are part of an intensive aquatic ecosystem research effort at Lake Wingra, Madison, Wisconsin. It is anticipated that photographic techniques would supply information about the growth and distribution of littoral macrophytes with efficiency and accuracy greater than conventional methods.

  4. Active infrared thermal imaging technology to detect the corrosion defects in aircraft cargo door

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Cunlin; Zeng, Zhi; Xing, Chunfei; Li, Yanhong

    2009-11-01

    Aircraft fuselage material corrosion problems have been major aviation security issues, which hinder the development of aviation industry. How can we use non-destructive testing methods to detect the internal corrosion defects from the outside of the fuselage, to find the hidden safety problems in advance and update the defective equipment and materials, has great significance for the prevention of accidents. Nowadays, the active infrared thermal imaging technology as a new nondestructive technology has been gradually used on a wide variety of materials, such as composite, metal and so on. This article makes use of this technology on an aircraft cargo door specimen to detect the corrosion defects. Firstly, use High-energy flash pulse to excite the specimen, and use the thermal image processing software to splice the thermal images, so the thermal images of the overall specimen can be showed. Then, heat the defects by ultrasonic excitation, this will cause vibration and friction or thermoelastic effects in the places of defects, so the ultrasonic energy will dissipate into heat and manifested in the uneven temperature of surface. An Infrared camera to capture the changes of temperature of material surface, send data to the computer and records the thermal information of the defects. Finally, extracting data and drawing infrared radiation-time curve of some selected points of interest to analyze the signal changes in heat of defects further more. The results of the experiments show that both of the two ways of heat excitation show a clear position and shape of defects, and the ultrasonic method has more obvious effect of excitation to the defects, and a higher signal to noise ratio than the flash pulse excitation, but flash pulse method do not contact the specimen in the process of excitation, and shows the location and shape of defects in the overall of the specimen has its advantages.

  5. A protocol for analysing thermal stress in insects using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Belén; Verdú, José R; Carrascal, Luis M; Lobo, Jorge M

    2016-02-01

    The study of insect responses to thermal stress has involved a variety of protocols and methodologies that hamper the ability to compare results between studies. For that reason, the development of a protocol to standardize thermal assays is necessary. In this sense, infrared thermography solves some of the problems allowing us to take continuous temperature measurements without handling the individuals, an important fact in cold-blooded organisms like insects. Here, we present a working protocol based on infrared thermography to estimate both cold and heat thermal stress in insects. We analyse both the change in the body temperature of individuals and their behavioural response. In addition, we used partial least squares regression for the statistical analysis of our data, a technique that solves the problem of having a large number of variables and few individuals, allowing us to work with rare or endemic species. To test our protocol, we chose two species of congeneric, narrowly distributed dung beetles that are endemic to the southeastern part of the Iberian Peninsula. With our protocol we have obtained five variables in the response to cold and twelve in the response to heat. With this methodology we discriminate between the two flightless species of Jekelius through their thermal response. In response to cold, Jekelius hernandezi showed a higher rate of cooling and reached higher temperatures of stupor and haemolymph freezing than Jekelius punctatolineatus. Both species displayed similar thermoregulation ranges before reaching lethal body temperature with heat stress. Overall, we have demonstrated that infrared thermography is a suitable method to assess insect thermal responses with a high degree of sensitivity, allowing for the discrimination between closely related species. PMID:26857985

  6. Thermal response of large area high temperature superconducting YBaCuO infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, Ali E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal analysis of large area high temperature superconducting infrared detector operating in the equilibrium mode (bolometer) was performed. An expression for the temperature coefficient beta = 1/R(dR/dT) in terms of the thermal conductance and the thermal time constant of the detector were derived. A superconducting transition edge bolometer is a thermistor consisting of a thin film superconducting YBaCuO evaporated into a suitable thermally isolated substrate. The operating temperature of the bolometer is maintained close to the midpoint of the superconducting transition region where the resistance R has a maximum dynamic range. A detector with a strip configuration was analyzed and an expression for the temperature rise (delta T) above the ambient due to a uniform illumination with a source of power density was calculated. An expression for the thermal responsibility depends upon the spatial modulation frequency and the angular frequency of the incoming radiation. The problem of the thermal cross talk between different detector elements was addressed. In the case of monolithic HTS detector array with a row of square elements of dimensions 2a and CCD or CID readout electronics the thermal spread function was derived for different spacing between elements.

  7. Thermal Infrared (8-13 micron) Spectra of the NEA 2100 Ra-Shalom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, L. F.; Emery, J. P.; McConnochie, T. H.

    2005-08-01

    Thermal infrared spectra of the near-Earth asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom were measured on August 22 and 23 (UT) 2003 at Palomar Observatory using Spectrocam-10 on the 200'' Hale telescope. Total integration time was 186 minutes. These observations were part of the multi-wavelength observing campaign organized by Shepard et al. (2004). The thermal spectra of most main-belt asteroids can be well modelled by the Standard Thermal Model (STM) with a ``beaming parameter'' η =0.756 ± 0.014, which implies rough ``dusty'' surfaces of negligible thermal inertia. A STM fit of our Ra-Shalom data, however, yields η =1.2, corroborating the conclusion of Harris et al. (1998) and Lebofsky et al. (1979) that Ra-Shalom has a substantial thermal inertia. Harris et al., however, derived a higher value η =1.6--1.8 from their 1997 spectrophotometric data. We have used the pole solution of Kaasalainen et al. (2004) to apply a more sophisticated thermophysical model (Emery et al., 1998) to the circumstances of both our observations and those of Harris et al. Our preliminary result is that both data sets are consistent with asteroid radius R=1.15 km and thermal inertia ≥ 580 J/m2}/s{0.5/K. This is a lower limit because at the phase angles of these observations, surface roughness increases color temperature by infrared ``beaming''. Further modelling will be conducted with varying surface roughnesses. Despite its unusually high thermal inertia, Ra-Shalom appears to be similar to its main-belt counterparts in lacking spectral emissivity variation at the 5% level. (1) Shepard et al. (2004), LPSC XXXV, #1120. (2) Harris et al. (1998), Icarus 135, 441-450. (3) Lebofsky et al. (1979), Astron. J. 84, 885-888. (4) Kaasalainen et al. (2004), Icarus 167, 178-196. (5) Emery et al. (1998), Icarus 136, 104-123.

  8. Synegies Between Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrometry and the Thermal Infrared in an Urban Environment: An Evaluation of the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HYSPIRI) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Hulley, Glynn C.; Hook, Simon J.; Green, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    A majority of the human population lives in urban areas and as such, the quality of urban environments is becoming increasingly important to the human population. Furthermore, these areas are major sources of environmental contaminants and sinks of energy and materials. Remote sensing provides an improved understanding of urban areas and their impacts by mapping urban extent, urban composition (vegetation and impervious cover fractions), and urban radiation balance through measures of albedo, emissivity and land surface temperature (LST). Recently, the National Research Council (NRC) completed an assessment of remote sensing needs for the next decade (NRC, 2007), proposing several missions suitable for urban studies, including a visible, near-infrared and shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectrometer and a multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) instrument called the Hyperspectral Infrared Imagery (HyspIRI). In this talk, we introduce the HyspIRI mission, focusing on potential synergies between VSWIR and TIR data in an urban area. We evaluate potential synergies using an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and MODIS-ASTER (MASTER) image pair acquired over Santa Barbara, United States. AVIRIS data were analyzed at their native spatial resolutions (7.5m VSWIR and 15m TIR), and aggregated 60 m spatial resolution similar to HyspIRI. Surface reflectance was calculated using ACORN and a ground reflectance target to remove atmospheric and sensor artifacts. MASTER data were processed to generate estimates of spectral emissivity and LST using Modtran radiative transfer code and the ASTER Temperature Emissivity Separation algorithm. A spectral library of common urban materials, including urban vegetation, roofs and roads was assembled from combined AVIRIS and field-measured reflectance spectra. LST and emissivity were also retrieved from MASTER and reflectance/emissivity spectra for a subset of urban materials were retrieved from co-located MASTER and

  9. Noninvasive determination of burn depth in children by digital infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Preciado, Jose David; Kolosovas-Machuca, Eleazar Samuel; Velez-Gomez, Ezequiel; Miranda-Altamirano, Ariel; González, Francisco Javier

    2013-06-01

    Digital infrared thermal imaging is used to assess noninvasively the severity of burn wounds in 13 pediatric patients. A delta-T (ΔT) parameter obtained by subtracting the temperature of a healthy contralateral region from the temperature of the burn wound is compared with the burn depth measured histopathologically. Thermal imaging results show that superficial dermal burns (IIa) show increased temperature compared with their contralateral healthy region, while deep dermal burns (IIb) show a lower temperature than their contralateral healthy region. This difference in temperature is statistically significant (p<0.0001) and provides a way of distinguishing deep dermal from superficial dermal burns. These results show that digital infrared thermal imaging could be used as a noninvasive procedure to assess burn wounds. An additional advantage of using thermal imaging, which can image a large skin surface area, is that it can be used to identify regions with different burn depths and estimate the size of the grafts needed for deep dermal burns.

  10. Noninvasive determination of burn depth in children by digital infrared thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Medina-Preciado, Jose David; Kolosovas-Machuca, Eleazar Samuel; Velez-Gomez, Ezequiel; Miranda-Altamirano, Ariel; González, Francisco Javier

    2013-06-01

    Digital infrared thermal imaging is used to assess noninvasively the severity of burn wounds in 13 pediatric patients. A delta-T (ΔT) parameter obtained by subtracting the temperature of a healthy contralateral region from the temperature of the burn wound is compared with the burn depth measured histopathologically. Thermal imaging results show that superficial dermal burns (IIa) show increased temperature compared with their contralateral healthy region, while deep dermal burns (IIb) show a lower temperature than their contralateral healthy region. This difference in temperature is statistically significant (p<0.0001) and provides a way of distinguishing deep dermal from superficial dermal burns. These results show that digital infrared thermal imaging could be used as a noninvasive procedure to assess burn wounds. An additional advantage of using thermal imaging, which can image a large skin surface area, is that it can be used to identify regions with different burn depths and estimate the size of the grafts needed for deep dermal burns.

  11. Computational imaging from non-uniform degradation of staggered TDI thermal infrared imager.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Jian Guo; Shi, Yan; Chen, Wangli; Qin, Qianqing; Zhang, Zijian

    2015-09-21

    For the Time Delay Integration (TDI) staggered line-scanning thermal infrared imager, a Computational Imaging (CI) approach is developed to achieve higher spatial resolution images. After a thorough analysis of the causes of non-uniform image displacement and degradation for multi-channel staggered TDI arrays, the study aims to approach one-dimensional (1D) sub-pixel displacement estimation and superposition of images from time-division multiplexing scanning lines. Under the assumption that a thermal image is 2D piecewise C(2) smooth, a sparse-and-smooth deconvolution algorithm with L1-norm regularization terms combining the first and second order derivative operators is proposed to restore high frequency components and to suppress aliasing simultaneously. It is theoretically and experimentally demonstrated, with simulation and airborne thermal infrared images, that this is a state-of-the-art practical CI method to reconstruct clear images with higher frequency components from raw thermal images that are subject to instantaneous distortion and blurring. PMID:26406660

  12. Thermal Infrared Reflective Metal Oxide Sol-Gel Coatings for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Brandon Demar

    Recent trends in composite research include the development of structural materials with multiple functionalities. In new studies, novel materials are being designed, developed, modified, and implemented into composite designs. Typically, an increase in functionality requires additional material phases within one system. The presence of excessive phases can result in deterioration of individual or overall properties. True multi-functional materials must maintain all properties at or above the minimum operating limit. In this project, samples of antimony and cobalt-doped tin oxide (ATO(Co2O 3)) sol-gel solutions are used to coat carbon fibers and are heat treated at a temperature range of 200 - 500 °C. Results from this research are used to model the implementation of sol-gel coatings into carbon fiber reinforced multifunctional composite systems. This research presents a novel thermo-responsive sol-gel/ (dopant) combination and evaluation of the actuating responses (reflectivity and surface heat dissipation) due to various heat treatment temperatures. While ATO is a well-known transparent conductive material, the implementation of ATO on carbon fibers for infrared thermal reflectivity has not been examined. These coatings serve as actuators capable of reflecting thermal infrared radiation in the near infrared wavelengths of 0.7-1.2 μm. By altering the level of Co2O3 and heat treatment temperatures, optimal optical properties are obtained. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used for imaging, electron diffraction spectroscopy (EDS) is used to verify the compounds present in the coatings. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to analyze the chemical bonds and reflectivity in the infrared spectra after the heat treatments. Total reflection and angle-dependent reflectivity measurements were performed on the coatings in the wavelengths of 0.7-2 μm. Laser induced damage threshold testing was done to investigate the dielectric breakdown

  13. Estimating evapotranspiration of riparian vegetation using high resolution multispectral, thermal infrared and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, Christopher M. U.; Geli, Hatim; Taghvaeian, Saleh; Masih, Ashish; Pack, Robert T.; Simms, Ronald D.; Baker, Michael; Milliken, Jeff A.; O'Meara, Scott; Witherall, Amy J.

    2011-11-01

    High resolution airborne multispectral and thermal infrared imagery was acquired over the Mojave River, California with the Utah State University airborne remote sensing system integrated with the LASSI imaging Lidar also built and operated at USU. The data were acquired in pre-established mapping blocks over a 2 day period covering approximately 144 Km of the Mojave River floodplain and riparian zone, approximately 1500 meters in width. The multispectral imagery (green, red and near-infrared bands) was ortho-rectified using the Lidar point cloud data through a direct geo-referencing technique. Thermal Infrared imagery was rectified to the multispectral ortho-mosaics. The lidar point cloud data was classified to separate ground surface returns from vegetation returns as well as structures such as buildings, bridges etc. One-meter DEM's were produced from the surface returns along with vegetation canopy height also at 1-meter grids. Two surface energy balance models that use remote sensing inputs were applied to the high resolution imagery, namely the SEBAL and the Two Source Model. The model parameterizations were slightly modified to accept high resolution imagery (1-meter) as well as the lidar-based vegetation height product, which was used to estimate the aerodynamic roughness length. Both models produced very similar results in terms of latent heat fluxes (LE). Instantaneous LE values were extrapolated to daily evapotranspiration rates (ET) using the reference ET fraction, with data obtained from a local weather station. Seasonal rates were obtained by extrapolating the reference ET fraction according to the seasonal growth habits of the different species. Vegetation species distribution and area were obtained from classification of the multispectral imagery. Results indicate that cottonwood and salt cedar (tamarisk) had the highest evapotranspiration rates followed by mesophytes, arundo, mesquite and desert shrubs. This research showed that high

  14. Design of mct1024×1 short wave infrared thermal camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xian Zhong; Zhang, Su Ying

    2005-10-01

    A thermal camera consists of 1024-element MCT line wavelength IRFPA with reading electrocircuit made in china. It is presented the composing of this infrared thermal camera and some key question of this thermal camera: 1) nonuniformity correction; 2) Correction of lines and rows. With same axial transmission optics and a 1-D equality angle scanner and 1024X1600 pixels per frame.the scan efficiency of the sensor is over 88% and the half periods of scanner is 5 seconds. we developed a IR instrument. the main technic target is followed: optics calibre: 90 mm, focus: 270.6 mm, identifiaction ratio:170 urad, wave band: 2-2.5um, the half period: 5 second, NEΔρ: 0.8%.

  15. High-Q mid-infrared thermal emitters operating with high power-utilization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takuya; De Zoysa, Menaka; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2016-06-27

    We demonstrate a single-mode high-Q (Q>100) mid-infrared thermal emitter operating with high power-utilization efficiency. The emitter consists of a rod-type photonic crystal (PC) slab interacting with GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs), a GaAs substrate frame supporting the PC slab, and electric wires for Joule heating of the device. We carefully design the structure of the PC slab and the supporting frame/wires to minimize unwanted thermal losses and realize narrowband thermal emission having a peak intensity, under a given electrical input power, that is an order of magnitude higher than that of a reference blackbody emitter due to the efficient increase of the device temperature. PMID:27410661

  16. Potential of remote visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance measurements for mapping thermal maturity variations

    SciTech Connect

    Rowan, L.C.; Pawlewicz, M.J.; Jones, O.D. )

    1989-09-01

    The visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral reflectance of rocks containing organic matter is related to thermal maturity because thermal alteration liberates hydrogen and forms highly absorbing carbon-rich polycondensed structures. To evaluate the usefulness of remote spectral reflectance measurements for mapping thermal maturity differences, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images of the Eureka, Nevada, area were processed to produce a digital classification image maps that shows maturity in well-exposed, sparsely vegetated areas consisting of Chainman Shale. The relationship between spectral reflectance in TM bands and band ratios and maturity was confirmed through analysis of laboratory VNIR spectral reflectance and mean vitrinite reflectance (R{sub m}) measurements of 20 samples.

  17. [Study on Hollow Brick Wall's Surface Temperature with Infrared Thermal Imaging Method].

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming-fang; Yin, Yi-hua

    2015-05-01

    To address the characteristic of uneven surface temperature of hollow brick wall, the present research adopts soft wares of both ThermaCAM P20 and ThermaCAM Reporter to test the application of infrared thermal image technique in measuring surface temperature of hollow brick wall, and further analyzes the thermal characteristics of hollow brick wall, and building material's impact on surface temperature distribution including hollow brick, masonry mortar, and so on. The research selects the construction site of a three-story-high residential, carries out the heat transfer experiment, and further examines the exterior wall constructed by 3 different hollow bricks including sintering shale hollow brick, masonry mortar and brick masonry. Infrared thermal image maps are collected, including 3 kinds of sintering shale hollow brick walls under indoor heating in winter; and temperature data of wall surface, and uniformity and frequency distribution are also collected for comparative analysis between 2 hollow bricks and 2 kinds of mortar masonry. The results show that improving heat preservation of hollow brick aid masonry mortar can effectively improve inner wall surface temperature and indoor thermal environment; non-uniformity of surface temperature decreases from 0. 6 to 0. 4 °C , and surface temperature frequency distribution changes from the asymmetric distribution into a normal distribution under the condition that energy-saving sintering shale hollow brick wall is constructed by thermal mortar replacing cement mortar masonry; frequency of average temperature increases as uniformity of surface temperature increases. This research provides a certain basis for promotion and optimization of hollow brick wall's thermal function.

  18. Determination of physical properties of the Asteroid (41) Daphne from interferometric observations in the thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, Alexis; Delbo, Marco; Ligori, Sebastiano; Crouzet, Nicolas; Tanga, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    We describe interferometric observations of the Asteroid (41) Daphne in the thermal infrared obtained with the Mid-Infrared Interferometric Instrument (MIDI) and the Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). We derived the size and the surface thermal properties of (41) Daphne by means of a thermophysical model (TPM), which is used for the interpretation of interferometric data for the first time. From our TPM analysis, we derived a volume equivalent diameter for (41) Daphne of 189 km, using a non-convex 3-D shape model derived from optical lightcurves and adaptive optics images (B. Carry, private communication). On the other hand, when using the convex shape of Kaasalainen et al. (Kaasalainen, M., Mottola, S., Fulchignoni, M. [2002]. Icarus 159, 369-395) in our TPM analysis, the resulting volume equivalent diameter of (41) Daphne is between 194 and 209 km, depending on the surface roughness. The shape of the asteroid is used as an a priori information in our TPM analysis. No attempt is made to adjust the shape to the data. Only the size of the asteroid and its thermal parameters such as, albedo, thermal inertia and roughness are adjusted to the data. We estimated our model systematic uncertainty to be of 4% and of 7% on the determination of the asteroid volume equivalent diameter depending on whether the non-convex or the convex shape is used, respectively. In terms of thermal properties, we derived a value of the surface thermal inertia smaller than 50 J m -2 s -0.5 K -1 and preferably in the range between 0 and ˜30 J m -2 s -0.5 K -1. Our TPM analysis also shows that Daphne has a moderate macroscopic surface roughness.

  19. Planck 2015 results. XXIII. The thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect-cosmic infrared background correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-08-01

    We use Planck data to detect the cross-correlation between the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect and the infrared emission from the galaxies that make up the the cosmic infrared background (CIB). We first perform a stacking analysis towards Planck-confirmed galaxy clusters. We detect infrared emission produced by dusty galaxies inside these clusters and demonstrate that the infrared emission is about 50% more extended than the tSZ effect. Modelling the emission with a Navarro-Frenk-White profile, we find that the radial profile concentration parameter is c500 = 1.00+0.18-0.15 . This indicates that infrared galaxies in the outskirts of clusters have higher infrared flux than cluster-core galaxies. We also study the cross-correlation between tSZ and CIB anisotropies, following three alternative approaches based on power spectrum analyses: (i) using a catalogue of confirmed clusters detected in Planck data; (ii) using an all-sky tSZ map built from Planck frequency maps; and (iii) using cross-spectra between Planck frequency maps. With the three different methods, we detect the tSZ-CIB cross-power spectrum at significance levels of (i) 6σ; (ii) 3σ; and (iii) 4σ. We model the tSZ-CIB cross-correlation signature and compare predictions with the measurements. The amplitude of the cross-correlation relative to the fiducial model is AtSZ-CIB = 1.2 ± 0.3. This result is consistent with predictions for the tSZ-CIB cross-correlation assuming the best-fit cosmological model from Planck 2015 results along with the tSZ and CIB scaling relations.

  20. Reconstructing Face Image from the Thermal Infrared Spectrum to the Visible Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kresnaraman, Brahmastro; Deguchi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Mekada, Yoshito; Ide, Ichiro; Murase, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During the night or in poorly lit areas, thermal cameras are a better choice instead of normal cameras for security surveillance because they do not rely on illumination. A thermal camera is able to detect a person within its view, but identification from only thermal information is not an easy task. The purpose of this paper is to reconstruct the face image of a person from the thermal spectrum to the visible spectrum. After the reconstruction, further image processing can be employed, including identification/recognition. Concretely, we propose a two-step thermal-to-visible-spectrum reconstruction method based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). The reconstruction is done by utilizing the relationship between images in both thermal infrared and visible spectra obtained by CCA. The whole image is processed in the first step while the second step processes patches in an image. Results show that the proposed method gives satisfying results with the two-step approach and outperforms comparative methods in both quality and recognition evaluations. PMID:27110781

  1. Reconstructing Face Image from the Thermal Infrared Spectrum to the Visible Spectrum †

    PubMed Central

    Kresnaraman, Brahmastro; Deguchi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Mekada, Yoshito; Ide, Ichiro; Murase, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During the night or in poorly lit areas, thermal cameras are a better choice instead of normal cameras for security surveillance because they do not rely on illumination. A thermal camera is able to detect a person within its view, but identification from only thermal information is not an easy task. The purpose of this paper is to reconstruct the face image of a person from the thermal spectrum to the visible spectrum. After the reconstruction, further image processing can be employed, including identification/recognition. Concretely, we propose a two-step thermal-to-visible-spectrum reconstruction method based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). The reconstruction is done by utilizing the relationship between images in both thermal infrared and visible spectra obtained by CCA. The whole image is processed in the first step while the second step processes patches in an image. Results show that the proposed method gives satisfying results with the two-step approach and outperforms comparative methods in both quality and recognition evaluations. PMID:27110781

  2. Reconstructing Face Image from the Thermal Infrared Spectrum to the Visible Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kresnaraman, Brahmastro; Deguchi, Daisuke; Takahashi, Tomokazu; Mekada, Yoshito; Ide, Ichiro; Murase, Hiroshi

    2016-04-21

    During the night or in poorly lit areas, thermal cameras are a better choice instead of normal cameras for security surveillance because they do not rely on illumination. A thermal camera is able to detect a person within its view, but identification from only thermal information is not an easy task. The purpose of this paper is to reconstruct the face image of a person from the thermal spectrum to the visible spectrum. After the reconstruction, further image processing can be employed, including identification/recognition. Concretely, we propose a two-step thermal-to-visible-spectrum reconstruction method based on Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). The reconstruction is done by utilizing the relationship between images in both thermal infrared and visible spectra obtained by CCA. The whole image is processed in the first step while the second step processes patches in an image. Results show that the proposed method gives satisfying results with the two-step approach and outperforms comparative methods in both quality and recognition evaluations.

  3. MULTISCALE THERMAL-INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF THE MAUNA LOA CALDERA, HAWAII

    SciTech Connect

    L. BALICK; A. GILLESPIE; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Until recently, most thermal infrared measurements of natural scenes have been made at disparate scales, typically 10{sup {minus}3}-10{sup {minus}2} m (spectra) and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} m (satellite images), with occasional airborne images (10{sup 1} m) filling the gap. Temperature and emissivity fields are spatially heterogeneous over a similar range of scales, depending on scene composition. A common problem for the land surface, therefore, has been relating field spectral and temperature measurements to satellite data, yet in many cases this is necessary if satellite data are to be interpreted to yield meaningful information about the land surface. Recently, three new satellites with thermal imaging capability at the 10{sup 1}-10{sup 2} m scale have been launched: MTI, TERRA, and Landsat 7. MTI acquires multispectral images in the mid-infrared (3-5{micro}m) and longwave infrared (8-10{micro}m) with 20m resolution. ASTER and MODIS aboard TERRA acquire multispectral longwave images at 90m and 500-1000m, respectively, and MODIS also acquires multispectral mid-infrared images. Landsat 7 acquires broadband longwave images at 60m. As part of an experiment to validate the temperature and thermal emissivity values calculated from MTI and ASTER images, we have targeted the summit region of Mauna Loa for field characterization and near-simultaneous satellite imaging, both on daytime and nighttime overpasses, and compare the results to previously acquired 10{sup {minus}1} m airborne images, ground-level multispectral FLIR images, and the field spectra. Mauna Loa was chosen in large part because the 4x6km summit caldera, flooded with fresh basalt in 1984, appears to be spectrally homogeneous at scales between 10{sup {minus}1} and 10{sup 2} m, facilitating the comparison of sensed temperature. The validation results suggest that, with careful atmospheric compensation, it is possible to match ground measurements with measurements from space, and to use the Mauna Loa validation

  4. Retrieving Land Surface Temperature from Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Data Using a Multi-Channel Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xinke; Huo, Xing; Ren, Chao; Labed, Jelila; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key parameter in climate systems. The methods for retrieving LST from hyperspectral thermal infrared data either require accurate atmospheric profile data or require thousands of continuous channels. We aim to retrieve LST for natural land surfaces from hyperspectral thermal infrared data using an adapted multi-channel method taking Land Surface Emissivity (LSE) properly into consideration. In the adapted method, LST can be retrieved by a linear function of 36 brightness temperatures at Top of Atmosphere (TOA) using channels where LSE has high values. We evaluated the adapted method using simulation data at nadir and satellite data near nadir. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the LST retrieved from the simulation data is 0.90 K. Compared with an LST product from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on Meteosat, the error in the LST retrieved from the Infared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is approximately 1.6 K. The adapted method can be used for the near-real-time production of an LST product and to provide the physical method to simultaneously retrieve atmospheric profiles, LST, and LSE with a first-guess LST value. The limitations of the adapted method are that it requires the minimum LSE in the spectral interval of 800–950 cm−1 larger than 0.95 and it has not been extended for off-nadir measurements. PMID:27187408

  5. Retrieving Land Surface Temperature from Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Data Using a Multi-Channel Method.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xinke; Huo, Xing; Ren, Chao; Labed, Jelila; Li, Zhao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is a key parameter in climate systems. The methods for retrieving LST from hyperspectral thermal infrared data either require accurate atmospheric profile data or require thousands of continuous channels. We aim to retrieve LST for natural land surfaces from hyperspectral thermal infrared data using an adapted multi-channel method taking Land Surface Emissivity (LSE) properly into consideration. In the adapted method, LST can be retrieved by a linear function of 36 brightness temperatures at Top of Atmosphere (TOA) using channels where LSE has high values. We evaluated the adapted method using simulation data at nadir and satellite data near nadir. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of the LST retrieved from the simulation data is 0.90 K. Compared with an LST product from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on Meteosat, the error in the LST retrieved from the Infared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is approximately 1.6 K. The adapted method can be used for the near-real-time production of an LST product and to provide the physical method to simultaneously retrieve atmospheric profiles, LST, and LSE with a first-guess LST value. The limitations of the adapted method are that it requires the minimum LSE in the spectral interval of 800-950 cm(-1) larger than 0.95 and it has not been extended for off-nadir measurements. PMID:27187408

  6. Infrared Thermal Imaging: A Tool for Simple, Simultaneous, and High-Throughput Enthalpimetric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Tischer, Bruna; Oliveira, Alessandra Stangherlin; Wagner, Roger; Costa, Adilson Ben; Flores, Erico Marlon Moraes

    2015-12-15

    In this work, the feasibility of infrared thermal imaging (ITI) is demonstrated to show its potential application in analytical chemistry. A system of ITI was combined with disposable microplates to perform enthalpimetric analysis, which was selected as an example in order to show the reliability of this method. In this way, the novel thermal infrared enthalpimetry (TIE) method was evaluated in neutralization, precipitation, redox, and complexation reactions, with a multichannel pipet for adding the reagent and an infrared camera to monitor the temperature of multiple reactions (up to 24 simultaneous reactions) in a contactless way. Analytical signals were obtained in only 10 s, and the difference in temperature (ΔT) before and after the reaction was used for the construction of calibration curves by use of reference solutions. More than 10,000 values were considered for the temperature determination for each reaction. The proposed method was applied for determination of the total acidity of vinegar as well as the chloride, iron, and calcium content of pharmaceuticals. The results were compared with those from conventional techniques (titration), and agreement between 96% and 101% was obtained. Sample throughput could even reach thousands of samples analyzed in 1 h. These preliminary results demonstrate the important features of TIE and possible application for other matrices and analytical parameters. The proposed TIE could be spread to cover other enthalpimetric techniques, different reactors (e.g., microfluidic and paper analytical devices), and portable devices, thus reaching other fields of chemistry. PMID:26562490

  7. The influence of the thermal environment on the stray light performances of infrared telescope systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jing; Yao, Xiuwen; Zhang, Bin; Zeng, Shuguang; He, Pan

    2010-05-01

    Infrared telescopes are often required to work in a complex thermal environment. A long time of daytime heating will cause the temperature of the telescope dome and the surrounding facilities different from the ambient air during the night. Different levels of temperature controlling and the accuracy of forecasting will lead to the temperature departures between the components in the system. Furthermore, the contaminated particles settled on the optical elements will change the optical characteristics of the optical elements. All of these factors will degrade the stray light performances of infrared telescopes. In this paper, taking Cassegrain as a typical example and using the optical analysis software, i.e., ASAP, the three-dimensional simulation models of the infrared telescope and the dome has been built up. On this basis, the stray light performances and the variation of the systems have been simulated and analyzed for the different cases of the different coating for the dome, the change of the temperature of primary and ambient, as well as the existence of the mirror contamination. The effective emissivity has been introduced and the stray light performance of the systems has been evaluated. The results indicate that the contaminated particles settled on the optical elements will degrade the system performances significantly, whereas the influences of other factors are relatively small. Therefore, it is of great importance to focus on the contaminated particles settled on the optical elements to adopt proper methods to improve the stray light performances of infrared telescope systems.

  8. Optical assembly of a visible through thermal infrared multispectral imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Henson, T.; Bender, S.; Byrd, D.; Rappoport, W.; Shen, G.Y.

    1998-06-01

    The Optical Assembly (OA) for the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) program has been fabricated, assembled, and successfully tested for its performance. It represents a major milestone achieved towards completion of this earth observing E-O imaging sensor that is to be operated in low earth orbit. Along with its wide-field-of-view (WFOV), 1.82{degree} along-track and 1.38{degree} cross-track, and comprehensive on-board calibration system, the pushbroom imaging sensor employs a single mechanically cooled focal plane with 15 spectral bands covering a wavelength range from 0.45 to 10.7 {micro}m. The OA has an off-axis three-mirror anastigmatic (TMA) telescope with a 36-cm unobscured clear aperture. The two key performance criteria, 80% enpixeled energy in the visible and radiometric stability of 1% 1{sigma} in the visible/near-infrared (VNIR) and short wavelength infrared (SWIR), of 1.45% 1{sigma} in the medium wavelength infrared (MWIR), and of 0.53% 1{sigma} long wavelength infrared (LWIR), as well as its low weight (less than 49 kg) and volume constraint (89 cm x 44 cm x 127 cm) drive the overall design configuration of the OA and fabrication requirements.

  9. Infrared survey of 50 buildings constructed during 100 years: thermal performances and damage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1995-03-01

    Different building constructions and craftsmanship give rise to different thermal performance and damage conditions. The building stock of most industrial countries consists of buildings of various age, and constructions, from old historic buildings with heavy stone or wooden construction, to new buildings with heavy or light concrete construction, or modern steel or wooden construction. In this paper the result from a detailed infrared survey of 50 buildings from six Swedish military camps is presented. The presentation is limited to a comparison of thermal performance and damage conditions of buildings of various ages, functions, and constructions, of a building period of more than 100 years. The result is expected to be relevant even to civilian buildings. Infrared surveys were performed during 1992-1993, with airborne, and mobile short- and longwave infrared systems, out- and indoor thermography. Interpretation and analysis of infrared data was performed with interactive image and analyzing systems. Field inspections were carried out with fiber optics system, and by ocular inspections. Air-exchange rate was measured in order to quantify air leakages through the building envelope, indicated in thermograms. The objects studied were single-family houses, barracks, office-, service-, school- and exercise buildings, military hotels and restaurants, aircraft hangars, and ship factory buildings. The main conclusions from this study are that most buildings from 1880 - 1940 have a solid construction with a high quality of craftsmanship, relatively good thermal performance, due to extremely thick walls, and adding insulation at the attic floor. From about 1940 - 1960 the quality of construction, thermal performance and craftsmanship seem to vary a lot. Buildings constructed during the period of 1960 - 1990 have in general the best thermal performance due to a better insulation capacity, however, also one finds here the greatest variety of problems. The result from this

  10. Definitions in use by the visible and near-infrared, and thermal working groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Miller, ED; Martin, Bob; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Palmer, James M.

    1992-01-01

    The Calibration Advisory Panel (CAP) is composed of calibration experts from each of the Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments, science investigation, and cross-calibration teams. These members come from a variety of institutions and backgrounds. In order to facilitate an exchange of ideas, and assure a common basis for communication, it was desirable to assemble this list of definitions. These definitions were developed for use by the visible and near-infrared working group, and the thermal infrared working group. Where necessary or appropriate, deviations from these for specific instruments or other sensor types are given in the individual calibration plans. The definitions contained in this document are derived, wherever possible, from definitions accepted by international and national metrological commissions including the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and the International Organization of Legal Metrology (OIML).

  11. Applications of the BAE SYSTEMS MicroIR uncooled infrared thermal imaging cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickman, Heather A.; Henebury, John J., Jr.; Long, Dennis R.

    2003-09-01

    MicroIR uncooled infrared imaging modules (based on VOx microbolometers), developed and manufactured at BAE SYSTEMS, are integrated into ruggedized, weatherproof camera systems and are currently supporting numerous security and surveillance applications. The introduction of uncooled thermal imaging has permitted the expansion of traditional surveillance and security perimeters. MicroIR cameras go beyond the imagery limits of visible and low-light short wavelength infrared sensors, providing continual, uninterrupted, high quality imagery both day and night. Coupled with an appropriate lens assembly, MicroIR cameras offer exemplary imagery performance that lends itself to a more comprehensive level of surveillance. With the current increased emphasis on security and surveillance, MicroIR Cameras are evolving as an unquestionably beneficial instrument in the security and surveillance arenas. This paper will elaborate on the attributes of the cameras, and discuss the development and the deployment, both present and future, of BAE SYSTEMS MicroIR Cameras.

  12. Identification of the epoxy curing mechanism under isothermal conditions by thermal analysis and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Hideki; Morita, Shigeaki

    2014-07-01

    A curing reaction of bisphenol A diglycidyl ether epoxy resin with 4,4‧-diaminodicyclohexyl methane hardener was investigated by means of modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC), thermal scanning rheometer (TSR), near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. The relation between change in the physical properties and molecular structures during the isothermal curing reaction were studied. MDSC and NIR results corroborated vitrification with the secondary to tertiary amine conversion; the process afforded a three-dimensional cross-linking structure. TSR estimation of the gelation point was corroborated with the NIR-determined maximum concentration of the generated secondary amine. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy confirmed that reaction between the primary amine and epoxy occurred more rapidly than any other functional group reaction. The ether groups were generated at the early stage of the curing reaction, and their formation occurred immediately with the generation of hydroxyl groups.

  13. Ultraviolet radiation effects on the infrared damage rate of a thermal control coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation on the infrared reflectance of ZnO silicone white thermal coatings were investigated. Narrow band ultraviolet radiation for wavelengths in the 2200A to 3500A range by a monochromator and a high pressure, 150-W Eimac xenon lamp. The sample was irradiated while in a vacuum of at least 0.000001 torr, and infrared reflectance was measured in situ with a spectroreflectometer at 19,500A. Reflectance degradation was studied as a function of wavelength, time, intensity, and dose. Damage was wavelength dependent at constant exposure, but no maximum was evident above the shortest wavelength investigated here. The degradation rate at constant intensity was an exponential function of time and varies with intensity.

  14. INTERPRETATION OF THERMAL-INFRARED MULTISPECTRAL SCANNER IMAGES OF THE OSGOOD MOUNTAINS, NEVADA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1984-01-01

    Data from the Thermal-Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) were collected over the Osgood Mountains in northern Nevada midmorning on 27 August 1983. The area includes gold-producing properties of the Getchell Mine, the Prinson Mine, and a prospect being developed near Preble, Nevada. Tungsten-bearing tactite deposits, barite deposits, and some minor lead-zinc deposits are also present. The area was surveyed to determine if multichannel, mid-infrared data could detect the effects of hydrothermal alteration in the sediment-hosted disseminated gold deposits. Because the gold in the deposits is generally microscopic and the effects of alteration are difficult to observe, the deposits present a difficult challenge for geological remote sensing.

  15. Optimum thermal infrared bands for mapping general rock type and temperature from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Q. A.; Nuesch, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine quantitatively the number and locations of spectral bands required to perform general rock-type discrimination from spaceborne imaging sensors using only thermal infrared measurements. Beginning with laboratory spectra collected under idealized conditions from relatively well characterized, homogeneous samples, a radiative transfer model was employed to transform ground exitance values into the corresponding spectral radiance at the top of the atmosphere. Taking sensor noise into account analysis of these data revealed that three 1 micrometer wide spectral bands would permit independent estimators of rock-type and sample temperature from a satellite infrared multispectral scanner. This study, indicates that the location of three spectral bands at 8.1-9.1 micrometers, 9.5-10.5 micrometers and 11.0-12.0 micrometers, and the employment of appropriate preprocessing to minimize atmospheric effects makes it possible to predict general rock-type and temperature for a variety of atmospheric states and temperatures.

  16. Triple-wavelength infrared plasmonic thermal emitter using hybrid dielectric materials in periodic arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Lun; Hsiao, Hui-Hsin; Tang, Ming-Ru; Lee, Si-Chen

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a triple-wavelength infrared plasmonic thermal emitter using a periodic arrangement of hybrid dielectric materials within a tri-layer metal/dielectric/metal structure. The proposed arrangement makes it possible to sustain multiple resonance of localized surface plasmons (LSP), thereby providing an additional degree of freedom by which to vary the resonant wavelengths in the medium infrared region. Variations in the effective refractive index due to the different modal distribution within dielectric gratings results in multiple LSP resonances, and the resonant wavelengths can be easily tuned by altering the compositions of hybrid dielectric materials. The measured dispersion relation diagram and the finite difference time domain simulation indicated that the resonances were localized. They also indicate that the magnetic fields generated by the multiple LSP modes exhibit distribution patterns similar to that of a standing wave in the periodic arrangement of the hybrid dielectric layer, each of which presents an emission peak corresponding to a different modal order.

  17. A new perspective on Mercury's surface composition and temperatures: Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Gabriele E.; Helbert, Jörn; Hiesinger, Harald; Peter, Gisbert

    2011-09-01

    MERTIS (MErcury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer), scheduled for launch on board the Bepi Colombo Mercury Orbiter, will be the first mid-infrared imaging spectrometer to explore the innermost planet of the Solar System from orbit. The instrument is an advanced IR technology designed to study the surface composition, and surface temperature variations of planet Mercury. High resolution and global mid-IR spectral and temperature data obtained by MERTIS will contribute to a better understanding of Mercury's genesis and evolution. MERTIS uses an uncooled microbolometer detector array. It combines a push-broom IR grating spectrometer (TIS) with a radiometer (TIR) sharing the same optics, instrument electronics, and in-fight calibration components for a wavelength range of 7-14 and 7-40 μm, respectively. The paper summarizes the scientific objectives, observational goals, comparative laboratory spectral studies of mineral analogues, and introduces the technical overview and actual instrument development status of the experiment.

  18. Preliminary measurements of spectral signatures of tropical and temperate plants in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, John W.; Milton, N. M.

    1987-01-01

    Spectral reflectance measurements of seven tropical species and six deciduous species were carried out in thermal infrared to establish the species-dependent spectral characteristics and to investigate the effect on spectral signatures of environmental variables, such as leaf maturity, drought, and metal stress. Seasonal variations of spectral signatures occurred between spring and summer leaves, but such variations were minimal during summer and early fall. Overall reflectance of senescent leaves was higher than that of young leaves, as was the reflectance of leaves from trees growing in metal-enriched soils, as compared with leaves from the control area. However, the characteristic spectral features were not changed in either case. It was also found that water stress did not have any effect on the infrared signatures: trees grown during a drought season maintained their characteristic spectral signatures.

  19. MODVOLC2: A Hybrid Time Series Analysis for Detecting Thermal Anomalies Applied to Thermal Infrared Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppen, W. C.; Wright, R.; Pilger, E.

    2009-12-01

    We developed and tested a new, automated algorithm, MODVOLC2, which analyzes thermal infrared satellite time series data to detect and quantify the excess energy radiated from thermal anomalies such as active volcanoes, fires, and gas flares. MODVOLC2 combines two previously developed algorithms, a simple point operation algorithm (MODVOLC) and a more complex time series analysis (Robust AVHRR Techniques, or RAT) to overcome the limitations of using each approach alone. MODVOLC2 has four main steps: (1) it uses the original MODVOLC algorithm to process the satellite data on a pixel-by-pixel basis and remove thermal outliers, (2) it uses the remaining data to calculate reference and variability images for each calendar month, (3) it compares the original satellite data and any newly acquired data to the reference images normalized by their variability, and it detects pixels that fall outside the envelope of normal thermal behavior, (4) it adds any pixels detected by MODVOLC to those detected in the time series analysis. Using test sites at Anatahan and Kilauea volcanoes, we show that MODVOLC2 was able to detect ~15% more thermal anomalies than using MODVOLC alone, with very few, if any, known false detections. Using gas flares from the Cantarell oil field in the Gulf of Mexico, we show that MODVOLC2 provided results that were unattainable using a time series-only approach. Some thermal anomalies (e.g., Cantarell oil field flares) are so persistent that an additional, semi-automated 12-µm correction must be applied in order to correctly estimate both the number of anomalies and the total excess radiance being emitted by them. Although all available data should be included to make the best possible reference and variability images necessary for the MODVOLC2, we estimate that at least 80 images per calendar month are required to generate relatively good statistics from which to run MODVOLC2, a condition now globally met by a decade of MODIS observations. We also found

  20. Thermal infrared observations of lava flows during the 1984 Mauna Loa eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieri, D. C.; Gillespie, R.; Kahle, A. B.; Kahle, J.; Baloga, S. M.

    1985-04-01

    Thermal infrared videotape images of the flowing lava streams and the vent areas at 10.6 microns were made, as well as some broadband images in the 8 to 12 micron range (for gas plume detection). These data were calibrated with on-site hand-held radiometer measurements, in-flow thermocouple measurements, and with later laboratory kiln measurements. Infrared video data are useful in quantitatively assessing the pattern and mode of flow thermal losses, particularly with regard to radiative losses from established/incipient floating crust. The general cooling of the flows downstream was readily apparent. Upper reaches of the active flow exhibited nearly crust-free main channels, radiating at about 700 to 800 degrees C. Below about the 7500 foot level (about 8 km from the vent) the flows formed nearly continuous crust and tended to spread, become less well-defined and founder due to a reduction in slope. Nevertheless, in thermal IR observations, the surface trace of the active subsurface channel was visible, radiating at about 500 to 700 degrees C. At the active flow front, most solid crust radiated at temperatures less than 500 to 600 degrees C, however bright high temperature interiors (approximately 900 to 1000 degrees C) were clearly visible though evolving fissures.

  1. Biological thermal detection: micromechanical and microthermal properties of biological infrared receptors.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, V; Fuchigami, N; Stone, M; Grace, M; Tsukruk, V V

    2002-01-01

    Bioinspired design of biomimetic sensors relies upon the complete understanding of properties and functioning of biological analogues in conjunction with an understanding of their microstructural organization at various length scales. In the spirit of this approach, the microscopic properties of infrared (IR) receptors of snakes with "infrared vision" were studied with scanning thermal microscopy and micromechanical analysis. Low surface thermal conductivity of 0.11 W/(m K) was measured for the IR receptor surfaces as compared to the nonspecific skin areas. This difference in surface thermal conductivity should result in a significant local temperature gradient around the receptor areas. Micromechanical analysis showed that pit organs were more compliant than surrounding skin areas with an elastic modulus close to 40 MPa. In addition, the maximum elastic modulus was detected for the outermost layer with gradually reduced elastic resistance for the interior. The porous microstructure of the underlying tissue combined with the highly branched microfibrillar network (Biomacromolecules 2001, 2, 757) is thought to be responsible for such a combination of biomaterial properties. Considering these biomaterials features, we postulated a possible design of an artificial photothermal detector inspired by the microstructure of natural receptors. This bioinspired design would include a microfabricated cavity filled with an ordered lattice of microspheres with a gradient periodicity from the surface to the interior. Such a "photonic cavity" could provide an opportunity for multiple scattering at wavelength tuned to 8-12 microm as a range of highest sensitivity.

  2. Thermal Infrared Observations of Lava Flows During the 1984 Mauna Loa Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieri, D. C.; Gillespie, R.; Kahle, A. B.; Kahle, J.; Baloga, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal infrared videotape images of the flowing lava streams and the vent areas at 10.6 microns were made, as well as some broadband images in the 8 to 12 micron range (for gas plume detection). These data were calibrated with on-site hand-held radiometer measurements, in-flow thermocouple measurements, and with later laboratory kiln measurements. Infrared video data are useful in quantitatively assessing the pattern and mode of flow thermal losses, particularly with regard to radiative losses from established/incipient floating crust. The general cooling of the flows downstream was readily apparent. Upper reaches of the active flow exhibited nearly crust-free main channels, radiating at about 700 to 800 degrees C. Below about the 7500 foot level (about 8 km from the vent) the flows formed nearly continuous crust and tended to spread, become less well-defined and founder due to a reduction in slope. Nevertheless, in thermal IR observations, the surface trace of the active subsurface channel was visible, radiating at about 500 to 700 degrees C. At the active flow front, most solid crust radiated at temperatures less than 500 to 600 degrees C, however bright high temperature interiors (approximately 900 to 1000 degrees C) were clearly visible though evolving fissures.

  3. Multivariate curve resolution for the analysis of remotely sensed thermal infrared hyperspectral images.

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, David Michael; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2004-07-01

    While hyperspectral imaging systems are increasingly used in remote sensing and offer enhanced scene characterization relative to univariate and multispectral technologies, it has proven difficult in practice to extract all of the useful information from these systems due to overwhelming data volume, confounding atmospheric effects, and the limited a priori knowledge regarding the scene. The need exists for the ability to perform rapid and comprehensive data exploitation of remotely sensed hyperspectral imagery. To address this need, this paper describes the application of a fast and rigorous multivariate curve resolution (MCR) algorithm to remotely sensed thermal infrared hyperspectral images. Employing minimal a priori knowledge, notably non-negativity constraints on the extracted endmember profiles and a constant abundance constraint for the atmospheric upwelling component, it is demonstrated that MCR can successfully compensate thermal infrared hyperspectral images for atmospheric upwelling and, thereby, transmittance effects. We take a semi-synthetic approach to obtaining image data containing gas plumes by adding emission gas signals onto real hyperspectral images. MCR can accurately estimate the relative spectral absorption coefficients and thermal contrast distribution of an ammonia gas plume component added near the minimum detectable quantity.

  4. The Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) for the BepiColombo mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, H.; Helbert, J.; Mertis Co-I Team

    2010-01-01

    Scheduled for launch on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) in 2014, the Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer (MERTIS) is an innovative instrument for studying the surface composition and mineralogy of planet Mercury. MERTIS combines an uncooled grating push broom IR-spectrometer (TIS) with a radiometer (TIR), which will operate in the wavelength region of 7-14 and 7-40 μm, respectively. The spatial resolution of the MERTIS observations will be about 500 m globally and better than 500 m for approximately 5-10% of the surface. The thermal infrared range offers unique diagnostic capabilities to study the surface composition of Mercury. In particular, feldspars can easily be detected and characterized, because they show several diagnostic spectral signatures in the 7-14 μm range: the Christiansen feature, reststrahlen bands, and the transparency feature. In addition, MERTIS will allow the identification and mapping of elemental sulfur, pyroxenes, olivines, and other complex minerals. The scientific objectives of MERTIS include: (1) characterization of Mercury's surface composition, (2) identification of rock-forming minerals, (3) mapping of the surface mineralogy, and (4) study of surface temperature variations and the thermal inertia. In preparation for the MERTIS data interpretation, we are performing spectral measurements of appropriate analogue materials in the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) and are building a spectral library (Berlin Emissivity Database (BED)) of these materials for a variety of grain sizes.

  5. Nanoshell-mediated near-infrared thermal therapy of tumors under magnetic resonance guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, L. R.; Stafford, R. J.; Bankson, J. A.; Sershen, S. R.; Rivera, B.; Price, R. E.; Hazle, J. D.; Halas, N. J.; West, J. L.

    2003-11-01

    Metal nanoshells are a class of nanoparticles with tunable optical resonances. In this article, an application of this technology to thermal ablative therapy for cancer is described. By tuning the nanoshells to strongly absorb light in the near infrared, where optical transmission through tissue is optimal, a distribution of nanoshells at depth in tissue can be used to deliver a therapeutic dose of heat by using moderately low exposures of extracorporeally applied near-infrared (NIR) light. Human breast carcinoma cells incubated with nanoshells in vitro were found to have undergone photothermally induced morbidity on exposure to NIR light (820 nm, 35 W/cm2), as determined by using a fluorescent viability stain. Cells without nanoshells displayed no loss in viability after the same periods and conditions of NIR illumination. Likewise, in vivo studies under magnetic resonance guidance revealed that exposure to low doses of NIR light (820 nm, 4 W/cm2) in solid tumors treated with metal nanoshells reached average maximum temperatures capable of inducing irreversible tissue damage (T = 37.4 ± 6.6°C) within 4-6 min. Controls treated without nanoshells demonstrated significantly lower average temperatures on exposure to NIR light (T < 10°C). These findings demonstrated good correlation with histological findings. Tissues heated above the thermal damage threshold displayed coagulation, cell shrinkage, and loss of nuclear staining, which are indicators of irreversible thermal damage. Control tissues appeared undamaged.

  6. Mapping Glacial Weathering Processes with Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing: A Case Study at Robertson Glacier, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, A. M.; Christensen, P. R.; Shock, E.; Canovas, P. A., III

    2014-12-01

    Geologic weathering processes in cold environments, especially subglacial chemical processes acting on rock and sediment, are not well characterized due to the difficulty of accessing these environments. Glacial weathering of geologic materials contributes to the solute flux in meltwater and provides a potential source of energy to chemotrophic microbes, and is thus an important component to understand. In this study, we use Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data to map the extent of glacial weathering in the front range of the Canadian Rockies using remotely detected infrared spectra. We ground-truth our observations using laboratory infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and geochemical analyses of field samples. The major goals of the project are to quantify weathering inputs to the glacial energy budget, and to link in situ sampling with remote sensing capabilities. Robertson Glacier, Alberta, Canada is an excellent field site for this technique as it is easily accessible and its retreating stage allows sampling of fresh subglacial and englacial sediments. Infrared imagery of the region was collected with the ASTER satellite instrument. At that same time, samples of glacially altered rock and sediments were collected on a downstream transect of the glacier and outwash plain. Infrared laboratory spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to determine the composition and abundance of minerals present. Geochemical data were also collected at each location, and ice and water samples were analyzed for major and minor elements. Our initial conclusion is that the majority of the weathering seems to be occurring at the glacier-rock interface rather than in the outwash stream. Results from both laboratory and ASTER data indicate the presence of leached weathering rinds. A general trend of decreasing carbonate abundances with elevation (i.e. residence time in ice) is observed, which is consistent with increasing calcium ion

  7. Spatiotemporal Evaluation of Nocturnal Cold Air Drainage Over a Simple Slope Using Thermal Infrared Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikani, V.; Chokmani, K.; Fathollahi, L.; Granberg, H.; Fournier, R.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of climatic processes such as cold air drainage flows are problematic over mountainous areas. Observation of cold air drainage is not available in the existing observation network and it requires a special methodology. The main objective of this study was to characterize the cold air drainage over regions with a slope. A high resolution infrared camera, a meteorological station and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) were used. The specific objective was to derive nocturnal cold air drainage velocity over the slope. To address these objectives, a number of infrared measurement campaigns were conducted during calm and clear sky conditions over an agricultural zone (blackcurrant farm) in Canada. Using thermal infrared images, the nocturnal surface temperature gradient were computed in hourly basis. The largest gradient magnitudes were found between 17h -20h. The cooling rates at basin area were two times higher in comparison to the magnitudes observed within slope area. The image analysis illustrated this considerable temperature gradient of the basin may be partly due to transport of cold air drainage into the basin from the slope. The results show that thermal imagery can be used to characterize and understand the microclimate related to the occurrence of radiation frost in the agricultural field. This study provided the opportunity to track the cold air drainage flow and pooling of cold air in low lying areas. The infrared analysis demonstrated that nocturnal drainage flow displayed continuous variation in terms of space and time in response to microscale slope heterogeneities. In addition, the analysis highlighted the periodic aspect for cold air drainage flow.

  8. Application of combined Landsat thematic mapper and airborne thermal infrared multispectral scanner data to lithologic mapping in Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Podwysocki, M.H.; Ehmann, W.J.; Brickey, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Future Landsat satellites are to include the Thematic Mapper (TM) and also may incorporate additional multispectral scanners. One such scanner being considered for geologic and other applications is a four-channel thermal-infrared multispectral scanner having 60-m spatial resolution. This paper discusses the results of studies using combined Landsat TM and airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital data for lithologic discrimination, identification, and geologic mapping in two areas within the Basin and Range province of Nevada. Field and laboratory reflectance spectra in the visible and reflective-infrared and laboratory spectra in the thermal-infrared parts of the spectrum were used to verify distinctions made between rock types in the image data sets.

  9. Relationship among eye temperature measured using digital infrared thermal imaging and vaginal and rectal temperatures in hair sheep and cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI) using a thermal camera has potential to be a useful tool for the production animal industry. Thermography has been used in both humans and a wide range of animal species to measure body temperature as a method to detect injury or inflammation. The objective of...

  10. A model for μ-biomimetic thermal infrared sensors based on the infrared receptors of Melanophila acuminata.

    PubMed

    Siebke, Georg; Holik, Peter; Schmitz, Sam; Schmitz, Helmut; Lacher, Manfred; Steltenkamp, Siegfried

    2014-09-01

    Beetles of the genus Melanophila acuminata detect forest fires from distances as far as 130 km with infrared-sensing organs. Inspired by this extremely sensitive biological device, we are developing an IR sensor that operates at ambient temperature using MEMS technology. The sensor consists of two liquid-filled chambers that are connected by a micro-fluidic system. Absorption of IR radiation by one of these chambers leads to heating and expansion of a liquid. The increasing pressure deflects a membrane covered by one electrode of a plate capacitor. The micro-fluidic system and the second chamber represent a fluidic low-pass filter, preventing slow, but large pressure changes. However, the strong frequency dependence of the filter demands a precise characterization of its properties. Here, we present a theoretical model that describes the frequency-dependent response of the sensor based on material properties and geometrical dimensions. Our model is divided into four distinct parts that address different aspects of the sensor. The model describes the frequency-dependent behaviour of the fluidic filter and a thermal low-pass filter as well as saturation effects at low frequencies. This model allows the calculation of optimal design parameters, and thereby provides the foundation for the development of such a sensor.

  11. Proximity and gaze influences facial temperature: a thermal infrared imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Stephanos; Morris, Paul; Mercer, Hayley; Baker, Marc; Gallese, Vittorio; Reddy, Vasudevi

    2014-01-01

    Direct gaze and interpersonal proximity are known to lead to changes in psycho-physiology, behavior and brain function. We know little, however, about subtler facial reactions such as rise and fall in temperature, which may be sensitive to contextual effects and functional in social interactions. Using thermal infrared imaging cameras 18 female adult participants were filmed at two interpersonal distances (intimate and social) and two gaze conditions (averted and direct). The order of variation in distance was counterbalanced: half the participants experienced a female experimenter's gaze at the social distance first before the intimate distance (a socially “normal” order) and half experienced the intimate distance first and then the social distance (an odd social order). At both distances averted gaze always preceded direct gaze. We found strong correlations in thermal changes between six areas of the face (forehead, chin, cheeks, nose, maxilliary, and periorbital regions) for all experimental conditions and developed a composite measure of thermal shifts for all analyses. Interpersonal proximity led to a thermal rise, but only in the “normal” social order. Direct gaze, compared to averted gaze, led to a thermal increase at both distances with a stronger effect at intimate distance, in both orders of distance variation. Participants reported direct gaze as more intrusive than averted gaze, especially at the intimate distance. These results demonstrate the powerful effects of another person's gaze on psycho-physiological responses, even at a distance and independent of context. PMID:25136326

  12. Evaluating Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing of Evapotranspiration over Cotton with Two Surface Energy Balance Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, A. N.; Hunsaker, D.; Thorp, K.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal infrared remote sensing can be used to map evapotranspiration (ET) over irrigated crops, which provides a way to estimate plant water use, detect water stress, and improve water management decision support systems. Multiple thermal infrared surface energy balance models that estimate ET have been developed and refined over recent years and are actively being used at local to continental scales. However, relatively few intensive, field-based studies have been conducted to evaluate model estimates and their relative merits. To help resolve ET estimation accuracy with differing remote sensing models, a study was conducted over an irrigated crop in Central Arizona in 2009 and 2011. Using extensive ground moisture measurements over a 4.9 ha cotton field and seven airborne remote sensing flights, this study evaluated ET provided by two prominent approaches: the two-source energy balance model (TSEB) and the 'Satellite-based energy balance for mapping evapotranspiration with internalized calibration' model (METRIC). Both use thermal infrared data as essential inputs. However, TSEB is characterized by strong linkage to biophysics, while METRIC is distinguished by its use of contextual information. Based on soil moisture profile observations at 112 locations, and the same input remote sensing data, METRIC was found accurate to 2 mm/day in a majority of cases, while TSEB was similarly accurate at a 1.5 mm/day threshold. These accuracies were representative for emergent, full canopy, and late season cotton growth phases. TSEB and METRIC were similarly biased, ~ -0.7 mm/day. Considering similarity of results at field scale, model complexity, input data requirements, and ease of implementation, TSEB would be preferred for well-instrumented sites. In the case of data sparse sites, METRIC would be recommended as a robust ET approach. The role of land surface temperature uncertainty for modeling ET will be discussed.

  13. Thermal Infrared Imaging Experiments of C-Type Asteroid 162173 Ryugu on Hayabusa2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsuaki; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Taguchi, Makoto; Imamura, Takeshi; Arai, Takehiko; Senshu, Hiroki; Ogawa, Yoshiko; Demura, Hirohide; Kitazato, Kohei; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Kouyama, Toru; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Wada, Takehiko; Takita, Jun; Sakatani, Naoya; Horikawa, Yamato; Endo, Ken; Helbert, Jörn; Müller, Thomas G.; Hagermann, Axel

    2016-09-01

    The thermal infrared imager TIR onboard Hayabusa2 has been developed to investigate thermo-physical properties of C-type, near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu. TIR is one of the remote science instruments on Hayabusa2 designed to understand the nature of a volatile-rich solar system small body, but it also has significant mission objectives to provide information on surface physical properties and conditions for sampling site selection as well as the assessment of safe landing operations. TIR is based on a two-dimensional uncooled micro-bolometer array inherited from the Longwave Infrared Camera LIR on Akatsuki (Fukuhara et al., 2011). TIR takes images of thermal infrared emission in 8 to 12 μm with a field of view of 16 × 12° and a spatial resolution of 0.05° per pixel. TIR covers the temperature range from 150 to 460 K, including the well calibrated range from 230 to 420 K. Temperature accuracy is within 2 K or better for summed images, and the relative accuracy or noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) at each of pixels is 0.4 K or lower for the well-calibrated temperature range. TIR takes a couple of images with shutter open and closed, the corresponding dark frame, and provides a true thermal image by dark frame subtraction. Data processing involves summation of multiple images, image processing including the StarPixel compression (Hihara et al., 2014), and transfer to the data recorder in the spacecraft digital electronics (DE). We report the scientific and mission objectives of TIR, the requirements and constraints for the instrument specifications, the designed instrumentation and the pre-flight and in-flight performances of TIR, as well as its observation plan during the Hayabusa2 mission.

  14. A Study of Thermal Infrared Field Spectral Signatures: Implications for Studies of Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keim, E.; Kirkland, L.; Herr, K.; Adams, P.; Hackwell, J.

    2000-10-01

    Hyperspectral data recorded of indurated, weathered carbonates by the airborne imaging spectrometer SEBASS show that some massive carbonates exhibit dramatically reduced spectral contrast for the strong carbonate bands at 6.5 and 11.25 microns. If massive carbonates are present on Mars, this type of reduced spectral contrast could explain why they have not been detected using thermal infrared data sets, including the Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). It could also cause similarly rough carbonates to be missed by the planned 2001 nine-band radiometer THEMIS, and could affect measurements by a landed spectrometer. On the other hand, SEBASS data demonstrate that these deposits can be detected by spectra recorded with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The observed reduction in band contrast is significant, and we conclude it is cause by surface roughness effects [1]. The nature of carbonate and other formations on Mars is uncertain, but a rough surface is certainly a possibility that must be taken into account. These results should be considered in planning for future instruments and when utilizing current data sets to set detection limits. Most spectral studies to determine detection limits rely predominantly on laboratory measurements of well-crystalline, pure end-members, with desirable instrument parameters and detection limits based on those results. However, our results show the importance of extending thermal infrared spectral studies to the field, and the relevance to spectral studies of Mars. This effect was found by drawing on expertise and unique technology most commonly used for the Department of Defense (DoD). The significance of the lessons learned illustrate the importance both of extending spectral studies to the field, and of drawing on non-traditional groups in order to best define what is needed to detect and identify interesting materials on Mars using infrared spectroscopy. [1] Kirkland L. et al. (2000) LPSC abs.1876 and

  15. Thermal-Infrared Laboratory Measurements in Support of the Diviner Lunar Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Bowles, N. E.; Warren, T.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; LRO Diviner Team

    2012-10-01

    The Diviner Lunar Radiometer is a high-resolution, nine-channel mapping radiometer currently orbiting the Moon on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The instrument consists of two solar channels (0.35 - 2.8 μm), three ‘8 μm’ channels (7.55 - 8.05, 8.1 - 8.4 and 8.4 - 8.7 μm) and four thermal channels (13 - 23, 25 - 41, 50 - 100, and 100 - 400 μm) [6]. The ‘8 μm’ channels were designed to map the spectral location of the Christiansen Feature (CF), a mid-infrared emissivity maximum, the wavelength of which is highly dependent on surface composition [5], while the longer-wavelength channels measure surface brightness temperatures down to < 30K [6]. The shape and wavelength of the CF is highly affected by the lunar environment [e.g. 1,2,3,4 etc.], therefore using most existing mid-infrared spectral libraries is problematic, hence new measurements made in a simulated thermal environment are required. Also, mid-infrared emission and scattering properties are poorly constrained at present. Therefore, to further understand Diviner observations, several experiments have been built (and continue to be built) in the department. These include: (a) a chamber for measuring the mid- and far- infrared emissivity of minerals and lunar samples in a simulated lunar environment; (b) a multiple-angle infrared reflectance apparatus; and (c) a mid- and far- infrared lunar environment goniometer, which is currently under construction. [1] Henderson, B. G. et al. (1996) J. Geophys. Res., 101, 14969-1497 [2] Henderson, B. G. & Jakosky, B. M. (1997) J. Geophys. Res., 102, 6567-6580 [3] Logan, L. M. and Hunt G. R. (1970) Science, 169, 865-866 [4] Logan, L. M. et al. (1973) J. Geophys. Res., 78, 4983-5003 [5] Nash, D. B. et al. (1993) J. Geophys. Res., 98, 23535-23552 [6] Paige, D. A. et al. (2009) Space Sci. Rev., 150, 125-160

  16. Soil moisture estimation using reflected solar and emitted thermal infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Cihlar, J.; Estes, J. E.; Heilman, J. L.; Kahle, A.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Millard, J.; Price, J. C.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Classical methods of measuring soil moisture such as gravimetric sampling and the use of neutron moisture probes are useful for cases where a point measurement is sufficient to approximate the water content of a small surrounding area. However, there is an increasing need for rapid and repetitive estimations of soil moisture over large areas. Remote sensing techniques potentially have the capability of meeting this need. The use of reflected-solar and emitted thermal-infrared radiation, measured remotely, to estimate soil moisture is examined.

  17. Fractal morphology of black carbon aerosol enhances absorption in the thermal infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Heinson, William R; Chakrabarty, Rajan K

    2016-02-15

    In this Letter, we numerically calculate the mass absorption cross sections (MACs) of black carbon fractal aggregates in the thermal infrared solar spectrum. Compared to equivalent-size spheres, the MAC values of aggregates show a percent enhancement of ≈150 and 400 at small and large length scales, respectively. The absorption properties of aggregates with size parameters >1 surprisingly continued to remain in the Rayleigh optics regime. We explain this phenomenon using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory and the concept of phase shift parameter. PMID:26872194

  18. Thermal Physical, and Infrared Spectroscopic Studies on Glasses Prepared by Microwave Route

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesha, N.; Gowda, V. C. Veeranna; Chakradhar, R. P. S.; Reddy, C. Narayana

    2011-07-15

    This paper describes thermal, physical and spectroscopic properties of glasses prepared by a novel micro wave method. These studies exhibited a strong compositional dependent trend and existence of characteristic boro-vanadate groups in these glasses. The scheme of modification of borate and vanadate groups is controlled by Sanderson's electronegativity principle. Analysis of density and glass transition temperatures suggests the presence of characteristic four coordinated borate and diboro - vanadate groups in these glasses. The presence of [BO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} and [B{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 9}]{sup 2-}) groups are confirmed by Infrared Spectroscopy of investigated glasses.

  19. Utilization of thermal infrared image for inversion of winter wheat yield and biomass.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen-Yong; Zhang, Lu-Da; Hu, Zhen-Fang; Shamaila, Z; Zeng, Ai-Jun; Song, Jian-Li; Liu, Ya-Jia; Wolfram, S; Joachim, M; He, Xiong-Kui

    2011-06-01

    The present paper utilizes thermal infrared image for inversion of winter wheat yield and biomass with different technology of irrigation (drip irrigation, sprinkler irrigation, flood irrigation). It is the first time that thermal infrared image is used for predicting the winter wheat yield and biomass. The temperature of crop and background was measured by thermal infrared image. It is necessary to get the crop background separation index (CBSI(L), CBSI(H)), which can be used for distinguishing the crop value from the image. CBSI(L) and CBSI(H) (the temperature when the leaves are wet adequately; the temperature when the stomata of leaf is closed completely) are the threshold values. The temperature of crop ranged from CBSI(L) to CBSI(H). Then the ICWSI was calculated based on relevant theoretical method. The value of stomata leaf has strong negative correlation with ICWSI proving the reliable value of ICWSI. In order to construct the high accuracy simulation model, the samples were divided into two parts. One was used for constructing the simulation model, the other for checking the accuracy of the model. Such result of the model was concluded as: (1) As for the simulation model of soil moisture, the correlation coefficient (R2) is larger than 0.887 6, the average of relative error (Er) ranges from 13.33% to 16.88%; (2) As for the simulation model of winter wheat yield, drip irrigation (0.887 6, 16.89%, -0.12), sprinkler irrigation (0.970 0, 14.85%, - 0.12), flood irrigation (0.969 0, 18.87%, -0.18), with the values of R2, Er and CRM listed in the parentheses followed by the individual term. (3) As for winter wheat biomass, drip irrigation (0.980 0, 13.70%, -0.13), sprinkler irrigation (0.95, 13.15%, -0.14), flood irrigation (0.970 0, 14.48%, -0.13), and the values in the parentheses are demonstrated the same as above. Both the CRM and Er are shown to be very low values, which points to the accuracy and reliability of the model investigated. The accuracy of model

  20. General characteristics and availability of Landsat 3 and heat capacity mapping mission thermal infrared data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    Two satellite systems launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in 1978 carried sensors which operated in the thermal infrared (IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum, The final IR radiation data provide spectral information about the physical properties of the Earth's surficial materials not duplicated in either the visible or reflective IR wavelength regions. Landsat 3, launched on March 5, 1978, contained a thermal sensor as part of the multispectral scanner (MSS) system. The sensor operated in the 10.4- to 12.6-?m (band 8) wavelength region and produced imagery with a ground resolution of approximately 235 m. Launched on April 26) 1978) the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM) spacecraft carried a sensor, the heat capacity mapping radiometer (HCMR) which operated in the 10.5- to 12.5?m wavelength region and produced imagery with a ground resolution of approximately 600 m at nadir. The HCMM satellite acquired over 6,600 data passes of visible (0.55-1.1 ?m), as well as thermal IR data, over North America, Europe, and Australia. General characteristics and availability of Landsat 3 and HCMM thermal IR data are discussed. Landsat 3 reflected IR band 7 (0.55-1.1 ?m) and Landsat 3 band 8 thermal data acquired over the eastern and western United States are analyzed and compared with HCMM visible, thermal IR, thermal inertia, and day-night temperature difference imagery for geologic applications. Digitally processed and enhanced HCMM data (high-pass filters, diagonal derivatives, and band ratios), produced by the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff) Ariz., are presented for geologic interpretation.

  1. Thermal Aspects of Pyroelectric Ceramic Functional Material for Infrared Image Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, M. A.; Sugai, T.; Kawazu, N.; Akai, D.; Sawada, K.; Ishida, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design, fabrication and thermal simulation of smart 1024-element (32 × 32 pixels), monolithic, pyroelectric, functional electro-ceramic material-based infrared (IR) image sensors. A sol-gel-deposited PbZr0.4Ti0.6O3 (PZT) thin film was used as a pyroelectric material for the detector. We tailored the geometries and dimensions of the devices in designing the the image sensors with a smart material. The influence of a thermal isolator has been shown to significantly reduce heat loss to the device structure and environment. Introducing circular pixels instead of square ones has confirmed the ability to obtain an optimal design with a functional material for use in a smart image sensor, resulting in a maximal temperature change of 4 mK at a response frequency of 10 Hz.

  2. [Quantitative estimation of CaO content in surface rocks using hyperspectral thermal infrared emissivity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Fu; Zhang, Xue-Wen; Huang, Zhao-Qiang; Yang, Hang; Zhang, Fei-Zhou

    2011-11-01

    The objective of the present paper is to study the quantitative relationship between the CaO content and the thermal infrared emissivity spectra. The surface spectral emissivity of 23 solid rocks samples were measured in the field and the first derivative of the spectral emissivity was also calculated. Multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were modeled and the regression results were compared. The results show that there is a good relationship between CaO content and thermal emissivity spectra features; emissivities become lower when CaO content increases in the 10.3-13 mm region; the first derivative spectra have a better predictive ability compared to the original emissivity spectra.

  3. Thermal runaway in polyimide at high electric field probed by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaham, Sombel; Belijar, Guillaume; Locatelli, Marie-Laure; Lebey, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    An original way for characterizing dielectrics under high electric field and high temperature based on the coupling between electric current measurements and real-time fast infrared (IR) thermography is demonstrated. Particularly, the Joule heating phenomenon at high field is quantified by 2D-temperature cartography in a polyimide (PI) film set at an initial temperature of 300 °C through IR observations of the polarized electrode. 2D-temperature cartography highlights the temperature increase with increasing the electric field. The thermal runway occurs prior to the dielectric breakdown from an electric field threshold of 140-150 V/μm. This corresponds to a dissipated volume power density between 2 and 5 mW/μm3. Such values report the limit of the electro-thermal equilibrium in PI film.

  4. The Case for Moderately-Cooled, Far-Infrared Thermal Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, John C.; Lakew, Brook

    2004-01-01

    There are moderately-cooled (around 77K) infrared detectors, for instance InSb (around 5 microns wavelength) and HgCdTe (around 15 to 20 microns wavelength). However for longer wavelengths there are either uncooled thermal-type detectors or highly cooled (about 4K and lower) quantum and thermal detectors, with the notable exception of high Tc superconductor detectors. We will describe certain long-wavelength applications in space where only moderate cooling is feasible, and where better sensitivity is required than possible with uncooled detectors. These requirements could be met with high Tc bolometers, but it may also be prudent to develop other technologies. Additionally, over the past 16 years a marketplace has not developed for the commercial production of high Tc bolometers, indicating their production may be a natural endeavor for government laboratories.

  5. Anomalous subsurface thermal behavior in tissue mimics upon near infrared irradiation mediated photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soham; Sahoo, Nilamani; Sajanlal, P R; Sarangi, Nirod Kumar; Ramesh, Nivarthi; Panda, Tapobrata; Pradeep, T; Das, Sarit Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Photothermal therapy using (Near Infrared) NIR region of EM spectrum is a fast emerging technology for cancer therapy. Different types of nanoparticles may be used for enhancing the treatment. Though the treatment protocols are developed based on experience driven estimated temperature increase in the tissue, it is not really known what spatiotemporal thermal behavior in the tissue is. In this work, this thermal behavior of tissue models is investigated with and without using nanoparticles. An increased temperature inside tissue compared to surface is observed which is counter intuitive from the present state of knowledge. It is shown from fiber level microstructure that this increased temperature leads to enhanced damage at the deeper parts of biomaterials. Nanoparticles can be utilized to control this temperature increase spatially. A multiple scattering based physical model is proposed to explain this counterintuitive temperature rise inside tissue. The results show promising future for better understanding and standardizing the protocols for photothermal therapy.

  6. Photothermal and infrared thermography characterizations of thermal diffusion in hydroxyapatite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Conde-Contreras, M.; Trujillo, S.; Martinez-Torres, P.; Cruz-Jimenez, B.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    Non destructive analysis of hydroxyapatite materials is an active research area mainly in the study of dental pieces and bones due to the importance these pieces have in medicine, archeology, dentistry, forensics and anthropology. Infrared thermography and photothermal techniques constitute highly valuable tools in those cases. In this work the quantitative analysis of thermal diffusion in bones is presented. The results obtained using thermographic images are compared with the ones obtained from the photothermal radiometry. Special emphasis is done in the analysis of samples with previous thermal damage. Our results show that the treatments induce changes in the physical properties of the samples. These results could be useful in the identification of the agents that induced modifications of unknown origin in hydroxyapatite structures.

  7. Evaluation of the infrared test method for the olympus thermal balance tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, M.; Stpierre, D.; Green, J.; Reeves, M.

    The performance of the infrared (IR) rig used for the thermal balance testing of the Olympus S/C thermal model is discussed. Included in this evaluation are the rig effects themselves, the IRFLUX computer code used to predict the radiation inputs, the Monitored Background Radiometers (MBR's) developed to measure the absorbed radiation flux intensity, the Uniform Temperature Reference (UTR) based temperature measurement system and the data acquisition system. A preliminary set of verification tests were performed on a 1 m x 1 m zone to assess the performance of the IR lamps, calrods, MBR's and aluminized baffles. The results were used, in part, to obtain some empirical data required for the IRFLUX code. This data included lamp and calrod characteristics, the absorptance function for various surface types, and the baffle reflectivities.

  8. Use of thermal-infrared imagery in ground-water investigations in Montana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettcher, A. J.; Haralick, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal infrared imagery was used to locate ground-water inflow along three streams and one lake in Montana. The thermal scanner used in May 1972, March 1973, and November 1975 was mounted in a twin-engined aircraft. On the 1973 and 1975 flights, the data were recorded in an analog format on magnetic tape in flight, later were converted to digital format, and were computer processed using an assignment of patterns to indicate differences in water temperature. Output from the image processing program was converted to a temperature map having an isotherm spacing of 0.5 C. Computerization was found to be the most efficient method to manipulate data from lakes, large rivers, and narrow sinuous streams.

  9. Aerial Photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    John Hill, a pilot and commercial aerial photographer, needed an information base. He consulted NERAC and requested a search of the latest developments in camera optics. NERAC provided information; Hill contacted the manufacturers of camera equipment and reduced his photographic costs significantly.

  10. A statistical approach to the thermal analysis at fumarole fields using infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisciotta, Antonino; Diliberto, Iole Serena

    2016-04-01

    In the last decades, volcanology has evolved significantly, allowing for an improved understanding of volcanic processes preceding, accompanying and following eruptive events. Thermal imaging data, especially when used together with other monitoring techniques (such as seismicity, GPS measurements, and gas emissions), help to determine the nature of volcanic hazards. Between 2013 and 2015, four thermal surveys of the Vulcano Fossa fumarole field have been carried out. The fluid geochemistry of the target area and the time variation of the maximum temperature of the fluids released by the steaming vents have been well defined during the last decades and a great amount of scientific papers discussing interpretative models of the hydrothermal and magmatic systems feeding the fumaroles are available. The sequences of thermal images were recorded from a fixed view point 400 m (38°24.111' N 14°57.721' E), using a handheld infrared camera. The field surveys aimed to define the areal extension of thermal anomalies. The probability plots revealed different populations of data in each survey. The temperature space variability can be inferred to variable components of heat transport (radiative, convective, conductive) participating in the heat exchange occurring at the ground surface. The variation of shallow permeability of the ground and of the thermal capacity of the exposed surfaces are the main causes of space variability of exposed surfaces. The enlargement of the exhaling area and/or an increase of thermal anomaly surrounding the main fumarole vents (due to steam heating from the bottom source) can highlight significant increases of thermal release even when the maximum temperature of fumarole fluids falls. It has occurred in the last years in the fumarole in the inner slope, like FA fumarole where t dropped from 700°C in 1993 to the actual 250 °C but at the same time the area of steam emission abruptly changed. Responding to thermodynamic basic principles the

  11. Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies.

    PubMed

    Cilip, Christopher M; Rosenbury, Sarah B; Giglio, Nicholas; Hutchens, Thomas C; Schweinsberger, Gino R; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Nau, William H; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-05-01

    Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578 ± 154, 530 ± 171, and 426 ± 174  mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0 ± 0.4  mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (>4  mm outer diameter). PMID:23640080

  12. Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies.

    PubMed

    Cilip, Christopher M; Rosenbury, Sarah B; Giglio, Nicholas; Hutchens, Thomas C; Schweinsberger, Gino R; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Nau, William H; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-05-01

    Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578 ± 154, 530 ± 171, and 426 ± 174  mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0 ± 0.4  mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (>4  mm outer diameter).

  13. Infrared laser thermal fusion of blood vessels: preliminary ex vivo tissue studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Rosenbury, Sarah B.; Giglio, Nicholas; Hutchens, Thomas C.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Kerr, Duane; Latimer, Cassandra; Nau, William H.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-05-01

    Suture ligation of blood vessels during surgery can be time-consuming and skill-intensive. Energy-based, electrosurgical, and ultrasonic devices have recently replaced the use of sutures and mechanical clips (which leave foreign objects in the body) for many surgical procedures, providing rapid hemostasis during surgery. However, these devices have the potential to create an undesirably large collateral zone of thermal damage and tissue necrosis. We explore an alternative energy-based technology, infrared lasers, for rapid and precise thermal coagulation and fusion of the blood vessel walls. Seven near-infrared lasers (808, 980, 1075, 1470, 1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were tested during preliminary tissue studies. Studies were performed using fresh porcine renal vessels, ex vivo, with native diameters of 1 to 6 mm, and vessel walls flattened to a total thickness of 0.4 mm. A linear beam profile was applied normal to the vessel for narrow, full-width thermal coagulation. The laser irradiation time was 5 s. Vessel burst pressure measurements were used to determine seal strength. The 1470 nm laser wavelength demonstrated the capability of sealing a wide range of blood vessels from 1 to 6 mm diameter with burst strengths of 578±154, 530±171, and 426±174 mmHg for small, medium, and large vessel diameters, respectively. Lateral thermal coagulation zones (including the seal) measured 1.0±0.4 mm on vessels sealed at this wavelength. Other laser wavelengths (1550, 1850 to 1880, and 1908 nm) were also capable of sealing vessels, but were limited by lower vessel seal pressures, excessive charring, and/or limited power output preventing treatment of large vessels (>4 mm outer diameter).

  14. A theoretical investigation of human skin thermal response to near-infrared laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Tianhong; Pikkula, Brian M.; Wang, Lihong V.; Anvari, Bahman

    2004-07-01

    Near-infrared wavelengths are absorbed less by epidermal melanin mainly located at the basal layer of epidermis (dermo-epidermal junction), and penetrate deeper into human skin dermis and blood than visible wavelengths. Therefore, laser irradiation using near-infrared wavelength may improve the therapeutic outcome of cutaneous hyper-vascular malformations in moderately to heavily pigmented skin patients and those with large-sized blood vessels or blood vessels extending deeply into the skin. A mathematical model composed of a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate the distribution of absorbed light followed by numerical solution of a bio-heat diffusion equation was utilized to investigate the thermal response of human skin to near-infrared laser irradiation, and compared it with that to visible laser irradiation. Additionally, the effect of skin surface cooling on epidermal protection was theoretically investigated. Simulation results indicated that 940 nm wavelength is superior to 810 and 1064 nm in terms of the ratio of light absorption by targeted blood vessel to the absorption by the basal layer of epidermis, and is more efficient than 595 nm wavelength for the treatment of patients with large-sized blood vessels and moderately to heavily pigmented skin. Dermal blood content has a considerable effect on the laser-induced peak temperature at the basal layer of epidermis, while the effect of blood vessel size is minimum.

  15. Infrared-based NDE methods for determining thermal properties and defects in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Ellingson, W.A.; Steckenrider, J.S.; Koch, S.

    1996-08-01

    Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites are currently being developed for various high temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. In the material classes of interest for such applications, i.e., silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC{sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3 (f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, etc., the condition of the interface between the fibers and matrix is critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of each component. A nondestructive evaluation method developed at Argonne National Laboratory uses infrared thermal imaging to provide ``single-shot`` full-field measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. By applying digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, the authors have achieved acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density, and variations in fiber coatings in a full array of test specimens.

  16. Determining thermal diffusivity and defect attributes in ceramic matrix composites by infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Sanjay; Ellingson, William A.; Stuckey, J. B.; Koehl, E. R.

    1996-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for numerous high temperature applications, including rotors and combustors for advanced turbine engines, heat exchanger and hot-gas filters for coal gasification plants. Among the materials of interest are silicon-carbide-fiber- reinforced-silicon-carbide (SiC(f)/SiC), silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-nitride (SiC(f)/Si3N4), aluminum-oxide-reinforced-alumina (Al2O3(f)/Al2O3, etc. In the manufacturing of these ceramic composites, the conditions of the fiber/matrix interface are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component. Defects such as delaminations and non-uniform porosity can directly affect the performance. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method, developed at Argonne National Laboratory has proved beneficial in analyzing as-processed conditions and defect detection created during manufacturing. This NDE method uses infrared thermal imaging for full-field quantitative measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. Intensity transform algorithms have been used for contrast enhancement of the output image. Nonuniformity correction and automatic gain control are used to dynamically optimize video contrast and brightness, providing additional resolution in the acquired images. Digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques have been incorporated for noise reduction and data acquisition. The Argonne NDE system has been utilized to determine thermal shock damage, density variations, and variations in fiber coating in a full array of test specimens.

  17. MAPPING INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA L.) IN THREE COASTAL ESTUARIES OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST USA USING FALSE-COLOUR NEAR-INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study describes a hybrid technique of digitally classifying aerial photography used for mapping the intertidal habitat of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in Pacific Northwest USA estuaries. The large tidal range (2-3 m) in this region exposes most of this seagrass community at ...

  18. Thermal stability of lightweight graphite glass sandwich reflectors for far infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluege, J. H.; Mayor, R. A.; Hoffman, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Graphite fiber-reinforced glass matrix composites are being developed for a variety of structural applications requiring excellent thermomechanical stability. These materials are ideally suited for lightweight, high strength, thermally stable infrared mirrors because of their low density, low thermal expansion, high strength and stiffness, and their ability to be machined, replicated and figured using standard polishing techniques. These properties are particularly promising for applications such as a 3-meter balloon-borne far-infrared and submillimeter telescope mirror which must be both very lightweight and able to retain its figure accuracy when cycled between room temperature and its operating temperature of -50 C. This paper presents the results of a set of low temperature optical tests conducted to determine the figure stability of a 30-cm diameter, frit-bonded graphite/glass mirror in the +20 to -60 C temperature range using a 10.6 micron laser interferometer. The results indicate that the residual change in figure was less than 0.3 microns, rms.

  19. Determination of rock type on Mercury and the moon through remote sensing in the thermal infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, Ann L.; Kozlowski, Richard W. H.; Lebofsky, Larry A.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal infrared emission spectra of the moon and Mercury have been obtained using the Si:As photoconductor and circular variable filter at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Lunar spectra from 7.2 to 12.2 microns for two different locations in the south polar highlands have Christiansen frequency peaks at 8.1 microns and 7.9 microns, respectively. This indicates different compositions at the two locations; mafic in the first case, more felsic in the second. Emission spectra from Mercury are not as spatially localized,; however, the longitude of maximum contribution to the spectrum can be calculated from thermal models of the earth-facing disk. Results for areas centered at two longitudes have been obtained. Two locations in the intercrater plains were observed. At 40-deg longitude (very near the crater Homer), a peak at 7.9 microns indicates mafic igneous rock type. Spectra emanating from 46-deg longitude have peaks at 7.8 microns, indicating a region borderline between mafic and intermediate composition.

  20. Multispectral thermal infrared mapping of the 1 October 1988 Kupaianaha flow field, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Realmuto, V.J.; Hon, K.; Kahle, A.B.; Abbott, E.A.; Pieri, D.C.

    1992-01-01

    Multispectral thermal infrared radiance measurements of the Kupaianaha flow field were acquired with the NASA airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) on the morning of 1 October 1988. The TIMS data were used to map both the temperature and emissivity of the surface of the flow field. The temperature map depicted the underground storage and transport of lava. The presence of molten lava in a tube or tumulus resulted in surface temperatures that were at least 10?? C above ambient. The temperature map also clearly defined the boundaries of hydrothermal plumes which resulted from the entry of lava into the ocean. The emissivity map revealed the boundaries between individual flow units within the Kupaianaha field. In general, the emissivity of the flows varied systematically with age but the relationship between age and emissivity was not unique. Distinct spectral anomalies, indicative of silica-rich surface materials, were mapped near fumaroles and ocean entry sites. This apparent enrichment in silica may have resulted from an acid-induced leaching of cations from the surfaces of glassy flows. Such incipient alteration may have been the cause for virtually all of the emissivity variations observed on the flow field, the spectral anomalies representing areas where the acid attack was most intense. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Comparison of 3 infrared thermal detection systems and self-report for mass fever screening.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An V; Cohen, Nicole J; Lipman, Harvey; Brown, Clive M; Molinari, Noelle Angelique; Jackson, William L; Kirking, Hannah; Szymanowski, Paige; Wilson, Todd W; Salhi, Bisan A; Roberts, Rebecca R; Stryker, David W; Fishbein, Daniel B

    2010-11-01

    Despite limited evidence regarding their utility, infrared thermal detection systems (ITDS) are increasingly being used for mass fever detection. We compared temperature measurements for 3 ITDS (FLIR ThermoVision A20M [FLIR Systems Inc., Boston, MA, USA], OptoTherm Thermoscreen [OptoTherm Thermal Imaging Systems and Infrared Cameras Inc., Sewickley, PA, USA], and Wahl Fever Alert Imager HSI2000S [Wahl Instruments Inc., Asheville, NC, USA]) with oral temperatures (≥ 100 °F = confirmed fever) and self-reported fever. Of 2,873 patients enrolled, 476 (16.6%) reported a fever, and 64 (2.2%) had a confirmed fever. Self-reported fever had a sensitivity of 75.0%, specificity 84.7%, and positive predictive value 10.1%. At optimal cutoff values for detecting fever, temperature measurements by OptoTherm and FLIR had greater sensitivity (91.0% and 90.0%, respectively) and specificity (86.0% and 80.0%, respectively) than did self-reports. Correlations between ITDS and oral temperatures were similar for OptoTherm (ρ = 0.43) and FLIR (ρ = 0.42) but significantly lower for Wahl (ρ = 0.14; p < 0.001). When compared with oral temperatures, 2 systems (OptoTherm and FLIR) were reasonably accurate for detecting fever and predicted fever better than self-reports.

  2. [Validation of HJ-1B thermal infrared channels onboard radiometric calibration based on spectral response differences].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Fu, Qiao-yan; Shi, Ting-ting; Wang, Ai-chun; Zhang, Xue-wen

    2014-08-01

    Since HJ-1B was launched, 7 sets of blackbody data have been used to calculate onboard calibration coefficients, but the research work on the validation of coefficients is rare. According to the onboard calibration principle, calibration coefficients of HJ-1B thermal infrared channel on Sep 14th, 2009 were calculated with the half-width, moments and look-up table methods. MODIS was selected for the reference sensor, and algorithms of spectral match were improved between the HJ-1B thermal infrared channel and MODIS 31, 32 channels based on the spectral response divergence. The relationship of top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance between the remote sensors was calculated, based on which the surface leaving brightness temperature was calculated by Planck function to validate the brightness temperature calculated through the onboard calibration coefficients. The equivalent brightness temperature calculated by spectral response divergence method is 285.97 K, and the inversion brightness temperature calculated by half-width, moments and look-up table methods is 288.77, 274.52 and 285.97 K respectively. The difference between the inversion brightness temperature and the equivalent brightness temperature is 2.8, -11.46 and 0.02 K, respectively, which demonstrate that onboard calibration coefficients calculated by the look-up table method has better precision and feasibility.

  3. Dark and background response stability for the Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared Sensor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vanderwerff, Kelly; Montanaro, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) is a pushbroom sensor that will be a part of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), which is a joint mission between NASA and the USGS. The TIRS instrument will continue to collect the thermal infrared data that are currently being collected by the Thematic Mapper and the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus on Landsats 5 and 7, respectively. One of the key requirements of the new sensor is that the dark and background response be stable to ensure proper data continuity from the legacy Landsat instruments. Pre launch testing of the instrument has recently been completed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), which included calibration collects that mimic those that will be performed on orbit. These collects include images of a cold plate meant to simulate the deep space calibration source as viewed by the instrument in flight. The data from these collects give insight into the stability of the instrument’s dark and background response, as well as factors that may cause these responses to vary. This paper quantifies the measured background and dark response of TIRS as well as its stability.

  4. Infrared Radiative Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeff I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Street, Ken W.; Markham, Jim R.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The infrared (IR) transmittance and reflectance of translucent thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have important implications for both the performance of these coatings as radiation barriers and emitters as well as affecting measurements of TBC thermal conductivity, especially as TBCs are being pushed to higher temperatures. In this paper, the infrared spectral directional-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance of plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) TBCs are reported. These measurements are compared to those for single crystal YSZ specimens to show the effects of the plasma-sprayed coating microstructure. It is shown that the coatings exhibit negligible absorption at wavelengths up to about 5 micrometers, and that internal scattering rather than surface reflections dominates the hemispherical reflectance. The translucent nature of the 8YSZ TBCs results in the absorptance/emittance and reflectance of TBC-coated substrates depending on the TBC thickness, microstructure, as well as the radiative properties of the underlying substrate. The effects of these properties on TBC measurements and performance are discussed.

  5. Comparison of 3 infrared thermal detection systems and self-report for mass fever screening.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, An V; Cohen, Nicole J; Lipman, Harvey; Brown, Clive M; Molinari, Noelle Angelique; Jackson, William L; Kirking, Hannah; Szymanowski, Paige; Wilson, Todd W; Salhi, Bisan A; Roberts, Rebecca R; Stryker, David W; Fishbein, Daniel B

    2010-11-01

    Despite limited evidence regarding their utility, infrared thermal detection systems (ITDS) are increasingly being used for mass fever detection. We compared temperature measurements for 3 ITDS (FLIR ThermoVision A20M [FLIR Systems Inc., Boston, MA, USA], OptoTherm Thermoscreen [OptoTherm Thermal Imaging Systems and Infrared Cameras Inc., Sewickley, PA, USA], and Wahl Fever Alert Imager HSI2000S [Wahl Instruments Inc., Asheville, NC, USA]) with oral temperatures (≥ 100 °F = confirmed fever) and self-reported fever. Of 2,873 patients enrolled, 476 (16.6%) reported a fever, and 64 (2.2%) had a confirmed fever. Self-reported fever had a sensitivity of 75.0%, specificity 84.7%, and positive predictive value 10.1%. At optimal cutoff values for detecting fever, temperature measurements by OptoTherm and FLIR had greater sensitivity (91.0% and 90.0%, respectively) and specificity (86.0% and 80.0%, respectively) than did self-reports. Correlations between ITDS and oral temperatures were similar for OptoTherm (ρ = 0.43) and FLIR (ρ = 0.42) but significantly lower for Wahl (ρ = 0.14; p < 0.001). When compared with oral temperatures, 2 systems (OptoTherm and FLIR) were reasonably accurate for detecting fever and predicted fever better than self-reports. PMID:21029528

  6. [Diagnosis method of cotton water status based on infrared thermal imaging].

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Ji-yang; Liu, Hao; Qiang, Xiao-man; Ning, Hui-feng; Chen, Xin-guo; Gong, Xue-wen

    2016-01-01

    Canopy temperature is one of promising signals for evaluating crop water status. The infrared thermal imager can provide real-time temperature distributions over larger areas with high spatial resolution. The main factors (the observation orientation, angle and distance) controlling the accuracy of measuring canopy temperature with the infrared thermal imaging were investigated in a cotton field. Moreover, the correlation relationships between the crop water stress index (CWSI), which was observed using different methods, and soil water content (SWC), leaf water potential (LWP), and stomatal conductance (g(s)) of cotton in different water treatments were analyzed. Results indicated that the CWSI, which was measured in the opposite direction of the sun with the observation angle of 45°, was in good correlation with LWP, g(s) and SWC, indicating it was a suitable observing method of canopy temperature. The canopy temperature gradually decreased with the increasing observation distance, so the calibration was necessary for long-distance measurement. By analyzing the relationship between the temperature at the dry/wet reference surface and the canopy temperature, we developed a suitable and simplified model of CWSI for cotton in the North China Plain. PMID:27228606

  7. Object detection utilizing a linear retrieval algorithm for thermal infrared imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and remote sensing have been proven to be extremely valuable tools for mineralogic discrimination. One technique for sub-pixel detection and data reduction, known as a spectral retrieval or unmixing algorithm, will prove useful in the analysis of data from scheduled TIR orbital instruments. This study represents the first quantitative attempt to identify the limits of the model, specifically concentrating on the TIR. The algorithm was written and applied to laboratory data, testing the effects of particle size, noise, and multiple endmembers, then adapted to operate on airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner data of the Kelso Dunes, CA, Meteor Crater, AZ, and Medicine Lake Volcano, CA. Results indicate that linear spectral unmixmg can produce accurate endmember detection to within an average of 5%. In addition, the effects of vitrification and textural variations were modeled. The ability to predict mineral or rock abundances becomes extremely useful in tracking sediment transport, decertification, and potential hazard assessment in remote volcanic regions. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  8. [Validation of HJ-1B thermal infrared channels onboard radiometric calibration based on spectral response differences].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Fu, Qiao-yan; Shi, Ting-ting; Wang, Ai-chun; Zhang, Xue-wen

    2014-08-01

    Since HJ-1B was launched, 7 sets of blackbody data have been used to calculate onboard calibration coefficients, but the research work on the validation of coefficients is rare. According to the onboard calibration principle, calibration coefficients of HJ-1B thermal infrared channel on Sep 14th, 2009 were calculated with the half-width, moments and look-up table methods. MODIS was selected for the reference sensor, and algorithms of spectral match were improved between the HJ-1B thermal infrared channel and MODIS 31, 32 channels based on the spectral response divergence. The relationship of top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance between the remote sensors was calculated, based on which the surface leaving brightness temperature was calculated by Planck function to validate the brightness temperature calculated through the onboard calibration coefficients. The equivalent brightness temperature calculated by spectral response divergence method is 285.97 K, and the inversion brightness temperature calculated by half-width, moments and look-up table methods is 288.77, 274.52 and 285.97 K respectively. The difference between the inversion brightness temperature and the equivalent brightness temperature is 2.8, -11.46 and 0.02 K, respectively, which demonstrate that onboard calibration coefficients calculated by the look-up table method has better precision and feasibility. PMID:25508743

  9. [Validation of HJ-1B thermal infrared channels onboard radiometric calibration based on spectral response differences].

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Fu, Qiao-yan; Shi, Ting-ting; Wang, Ai-chun; Zhang, Xue-wen

    2014-08-01

    Since HJ-1B was launched, 7 sets of blackbody data have been used to calculate onboard calibration coefficients, but the research work on the validation of coefficients is rare. According to the onboard calibration principle, calibration coefficients of HJ-1B thermal infrared channel on Sep 14th, 2009 were calculated with the half-width, moments and look-up table methods. MODIS was selected for the reference sensor, and algorithms of spectral match were improved between the HJ-1B thermal infrared channel and MODIS 31, 32 channels based on the spectral response divergence. The relationship of top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance between the remote sensors was calculated, based on which the surface leaving brightness temperature was calculated by Planck function to validate the brightness temperature calculated through the onboard calibration coefficients. The equivalent brightness temperature calculated by spectral response divergence method is 285.97 K, and the inversion brightness temperature calculated by half-width, moments and look-up table methods is 288.77, 274.52 and 285.97 K respectively. The difference between the inversion brightness temperature and the equivalent brightness temperature is 2.8, -11.46 and 0.02 K, respectively, which demonstrate that onboard calibration coefficients calculated by the look-up table method has better precision and feasibility. PMID:25474964

  10. A fast and mobile system for registration of low-altitude visual and thermal aerial images using multiple small-scale UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahyanejad, Saeed; Rinner, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    The use of multiple small-scale UAVs to support first responders in disaster management has become popular because of their speed and low deployment costs. We exploit such UAVs to perform real-time monitoring of target areas by fusing individual images captured from heterogeneous aerial sensors. Many approaches have already been presented to register images from homogeneous sensors. These methods have demonstrated robustness against scale, rotation and illumination variations and can also cope with limited overlap among individual images. In this paper we focus on thermal and visual image registration and propose different methods to improve the quality of interspectral registration for the purpose of real-time monitoring and mobile mapping. Images captured by low-altitude UAVs represent a very challenging scenario for interspectral registration due to the strong variations in overlap, scale, rotation, point of view and structure of such scenes. Furthermore, these small-scale UAVs have limited processing and communication power. The contributions of this paper include (i) the introduction of a feature descriptor for robustly identifying corresponding regions of images in different spectrums, (ii) the registration of image mosaics, and (iii) the registration of depth maps. We evaluated the first method using a test data set consisting of 84 image pairs. In all instances our approach combined with SIFT or SURF feature-based registration was superior to the standard versions. Although we focus mainly on aerial imagery, our evaluation shows that the presented approach would also be beneficial in other scenarios such as surveillance and human detection. Furthermore, we demonstrated the advantages of the other two methods in case of multiple image pairs.

  11. Atmospheric transmission and thermal background emission in the mid-infrared at Mauna Kea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otárola, A.; Richter, M.; Packham, C.; Chun, M.

    2015-04-01

    We present results of a preliminary study intended to quantitatively estimate the atmospheric transmission and thermal background emission in the mid-infrared (MIR), 7 μm - 26 μm, at the 13N TMT site in Mauna Kea. This is in the interest of supporting the planning of MIR instrumentation for the posible second-generation of astronomical instruments for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project. Mauna Kea, located at high altitude (4,050 m above sea level), enjoys natural conditions that make it an outstanding location for astronomical observations in the mid-infrared. The goal of this work is to produce a dataset and model that shows the atmospheric transmission and thermal emission for two cases of precipitable water vapor (PWV), a low value of 0.3 mm, and at 1.5 mm which represent near median conditions at the site. Besides, and driven by the interest of the MIR community to exploit the daily twilight times, we look at the specific atmospheric conditions around twilight as a function of season. The best conditions are found for cold and dry winter days, and in particular the morning twilight offers the best conditions. The analysis of PWV data, shows the median value for the site (all year conditions between 6:00 PM and 7:30AM) is 1.8 mm and that periods of water vapor lower than 1.0 mm are common, these supports the opportunity and discovery potential of the TMT project in the mid-infrared bands.

  12. The SpaceWire-based thermal infrared imager system for asteroid sample return mission HAYABUSA2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Hisashi; Okada, Tatsuaki; Funase, Ryu; Hihara, Hiroki; Sano, Junpei; Iwase, Kaori; Kashikawa, Ryoichi; Higashino, Isamu; Masuda, Tetsuya

    2013-09-01

    Thermal infrared imager system is developed for HAYABUSA2, which is planned to be launched in 2014 and aims at sample-return from a C class near-Earth asteroid 1999JU3 considered to contain organic or hydrated materials. The system consists of a thermal-infrared imager (TIR) and a digital electronics, which is used not only for the scientific investigation of physical properties of the asteroid surface, but also for the assessment of landing site selection and safe descent operation onto the asteroid surface with in situ measurement. Since round trip communication time between the asteroid and the Earth is more than thirty minutes, onboard automatic data processing function and high speed data recording capability are provided to exploit the limited downlink capacity which is up to 32kbps. TIR adopts an uncooled bolometer with 320 x 240 effective pixels. Image operations as multiple images summation, dark image subtraction, and the compensation of dead pixels are processed onboard. A processing module is connected to sensor interfaces through SpaceWire in order to provide deterministic processing time. Data compression is also provided to reduce restriction on storage capacity and operation time, which provides the equivalent compression ratio as JPEG2000 in 1/30 processing time in average. A high speed data recorder is also connected through SpaceWire in 50Mbps in order to record TIR data in parallel with other sensor data. The modularity of SpaceWire enables to use as built devices for TIR and inherits the same design as the long-wavelength infrared imager developed for the Venus climate orbiter Akatsuki.

  13. Mapping playa evaporite minerals and associated sediments in Death Valley, California, with multispectral thermal infrared images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Hook, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Efflorescent salt crusts and associated sediments in Death Valley, California, were studied with remote-sensing data acquired by the NASA thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS). Nine spectral classes that represent a variety of surface materials were distinguished, including several classes that reflect important aspects of the playa groundwater chemistry and hydrology. Evaporite crusts containing abundant thenardite (sodium sulfate) were mapped along the northern and eastern margins of the Cottonball Basin, areas where the inflow waters are rich in sodium. Gypsum (calcium sulfate) crusts were more common in the Badwater Basin, particularly near springs associated with calcic groundwaters along the western basin margin. Evaporite-rich crusts generally marked areas where groundwater is periodically near the surface and thus able to replenish the crusts though capillary evaporation. Detrital silicate minerals were prevalent in other parts of the salt pan where shallow groundwater does not affect the surface composition. The surface features in Death Valley change in response to climatic variations on several different timescales. For example, salt crusts on low-lying mudflats form and redissolve during seasonal-to-interannual cycles of wetting and desiccation. In contrast, recent flooding and erosion of rough-salt surfaces in Death Valley probably reflect increased regional precipitation spanning several decades. Remote-sensing observations of playas can provide a means for monitoring changes in evaporite facies and for better understanding the associated climatic processes. At present, such studies are limited by the availability of suitable airborne scanner data. However, with the launch of the Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 Platform in 1998, multispectral visible/near-infrared and thermal infrared remote-sensing data will become globally available. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. NEAR-INFRARED THERMAL EMISSION DETECTIONS OF A NUMBER OF HOT JUPITERS AND THE SYSTEMATICS OF GROUND-BASED NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Croll, Bryce; Albert, Loic; Lafreniere, David; Jayawardhana, Ray; Cushing, Michael; Moutou, Claire; Johnson, John Asher; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Deleuil, Magali; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-03-20

    We present detections of the near-infrared thermal emission of three hot Jupiters and one brown dwarf using the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These include Ks-band secondary eclipse detections of the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and Qatar-1b and the brown dwarf KELT-1b. We also report Y-band, K {sub CONT}-band, and two new and one reanalyzed Ks-band detections of the thermal emission of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b. We present a new reduction pipeline for CFHT/WIRCam data, which is optimized for high precision photometry. We also describe novel techniques for constraining systematic errors in ground-based near-infrared photometry, so as to return reliable secondary eclipse depths and uncertainties. We discuss the noise properties of our ground-based photometry for wavelengths spanning the near-infrared (the YJHK bands), for faint and bright stars, and for the same object on several occasions. For the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and WASP-12b we demonstrate the repeatability of our eclipse depth measurements in the Ks band; we therefore place stringent limits on the systematics of ground-based, near-infrared photometry, and also rule out violent weather changes in the deep, high pressure atmospheres of these two hot Jupiters at the epochs of our observations.

  15. Compositional and textural information from the dual inversion of visible, near and thermal infrared remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brackett, Robert A.; Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1993-01-01

    A technique is presented that allows extraction of compositional and textural information from visible, near and thermal infrared remotely sensed data. Using a library of both emissivity and reflectance spectra, endmember abundances and endmember thermal inertias are extracted from AVIRIS (Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) and TIMS (Thermal Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) data over Lunar Crater Volcanic Field, Nevada, using a dual inversion. The inversion technique is motivated by upcoming Mars Observer data and the need for separation of composition and texture parameters from sub pixel mixtures of bedrock and dust. The model employed offers the opportunity to extract compositional and textural information for a variety of endmembers within a given pixel. Geologic inferences concerning grain size, abundance, and source of endmembers can be made directly from the inverted data. These parameters are of direct relevance to Mars exploration, both for Mars Observer and for follow-on missions.

  16. [Effects of fullerene soot on the thermal decomposition and Fourier transform infrared spectrum of PEG].

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Li, Shu-fen; Zhao, Feng-qi; Pan, Qing; Yi, Jian-hua

    2008-12-01

    Effects of fullerene soot (FS) on the thermal decomposition and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FTIR) of polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular weight= 20,000) were investigated by thermal analysis (TG-DTG) and in-situ FTIR experiments. The results of thermal analytical experiments showed that the addition of FS postponed not only the initial decomposition temperatures but also the temperatures at maximum decomposition rate of PEG. The maximum decomposition peak temperatures increased and the maximum decomposition rates were lowered even with the addition of 0.1%FS. The in-situ FTIR experiments proved that there was no difference between the IR spectra of PEG and PEG with 10%FS. There wasn't any new chemical band formed but Vander waals force between FS and PEG. Although the addition of FS didn't influence the constitution of decomposition products of PEG, it obviously increased the decomposition temperature and the decomposition rate of PEG. Through the researches on condensed phase and gaseous phase FTIR spectrum of PEG and PEG with 10%FS, one could see that the effect of FS on the condensed phase FTIR spectrum of PEG was not obvious, but the addition of FS markedly enhanced the occurrence temperatures of most gaseous decomposition products of PEG. These results showed that the effect of FS on thermal decomposition of PEG was through the absorbance and desorption of gaseous phase decomposition products. With the temperature elevated, the gaseous products were gradually desorbed from the activity centers and the decomposition of PEG continued. The thermal decomposition peak of PEG was moved toward hi gher temperature with the addition of FS than that without FS.

  17. Thermal infrared observations and thermophysical characterization of OSIRIS-REx target asteroid (101955) Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, J. P.; Fernández, Y. R.; Kelley, M. S. P.; Warden (nèe Crane), K. T.; Hergenrother, C.; Lauretta, D. S.; Drake, M. J.; Campins, H.; Ziffer, J.

    2014-05-01

    Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) have garnered ever increasing attention over the past few years due to the insights they offer into Solar System formation and evolution, the potential hazard they pose, and their accessibility for both robotic and human spaceflight missions. Among the NEAs, carbonaceous asteroids hold particular interest because they may contain clues to how the Earth got its supplies of water and organic materials, and because none has yet been studied in detail by spacecraft. (101955) Bennu is special among NEAs in that it will not only be visited by a spacecraft, but the OSIRIS-REx mission will also return a sample of Bennu’s regolith to Earth for detailed laboratory study. This paper presents analysis of thermal infrared photometry and spectroscopy that test the hypotheses that Bennu is carbonaceous and that its surface is covered in fine-grained (sub-cm) regolith. The Spitzer Space Telescope observed Bennu in 2007, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to obtain spectra over the wavelength range 5.2-38 μm and images at 16 and 22 μm at 10 different longitudes, as well as the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to image Bennu at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm, also at 10 different longitudes. Thermophysical analysis, assuming a spherical body with the known rotation period and spin-pole orientation, returns an effective diameter of 484 ± 10 m, in agreement with the effective diameter calculated from the radar shape model at the orientation of the Spitzer observations (492 ± 20 m, Nolan, M.C., Magri, C., Howell, E.S., Benner, L.A.M., Giorgini, J.D., Hergenrother, C.W., Hudson, R.S., Lauretta, D.S., Margo, J.-L., Ostro, S.J., Scheeres, D.J. [2013]. Icarus 226, 629-640) and a visible geometric albedo of 0.046 ± 0.005 (using Hv = 20.51, Hergenrother, C.W. et al. [2013]. Icarus 226, 663-670). Including the radar shape model in the thermal analysis, and taking surface roughness into account, yields a disk-averaged thermal inertia of 310 ± 70 J m-2 K-1 s-1

  18. Preliminary on-orbit performance of the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on board Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Matthew; Tesfaye, Zelalem; Lunsford, Allen; Wenny, Brian; Reuter, Dennis; Markham, Brian; Smith, Ramsey; Thome, Kurtis

    2013-09-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on board Landsat 8 continues thermal band measurements of the Earth for the Landsat program. TIRS improves on previous Landsat designs by making use of a pushbroom sensor layout to collect data from the Earth in two spectral channels. The radiometric performance requirements of each detector were set to ensure the proper radiometric integrity of the instrument. The performance of TIRS was characterized during pre-flight thermal-vacuum testing. Calibration methods and algorithms were developed to translate the raw signal from the detectors into an accurate at-aperture spectral radiance. The TIRS instrument has the ability to view an on-board variable-temperature blackbody and a deep space view port for calibration purposes while operating on-orbit. After TIRS was successfully activated on-orbit, checks were performed on the instrument data to determine its image quality. These checkouts included an assessment of the on-board blackbody and deep space views as well as normal Earth scene collects. The calibration parameters that were determined pre-launch were updated by utilizing data from these preliminary on-orbit assessments. The TIRS on-orbit radiometric performance was then characterized using the updated calibration parameters. Although the characterization of the instrument is continually assessed over the lifetime of the mission, the preliminary results indicate that TIRS is meeting the noise and stability requirements while the pixel-to-pixel uniformity performance and the absolute radiometric performance require further study.

  19. Direct fusion of geostationary meteorological satellite visible and infrared images based on thermal physical properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Wulie, Buzha; Yang, Yiling; Wang, Hongqing

    2015-01-05

    This study investigated a novel method of fusing visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) images with the major objective of obtaining higher-resolution IR images. Most existing image fusion methods focus only on visual performance and many fail to consider the thermal physical properties of the IR images, leading to spectral distortion in the fused image. In this study, we use the IR thermal physical property to correct the VIS image directly. Specifically, the Stefan-Boltzmann Law is used as a strong constraint to modulate the VIS image, such that the fused result shows a similar level of regional thermal energy as the original IR image, while preserving the high-resolution structural features from the VIS image. This method is an improvement over our previous study, which required VIS-IR multi-wavelet fusion before the same correction method was applied. The results of experiments show that applying this correction to the VIS image directly without multi-resolution analysis (MRA) processing achieves similar results, but is considerably more computationally efficient, thereby providing a new perspective on VIS and IR image fusion.

  20. Analytical approaches for determining heat distributions and thermal criteria for infrared neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Norton, Bryan J; Bowler, Meghan A; Wells, Jonathon D; Keller, Matthew D

    2013-09-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is becoming an important complementary tool to electrical stimulation. Since the mechanism of INS is photothermal, describing the laser-induced heat distribution is fundamental to determining the relationship between stimulation pulses and neural responses. This work developed both a framework describing the time evolution of the heat distribution induced by optical fluence and a new method to extract thermal criteria (e.g., temperature change and rate of change) for neural activation. To solve the general problem of describing the temperature distribution, a Green's function solution to the heat diffusion equation was determined and convolved with the optical fluence. This provided a solution in the form of a single integral over time, from which closed-form solutions can be determined for special cases. This work also yielded an expression for thermal relaxation time, which provides a rigorous description of thermal confinement for INS. The developed framework was then applied to experimental data from the cochlea to extract the minimum temperature increase and rate of that increase to stimulate the cochlear spiral ganglion. This result, and similar analyses applied to other neural systems, can then shed light on the fundamental mechanism for INS and aid the development of optical neuroprostheses.

  1. Landsat Data Continuity Mission operational land imager and thermal infrared sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Dabney, Philip W.; Reuter, Dennis; Thome, Kurtis J.; Irons, James R.; Barsi, Julia A.; Montanaro, Matt

    2011-10-01

    The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) will have two pushbroom Earth-imaging sensors: the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS). The OLI has the reflective 30-meter and panchromatic 15-meter ETM+ bands plus additional 30-meter bands at 443 nm and 1375 nm. The TIRS has two 100-meter bands that spectrally split the ETM+ thermal band. OLI has completed performance testing and is scheduled for a late summer 2011 delivery to the spacecraft. OLI radiometric performance has shown that polarization sensitivity is 1-2%; Signal-to-Noise Ratios at signal levels about 5-10% of full scale are between 6-12 times better than ETM+, e.g., 250 versus 30; radiometric stability over 16 days is better than 0.5% (2-sigma); coherent noise is not visible; detector operability is 100% (no dead or inoperable detectors), absolute radiance calibration uncertainty is ~4%, reflectance calibration uncertainty is ~2.5% and detector-to-detector radiometric uniformity is generally better than 0.5%. TIRS completed initial performance testing in March 2011 and in August 2011 will be entering its primary thermal vacuum performance testing with the integrated instrument. At this point indications are that the TIRS instrument will have noise levels roughly ¼ of the ETM+ bands and detector-to-detector radiometric uniformity of better than 0.5%.

  2. Detecting small geothermal features at Northern Pacific volcanoes with ASTER thermal infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, R.; Senyukov, S.; Tranbenkova, A.; Ramsey, M. S.; Schneider, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitor the eruptive state of volcanoes throughout the Aleutian, Kamchatkan, and Kurile arcs. This is accomplished in part by analyzing thermal infrared (TIR) data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors at least twice per day for major thermal anomalies. The AVHRR and MODIS 1-km spatial resolution data have been very useful for detecting large and/or high-temperature thermal signatures such as Strombolian activity as well as lava and pyroclastic flows. Such anomalies commonly indicate a major eruptive event is in progress. However, in order to observe and quantify small and/or lower temperature thermal features such as fumaroles and lava domes, higher spatial resolution data with better radiometric and spectral resolution are required. We have reviewed 2600 available night and day time TIR scenes acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) over the volcanoes of the northern Pacific. The current archive spans from March, 2000 to present. ASTER is the only instrument that routinely acquires high spatial resolution (30 - 90 m) night time data over volcanic targets. These data sets typically contain 5 TIR (8-12 microns) with 90 meter spatial resolution and 6 shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands (1-3 microns) with 30 meter spatial resolution. After the general survey of the volcanic arcs, we have focused our efforts on several targets. Mt. Hague, in the Emmons Lake complex on the Alaska Peninsula, has had mostly cloud-free ASTER observations for twenty night time TIR and six daytime TIR since August 2000. A small lake in the lower crater of Mt. Hague has had a history of appearing and disappearing over the last few years. The ASTER data combined with several recent field observations allow us to track the changes in lake area and associated temperatures

  3. Thermal infrared observations and thermophysical characterization of the OSIRIS-REx target asteroid (101955) Bennu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emery, J.; Fernandez, Y.; Kelley, M.; Warden, K.; Hergenrother, C.; Lauretta, D.; Drake, M.; Campins, H.; Ziffer, J.

    2014-07-01

    Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) have garnered ever-increasing attention over the past few years due to the insights they offer into Solar System formation and evolution, the potential hazard they pose, and their accessibility for both robotic and human spaceflight missions. Among the NEAs, carbonaceous asteroids hold particular interest, because they may contain clues to how the Earth got its supplies of water and organic materials, and because none has yet been studied in detail by spacecraft. (101955) Bennu is special among the NEAs in that it will not only be visited by a spacecraft, but the OSIRIS-REx mission will also return a sample of Bennu's regolith to the Earth for detailed laboratory study. We present analysis of thermal infrared photometry and spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that Bennu is carbonaceous and that its surface is covered in fine-grained (sub-cm) regolith. The Spitzer Space Telescope observed Bennu in 2007, using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) to obtain spectra over the wavelength range of 5.2-38 μ m and images at 16 and 22 μ m at 10 different longitudes, as well as the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) to image Bennu at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μ m, also at 10 different longitudes. Thermophysical analysis, assuming a spherical body with the known rotation period and spin-pole orientation, returns an effective diameter of 484±10 m, in agreement with the effective diameter calculated from the radar shape model at the orientation of the Spitzer observations (492±20 m, Nolan et al. 2013) and a visible geometric albedo of 0.046±0.005 (using H_{V}=20.51, Hergenrother et al. 2013). Including the radar shape model in the thermal analysis, and taking surface roughness into account, yields a disk-averaged thermal inertia of 310±70 J m^{-2}K^{-1}s^{-1/2}, which is significantly lower than that for several other NEAs of comparable size. There may be a small variation of thermal inertia with rotational phase (±60 J m^{-2}K^{-1}s^{-1/2}). The spectral

  4. Identification of infrared absorption peaks of amorphous silicon-carbon alloy by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Liang; Tsai, Hsiung-Kuang; Lee, Si-Chen; Sah, Wen-Jyh; Tzeng, Wen-Jer

    1987-12-01

    Amorphous silicon-carbon hydrogen alloy was prepared by radio frequency glow discharge decomposition of a silane-methane mixture. The infrared absorption spectra were measured at various stages of thermal annealing. By observing the change of relative intensities between these peaks the hydrogen bonding responsible for the absorption peaks could be assigned more accurately, for example, the stretching mode of monohydride Si-H is determined by its local environment, which supports H. Wagner's and W. Beyer's results [Solid State Commun. 48, 585 (1983)] but is inconsistent with the commonly believed view. It is also found that a significant fraction of carbon atoms are introduced into the film in -CH3 configuration which forms a local void and enhances the formation of polysilane chain and dangling bond defects. Only after high-temperature annealing are the hydrogen atoms driven out, and Si and C start to form a better silicon carbide network.

  5. Controlled thermal emission of polarized infrared waves from arrayed plasmon nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.; Miyazaki, H. T.; Kasaya, T.; Yamamoto, K.; Inoue, Y.; Fujimura, K.; Kanakugi, T.; Okada, M.; Hatade, K.; Kitagawa, S.

    2008-01-01

    We have demonstrated thermal emission of linearly polarized and narrow-band midinfrared waves from subwavelength gratings of narrow and deep rectangular cavities engraved on a Au surface. 100-nm-wide and 1000-nm-deep, high-aspect trenches were accurately manufactured by inversion from master molds. Organ pipe resonance of surface plasmons in the cavities exhibits a Lorentzian emission peak centered at 2.5-5.5μm. The maximum emittance reaches 0.90 and the peak width Δλ /λ is as narrow as 0.13-0.23. This simple emitter is expected to play a key role in the infrared sensing technologies for analyzing our environment.

  6. Calibration of the Thermal Infrared Sensor on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, K; Reuter, D.; Lunsford, D.; Montanaro, M.; Smith, J.; Tesfaye, Z.; Wenny, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Landsat series of satellites provides the longest running continuous data set of moderate-spatial-resolution imagery beginning with the launch of Landsat 1 in 1972 and continuing with the 1999 launch of Landsat 7 and current operation of Landsats 5 and 7. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) will continue this program into a fourth decade providing data that are keys to understanding changes in land-use changes and resource management. LDCM consists of a two-sensor platform comprised of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensors (TIRS). A description of the applications and design of the TIRS instrument is given as well as the plans for calibration and characterization. Included are early results from preflight calibration and a description of the inflight validation.

  7. Ion attachment mass spectrometry combined with infrared image furnace for thermal analysis: evolved gas analysis studies.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yuki; Takahashi, Seiji; Kuramoto, Noriyuki; Sala, Martin; Tsugoshi, Takahisa; Sablier, Michel; Fujii, Toshihiro

    2009-04-15

    A well-established ion attachment mass spectrometer (IAMS) is combined with an in-house single-atom infrared image furnace (IIF) specifically for thermal analysis studies. Besides the detection of many chemical species at atmospheric pressure, including free radical intermediates, the ion attachment mass spectrometer can also be used for the analysis of products emanating from temperature-programmed pyrolysis. The performance and applicability of the IIF-IAMS is illustrated with poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) samples. The potential of the system for the analysis of oxidative pyrolysis is also considered. Temperature-programmed decomposition of PTFE gave constant slopes of the plots of temperature versus signal intensity in a defined region and provided an apparent activation energy of 28.8 kcal/mol for the PTFE decomposition product (CF(2))(3). A brief comparison with a conventional pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry system is also given.

  8. Infrared Spectral Studies of the Thermally-Driven Chemistry Present on Icy Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, Mark J.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of Jupiters icy satellites has revealed that even though their surfaces arc composed mostly of water ice, molecules such as SO2, CO2, H2O2. O2, and O3 also are present. On Europa, a high radiation flux is believed to play a role in the formation of many of the minor species detected, and numerous laboratory studies have been devoted to explore this hypothesis. In this presentation we will discuss some of our recent research on another alteration pathway, thermally-driven chemical reactions, which are also important for understanding the chemical evolution of Europa's surface and sub-surface ices. We will focus on the infrared spectra of and reactions between H2O, SO2 and H2O2, at 80 - 130 K.

  9. These images show thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter at different wavelengths which are diagnos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images show thermal infrared radiation from Jupiter at different wavelengths which are diagnostic of physical phenomena The 7.85-micron image in the upper left shows stratospheric temperatures which are elevated in the region of the A fragment impact (to the left of bottom). Temperatures deeper in the atmosphere near 150-mbar are shown by the 17.2-micron image in the upper right. There is a small elevation of temperatures at this depth, indicated by the arrow, and confirmed by other measurements near this wavelength. This indicates that the influence of the impact of fragment A on the troposphere has been minimal. The two images in the bottom row show no readily apparent perturbation of the ammmonia condensate cloud field near 600 mbar, as diagnosed by 8.57-micron radiation, and deeper cloud layers which are diagnosed by 5-micron radiation.

  10. Thermal infrared as a tool to detect tree water stress in a coniferous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourtier, M.; Chanzy, A.; Bes, B.; Davi, H.; Hanocq, J. F.; Mariotte, N.; Sappe, G.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of climatic change, species area may move and so, a study of forest species vulnerability is on interest. In Mediterranean regions, trees can suffer of water stress due to drought during summer. Responses to environmental constraints are delayed in forest so it is necessary to anticipate risks in order to adapt management. It would be therefore interesting to localize areas where trees might be vulnerable to water stress. To detect such areas, the idea developed in this study is to map the severity of water stress, which may be linked to soil. Because vegetation surface temperature is linked to transpiration and so to water stress, the relevance of thermal infrared as a tool to detect water stress was explored. Past studies about surface temperature of forests at the planting scale did not lead to conclusive results. At this scale, important spatial and temporal variations of surface temperature, with a magnitude of about 10°C, can be registered but there is possibly a sizeable contribution of the undergrowth (Duchemin, 1998a, 1998b). In the other hand, important stress are not detectable, probably due to meteorological conditions (Pierce et al., 1990). During spring and summer 2008, an experimentation was carried out on the silver fir (Abies alba) forest of Mont Ventoux (south of France) to evaluate temporal variations at tree scale of the surface temperature in relation to water stress and climatic conditions. Two sites and three trees were chosen for measurements of surface temperature with a view to have different levels of water stress. Transpiration deficit is characterised by the ratio of actual transpiration to potential transpiration which is computed by the ISBA model (Noilhan et al., 1989) implemented by climatic observations made at the top of tree canopy. Sap flow measurements needed to calculate this ratio were completed on different trees of the sites. Climatic datas also allows building reference temperature and then surface

  11. NMR and Infrared Study of Thermal Oxidation of cis-1, 4-Polybutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gemmer, Robert V.; Golub, Morton A.

    1978-01-01

    A study of the microstructural changes occuring in CB during thermal, uncatalyzed oxidation was carried out. Although the oxidation of CB is accompanied by extensive crosslinking with attendant insolubilization, it was found possible to follow the oxidation of solid CB directly with C-13 NMR spectroscopy. The predominant products appearing in the C-13 NMR spectra of oxidized CB are epoxides. The presence of lesser amounts of alcohols, peroxides, and carbonyl structures was adduced from complementary infrared and NMR spectra of soluble extracts obtained from the oxidized, crosslinked CB. This distribution of functional groups contrasts with that previously reported for the autooxidation of 1,4-polyisoprene. The difference was rationalized in terms of the relative stabilities of intermediate radical species involved in the autoxidation of CB and 1,4-polyisoprene.

  12. Measurement of the stratospheric hydrogen peroxide concentration profile using far infrared thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K. V.; Johnson, D. G.; Traub, W. A.; Jucks, K. W.

    1991-01-01

    The first unequivocal measurement of hydrogen peroxide in the stratosphere have been made, a concentration profile obtained from a balloon platform using Fourier transform thermal emission spectroscopy in the far infrared. Measurements were made using the 112/cm R-Q5 branch of the rotational-torsional spectrum, with some confirmation from the 94/cm R-Q4 branch. The volume mixing ratio of H2O2 is 1.6 x 10 to the -10th at 38.4 km, decreasing to 0.6 x 10 to the -10th at 23.8 km, with uncertainties of about 16 percent. These measurements are compared to a recent stratospheric model calculation.

  13. Stratospheric minor constituent distributions from far-infrared thermal emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Traub, Wesley A.

    1992-11-01

    We retrieve mixing ratio profiles of O3, H2(O-16), H2(O-17), H2(O-18), HF, and HCl from far-infrared thermal emission observations of the limb in the 80-220 cm/sec spectral region. The observations were made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer as a part of the 1983 Balloon Intercomparison Campaign (BIC-2). A subset of the data was analyzed previously using the method in the work of Traub et al. (1982, 1991); in the present paper we use an alternative method of calibration and analysis, given by Abbas et al. (1985). The retrieved constituent profiles are compared with the measurements made with other instruments on the BIC-2 flights. The results for the concentrations of H2(O-17) and H2(O-18) obtained in this study indicate no isotopic enhancement or depletion with a standard deviation of about 20 percent.

  14. A scan-angle correction for thermal infrared multispectral data using side lapping images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) images, acquired with side lapping flight lines, provide dual angle observations of the same area on the ground and can thus be used to estimate variations in the atmospheric transmission with scan angle. The method was tested using TIMS aircraft data for six flight lines with about 30% sidelap for an area within Joshua Tree National Park, California. Generally the results correspond to predictions for the transmission scan-angle coefficient based on a standard atmospheric model although some differences were observed at the longer wavelength channels. A change was detected for the last pair of lines that may indicate either spatial or temporal atmospheric variation. The results demonstrate that the method provides information for correcting regional survey data (requiring multiple adjacent flight lines) that can be important in detecting subtle changes in lithology.

  15. Physics Based Modeling and Rendering of Vegetation in the Thermal Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A.; Ballard, J. R., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    We outline a procedure for rendering physically-based thermal infrared images of simple vegetation scenes. Our approach incorporates the biophysical processes that affect the temperature distribution of the elements within a scene. Computer graphics plays a key role in two respects. First, in computing the distribution of scene shaded and sunlit facets and, second, in the final image rendering once the temperatures of all the elements in the scene have been computed. We illustrate our approach for a simple corn scene where the three-dimensional geometry is constructed based on measured morphological attributes of the row crop. Statistical methods are used to construct a representation of the scene in agreement with the measured characteristics. Our results are quite good. The rendered images exhibit realistic behavior in directional properties as a function of view and sun angle. The root-mean-square error in measured versus predicted brightness temperatures for the scene was 2.1 deg C.

  16. Monitoring vegetation recovery patterns on Mount St. Helens using thermal infrared multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langran, Kenneth J.

    1986-01-01

    The Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption offers an opportunity to study vegetation recovery rates and patterns in a perturbed ecosystem. The eruptions of Mount St. Helens created new surfaces by stripping and implacing large volumes of eroded material and depositing tephra in the blast area and on the flanks of the mountain. Areas of major disturbance are those in the blast zone that were subject to debris avalanche, pyroclastic flows, mudflows, and blowdown and scorched timber; and those outside the blast zone that received extensive tephra deposits. It was observed that during maximum daytime solar heating, surface temperatures of vegetated areas are cooler than surrounding nonvegetated areas, and that surface temperature varies with percent vegetation cover. A method of measuring the relationship between effective radiant temperature (ERT) and percent vegetation cover in the thermal infrared (8 to 12 microns) region of the electromagnetic spectrum was investigated.

  17. Monitoring vegetation recovery patterns on Mount St. Helens using thermal infrared multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langran, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    The eruptions of Mount St. Helens created new surfaces by stripping and implacing large volumes of eroded material and depositing tephra in the blast area and on the flanks of the mountain. Areas of major disturbance are those in the blast zone that were subject to debris avalanche, pyroclastic flows, mudflows, and blowdown and scorched timber; and those outside the blast zone that received extensive tephra deposits. These zones represent a spectrum of disturbance types and intensities that can be indexed by temperature, impact force, and depth of subsequent deposition. This paper describes an application of NASA's Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) in monitoring vegetation recovery patterns in disturbed areas. Preliminary study results indicate a significant correlation between measured effective radiant temperature and vegetated/nonvegetated areas, percent vegetation cover, and vegetation type.

  18. A new type of insect infrared organ of low thermal mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Helmut; Schmitz, Anke; Trenner, Stefan; Bleckmann, Horst

    2002-03-01

    The Australian beetle Acanthocnemus nigricans is attracted by forest fires and has a pair of complex infrared (IR) receptor organs on the first thoracic segment. Each organ consists of a tiny sensory disc (diameter 120-130 µm) which serves as an absorbing structure for IR radiation. The disc is arranged above an air-filled cavity which is located just anteriorly to the coxae of the prothoracic legs. Inside the disc, about 30 multipolar thermoreceptors (warmth receptors) are tightly attached to the cuticle which is directed to the outside. The many dendrites of each multipolar neuron are tightly wrapped around the soma and contain a large number of mitochondria. Absorption of IR radiation by the disc causes an increase in temperature which is measured by the warmth receptors. Therefore, the IR receptors of A. nigricans can be classified as microbolometers with reduced thermal mass and in principle can be compared to the IR organs of pit vipers.

  19. Potential of thermal infrared radiometry for remote sensing of volcanic ash clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuisson, P.; Minvielle, F.; Hebin, H.; Thieuleux, F.; Parol, F.; Pelon, J.

    2011-12-01

    This study reports on the optical and microphysical characterization of particles contained in volcanic ash clouds using thermal infrared radiometry. Several works have shown the potential of the split window technique for estimating the effective particle size and optical thickness of semi-transparent clouds from two channels in the infrared atmospheric window (8 - 12 μm). In the present study, this approach is applied to the characterization of volcanic particles. The inversion algorithm is based on LUTs built with an accurate radiative transfer code, including gaseous absorption as well as multiple scattering and absorption by particles. Realistic spectral variations for optical properties of several types of volcanic particle (Ash, H2SO4 ...) and water or ice clouds have been calculated from refractive indices and Mie theory. In addition, this inversion procedure needs to define the altitude, temperature and thickness of the ash cloud. Consequently, meteorological data relative to the atmosphere and the state of ash cloud have been calculated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). This model allows giving a 3D dynamical transport of the ash plume and its vertical distribution. Ash sources and scenes area have been studied in detail with higher resolution using nested grid system of the model. In a first step, a sensitivity study based on radiative transfer calculations is presented in order to illustrate the potential of this approach. This technique is then applied to volcanic plumes in April-May 2010. Brightness temperatures from the MODIS spectroradiometer, the Infrared Imaging Radiometer (IIR) and the SEVIRI radiometer are used for some scenes acquired simultaneously over North / West of Europe with similar spectral or spatial resolutions. Spatial distribution of the retrieved optical thickness and effective size of particles are presented and analyzed. Comparisons between retrievals from IIR, MODIS and SEVIRI are presented. Contributions

  20. Data Validation and Case Studies using the TET-1 Thermal Infrared Satellite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, C.; Klein, D.; Kerr, G.; Stein, E.; Lorenz, E.; Frauenberger, O.; Borg, E.

    2015-04-01

    Based on the DLR satellite system BIRD, launched and operated in the early 2000, the TET-1 satellite has been launched in 2012 as part of the FireBird satellite constellation. The constellation will consist of two satellites, the second one to be launched in the first half of 2016. Acquired imagery is processed and archived by DLR and will be publicly available. For this purpose, a processing chain has been implemented converting raw data (level 0 product) to geo-annotated at-sensor radiance (level 1b). Further data products can be derived, e.g. information on brightness temperature, fire radiative power, and surface emissivity. Other processing levels, such as atmospherically corrected reflectance, could also be produced. The sensitivity of a Thermal Infrared (TIR) sensor system depends on its spectral characteristics and its spatial resolution. Various methods for high temperature event (HTE) detection and quantification have been developed, which can be categorized into single- and multi-band algorithms. While single band methods rely on the robust demarcation of background pixels and higher temperature pixels, considered as being anomalous, the TET-1 system facilitates the application of the widely used bi-spectral algorithm approach introduced by Dozier (1981), using the mid-infrared and longwave-infrared channel. This approach takes advantage of the non-linear nature of the Planck's curves to calculate temperatures and the HTE area on a sub-pixel basis. TIR remote sensing can make a significant contribution to the detection and, partly, the monitoring of land surface temperature (LST), HTE and of parameters describing the surface energy balance for specific areas.

  1. Thermal Structure of Jupiter's Infrared Hotspots and Plumes in the Northern Equatorial Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, Glenn S.; Rogers, John H.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Momary, Thomas W.; Giles, Rohini Sara; Melin, Henrik; Sinclair, James; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Vedovato, Marco

    2016-10-01

    The most prominent features of Jupiter's northern equatorial region are the visibly dark, 5-µm-bright 'hotspots' that move rapidly eastward on the southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt (NEB, Allison 1990, doi:10.1016/0019-1035(90)90069-L). We combine high-resolution thermal-infrared (5-20 µm) imaging from VLT/VISIR and IRTF/SpeX with spatially resolved spectroscopy from IRTF/TEXES to examine the thermal and chemical conditions in the equatorial region during the 2015-2016 apparition. The high spatial resolution permits the first detailed cross-comparison of thermal and visible-albedo conditions within the hotspots. We find that: (i) cloud-clearing within the hotspots creates 8.6-µm bright patches that are broader and more diffuse than their 5-µm counterparts; (ii) cloudy, cool cells ("plumes") in the northern Equatorial Zone are ammonia-rich and dark in the 5- and 8-12 µm range; (iii) the hotspots sometimes demonstrate a westward tilt with altitude in the 0.1-0.8 bar region (Fletcher et al., 2016, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.06.008); and (iv) blue-grey streaks on the southeastern edges of these ammonia-rich cells are also cloud free and bright at 5-12 µm. This regular longitudinal pattern of cloudy cells and cloud-free hotspots is consistent with condensation of NH3-rich air as it ascends in cells, and subsidence of dry, volatile-depleted air in the hotspots. The westward tilt of the NEB hotspots with height that was detected in 2014 (but not in 2016) supports the equatorial Rossby-wave hypothesis for the NEB pattern. This equatorial wave is distinct from those in the upper troposphere during the 2015-16 NEB expansion event (Orton et al., DPS/EPSC 2016). The cells and hotspots observed in the thermal-IR are the same type as those detected at near-IR wavelengths by Galileo/NIMS (Baines et al. 2002, doi:10.1006/icar.2002.6901) and in the radio, probing the deep atmosphere (de Pater et al., 2016, doi:10.1126/science.aaf2210), suggesting a coherent structure

  2. Determining thermal diffusivity and defect attributes in ceramic matrix composites by infrared imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, S.; Ellingson, W. A.; Koehl, E. R.; Stuckey, J.

    1997-12-05

    Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for numerous high temperature applications, including rotors and combustors for advanced turbine engines, heat exchanger and hot-gas filters for coal gasification plants. Among the materials of interest are silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-carbide (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-nitride (SiC{sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum-oxide-reinforced-alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3(f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), etc. In the manufacturing of these ceramic composites, the conditions of the fiber/matrix interface are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component. Defects such as delaminations and non-uniform porosity can directly effect the performance. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method, developed at Argonne National Laboratory has proved beneficial in analyzing as-processed conditions and defect detection created during manufacturing. This NDE method uses infrared thermal imaging for fill-field quantitative measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. Intensity transform algorithms have been used for contrast enhancement of the output image. Nonuniformity correction and automatic gain control are used to dynamically optimize video contrast and brightness, providing additional resolution in the acquired images. Digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques have been incorporated for noise reduction and data acquisition. The Argonne NDE system has been utilized to determine thermal shock damage, density variations, and variations in fiber coating in a full array of test specimens.

  3. THERMAL MODEL CALIBRATION FOR MINOR PLANETS OBSERVED WITH WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER/NEOWISE

    SciTech Connect

    Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Ressler, M.; Eisenhardt, P.; Grav, T.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; Cohen, M.

    2011-08-01

    With the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have observed over 157,000 minor planets. Included in these are a number of near-Earth objects, main-belt asteroids, and irregular satellites which have well measured physical properties (via radar studies and in situ imaging) such as diameters. We have used these objects to validate models of thermal emission and reflected sunlight using the WISE measurements, as well as the color corrections derived in Wright et al. for the four WISE bandpasses as a function of effective temperature. We have used 50 objects with diameters measured by radar or in situ imaging to characterize the systematic errors implicit in using the WISE data with a faceted spherical near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) to compute diameters and albedos. By using the previously measured diameters and H magnitudes with a spherical NEATM model, we compute the predicted fluxes (after applying the color corrections given in Wright et al.) in each of the four WISE bands and compare them to the measured magnitudes. We find minimum systematic flux errors of 5%-10%, and hence minimum relative diameter and albedo errors of {approx}10% and {approx}20%, respectively. Additionally, visible albedos for the objects are computed and compared to the albedos at 3.4 {mu}m and 4.6 {mu}m, which contain a combination of reflected sunlight and thermal emission for most minor planets observed by WISE. Finally, we derive a linear relationship between subsolar temperature and effective temperature, which allows the color corrections given in Wright et al. to be used for minor planets by computing only subsolar temperature instead of a faceted thermophysical model. The thermal models derived in this paper are not intended to supplant previous measurements made using radar or spacecraft imaging; rather, we have used them to characterize the errors that should be expected when computing diameters and albedos of minor planets observed by WISE using a spherical

  4. Thermal Model Calibration for Minor Planets Observed with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer/NEOWISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Wright, E.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; Cohen, M.; Ressler, M.; Eisenhardt, P.

    2011-08-01

    With the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have observed over 157,000 minor planets. Included in these are a number of near-Earth objects, main-belt asteroids, and irregular satellites which have well measured physical properties (via radar studies and in situ imaging) such as diameters. We have used these objects to validate models of thermal emission and reflected sunlight using the WISE measurements, as well as the color corrections derived in Wright et al. for the four WISE bandpasses as a function of effective temperature. We have used 50 objects with diameters measured by radar or in situ imaging to characterize the systematic errors implicit in using the WISE data with a faceted spherical near-Earth asteroid thermal model (NEATM) to compute diameters and albedos. By using the previously measured diameters and H magnitudes with a spherical NEATM model, we compute the predicted fluxes (after applying the color corrections given in Wright et al.) in each of the four WISE bands and compare them to the measured magnitudes. We find minimum systematic flux errors of 5%-10%, and hence minimum relative diameter and albedo errors of ~10% and ~20%, respectively. Additionally, visible albedos for the objects are computed and compared to the albedos at 3.4 μm and 4.6 μm, which contain a combination of reflected sunlight and thermal emission for most minor planets observed by WISE. Finally, we derive a linear relationship between subsolar temperature and effective temperature, which allows the color corrections given in Wright et al. to be used for minor planets by computing only subsolar temperature instead of a faceted thermophysical model. The thermal models derived in this paper are not intended to supplant previous measurements made using radar or spacecraft imaging; rather, we have used them to characterize the errors that should be expected when computing diameters and albedos of minor planets observed by WISE using a spherical NEATM model.

  5. Dust coatings on basaltic rocks and implications for thermal infrared spectroscopy of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Christensen, P.R.; Lucey, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Thin coatings of atmospherically deposited dust can mask the spectral characteristics of underlying surfaces on Mars from the visible to thermal infrared wavelengths, making identification of substrate and coating mineralogy difficult from lander and orbiter spectrometer data. To study the spectral effects of dust coatings, we acquired thermal emission and hemispherical reflectance spectra (5-25 ??m; 2000-400 cm-1) of basaltic andesite coated with different thicknesses of air fall-deposited palagonitic soils, fine-grained ceramic clay powders, and terrestrial loess. The results show that thin coatings (10-20 ??m) reduce the spectral contrast of the rock substrate substantially, consistent with previous work. This contrast reduction continues linearly with increasing coating thickness until a "saturation thickness" is reached, after which little further change is observed. The saturation thickness of the spectrally flat palagonite coatings is ??? 100-120 ??m, whereas that for coatings with higher spectral contrast is only ??? 50-75 ??m. Spectral differences among coated and uncoated samples correlate with measured coating thicknesses in a quadratic manner, whereas correlations with estimated surface area coverage are better fit by linear functions. Linear mixture modeling of coated samples using the rock substrate and coating materials as end-members is also consistent with their measured coating thicknesses and areal coverage. A comparison of ratios of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra of dark and bright intracrater and windstreak deposits associated with Radau crater suggests that the dark windstreak material may be coated with as much as 90% areal coverage of palagonitic dust. The data presented here also will help improve interpretations of upcoming mini-TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) observations of coated Mars surface materials.

  6. Thermal-infrared and visual imaging of comet Giacobini-Zinner

    SciTech Connect

    Telesco, C.M.; Decher, R.; Baugher, C.; Campins, H.; Mozurkewich, D.; Thronson, H.A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Hammel, H.B.; Larson, S.; Sekanina, Z.

    1986-11-01

    Thermal-infrared and visual images obtained simultaneously of comet Giacobini-Zinner on UT 1985 August 4.4 are presented. The 10.8-micron map, which spans several arc minutes with 8-arcsec resolution, is the first ground-based infrared image of a comet. Considerable spatial structure is evident in the map, including a curved dust tail consisting primarily of dust grains larger than 100 microns. The width of this large-grain tail implies that these grains depart the nucleus with velocities less than 3 m/s. The distribution of grain albedo is determined for the central 1 arcmin. It is speculated that an observed increase in the albedo by a factor of 2 with distance from the nucleus and prolonged radius vector results from the confinement to the orbital plane of large fluffy grains previously considered for GZ by others; the lower albedo of this dust could result from multiple internal scattering increasing the probability of absorption of incident light. It is estimated that dust was departing the nucleus at the rate of about 8 x 10 to the 5th g/s, comparable to that derived for many other comets. 29 references.

  7. Thermal image study of detecting near-underground structures by means of infrared radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yoshizo; Fan, Zuofen; Liu, Chanliang; Inagaki, Terumi

    1995-03-01

    An infrared radiometer is used to detect several flaws of industrial structural elements, as one remote sensing device. The thermal image method (TIM) was carried out to analyze location and dimension of the internal flaws of mechanical components, like piping, vessel, slab and pile. Internal flaws were detected by visualizing abnormal behavior of radiation temperature distribution of the tested surface by solar and artificial heat injection. The induced nonuniform temperature shows the existence of the internal flaws imaged on the CRT display of the infrared radiometer. As one application subject, the TIM method was extensively applied to near-underground buried materials of ancient remains; such as corner stone, stone settlement, shell mound, and tomb. The paper represents basic experimental and analytical results of preliminary and demonstration model tests of the buried materials in the soil and rock by solar, direct, and indirect combustion heaters. After continuous irradiation heating, we measured and recorded transient radiation temperature distribution of the tested ground surface which inserts the model near-underground tests plates of stylene, concrete, stone and gravel, changing width and depth of the test plates. Nonuniform and discontinuous temperature distribution of the tested surface above the inserted plates shows the existence of near- underground buried materials. Furthermore, transient temperature and heat flow behavior was numerically analyzed by solving a transient two-dimensional heat-balance equation. Calculation results were quite useful to analyze the experimental heat flow behavior around the buried object.

  8. Thermal infrared imaging of Mercury - MERTIS - a new remote sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Gabriele E.; Hiesinger, Harald; Helbert, Jörn; Paproth, Carsten; Säuberlich, Thomas; Peter, Gisbert; Walter, Ingo

    2009-08-01

    MERTIS (MERcury Thermal infrared Imaging Spectrometer) is an advanced infrared remote sensing instrument that is part of the ESA mission BepiColombo to the planet Mercury. The scientific goals of MERTIS science are surface composition analyses, identification of rock-forming minerals, mapping of the surface mineralogy, and studies of surface temperature variations. MERTIS combines a push-broom IR grating spectrometer (TIS) with a radiometer (TIR), which operate in the wavelength region of 7-14 μm (TIS) and 7-40 μm (TIR), respectively. The instrument represents a modular concept of the sensor head, electronic units and power/calibration systems. The integrated instrument approach allows the subsystems TIS and TIR to share the same optics, instrument electronics and in-fight calibration components. The instrument is designed to achieve a signal-to-noise ratio above 100 in the 7-14 μm wavelength range with a spectral channel width of 90 nm. The TIS optical design combines a three mirror anastigmat (TMA) with a modified Offner spectrometer. The spatial resolution will be about 500 m globally and better than 500 m for 5-10% of the Mercury's surface. With an uncooled microbolometer detector, the instrument can be operated in the hot environment of Mercury without the need for a cryogenic cooling system. We are reporting on the measurement requirements, the status of the instrument development, and ongoing qualification efforts.

  9. SpaceWire-based thermal-infrared imager system for asteroid sample return mission HAYABUSA2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hihara, Hiroki; Iwase, Kaori; Sano, Junpei; Otake, Hisashi; Okada, Tatsuaki; Funase, Ryu; Kashikawa, Ryoichi; Higashino, Isamu; Masuda, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    A thermal-infrared (TIR) imager system is developed for HAYABUSA2, which is planned to be launched in 2014 and aims at sample-return from a C-class near-Earth asteroid 162173 (1999JU3) considered to contain organic or hydrated materials. The system consists of a TIR imager and digital electronics, which are used not only for the scientific investigation of physical properties of the asteroid surface, but also for the assessment of landing site selection and safe descent operation onto the asteroid surface with in situ measurement. TIR adopts an uncooled bolometer. Image operations such as multiple images summation, dark image subtraction, and the compensation of dead pixels are processed onboard. A processing module is connected to sensor interfaces through SpaceWire in order to provide deterministic processing time. Data compression is also provided to reduce the restriction of transmission time, which provides the equivalent compression ratio as JPEG2000 in 1/30 processing time in average. A high-speed data recorder is connected through SpaceWire in order to record TIR data in parallel with other sensor data. The modularity of SpaceWire enables us to use these as built devices for TIR and inherits the same design as the long-wavelength infrared imager developed for the Venus climate orbiter Akatsuki.

  10. Wavelet subspace decomposition of thermal infrared images for defect detection in artworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. Z.; Khan, A. A.; Mezghani, S.; Perrin, E.; Mouhoubi, K.; Bodnar, J. L.; Vrabie, V.

    2016-07-01

    Health of ancient artworks must be routinely monitored for their adequate preservation. Faults in these artworks may develop over time and must be identified as precisely as possible. The classical acoustic testing techniques, being invasive, risk causing permanent damage during periodic inspections. Infrared thermometry offers a promising solution to map faults in artworks. It involves heating the artwork and recording its thermal response using infrared camera. A novel strategy based on pseudo-random binary excitation principle is used in this work to suppress the risks associated with prolonged heating. The objective of this work is to develop an automatic scheme for detecting faults in the captured images. An efficient scheme based on wavelet based subspace decomposition is developed which favors identification of, the otherwise invisible, weaker faults. Two major problems addressed in this work are the selection of the optimal wavelet basis and the subspace level selection. A novel criterion based on regional mutual information is proposed for the latter. The approach is successfully tested on a laboratory based sample as well as real artworks. A new contrast enhancement metric is developed to demonstrate the quantitative efficiency of the algorithm. The algorithm is successfully deployed for both laboratory based and real artworks.

  11. Measurement of mixed biomass burning and mineral dust aerosol in the thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, C. H.; Trautmann, T.; Lindermeir, E.

    2009-03-01

    From January 19th to February 7th, 2008, we installed a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) at Praia Airport on the island of Santiago, Cape Verde. Our goal was to measure the combined radiative effect of biomass burning aerosol and mineral dust usually observed there during that time of the year, when mineral dust emerging from the Sahara mixes with biomass burning aerosol transported north-westwards from the Sahelian region. Our measurements were part of the Saharan Mineral Dwst Experiment 2 (SAMUM 2) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) as continuation of the SAMUM field experiment in Morocco in 2006. SAMUM 2 is a joint venture of several German research institutes and universities and included both ground based as well as airborne measurements with the DLR Falcon research aircraft. The ground based instrumentation included spectrometers for visible and thermal infrared downwelling radiation, sun photometers, LIDAR and particle impactors while the Falcon was equipped with LIDAR and several instruments for aerosol analysis and sample return. A comparison of the FTIR measurements with radiative transfer simulations yields the expected aerosol forcing in the atmospheric window region after application of a suitable calibration method.

  12. Spectral analysis of the primary flight focal plane arrays for the thermal infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Matthew; Reuter, Dennis C.; Markham, Brian L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Gerace, Aaron D.

    2011-06-01

    The Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on board the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) is a two-channel, push-broom imager that will continue Landsat thermal band measurements of the Earth. The core of the instrument consists of three Quantum Well Infrared Photodetector (QWIP) arrays whose data are combined to effectively produce a linear array of 1850 pixels for each band with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 meters and a swath width of 185 kilometers. In this push-broom configuration, each pixel may have a slightly different band shape. An on-board blackbody calibrator is used to correct each pixel. However, depending on the scene being observed, striping and other artifacts may still be present in the final data product. The science-focused mission of LDCM requires that these residual effects be understood. The analysis presented here assisted in the selection of the three flight QWIP arrays. Each pixel was scrutinized in terms of its compliance with TIRS spectral requirements. This investigation utilized laboratory spectral measurements of the arrays and filters along with radiometric modeling of the TIRS instrument and environment. These models included standard radiometry equations along with complex physics-based models such as the MODerate spectral resolution TRANsmittance (MODTRAN) and Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tools. The laboratory measurements and physics models were used to determine the extent of striping and other spectral artifacts that might be present in the final TIRS data product. The results demonstrate that artifacts caused by the residual pixel-to-pixel spectral non-uniformity are small enough that the data can be expected to meet the TIRS radiometric and image quality requirements.

  13. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion (SICWC): Arc Lamp, InfraRed (IR) Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Sebright, J.

    2007-12-15

    The primary goal of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) betwe1311 UT-Battelle (Contractor) and Caterpillar Inc. (Participant) was to develop the plasma arc lamp (PAL), infrared (IR) thermal processing technology 1.) to enhance surface coating performance by improving the interfacial bond strength between selected coatings and substrates; and 2.) to extend this technology base for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant. Completion of the following three key technical tasks (described below) was necessary in order to accomplish this goal. First, thermophysical property data sets were successfully determined for composite coatings applied to 1010 steel substrates, with a more limited data set successfully measured for free-standing coatings. These data are necessary for the computer modeling simulations and parametric studies to; A.) simulate PAL IR processing, facilitating the development of the initial processing parameters; and B.) help develop a better understanding of the basic PAL IR fusing process fundamentals, including predicting the influence of melt pool stirring and heat tnmsfar characteristics introduced during plasma arc lamp infrared (IR) processing; Second, a methodology and a set of procedures were successfully developed and the plasma arc lamp (PAL) power profiles were successfully mapped as a function of PAL power level for the ORNL PAL. The latter data also are necessary input for the computer model to accurately simulate PAL processing during process modeling simulations, and to facilitate a better understand of the fusing process fundamentals. Third, several computer modeling codes have been evaluated as to their capabilities and accuracy in being able to capture and simulate convective mixing that may occur during PAL thermal processing. The results from these evaluation efforts are summarized in this report. The intention of this project was to extend the technology base and provide for

  14. Regional Stream Temperature Estimation Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Images From Terra - ASTER And Ground Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveh, N.; Cherkauer, K. A.; Burges, S. J.; Kay, J. E.; Handcock, R. N.; Gillespie, A.; Booth, D. B.

    2001-12-01

    Stream temperature is a significant water quality concern in the Pacific Northwest, where warm water can be lethal for indigenous fish species and cold water refugia are essential for the survival of threatened and endangered salmon. This necessitates regional-scale assessments of water temperature for compliance monitoring. These assessments have, however, been limited by sparse sampling in both space and time using submerged temperature-recording sensors. In the Puget Sound region, for example, the State of Washington relied on periodic data collected at 76 stations to assess water quality conditions for 12,721 km of streams and rivers (i.e., one station for 167 km of stream). We are evaluating the utility of remotely sensed thermal infrared (TIR) and visible images of streams and stream corridors for increasing the data coverage for stream temperature analysis and assessment. If stream temperatures can be estimated from images with known and acceptable levels of confidence, then regional temperature assessments will be less sensitive to the uncertainty associated with sampling temperature at a relatively small number of ground stations. Stream temperatures, energy and water fluxes are monitored to evaluate their significance to the stream energy balance using a ground-based network of temperature data loggers, stream gauging stations, and meteorological observations. Radiant ("skin") temperatures of streams and rivers are recorded with point measurements to evaluate the relationship between the kinetic and the "skin" temperature of the water in various conditions. TIR images from Terra - ASTER of parts of the Green River basin, Washington State, are processed and analyzed to obtain spatially extensive "skin" water temperature, and to identify the types of stream that are amenable to satellite thermal infrared remote temperature monitoring.

  15. Lithologic analysis from multispectral thermal infrared data of the alkalic rock complex at Iron Hill, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, K.; Rowan, L.C.; Bowers, T.L.; Anton-Pacheco, C.; Gumiel, P.; Miller, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    Airborne thermal-infrared multispectral scanner (TIMS) data of the Iron Hill carbonatite-alkalic igneous rock complex in south-central Colorado are analyzed using a new spectral emissivity ratio algorithm and confirmed by field examination using existing 1:24 000-scale geologic maps and petrographic studies. Color composite images show that the alkalic rocks could be clearly identified and that differences existed among alkalic rocks in several parts of the complex. An unsupervised classification algorithm defines four alkalic rock classes within the complex: biotitic pyroxenite, uncompahgrite, augitic pyroxenite, and fenite + nepheline syenite. Felsic rock classes defined in the surrounding country rock are an extensive class consisting of tuff, granite, and felsite, a less extensive class of granite and felsite, and quartzite. The general composition of the classes can be determined from comparisons of the TIMS spectra with laboratory spectra. Carbonatite rocks are not classified, and we attribute that to the fact that dolomite, the predominant carbonate mineral in the complex, has a spectral feature that falls between TIMS channels 5 and 6. Mineralogical variability in the fenitized granite contributed to the nonuniform pattern of the fenite-nepheline syenite class. The biotitic pyroxenite, which resulted from alteration of the pyroxenite, is spatially associated and appears to be related to narrow carbonatite dikes and sills. Results from a linear unmixing algorithm suggest that the detected spatial extent of the two mixed felsic rock classes was sensitive to the amount of vegetation cover. These results illustrate that spectral thermal infrared data can be processed to yield compositional information that can be a cost-effective tool to target mineral exploration, particularly in igneous terranes.

  16. Temperature and emissivity separation and mineral mapping based on airborne TASI hyperspectral thermal infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Yan, Bokun; Dong, Xinfeng; Zhang, Shimin; Zhang, Jingfa; Tian, Feng; Wang, Runsheng

    2015-08-01

    Thermal infrared remote sensing (8-12 μm) (TIR) has great potential for geologic remote sensing studies. TIR has been successfully used for terrestrial and planetary geologic studies to map surface materials. However, the complexity of the physics and the lack of hyperspectral data make the studies under-investigated. A new generation of commercial hyperspectral infrared sensors, known as Thermal Airborne Spectrographic Imager (TASI), was used for image analysis and mineral mapping in this study. In this paper, a combined method integrating normalized emissivity method (NEM), ratio algorithm (RATIO) and maximum-minimum apparent emissivity difference (MMD), being applied in multispectral data, has been modified and used to determine whether this method is suitable for retrieving emissivity from TASI hyperspectral data. MODTRAN 4 has been used for the atmospheric correction. The retrieved emissivity spectra matched well with the field measured spectra except for bands 1, 2, and 32. Quartz, calcite, diopside/hedenbergite, hornblende and microcline have been mapped by the emissivity image. Mineral mapping results agree with the dominant minerals identified by laboratory X-ray powder diffraction and spectroscopic analyses of field samples. Both of the results indicated that the atmospheric correction method and the combined temperature-emissivitiy method are suitable for TASI image. Carbonate skarnization was first found in the study area by the spatial extent of diopside. Chemical analyses of the skarn samples determined that the Au content was 0.32-1.74 g/t, with an average Au content of 0.73 g/t. This information provides an important resource for prospecting for skarn type gold deposits. It is also suggested that TASI is suitable for prospect and deposit scale exploration.

  17. Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of natural surfaces: Application to desert varnish coatings on rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Harrison Thliveris, Stephanie

    1993-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectroscopy has become an increasingly important tool for remote compositional analysis and geologic mapping. Most published laboratory measurements have been obtained in bidirectional reflection or transmission, whereas remotely sensed thermal infrared data are obtained by measuring the emitted energy. Section 2 of this paper describes a laboratory technique for determining calibrated emissivities of natural surfaces. Equations are developed to account for the energy reflected from the environment and to determine directly the sample temperature from measurements of hot and cold blackbody targets. Two methods for determining emissivity are developed: one in which only a hot sample measurement is made and the reflected background energy is removed by modeling, and a second in which the sample is cooled and the reflected energy is measured directly. Relative emissivity can be obtained to approximately 1% and absolute emissivities can be obtained to 2-15%, depending on the validity of the assumption that the emissivity of the sample is unity at some wavelength. The emission data agree well within the hemispherically integrated reflection data but point out probelms associated with bidirectional reflectance measurements. Section 3 applies emissivity measurements to the study of layered surfaces consisting of desert varnish coatings on granite and granodiorite rock suites. Two linear models are developed: the first assumes linear mixing of independent emission from the substrate and varnish (checkerboard model); the second models tansmission through an absorbing/emitting medium. Regardless of whether the varnish is or is not relatively transparant and strongly absorptive, the spectral effect of varnish increases linearly with varnish thickness, indicating that thick patches of varnish dominate the spectral properties. As a result, medium varnish thickness can be determined from spectral measurements. In addition, the composition of a substrate can be

  18. A Near-Infrared and Thermal Imager for Mapping Titan's Surface Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aslam, S.; Hewagma, T.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 10% of the solar insolation reaches the surface of Titan through atmospheric spectral windows. We will discuss a filter based imaging system for a future Titan orbiter that will exploit these windows mapping surface features, cloud regions, polar storms. In the near-infrared (NIR), two filters (1.28 micrometer and 1.6 micrometer), strategically positioned between CH1 absorption bands, and InSb linear array pixels will explore the solar reflected radiation. We propose to map the mid, infrared (MIR) region with two filters: 9.76 micrometer and 5.88-to-6.06 micrometers with MCT linear arrays. The first will map MIR thermal emission variations due to surface albedo differences in the atmospheric window between gas phase CH3D and C2H4 opacity sources. The latter spans the crossover spectral region where observed radiation transitions from being dominated by thermal emission to solar reflected light component. The passively cooled linear arrays will be incorporated into the focal plane of a light-weight thin film stretched membrane 10 cm telescope. A rad-hard ASIC together with an FPGA will be used for detector pixel readout and detector linear array selection depending on if the field-of-view (FOV) is looking at the day- or night-side of Titan. The instantaneous FOV corresponds to 3.1, 15.6, and 31.2 mrad for the 1, 5, and 10 micrometer channels, respectively. For a 1500 km orbit, a 5 micrometer channel pixel represents a spatial resolution of 91 m, with a FOV that spans 23 kilometers, and Titan is mapped in a push-broom manner as determined by the orbital path. The system mass and power requirements are estimated to be 6 kg and 5 W, respectively. The package is proposed for a polar orbiter with a lifetime matching two Saturn seasons.

  19. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy from Mars Landers and Rovers: A New Angle on Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moersch, J.; Horton, K.; Lucey, P.; Roush, T.; Ruff, S.; Smith, M.

    1999-01-01

    The MINUTES instrument of the Athena Precursor Experiment (APEX) on the Mars Surveyor 2001 lander mission will perform the first thermal infrared remote sensing observations from the surface of another planet. Experience gained from this experiment will be used to guide observations from identical instruments mounted on the Athena rovers, to be launched in 2003 and 2005. The utility of infrared spectrometers in determining the mineralogic composition of geologic surfaces from airborne and spaceborne platforms has been amply demonstrated. However, relatively little experience exists in using functionally similar instruments on the ground in the context of planetary science. What work has been done on this problem has mostly utilized field spectrometers that are designed to look down on nearby target rocks. While many Mini-TES observations will be made with this type of geometry, it is likely that other observations will be made looking horizontally at the more vertically-oriented facets of rock targets, to avoid spectral contamination from dust mantles. On rover missions, the Mini-TES may also be pointed horizontally at rocks several meters away, to determine if they are worthy of approaching for in situ observations and possible sample cacheing. While these observations will undoubtedly prove useful, there are important, and perhaps unappreciated, differences between horizontal-viewing, surface-based spectroscopy and the more traditional nadir-viewing, orbit or aircraft-based observations. Plans also exist to step the Mini-TES in a rastering motion to build hyperspectral scenes. Horizontal viewing hyperspectral cubes also possess unique qualities that call for innovative analysis techniques. The effect of viewing geometry: In thermal emission spectroscopy, regardless of whether an instrument is looking down on or horizontally at a target, the same basic equation governs the radiance reaching the sensor .

  20. Enhanced thermal radiation in terahertz and far-infrared regime by hot phonon excitation in a field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Pei-Kang; Yen, Shun-Tung

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate the hot phonon effect on thermal radiation in the terahertz and far-infrared regime. A pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor is used for efficiently exciting hot phonons. Boosting the hot phonon population can enhance the efficiency of thermal radiation. The transistor can yield at least a radiation power of 13 μW and a power conversion efficiency higher than a resistor by more than 20%.

  1. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  2. Jupiter's auroral-related thermal infrared emission from IRTF-TEXES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn; Greathouse, Thomas; Fletcher, Leigh; Irwin, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Auroral processes on Jupiter can be observed at a large range of wavelengths. Charged particles of the solar wind are deflected by Jupiter’s magnetic field and penetrate the atmosphere at high latitudes. This results in ion and/or electron precipitation, which produces emission at X-ray, UV, visible, near-infrared and even radio wavelengths. These observations indicate three distinct features of the aurora: 1) filament-like oval structures fixed at the magnetic poles (~80°W (System III) in the south, ~180°W in the north), 2) spatially-continuous but transient aurora that fill these oval regions and 3) discrete spots associated with the magnetic footprints of Io and other Galilean satellites. However, observations in the thermal infrared indicate the aurora also modify the neutral atmosphere. Enhanced emission of CH4 is observed coincident with the auroral ovals and indicates heightened stratospheric temperatures possibly as a result of joule heating by the influx of charged particles. Stronger emission is also observed of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6 and even C6H6 though previous work has struggled to determine whether this is a temperature or compositional effect. In order to quantify the auroral effects on the neutral atmosphere and to support the 2016 Juno mission (which has no thermal infrared instrument) we have performed a retrieval analysis of IRTF-TEXES (Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, 5- to 25-μm) spectra obtained on Dec 11th 2014 near solar maximum. The instrument slit was scanned east-west across high latitudes in each hemisphere and Jupiter’s rotation was used to obtain ~360° longitudinal coverage. Spectra of H2 S(1), CH4, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6 emission were measured at a resolving power of R = 85000, allowing a large vertical range in the atmosphere (100 - 0.001 mbar) to be sounded. Preliminary retrievals of the vertical temperature profile from H2 S(1) and CH4 measurements at 60°N, 180°W (on aurora), in comparison to 60°N, 60°W (quiescent

  3. Lunar crater ejecta: Physical properties revealed by radar and thermal infrared observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, R. R.; Carter, L. M.; Bandfield, J. L.; Tai Udovicic, C. J.; Campbell, B. A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the physical properties, and changes through time, of lunar impact ejecta using radar and thermal infrared data. We use data from two instruments on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) - the Diviner thermal radiometer and the Miniature Radio Frequency (Mini-RF) radar instrument - together with Earth-based radar observations. We use this multiwavelength intercomparison to constrain block sizes and to distinguish surface from buried rocks in proximal ejecta deposits. We find that radar-detectable rocks buried within the upper meter of regolith can remain undisturbed by surface processes such as micrometeorite bombardment for >3 Gyr. We also investigate the thermophysical properties of radar-dark haloes, comprised of fine-grained, rock-poor ejecta distal to the blocky proximal ejecta. Using Diviner data, we confirm that the halo material is depleted in surface rocks, but show that it is otherwise thermophysically indistinct from background regolith. We also find that radar-dark haloes, like the blocky ejecta, remain visible in radar observations for craters with ages >3 Ga, indicating that regolith overturn processes cannot replenish their block populations on that timescale.

  4. Multi-Sensor Fusion of Landsat 8 Thermal Infrared (TIR) and Panchromatic (PAN) Images

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyung-Sup; Park, Sung-Whan

    2014-01-01

    Data fusion is defined as the combination of data from multiple sensors such that the resulting information is better than would be possible when the sensors are used individually. The multi-sensor fusion of panchromatic (PAN) and thermal infrared (TIR) images is a good example of this data fusion. While a PAN image has higher spatial resolution, a TIR one has lower spatial resolution. In this study, we have proposed an efficient method to fuse Landsat 8 PAN and TIR images using an optimal scaling factor in order to control the trade-off between the spatial details and the thermal information. We have compared the fused images created from different scaling factors and then tested the performance of the proposed method at urban and rural test areas. The test results show that the proposed method merges the spatial resolution of PAN image and the temperature information of TIR image efficiently. The proposed method may be applied to detect lava flows of volcanic activity, radioactive exposure of nuclear power plants, and surface temperature change with respect to land-use change. PMID:25529207

  5. Fourier transform infrared study of the effect of different cations on bacteriorhodopsin protein thermal stability.

    PubMed Central

    Heyes, Colin D; Wang, Jianping; Sanii, Laurie S; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2002-01-01

    The effect of divalent ion binding to deionized bacteriorhodopsin (dI-bR) on the thermal transitions of the protein secondary structure have been studied by using temperature-dependent Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The native metal ions in bR, Ca(2+), and Mg(2+), which we studied previously, are compared with Mn(2+), Hg(2+), and a large, synthesized divalent organic cation, ((Et)(3)N)(2)Bu(2+). It was found that in all cases of ion regeneration, there is a pre-melting, reversible conformational transition in which the amide frequency shifts from 1665 to 1652 cm(-1). This always occurs at approximately 80 degrees C, independent of which cation is used for the regeneration. The irreversible thermal transition (melting), monitored by the appearance of the band at 1623 cm(-1), is found to occur at a lower temperature than that for the native bR but higher than that for acid blue bR in all cases. However, the temperature for this transition is dependent on the identity of the cation. Furthermore, it is shown that the mechanism of melting of the organic cation regenerated bR is different than for the metal cations, suggesting a difference in the type of binding to the protein (either to different sites or different binding to the same site). These results are used to propose specific direct binding mechanisms of the ions to the protein of deionized bR. PMID:11867472

  6. Thermal Infrared Emission Spectra of Terrestrial Exoplanets Influenced by Multi-layer Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, Franz; Vasquez, Mayte; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Kitzmann, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Clouds play an important role in the radiative transfer of planetary atmospheres: they are key elements of the climate system and influence the planet's spectral appearance. Given the thousands of exoplanets discovered so far, including some dozens of Earth-sized exoplanets, the feasibility of remote sensing of exoplanet atmospheres is attracting increasing attention. Here we present a study of the thermal emission of cloud-covered Earth-like exoplanets orbiting in the habitable zone of F, G, K, and M-type stars. A line-by-line model for molecular absorption has been coupled to a discrete ordinate multiple scattering radiative transfer solver. Pressure, temperature, and molecular concentration profiles were taken from a consistent radiative-convective climate model including a parameterized cloud description (Kitzmann et al., A&A, 2010). The main focus of the current work is the impact of multi-layer clouds on emission spectra in the thermal infrared. The effects of low-level water clouds and high level ice clouds simultaneously on signatures of H2O, CO2, O3, etc will be studied for various resolutions. Furthermore, comparisons with spectra resulting from a low-resolution code will be shown.

  7. Thermal tuning of infrared resonant absorbers based on hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kocer, Hasan; Butun, Serkan; Aydin, Koray; Banar, Berker; Wang, Kevin; Wu, Junqiao; Tongay, Sefaatttin

    2015-04-20

    Resonant absorbers based on plasmonic materials, metamaterials, and thin films enable spectrally selective absorption filters, where absorption is maximized at the resonance wavelength. By controlling the geometrical parameters of nano/microstructures and materials' refractive indices, resonant absorbers are designed to operate at wide range of wavelengths for applications including absorption filters, thermal emitters, thermophotovoltaic devices, and sensors. However, once resonant absorbers are fabricated, it is rather challenging to control and tune the spectral absorption response. Here, we propose and demonstrate thermally tunable infrared resonant absorbers using hybrid gold-vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) nanostructure arrays. Absorption intensity is tuned from 90% to 20% and 96% to 32% using hybrid gold-VO{sub 2} nanowire and nanodisc arrays, respectively, by heating up the absorbers above the phase transition temperature of VO{sub 2} (68 °C). Phase change materials such as VO{sub 2} deliver useful means of altering optical properties as a function of temperature. Absorbers with tunable spectral response can find applications in sensor and detector applications, in which external stimulus such as heat, electrical signal, or light results in a change in the absorption spectrum and intensity.

  8. Comparison of broadband and hyperspectral thermal infrared imaging of buried threat objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Achal, Steve B.; Diaz, Alejandra U.; Faust, Anthony A.

    2013-06-01

    Previous research by many groups has shown that broad-band thermal infrared (TIR) imagers can detect buried explosive threat devices, such as unexploded ordnance (UXO), landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Broad-band detection measures the apparent temperature - an average over the wave band of the product of the true soil surface temperature and the emissivity. Broad-band detection suffers from inconsistent performance (low signal, high clutter rates), due in part to diurnal variations, environmental and meteorological conditions, and soil surface effects. It has been suggested that hyperspectral TIR imaging might have improved performance since it can, in principle, allow extraction of the wavelength-dependent emissivity and the true soil surface temperature. This would allow the surface disturbance effects to be separated from the soil column (bulk) effects. A significant, and as yet unanswered, question is whether hyperspectral TIR images provide better detection capability (higher probability of detection and/or lower false alarm rate) than do broad-band thermal images. TIR hyperspectral image data of threat objects, buried and surface-laid in bare soil, were obtained in arid, desert-like conditions over full diurnal cycles for several days. Regions of interest containing threat objects and backgrounds were extracted throughout the time period. Simulated broad-band images were derived from the hyperspectral images. The diurnal variation of the images was studied. Hyperspectral was found to provide some advantage over broad-band imaging in detection of buried threat objects for the limited data set studied.

  9. Modelling Miniature Incandescent Light Bulbs for Thermal Infrared `THz Torch' Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangjing; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2015-04-01

    The ` THz Torch' concept is an emerging technology that was recently introduced by the authors for implementing secure wireless communications over short distances within the thermal infrared (20-100 THz, 15 μm to 3 μm). In order to predict the band-limited output radiated power from ` THz Torch' transmitters, for the first time, this paper reports on a detailed investigation into the radiation mechanisms associated with the basic thermal transducer. We demonstrate how both primary and secondary sources of radiation emitted from miniature incandescent light bulbs contribute to the total band-limited output power. The former is generated by the heated tungsten filament within the bulb, while the latter is due to the increased temperature of its glass envelope. Using analytical thermodynamic modelling, the band-limited output radiated power is calculated, showing good agreement with experimental results. Finally, the output radiated power to input DC power conversion efficiency for this transducer is determined, as a function of bias current and operation within different spectral ranges. This modelling approach can serve as an invaluable tool for engineering solutions that can achieve optimal performances with both single and multi-channel ` THz Torch' systems.

  10. Evaluation of an infrared thermal detection system for fever recognition during the H1N1 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Hewlett, Angela L; Kalil, Andre C; Strum, Rahman A; Zeger, Wesley G; Smith, Philip W

    2011-05-01

    Infrared thermal detection systems (ITDSs) have been utilized in several countries to screen for fever in travelers. Since fever screening with an ITDS is rapid and noninvasive, this technology may be useful as an infection control measure in clinical settings during a pandemic.

  11. Nanocomposites for high-speed optical modulators and plasmonic thermal mid-infrared emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Veysi

    Demand for high-speed optical modulators and narrow-bandwidth infrared thermal emitters for numerous applications continues to rise and new optical devices are needed to deal with massive data flows, processing powers, and fabrication costs. Conventional techniques are usually hindered by material limitations or electronic interconnects and advances in organic nanocomposite materials and their integration into photonic integrated circuits (PICs) have been acknowledged as a promising alternative to single crystal techniques. The work presented in this thesis uses plasmonic and magneto-optic effects towards the development of novel optical devices for harnessing light and generating high bandwidth signals (>40GHz) at room and cryogenic temperatures (4.2°K). Several publications have resulted from these efforts and are listed at the end of the abstract. In our first published research we developed a narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitter using an Ag/dielectric/Ag thin film structure arranged in hexagonal planar lattice structures. PECVD produced nanoamorphous carbon (NAC) is used as a dielectric layer. Spectrally tunable (>2 mum) and narrow bandwidth (<0.5 mum) emission peaks in the range of 4-7 mum were demonstrated by decreasing the resistivity of NAC from 1012 and 109 O.cm with an MoSi2 dopant and increasing the emitter lattice constant from 4 to 7 mum. This technique offers excellent flexibility for developing cost-effective mid-IR sources as compared to costly fiber and quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). Next, the effect of temperature on the Verdet constant for cobalt-ferrite polymer nanocomposites was measured for a series of temperatures ranging from 40 to 200°K with a Faraday rotation polarimeter. No visual change was observed in the films during thermal cycling, and ˜4x improvement was achieved at 40°K. The results are promising and further analysis is merited at 4.2°K to assess the performance of this material for cryogenic magneto-optic modulators

  12. Near-infrared Thermal Emission Detections of a Number of Hot Jupiters and the Systematics of Ground-based Near-infrared Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croll, Bryce; Albert, Loic; Jayawardhana, Ray; Cushing, Michael; Moutou, Claire; Lafreniere, David; Johnson, John Asher; Bonomo, Aldo S.; Deleuil, Magali; Fortney, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    We present detections of the near-infrared thermal emission of three hot Jupiters and one brown dwarf using the Wide-field Infrared Camera (WIRCam) on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These include Ks-band secondary eclipse detections of the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and Qatar-1b and the brown dwarf KELT-1b. We also report Y-band, K CONT-band, and two new and one reanalyzed Ks-band detections of the thermal emission of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b. We present a new reduction pipeline for CFHT/WIRCam data, which is optimized for high precision photometry. We also describe novel techniques for constraining systematic errors in ground-based near-infrared photometry, so as to return reliable secondary eclipse depths and uncertainties. We discuss the noise properties of our ground-based photometry for wavelengths spanning the near-infrared (the YJHK bands), for faint and bright stars, and for the same object on several occasions. For the hot Jupiters WASP-3b and WASP-12b we demonstrate the repeatability of our eclipse depth measurements in the Ks band; we therefore place stringent limits on the systematics of ground-based, near-infrared photometry, and also rule out violent weather changes in the deep, high pressure atmospheres of these two hot Jupiters at the epochs of our observations. Based on observations obtained with WIRCam, a joint project of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), Taiwan, Korea, Canada, France, at the CFHT, which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institute National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  13. Can we detect water stressed areas in forest thanks thermal infrared remote sensing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourtier, Marie; Chanzy, André; Bes, Bernard; Mariotte, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    In Mediterranean and mountainous areas, an increase of mortality in forest is observed after important drought events. In the context of climate changes, a study of the impact of drought stress on forest is necessary. In order to detect water stress over the whole forest at different periods of the year, we propose the use of a spatialisable indicator, easily measurable: crown surface temperature. As previous works were not conclusive concerning the potentiality of this indicator in forest (Duchemin, 1998a, 1998b, Pierce et al., 1990), we set up an experimentation to study the surface temperature evolution linked to the transpiration at tree scale, during the spring and summer periods on silver fir (Abies alba) forest of Mont Ventoux (south of France). At the same time, several thermal infrared images of the mountainside were acquired corresponding to different levels of transpiration. The signal of surface temperature is studying via the evolution of the difference between measured surface temperature and calculated surface temperature for a tree at maximum transpiration rate. At tree scale, there is a difference of 4 °C of amplitude in the signal of surface temperature between maximum and zero transpiration conditions. The difficulty resides in taking into account the influence of climatic conditions, source of variability in the signal uncorrelated with transpiration evolution. Indices of surface temperature, built to include this influence of climatic conditions, permit to reduce this variability. Another source of variability lies in the percentage of branches present in the area of measurement. Indeed branches have a thermal dynamic differing from the needles one and, considering comparison between trees, the percentage of branches varies. At the mountainside scale, contrasted areas in terms of surface temperature indices are observable. By comparing different dates, corresponding to different levels of drought, it is possible to locate areas with precocious

  14. Maximizing the Use of Satellite Thermal Infrared Data for Advancing Land Surface Temperature Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Q.; Fu, P.; Gao, F.

    2014-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a crucial parameter in investigating environmental, ecological processes and climate change at various scales, and is also valuable in the studies of evapotranspiration, soil moisture conditions, surface energy balance, and urban heat islands. These studies require thermal infrared (TIR) images at both high temporal and spatial resolution to retrieve LST. However, currently, no single satellite sensors can deliver TIR data at both high temporal and spatial resolution. Thus, various algorithms/models have been developed to enhance the spatial or the temporal resolution of TIR data, but rare of those can enhance both spatial and temporal details. This paper presents a new data fusion algorithm for producing Landsat-like LST data by blending daily MODIS and periodic Landsat TM datasets. The original Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM) was improved and modified for predicting thermal radiance and LST data by considering annual temperature cycle (ATC) and urban thermal landscape heterogeneity. The technique of linear spectral mixture analysis was employed to relate the Landsat radiance with the MODIS one, so that the temporal changes in radiance can be incorporated in the fusion model. This paper details the theoretical basis and the implementation procedures of the proposed data fusion algorithm, Spatio-temporal Adaptive Data Fusion Algorithm for Temperature mapping (SADFAT). A case study was conducted that predicted LSTs of five dates in 2005 from July to October in Los Angeles County, California. The results indicate that the prediction accuracy for the whole study area ranged from 1.3 K to 2 K. Like existing spatio-temporal data fusion models, the SADFAT method has a limitation in predicting LST changes that were not recorded in the MODIS and/or Landsat pixels due to the model assumption.

  15. Application of satellite infrared data for mapping of thermal plume contamination in coastal ecosystem of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Lee, Jae-Hak; Kang, Yong Q

    2006-03-01

    The 5900 MW Younggwang nuclear power station on the west coast of Korea discharges warm water affecting coastal ecology [KORDI report (2003). Wide area observation of the impact of the operation of Younggwang nuclear power plant 5 and 6, No. BSPI 319-00-1426-3, KORDI, Seoul, Korea]. Here the spatial and temporal characteristics of the thermal plume signature of warm water are reported from a time series (1985-2003) of space-borne, thermal infrared data from Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Sea surface temperature (SST) were characterized using advanced very high resolution radiometer data from the NOAA satellites. These data demonstrated the general pattern and extension of the thermal plume signature in the Younggwang coastal areas. In contrast, the analysis of SST from thematic mapper data using the Landsat-5 and 7 satellites provided enhanced information about the plume shape, dimension and direction of dispersion in these waters. The thermal plume signature was detected from 70 to 100 km to the south of the discharge during the summer monsoon and 50 to 70 km to the northwest during the winter monsoon. The mean detected plume temperature was 28 degrees C in summer and 12 degrees C in winter. The DeltaT varied from 2 to 4 degrees C in winter and 2 degrees C in summer. These values are lower than the re-circulating water temperature (6-9 degrees C). In addition the temperature difference between tidal flats and offshore (SSTtidal flats - SSToffsore) was found to vary from 5.4 to 8.5 degrees C during the flood tides and 3.5 degrees C during the ebb tide. The data also suggest that water heated by direct solar radiation on the tidal flats during the flood tides might have been transported offshore during the ebb tide. Based on these results we suggest that there is an urgent need to protect the health of Younggwang coastal marine ecosystem from the severe thermal impact by the large quantity of warm water discharged from

  16. Application of satellite infrared data for mapping of thermal plume contamination in coastal ecosystem of Korea.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Lee, Jae-Hak; Kang, Yong Q

    2006-03-01

    The 5900 MW Younggwang nuclear power station on the west coast of Korea discharges warm water affecting coastal ecology [KORDI report (2003). Wide area observation of the impact of the operation of Younggwang nuclear power plant 5 and 6, No. BSPI 319-00-1426-3, KORDI, Seoul, Korea]. Here the spatial and temporal characteristics of the thermal plume signature of warm water are reported from a time series (1985-2003) of space-borne, thermal infrared data from Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Sea surface temperature (SST) were characterized using advanced very high resolution radiometer data from the NOAA satellites. These data demonstrated the general pattern and extension of the thermal plume signature in the Younggwang coastal areas. In contrast, the analysis of SST from thematic mapper data using the Landsat-5 and 7 satellites provided enhanced information about the plume shape, dimension and direction of dispersion in these waters. The thermal plume signature was detected from 70 to 100 km to the south of the discharge during the summer monsoon and 50 to 70 km to the northwest during the winter monsoon. The mean detected plume temperature was 28 degrees C in summer and 12 degrees C in winter. The DeltaT varied from 2 to 4 degrees C in winter and 2 degrees C in summer. These values are lower than the re-circulating water temperature (6-9 degrees C). In addition the temperature difference between tidal flats and offshore (SSTtidal flats - SSToffsore) was found to vary from 5.4 to 8.5 degrees C during the flood tides and 3.5 degrees C during the ebb tide. The data also suggest that water heated by direct solar radiation on the tidal flats during the flood tides might have been transported offshore during the ebb tide. Based on these results we suggest that there is an urgent need to protect the health of Younggwang coastal marine ecosystem from the severe thermal impact by the large quantity of warm water discharged from

  17. Thermal considerations in the design of a long focal length, low f-number, long wave infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Harvey M.

    2010-08-01

    Sensors operating in the 8-12 micron long wave infrared (LWIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum have long been used to extend the useful range of operating conditions beyond those of sensor systems operating in the visual spectral band. Infrared systems must cover widely varying fields-of-view (FOV) depending on application, at fast f/numbers compared to systems operating in the visible band. Typical FOVs for LWIR sensors run the gamut from < 1 degree to >50 degrees for large focal planes, necessitating the use of long focal lengths. When the focal length of the optics increases, the sensitivity to defocus caused by thermal effects also increases. Optical materials with useful transmission in the infrared region exhibit larger changes (> 400X) in refractive index with temperature (dN/dT) than optical glass. This in turn introduces larger changes in focus over temperature for infrared systems compared to comparable focal length visual systems. Thermal expansion and contraction of the materials also contribute to changes in system performance and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is generally larger for infrared materials than for visual band optical glasses. The thermal performance problem is exacerbated with low f-numbers systems. The ability to detect targets having a small temperature difference from ambient is proportional to the light collecting ability of the optics, especially when uncooled detectors are used. It is typical to require f-numbers in the f/1 regime for the LWIR for uncooled applications. Methods have been developed to find optical designs with reduced thermal sensitivity for these applications.

  18. An aerial multispectral thermographic survey of the Oak Ridge Reservation for selected areas K-25, X-10, and Y-12, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, I.W.

    1996-10-01

    During June 5-7, 1996, the Department of Energy`s Remote Sensing Laboratory performed day and night multispectral surveys of three areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation: K-25, X-10, and Y-12. Aerial imagery was collected with both a Daedalus DS1268 multispectral scanner and National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Thermal Infrared Multispectral System, which has six bands in the thermal infrared region of the spectrum. Imagery from the Thermal Infrared Multispectral System was processed to yield images of absolute terrain temperature and of the terrain`s emissivities in the six spectral bands. The thermal infrared channels of the Daedalus DS1268 were radiometrically calibrated and converted to apparent temperature. A recently developed system for geometrically correcting and geographically registering scanner imagery was used with the Daedalus DS1268 multispectral scanner. The corrected and registered 12-channel imagery was orthorectified using a digital elevation model. 1 ref., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Thermal-infrared imager TIR on Hayabusa2: Result of ground calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, T.; Fukuhara, T.; Tanaka, S.; Taguchi, M.; Arai, T.; Imamura, T.; Senshu, H.; Sekiguchi, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Demura, H.; Sakatani, N.; Horikawa, Y.; Helbert, J.; Mueller, T.; Hagermann, A.; H. TIR-Team

    2014-07-01

    Thermal-infrared imager TIR on Hayabusa2 will image C-class NEA (162173)1999JU3 in 8-12 micrometer band. TIR observation is not only for scientific investigation of asteroid thermo-physical properties, but also for assessment of landing site selection and safety descent operation. Hayabusa2 is the follow-on mission after Hayabusa that accomplished the first asteroid sample-return in 2010. Hayabusa2 is primarily an asteroid sample-return mission, but remote sensing of the asteroid is also essential to understand the global nature of asteroid, complementary to returned samples. Active impact experiment using SCI (Small Carry-on Impactor) and surface measurements using MASCOT lander which carries camera, NIR imaging microscope, radiator, and magnetometer, as well as hopping rover MINERVA are also planned in this mission. A thermal-infrared imager is to image the surface temperature profile and its temporal variation by asteroid rotation. TIR adopts a non- cooled bolometer array NEC 320A with 328×248 effective pixels. Its fields of view covers 16°×12° with 0.05° per pixel. The image can be taken at 60 Hz, and summation onboard can be set from 1 to 128 to improve signal-to-background ratio. The imaging is interlaced with the shutter open and close. The subtraction of shutter-close image (bias data) from shutter-open image (biased image) produces the realistic thermal images. To improve more accurate data in radiation intensity, those realistic thermal images can be summed by onboard software. Data compression is also conducted by onboard software[1]. TIR is based on LIR on Akatsuki Venus climate orbiter [2]. We know something about C-type meteorites but little about C-class asteroids. We know little about asteroid 1999JU3 but it is considered as something like low-dense and huge-cratered as asteroid 253 Mathilde, or like rubble-piled, sedimented small asteroid 25143 Itokawa. To investigate the nature of asteroid and its formation processes, thermo

  20. Characterization of Lunar Soils Using a Thermal Infrared Microscopic Spectral Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crites, S. T.; Lucey, P. G.

    2010-12-01

    Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's Diviner radiometer has provided the planetary science community with a large amount of thermal infrared spectral data. This data set offers rich opportunities for lunar science, but interpretation of the data is complicated by the limited data on lunar materials. While spectra of pure terrestrial minerals have been used effectively for Mars applications, lunar minerals and glasses have been affected by space weathering processes that may alter their spectral properties in important ways. For example, mineral grains acquire vapor deposited coatings, and agglutinate glass contains abundant nanophase iron as a result of exposure to the space environment. Producing mineral separates in sufficient quantities (at least tens of mg) for spectral characterization is painstaking, time consuming and labor intensive; as an alternative we have altered an infrared hyperspectral imaging system developed for remote sensing under funding from the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development program (PIDDP) to enable resolved microscopic spectral imaging. The concept is to characterize the spectral properties of individual grains in lunar soils, enabling a wide range of spectral behaviors of components to be measured rapidly. The instrument, sensitive from 8 to 15 microns at 15 wavenumber resolution, images a field of view of 8 millimeters at 30 micron resolution and scans at a rate of about 1 mm/second enabling relatively large areas to be scanned rapidly. Our experiments thus far use a wet-sieved 90-150 um size fraction with the samples arrayed on a heated substrate in a single layer in order to prevent spectral interactions between grains. We have begun with pure mineral separates, and unsurprisingly we find that the individual mineral grain emission spectra of a wide range of silicates are very similar to spectra of coarse grained powders. We have begun to obtain preliminary data on lunar soils as well. We plan to continue imaging of lunar soils

  1. A new paradigm of oral cancer detection using digital infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Banerjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Patsa, S.; Ray, J. G.; Chaudhuri, K.

    2016-03-01

    Histopathology is considered the gold standard for oral cancer detection. But a major fraction of patient pop- ulation is incapable of accessing such healthcare facilities due to poverty. Moreover, such analysis may report false negatives when test tissue is not collected from exact cancerous location. The proposed work introduces a pioneering computer aided paradigm of fast, non-invasive and non-ionizing modality for oral cancer detection us- ing Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging (DITI). Due to aberrant metabolic activities in carcinogenic facial regions, heat signatures of patients are different from that of normal subjects. The proposed work utilizes asymmetry of temperature distribution of facial regions as principle cue for cancer detection. Three views of a subject, viz. front, left and right are acquired using long infrared (7:5 - 13μm) camera for analysing distribution of temperature. We study asymmetry of facial temperature distribution between: a) left and right profile faces and b) left and right half of frontal face. Comparison of temperature distribution suggests that patients manifest greater asymmetry compared to normal subjects. For classification, we initially use k-means and fuzzy k-means for unsupervised clustering followed by cluster class prototype assignment based on majority voting. Average classification accuracy of 91:5% and 92:8% are achieved by k-mean and fuzzy k-mean framework for frontal face. The corresponding metrics for profile face are 93:4% and 95%. Combining features of frontal and profile faces, average accuracies are increased to 96:2% and 97:6% respectively for k-means and fuzzy k-means framework.

  2. A highly efficient CMOS nanoplasmonic crystal enhanced slow-wave thermal emitter improves infrared gas-sensing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Andreas; de Luca, Andrea; Oh, Sang S.; Wuestner, Sebastian; Roschuk, Tyler; Chen, Yiguo; Boual, Sophie; Ali, Zeeshan; Phillips, Chris C.; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.; Udrea, Florin; Hopper, Richard H.; Hess, Ortwin

    2015-12-01

    The application of plasmonics to thermal emitters is generally assisted by absorptive losses in the metal because Kirchhoff’s law prescribes that only good absorbers make good thermal emitters. Based on a designed plasmonic crystal and exploiting a slow-wave lattice resonance and spontaneous thermal plasmon emission, we engineer a tungsten-based thermal emitter, fabricated in an industrial CMOS process, and demonstrate its markedly improved practical use in a prototype non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas-sensing device. We show that the emission intensity of the thermal emitter at the CO2 absorption wavelength is enhanced almost 4-fold compared to a standard non-plasmonic emitter, which enables a proportionate increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the CO2 gas sensor.

  3. A highly efficient CMOS nanoplasmonic crystal enhanced slow-wave thermal emitter improves infrared gas-sensing devices.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Andreas; De Luca, Andrea; Oh, Sang S; Wuestner, Sebastian; Roschuk, Tyler; Chen, Yiguo; Boual, Sophie; Ali, Zeeshan; Phillips, Chris C; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A; Udrea, Florin; Hopper, Richard H; Hess, Ortwin

    2015-01-01

    The application of plasmonics to thermal emitters is generally assisted by absorptive losses in the metal because Kirchhoff's law prescribes that only good absorbers make good thermal emitters. Based on a designed plasmonic crystal and exploiting a slow-wave lattice resonance and spontaneous thermal plasmon emission, we engineer a tungsten-based thermal emitter, fabricated in an industrial CMOS process, and demonstrate its markedly improved practical use in a prototype non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas-sensing device. We show that the emission intensity of the thermal emitter at the CO(2) absorption wavelength is enhanced almost 4-fold compared to a standard non-plasmonic emitter, which enables a proportionate increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the CO(2) gas sensor. PMID:26639902

  4. A highly efficient CMOS nanoplasmonic crystal enhanced slow-wave thermal emitter improves infrared gas-sensing devices

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Andreas; De Luca, Andrea; Oh, Sang S.; Wuestner, Sebastian; Roschuk, Tyler; Chen, Yiguo; Boual, Sophie; Ali, Zeeshan; Phillips, Chris C.; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.; Udrea, Florin; Hopper, Richard H.; Hess, Ortwin

    2015-01-01

    The application of plasmonics to thermal emitters is generally assisted by absorptive losses in the metal because Kirchhoff’s law prescribes that only good absorbers make good thermal emitters. Based on a designed plasmonic crystal and exploiting a slow-wave lattice resonance and spontaneous thermal plasmon emission, we engineer a tungsten-based thermal emitter, fabricated in an industrial CMOS process, and demonstrate its markedly improved practical use in a prototype non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas-sensing device. We show that the emission intensity of the thermal emitter at the CO2 absorption wavelength is enhanced almost 4-fold compared to a standard non-plasmonic emitter, which enables a proportionate increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the CO2 gas sensor. PMID:26639902

  5. Integration of thermal infrared satellite data with ground-based geophysical data for understanding volcanic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffke, Andrea M.

    This dissertation examines the tools and applications available for investigating volcanic phenomenon using satellite thermal infrared remote sensing data. Various algorithms have been developed to automatically detect volcanic thermal anomalies. A contextual (VAST), fixed threshold (MODVOLC) and temporal (RAT), the three main types of algorithms, are compared to determine how effective they are at detecting thermal anomalies caused by various types of volcanic activity (lava flows, lava domes, strombolian activity, and fumarolic activity). Each of the algorithms operates with the highest accuracy for the types of activity that they were designed to detect and no algorithm is 100 percent accurate. With the current data restrictions no algorithm ever will be, therefore user interaction is key. Results from the automated algorithms are then applied to determine discharge rates and cumulative volumes of erupted lava during the Stromboli 2007 eruption. Blinding applying the result can cause errors up to an order of magnitude with the main cause of errors coming from the inclusion of cloudy data and not identifying the most radiant pixels. From the manual results it was determined the 2007 eruption was a typical Strombolian effusive eruption caused by tapping a pressurized magma source. The satellite derived discharge rates and SO2 flux supply rates are then calculated and compared at Etna from 2002-2006. Differences in the supply rate of magma and erupted volume of lava occur from eruption to eruption and also vary throughout individual eruptions, indicating a complex supply system within Etna. Thermal satellite data is also used to estimate plume heights at Tungurahua volcano from 2006-2008. Heights are compared with acoustic power. Good correlation between plume height and acoustic power was found. By integrating the two data sets it is possible to distinguish between different eruption styles and aids in classification of eruption types. Although satellite data is a

  6. Interactive Radiative Transfer Modeling Tools to Map Volcanic Emissions with Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Realmuto, V. J.

    2012-12-01

    The estimation of plume composition from thermal infrared (TIR) radiance measurements is based in radiative transfer (RT) modeling. To model the observed spectra we must consider the temperature, emissivity, and elevation of the surface beneath the plume, plume altitude and thickness, and the local atmospheric temperature and humidity. Our knowledge of these parameters is never perfect, and interactive RT modeling allows us to evaluate the impact of these uncertainties on our estimates of plume composition. Interactive RT modeling has three main components: retrieval procedures for plume components, an engine for RT calculations, and a graphic user interface (GUI) to input radiance data, modify model parameters, launch retrievals, and visualize the resulting estimates of plume composition. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in collaboration with Spectral Sciences, Inc. (SSI), is developing a new class of tools for interactive RT modeling. We will implement RT modeling on graphics processors (GPU) to achieve a 100-fold increase in processing speed, relative to conventional CPU-based processing, and thus enable fully-interactive estimation and visualization of plume composition. The heritage for our new tools is based on the Plume Tracker toolkit, developed at JPL, and MODTRAN RT model, developed by SSI. Plume Tracker integrates retrieval procedures, interactive visualization tools, and an interface to a modified version of MODTRAN under a single GUI. Our new tools will incorporate refinements from a recent adaptation of MODTRAN to optimize modeling the radiative properties of chemical clouds. This presentation will include a review of the foundations of plume mapping in the TIR and examples of the application of Plume Tracker to ASTER, MODIS, and AIRS data. We will present an overview of our tool development effort and discuss the application of these tools to data from new and future instruments, such as the airborne Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer

  7. Improving spatio-temporal resolution of infrared images to detect thermal activity of defect at the surface of inorganic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvec, Guillaume; Robin, Eric; Le Cam, Jean-Benoît; Sangleboeuf, Jean-Christophe; Lucas, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a noise suppression methodology to improve the spatio-temporal resolution of infrared images. The methodology is divided in two steps. The first one consists in removing the noise from the temporal signal at each pixel. Three basic temporal filters are considered for this purpose: average filter, cost function minimization (FIT) and short time Fast Fourier Transform approach (STFFT). But while this step effectively reduces the temporal signal noise at each pixel, the infrared images may still appear noisy. This is due to a random distribution of a residual offset value of pixels signal. Hence in the second step, the residual offset is identified by considering thermal images for which no mechanical loading is applied. In this case, the temperature variation field is homogeneous and the value of temperature variation at each pixel is theoretically equal to zero. The method is first tested on synthetic images built from infrared computer-generated images combined with experimental noise. The results demonstrate that this approach permits to keep the spatial resolution of infrared images equal to 1 pixel. The methodology is then applied to characterize thermal activity of a defect at the surface of inorganic glass submitted to cyclic mechanical loading. The three basic temporal filters are quantitatively compared and contrasted. Results obtained demonstrate that, contrarily to a basic spatio-temporal approach, the denoising method proposed is suitable to characterize low thermal activity combined to strong spatial gradients induced by cyclic heterogeneous deformations.

  8. [Application study of the thermal infrared emissivity spectra in the estimation of salt content of saline soil].

    PubMed

    Xia, Jun; Tashpolat, Tiyip; Mamat, Sawut; Zhang, Fei; Han, Gui-Hong

    2012-11-01

    Studying of soil salinization is of great significance for agricultural production in arid area oasis, thermal infrared remote sensing technology provides a new technology and method in this field. Authors used Fourier transform infrared spectrometer to measure the oasis saline soil in field, employed iterative spectrally smooth temperature/emissivity separation algorithm (ISSTES) to separate temperature and emissivity, and acquired the thermal infrared emissivity data of the saline soil. Through researching the emissivity spectral feature of saline soil, and concluded that soil emissivity will reduce with the increasing of salt content from 8 to 13 microm, so emissivity spectra is more sensitive to salt factor from 8 to 9.5 microm. Then, analyzed the correlation between original emissivity spectra and its first derivative, second derivative and normalized ratio with salt content, the result showed that they have a negative correlation relationship between soil emissivity and salt content, and the correlation between emissivity first derivative and salt content is highest, reach to 0.724 2, the corresponding bands are from 8.370 745-8.390 880 microm. Finally, established the quadratic function regression model, its determination coefficient is 0.741 4, and root mean square error is 0.235 5, the result explained that the approach of using thermal infrared emissivity to retrieve the salt content of saline soil is feasible.

  9. Analysis of urban residential environments using color infrared aerial photography: An examination of socioeconomic variables and physical characteristics of selected areas in the Los Angeles basin, with addendum: An application of the concepts of the Los Angeles residential environment study to the Ontario-Upland region of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullens, R. H., Jr.; Senger, L. W.

    1969-01-01

    Aerial photographs taken with color infrared film were used to differentiate various types of residential areas in the Los Angeles basin, using characteristics of the physical environment which vary from one type of residential area to another. Residential areas of varying quality were classified based on these characteristics. Features of the physical environment, identifiable on CIR aerial photography were examined to determine which of these are the best indicators of quality of residential areas or social areas, as determined by the socioeconomic characteristics of the inhabitants of the selected areas. Association between several physical features and the socioeconomic variables was found to exist.

  10. Hyperspectral Thermal Infrared Analysis of the Salton Sea, CA Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reath, K. A.; Ramsey, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is an active 20 km2 region in southern California, which lies along the Calipatria Fault; an offshoot of the San Andreas Fault. Several geothermal fields (including the Davis-Schrimpf and Sandbar fields) and ten power plants generating 340 MW lie within this region. In order to better understand the mineral and thermal distribution of the surface, hyperspectral thermal infrared (TIR) data were acquired by Aerospace Corporation using the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System (SEABSS) airborne sensor on March 26, 2009 and April 6, 2010. SEBASS collects 128 wavelength channels at 1 meter spatial resolution, from which a new and more accurate interpretation was produced of the surface mineralogy of the geothermal fields and surrounding areas. Such data are rarely available for this type of scientific analysis and enabled the identification of mineral assemblages associated with geothermally-active areas. These minerals include anhydrite, gypsum, as well as an unknown mineral with a unique TIR wavelength feature at 8.2 μm. Comparing the 2009 and 2010 data, this unknown mineral varies in abundance and spatial distribution likely due to changes in rainfall. Samples rich in this mineral were collected from an area identified in the SEBASS data and analyzed in the laboratory using high resolution TIR emission spectroscopy. The same spectral absorption feature was found confirming the mineral's presence. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed on one of the samples in order to positively identify this mineral and further constrain the TIR analysis. By using the combination of airborne and laboratory spectroscopy, detailed and temporally-variable patterns of the surface mineralogy were ultimately produced. This work has the potential to be used at other geothermal sites to better characterize transient mineralogy, understand the influence of surface and ground water in these systems, and

  11. Thermal Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Synthetic Allophane and its Potential Formation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Kraft, M. D.; Sharp, T. G.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    Allophane is a poorly-crystalline, hydrous aluminosilicate with variable Si/Al ratios approx.0.5-1 and a metastable precursor of clay minerals. On Earth, it forms rapidly by aqueous alteration of volcanic glass under neutral to slightly acidic conditions [1]. Based on in situ chemical measurements and the identification of alteration phases [2-4], the Martian surface is interpreted to have been chemically weathered on local to regional scales. Chemical models of altered surfaces detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit in Gusev crater suggest the presence of an allophane-like alteration product [3]. Thermal infrared (TIR) spectroscopy and spectral deconvolution models are primary tools for determining the mineralogy of the Martian surface [5]. Spectral models of data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) indicate a global compositional dichotomy, where high latitudes tend to be enriched in a high-silica material [6,7], interpreted as high-silica, K-rich volcanic glass [6,8]. However, later interpretations proposed that the high-silica material may be an alteration product (such as amorphous silica, clay minerals, or allophane) and that high latitude surfaces are chemically weathered [9-11]. A TIR spectral library of pure minerals is available for the public [12], but it does not contain allophane spectra. The identification of allophane on the Martian surface would indicate high water activity at the time of its formation and would help constrain the aqueous alteration environment [13,14]. The addition of allophane to the spectral library is necessary to address the global compositional dichotomy. In this study, we characterize a synthetic allophane by IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to create an IR emission spectrum of pure allophane for the Mars science community to use in Martian spectral models.

  12. Preliminary investigation of KTN as a surface acoustic wave infrared/thermal detector

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of preliminary investigations of thin films of KTN (KTa1−xNbxO3) surface acoustic wave (SAW) structures for their suitability as thermal detectors. The goal is to use the technique for infrared (IR) detection and imaging. The thin films (0.6 m) of K(Ta1−xNbx)O3 [x = 0.5] epitaxial films were grown and polished on KTaO3 (0 0 1) substrates approximately 1 mm thick. SAW resonators with a center frequency of approximately 480 MHz were fabricated using these substrates. To form the basis of comparison to commonly used, thermally sensitive SAW substrates, SAW devices using lithium niobate (LiNbO3) as the substrate material were also fabricated. The phase response as a function of temperature for the KTN as well as the LiNbO3 SAW devices was measured with a network analyzer. The largest phase change exhibited by the LiNbO3 was about −4.7 / C, whereas the largest phase change exhibited by the KTN was about twice as much (11 / C). Assuming a worst case network analyzer phase resolution of 0.5 , this corresponds to a temperature resolution of 0.1 C for the LiNbO3 and 0.05 C for the KTN. By comparison, typical sensitivity of (uncooled) microbolometers is of the order of 50 mK. We believe that with improved fabrication and signal processing, the KTN/SAW-based detection approach can achieve a temperature resolution of better than 50 mK.

  13. Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing for Analysis of Landscape Ecological Processes: Methods and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal Infrared (TIR) remote sensing data can provide important measurements of surface energy fluxes and temperatures, which are integral to understanding landscape processes and responses. One example of this is the successful application of TIR remote sensing data to estimate evapotranspiration and soil moisture, where results from a number of studies suggest that satellite-based measurements from TIR remote sensing data can lead to more accurate regional-scale estimates of daily evapotranspiration. With further refinement in analytical techniques and models, the use of TIR data from airborne and satellite sensors could be very useful for parameterizing surface moisture conditions and developing better simulations of landscape energy exchange over a variety of conditions and space and time scales. Thus, TIR remote sensing data can significantly contribute to the observation, measurement, and analysis of energy balance characteristics (i.e., the fluxes and redistribution of thermal energy within and across the land surface) as an implicit and important aspect of landscape dynamics and landscape functioning. The application of TIR remote sensing data in landscape ecological studies has been limited, however, for several fundamental reasons that relate primarily to the perceived difficulty in use and availability of these data by the landscape ecology community, and from the fragmentation of references on TIR remote sensing throughout the scientific literature. It is our purpose here to provide evidence from work that has employed TIR remote sensing for analysis of landscape characteristics to illustrate how these data can provide important data for the improved measurement of landscape energy response and energy flux relationships. We examine the direct or indirect use of TIR remote sensing data to analyze landscape biophysical characteristics, thereby offering some insight on how these data can be used more robustly to further the understanding and modeling of

  14. Thermal infrared spectroscopy of experimentally shocked anorthosite and pyroxenite: Implications for remote sensing of Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Lucey, P.G.; Christensen, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    The feldspar and pyroxene mineralogies on Mars revealed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on Mars Global Surveyor likely record a variety of shock effects, as suggested by petrologic analyses of the Martian meteorites and the abundance of impact craters on the planet's surface. To study the effects of shock pressures on thermal infrared spectra of these minerals, we performed shock recovery experiments on orthopyroxenite and anorthosite samples from the Stillwater Complex (Montana) over peak pressures from 17 to 63 GPa. We acquired emissivity and hemispherical reflectance spectra (350-1400 cm-1; ???7-29 ??m) of both coherent chips and fine-grained powders of shocked and unshocked samples. These spectra are more directly comparable to remotely sensed data of Mars (e.g., TES) than previously acquired absorption or transmission spectra of shocked minerals. The spectra of experimentally shocked feldspar show systematic changes with increasing pressure due to depolymerization of the silica tetrahedra. For the spectra of chips, this includes the disappearance of small bands in the 500-650 cm-1 region and a strong band at 1115 cm-1, and changes in positions of a strong band near 940 cm-1 and the Christiansen feature near 1250 cm-1. Spectra of the shocked powders show the gradual disappearance of a transparency feature near 830 cm-1. Fewer changes are observed in the pyroxene spectra at pressures as high as 63 GPa. Spectra of experimentally shocked minerals will help identify more precisely the mineralogy of rocks and soils not only from TES but also from Mars instruments such as miniTES and THEMIS.

  15. Thermal infrared remote sensing and its usefulness in determining regional stream temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkauer, K. A.; Handcock, R. N.; Kay, J. E.; Kampf, S. K.; Gillespie, A. R.; Burges, S. J.

    2003-12-01

    Stream temperatures are an important water quality variable in the Pacific Northwest, especially due their impact on health of regional salmon and steelhead runs. With several of these runs classified as threatened or endangered by the National Marine Fisheries Service in the last decade, monitoring of regional stream temperatures has never been more important. Networks of in-situ temperature observation sites tend to be costly to install and maintain, limiting their ability to monitor large regions in detail. Thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing from aircraft and satellite based platforms have the potential to provide high resolution regional information about stream temperatures at a specific time. We present results from a three-year study, conducted to investigate the usefulness of TIR images in monitoring and observing regional stream temperatures. This project compared satellite-, aircraft- and ground-based TIR sensors with a network of in-stream temperature loggers and volunteer observations to assess the accuracy and uncertainty of TIR derived stream temperatures. Accuracy and uncertainty of temperatures extracted from the TIR images are strongly related to our ability to correct imagery for the effects of surface emissivity, atmospheric conditions and thermal scattering from the near-bank environment. Limited observations of atmospheric water vapor are of particular concern, however, total column water predictions from a meso-scale atmospheric model can be a useful substitute. The biggest limiting factor in using remote sensing for the evaluation of regional stream temperatures is the resolution of the sensor. Satellite-based sensors are unable to fully resolve all but the largest regional rivers. Higher-resolution aircraft-based images can resolve most regional rivers and stream, but may be unable to yield accurate temperatures in the presence of dense riparian zone vegetation. Very high-resolution images from the ground-based TIR sensors can resolve

  16. MAPPING SPATIAL/TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF GREEN MACROALGAE IN A PACIFIC NORTHWEST COASTAL ESTUARY VIA SMALL FORMAT COLOR INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small format 35 mm hand-held camera with color infrared slide film was used to map blooms of benthic green macroalgae upon mudflats of Yaquina Bay estuary on the central Oregon coast, U.S.A. Oblique photographs were taken during a series of low tide events, when the intertidal...

  17. Identification of thermal properties distribution in building wall using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouns, Jordan; Dumoulin, Jean

    2016-04-01

    [1] L. Ibos, J-P. Monchau, V. Feuillet, Y. Candau, A comparative study of in-situ measurement methods of a building wall thermal resistance using infrared thermography, in Proc. SPIE 9534, Twelfth International Conference on Quality Control by Artificial Vision 2015, 95341I (April 30, 2015); doi:10.1117/12.2185126 [2] Nassiopoulos, A., Bourquin, F., On-site building walls characterization, Numerical Heat Transfer, Part A : Applications, 63(3) :179 :200, 2013 [3] J. Brouns, Développement d'outils numériques pour l'audit énergétique des bâtiments, PhD thesis, Université Paris-Est, SIE, 2014 [4] J.-L. Lions, Contrôle optimal de systèmes gouvernés par des équations aux dérivées partielles. Book, Dunod editor, 1968.

  18. The Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer (PHyTIR): A High Speed, Multispectral, Thermal Instrument Development in Support of HyspIRI-TIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer (PHyTIR) is being developed as part of the risk reduction activities associated with the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI). The HyspIRI mission was recommended by the National Research Council Decadal Survey and includes a visible shortwave infrared (SWIR) pushboom spectrometer and a multispectral whiskbroom thermal infrared (TIR) imager. Data from the HyspIRI mission will be used to address key science questions related to the Solid Earth and Carbon Cycle and Ecosystems focus areas of the NASA Science Mission Directorate. The HyspIRI TIR system will have 60m ground resolution, better than 200mK noise equivalent delta temperature (NEDT), 0.5C absolute temperature resolution with a 5-day repeat from LEO orbit. PHyTIR addresses the technology readiness level (TRL) of certain key subsystems of the TIR imager, primarily the detector assembly and scanning mechanism. PHyTIR will use Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) technology at the focal plane and operate in time delay integration mode. A custom read out integrated circuit (ROIC) will provide the high speed readout hence allowing the high data rates needed for the 5 day repeat. PHyTIR will also demonstrate a newly developed interferometeric metrology system. This system will provide an absolute measurement of the scanning mirror to an order of magnitude better than conventional optical encoders. This will minimize the reliance on ground control points hence minimizing post-processing (e.g. geo-rectification computations).

  19. Assessing stream temperature variations in the Pacific Northwest using airborne thermal infrared remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, J.; Cherkauer, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality, and a significant concern for endangered cold-water fish species in the Pacific Northwest. Thermal-infrared (TIR) remote sensing allows for the observation of water temperatures in entire river systems in a relatively short space of time, as opposed to more traditional point-based in situ observing methods that can capture only localized water conditions. Point measurements can therefore miss important spatial patterns associated with various factors including exposure to solar radiation, urbanization, changes to riparian zone vegetation, and the presence of groundwater returns and springs. In this paper, we analyze moderate resolution TIR imagery collected from an airborne platform for the Green River in Washington State. Five-meter MODIS/ASTER (MASTER) imagery along the main channel of the Green River was acquired in multiple straight line passes with image overlaps occurring at time intervals of between 3 and 30 minutes on August 25 and 27, 2001. Overlaps of two adjacent images provide a detailed comparison of how stream temperature changes over relatively short time scales, while image captured from different days help identify persistent localized temperature differences. Trees and shrubs in the riparian zone increases shading of the stream and reduces along-stream increases in temperature compared to stream reaches with reduced shading, such as urban areas. Longitudinal profiles of stream temperature from upstream to downstream show that other factors, such as sandbars and cold-water seeps, also contribute to along-stream temperature variations.

  20. Modeling of scattering and absorption by nonspherical cirrus ice particles at thermal infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Sun, W.B.; Yang, P.

    1999-08-15

    This paper examines a number of commonly used methods for the calculation of the scattering and absorption properties of nonspherical ice crystals at thermal infrared wavelengths. It is found that, for randomly oriented nonspherical particles, Mie theory using equivalent ice spheres tends to overestimate the absorption efficiency while the anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) and the geometric optics method (GOM) tend to underestimate it. The absorption efficiency is not sensitive to the particle shape when the size parameter is large. Herein a composite scheme is used that is valid for nonspherical particles with a wide range of size parameters. This scheme is a composite of Mie theory, GOM, and ADT to fit the single-scattering properties of hexagonal particles derived from the GOM for large size parameters and the finite-difference time domain technique for small size parameters. Applying this composite technique, errors in the broadband emissivity of cirrus clouds associated with conventional approaches are examined. It is shown that, when the projected area is preserved, Mie results overestimate the emissivity of cirrus clouds while, when the volume is preserved, Mie results underestimate the emissivity. Mie theory yields the best results when both projected area and volume are preserved (the relative errors are less than 10%). It is also shown that the ADT underestimates cirrus cloud emissivity. In some cases, the relative errors can be as large as 20%. The errors in the GOM are also significant and are largely a result of nonspherical particles with size parameters smaller than 40.

  1. Characterization and validation of CH4 profiles derived from the GOSAT thermal infrared band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is one of most effective greenhouse gases which is responsible for global warming since pre-industrial time. CH4 emitted from anthropogenic and natural sources can be identified but poorly quantified in the local scale. Vertical profiles of CH4 are retrieved from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) Thermal InfraRed (TIR) band, and the evaluation of the GOSAT TIR CH4 profile is being conducted. Here we show the results of the comparison of GOSAT TIR and the aircraft CH4 in-situ profiles measured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX). We compare the TIR CH4 with the aircraft profiles from 15 NOAA sites and Railroad valley measured by AJAX. GOSAT TIR CH4 profiles are collected under conditions within 200 km and ±12 hours from the aircraft measurements at each observation site. The TIR CH4 profiles agree well with aircraft profiles and average differences have slightly negative biases (-3 to -6 ppb) in both the boundary layer and the free troposphere.Satellite based CH4 measurements can provide the large spatial and temporal that improve the understanding of CH4 transport, surface emissions and chemical loss.

  2. Biological thermal detection in infrared imaging snakes. 1. Ultramicrostructure of pit receptor organs.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, N; Hazel, J; Gorbunov, V V; Stone, M; Grace, M; Tsukruk, V V

    2001-01-01

    The receptor organs of snakes with "thermal vision" were studied with ultra-high-resolution scanning probe microscopy (SPM) at close to in vivo conditions to elucidate their surface morphology and materials properties critical for prospective biomimetic design of "soft matter"-based infrared (IR) sensors. The surfaces of living tissues were scanned under wet ambient conditions in physiological solution, and the resulting parameters were compared with SPM data obtained for chemically treated (formaldehyde-fixed) tissue in ambient air and TEM studies in high vacuum. We found that the microstructural parameters for the living tissue are similar to ones observed for the formaldehyde-fixed snake tissues. However, previous data obtained from TEM analysis in high vacuum underestimated actual dimensions of surface microstructures. The average spacing of the nanopit array observed within receptor surface areas, which was suggested to play a critical role in selective IR adsorption, was determined to be 520 nm. This value is close to the grating spacing required for efficient reflection of electromagnetic radiation characteristic for sunlight without affecting IR adsorbance.

  3. Estimating wave energy dissipation in the surf zone using thermal infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Roxanne J.; Chickadel, C. Chris; Jessup, Andrew T.; Thomson, Jim

    2015-06-01

    Thermal infrared (IR) imagery is used to quantify the high spatial and temporal variability of dissipation due to wave breaking in the surf zone. The foam produced in an actively breaking crest, or wave roller, has a distinct signature in IR imagery. A retrieval algorithm is developed to detect breaking waves and extract wave roller length using measurements taken during the Surf Zone Optics 2010 experiment at Duck, NC. The remotely derived roller length and an in situ estimate of wave slope are used to estimate dissipation due to wave breaking by means of the wave-resolving model by Duncan (1981). The wave energy dissipation rate estimates show a pattern of increased breaking during low tide over a sand bar, consistent with in situ turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate estimates from fixed and drifting instruments over the bar. When integrated over the surf zone width, these dissipation rate estimates account for 40-69% of the incoming wave energy flux. The Duncan (1981) estimates agree with those from a dissipation parameterization by Janssen and Battjes (2007), a wave energy dissipation model commonly applied within nearshore circulation models.

  4. Multifunctional upconversion nanoprobe for tumor fluorescence imaging and near-infrared thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yanchun; Chen, Qun; Wu, Baoyan; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    The combination of diagnostics and therapeutics is growing rapidly in cancer treatment. Here, using upconversion nanoparticles coated with chitosan conjugated with a targeting molecule and loaded with indocyanine green (ICG), an excitation-selectable nanoprobe with highly integrated functionalities, including the emission of visible and near-infrared (NIR) light, strong optical absorption in the NIR region and high photostability was developed. After injected in mice, the nanoprobes targeted to the tumor vascular system. NIR lasers (980 and 808 nm) were then selectively applied to the mice. The results show that, the emitted upconversion fluorescence and NIR fluorescence can be used in a complementary manner for high signal/noise ratio and sensitive tumor imaging for more precise tumor localization; Highly effective photothermal therapy can be realized using 808 nm laser irradiation. The upconversion fluorescence at 654 nm is useful for monitoring treatment effect during thermal therapy. In summary, using the nanoprobes, outstanding therapeutic efficacy could be realized and the nanofabrication strategy would highlight the promise of upconversion nanoparticles in cancer theranostics.

  5. Thermal infrared and visual observations of a water ice lag in the Mars southern summer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Titus, T.N.

    2005-01-01

    We present thermal infrared and visual evidence for the existence of water ice lags in the early southern summer. The observed H2O-ice lags lay in and near a chasma and appears to survive between 6-8 sols past the sublimation of the CO2. Possible sources of the H2O that compose the lag are (1) atmospheric H2O that is incorporated into the seasonal cap during condensation, (2) cold trapping of atmospheric water vapor onto the surface of the cap in the spring, or (3) a combination of the 2 processes where water is released from the sublimating cap only to be transported back over the cap edge and cold trapped. We refer to this later process as the "Houben" effect which may enrich the amount of water contained in the seasonal cap at 85??S by as much as a factor of 15. This phenomenon, which has already been identified for the northern retreating cap, may present an important water transport mechanism in the Southern Hemisphere.

  6. Thermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Atmospheric Species Critical to Radiative Forcing of Earth's Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasunas, J. C., Jr.; Kostiuk, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Hewagama, T.; Kolasinski, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal-infrared (from about 6 to 100 or more microns wavelength), emission-mode Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) systems acquire radiometric spectra for diurnal diagnostics of atmospheric properties. We have been funded through NASA's Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) to develop CIRS-lite as a lightweight successor to the Goddard-developed Cassini CIRS FTS currently operating in Saturn orbit. CIRS-lite also has promise for Earth science due to its modest mass, power and volume requirements and novel technical capabilities. For Earth, CIRS-lite supports the characterization of climate radiative forcing, including trace species measurements such as methane. Detection capability beyond the typical limit of HgCdTe focal planes (about 16 microns wavelength) enables a more complete characterization of the greenhouse effect. As for trace-species quantification, a beyond-HgCdTe focal plane permits characterization of water without overlapping lines from other species, enabling better measurements of these other species such as methane at wavelengths reachable by HgCdTe.

  7. Estimation of absolute water surface temperature based on atmospherically corrected thermal infrared multispectral scanner digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne remote sensing systems, as well as those on board Earth orbiting satellites, sample electromagnetic energy in discrete wavelength regions and convert the total energy sampled into data suitable for processing by digital computers. In general, however, the total amount of energy reaching a sensor system located at some distance from the target is composed not only of target related energy, but, in addition, contains a contribution originating from the atmosphere itself. Thus, some method must be devised for removing or at least minimizing the effects of the atmosphere. The LOWTRAN-6 Program was designed to estimate atmospheric transmittance and radiance for a given atmospheric path at moderate spectral resolution over an operational wavelength region from 0.25 to 28.5 microns. In order to compute the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) digital values which were recorded in the absence of the atmosphere, the parameters derived from LOWTRAN-6 are used in a correction equation. The TIMS data were collected at 1:00 a.m. local time on November 21, 1983, over a recirculating cooling pond for a power plant in southeastern Mississippi. The TIMS data were analyzed before and after atmospheric corrections were applied using a band ratioing model to compute the absolute surface temperature of various points on the power plant cooling pond. The summarized results clearly demonstrate the desirability of applying atmospheric corrections.

  8. Measurement of evapotranspiration with combined reflective and thermal infrared radiance observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, Allen S.

    1993-01-01

    The broad goal of the research summarized in this report was 'To facilitate the evaluation of regional evapotranspiration (ET) through the combined use of solar reflective and thermal infrared radiance observations.' The specific objectives stated by Goward and Hope (1986) were to: (1) investigate the nature of the relationship between surface temperature (T(sub S)) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and develop an understanding of this relationship in terms of energy exchange processes, particularly latent flux heat (LE); (2) develop procedures to estimate large area LE using combined T(sub S) and NDVI observations obtained from AVHRR data; and (3) determine whether measurements derived from satellite observations relate directly to measurements made at the surface or from aircraft platforms. Both empirical and modeling studies were used to develop an understanding of the T(sub S)-NDVI relationship. Most of the modeling was based on the Tergra model as originally proposed by Goward. This model, and modified versions developed in this project, simulates the flows of water and energy in the soil-plant-atmosphere system using meteorological, soil and vegetation inputs. Model outputs are the diurnal course of soil moisture, T(sub S), LE and the other individual components of the surface energy balance.

  9. Infrared and radio study of the W43 cluster. Resolved binaries and non-thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Escamilla, P. L.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, A. J.; Sánchez-Sutil, J. R.; Martí, J.; Combi, J. A.; Sánchez-Ayaso, E.

    2011-08-01

    Context. The recent detection of very high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from the direction of the W43 star-forming region prompted us to investigate its stellar population in detail in an attempt to see wether or not it is possible an association. Aims: We search for the possible counterpart(s) of the gamma-ray source or any hints of them, such as non-thermal synchrotron emission as a tracer of relativistic particles often involved in plausible physical scenarios for VHE emission. Methods: We data-mined several archival databases with different degrees of success. The most significant results came from radio and near-infrared archival data. Results: The previously known Wolf-Rayet star in the W43 central cluster and another cluster member appear to be resolved into two components,suggesting a likely binary nature. In addition, extended radio emission with a clearly negative spectral index is detected in coincidence with the W43 cluster. These findings could have important implications for possible gamma-ray emitting scenarios, which we also briefly discuss.

  10. Mapping the distribution of vesicular textures on silicic lavas using the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondrusek, Jaime; Christensen, Philip R.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effect of vesicularity on TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) imagery independent of chemical variations, we studied a large rhyolitic flow of uniform composition but textural heterogeneity. The imagery was recalibrated so that the digital number values for a lake in the scene matched a calculated ideal spectrum for water. TIMS spectra for the lava show useful differences in coarsely and finely vesicular pumice data, particularly in TIMS bands 3 and 4. Images generated by ratioing these bands accurately map out those areas known from field studies to be coarsely vesicular pumice. These texture-related emissivity variations are probably due to the larger vesicles being relatively deeper and separated by smaller septa leaving less smooth glass available to give the characteristic emission of the lava. In studies of inaccessible lava flows (as on Mars) areas of coarsely vesicular pumice must be identified and avoided before chemical variations can be interpreted. Remotely determined distributions of vesicular and glassy textures can also be related to the volatile contents and potential hazards associated with the emplacement of silicic lava flows on Earth.

  11. Application methods of infrared thermal images in the health care field of traditional Chinese medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ziru; Zhang, Xusheng

    2008-12-01

    Infrared thermal imaging (ITI) is the potential imaging technique for the health care field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Successful application demands obeying the characteristics and regularity of the ITI of human body and designing rigorous trials. First, the influence of time must be taken into account as the ITI of human body varies with time markedly. Second, relative magnitude is preferred to be the index of the image features. Third, scatter diagrams and the method of least square could present important information for evaluating the health care effect. A double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trial was undertaken to study the influences of Shengsheng capsule, one of the TCM health food with immunity adjustment function, on the ITI of human body. The results showed that the effect of Shengsheng capsule to people with weak constitution or in the period of being weak could be reflected objectively by ITI. The relative efficacy rate was 81.3% for the trial group and 30.0% for the control group, there was significant difference between the