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Sample records for aero engines ag

  1. 78 FR 1776 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Aero Engines AG (IAE), V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, with a certain number (No.) 4...

  2. 75 FR 9140 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... International Aero Engines AG, ``Docket No. FAA-2009-0544'' is corrected to read ``Docket No. FAA- 2009-1100... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525-D5, V2527-A5, V2527E-A5, V2527M-A5, V2528-D5,...

  3. 78 FR 22168 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... published in the Federal Register on January 9, 2013 (78 FR 1776). That NPRM proposed to require the... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final...

  4. Aero/structural tailoring of engine blades (AERO/STAEBL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the Aero/Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (AERO/STAEBL) program, which is a computer code used to perform engine fan and compressor blade aero/structural numerical optimizations. These optimizations seek a blade design of minimum operating cost that satisfies realistic blade design constraints. This report documents the overall program (i.e., input, optimization procedures, approximate analyses) and also provides a detailed description of the validation test cases.

  5. Aero-Engine Condition Monitoring Based on Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxiao; Wang, Nan

    The maintenance and management of civil aero-engine require advanced monitor approaches to estimate aero-engine performance and health in order to increase life of aero-engine and reduce maintenance costs. In this paper, we adopted support vector machine (SVM) regression approach to monitor an aero-engine health and condition by building monitoring models of main aero-engine performance parameters(EGT, N1, N2 and FF). The accuracy of nonlinear baseline models of performance parameters is tested and the maximum relative error does not exceed ±0.3%, which meets the engineering requirements. The results show that SVM nonlinear regression is an effective method in aero-engine monitoring.

  6. Vibration modelling and verifications for whole aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a new rotor-ball-bearing-casing coupling dynamic model for a practical aero-engine is established. In the coupling system, the rotor and casing systems are modelled using the finite element method, support systems are modelled as lumped parameter models, nonlinear factors of ball bearings and faults are included, and four types of supports and connection models are defined to model the complex rotor-support-casing coupling system of the aero-engine. A new numerical integral method that combines the Newmark-β method and the improved Newmark-β method (Zhai method) is used to obtain the system responses. Finally, the new model is verified in three ways: (1) modal experiment based on rotor-ball bearing rig, (2) modal experiment based on rotor-ball-bearing-casing rig, and (3) fault simulations for a certain type of missile turbofan aero-engine vibration. The results show that the proposed model can not only simulate the natural vibration characteristics of the whole aero-engine but also effectively perform nonlinear dynamic simulations of a whole aero-engine with faults.

  7. Investigation of intelligent measurement system for aero-engine experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weisong

    1990-07-01

    An intelligent aero-engine measurement system has been developed. The system is original and new in its global design. It integrates data acquisition, real-time calibration, displacement control, angle tracking, data processing, and table printing. The system has been used successfully in combustion and turbine testing; its technical and economic effectiveness has been proved remarkable.

  8. Some considerations relating to aero engine pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, P. J.

    1986-11-01

    With turbine blade optical pyrometry rapidly becoming accepted by the aerospace community as a viable flight control technique, some of the traditional and emerging demands are described, with examples of how they are being addressed. Many of these demands are now being met by skillful application of materials technology, electronic engineering, signal processing and fluid flow techniques, but it is probable that flight conditions will impose a more pragmatic approach than customarily adopted towards test bed installations.

  9. Overview of additive manufacturing activities at MTU aero engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberg, Joachim; Dusel, Karl-Heinz; Satzger, Wilhelm

    2015-03-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a promising technology to produce parts easily and effectively, just by using metallic powder or wire as starting material and a sophisticated melting process. In contrast to milling or turning technologies complex shaped and hollow parts can be built up in one step. That reduces the production costs and allows the implementation of complete new 3D designs. Therefore AM is also of great interest for aerospace and aero engine industry. MTU Aero Engines has focused its AM activities to the selective laser melting technique (SLM). This technique uses metallic powder and a laser for melting and building up the part layer by layer. It is shown which lead part was selected for AM and how the first production line was established. A special focus is set on the quality assurance of the selective laser melting process. In addition to standard non-destructive inspection techniques a new online monitoring tool was developed and integrated into the SLM machines. The basics of this technique is presented.

  10. Fatigue Life Analysis of Turbine Disks Based on Load Spectra of Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Feng; Lv, Zhiqiang; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Load spectra of aero-engines reflect the process of operating aircrafts as well as the changes of parameters of aircrafts. According to flight hours and speed cycle numbers of the aero-engines, the relationship between load spectra and the fatigue life of main components of the aero-engines is obtained. Based on distribution function and a generalized stress-strength interference model, the cumulative fatigue damage of aero-engines is then calculated. After applying the analysis of load spectra and the cumulative fatigue damage theory, the fatigue life of the first-stage turbine disks of the aero-engines is evaluated by using the S-N curve and Miner's rule in this paper.

  11. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization on Conceptual Design of Aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Zhan-xue; Zhou, Li; Liu, Zeng-wen

    2016-06-01

    In order to obtain better integrated performance of aero-engine during the conceptual design stage, multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, weight, and aircraft mission are required. Unfortunately, the couplings between these disciplines make it difficult to model or solve by conventional method. MDO (Multidisciplinary Design Optimization) methodology which can well deal with couplings of disciplines is considered to solve this coupled problem. Approximation method, optimization method, coordination method, and modeling method for MDO framework are deeply analyzed. For obtaining the more efficient MDO framework, an improved CSSO (Concurrent Subspace Optimization) strategy which is based on DOE (Design Of Experiment) and RSM (Response Surface Model) methods is proposed in this paper; and an improved DE (Differential Evolution) algorithm is recommended to solve the system-level and discipline-level optimization problems in MDO framework. The improved CSSO strategy and DE algorithm are evaluated by utilizing the numerical test problem. The result shows that the efficiency of improved methods proposed by this paper is significantly increased. The coupled problem of VCE (Variable Cycle Engine) conceptual design is solved by utilizing improved CSSO strategy, and the design parameter given by improved CSSO strategy is better than the original one. The integrated performance of VCE is significantly improved.

  12. Fault Diagnosis of Demountable Disk-Drum Aero-Engine Rotor Using Customized Multiwavelet Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinglong; Wang, Yu; He, Zhengjia; Wang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor is an important piece of equipment that greatly impacts the safe operation of aircraft. However, assembly looseness or crack fault has led to several unscheduled breakdowns and serious accidents. Thus, condition monitoring and fault diagnosis technique are required for identifying abnormal conditions. Customized ensemble multiwavelet method for aero-engine rotor condition identification, using measured vibration data, is developed in this paper. First, customized multiwavelet basis function with strong adaptivity is constructed via symmetric multiwavelet lifting scheme. Then vibration signal is processed by customized ensemble multiwavelet transform. Next, normalized information entropy of multiwavelet decomposition coefficients is computed to directly reflect and evaluate the condition. The proposed approach is first applied to fault detection of an experimental aero-engine rotor. Finally, the proposed approach is used in an engineering application, where it successfully identified the crack fault of a demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor. The results show that the proposed method possesses excellent performance in fault detection of aero-engine rotor. Moreover, the robustness of the multiwavelet method against noise is also tested and verified by simulation and field experiments. PMID:26512668

  13. Fault Diagnosis of Demountable Disk-Drum Aero-Engine Rotor Using Customized Multiwavelet Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinglong; Wang, Yu; He, Zhengjia; Wang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor is an important piece of equipment that greatly impacts the safe operation of aircraft. However, assembly looseness or crack fault has led to several unscheduled breakdowns and serious accidents. Thus, condition monitoring and fault diagnosis technique are required for identifying abnormal conditions. Customized ensemble multiwavelet method for aero-engine rotor condition identification, using measured vibration data, is developed in this paper. First, customized multiwavelet basis function with strong adaptivity is constructed via symmetric multiwavelet lifting scheme. Then vibration signal is processed by customized ensemble multiwavelet transform. Next, normalized information entropy of multiwavelet decomposition coefficients is computed to directly reflect and evaluate the condition. The proposed approach is first applied to fault detection of an experimental aero-engine rotor. Finally, the proposed approach is used in an engineering application, where it successfully identified the crack fault of a demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor. The results show that the proposed method possesses excellent performance in fault detection of aero-engine rotor. Moreover, the robustness of the multiwavelet method against noise is also tested and verified by simulation and field experiments. PMID:26512668

  14. The application of manufacturing systems engineering for aero engine gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pewsey, Stephen M. S.

    1991-10-01

    The adoption of manufacturing systems engineering principles in order to improve cost effectiveness of manufacturing operations is considered. The introduction of cells where families of parts are made from raw material to finished product using a team approach has been initiated. The benefits to date are significant in terms of lead time reductions, inventory, and nonconformance savings as well as improvements in work force motivation and morale. The overall corporate manufacturing strategy of gears is explained. Some of the problems encountered with the transfer of gear production from one site to another with minimum disruption are described. Some of the radical changes being made in the manufacture of gears in line with the strategy of making Rolls-Royce a total quality organization are also described.

  15. Aero-acoustic performance comparison of core engine noise suppressors on NASA quiet engine C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Schaefer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The relative aero-acoustic effectiveness of two core engine suppressors, a contractor-designed suppressor delivered with the Quiet Engine, and a NASA-designed suppressor was evaluated. The NASA suppressor was tested with and without a splitter making a total of three configurations being reported in addition to the baseline hardwall case. The aerodynamic results are presented in terms of tailpipe pressure loss, corrected net thrust, and corrected specific fuel consumption as functions of engine power setting. The acoustic results are divided into duct and far-field acoustic data. The NASA-designed core suppressor did the better job of suppressing aft end noise, but the splitter associated with it caused a significant engine performance penality. The NASA core suppressor without the spltter suppressed most of the core noise without any engine performance penalty.

  16. Aero-acoustic performance comparison of core engine noise suppressors on NASA quiet engine 'C'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Schaefer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the experimental program reported herein was to evaluate and compare the relative aero-acoustic effectiveness of two core engine suppressors, a contractor-designed suppressor delivered with the Quiet Engine, and a NASA-designed suppressor, designed and built subsequently. The NASA suppressor was tested with and without a splitter making a total of three configurations being reported in addition to the baseline hardwall case. The aerodynamic results are presented in terms of tailpipe pressure loss, corrected net thrust, and corrected specific fuel consumption as functions of engine power setting. The acoustic results are divided into duct and far-field acoustic data. The NASA-designed core suppressor did the better job of suppressing aft end noise, but the splitter associated with it caused a significant engine performance penalty. The NASA core suppressor without the splitter suppressed most of the core noise without any engine performance penalty.

  17. FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

  18. Aero/aeroderivative engines - Internal transducers offer potential for enhanced condition monitoring and vibration diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Malcolm J.

    1990-06-01

    Gas turbine aero engines and their ground based derivatives can benefit greatly from the enhanced condition and diagnostic data available from internal vibration transducers. This paper discusses transducer selection, illustrates typical transducer locations and mounting, and describes some of the rotor malfunctions that can be diagnosed from the vibrations data.

  19. Advanced Engineering Methods for Assessing Welding Distortion in Aero-Engine Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Kathryn; Darlington, Roger

    2011-12-01

    Welding remains an attractive fabrication method for aero-engine assemblies, offering high production rates and reduced total cost, particularly for large complex assemblies. However, distortion generated during the welding process continues to provide a major challenge in terms of the control of geometric tolerances and residual stress. The welding distortion is influenced by the sequence and position of joints, the clamping configuration and the design of the assembly. For large complex assemblies the range of these options may be large. Hence the use of numerical simulation at an early stage of the product development process is valuable to enable a wide range of these factors to be explored with the aim of minimising welding distortions before production commences, and thereby reducing the product development time. In this paper, a new technique for simulation of welding distortions based on a shrinkage analysis is evaluated for an aero-engine assembly. The shrinkage simulations were built and solved using the ESI Group software Weld Planner. The rapid simulation speed enabled a wide range of welding plans to be explored, leading to recommendations for the fabrication process. The sensitivity of the model to mesh size and material properties is reported. The results of the shrinkage analysis were found to be similar to those of a transient analysis generated using ESI Group software SysWeld. The solution times were found to be significantly lower for the shrinkage analysis than the transient analysis. Hence it has been demonstrated that shrinkage analysis is a valuable tool for exploring the fabrication process of a welded assembly at an early stage of the product development process.

  20. Characterization of Surface Treated Aero Engine Alloys by Rayleigh Wave Velocity Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, B.; Barth, M.; Schubert, F.; Bamberg, J.; Baron, H.-U.

    2010-02-01

    In aero engines mechanically high stressed components made of high-strength alloys like IN718 and Ti6Al4V are usually surface treated by shot-peening. Other methods, e.g. laser-peening, deep rolling and low plasticity burnishing are also available. All methods introduce compres-sive residual stress desired for minimize sensitivity to fatigue or stress corrosion failure mechanisms, resulting in improved performance and increased lifetime of components. Beside that, also cold work is introduced in an amount varying from method to method. To determine the remaining life time of critical aero engine components like compressor and turbine discs, a quantitative non-destructive determination of compressive stresses is required. The opportunity to estimate residual stress in surface treated aero engine alloys by SAW phase velocity measurements has been re-examined. For that original engine relevant material IN718 has been used. Contrary to other publications a significant effect of the surface treatment to the sound velocity was observed which disappeared after thermal treatment. Also preliminary measurements of the acousto-elastic coefficient fit into this picture.

  1. Influence of secondary flow on aero-engine performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Zhan-xue; Liu, Zeng-wen

    2013-03-01

    In the actual design of turbofan engine with a high thrust-weight ratio, its secondary flow comes from the engine compression parts (fan or high pressure compressor), no matter the Fluidic Thrust Vector (FTV) nozzle is based on Shock Vectoring Controlling (SVC) or Throat Shift (TS). When the turbofan engine works in the state of thrust vector, regardless of the air bleeding from fan or high pressure compressor, the secondary flow have an impact on the components matching and engine performance. Therefore, the study of FTV technology in structurally fixed nozzle cannot just focus on a single nozzle, in the meantime, nozzle should be installed in the actual environment considering the synthesis of flow loss caused by bleed air (for example, bleed air from the compressor) and mixing of the main flow and secondary flow in the nozzle expansion section as well as effect on engine cycle and performance caused by the shockwave loss. Based on this consideration, this article proposes a component-based matching technique, which is applied via numerical simulation in the real environment. The main purpose of this article is research on the effect of FTV on the engine thermodynamic cycle and performance (thrust, fuel consumption and other parameters), considering the processes both air bleeds from fan/high pressure compressor, and it injects into the nozzle expansion section through the holes / slot.

  2. The Brief Introduction of Different Laser Diagnostics Methods Used in Aero-Engine Combustion Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fei; Song, Ge; Ruan, Can; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Yongjun

    2016-06-01

    Combustion test diagnose has always been one of the most important technologies for the development of aerospace engineering. Laser diagnostics techniques developed quickly in the past several years. They are used to measure the parameters of the combustion flow field such as velocity, temperature, components concentration with high space and time resolution and brought no disturbance. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence, Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering, Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and Raman Scattering were introduced systemically in this paper. After analysis their own advantages and disadvantages, it is believed that Raman Scattering system is more suitable for research activities on aero-engine combustion systems.

  3. The spectral analysis of an aero-engine assembly incorporating a squeeze-film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.; Dede, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aero-engine structures have very low inherent damping and so artificial damping is often introduced by pumping oil into annular gaps between the casings and the outer races of some or all of the rolling-element bearings supporting the rotors. The thin oil films so formed are called squeeze film dampers and they can be beneficial in reducing rotor vibration due to unbalance and keeping to reasonable limits the forces transmitted to the engine casing. However, squeeze-film dampers are notoriously non-linear and as a result can introduce into the assembly such phenomena as subharmonic oscillations, jumps and combination frequencies. The purpose of the research is to investigate such phenomena both theoretically and experimentally on a test facility reproducing the essential features of a medium-size aero engine. The forerunner of this work was published. It was concerned with the examination of a squeeze-film damper in series with housing flexibility when supporting a rotor. The structure represented to a limited extent the essentials of the projected Rolls Royce RB401 engine. That research demonstrated the ability to calculate the oil-film forces arising from the squeeze film from known motions of the bearing components and showed that the dynamics of a shaft fitted with a squeeze film bearing can be predicted reasonably accurately. An aero-engine will normally have at least two shafts and so in addition to the excitation forces which are synchronous with the rotation of one shaft, there will also be forces at other frequencies from other shafts operating on the squeeze-film damper. Theoretical and experimental work to consider severe loading of squeeze-film dampers and to include these additional effects are examined.

  4. Simulation of the secondary air system of aero engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutz, K. J.; Speer, T. M.

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes a computer program for the simulation of secondary air systems. Typical flow system elements are presented, such as restrictors, tappings, seals, vortices, and coverplates. Two-phase flow as occurring in bearing chamber vent systems is briefly discussed. An algorithm is described for the solution of the resulting nonlinear equations. The validity of the simulation over the engine operation envelope is demonstrated by a comparison with test results.

  5. A Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation of a Large Commercial Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Frederick, Dean K.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation of a commercial engine has been developed in a graphical environment to meet the increasing need across the controls and health management community for a common research and development platform. This paper describes the Commercial Modular Aero Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS), which is representative of a 90,000-lb thrust class two spool, high bypass ratio commercial turbofan engine. A control law resembling the state-of-the-art on board modern aircraft engines is included, consisting of a fan-speed control loop supplemented by relevant engine limit protection regulator loops. The objective of this paper is to provide a top-down overview of the complete engine simulation package.

  6. A rapid method to achieve aero-engine blade form detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a rapid method to detect aero-engine blade form, according to the characteristics of an aero-engine blade surface. This method first deduces an inclination error model in free-form surface measurements based on the non-contact laser triangulation principle. Then a four-coordinate measuring system was independently developed, a special fixture was designed according to the blade shape features, and a fast measurement of the blade features path was planned. Finally, by using the inclination error model for correction of acquired data, the measurement error that was caused by tilt form is compensated. As a result the measurement accuracy of the Laser Displacement Sensor was less than 10 μm. After the experimental verification, this method makes full use of optical non-contact measurement fast speed, high precision and wide measuring range of features. Using a standard gauge block as a measurement reference, the coordinate system conversion data is simple and practical. It not only improves the measurement accuracy of the blade surface, but also its measurement efficiency. Therefore, this method increases the value of the measurement of complex surfaces. PMID:26039420

  7. A Rapid Method to Achieve Aero-Engine Blade Form Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a rapid method to detect aero-engine blade form, according to the characteristics of an aero-engine blade surface. This method first deduces an inclination error model in free-form surface measurements based on the non-contact laser triangulation principle. Then a four-coordinate measuring system was independently developed, a special fixture was designed according to the blade shape features, and a fast measurement of the blade features path was planned. Finally, by using the inclination error model for correction of acquired data, the measurement error that was caused by tilt form is compensated. As a result the measurement accuracy of the Laser Displacement Sensor was less than 10 μm. After the experimental verification, this method makes full use of optical non-contact measurement fast speed, high precision and wide measuring range of features. Using a standard gauge block as a measurement reference, the coordinate system conversion data is simple and practical. It not only improves the measurement accuracy of the blade surface, but also its measurement efficiency. Therefore, this method increases the value of the measurement of complex surfaces. PMID:26039420

  8. Aero-Propulsion Technology (APT) Task V Low Noise ADP Engine Definition Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcombe, V.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify and evaluate noise reduction technologies for advanced ducted prop propulsion systems that would allow increased capacity operation and result in an economically competitive commercial transport. The study investigated the aero/acoustic/structural advancements in fan and nacelle technology required to match or exceed the fuel burned and economic benefits of a constrained diameter large Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) compared to an unconstrained ADP propulsion system with a noise goal of 5 to 10 EPNDB reduction relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 at each of the three measuring stations namely, takeoff (cutback), approach and sideline. A second generation ADP was selected to operate within the maximum nacelle diameter constrain of 160 deg to allow installation under the wing. The impact of fan and nacelle technologies of the second generation ADP on fuel burn and direct operating costs for a typical 3000 nm mission was evaluated through use of a large, twin engine commercial airplane simulation model. The major emphasis of this study focused on fan blade aero/acoustic and structural technology evaluations and advanced nacelle designs. Results of this study have identified the testing required to verify the interactive performance of these components, along with noise characteristics, by wind tunnel testing utilizing and advanced interaction rig.

  9. Numerical Study of a Fuel Centrifugal Pump with Variable Impeller Width for Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Guan, Huasheng; Ye, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    As typical pump with large flow rate and high reliability, centrifugal pumps in fuel system of aero-engines mostly regulate flow rate by flow bypass, which leads to low efficiency and large fuel temperature rise especially at low flow rate. An innovative fuel centrifugal pump with variable impeller width is a more effective way to regulate flow rate than flow bypass. To find external characteristics of the centrifugal pump with variable impeller width proposed in this paper, flow domain within the pump is simulated numerically and some primary performance parameters and their correlation are analyzed. Results show that flow rate of the pump can be regulated by variable impeller width and that efficiency for this scheme is higher than that for flow bypass. The higher outlet static pressure the pump runs at, the wider range of flow rates can be obtained with stronger nonlinear relationship between flow rate and impeller width.

  10. Ultrasonic evaluation of residual stresses in aero engine materials using bulk and Rayleigh surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubel, Sebastian; Dillhöfer, Alexander; Rieder, Hans; Spies, Martin; Bamberg, Joachim; Götz, Joshua; Hessert, Roland; Preikszas, Christina

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of residual stresses using ultrasound can be a very complex issue, because different material properties may effect the propagation of ultrasonic waves. Nevertheless, in the manufacturing of modern aero engines it is essential to benefit from the full potential of the employed materials. In this context, it is indispensable to test whether ultrasonic stress measurement is applicable for the highly developed nickel- and titanium-based alloys. This contribution contains basic investigations on the achievable measurement effect in samples made of Inconel IN718 and the Titanium alloy Ti 6-2-4-6. Furthermore, we give an overview over the principles of ultrasonic stress measurement using bulk and Rayleigh waves and present first results which are discussed with respect to texture effects and future work.

  11. Unified Multi-speed analysis (UMA) for the condition monitoring of aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nembhard, Adrian D.; Sinha, Jyoti K.

    2015-12-01

    For rotating machinery in which speeds and dynamics constantly change, performing vibration-based condition monitoring can be challenging. Thus, an effort is made here to develop a Unified Multi-speed fault diagnosis technique that can exploit useful vibration information available at various speeds from a rotating machine in a single analysis. Commonly applied indicators are computed from data collected from a rig at different speeds for a baseline case and different faults. Four separate analyses are performed: single speed at a single bearing, integrated features from multiple speeds at a single bearing, single speed for integrated features from multiple bearings and the proposed Unified Multi-speed analysis. The Unified Multi-speed approach produces the most conspicuous separation and isolation among the conditions tested. Observations made here suggest integration of more dynamic features available at different speeds improves the learning process of the tool which could prove useful for aero-engine condition monitoring.

  12. Nonlocal sparse model with adaptive structural clustering for feature extraction of aero-engine bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Xuefeng; Du, Zhaohui; Li, Xiang; Yan, Ruqiang

    2016-04-01

    Fault information of aero-engine bearings presents two particular phenomena, i.e., waveform distortion and impulsive feature frequency band dispersion, which leads to a challenging problem for current techniques of bearing fault diagnosis. Moreover, although many progresses of sparse representation theory have been made in feature extraction of fault information, the theory also confronts inevitable performance degradation due to the fact that relatively weak fault information has not sufficiently prominent and sparse representations. Therefore, a novel nonlocal sparse model (coined NLSM) and its algorithm framework has been proposed in this paper, which goes beyond simple sparsity by introducing more intrinsic structures of feature information. This work adequately exploits the underlying prior information that feature information exhibits nonlocal self-similarity through clustering similar signal fragments and stacking them together into groups. Within this framework, the prior information is transformed into a regularization term and a sparse optimization problem, which could be solved through block coordinate descent method (BCD), is formulated. Additionally, the adaptive structural clustering sparse dictionary learning technique, which utilizes k-Nearest-Neighbor (kNN) clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) learning, is adopted to further enable sufficient sparsity of feature information. Moreover, the selection rule of regularization parameter and computational complexity are described in detail. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated through numerical experiment and its superiority with respect to the state-of-the-art method in the field is demonstrated through the vibration signals of experimental rig of aircraft engine bearings.

  13. Near-field sound radiation of fan tones from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Alan; Gaffney, James; Kingan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The development of a distributed source model to predict fan tone noise levels of an installed turbofan aero-engine is reported. The key objective is to examine a canonical problem: how to predict the pressure field due to a distributed source located near an infinite, rigid cylinder. This canonical problem is a simple representation of an installed turbofan, where the distributed source is based on the pressure pattern generated by a spinning duct mode, and the rigid cylinder represents an aircraft fuselage. The radiation of fan tones can be modelled in terms of spinning modes. In this analysis, based on duct modes, theoretical expressions for the near-field acoustic pressures on the cylinder, or at the same locations without the cylinder, have been formulated. Simulations of the near-field acoustic pressures are compared against measurements obtained from a fan rig test. Also, the installation effect is quantified by calculating the difference in the sound pressure levels with and without the adjacent cylindrical fuselage. Results are shown for the blade passing frequency fan tone radiated at a supersonic fan operating condition. PMID:26428770

  14. A method for the assessment of operational severity for a high pressure turbine blade of an aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, Anthony; Abu, Abdullahi; Laskaridis, Panagiotis

    2015-12-01

    This paper provides a tool for the estimation of the operational severity of a high pressure turbine blade of an aero engine. A multidisciplinary approach using aircraft/ engine performance models which provide inputs to a thermo-mechanical fatigue damage model is presented. In the analysis, account is taken of blade size, blade metal temperature distribution, relevant heat transfer coefficients and mechanical and thermal stresses. The leading edge of the blade is selected as the critical part in the estimation of damage severity for different design and operational parameters. The study also suggests a method for production of operational severity data for the prediction of maintenance intervals.

  15. Novel Framework for Reduced Order Modeling of Aero-engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, Ali

    The present study focuses on the popular dynamic reduction methods used in design of complex assemblies (millions of Degrees of Freedom) where numerous iterations are involved to achieve the final design. Aerospace manufacturers such as Rolls Royce and Pratt & Whitney are actively seeking techniques that reduce computational time while maintaining accuracy of the models. This involves modal analysis of components with complex geometries to determine the dynamic behavior due to non-linearity and complicated loading conditions. In such a case the sub-structuring and dynamic reduction techniques prove to be an efficient tool to reduce design cycle time. The components whose designs are finalized can be dynamically reduced to mass and stiffness matrices at the boundary nodes in the assembly. These matrices conserve the dynamics of the component in the assembly, and thus avoid repeated calculations during the analysis runs for design modification of other components. This thesis presents a novel framework in terms of modeling and meshing of any complex structure, in this case an aero-engine casing. In this study the affect of meshing techniques on the run time are highlighted. The modal analysis is carried out using an extremely fine mesh to ensure all minor details in the structure are captured correctly in the Finite Element (FE) model. This is used as the reference model, to compare against the results of the reduced model. The study also shows the conditions/criteria under which dynamic reduction can be implemented effectively, proving the accuracy of Criag-Bampton (C.B.) method and limitations of Static Condensation. The study highlights the longer runtime needed to produce the reduced matrices of components compared to the overall runtime of the complete unreduced model. Although once the components are reduced, the assembly run is significantly. Hence the decision to use Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) is to be taken judiciously considering the number of

  16. Soot volume fraction measurements in aero-engine exhausts using extinction-calibrated backward laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhay, J.; Desgroux, P.; Therssen, E.; Bladh, H.; Bengtsson, P.-E.; Hönen, H.; Black, J. D.; Vallet, I.

    2009-06-01

    Control and reduction of soot particle emissions from aeronautic turbines requires a monitoring system suitable for quantification of these emissions. Currently, such emissions are estimated using the technique of smoke number. This is an extractive method, which is not sensitive enough for the low emission levels of modern gas turbines. Within a recent European project, AEROTEST, part of the project aimed at investigating an alternative soot monitoring technique, laser-induced incandescence (LII) as an in-situ optical diagnostic for quantification of soot emissions. For aero-engine applications, especially those involving large-scale turbines, it is necessary to perform the measurements at long distance from the turbine. The LII technique is favourable in this respect as it provides for non-intrusive measurements and, by detecting the isotropic LII signal along the same axis as the incoming laser beam (so called backward LII), both the laser and the detector can be built inside one system located several meters from the turbine. The concept was initiated in the previous European projects, AEROJET I and II. This paper describes the modified version of the system and the procedure developed to achieve reliable and quantitative soot volume fraction measurements in the exhausts of aero-engines. Application of the backward LII technique is demonstrated in the exhaust of a military turbojet engine for different engine speeds.

  17. Influence of high rotational speeds on heat transfer and oil film thickness in aero-engine bearing chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, S.; Glahn, A.; Himmelsbach, J.

    1994-04-01

    Increasing the thermal loading of bearing chambers in modern aero-engines requires advanced techniques for the determination of heat transfer characteristics. In the present study, film thickness and heat transfer measurements have been carried out for the complex two-phase oil/air flow in bearing chambers. In order to ensure real engine conditions, a new test facility has been built up, designed for rotational speeds up to n = 16,000 rpm and maximum flow temperatures of T(sub max) = 473 K. Sealing air and lubrication oil flow can be varied nearly in the whole range of aero-engine applications. Special interest is directed toward the development of an ultrasonic oil film thickness measuring technique, which can be used without any reaction on the flow inside the chamber. The determination of local heat transfer at the bearing chamber housing is based on a well-known temperature gradient method using surface temperature measurements and a finite element code to determine temperature distributions within the bearing chamber housing. The influence of high rotational speed on the local heat transfer and the oil film thickness is discussed.

  18. On the Development of an Efficient Parallel Hybrid Solver with Application to Acoustically Treated Aero-Engine Nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Nark, Douglas M.; Nguyen, Duc T.; Tungkahotara, Siroj

    2006-01-01

    A finite element solution to the convected Helmholtz equation in a nonuniform flow is used to model the noise field within 3-D acoustically treated aero-engine nacelles. Options to select linear or cubic Hermite polynomial basis functions and isoparametric elements are included. However, the key feature of the method is a domain decomposition procedure that is based upon the inter-mixing of an iterative and a direct solve strategy for solving the discrete finite element equations. This procedure is optimized to take full advantage of sparsity and exploit the increased memory and parallel processing capability of modern computer architectures. Example computations are presented for the Langley Flow Impedance Test facility and a rectangular mapping of a full scale, generic aero-engine nacelle. The accuracy and parallel performance of this new solver are tested on both model problems using a supercomputer that contains hundreds of central processing units. Results show that the method gives extremely accurate attenuation predictions, achieves super-linear speedup over hundreds of CPUs, and solves upward of 25 million complex equations in a quarter of an hour.

  19. 76 FR 82202 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    .... Discussion On September 15, 2010, we issued AD 2010-20-07, Amendment 39-16441 (75 FR 59067, September 27.... Actions Since Existing AD Was Issued Since we issued AD 2010-20-07 (75 FR 59067, September 27, 2010... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...

  20. 77 FR 30371 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... AD 2010-20-07, Amendment 39-16441 (75 FR 59067, September 27, 2010). That AD applies to the specified products. The NPRM published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2011 (76 FR 82202). That NPRM proposed.... The commenter also requested that we remove the requirement for borescoping the HPC stage 7 to 8...

  1. Two-phase air/oil flow in aero engine bearing chambers: Characterization of oil film flows

    SciTech Connect

    Glahn, A.; Wittig, S.

    1996-07-01

    For the design of secondary air and lubrication oil systems, a sufficient knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena under bearing chamber flow conditions is required. The characterization of oil film flows at the bearing chamber walls is one of the major tasks for a better understanding of these processes and, therefore, a necessity for improvements of the efficiency of aero engines. The present paper gives a contribution to this subject. Utilizing a fiber-optic LDV setup, measurements of oil film velocity profiles have been performed in the high-speed bearing chamber rig simulating real engine conditions. All data have been compared with different theoretical approaches, which have been derived from a force balance at a liquid film element, including geometric conditions and temperature dependent fluid properties, and by approaches for the eddy viscosity available in the literature.

  2. An engineer at AeroVironment's Design Development Center inspects a set of silicon solar cells for p

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An engineer at AeroVironment's Design Development Center in Simi Valley, California, closely inspects a set of silicon solar cells for potential defects. The cells, fabricated by SunPower, Inc., of Sunnyvale, California, are among 64,000 solar cells which have been installed on the Helios Prototype solar-powered aircraft to provide power to its 14 electric motors and operating systems. Developed by AeroVironment under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude aircraft which can perform atmospheric science missions and serve as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere. Target goals set by NASA for the giant 246-foot span flying wing include reaching and sustaining subsonic horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude in 2001, and sustained continuous flight for at least four days and nights in 2003 with the aid of a regenerative fuel cell-based energy storage system now in development.

  3. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Two Nickel-Based Superalloys Produced by Metal Injection Molding for Aero Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Benedikt; Völkl, Rainer; Glatzel, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    For different high-temperature applications like aero engines or turbochargers, metal injection molding (MIM) of superalloys is an interesting processing alternative. For operation at high temperatures, oxidation behavior of superalloys produced by MIM needs to match the standard of cast or forged material. The oxidation behavior of nickel-based superalloys Inconel 713 and MAR-M247 in the temperature interval from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) is investigated and compared to cast material. Weight gain is measured discontinuously at different oxidation temperatures and times. Analysis of oxidized samples is done via SEM and EDX-measurements. MIM samples exhibit homogeneous oxide layers with a thickness up to 4 µm. After processing by MIM, Inconel 713 exhibits lower weight gain and thinner oxide layers than MAR-M247.

  4. USAF bioenvironmental noise data handbook. Volume 172: Hush-noise suppressor (Aero Systems Engineering, Incorporated) far-field noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. A.; Rau, T. H.; Jones, C.

    1982-07-01

    The hush-house noise suppressor was made by Aero Systems Engineering of Texas, Inc. for acoustical suppression of various AF fighter/trainer aircraft during ground runup operations. This report provides measured and extrapolated data defining the bioacoustic environments produced by several aircraft/engines operating in the hush-house suppressor for various engine power configurations. Far-field data measured at 20 locations are normalized to standard meteorological conditions and extrapolated from 75-8000 meters to derive sets of equal-value contours for seven acoustic measures as function of angle and distance from the source. Refer to Volume 1 of this handbook, 'USAF Bioenvironmental Noise Data Handbook, Vol 1: Organization, Content and Application,' AMRL-TR-75(1) 1975, for discussion of the objective and design of the handbook, the types of data presented, measurement procedures, instrumentation, data processing, definitions of quantities, symbols, equations, applications, limitations, etc. Data are presented for the following aircraft/engines operating in the hush-house noise suppressor: F-4, F-15, F-16, F-105, F-106, F-111F and T-38 aircraft and the TF41-A-1, J79-GE-15, F100-PW-100, J75-P19, J-75-P-17 and TF30-P-100 engines.

  5. ENGINEERING OF THE AGS SNAKE COIL ASSEMBLY.

    SciTech Connect

    ANERELLA,M.GUPTA,R.KOVACH,P.MARONE,A.PLATE,S.POWER,K.SCHMALZLE,J.WILLEN,E.

    2003-05-12

    A 30% Snake superconducting magnet is proposed to maintain polarization in the AGS proton beam, the magnetic design of which is described elsewhere. The required helical coils for this magnet push the limits of the technology developed for the RHIC Snake coils. First, fields must be provided with differing pitch along the length of the magnet. To accomplish this, a new 3-D CAD system (''Pro/Engineer'' from PTC), which uses parametric techniques to enable fast iterations, has been employed. Revised magnetic field calculations are then based on the output of the mechanical model. Changes are made in turn to the model on the basis of those field calculations. To ensure that accuracy is maintained, the final solid model is imported directly into the CNC machine programming software, rather than by the use of graphics translating software. Next, due to the large coil size and magnetic field, there was concern whether the structure could contain the coil forces. A finite element analysis was performed, using the 3-D model, to ensure that the stresses and deflections were acceptable. Finally, a method was developed using ultrasonic energy to improve conductor placement during coil winding, in an effort to minimize electrical shorts due to conductor misplacement, a problem that occurred in the RHIC helical coil program. Each of these activities represents a significant improvement in technology over that which was used previously for the RHIC snake coils.

  6. A Neural Network Aero Design System for Advanced Turbo-Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, Jose M.

    1999-01-01

    An inverse design method calculates the blade shape that produces a prescribed input pressure distribution. By controlling this input pressure distribution the aerodynamic design objectives can easily be met. Because of the intrinsic relationship between pressure distribution and airfoil physical properties, a Neural Network can be trained to choose the optimal pressure distribution that would meet a set of physical requirements. Neural network systems have been attempted in the context of direct design methods. From properties ascribed to a set of blades the neural network is trained to infer the properties of an 'interpolated' blade shape. The problem is that, especially in transonic regimes where we deal with intrinsically non linear and ill posed problems, small perturbations of the blade shape can produce very large variations of the flow parameters. It is very unlikely that, under these circumstances, a neural network will be able to find the proper solution. The unique situation in the present method is that the neural network can be trained to extract the required input pressure distribution from a database of pressure distributions while the inverse method will still compute the exact blade shape that corresponds to this 'interpolated' input pressure distribution. In other words, the interpolation process is transferred to a smoother problem, namely, finding what pressure distribution would produce the required flow conditions and, once this is done, the inverse method will compute the exact solution for this problem. The use of neural network is, in this context, highly related to the use of proper optimization techniques. The optimization is used essentially as an automation procedure to force the input pressure distributions to achieve the required aero and structural design parameters. A multilayered feed forward network with back-propagation is used to train the system for pattern association and classification.

  7. A Honeycomb-Structured Ti-6Al-4V Oil-Gas Separation Rotor Additively Manufactured by Selective Electron Beam Melting for Aero-engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H. P.; Wang, Q. B.; Yang, G. Y.; Gu, J.; Liu, N.; Jia, L.; Qian, M.

    2016-03-01

    Oil -gas separation is a key process in an aero-engine lubrication system. This study reports an innovative development in oil -gas separation. A honeycomb-structured rotor with hexagonal cone-shaped pore channels has been designed, additively manufactured from Ti-6Al-4V using selective electron beam melting (SEBM) and assessed for oil -gas separation for aero-engine application. The Ti-6Al-4V honeycomb structure showed a high compressive strength of 110 MPa compared to less than 20 MPa for metal foam structures. The oil -gas separation efficiency of the honeycomb-structured separation rotor achieved 99.8% at the rotation speed of 6000 rpm with much lower ventilation resistance (17.3 kPa) than that of the separator rotor constructed using a Ni-Cr alloy foam structure (23.5 kPa). The honeycomb-structured Ti-6Al-4V separator rotor produced by SEBM provides a promising solution to more efficient oil -gas separation in the aero-engine lubrication system.

  8. NASA-universities relationships in aero/space engineering: A review of NASA's program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    NASA is concerned about the health of aerospace engineering departments at U.S. universities. The number of advanced degrees in aerospace engineering has declined. There is concern that universities' facilities, research equipment, and instrumentation may be aging or outmoded and therefore affect the quality of research and education. NASA requested that the National Research Council's Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) review NASA's support of universities and make recommendations to improve the program's effectiveness.

  9. Transport of stabilized engineered silver (Ag) nanoparticles through porous sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Christoph; Braun, Anika; Azzam, Rafig

    2014-03-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are increasingly applied in consumer products and concerns are rising regarding their risk as potential contaminants or carriers for colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. Engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are among the most widely used nanomaterials in consumer products. However, their mobility in groundwater has been scarcely investigated. In this study, transport of stabilized AgNP through porous sandstones with variations in mineralogy, pore size distribution and permeability is investigated in laboratory experiments with well-defined boundary conditions. The AgNP samples were mainly characterized by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to a multi-angle static laser light detector and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy for determination of particle size and concentration. The rock samples are characterized by mercury porosimetry, flow experiments and solute tracer tests. Solute and AgNP breakthrough was quantified by applying numerical models considering one kinetic site model for particle transport. The transport of AgNP strongly depends on pore size distribution, mineralogy and the solution ionic strength. Blocking of attachment sites results in less reactive transport with increasing application of AgNP mass. AgNPs were retained due to physicochemical filtration and probably due to straining. The results demonstrate the restricted applicability of AgNP transport parameters determined from simplified experimental model systems to realistic environmental matrices.

  10. Implementation of In-Situ Impedance Techniques on a Full Scale Aero-Engine System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaeta, R. J.; Mendoza, J. M.; Jones, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Determination of acoustic liner impedance for jet engine applications remains a challenge for the designer. Although suitable models have been developed that take account of source amplitude and the local flow environment experienced by the liner, experimental validation of these models has been difficult. This is primarily due to the inability of researchers to faithfully mimic the environment in jet engine nacelles in the laboratory. An in-situ measurement technique, one that can be implemented in an actual engine, is desirable so an accurate impedance can be determined for future modeling and quality control. This paper documents the implementation of such a local acoustic impedance measurement technique that is used under controlled laboratory conditions as well as on full scale turbine engine liner test article. The objective for these series of in-situ measurements is to substantiate treatment design, provide understanding of flow effects on installed liner performance, and provide modeling input for fan noise propagation computations. A series of acoustic liner evaluation tests are performed that includes normal incidence tube, grazing incidence tube, and finally testing on a full scale engine on a static test stand. Lab tests were intended to provide insight and guidance for accurately measuring the impedance of the liner housed in the inlet of a Honeywell Tech7000 turbofan. Results have shown that one can acquire very reasonable liner impedance data for a full scale engine under realistic test conditions. Furthermore, higher fidelity results can be obtained by using a three-microphone coherence technique that can enhance signal-to-noise ratio at high engine power settings. This research has also confirmed the limitations of this particular type of in-situ measurement. This is most evident in the installation of instrumentation and its effect on what is being measured.

  11. Non-invasive temperature measurements by neutron diffraction in aero-engine components

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, T.M.; Root, J.H.; Tennant, D.C.; Leggett, D.

    1995-12-31

    A requirement exists in the aeronautical industry for measuring temperature non-invasively in critical components, such as the turbine disc in an operating engine. Neutron diffraction, unique among nuclear techniques, offers the possibility of measuring both temperature and strain within an operating engine by virtue of the high penetration of neutrons through industrial materials. Static diffraction experiments on Waspaloy and Ti6Al4V showed, by comparison with thermocouples, that both the diffraction peak position and the peak intensity can measure the temperature to within {+-}6 K at 800 K.

  12. Present and future of CFD on the aero-engine development in IHI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Atsushige

    1990-09-01

    Advances in aircraft engine performance and economy are achieved by a fusion of many individual advances in technology. Especially striking advances in the evolution of aerodynamic technology have appeared in the development and utilization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD already may have attained the level and continues to demonstrate extraordinarily valuable possibilities, in which it is an essential complement to testing and experimentation. A brief review is presented of the current status and the future of CFD on aircraft engine development in IHI.

  13. Aero-Thermo-Structural Analysis of Inlet for Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Challa, Preeti; Sree, Dave; Reddy, Dhanireddy R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA has been developing advanced space transportation concepts and technologies to make access to space less costly. One such concept is the reusable vehicles with short turn-around times. The NASA Glenn Research Center's concept vehicle is the Trailblazer powered by a rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine. Inlet is one of the most important components of the RBCC engine. This paper presents fluid flow, thermal, and structural analysis of the inlet for Mach 6 free stream velocity for fully supersonic and supercritical with backpressure conditions. The results concluded that the fully supersonic condition was the most severe case and the largest stresses occur in the ceramic matrix composite layer of the inlet cowl. The maximum tensile and the compressive stresses were at least 3.8 and 3.4, respectively, times less than the associated material strength.

  14. The effect of aircraft inlets on the behaviour of aero engine axial flow compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Christopher J.

    The air inlet and its effect on turbocompressors are described, covering the following: the engine aircraft operating envelopes, inlet loading, interaction between inlet and compressor, compression distortion tolerance, response of compressor to inlet total pressure distortion, inlet and outlet static pressure distribution, and other threats to compressor stability due to inlet. The following conclusions are made: the aircraft operating envelope is demanding of the inlet when the pressures to reduce size cost, weight, and drag are obvious; the inlet separates at the edges of the envelope; the separation can be reduced by applying well known scaling laws; this asymmetric separation can degrade the compressor surge margin; and the stability margin of the engine can be affected by other features of the inlet.

  15. Buzz-saw noise : propagation of shock waves in aero-engine inlet ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Rasika; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Druon, Yann

    2008-06-01

    For supersonic flows relative to turbo-engine fan blades, measured acoustic spectra near the inlet present tones at fan blade passing frequency (BPF), engine shaft rotation frequency, or Engine Order (EO), and their respective harmonics. The latter are responsible for the Buzz-saw noise and are thus referred to as "Buzz-saw" or "multiple pure" tones. This work first attempts to reformulate McAlpine and Fisher's frequency domain model (2001) for the propagation of a unidimensional sawtooth waveform spiralling inside a hard-walled cylindrical duct in the presence of a uniform flow. The non-dissipative Burgers equation is solved using a shock fitting method, and modal attenuation and dispersion are added using a split-step computational method. In practice, shocks do not only occur at blade tips but on a significant portion of the blade span. The plane wave hypothesis being no longer valid, a new three dimensional model is required. This model is based on the computation of the axially varying amplitudes of the modal solutions, in order to take into account the nonlinear modal interactions.

  16. Aero engine test experience with CMSX-4{reg_sign} alloy single-crystal turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Fullagar, K.P.L.; Broomfield, R.W.; Hulands, M.; Harris, K.; Erickson, G.L.; Sikkenga, S.L.

    1996-04-01

    A team approach involving a turbine engine company (Rolls-Royce), its single-crystal casting facilities, and a superalloy developer and ingot manufacturer (Cannon-Muskegon), utilizing the concepts of simultaneous engineering, has been used to develop CMSX-4 alloy successfully for turbine blade applications. CMSX-4 alloy is a second-generation nickel-base single-crystal superalloy containing 3 percent (wt) rhenium (Re) and 70 percent volume fraction of the coherent {gamma}{prime} precipitate strengthening phase. The paper details the single-crystal casting process and heat treatment manufacturing development for turbine blades in CMSX-4 alloy. Competitive single-crystal casting yields are being achieved in production and extensive vacuum heat treatment experience confirms CMSX-4 alloy to have a practical production solution heat treat/homogenization ``window.`` The creep-rupture data-base on CMSX-4 alloy now includes 325 data points from 17 heats including 3,630 kg (8,000 lb) production size heats. An appreciable portion of this data was machined-from-blade (MFB) properties, which indicate turbine blade component capabilities based on single-crystal casting process, component configuration, and heat treatment. The use of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been shown to eliminate single-crystal casting micropores, which along with the essential absence of {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} eutectic phase, carbides, stable oxide, nitride and sulfide inclusions, results in remarkably high mechanical fatigue properties, with smooth and particularly notched specimens. The Re addition has been shown not only to benefit creep and mechanical fatigue strength, but also bare oxidation, hot corrosion, and coating performance. The high level of balanced properties determined by extensive laboratory evaluation has been confirmed during engine testing of the Rolls-Royce Pegasus turbofan.

  17. Noise emission of civil and military aero-engines. Sources of generation and measures for attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieb, H.; Heinig, K.

    1986-09-01

    It is shown that noise reduction on high bypass ratio turbofans for civil airliners is well established. The noise levels achieved meet the internationally agreed regulations (FAR 36). The same holds true for large military transport aircraft. Helicopter noise is caused essentially by the main and tail rotors. Noise reduction on afterburner and dry engines for combat and strike aircraft, which represent the major noise annoyance to the public, is very difficult because: high specific thrust is mandatory for aircraft performance and effectiveness; jet noise with and without afterburning is predominant; and the design of the reheat section and final (variable) nozzle in practice precludes the application of known concepts for jet noise attenuation in dry and reheated operation.

  18. Clean melting and the removal of defects from aero-engine materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, A.

    The paper discusses the metallurgical reasons for introducing the electron-beam-melting technique to achieve clean melting and to remove defects from superalloys and titanium alloys used in spacecraft engine components. Attention is given to the types of defects encountered in superalloy structures, the types of inclusions and their origin and treatment, the solidification defects, and the particular techniques used to avoid defects. It is concluded that the electron-beam technology is at a stage where the method is viable, from both an economical and technical viewpoints. In spite of the fact that the electron-beam melting brings its own problems in regard to reliable operation, it holds the promise of producing alloys with a level of property reliability far beyond that available at present.

  19. Probability density of intensity fluctuations for laser beams disturbed by turbulent aero-engine exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, I. V.; Dmitriev, D. I.; Sirazetdinov, V. S.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we analyze some results of natural and numerical experiments on probability density of intensity fluctuations on an axis for 1,06 microns and 0,53 microns laser beams in comparison with theoretical dependences (lognormal, exponential and K-distribution). Beams were propagated in aviation engine exhaust at various angles between the jet and beam axes. It has been shown that for a beam with a wavelength of 0,53 microns experimental data can be approximated as exponential and K-distribution, while for radiation with a wavelength of 1,06 microns good conformity to K-distribution has been observed. Optimum conditions for image registration with CCD-cameras of laser beams distorted by turbulence have been chosen. For this purpose transfer characteristics of several same type samples of CCD-cameras have been studied at various irradiation modes and registration tunings. It has been shown that the dynamic range of the cameras is used to maximum capacity for image recording when gamma-correction is applied.

  20. Processing of Ni-based aero engine components with repetitively Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostanjoglo, Georg; Sarady, Istvan; Beck, Thomas; Weber, Horst

    1996-09-01

    Aircraft engine industry uses free running high power Nd:YAG lasers for drilling cooling holes into nickel base alloy turbine components. A cw-pumped, Q-switched, high beam quality laser system with 400W laser power is presented. The laser is used to trepan drilling of 1.6mm. Hastelloy X sheets and ceramic coated combustion chamber tubes of the same metal. Cylindrical shape, uniformity, and reproducibility are achieved with a trepan-like drilling setup. The heat load of the workpiece as well as the process time is considerably decreased by employing high-repetition Q-switched lasers.

  1. Proceedings of the Non-Linear Aero Prediction Requirements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Non-Linear Aero Prediction Requirements Workshop, held at NASA Langley Research Center on 8-9 Dec. 1993, was to identify and articulate requirements for non-linear aero prediction capabilities during conceptual/preliminary design. The attendees included engineers from industry, government, and academia in a variety of aerospace disciplines, such as advanced design, aerodynamic performance analysis, aero methods development, flight controls, and experimental and theoretical aerodynamics. Presentations by industry and government organizations were followed by panel discussions. This report contains copies of the presentations and the results of the panel discussions.

  2. Aero dopes and varnishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, H T S

    1927-01-01

    Before proceeding to discuss the preparation of dope solutions, it will be necessary to consider some of the essential properties which should be possessed of a dope film, deposited in and on the surface of an aero fabric. The first is that it should tighten the material and second it should withstand weathering.

  3. Aero Commander in flight - Upswept fuselage study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The NASA Flight Research Center's Aero Commander 680F is shown in flight with tufts attached to the side and bottom sections of the aircraft. These were placed on the aircraft for a Upswept Fuselage Study to see if the flow separated on the aft section of a small aircraft for comparison of data acquired from a large cargo-type aircraft with an upswept aft section. The photo of the tufts demonstrates that the flow is attached with no turbulence present. (Note the straight lines of tufts). The Aero Commander was used both for support and as a research aircraft. Among other uses, it was flown to outlying dry lakebeds, used as emergency landing sites, before X-15 flights. It could reach the lakebeds quickly and land on the hard-packed surfaces to ensure they were not soft from rainfall or some other cause. Between 1964 and 1966, the Flight Research Center used the aircraft in the Aviation Safety and Operating Problems Program to evaluate the aerodynamics of various light aircraft and to define possible technological improvements. The Aero Commander left what had become the Dryden Flight Research Center on March 14, 1979, and was transferred to the Customs Air Branch in San Diego. The Aero Commander 680F (N6297), built by the Aero Commander Company of Bethany, Oklahoma, is a pressurized five-place aircraft that is powered by two 380-horsepower reciprocating engines built by Lycoming Company. The fuselage length is 24.2 feet with a wing span of 35.98 feet.

  4. Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.; Hall, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To help increase the capacity and efficiency of the nation s airports, a secure wideband wireless communications system is proposed for use on the airport surface. This paper provides an overview of the research and development process for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). AeroMACS is based on a specific commercial profile of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard known as Wireless Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access or WiMAX (WiMax Forum). The paper includes background on the need for global interoperability in air/ground data communications, describes potential AeroMACS applications, addresses allocated frequency spectrum constraints, summarizes the international standardization process, and provides findings and recommendations from the world s first AeroMACS prototype implemented in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

  5. Aero-optics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn D.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Army Strategic Defense Command (USASDC) has several ongoing and planned programs that utilize optical sensors aboard missiles traveling at hypersonic velocities in the atmosphere. Central to the missile homing problem are aero-optical effects upon a missile-borne sensor/seeker which looks through both an electromagnetic window and the flow field about the vehicle. Aspects of the problem include modeling and simulation of the flow field on incident radiation from a target, and finally, predicting the resultant image imperfections and error in apparent object position as perceived by the sensor.

  6. Aero-optics overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-04-01

    Various aero-optical phenomena are discussed with reference to their effect on airborne high energy lasers. Major emphasis is placed on: compressibility effects induced in the surrounding flow field; viscous effects which manifests themselves as aircraft boundary layers or shear layers; inviscid flow fields surrounding the aircraft due to airflow around protuberance such as laser turret assemblies; and shocks, established whenever local flow exceeds Mach one. The significant physical parameters affecting the interaction of a laser beam with a turbulent boundary layer are also described.

  7. Aero-Assisted Spacecraft Missions Using Hypersonic Waverider Aeroshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, Jeremy

    This work examines the use of high-lift, low drag vehicles which perform orbital transfers within a planet's atmosphere to reduce propulsive requirements. For the foreseeable future, spacecraft mission design will include the objective of limiting the mass of fuel required. One means of accomplishing this is using aerodynamics as a supplemental force, with what is termed an aero-assist maneuver. Further, the use of a lifting body enables a mission designer to explore candidate trajectory types wholly unavailable to non-lifting analogs. Examples include missions to outer planets by way of an aero-gravity assist, aero-assisted plane change, aero-capture, and steady atmospheric periapsis probing missions. Engineering level models are created in order to simulate both atmospheric and extra-atmospheric space flight. Each mission is parameterized using discrete variables which control multiple areas of design. This work combines the areas of hypersonic aerodynamics, re-entry aerothermodynamics, spacecraft orbital mechanics, and vehicle shape optimization. In particular, emphasis is given to the parametric design of vehicles known as "waveriders" which are inversely designed from known shock flowfields. An entirely novel means of generating a class of waveriders known as "starbodies" is presented. A complete analysis is performed of asymmetric starbody forms and compared to a better understood parameterization, "osculating cone" waveriders. This analysis includes characterization of stability behavior, a critical discipline within hypersonic flight. It is shown that asymmetric starbodies have significant stability improvement with only a 10% reduction in the lift-to-drag ratio. By combining the optimization of both the shape of the vehicle and the trajectory it flies, much is learned about the benefit that can be expected from lifting aero-assist missions. While previous studies have conceptually proven the viability, this work provides thorough quantification of the

  8. AeroSpace Days 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    At the eighth annual AeroSpace Days, first mom in space, Astronaut AnnaFisher, and Sen. Louise Lucas, interacted with students from Mack BennJr. Elementary School in Suffolk, Va. through NASA’s...

  9. AeroDyn Theory Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P. J.; Hansen, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    AeroDyn is a set of routines used in conjunction with an aeroelastic simulation code to predict the aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines. These subroutines provide several different models whose theoretical bases are described in this manual. AeroDyn contains two models for calculating the effect of wind turbine wakes: the blade element momentum theory and the generalized dynamic-wake theory. Blade element momentum theory is the classical standard used by many wind turbine designers and generalized dynamic wake theory is a more recent model useful for modeling skewed and unsteady wake dynamics. When using the blade element momentum theory, various corrections are available for the user, such as incorporating the aerodynamic effects of tip losses, hub losses, and skewed wakes. With the generalized dynamic wake, all of these effects are automatically included. Both of these methods are used to calculate the axial induced velocities from the wake in the rotor plane. The user also has the option of calculating the rotational induced velocity. In addition, AeroDyn contains an important model for dynamic stall based on the semi-empirical Beddoes-Leishman model. This model is particularly important for yawed wind turbines. Another aerodynamic model in AeroDyn is a tower shadow model based on potential flow around a cylinder and an expanding wake. Finally, AeroDyn has the ability to read several different formats of wind input, including single-point hub-height wind files or multiple-point turbulent winds.

  10. Hypersonic Interplanetary Flight: Aero Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al; Banks, Dan; Randolph, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The use of aero-gravity assist during hypersonic interplanetary flights is highlighted. Specifically, the use of large versus small planet for gravity asssist maneuvers, aero-gravity assist trajectories, launch opportunities and planetary waverider performance are addressed.

  11. Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2006-01-01

    The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS) is a graphical simulation environment designed for the development of advanced control algorithms and rapid testing of these algorithms on a generic computational model of a turbofan engine and its control system. MAPSS is a nonlinear, non-real-time simulation comprising a Component Level Model (CLM) module and a Controller-and-Actuator Dynamics (CAD) module. The CLM module simulates the dynamics of engine components at a sampling rate of 2,500 Hz. The controller submodule of the CAD module simulates a digital controller, which has a typical update rate of 50 Hz. The sampling rate for the actuators in the CAD module is the same as that of the CLM. MAPSS provides a graphical user interface that affords easy access to engine-operation, engine-health, and control parameters; is used to enter such input model parameters as power lever angle (PLA), Mach number, and altitude; and can be used to change controller and engine parameters. Output variables are selectable by the user. Output data as well as any changes to constants and other parameters can be saved and reloaded into the GUI later.

  12. Current Challenges for HTCMC Aero-Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2007-01-01

    In comparison to the best metallic materials, HTCMC aero-propulsion engine components offer the opportunity of reduced weight and higher temperature operation, with corresponding improvements in engine cooling requirements, emissions, thrust, and specific fuel consumption. Although much progress has been made in the development of advanced HTCMC constituent materials and processes, major challenges still remain for their implementation into these components. The objectives of this presentation are to briefly review (1) potential HTCMC aero-propulsion components and their generic material performance requirements, (2) recent progress at NASA and elsewhere concerning advanced constituents and processes for meeting these requirements, (3) key HTCMC component implementation challenges that are currently being encountered, and (4) on-going activities within the new NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that are addressing these challenges.

  13. 75 FR 71373 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525-D5...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... borescope inspections of high-pressure turbine (HPT) stage 1 blade outer air seal segments for evidence of... engine fire, and damage to the airplane. DATES: We must receive any comments on this proposed AD by...Rulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and follow the instructions for sending your...

  14. 75 FR 6860 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-12

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78.... Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February... proposed AD would require removal from service of the fully silver plated nuts attaching the HPC stage 3...

  15. 75 FR 59067 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525-D5...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... proposed AD in the Federal Register on February 12, 2010 (75 FR 6860). That action proposed to require: For... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will..., this AD requires removal from service of the fully silver plated nuts attaching the HPC stage 3 to...

  16. Unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of inlet distortion in the fan system of a gas-turbine aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spotts, Nathan

    As modern trends in commercial aircraft design move toward high-bypass-ratio fan systems of increasing diameter with shorter, nonaxisymmetric nacelle geometries, inlet distortion is becoming common in all operating regimes. The distortion may induce aerodynamic instabilities within the fan system, leading to catastrophic damage to fan blades, should the surge margin be exceeded. Even in the absence of system instability, the heterogeneity of the flow affects aerodynamic performance significantly. Therefore, an understanding of fan-distortion interaction is critical to aircraft engine system design. This thesis research elucidates the complex fluid dynamics and fan-distortion interaction by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of a complete engine fan system; including rotor, stator, spinner, nacelle and nozzle; under conditions typical of those encountered by commercial aircraft. The CFD simulations, based on a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach, were unsteady, three-dimensional, and of a full-annulus geometry. A thorough, systematic validation has been performed for configurations from a single passage of a rotor to a full-annulus system by comparing the predicted flow characteristics and aerodynamic performance to those found in literature. The original contributions of this research include the integration of a complete engine fan system, based on the NASA rotor 67 transonic stage and representative of the propulsion systems in commercial aircraft, and a benchmark case for unsteady RANS simulations of distorted flow in such a geometry under realistic operating conditions. This study is unique in that the complex flow dynamics, resulting from fan-distortion interaction, were illustrated in a practical geometry under realistic operating conditions. For example, the compressive stage is shown to influence upstream static pressure distributions and thus suppress separation of flow on the nacelle. Knowledge of such flow physics is

  17. Analytical and numerical prediction of harmonic sound power in the inlet of aero-engines with emphasis on transonic rotation speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewy, Serge; Polacsek, Cyril; Barrier, Raphael

    2014-12-01

    Tone noise radiated through the inlet of a turbofan is mainly due to rotor-stator interactions at subsonic regimes (approach flight), and to the shock waves attached to each blade at supersonic helical tip speeds (takeoff). The axial compressor of a helicopter turboshaft engine is transonic as well and can be studied like turbofans at takeoff. The objective of the paper is to predict the sound power at the inlet radiating into the free field, with a focus on transonic conditions because sound levels are much higher. Direct numerical computation of tone acoustic power is based on a RANS (Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes) solver followed by an integration of acoustic intensity over specified inlet cross-sections, derived from Cantrell and Hart equations (valid in irrotational flows). In transonic regimes, sound power decreases along the intake because of nonlinear propagation, which must be discriminated from numerical dissipation. This is one of the reasons why an analytical approach is also suggested. It is based on three steps: (i) appraisal of the initial pressure jump of the shock waves; (ii) 2D nonlinear propagation model of Morfey and Fisher; (iii) calculation of the sound power of the 3D ducted acoustic field. In this model, all the blades are assumed to be identical such that only the blade passing frequency and its harmonics are predicted (like in the present numerical simulations). However, transfer from blade passing frequency to multiple pure tones can be evaluated in a fourth step through a statistical analysis of irregularities between blades. Interest of the analytical method is to provide a good estimate of nonlinear acoustic propagation in the upstream duct while being easy and fast to compute. The various methods are applied to two turbofan models, respectively in approach (subsonic) and takeoff (transonic) conditions, and to a Turbomeca turboshaft engine (transonic case). The analytical method in transonic appears to be quite reliable by comparison

  18. Stage-by-Stage and Parallel Flow Path Compressor Modeling for a Variable Cycle Engine, NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program - Commercial Supersonic Technology Project - AeroServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Cheng, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of stage-by-stage and parallel flow path compressor modeling approaches for a Variable Cycle Engine. The stage-by-stage compressor modeling approach is an extension of a technique for lumped volume dynamics and performance characteristic modeling. It was developed to improve the accuracy of axial compressor dynamics over lumped volume dynamics modeling. The stage-by-stage compressor model presented here is formulated into a parallel flow path model that includes both axial and rotational dynamics. This is done to enable the study of compressor and propulsion system dynamic performance under flow distortion conditions. The approaches utilized here are generic and should be applicable for the modeling of any axial flow compressor design accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  19. National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the technology development management objectives thus far planned for the DOD/NASA National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The technology required by NASP will first be developed in ground-based facilities and then integrated during the design and construction of the X-30 experimental aircraft. Five airframe and three powerplant manufacturers are currently engaged in an 18-month effort encompassing design studies and tradeoff analyses. The first flight of the X-30 is scheduled for early 1993.

  20. Aero-optimum hovering kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2015-08-01

    Hovering flight for flapping wing vehicles requires rapid and relatively complex reciprocating movement of a wing relative to a stationary surrounding fluid. This note develops a compact analytical aero-kinematic model that can be used for optimization of flapping wing kinematics against aerodynamic criteria of effectiveness (maximum lift) and efficiency (minimum power for a given amount of lift). It can also be used to make predictions of required flapping frequency for a given geometry and basic aerodynamic parameters. The kinematic treatment is based on a consolidation of an existing formulation that allows explicit derivation of flapping velocity for complex motions whereas the aerodynamic model is based on existing quasi-steady analysis. The combined aero-kinematic model provides novel explicit analytical expressions for both lift and power of a hovering wing in a compact form that enables exploration of a rich kinematic design space. Good agreement is found between model predictions of flapping frequency and observed results for a number of insects and optimal hovering kinematics identified using the model are consistent with results from studies using higher order computational models. For efficient flight, the flapping angle should vary using a triangular profile in time leading to a constant velocity flapping motion, whereas for maximum effectiveness the shape of variation should be sinusoidal. For both cases the wing pitching motion should be rectangular such that pitch change at stroke reversal is as rapid as possible. PMID:26248884

  1. Impacts of Pristine and Transformed Ag and Cu Engineered Nanomaterials on Surficial Sediment Microbial Communities Appear Short-Lived.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joe D; Stegemeier, John P; Bibby, Kyle; Marinakos, Stella M; Lowry, Gregory V; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory-based studies have shown that many soluble metal and metal oxide engineered nanomaterials (ENM) exert strong toxic effects on microorganisms. However, laboratory-based studies lack the complexity of natural systems and often use "as manufactured" ENMs rather than more environmentally relevant transformed ENMs, leaving open the question of whether natural ligands and seasonal variation will mitigate ENM impacts. Because ENMs will accumulate in subaquatic sediments, we examined the effects of pristine and transformed Ag and Cu ENMs on surficial sediment microbial communities in simulated freshwater wetlands. Five identical mesocosms were dosed through the water column with either Ag(0), Ag2S, CuO or CuS ENMs (nominal sizes of 4.67 ± 1.4, 18.1 ± 3.2, 31.1 ± 12, and 12.4 ± 4.1, respectively) or Cu(2+). Microbial communities were examined at 0, 7, 30, 90, 180, and 300 d using qPCR and high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results suggest differential short-term impacts of Ag(0) and Ag2S, similarities between CuO and CuS, and differences between Cu ENMs and Cu(2+). PICRUSt-predicted metagenomes displayed differential effects of Ag treatments on photosynthesis and of Cu treatments on methane metabolism. By 300 d, all metrics pointed to reconvergence of ENM-dosed mesocosm microbial community structure and composition, suggesting that the long-term microbial community impacts from a pulse of Ag or Cu ENMs are limited. PMID:26841726

  2. The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS) Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation is a flexible turbofan engine simulation environment that provides the user a platform to develop advanced control algorithms. It is capable of testing the performance of control designs on a validated and verified generic engine model. In addition, it is able to generate state-space linear models of the engine model to aid in controller design. The engine model used in MAPSS is a generic high-pressure ratio, dual-spool, lowbypass, military-type, variable cycle turbofan engine with a digital controller. MAPSS is controlled by a graphical user interface (GUI) and this guide explains how to use it to take advantage of the capabilities of MAPSS.

  3. Laser fringe anemometry for aero engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, Anthony J.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in flow measurement techniques in turbomachinery continue to be paced by the need to obtain detailed data for use in validating numerical predictions of the flowfield and for use in the development of empirical models for those flow features which cannot be readily modelled numerically. The use of laser anemometry in turbomachinery research has grown over the last 14 years in response to these needs. Based on past applications and current developments, the key issues which are involved when considering the application of laser anemometry to the measurement of turbomachinery flowfields are discussed. Aspects of laser fringe anemometer optical design which are applicable to turbomachinery research are briefly reviewed. Application problems which are common to both laser fringe anemometry (LFA) and laser transit anemometry (LTA) such as seed particle injection, optical access to the flowfield, and measurement of rotor rotational position are covered. The efficiency of various data acquisition schemes is analyzed and issues related to data integrity and error estimation are addressed. Real-time data analysis techniques aimed at capturing flow physics in real time are discussed. Finally, data reduction and analysis techniques are discussed and illustrated using examples taken from several LFA turbomachinery applications.

  4. Laser fringe anemometry for aero engine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strazisar, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in flow measurement techniques in turbomachinery continue to be paced by the need to obtain detailed data for use in validating numerical predictions of the flowfield and for use in the development of empirical models for those flow features which cannot be readily modelled numerically. The use of laser anemometry in turbomachinery research has grown over the last 14 years in response to these needs. Based on past applications and current developments, this paper reviews the key issues which are involved when considering the application of laser anemometry to the measurement of turbomachinery flowfields. Aspects of laser fringe anemometer optical design which are applicable to turbomachinery research are briefly reviewed. Application problems which are common to both laser fringe anemometry (LFA) and laser transit anemometry (LTA) such as seed particle injection, optical access to the flowfield, and measurement of rotor rotational position are covered. The efficiency of various data acquisition schemes is analyzed and issues related to data integrity and error estimation are addressed. Real-time data analysis techniques aimed at capturing flow physics in real time are discussed. Finally, data reduction and analysis techniques are discussed and illustrated using examples taken from several LFA turbomachinery applications.

  5. Stall in axial flow aero engine compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Christopher J.

    The inception of stall in an aeroengine compressor over a range of speeds and the post stall behavior are described. Reference is made to the varying matching and system response as the speed is increased and the effects demonstrated on a single shaft gas turbine. In particular, the following are detailed: surge and stall in axial compressors, compressor matching, low speed stalls, mid speed stalls, stalls ending in rotating stalls, high speed surges, contour plots of stage 1, 4, and 7 pressures, and compressor behavior during surge.

  6. AeroMACS System Characterization and Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Dimond, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    This The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being developed to provide a new broadband wireless communications capability for safety critical communications in the airport surface domain, providing connectivity to aircraft and other ground vehicles as well as connections between other critical airport fixed assets. AeroMACS development has progressed from requirements definition through technology definition, prototype deployment and testing, and now into national and international standards development. The first prototype AeroMACS system has been deployed at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE) and the adjacent NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). During the past 3 years, extensive technical testing has taken place to characterize the performance of the AeroMACS prototype and provide technical support for the standards development process. The testing has characterized AeroMACS link and network performance over a variety of conditions for both fixed and mobile data transmission and has included basic system performance testing and fixed and mobile applications testing. This paper provides a summary of the AeroMACS performance testing and the status of standardization activities that the testing supports.

  7. AeroMACS System Characterization and Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Dimond, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being developed to provide a new broadband wireless communications capability for safety critical communications in the airport surface domain, providing connectivity to aircraft and other ground vehicles as well as connections between other critical airport fixed assets. AeroMACS development has progressed from requirements definition through technology definition, prototype deployment and testing, and now into national and international standards development. The first prototype AeroMACS system has been deployed at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE) and the adjacent NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). During the past three years, extensive technical testing has taken place to characterize the performance of the AeroMACS prototype and provide technical support for the standards development process. The testing has characterized AeroMACS link and network performance over a variety of conditions for both fixed and mobile data transmission and has included basic system performance testing and fixed and mobile applications testing. This paper provides a summary of the AeroMACS performance testing and the status of standardization activities that the testing supports.

  8. AeroMACS system characterization and demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerczewski, R. J.; Apaza, R. D.; Dimond, R. P.

    This The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being developed to provide a new broadband wireless communications capability for safety critical communications in the airport surface domain, providing connectivity to aircraft and other ground vehicles as well as connections between other critical airport fixed assets. AeroMACS development has progressed from requirements definition through technology definition, prototype deployment and testing, and now into national and international standards development. The first prototype AeroMACS system has been deployed at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE) and the adjacent NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). During the past three years, extensive technical testing has taken place to characterize the performance of the AeroMACS prototype and provide technical support for the standards development process. The testing has characterized AeroMACS link and network performance over a variety of conditions for both fixed and mobile data transmission and has included basic system performance testing and fixed and mobile applications testing. This paper provides a summary of the AeroMACS performance testing and the status of standardization activities that the testing supports.

  9. Future NASA Power Technologies for Space and Aero Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the ambitious goals that NASA has outlined for the next decades considerable development of power technology will be necessary. This presentation outlines the development objectives for both space and aero applications. It further looks at the various power technologies that support these objectives and examines drivers that will be a driving force for future development. Finally, the presentation examines what type of non-traditional learning areas should be emphasized in student curriculum so that the engineering needs of the third decade of the 21st Century are met.

  10. Development of a computational aero/fluids analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, P. B.

    1987-01-01

    The Computational Aero/Fluids Analysis System (AFAS) provides the analytical capability to perform state-of-the-art computational analyses in two difficult fluid dynamics disciplines associated with the Space Shuttle program. This system provides the analysis tools and techniques for rapidly and efficiently accessing, analyzing, and reformulating the large and expanding external aerodynamic data base while also providing tools for complex fluid flow analyses of the SSME engine components. Both of these fluid flow disciplines, external aerodynamics and internal gasdynamics, required this capability to ensure that MSFC can respond in a timely manner as problems are encountered and operational changes are made in the Space Shuttle.

  11. Modeled environmental concentrations of engineered nanomaterials (TiO(2), ZnO, Ag, CNT, Fullerenes) for different regions.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Fadri; Sonderer, Tobias; Scholz, Roland W; Nowack, Bernd

    2009-12-15

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are already used in many products and consequently released into environmental compartments. In this study, we calculated predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) based on a probabilistic material flow analysis from a life-cycle perspective of ENM-containing products. We modeled nano-TiO(2), nano-ZnO, nano-Ag, carbon nanotubes (CNT), and fullerenes for the U.S., Europe and Switzerland. The environmental concentrations were calculated as probabilistic density functions and were compared to data from ecotoxicological studies. The simulated modes (most frequent values) range from 0.003 ng L(-1) (fullerenes) to 21 ng L(-1) (nano-TiO(2)) for surface waters and from 4 ng L(-1) (fullerenes) to 4 microg L(-1) (nano-TiO(2)) for sewage treatment effluents. For Europe and the U.S., the annual increase of ENMs on sludge-treated soil ranges from 1 ng kg(-1) for fullerenes to 89 microg kg(-1) for nano-TiO(2). The results of this study indicate that risks to aquatic organisms may currently emanate from nano-Ag, nano-TiO(2), and nano-ZnO in sewage treatment effluents for all considered regions and for nano-Ag in surface waters. For the other environmental compartments for which ecotoxicological data were available, no risks to organisms are presently expected. PMID:20000512

  12. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  13. Phase Transformation Behavior of Hot Isostatically Pressed NiTi-X (X = Ag, Nb, W) Alloys for Functional Engineering Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, M.; Bram, M.; Buchkremer, H. P.; Stöver, D.

    2012-12-01

    Owing to their unique properties, NiTi-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) are highly attractive candidates for a lot of functional engineering applications like biomedical implants (stents), actuators, or coupling elements. Adding a third element is an effective measure to adjust or stabilize the phase transformation behavior to a certain extent. In this context, addition of alloying elements, which are low soluble or almost insoluble in the NiTi matrix is a promising approach and—with the exception of adding Nb—has rarely been reported in the literature so far, especially if the manufacturing of the net-shaped parts of these alloys is aspired. In the case of addition of elemental Nb, broadening of hysteresis between austenitic and martensitic phase transformation temperatures after plastic deformation of the Nb phase is a well-known effect, which is the key of function of coupling elements already established on the market. In the present study, we replaced Nb with additions of elemental Ag and W, both of which are almost insoluble in the NiTi matrix. Compared with Nb, Ag is characterized by higher ductility in combination with lower melting point, enabling liquid phase sintering already at moderate temperatures. Vice versa, addition of W might act in opposite manner considering its inherent brittleness combined with high melting temperature. In the present study, hot isostatic pressing was used for manufacturing such alloys starting from prealloyed NiTi powder and with the additions of Nb, Ag, and W as elemental powders. Microstructures, interdiffusion phenomena, phase transformation behaviors, and impurity contents were investigated aiming to better understand the influence of insoluble phases on bulk properties of NiTi SMAs.

  14. NOx abatement in the exhaust of lean-burn natural gas engines over Ag-supported γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Y.; Kambolis, A.; Boréave, A.; Giroir-Fendler, A.; Retailleau-Mevel, L.; Guiot, B.; Marchand, O.; Walter, M.; Desse, M.-L.; Marchin, L.; Vernoux, P.

    2016-04-01

    A series of Ag catalysts supported on γ-Al2O3, including two different γ-Al2O3 supports and various Ag loadings (2-8 wt.%), was prepared, characterized (SEM, TEM, BET, physisorption, TPR, NH3-TPD) and tested for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by CH4 for lean-burn natural gas engines exhausts. The catalysts containing 2 wt.% Ag supported on γ-Al2O3 were found to be most efficient for the NOx reduction into N2 with a maximal conversion of 23% at 650 °C. This activity was clearly linked with the ability of the catalyst to concomitantly produce CO, via the methane steam reforming, and NO2. The presence of small AgOx nanoparticles seems to be crucial for the methane activation and NOx reduction.

  15. Results of the AEROS satellite program: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lammerzahl, P.; Rawer, K.; Roemer, N.

    1980-01-01

    Published literature reporting aeronomic data collected on two AEROS missions is summarized. The extreme ultraviolet solar radiation and other significant parameters of the thermosphere/ionosphere were investigated. Kinetic pressure, the quantity of atomic nitrogen, and partial densities of helium, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and atomic nitrogen were determined. The thermal electron population, superthermal energy distribution, plasma density, ion temperature, and composition according to ion types were measured. The chief energy supply in the thermosphere was calculated. Aeronomic calculations showing that variations in the parameters of the ionosphere cannot be correlated with fluctuations of extreme ultraviolet solar radiation were performed. The AEROS data were compared with data from S3-1, ISIS, and AE-C satellites. Models of the thermosphere and ionosphere were developed.

  16. Transient aero-thermal simulations for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    Aero-thermal simulations are an integral part of the design process for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). These simulations utilize Computational Solid-Fluid Dynamics (CSFD) to estimate wind jitter and blur, dome and mirror seeing, telescope pointing error due to thermal drift, and to predict thermal effects on performance of components such as the primary mirror segments. Design guidance obtained from these simulations is provided to the Telescope, Enclosure, Facilities and Adaptive Optics groups. Computational advances allow for model enhancements and inclusion of phenomena not previously resolved, such as transient effects on wind loading and thermal seeing due to vent operation while observing or long exposure effects, with potentially different flow patterns corresponding to the beginning and end of observation. Accurate knowledge of the Observatory aero-thermal environment will result in developing reliable look-up tables for effective open loop correction of key active optics system elements, and cost efficient operation of the Observatory.

  17. PREFACE: 2013 International Conferences on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences (AeroEarth 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    The 2013 International Conferences on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences (AeroEarth 2013), was held at the Swiss Bell Mangga Besar, Jakarta, Indonesia, on 23 December 2013. The AeroEarth conference aims to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. AeroEarth 2013 promotes interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that high-level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Earth Science. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 91 papers and after rigorous review, 17 papers were accepted. The participants come from 8 countries. There are 3 (three) Plenary Sessions and two invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contribution. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of AeroEarth 2013. The AeroEarth 2013 Proceedings Editors Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Dr. Benfano Soewito Dr. Amit Desai Further information on the invited plenary speakers and photographs from the conference can be found in the pdf.

  18. 76 FR 77108 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... published in the Federal Register on November 23, 2010 (75 FR 71373). That NPRM proposed to require initial... determined that these minor changes: Are consistent with the intent that was proposed in the NPRM (75 FR... the public than was already proposed in the NPRM (75 FR 71373, November 23, 2010). We also...

  19. Aero Spacelines B377PG Pregnant Guppy on ramp in preparation for flight tests and pilot evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The Aero Spacelines B377PG Pregnant Guppy was flown by Aero Spacelines pilots to Dryden for tests and evaluation by pilots Joe Vensel and Stan Butchart in October 1962. The outsized cargo aircraft incorporated the wings, engines, lower fuselage and tail from a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser with a huge upper fuselage more than 20 feet in diameter. The modified aircraft was built to transport outsized cargo for NASA's Apollo program, primarily to carry portions of the Saturn V rockets from the manufacturer to Cape Canaveral. Later versions of the aircraft, including the Super Guppy and the Super Guppy Turbine, are still in use.

  20. AeroValve Experimental Test Data Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, Mark W.

    2014-09-01

    This report documents the collection of experimental test data and presents performance characteristics for the AeroValve brand prototype pneumatic bidirectional solenoid valves tested at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July/August 2014 as part of a validation of AeroValve energy efficiency claims. The test stand and control programs were provided by AeroValve. All raw data and processing are included in the report attachments.

  1. Thermodynamic efficiency of present types of internal combustion engines for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucke, Charles E

    1917-01-01

    Report presents requirements of internal combustion engines suitable for aircraft. Topics include: (1) service requirements for aeronautic engines - power versus weight, reliability, and adaptability factors, (2) general characteristics of present aero engines, (3) aero engine processes and functions of parts versus power-weight ratio, reliability, and adaptability factors, and (4) general arrangement, form, proportions, and materials of aero parts - power-weight ratio, reliability, and adaptability.

  2. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  3. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 1: Concepts of Use, Initial System Requirements, Architecture, and AeroMACS Design Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Henriksen, Steve; Zelkin, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this document) is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  4. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  5. Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei; Lavelle, Thomas; Litt, Jonathan; Csank, Jeffrey; May, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    The Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) software package is a nonlinear dynamic simulation of a 40,000-pound (approximately equals 178-kN) thrust class commercial turbofan engine, written in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The model has been tuned to capture the behavior of flight test data, and is capable of running at any point in the flight envelope [up to 40,000 ft (approximately equals 12,200 m) and Mach 0.8]. In addition to the open-loop engine, the simulation includes a controller whose architecture is representative of that found in industry. C-MAPSS40k fills the need for an easy-to-use, realistic, transient simulation of a medium-size commercial turbofan engine with a representative controller. It is a detailed component level model (CLM) written in the industry-standard graphical MATLAB/Simulink environment to allow for easy modification and portability. At the time of this reporting, no other such model exists in the public domain.

  6. Overview of NASA Glenn Research Center Programs in Aero-Heat Transfer and Future Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, Raymond E.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation concentrates on an overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center and the projects that are supporting Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Research. The principal areas include the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project, the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) Revolutionary Turbine Accelerator (RTA) Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) project, and the Propulsion & Power Base R&T - Smart Efficient Components (SEC), and Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts (RAC) Projects. In addition, highlights are presented of the turbine aero-heat transfer work currently underway at NASA Glenn, focusing on the use of the Glenn-HT Navier- Stokes code as the vehicle for research in turbulence & transition modeling, grid topology generation, unsteady effects, and conjugate heat transfer.

  7. Aero-optics overview. [laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    Various aero-optical phenomena are discussed with reference to their effect on airborne high energy lasers. Major emphasis is placed on: compressibility effects induced in the surrounding flow field; viscous effects which manifests themselves as aircraft boundary layers or shear layers; inviscid flow fields surrounding the aircraft due to airflow around protuberance such as laser turret assemblies; and shocks, established whenever local flow exceeds Mach one. The significant physical parameters affecting the interaction of a laser beam with a turbulent boundary layer are also described.

  8. Bidirectional threshold switching in engineered multilayer (Cu{sub 2}O/Ag:Cu{sub 2}O/Cu{sub 2}O) stack for cross-point selector application

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jeonghwan; Prakash, Amit; Lee, Daeseok; Woo, Jiyong; Cha, Euijun; Lee, Sangheon; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2015-09-14

    In this study, we achieved bidirectional threshold switching (TS) for selector applications in a Ag-Cu{sub 2}O-based programmable-metallization-cell device by engineering the stack wherein Ag was intentionally incorporated in the oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) layer by a simple approach comprising co-sputtering and subsequent optimized annealing. The distribution of the Ag was directly confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy line profiling. The observed TS occurred because of the spontaneous self-rupturing of the unstable Ag filament that formed in the oxide layer.

  9. Aero-Assisted Pre-Stage for Ballistic and Aero-Assisted Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A concept of an aero-assisted pre-stage is proposed, which enables launch of both ballistic and aero-assisted launch vehicles from conventional runways. The pre-stage can be implemented as a delta-wing with a suitable undercarriage, which is mated with the launch vehicle, so that their flight directions are coaligned. The ample wing area of the pre-stage combined with the thrust of the launch vehicle ensure prompt roll-out and take-off of the stack at airspeeds typical for a conventional jet airliner. The launch vehicle is separated from the pre-stage as soon as safe altitude is achieved, and the desired ascent trajectory is reached. Nominally, the pre-stage is non-powered. As an option, to save the propellant of the launch vehicle, the pre-stage may have its own short-burn propulsion system, whereas the propulsion system of the launch vehicle is activated at the separation point. A general non-dimensional analysis of performance of the pre-stage from roll-out to separation is carried out and applications to existing ballistic launch vehicle and hypothetical aero-assisted vehicles (spaceplanes) are considered.

  10. MEMS and mil/aero: technology push and market pull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Thomas H.

    2001-04-01

    MEMS offers attractive solutions to high-density fluidics, inertial, optical, switching and other demanding military/aerospace (mil/aero) challenges. However, full acceptance must confront the realities of production-scale producibility, verifiability, testability, survivability, as well as long-term reliability. Data on these `..ilities' are crucial, and are central in funding and deployment decisions. Similarly, mil/aero users must highlight specific missions, environmental exposures, and procurement issues, as well as the quirks of its designers. These issues are particularly challenging in MEMS, because of the laws of physics and business economics, as well as the risks of deploying leading-edge technology into no-fail applications. This paper highlights mil/aero requirements, and suggests reliability/qualification protocols, to guide development effort and to reassure mil/aero users that MEMS labs are mindful of the necessary realities.

  11. Aero-optical jitter estimation using higher-order wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Matthew R.; Goorskey, David J.; Drye, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Wavefront measurements from wind tunnel or flight testing of an optical system are affected by jitter sources due to the measurement platform, system vibrations, or aero-mechanical buffeting. Depending on the nature of the testing, the wavefront jitter will be a composite of several effects, one of which is the aero-optical jitter; i.e., the wavefront tilt due to random air density fluctuations. To isolate the aero-optical jitter component from recent testing, we have developed an estimation technique that uses only higher-order wavefront measurements to determine the jitter. By analogy with work done previously with free-stream turbulence, we have developed a minimum mean-square error estimator using higher-order wavefront modes to compute the current-frame tilt components through a linear operation. The estimator is determined from computational fluid dynamics evaluation of aero-optical disturbances, but does not depend on the strength of such disturbances. Applying this technique to turret flight test data, we found aero-optical jitter to be 7.7±0.8 μrad and to scale with (ρ/ρSL)M2 (˜1 μrad in the actual test cases examined). The half-power point of the aero-optical jitter variance was found to be ˜2u∞/Dt and to roll off in temporal frequency with a power law between f and f.

  12. AeroPropulsoServoElasticity: Dynamic Modeling of the Variable Cycle Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2012-01-01

    This presentation was made at the 2012 Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference and it covers research work for the Dynamic Modeling of the Variable cycle Propulsion System that was done under the Supersonics Project, in the area of AeroPropulsoServoElasticity. The presentation covers the objective for the propulsion system dynamic modeling work, followed by the work that has been done so far to model the variable Cycle Engine, modeling of the inlet, the nozzle, the modeling that has been done to model the affects of flow distortion, and finally presenting some concluding remarks and future plans.

  13. Aero-acoustic performance characteristics of duct burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.; Gutierrez, O.

    1976-01-01

    A recent experimental investigation has identified the aero/acoustic characteristics of exhaust nozzles for duct heating turbofan engines over a range of simulated flow conditions. Jet noise and performance levels are summarized for a series of coannular nozzles representing both acoustically suppressed and unsuppressed designs operating in a static environment. The basic coannular nozzles were found to provide inherent noise suppression. Multi-element suppressor nozzles provided additional noise suppression, but with appreciable thrust loss. The impact of these results on the advanced supersonic transport studies is also presented, indicating potentially large reductions in take-off gross weight or community noise footprints.

  14. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  15. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  16. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  17. Turbofan Volume Dynamics Model for Investigations of Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic Effects in a Supersonic Commercial Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Lemon, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan simulation has been developed for use in aero-propulso-servo-elastic coupling studies, on supersonic vehicles. A one-dimensional lumped volume approach is used whereby each component (fan, high-pressure compressor, combustor, etc.) is represented as a single volume using characteristic performance maps and conservation equations for continuity, momentum and energy. The simulation is developed in the MATLAB/SIMULINK (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment in order to facilitate controls development, and ease of integration with a future aero-servo-elastic vehicle model being developed at NASA Langley. The complete simulation demonstrated steady state results that closely match a proposed engine suitable for a supersonic business jet at the cruise condition. Preliminary investigation of the transient simulation revealed expected trends for fuel flow disturbances as well as upstream pressure disturbances. A framework for system identification enables development of linear models for controller design. Utilizing this framework, a transfer function modeling an upstream pressure disturbance s impacts on the engine speed is developed as an illustrative case of the system identification. This work will eventually enable an overall vehicle aero-propulso-servo-elastic model

  18. Aero-Structural Interaction, Analysis, and Shape Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., III

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis technique that has been shown to be independent of step-size selection is examined further. The accuracy of this step-size independent technique, which uses complex variables for determining sensitivity derivatives, has been previously established. The primary focus of this work is to validate the aero-structural analysis procedure currently being used. This validation consists of comparing computed and experimental data obtained for an Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2). Since the aero-structural analysis procedure has the complex variable modifications already included into the software, sensitivity derivatives can automatically be computed. Other than for design purposes, sensitivity derivatives can be used for predicting the solution at nearby conditions. The use of sensitivity derivatives for predicting the aero-structural characteristics of this configuration is demonstrated.

  19. 78 FR 32363 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... FR 14824, March 29, 1999), and adding the following new AD: PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A: Docket No... Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department... propose to rescind an airworthiness directive (AD) for PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A. Model...

  20. Some laser measurement techniques used in aero engine research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. G.

    Holographic flow visualization and laser anemometry are described. Flow within a fan blade passage can be visualized in three dimensions by recording two superimposed holograms on the same film, using a double pulse laser. Interferometric fringes formed by the images represent a shearing of the density field with respect to itself, caused by rotor movement during the separation of the double pulse laser. Shocks, overtip vortices, wakes, shock interaction with the boundary layer, and separated boundary layers can be observed. The anemometer measures the time taken for particles to cross between two focused laser beams separated by a known amount. The backscattered light from each beam is recorded by two photomultipliers and the discriminated events from the two beams are cross correlated. Correlograms of events for selected angles of orientation of the two spots at gated positions in rotor passage provide a spatially localized, but time averaged, value of flow velocity.

  1. Vehicle Health Management Communications Requirements for AeroMACS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Clements, Donna J.; Apaza, Rafael D.

    2012-01-01

    As the development of standards for the aeronautical mobile airport communications system (AeroMACS) progresses, the process of identifying and quantifying appropriate uses for the system is progressing. In addition to defining important elements of AeroMACS standards, indentifying the systems uses impacts AeroMACS bandwidth requirements. Although an initial 59 MHz spectrum allocation for AeroMACS was established in 2007, the allocation may be inadequate; studies have indicated that 100 MHz or more of spectrum may be required to support airport surface communications. Hence additional spectrum allocations have been proposed. Vehicle health management (VHM) systems, which can produce large volumes of vehicle health data, were not considered in the original bandwidth requirements analyses, and are therefore of interest in supporting proposals for additional AeroMACS spectrum. VHM systems are an emerging development in air vehicle safety, and preliminary estimates of the amount of data that will be produced and transmitted off an aircraft, both in flight and on the ground, have been prepared based on estimates of data produced by on-board vehicle health sensors and initial concepts of data processing approaches. This allowed an initial estimate of VHM data transmission requirements for the airport surface. More recently, vehicle-level systems designed to process and analyze VHM data and draw conclusions on the current state of vehicle health have been undergoing testing and evaluation. These systems make use of vehicle system data that is mostly different from VHM data considered previously for airport surface transmission, and produce processed system outputs that will be also need to be archived, thus generating additional data load for AeroMACS. This paper provides an analysis of airport surface data transmission requirements resulting from the vehicle level reasoning systems, within the context of overall VHM data requirements.

  2. Surface plasmon dispersion engineering via double-metallic AU/AG layers for nitride light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Tansu, Nelson; Zhao, Hongping; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Guangyu

    2014-04-01

    A double-metallic deposition process is used whereby adjacent layers of different metals are deposited on a substrate. The surface plasmon frequency of a base layer of a first metal is tuned by the surface plasmon frequency of a second layer of a second metal formed thereon. The amount of tuning is dependent upon the thickness of the metallic layers, and thus tuning can be achieved by varying the thicknesses of one or both of the metallic layers. In a preferred embodiment directed to enhanced LED technology in the green spectrum regime, a double-metallic Au/Ag layer comprising a base layer of gold (Au) followed by a second layer of silver (Ag) formed thereon is deposited on top of InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) on a sapphire/GaN substrate.

  3. Enzymatic plasmonic engineering of Ag/Au bimetallic nanoshells and their use for sensitive optical glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    He, Haili; Xu, Xiaolong; Wu, Haoxi; Jin, Yongdong

    2012-04-01

    Enzyme works for plasmonic nanostructure: an interesting enzyme-responsive hybrid Ag/Au-GOx bimetallic nanoshell (NS) system is reported, in which control over the enzyme reaction of glucose oxidase (GOx) can automatically fine-tune the morphology (from complete NS to porous NS) and optical properties of the hybrid nanostructure. The phenomenon is further exploited as a new platform for sensitive optical glucose sensing. PMID:22388952

  4. Positron emission mammography using Pr:LuAG scintillator - Fusion of optical material study and systems engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Yanagida, Takayuki; Kamada, Kei; Yokota, Yuui; Pejchal, Jan; Yamaji, Akihiro; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Miyake, Masayasu; Kumagai, Kazuaki; Sasaki, Katsuhisa; dos Santos, T. R.; Baba, Mamoru; Ito, Masatoshi; Takeda, Motohiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Nikl, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The breast cancer is one of the most frequent cause of death among female cancer patients. However, when discovered at the early stage, the probability of recovery is very high. Therefore, the development of positron emission mammography (PEM) to detect the breast cancer at the early stage with high efficiency is demanding. As the diameter of the scanner part is small, a scintillator with faster response is required. As the recently developed Pr:LuAG has almost twice as short scintillation decay time than that of Ce:LSO, the Pr:LuAG scintillator was employed in our recently developed PEM system. One camera unit consisted of 20 × 64 scintillator pixels optically coupled with three H8500-03 multi anode photomultipliers. The Pr:LuAG pixel size is 2.1 × 2.1 × 15 mm 3 and the BaSO 4 was used as a reflector. Four planar cameras are placed at both sides. Therefore, eight cameras were installed at both sides of the instrument. The spatial resolution was evaluated to be 1.1 mm using the 22Na point source. Fluorodeoxyglucose with 18F hotspot image was also detected using the breast phantom.

  5. Saltwater ecotoxicology of Ag, Au, CuO, TiO2, ZnO and C60 engineered nanoparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Minetto, D; Volpi Ghirardini, A; Libralato, G

    2016-01-01

    This review paper examined 529 papers reporting experimental nanoecotoxicological original data. Only 126 papers referred to saltwater environments (water column and sediment) including a huge variety of species (n=51), their relative endpoints and engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) (n=38). We tried to provide a synthetic overview of the ecotoxicological effects of ENPs from existing data, refining papers on the basis of cross-cutting selection criteria and supporting a "mind the gap" approach stressing on missing data for hazard and risk assessment. After a codified selection procedure, attention was paid to Ag, Au, CuO, TiO2, ZnO and C60 ENPs, evidencing and comparing the observed nanoecotoxicity range of effect. Several criticisms were evidenced: i) some model organisms are overexploited like microalgae and molluscs compared to annelids, echinoderms and fish; ii) underexploited model organisms: mainly bacteria and fish; iii) exposure scenario variability: high species-specific and ENP scenarios including organism life stage and way of administration/spiking of toxicants; iv) scarce comparability between results due to exposure scenario variability; v) micro- and mesocosms substantially unexplored; vi) mixture effects: few examples are available only for ENPs and traditional pollutants; mixtures of ENPs have not been investigated yet; vii) effects of ions and ENPs: nAg, nCuO and nZnO toxicity aetiology is still a matter of discussion; viii) size and morphology effects of ENPs: scarcely investigated, justified and understood. Toxicity results evidenced that: nAu>nZnO>nAg>nCuO>nTiO2>C60. PMID:27107224

  6. User's Guide for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Dean K.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    This report is a Users Guide for the NASA-developed Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) software, which is a transient simulation of a large commercial turbofan engine (up to 90,000-lb thrust) with a realistic engine control system. The software supports easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface (GUI). C-MAPSS provides the user with a graphical turbofan engine simulation environment in which advanced algorithms can be implemented and tested. C-MAPSS can run user-specified transient simulations, and it can generate state-space linear models of the nonlinear engine model at an operating point. The code has a number of GUI screens that allow point-and-click operation, and have editable fields for user-specified input. The software includes an atmospheric model which allows simulation of engine operation at altitudes from sea level to 40,000 ft, Mach numbers from 0 to 0.90, and ambient temperatures from -60 to 103 F. The package also includes a power-management system that allows the engine to be operated over a wide range of thrust levels throughout the full range of flight conditions.

  7. User's Guide for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS): Version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Frederick, Dean K.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Chan, William W.

    2012-01-01

    This report is a Users Guide for version 2 of the NASA-developed Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) software, which is a transient simulation of a large commercial turbofan engine (up to 90,000-lb thrust) with a realistic engine control system. The software supports easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface (GUI). C-MAPSS v.2 has some enhancements over the original, including three actuators rather than one, the addition of actuator and sensor dynamics, and an improved controller, while retaining or improving on the convenience and user-friendliness of the original. C-MAPSS v.2 provides the user with a graphical turbofan engine simulation environment in which advanced algorithms can be implemented and tested. C-MAPSS can run user-specified transient simulations, and it can generate state-space linear models of the nonlinear engine model at an operating point. The code has a number of GUI screens that allow point-and-click operation, and have editable fields for user-specified input. The software includes an atmospheric model which allows simulation of engine operation at altitudes from sea level to 40,000 ft, Mach numbers from 0 to 0.90, and ambient temperatures from -60 to 103 F. The package also includes a power-management system that allows the engine to be operated over a wide range of thrust levels throughout the full range of flight conditions.

  8. Overview of NASA Power Technologies for Space and Aero Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Raymond F.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve the ambitious goals that NASA has outlined for the next decades considerable development of power technology will be necessary. This presentation outlines the development objectives for both the space and aero applications. It further looks at the various power technologies that support these objectives and examines drivers that will be a driving force for future development.

  9. Rotary-Wing Relevant Compressor Aero Research and Technology Development Activities at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Skoch, Gary J.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Technical challenges of compressors for future rotorcraft engines are driven by engine-level and component-level requirements. Cycle analyses are used to highlight the engine-level challenges for 3000, 7500, and 12000 SHP-class engines, which include retention of performance and stability margin at low corrected flows, and matching compressor type, axial-flow or centrifugal, to the low corrected flows and high temperatures in the aft stages. At the component level: power-to-weight and efficiency requirements impel designs with lower inherent aerodynamic stability margin; and, optimum engine overall pressure ratios lead to small blade heights and the associated challenges of scale, particularly increased clearance-to-span ratios. The technical challenges associated with the aerodynamics of low corrected flows and stability management impel the compressor aero research and development efforts reviewed herein. These activities include development of simple models for clearance sensitivities to improve cycle calculations, full-annulus, unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations used to elucidate stall, its inception, and the physics of stall control by discrete tip-injection, development of an actuator-duct-based model for rapid simulation of nonaxisymmetric flow fields (e.g., due inlet circumferential distortion), advanced centrifugal compressor stage development and experimentation, and application of stall control in a T700 engine.

  10. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Science 2015 (AeroEarth 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2016-02-01

    The 3rd International Conferences on Geological, Geographical, Aerospaces and Earth Sciences 2015 (AeroEarth 2015), was held at The DoubleTree Hilton, Jakarta, Indonesia during 26 - 27 September 2015. The 1st AeoroEarth was held succefully in Jakarta in 2013. The success continued to The 2nd AeroEarth 2014 that was held in Kuta Bali, Indonesia. The publications were published by EES IOP in http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/19/1 and http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/23/1 respectively. The AeroEarth 2015 conference aims to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. Through research and development, Earth's scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. The theme of AeroEarth 2015 is ''Earth and Aerospace Sciences : Challenges and Opportunities'' Earth provides resources and the exact conditions to make life possible. However, with the advent of technology and industrialization, the Earth's resources are being pushed to the brink of depletion. Non-sustainable industrial practices are not only endangering the supply of the Earth's natural resources, but are also putting burden on life itself by bringing about pollution and climate change. A major role of earth science scholars is to examine the delicate balance between the Earth's resources and the growing demands of industrialization. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 78 papers and after rigorous review, 18 papers were accepted. The participants

  11. Sensitivity Analysis for Coupled Aero-structural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giunta, Anthony A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for calculating gradients of aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for an aeroelastic aircraft model. This method uses the Global Sensitivity Equations (GSE) to account for the aero-structural coupling, and a reduced-order modal analysis approach to condense the coupling bandwidth between the aerodynamic and structural models. Parallel computing is applied to reduce the computational expense of the numerous high fidelity aerodynamic analyses needed for the coupled aero-structural system. Good agreement is obtained between aerodynamic force and moment gradients computed with the GSE/modal analysis approach and the same quantities computed using brute-force, computationally expensive, finite difference approximations. A comparison between the computational expense of the GSE/modal analysis method and a pure finite difference approach is presented. These results show that the GSE/modal analysis approach is the more computationally efficient technique if sensitivity analysis is to be performed for two or more aircraft design parameters.

  12. Interfacial Engineering of Bimetallic Ag/Pt Nanoparticles on Reduced Graphene Oxide Matrix for Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Zhao, Yanhua; Yan, Li; Peltier, Raoul; Hui, Wenli; Yao, Xi; Cui, Yali; Chen, Xianfeng; Sun, Hongyan; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-04-01

    Environmental biofouling caused by the formation of biofilm has been one of the most urgent global concerns. Silver nanoparticles (NPs), owing to their wide-spectrum antimicrobial property, have been widely explored to combat biofilm, but their extensive use has raised growing concern because they persist in the environment. Here we report a novel hybrid nanocomposite that imparts enhanced antimicrobial activity and low cytotoxicity yet with the advantage of reduced silver loading. The nanocomposite consists of Pt/Ag bimetallic NPs (BNPs) decorated on the porous reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets. We demonstrate that the enhanced antimicrobial property against Escherichia coli is ascribed to the intricate control of the interfaces between metal compositions, rGO matrix, and bacteria, where the BNPs lead to a rapid release of silver ions, and the trapping of bacteria by the porous rGO matrix further provides high concentration silver ion sites for efficient bacteria-bactericide interaction. We envision that our facile approach significantly expands the design space for the creation of silver-based antimicrobial materials to achieve a wide spectrum of functionalities. PMID:27007980

  13. 2005 PathfinderPlus Aero-Elastic Research Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the 2005 Pathfinder along with an investigation of its aeroelastic responses. The contents include: 1) HALE Class of Vehicles; 2) Aero-elastic Research Flights Overall Objective; 3) General Arrangement; 4) Sensor Locations; 5) NASA Ramp Operations; 6) Lakebed Operations; 7) 1st Flight Data Set; 8) Tool development / data usage; 9) HALE Tool Development & Validation; 10) Building a HALE Foundation; 11) Compelling Needs Drive HALE Efforts; and 12) Team Photo

  14. Improvement of the AeroClipper system for cyclones monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, André; Philippe, Duvel Jean

    2016-07-01

    The AeroClipper developed by the French space agency (Centre National d'Études Spatiales, CNES) is a quasi-lagrangian device drifting with surface wind at about 20-30m above the ocean surface. It is a new and original device for real-time and continuous observation of air-sea surface parameters in open ocean remote regions. This device enables the sampling of the variability of surface parameters in particular under convective systems toward which it is attracted. The AeroClipper is therefore an ideal instrument to monitor Tropical Cyclones (TCs) in which they are likely to converge and provide original observations to evaluate and improve our current understanding and diagnostics of TCs as well as their representation in numerical models. In 2008, the AeroClipper demonstrates its capability to be captured by an Ocean Indian cyclone, as two models have converged, without damages, in the eye of Dora cyclone during the 2008 VASCO campaign. This paper will present the improvements of this balloon system for the international project 'the Year of Maritime Continent'.

  15. Aerosol Comparisons Between Observations and Models: AeroCom and ABC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Schulz, Michael; Kinne, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    I will represent the AeroCom community to the Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) workshop. I will summarize the activities and results from AeroCom Phase I activities in the past 8 years and introduce the new results and activities in the current AeroCom Phase II. We hope to coordinate some activities with the ABC community to share model output and data access for model evaluations, comparisons, and assessment.

  16. Aero-optical interaction mechanisms and resolution robustness in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Fazlul Rahim

    Turbulence is a fundamental phenomena found is a wide variety of large Reynolds number flows with many practical and theoretical applications. This dissertation will outline studies done on turbulent free shear layers in order to gain a greater fundamental understanding of more complex turbulent flow fields. This study will focus on directed energy propagation through turbulence, imaging and image resolution robustness of turbulence, and the multi-fractal nature of turbulent scalar interfaces. In the first part of this study, aero-optical interactions along laser beam propagation paths in turbulent compressible separated shear layers are examined on the basis of combined experiments and computations of the aero-optical phenomena. We introduce the idea of the interaction optical path difference (IOPD), and its associated r.m.s. value (IOPD rms), and we investigate these quantities as functions of the laser beam propagation distance throughout the flow and also as functions of the laser aperture size. Evidence of non-monotonic behavior of the IOPDrms , shown by partial reductions in the aperture-averaged laser aberrations, as a function of propagation distance in the flow is observed for individual realizations. The extent of this non-monotonic behavior depends on the orientation of, and gradients across, the refractive turbulent interfaces. These observations of non-monotonic behavior suggest the presence of a fundamental turbulence-induced self-correction mechanism, determined by the geometrical and physical properties of the high-gradient refractive interfaces, that can be utilized to optimize aero-optical effects in airborne directed energy applications. In addition, this work investigates the extent of aero-optical resolution robustness, i.e. the effects of resolution reduction on the aero-optical interactions, using combined experiments and computations. High-resolution images of the refractive index field in turbulent compressible separated shear layers at

  17. High Performance Magnetic Bearings for Aero Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Knospe, C. R.; Williams, R. D.; Lewis, D. W.; Barrett, L. E.; Maslen, E. H.; Humphris, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    Several previous annual reports were written and numerous papers published on the topics for this grant. That work is not repeated here in this final report. Only the work completed in the final year of the grant is presented in this final report. This final year effort concentrated on power loss measurements in magnetic bearing rotors. The effect of rotor power losses in magnetic bearings are very important for many applications. In some cases, these losses must be minimized to maximize the length of time the rotating machine can operate on a fixed energy or power supply. Examples include aircraft gas turbine engines, space devices, or energy storage flywheels. In other applications, the heating caused by the magnetic bearing must be removed. Excessive heating can be a significant problem in machines as diverse as large compressors, electric motors, textile spindles, and artificial heart pumps.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamic Modeling of a Supersonic Commercial Transport Turbo-Machinery Propulsion System for Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elasticity Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joe; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Kopasakis, George; Woolwine, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic model for a variable cycle turbofan engine, supersonic inlet, and convergent-divergent nozzle that can be integrated with an aeroelastic vehicle model to create an overall Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) modeling tool. The primary focus of this study is to provide a means to capture relevant thrust dynamics of a full supersonic propulsion system by using relatively simple quasi-one dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods that will allow for accurate control algorithm development and capture the key aspects of the thrust to feed into an APSE model. Previously, propulsion system component models have been developed and are used for this study of the fully integrated propulsion system. An overview of the methodology is presented for the modeling of each propulsion component, with a focus on its associated coupling for the overall model. To conduct APSE studies the described dynamic propulsion system model is integrated into a high fidelity CFD model of the full vehicle capable of conducting aero-elastic studies. Dynamic thrust analysis for the quasi-one dimensional dynamic propulsion system model is presented along with an initial three dimensional flow field model of the engine integrated into a supersonic commercial transport.

  19. Nonlinear Dynamic Modeling of a Supersonic Commercial Transport Turbo-Machinery Propulsion System for Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elasticity Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Woolwine, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic model for a variable cycle turbofan engine, supersonic inlet, and convergent-divergent nozzle that can be integrated with an aeroelastic vehicle model to create an overall Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) modeling tool. The primary focus of this study is to provide a means to capture relevant thrust dynamics of a full supersonic propulsion system by using relatively simple quasi-one dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods that will allow for accurate control algorithm development and capture the key aspects of the thrust to feed into an APSE model. Previously, propulsion system component models have been developed and are used for this study of the fully integrated propulsion system. An overview of the methodology is presented for the modeling of each propulsion component, with a focus on its associated coupling for the overall model. To conduct APSE studies the de- scribed dynamic propulsion system model is integrated into a high fidelity CFD model of the full vehicle capable of conducting aero-elastic studies. Dynamic thrust analysis for the quasi-one dimensional dynamic propulsion system model is presented along with an initial three dimensional flow field model of the engine integrated into a supersonic commercial transport.

  20. 78 FR 69600 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Industries S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... (AD) for certain Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes. This proposed AD results from... proposed AD, contact Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A--Airworthiness Office, Via Luigi Cibrario,...

  1. 78 FR 69597 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ...-16169 (75 FR 904, January 7, 2010). (c) Applicability This AD applies to PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A... Industries S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... (AD) for Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A Model P-180 airplanes that would supersede an existing AD....

  2. 77 FR 35888 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department... new airworthiness directive (AD) for PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes....

  3. 48 CFR 1852.235-70 - Center for AeroSpace Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Center for AeroSpace... SPACE ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-70 Center for AeroSpace Information. As prescribed in 1835.070(a), insert...

  4. 48 CFR 1852.235-70 - Center for AeroSpace Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Center for AeroSpace... SPACE ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-70 Center for AeroSpace Information. As prescribed in 1835.070(a), insert...

  5. 48 CFR 1852.235-70 - Center for AeroSpace Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Center for AeroSpace... SPACE ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-70 Center for AeroSpace Information. As prescribed in 1835.070(a), insert...

  6. Unsteady fluid and optical simulation of transonic aero-windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    The time-varying fluid and optical fields of several cavity configurations have been computed on overset mesh systems using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and geometric optics. Comparisons between numerical results and Airborne Optical Adjunct (AOA) flight data are made in two-dimensions for a quieted cavity geometry with two lip-blowing rates. In three-dimensions, two proposed aero-window locations for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) are discussed. The simulations indicate that convection of large shear layer structures across the aperture cause the blur circle diameter to be three times the diffraction-limited diameter in the near-infrared band.

  7. Exhaust System Experiments at NASA's AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the planned testing in the AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab (AAPL) in the coming 15 months. It was stressed in the presentation that these are plans that are subject to change due to changes in funding and/or programmatic direction. The first chart shows a simplified schedule of test entries with funding sponsor and dates for each. In subsequent charts are pages devoted to the Objectives and Issues with each test entry, along with a graphic intended to represent the test activity. The chart for each test entry also indicates sponsorship of the activity, and a contact person.!

  8. Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center aero-optics performance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.; Pond, John E.; Snow, Ronald; Hwang, Yanfang

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center's (HIPEC) aerooptics performance predictions capability. It includes code results for three dimensional shapes and comparisons to initial experiments. HIPEC consists of a collection of aerothermal, aerodynamic computational codes which are capable of covering the entire flight regime from subsonic to hypersonic flow and include chemical reactions and turbulence. Heat transfer to the various surfaces is calculated as an input to cooling and ablation processes. HIPEC also has aero-optics codes to determine the effect of the mean flowfield and turbulence on the tracking and imaging capability of on-board optical sensors. The paper concentrates on the latter aspects.

  9. Evaluation of aero commander propeller acoustic data: Taxi operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The acoustic data from ground tests performed on an Aero Commander propeller driven aircraft are analyzed. An array of microphones flush mounted on the side of the fuselage were used to record data. The propeller blade passage noise during operations at several different taxi speeds is considered and calculations of the magnitude and phase of the blade passage tones, the amplitude stability of the tones, and the spatial phase and coherence of the tones are included. The measured results are compared to theoretical predictions for propeller noise and various evaluations which reveal important details of propeller noise characteristics are presented.

  10. Interference Analysis Status and Plans for Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Interference issues related to the operation of an aeronautical mobile airport communications system (AeroMACS) in the C-Band (specifically 5091-5150 MHz) is being investigated. The issue of primary interest is co-channel interference from AeroMACS into mobile-satellite system (MSS) feeder uplinks. The effort is focusing on establishing practical limits on AeroMACS transmissions from airports so that the threshold of interference into MSS is not exceeded. The analyses are being performed with the software package Visualyse Professional, developed by Transfinite Systems Limited. Results with omni-directional antennas and plans to extend the models to represent AeroMACS more accurately will be presented. These models should enable realistic analyses of emerging AeroMACS designs to be developed from NASA Test Bed, RTCA 223, and European results.

  11. Integrated approach for stress based lifing of aero gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu, Abdullahi Obonyegba

    In order to analyse the turbine blade life, the damage due to the combined thermal and mechanical loads should be adequately accounted for. This is more challenging when detailed component geometry is limited. Therefore, a compromise between the level of geometric detail and the complexity of the lifing method to be implemented would be necessary. This research focuses on how the life assessment of aero engine turbine blades can be done, considering the balance between available design inputs and adequate level of fidelity. Accordingly, the thesis contributes to developing a generic turbine blade lifing method that is based on the engine thermodynamic cycle; as well as integrating critical design/technological factors and operational parameters that influence the aero engine blade life. To this end, thermo-mechanical fatigue was identified as the critical damage phenomenon driving the life of the turbine blade.. The developed approach integrates software tools and numerical models created using the minimum design information typically available at the early design stages. Using finite element analysis of an idealised blade geometry, the approach captures relevant impacts of thermal gradients and thermal stresses that contribute to the thermo-mechanical fatigue damage on the gas turbine blade. The blade life is evaluated using the Neu/Sehitoglu thermo-mechanical fatigue model that considers damage accumulation due to fatigue, oxidation, and creep. The leading edge is examined as a critical part of the blade to estimate the damage severity for different design factors and operational parameters. The outputs of the research can be used to better understand how the environment and the operating conditions of the aircraft affect the blade life consumption and therefore what is the impact on the maintenance cost and the availability of the propulsion system. This research also finds that the environmental (oxidation) effect drives the blade life and the blade coolant

  12. From fighter aircraft to pipeline: The development of the first ''third generation'' aero-derived gas turbine in the 16,000-8,000 HP class

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.N.; Mathers, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    Two totally unrelated sources of hot gas energy the FCCU oil refining process and the aircraft engine - both utilize the same range of basic aerodynamic and machinery design technologies for mechanical drive power recovery. this paper shows how these technologies came together and discusses the development of the Ingersoll-Rand GT-60 gas turbine, the first to use a general Electric LM1600 hot gas generator (from the F404 fighter engine program); it also illustrates how it was possible for the first ''third generation'' aero-derived gas turbine in the 16,000 - 18,000 hp class to be developed in a much shorter than normal lead time.

  13. PREFACE: The 2nd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences 2014 (AeroEarth 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Soewito, Benfano

    2015-01-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences 2014 (AeroEarth 2014), was held at Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel, Kuta, Bali, Indonesia during 11 - 12 October 2014. The AeroEarth 2014 conference aims to bring together researchers and engineers from around the world. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. Earth provides resources and the exact conditions to make life possible. However, with the advent of technology and industrialization, the Earth's resources are being pushed to the brink of depletion. Non-sustainable industrial practices are not only endangering the supply of the Earth's natural resources, but are also putting burden on life itself by bringing about pollution and climate change. A major role of earth science scholars is to examine the delicate balance between the Earth's resources and the growing demands of industrialization. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 98 papers and after rigorous review, 17 papers were accepted. The participants come from eight countries. There are four Parallel Sessions and two invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee

  14. Miga Aero Actuator and 2D Machined Mechanical Binary Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators provide the highest force-to-weight ratio of any known actuator. They can be designed for a wide variety of form factors from flat, thin packages, to form-matching packages for existing actuators. SMA actuators can be operated many thousands of times, so that ground testing is possible. Actuation speed can be accurately controlled from milliseconds to position and hold, and even electronic velocity-profile control is possible. SMA actuators provide a high degree of operational flexibility, and are truly smart actuators capable of being accurately controlled by onboard microprocessors across a wide range of voltages. The Miga Aero actuator is a SMA actuator designed specifically for spaceflight applications. Providing 13 mm of stroke with either 20- or 40-N output force in two different models, the Aero actuator is made from low-outgassing PEEK (polyether ether ketone) plastic, stainless steel, and nickel-titanium SMA wires. The modular actuator weighs less than 28 grams. The dorsal output attachment allows the Aero to be used in either PUSH or PULL modes by inverting the mounting orientation. The SPA1 actuator utilizes commercially available SMA actuator wire to provide 3/8-in. (approx. =.1 cm) of stroke at a force of over 28 lb (approx. = .125 N). The force is provided by a unique packaging of the single SMA wire that provides the output force of four SMA wires mechanically in parallel. The output load is shared by allowing the SMA wire to slip around the output attachment end to adjust or balance the load, preventing any individual wire segment from experiencing high loads during actuation. A built-in end limit switch prevents overheating of the SMA element following actuation when used in conjunction with the Miga Analog Driver [a simple MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) switching circuit]. A simple 2D machined mechanical binary latch has been developed to complement the capabilities of SMA wire

  15. Towards an Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elasticity Analysis of a Commercial Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Chwalowski, Pawel; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Silva, Walt A.; McNamara, Jack

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and linear structural deformations. The APSE model provides the integration of the following two previously developed nonlinear dynamic simulations: a variable cycle turbofan engine and an elastic supersonic commercial transport vehicle. The primary focus of this study is to provide a means to include relevant dynamics of a turbomachinery propulsion system into the aeroelastic studies conducted during a vehicle design, which have historically neglected propulsion effects. A high fidelity CFD tool is used here for the integration platform. The elastic vehicle neglecting the propulsion system serves as a comparison of traditional approaches to the APSE results. An overview of the methodology is presented for integrating the propulsion system and elastic vehicle. Static aeroelastic analysis comparisons between the traditional and developed APSE models for a wing tip detection indicate that the propulsion system impact on the vehicle elastic response could increase the detection by approximately ten percent.

  16. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aero-Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the development and application of ceramic matrix composites consisting of silicon carbide (SiC) based matrices reinforced by small-diameter continuous-length SiC-based fibers. For example, these SiC/SiC composites are now in the early stages of implementation into hot-section components of civil aero-propulsion gas turbine engines, where in comparison to current metallic components they offer multiple advantages due to their lighter weight and higher temperature structural capability. For current production-ready SiC/SiC, this temperature capability for long time structural applications is 1250 degC, which is better than 1100 degC for the best metallic superalloys. Foreseeing that even higher structural reliability and temperature capability would continue to increase the advantages of SiC/SiC composites, progress in recent years has also been made at NASA toward improving the properties of SiC/SiC composites by optimizing the various constituent materials and geometries within composite microstructures. The primary objective of this chapter is to detail this latter progress, both fundamentally and practically, with particular emphasis on recent advancements in the materials and processes for the fiber, fiber coating, fiber architecture, and matrix, and in the design methods for incorporating these constituents into SiC/SiC microstructures with improved thermo-structural performance.

  17. AGS II

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in rare K decays, neutrino oscillations and other fields have generated an increasing demand for running, and improved intensity and duty cycle, at the AGS. Current projects include acceleration of polarized protons and light ions (up to mass 32). Future plans are for a booster to increase intensity and allow heavy ions (up to mass 200), and a stretcher to give 100% duty cycle. A later upgrade could yield an average current of 32 ..mu.. amps. 6 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Prediction and control of turbulent aero-optical distortion using large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Robert E.

    1993-06-01

    The problem of aero-optical distortion caused by turbulence in high speed mixing layers was studied using large eddy simulation (LES) as the model of turbulence. The accuracy of LES is established for global features of the mixing layer, such as mean growth rate and statistics of turbulent velocity fluctuations. LES was then used to assess two concepts for suppressing density fluctuations and aero-optical distortion, lateral convergence and streamline curvature, and one of these was found to be reasonably effective.

  19. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2012 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor-Barsi, Christine; Allen, Arrington E.

    2013-01-01

    A full aero-thermal calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was completed in 2012 following the major modifications to the facility that included replacement of the refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. The calibration test provided data used to fully document the aero-thermal flow quality in the IRT test section and to construct calibration curves for the operation of the IRT.

  20. Considerations for Improving the Capacity and Performance of AeroMACS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Kamali, Behnam; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Dimond, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) has progressed from concept through prototype development, testing, and standards development and is now poised for the first operational deployments at nine US airports by the Federal Aviation Administration. These initial deployments will support fixed applications. Mobile applications providing connectivity to and from aircraft and ground-based vehicles on the airport surface will occur at some point in the future. Given that many fixed applications are possible for AeroMACS, it is necessary to now consider whether the existing capacity of AeroMACS will be reached even before the mobile applications are ready to be added, since AeroMACS is constrained by both available bandwidth and transmit power limitations. This paper describes some concepts that may be applied to improve the future capacity of AeroMACS, with a particular emphasis on gains that can be derived from the addition of IEEE 802.16j multihop relays to the AeroMACS standard, where a significant analysis effort has been undertaken.

  1. New TiAg composite coating for bone prosthesis engineering shows promising microvascular compatibility in the murine dorsal skinfold chamber model.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Ann-Kathrin; Beythien, Maximilian; Huber, Jakob; Zufraß, Thorsten; Butschkau, Antje; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of antimicrobial substances like silver into implant surface coatings is one promising concept against primary infections of endoprosthesis, especially for immunocompromised patients as well as against reinfection after revision operations. However, besides good antimicrobial and mechanical properties it is equally important that the implant material does not disturb the local microvascular perfusion of muscle tissue to enable microbial host defense and tissue repair processes. In this study the biocompatibility of a newly developed TiAg-composite coating applied on conventional titanium via physical vapor deposition was analysed. To evaluate the local microvascular and inflammatory response of striated muscle tissue upon implantation of TiAg-coated plates the murine dorsal skinfold chamber model was used. We repetitively examined local capillary and venular perfusion, endothelial integrity as well as leucocyte activation by intravital fluorescence microscopy at 1 h, 24 h as well as 3 and 7 days after implantation. TiAg-implants were well tolerated by the vascular system as indicated by intact functional capillary density and endothelial integrity compared to pure titanium plates and controls without a metal implant. Furthermore, quantification of rolling and adherent leucocytes did not reveal signs of inflammation upon TiAg-implantation. PMID:25589204

  2. Determination of cycle configuration of gas turbines and aircraft engines by an optimization procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuijikawa, Y.; Nagaoka, M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analyses and optimization of simple and sophisticated cycles, particularly for various gas turbine engines and aero-engines (including the scramjet engine) to achieve maximum performance. The optimization of such criteria as thermal efficiency, specific output, and total performance for gas turbine engines, and overall efficiency, nondimensional thrust, and specific impulse for aero-engines has been performed by the optimization procedure with the multiplier method. Comparison of results with analytical solutions establishes the validity of the optimization procedure.

  3. Concepts for Distributed Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Thomas, Randy; Saus, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for aero-propulsion systems are found to be highly optimized machines after over 70 years of development. Still, additional performance improvements are sought while reduction in the overall cost is increasingly a driving factor. Control systems play a vitally important part in these metrics but are severely constrained by the operating environment and the consequences of system failure. The considerable challenges facing future engine control system design have been investigated. A preliminary analysis has been conducted of the potential benefits of distributed control architecture when applied to aero-engines. In particular, reductions in size, weight, and cost of the control system are possible. NASA is conducting research to further explore these benefits, with emphasis on the particular benefits enabled by high temperature electronics and an open-systems approach to standardized communications interfaces.

  4. Traversing Microphone Track Installed in NASA Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory Dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.; Perusek, Gail P.

    1999-01-01

    The Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory is an acoustically treated, 65-ft-tall dome located at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Inside this laboratory is the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR), which is used in support of Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) and High Speed Research (HSR) to test engine exhaust nozzles for thrust and acoustic performance under simulated takeoff conditions. Acoustic measurements had been gathered by a far-field array of microphones located along the dome wall and 10-ft above the floor. Recently, it became desirable to collect acoustic data for engine certifications (as specified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)) that would simulate the noise of an aircraft taking off as heard from an offset ground location. Since nozzles for the High-Speed Civil Transport have straight sides that cause their noise signature to vary radially, an additional plane of acoustic measurement was required. Desired was an arched array of 24 microphones, equally spaced from the nozzle and each other, in a 25 off-vertical plane. The various research requirements made this a challenging task. The microphones needed to be aimed at the nozzle accurately and held firmly in place during testing, but it was also essential that they be easily and routinely lowered to the floor for calibration and servicing. Once serviced, the microphones would have to be returned to their previous location near the ceiling. In addition, there could be no structure could between the microphones and the nozzle, and any structure near the microphones would have to be designed to minimize noise reflections. After many concepts were considered, a single arched truss structure was selected that would be permanently affixed to the dome ceiling and to one end of the dome floor.

  5. AeroCOM Biomass Burning Emissions Experiment-Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, M. M.; Chin, M.; Kahn, R. A.; Val Martin, M.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is one of the major sources of optically and chemically potent carbonaceous aerosols, gaseous aerosol precursors, and volatile organic compounds. It is, therefore, important to represent these emissions as accurately as possible in the global and regional models. To correctly simulate BB emissions from a fire, the model needs two key inputs: emission source strength for the fire and the emission injection height. Based on pilot studies of injection height by M. Val Martin et al. (2010, 2012), and of source strength by M. Petrenko et al. (2012), we proposed an AeroCom-coordinated multi-model BB experiment. The core objectives of the experiment are: To inter-compare and quantify the accuracy and diversity of the AeroCom model simulated BB AOD using a common emissions inventory. To propose a region-by-region emission correction scheme based on the comparisons of model output with satellite snapshots of smoke-plume optical depth from the MODIS and MISR instruments. This will allow us to bring the widely used GFED v3 emissions inventory to the levels needed to improve model-observation comparisons. To test smoke injection height-emission intensity relationships used in global models against MISR multi-angle smoke-plume-height retrievals. With the first stage of the BB experiment focused on the source strength, this talk will provide an update on development and testing the method of using satellite-measured aerosol optical depth snapshots to constrain BB aerosol emissions in the global models. The global datasets of fire-and-smoke events, observed by MISR and MODIS during 2006, 2007 and 2008, to be used for model-satellite comparisons, will also be described. These events were selected according to a number of criteria to be suitable for model-observation comparison at the scales of global model resolution. In addition, we will showcase preliminary results of model inter-comparisons within the BB experiment, outline plans for future output analysis

  6. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in the 1994 annual report for the NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center's Sixth Annual Symposium. This conference covered: (1) Combustors and Nozzles; (2) Turbomachinery Aero- and Hydro-dynamics; (3) On-board Propulsion systems; (4) Advanced Propulsion Applications; (5) Vaporization and Combustion; (6) Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics; and (7) Atomization and Sprays.

  7. Supramolecular engineering through temperature-induced chemical modification of 2H-tetraphenylporphyrin on Ag(111): flat phenyl conformation and possible dehydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Giovanni; Blankenburg, Stephan; Castellarin-Cudia, Carla; Fanetti, Mattia; Borghetti, Patrizia; Sangaletti, Luigi; Floreano, Luca; Verdini, Alberto; Magnano, Elena; Bondino, Federica; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Nguyen, Manh-Thuong; Gaspari, Roberto; Passerone, Daniele; Goldoni, Andrea

    2011-12-16

    Scratching the surface: Formation of a monolayer of 2H-tetraphenylporphyrins (2H-TPP) on Ag(111), either by sublimation of a multilayer in the range 525-600 K or by annealing (at the same temperature) a monolayer deposited at room temperature, induces a chemical modification of the molecules. Rotation of the phenyl rings into a flat conformation is observed and tentatively explained, by using DFT calculations, as a peculiar reaction due to molecular dehydrogenation. PMID:22113855

  8. 3D modelling of an aero-gravity and -magnetic survey as an first exploration step in a frontier basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köther, Nils; Eckard, Marcel; Götze, Hans-Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    The West African Taoudeni basin covers a desert area of about 1.8 million km² and is one of the last frontier basins worldwide. Here Wintershall Holding AG holds acreage of about 68000 km². During 2005-2007 geological surveys and an aero-gravity and -magnetic survey were conducted in this area. The potential field modelling should contribute first insight about the subsurface to plan an economic seismic survey. 2D models lead to poor results. 2008 the results of an internship (NK) were 3D subsurface models, which were enhanced during the following diploma thesis (Köther, 2009). Complex igneous rocks and sparsely distributed constraints lead to an ambiguous interpretation. Therefore, several simple 3D models were compiled with the in-house software IGMAS+, which base on geological ideas of the underground and fit well the measured data. These basic models allow a geophysical evaluation of different geological theories about the subsurface. Also, for a thorough interpretation field transformations (Euler, Curvature, and Derivatives) were calculated. These results led to new constraints for further interpretation of the basin structures and therefore they are important contributions for future exploration e.g. the planning of seismic surveys.

  9. Observation and analysis of aero-optic effects on the ORCA laser communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, David T.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Andrews, Larry C.; Leclerc, Troy; Sauer, Paul

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we show evidence of aero-optic effects on the measured beacon beam as the gimbal angle of a nosemounted turret changes from 0 to 90 degrees and greater with respect to the line of flight. Data from the beacon beam was collected with a new technology 3-aperture scintillometer over a 82km to 104km air-to-ground downlink during field testing of the ORCA system in Nevada in May 2009. In this paper we present data analysis on the impact of an aero-optic boundary layer on a laser link between an aircraft and a ground-based stationary node. Particularly we look at the impact of an aero-optic boundary layer on the mean, variance, scintillation, probability density function (PDF), power spectral density (PSD), and fading of the received irradiance. We find that the most compelling argument for the presence of strong aero-optic effects comes from calculating the PSD of the received beacon intensity. We also find the cumulative effect of the aero-optic boundary layer differs depending on the transmitted beam parameters, i.e. collimated or divergent.

  10. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2012 Test)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor-Barsi, Christine M.; Arrington, E. Allen; VanZante, Judith Foss

    2012-01-01

    A major modification of the refrigeration plant and heat exchanger at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) occurred in autumn of 2011. It is standard practice at NASA Glenn to perform a full aero-thermal calibration of the test section of a wind tunnel facility upon completion of major modifications. This paper will discuss the tools and techniques used to complete an aero-thermal calibration of the IRT and the results that were acquired. The goal of this test entry was to complete a flow quality survey and aero-thermal calibration measurements in the test section of the IRT. Test hardware that was used includes the 2D Resistive Temperature Detector (RTD) array, 9-ft pressure survey rake, hot wire survey rake, and the quick check survey rake. This test hardware provides a map of the velocity, Mach number, total and static pressure, total temperature, flow angle and turbulence intensity. The data acquired were then reduced to examine pressure, temperature, velocity, flow angle, and turbulence intensity. Reduced data has been evaluated to assess how the facility meets flow quality goals. No icing conditions were tested as part of the aero-thermal calibration. However, the effects of the spray bar air injections on the flow quality and aero-thermal calibration measurements were examined as part of this calibration.

  11. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  12. Aero-thermal analysis of lifting body configurations in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2016-09-01

    The aero-thermal analysis of a hypersonic vehicle is of fundamental interest for designing its thermal protection system. The aero-thermal environment predictions over several critical regions of the hypothesized lifting body vehicle, including the stagnation region of the nose-cap, cylindrically swept leading edges, fuselage-upper, and fuselage-lower surfaces, are discussed. The drag (Λ=70°) and temperature (Λ=80°) minimized sweepback angles are considered in the configuration design of the two hypothesized lifting body shape hypersonic vehicles. The main aim of the present study is to analyze and compare the aero-thermal characteristics of these two lifting body configurations at same heat capacity. Accordingly, a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation has been carried out at Mach number (M∞=7), H=35 km altitude with zero Angle of Attack. Finally, the material selection for thermal protection system based on these predictions and current methodology is described.

  13. Preparation, characterization, and photocatalytic activity of porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Baozhu; Zhang, Jinlong; Xiong, Tianqing; Wang, Tingting

    2014-02-01

    Porous AgBr@Ag and AgBrI@Ag plasmonic photocatalysts were synthesized by a multistep route, including a dealloying method to prepare porous Ag, a transformation from Ag to AgBr and AgBrI, and a photo-reduction process to form Ag nanoparticles on the surface of AgBr and AgBrI. It was found that the porous structure kept unchanged during Ag was transferred into AgBr, AgBrI, AgBr@Ag, and AgBrI@Ag. Both porous AgBr@Ag and porous AgBrI@Ag showed much higher visible-light photocatalytic activity than cubic AgBr@Ag for the degradation of methyl orange, which is because the interconnected pore channels not only provide more reactive sites but also favor the transportation of photo-generated electrons and holes. For AgBrI@Ag, AgBrI solid solution formed at the interface of AgBr and AgI, and the phase junction can effectively separate the photo-generated electrons and holes, favorable to the improvement of photocatalytic activity. The optimal I content for obtaining the highest activity is ∼10 at.%.

  14. Side-mounted IR window aero-optic and aerothermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, John E.; Welch, Charles T.; Sutton, George W.

    1999-07-01

    Addition of a side mounted IR seeker, to an existing missile design, introduces new issues involving the aerodynamic flow over the optical window and its near field effect on the ability of the seeker to view the target. Image aberration, distortion and boresight shift vary according to flow conditions and the thermal state of the window system. A detailed analysis of the aerodynamic flow and its aero-optic effect for a side mounted IR window was performed to quantify target image degradation, window heating and bending, and window structural failure probability due to aerothermal and aero-optical effects.

  15. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2004 and 2005 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pastor, Christine M.; Gonsalez, Jose C.; Curry, Monroe R., III

    2010-01-01

    A full aero-thermal calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel was completed in 2004 following the replacement of the inlet guide vanes upstream of the tunnel drive system and improvement to the facility total temperature instrumentation. This calibration test provided data used to fully document the aero-thermal flow quality in the IRT test section and to construct calibration curves for the operation of the IRT. The 2004 test was also the first to use the 2-D RTD array, an improved total temperature calibration measurement platform.

  16. Effect of cysteine and humic acids on bioavailability of Ag from Ag nanoparticles to a freshwater snail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Tasha Stoiber; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Isabelle Romer; Ruth Merrifeild; Jamie Lead

    2016-01-01

    Metal-based engineered nanoparticles (NPs) will undergo transformations that will affect their bioavailability, toxicity and ecological risk when released to the environment, including interactions with dissolved organic material. The purpose of this paper is to determine how interactions with two different types of organic material affect the bioavailability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Silver uptake rates by the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis were determined after exposure to 25 nmol l-1 of Ag as PVP AgNPs, PEG AgNPs or AgNO3, in the presence of either Suwannee River humic acid or cysteine, a high-affinity thiol-rich organic ligand. Total uptake rate of Ag from the two NPs was either increased or not strongly affected in the presence of 1 – 10 mg 1-1 humic acid. Humic substances contain relatively few strong ligands for Ag explaining their limited effects on Ag uptake rate. In contrast, Ag uptake rate was substantially reduced by cysteine. Three components of uptake from the AgNPs were quantified in the presence of cysteine using a biodynamic modeling approach: uptake of dissolved Ag released by the AgNPs, uptake of a polymer or large (>3kD) Ag-cysteine complex and uptake of the nanoparticle itself. Addition of 1:1 Ag:cysteine reduced concentrations of dissolved Ag, which contributed to, but did not fully explain the reductions in uptake. A bioavailable Ag-cysteine complex (> 3kD) appeared to be the dominant avenue of uptake from both PVP AgNPs and PEG AgNPs in the presence of cysteine. Quantifying the different avenues of uptake sets the stage for studies to assess toxicity unique to NPs.

  17. Aero-optic characteristics of turbulent compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckham, Christopher Mark

    promising results over a very wide range of Mach numbers and conditions when used to compare the current work as well as previous work by others, and may prove to be a crucial tool in the study of boundary layer aero-optic behavior.

  18. Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, S.; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, S.; Ginoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M. C.; Landing, W.; Liu, X.; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

    2011-08-01

    This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angström exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they

  19. Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.B.

    1984-02-28

    An internal combustion engine has a piston rack depending from each piston. This rack is connected to a power output shaft through a mechanical rectifier so that the power output shaft rotates in only one direction. A connecting rod is pivotally connected at one end to the rack and at the other end to the crank of a reduced function crankshaft so that the crankshaft rotates at the same angular velocity as the power output shaft and at the same frequency as the pistons. The crankshaft has a size, weight and shape sufficient to return the pistons back into the cylinders in position for the next power stroke.

  20. OC3 -- Benchmark Exercise of Aero-Elastic Offshore Wind Turbine Codes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Passon, P.; Kuhn, M.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Camp, T.; Larsen, T. J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper introduces the work content and status of the first international investigation and verification of aero-elastic codes for offshore wind turbines as performed by the "Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration" (OC3) within the "IEA Wind Annex XXIII -- Subtask 2".

  1. Application of Multihop Relay for Performance Enhancement of AeroMACS Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamali, Behnam; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    A new transmission technology, based on IEEE 802.16-2009 (WiMAX), is currently being developed for airport surface communications. A C-band spectrum allocation at 5091-5150 MHz has been created by ITU to carry this application. The proposed technology, known as AeroMACS, will be used to support fixed and mobile ground to ground applications and services. This article proposes and demonstrates that IEEE 802.16j-amendment-based WiMAX is most feasible for AeroMACS applications. This amendment introduces multihop relay as an optional deployment that may be used to provide additional coverage and/or enhance the capacity of the network. Particular airport surface radio coverage situations for which IEEE 802.16-2009-WiMAX provides resolutions that are inefficient, costly, or excessively power consuming are discussed. In all these cases, it is argued that 16j technology offers a much better alternative. A major concern about deployment of AeroMACS is interference to co-allocated applications such as the Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder link. Our initial simulation results suggest that no additional interference to MSS feeder link is caused by deployment of IEEE 802.16j-based AeroMACS.

  2. The aero optics effect on near space laser communication optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuan; Fu, Yuegang; Jiang, Huilin

    2013-08-01

    With the developing of the space laser communication link, the performance index including higher transfer speed, extending transfer distance, and environmental adaptability, all ask the system accuracy and indexes improving. Special the developing near space platform, its environmental is extremes, the near space drone and other airplane flight speed is very quickly from the subsonic to supersonic. The aero optics effect caused by high speed will generate a thin turbulent air layer. It affects the performance of laser communication optical system by laser light vibration, deviation and so on, further more affects the performance of laser communication system working performance, even can't communication. Therefore, for achieving optical system indexes, we need do more research in optical system near space aero optics environmental adaptability. In this paper, near space link environmental characteristic are researched. And on the base of the aero optics theory, computer simulating method is applied to analyze the relationship among the altitude, the flight speed and the image dispersion. The result shows that, the aero optics effect cannot be ignored when the terminal is in low altitude or is moving with supersonic speed. The effect must be taken into considered from overall design. The result will provide the basis of research design.

  3. Swept Blade Aero-Elastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-07-01

    A preprocessor for analyzing preswept wind turbines using the in-house aero-elastic tool coupled with a multibody dynamic simulator was developed. A baseline 10-kW small wind turbine with straight blades and various configurations that featured bend-torsion coupling via blade-tip sweep were investigated to study their impact on ultimate loads and fatigue damage equivalent loads.

  4. Aero-optic image degradation through Gaussian and non-Gaussian turbulent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Ven H.

    1993-09-01

    Propagation of electro-optical signals through a turbulent medium such as the atmosphere or the boundary/shear layer around an aircraft or a missile, causes image degradation. This paper examines the characteristics of such aero-optical degradation, including blur and strehl distribution. In particular, the effect of using different turbulence correlation approximations is analyzed.

  5. Real-time implementation of structural and aero-optical effects for hypervelocity missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rhoe A.; Krawczyk, Walter J.; Kircher, James R.; Trolier, James W.

    1996-05-01

    The Kinetic-kill-vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation Facility (KHILS), located at Eglin AFB FL, has been involved in the development and ground testing of Ballistic Missile Defense Organization hit-to-kill interceptor concepts for 10 years. Work is ongoing to characterize the implement hardware-in-the-loop models for missile `environment' effects that are associated with high speed flight in general and endo-atmospheric flight in particular. Two critical areas of interest in endo-atmospheric simulation are: (1) effects on the line-of-sight due to divert thruster firings and the resulting structural vibration, and (2) the line-of-sight aero-optical environment which can be influenced by heated missile flowfields, coolant layers, and thruster fringes. The structural and aero-optical effects manifest themselves as image jitter, blurring, boresight shifts, and increased background radiance. At the KHILS facility, real-time closed-loop simulation techniques are being developed for structural and aero-optical effects presentation. These techniques include both software and hardware solutions. This paper describe the status of activities by describing the issues and the present KHILS solutions. The paper includes discussion of model interfaces with hardware-in-the-loop simulations, timing issues, and data transmittal bandwidth requirements. Image show the effects of structural and aero-optical disturbances on seeker focal plane energy distributions.

  6. 76 FR 60396 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Industries S.p.A. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... (AD) for certain Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes. This proposed AD results...

  7. 77 FR 67764 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request... Aero Industries S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes. That AD currently requires replacement of any...

  8. 76 FR 27872 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model P- 180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ] ACTION: Final... known U.S. owners and operators of PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A (Piaggio) Model PIAGGIO P-180 airplanes... fuselage on a number of Piaggio Model P.180 aeroplanes, which resulted in jamming of the flight...

  9. 76 FR 77369 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Industries S.p.A. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... Industries S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information.... For service information identified in this AD, contact Piaggio Aero Industries...

  10. Efficacy of predictive wavefront control for compensating aero-optical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorskey, David J.; Schmidt, Jason; Whiteley, Matthew R.

    2013-07-01

    Imaging and laser beam propagation from airborne platforms are degraded by dynamic aberrations due to air flow around the aircraft, aero-mechanical distortions and jitter, and free atmospheric turbulence. For certain applications, like dim-object imaging, free-space optical communications, and laser weapons, adaptive optics (AO) is necessary to compensate for the aberrations in real time. Aero-optical flow is a particularly interesting source of aberrations whose flowing structures can be exploited by adaptive and predictive AO controllers, thereby realizing significant performance gains. We analyze dynamic aero-optical wavefronts to determine the pointing angles at which predictive wavefront control is more effective than conventional, fixed-gain, linear-filter control. It was found that properties of the spatial decompositions and temporal statistics of the wavefronts are directly traceable to specific features in the air flow. Furthermore, the aero-optical wavefront aberrations at the side- and aft-looking angles were the most severe, but they also benefited the most from predictive AO.

  11. Dependence of AeroMACS Interference on Airport Radiation Pattern Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    AeroMACS (Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System), which is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard, is expected to be implemented in the 5091 to 5150 MHz frequency band. As this band is also occupied by Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. In this study, the cumulative interference power distribution at low earth orbit from AeroMACS transmitters at the 497 major airports in the contiguous United States was simulated with the Visualyse Professional software. The dependence of the interference power on the number of antenna beams per airport, gain patterns, and beam direction orientations was simulated. As a function of these parameters, the simulation results are presented in terms of the limitations on transmitter power required to maintain the cumulative interference power under the established threshold.

  12. Dependence of AeroMACS Interference on Airport Radiation Pattern Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    AeroMACS (Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System), which is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard, is expected to be implemented in the 5091-5150 MHz frequency band. As this band is also occupied by Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. In this study, the cumulative interference power distribution at low earth orbit from AeroMACS transmitters at the 497 major airports in the contiguous United States was simulated with the Visualyse Professional software. The dependence of the interference power on the number of antenna beams per airport, gain patterns, and beam direction orientations was simulated. As a function of these parameters, the simulation results are presented in terms of the limitations on transmitter power required to maintain the cumulative interference power under the established threshold.

  13. AERO: A Decision Support Tool for Wind Erosion Assessment in Rangelands and Croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloza, M.; Webb, N.; Herrick, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wind erosion is a key driver of global land degradation, with on- and off-site impacts on agricultural production, air quality, ecosystem services and climate. Measuring rates of wind erosion and dust emission across land use and land cover types is important for quantifying the impacts and identifying and testing practical management options. This process can be assisted by the application of predictive models, which can be a powerful tool for land management agencies. The Aeolian EROsion (AERO) model, a wind erosion and dust emission model interface provides access by non-expert land managers to a sophisticated wind erosion decision-support tool. AERO incorporates land surface processes and sediment transport equations from existing wind erosion models and was designed for application with available national long-term monitoring datasets (e.g. USDI BLM Assessment, Inventory and Monitoring, USDA NRCS Natural Resources Inventory) and monitoring protocols. Ongoing AERO model calibration and validation are supported by geographically diverse data on wind erosion rates and land surface conditions collected by the new National Wind Erosion Research Network. Here we present the new AERO interface, describe parameterization of the underpinning wind erosion model, and provide a summary of the model applications across agricultural lands and rangelands in the United States.

  14. Application of Multihop Relay for Performance Enhancement of AeroMACS Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamali, Behnam; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    A new transmission technology, based on IEEE 802.16-2009 (WiMAX), is currently being developed for airport surface communications. A C-band spectrum allocation at 5091 to 5150 MHz has been created by International Telecommunications Union (ITU) to carry this application. The proposed technology, known as AeroMACS, will be used to support fixed and mobile ground to ground applications and services. This article proposes and demonstrates that IEEE 802.16j-amendment-based WiMAX is most feasible for AeroMACS applications. This amendment introduces multihop relay as an optional deployment that may be used to provide additional coverage and/or enhance the capacity of the network. Particular airport surface radio coverage situations for which IEEE 802.16-2009-WiMAX provides resolutions that are inefficient, costly, or excessively power consuming are discussed. In all these cases, it is argued that 16j technology offers a much better alternative. A major concern about deployment of AeroMACS is interference to co-allocated applications such as the Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder link. Our initial simulation results suggest that no additional interference to MSS feeder link is caused by deployment of IEEE 802.16j-based AeroMACS.

  15. Turret optimization using passive flow control to minimize aero-optic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crahan, Grady C.

    Over the past several decades, optical systems have begun to be deployed regularly on aircraft that fly at compressible flow speeds. During this time, these optical systems have also moved towards shorter operating wavelengths that can deliver a higher peak irradiance in the focused spot on a distant target, and the assumption is that future systems will use even shorter-wavelength lasers. As this trend towards short-wavelength systems continues, the need to take into account the effect of flow-induced, or "aero-optic," aberrations that occur in the vicinity of the parent aircraft has become progressively more important. The conventional method for mounting an optical system is to place it in a hemispherical turret; however, from an aero-optic standpoint, there are two problems with this mounting arrangement. First, shocks begin to form on the surface of a sphere (or hemisphere) at a critical Mach number of only around 0.55. Furthermore, a shear layer is produced due to flow separation on the aft side of the sphere; both of these flows, shocks and separated shear layers, involve strong index-of-refraction variations in the flow that would severely aberrate the outgoing beam. One approach to the problem would be to employ adaptive-optic (AO) methods in which the conjugate of the aberration is applied to the outgoing beam before it transmits through the aero-optic flow; however, state-of-the-art AO systems are generally unable to match the high temporal frequencies associated with aero-optic flows. As such, there is a need for innovative mounting strategies for optical systems that avoid or mitigate the formation of optically-aberrating flows in the first place. This dissertation outlines an investigation into aerodynamic shaping of turrets to mitigate the aero-optic aberrations produced by shock waves and shear layers. Specifically, a computational and experimental investigation into the "virtual duct" concept, which is a passive flow-control approach to mitigating

  16. Dynamic Systems Analysis for Turbine Based Aero Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The aircraft engine design process seeks to optimize the overall system-level performance, weight, and cost for a given concept. Steady-state simulations and data are used to identify trade-offs that should be balanced to optimize the system in a process known as systems analysis. These systems analysis simulations and data may not adequately capture the true performance trade-offs that exist during transient operation. Dynamic systems analysis provides the capability for assessing the dynamic tradeoffs at an earlier stage of the engine design process. The dynamic systems analysis concept, developed tools, and potential benefit are presented in this paper. To provide this capability, the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) was developed to provide the user with an estimate of the closed-loop performance (response time) and operability (high pressure compressor surge margin) for a given engine design and set of control design requirements. TTECTrA along with engine deterioration information, can be used to develop a more generic relationship between performance and operability that can impact the engine design constraints and potentially lead to a more efficient engine.

  17. Understanding Aero-Fractures using optics and acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Zecevic, Megan; Daniel, Guillaume; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2016-04-01

    exponent p value around 0.5. An analytical model of overpressure diffusion predicting p = 0.5 and two other free parameters of the Omori Law (prefactor and origin time) is developed. The spatial density of the seismic events, and the time of end of formation of the channels can also be predicted using this developed model. Using direct simulations of acoustic emissions due to the air vibration in opening fractal cavities, the evolution in the power spectrum is investigated. 1. Turkaya S, Toussaint R, Eriksen FK, Zecevic M, Daniel G, Flekkøy EG, Måløy KJ. "Bridging aero-fracture evolution with the characteristics of the acoustic emissions in a porous medium." Front. Phys.3:70. 2015 doi: 10.3389/fphy.2015.00070

  18. Correlation tests of the engine performance parameter by using the detrended cross-correlation coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Keqiang; Gao, You; Jing, Liming

    2015-02-01

    The presence of cross-correlation in complex systems has long been noted and studied in a broad range of physical applications. We here focus on an aero-engine system as an example of a complex system. By applying the detrended cross-correlation (DCCA) coefficient method to aero-engine time series, we investigate the effects of the data length and the time scale on the detrended cross-correlation coefficients ρ DCCA ( T, s). We then show, for a twin-engine aircraft, that the engine fuel flow time series derived from the left engine and the right engine exhibit much stronger cross-correlations than the engine exhaust-gas temperature series derived from the left engine and the right engine do.

  19. Advanced Aero-Propulsive Mid-Lift-to-Drag Ratio Entry Vehicle for Future Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. H.; Stosaric, R. R; Cerimele, C. J.; Wong, K. A.; Valle, G. D.; Garcia, J. A.; Melton, J. E.; Munk, M. M.; Blades, E.; Kuruvila, G.; Picetti, D. J.; Hassan, B.; Kniskern, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is currently looking well into the future toward realizing Exploration mission possibilities to destinations including the Earth-Moon Lagrange points, Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the Moon. These are stepping stones to our ultimate destination Mars. New ideas will be required to conquer the significant challenges that await us, some just conceptions and others beginning to be realized. Bringing these ideas to fruition and enabling further expansion into space will require varying degrees of change, from engineering and integration approaches used in spacecraft design and operations, to high-level architectural capabilities bounded only by the limits of our ideas. The most profound change will be realized by paradigm change, thus enabling our ultimate goals to be achieved. Inherent to achieving these goals, higher entry, descent, and landing (EDL) performance has been identified as a high priority. Increased EDL performance will be enabled by highly-capable thermal protection systems (TPS), the ability to deliver larger and heavier payloads, increased surface access, and tighter landing footprints to accommodate multiple asset, single-site staging. In addition, realizing reduced cost access to space will demand more efficient approaches and reusable launch vehicle systems. Current operational spacecraft and launch vehicles do not incorporate the technologies required for these far-reaching missions and goals, nor what is needed to achieve the desired launch vehicle cost savings. To facilitate these missions and provide for safe and more reliable capabilities, NASA and its partners will need to make ideas reality by gaining knowledge through the design, development, manufacturing, implementation and flight testing of robotic and human spacecraft. To accomplish these goals, an approach is recommended for integrated development and implementation of three paradigm-shifting capabilities into an advanced entry vehicle system with additional application to launch

  20. Improvement of Aerodynamic Performance of the Aero-Train by Controlling Wing-Wing Interaction Using Single-Slotted Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Hee; Kohama, Yasuaki; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Kato, Takuma

    Aero-train is a new driving concept using aerodynamic technology under development by the Kohama Laboratory, Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University. It employs the wing-in-ground effect to enable travel at high speeds over land. Aero-train makes use of the ground effects of lift and side force between the wings and a U-shaped guideway for stability. The main wings have vertical wings at the tips, which are arranged in tandem to regulate the roll and yaw stability in the U-shaped guideway. However, the vertical wings deteriorate the lift-to-drag ratio of the Aero-train by aerodynamic interaction with the main wings. The present study was performed to improve the aerodynamic performance of the Aero-train by controlling wing-wing interaction. Installation of a single-slotted flap on the wings considerably improved the aerodynamic performance of the wings.

  1. AGS experiments - 1994, 1995, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains the following information on the Brookhaven AGS Accelerator complex: FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; FY 1997 AGS schedule (working copy); AGS beams 1997; AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program (in progress); a listing of experiments by number; two-phage summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and listing of AGS experimenters begins here.

  2. Current Progress of a Finite Element Computational Fluid Dynamics Prediction of Flutter for the AeroStructures Test Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This progress report focuses on the use of the STructural Analysis RoutineS suite program, SOLIDS, input for the AeroStructures Test Wing. The AeroStructures Test Wing project as a whole is described. The use of the SOLIDS code to find the mode shapes of a structure is discussed. The frequencies, and the structural dynamics to which they relate are examined. The results of the CFD predictions are compared to experimental data from a Ground Vibration Test.

  3. Study on aero-optical effect of a hypersonic missile infrared image guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Zhao, Yuejin; Hu, Xinqi

    2009-11-01

    When a hypersonic missile with a side mounted IR seeker is launched in the atmosphere, a serious aero-optical effect is formed and affects the quality of the detector's imaging. And in the course of the missile flight time,aero-optical effects changes over time, which makes real-time, accurate correction of optical distortion becomes very difficult. Therefore, it is necessary to study the relationship between the optical distortion and time.In this paper, Fluent,a computational fluid dynamics(CFD) internet applications is used to make researches on effect of optical transmission of the flow field outside the IR window. And a thermal finite element analysis (FEA) of an IR window is used to study the aerodynamic heat effect.

  4. Influence of aero-optical transmission on infrared imaging optical system in the supersonic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Meng, Weihua; Li, Yun; Dai, Xiaobing; Zuo, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Aero-optical transmission effect is becoming a crucial issue in the supersonic flight. In our study, the joint influences of the non-uniform aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamically heated optical window on imaging quality of an airborne infrared optical system are investigated in depth. Both the laminar and turbulent viscous models are used in the simulation of aerodynamic flow because of their distinct influences on aero-optical transmission. On the basis of the computed density field, the ray tracing method is applied to calculate the point spread functions of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamically heated window. The imaging quality is evaluated by using the point spread functions and modulation transfer functions. Experimental results show that the optical transmission through the aerodynamically heated window has a much severer influence on the imaging quality than that through the aerodynamic flow field.

  5. The aero-acoustic Galbrun equation in the time domain with perfectly matched layer boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Ben Tahar, Mabrouk; Baccouche, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a solution for aero-acoustic problems using the Galbrun equation in the time domain with a non-uniform steady mean flow in a two-dimensional coordinate system and the perfectly matched layer technique as the boundary conditions corresponding to an unbounded domain. This approach is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian description corresponding to a wave equation written only in terms of the Lagrangian perturbation of the displacement. It is an alternative to the Linearized Euler Equations for solving aero-acoustic problems. The Galbrun equation is solved using a mixed pressure-displacement Finite Element Method. A complex Laplace transform scheme is used to study the time dependent variables. Several numerical examples are presented to validate and illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach. PMID:26827028

  6. Computational Aero-acoustics As a Tool For Turbo-machinery Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will provide an overview of the field of computational aero-acoustics and its use in fan noise prediction. After a brief history of computational fluid dynamics, some of the recent developments in computational aero-acoustics will be explored. Computational issues concerning sound wave production, propagation, and reflection in practical turbo-machinery applications will be discussed including: (a) High order/High Resolution Numerical Techniques. (b) High Resolution Boundary Conditions. [c] MIMD Parallel Computing. [d] Form of Governing Equations Useful for Simulations. In addition, the basic design of our Broadband Analysis Stator Simulator (BASS) code and its application to a 2 D rotor wake-stator interaction will be shown. An example of the noise produced by the wakes from a rotor impinging upon a stator cascade will be shown.

  7. Global Mobile Satellite Service Interference Analysis for the AeroMACS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Hall, Ward; Phillips, Brent

    2013-01-01

    The AeroMACS (Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System), which is based on the IEEE 802.16-2009 mobile wireless standard, is envisioned as the wireless network which will cover all areas of airport surfaces for next generation air transportation. It is expected to be implemented in the 5091-5150 MHz frequency band which is also occupied by mobile satellite service uplinks. Thus the AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. Simulations using Visualyse software were performed utilizing a global database of 6207 airports. Variations in base station and subscriber antenna distribution and gain pattern were examined. Based on these simulations, recommendations for global airport base station and subscriber antenna power transmission limitations are provided.

  8. Nonlinear feedback guidance law for aero-assisted orbit transfer maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.

    1992-01-01

    Aero-assisted orbit transfer vehicles have the potential for significantly reducing the fuel requirements in certain classes of orbit transfer operations. Development of a nonlinear feedback guidance law for performing aero-assisted maneuvers that accomplish simultaneous change of all the orbital elements with least vehicle acceleration magnitude is discussed. The analysis is based on a sixth order nonlinear point-mass vehicle model with lift, bank angle, thrust and drag modulation as the control variables. The guidance law uses detailed vehicle aerodynamic and the atmosphere models in the feedback loop. Higher-order gravitational harmonics, planetary atmosphere rotation and ambient winds are included in the formulation. Due to modest computational requirements, the guidance law is implementable on-board an orbit transfer vehicle. The guidance performance is illustrated for three sets of boundary conditions.

  9. Influence of aero-optical disturbances on acquisition, tracking, and pointing performance characteristics in laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Matthew R.; Goorskey, David J.

    2011-05-01

    We have modeled the imaging performance of an acquisition, tracking, and pointing (ATP) sensor when operating on a high-speed aircraft platform through a turreted laser beam director/telescope. We applied standard scaling relations to wavefront sensor (WFS) data collected from the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory (AAOL) test platform operating at Mach 0.5 to model aero-optical aberrations for a λ = 1 μm wavelength laser system with a Dap = 30 cm aperture diameter and a 90 cm turret diameter on a platform operating at 30 kft and for speeds of Mach 0.4-0.8. Using these data, we quantified the imaging point spread function (PSF) for each aircraft speed. Our simulation results show Strehl ratios between 0.1-0.8 with substantial scattering of energy out to 7.5× the diffraction-limited core. Analysis of the imaging modulation transfer function (MTF) shows a rapid reduction of contrast for low-to-mid range spatial frequencies with increasing Mach number. Low modulation contrast at higher spatial frequencies limits imaging resolution to > 2× diffraction-limit at Mach 0.5 and approximately 5× diffraction-limit at Mach 0.8. Practical limits to usable spatial frequencies require higher image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the presence of aero-optical disturbances at high Mach number. Propagation of an illuminator laser through these aero-optical aberrations produces intensity modulation in the incident target illumination on scale sizes near the diffraction-limit of the transmitting laser aperture, thereby producing illumination artifacts which can degrade image-contrast-based tracking algorithms.

  10. Analysis of MMIC arrays for use in the ACTS Aero Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M.; Lee, R.; Rho, E.; Zaman, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The Aero Experiment is designed to demonstrate communication from an aircraft to an Earth terminal via the ACTS. This paper describes the link budget and antenna requirements for a 4.8 kbps full-duplex voice link at Ka-Band frequencies. Three arrays, one transmit array developed by TI and two receive arrays developed by GE and Boeing, were analyzed. The predicted performance characteristics of these arrays are presented and discussed in the paper.

  11. Composite adaptive control of belt polishing force for aero-engine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhsao, Pengbing; Shi, Yaoyao

    2013-09-01

    The existing methods for blade polishing mainly focus on robot polishing and manual grinding. Due to the difficulty in high-precision control of the polishing force, the blade surface precision is very low in robot polishing, in particular, quality of the inlet and exhaust edges can not satisfy the processing requirements. Manual grinding has low efficiency, high labor intensity and unstable processing quality, moreover, the polished surface is vulnerable to burn, and the surface precision and integrity are difficult to ensure. In order to further improve the profile accuracy and surface quality, a pneumatic flexible polishing force-exerting mechanism is designed and a dual-mode switching composite adaptive control(DSCAC) strategy is proposed, which combines Bang-Bang control and model reference adaptive control based on fuzzy neural network(MRACFNN) together. By the mode decision-making mechanism, Bang-Bang control is used to track the control command signal quickly when the actual polishing force is far away from the target value, and MRACFNN is utilized in smaller error ranges to improve the system robustness and control precision. Based on the mathematical model of the force-exerting mechanism, simulation analysis is implemented on DSCAC. Simulation results show that the output polishing force can better track the given signal. Finally, the blade polishing experiments are carried out on the designed polishing equipment. Experimental results show that DSCAC can effectively mitigate the influence of gas compressibility, valve dead-time effect, valve nonlinear flow, cylinder friction, measurement noise and other interference on the control precision of polishing force, which has high control precision, strong robustness, strong anti-interference ability and other advantages compared with MRACFNN. The proposed research achieves high-precision control of the polishing force, effectively improves the blade machining precision and surface consistency, and significantly reduces the surface roughness.

  12. The Effects of Manufacturing Tolerances on the Vibration of Aero-engine Rotor-damper Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, J. E. H.; Holmes, R.

    1991-01-01

    A range of rotor assemblies incorporating one and two squeeze film dampers with various static misalignments is investigated. Waterfall diagrams are constructed which demonstrate the effects of such misalignment and damper support flexibility on the nature and severity of subsynchronous resonance and jump phenomena. Vibration signatures of similar rotor-bearing assemblies are shown to contrast strongly due to different accumulations of tolerances during manufacture, fitting, and operation.

  13. Neutron diffraction residual stress studies for aero-engine component applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, K.; Small, C.

    1991-12-01

    Computer graphics for a presentation describing how Rolls-Royce is refining the method of residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction to suit the characteristic stress fields of components are presented. Results to date are given. An outline of how this residual stress data is to be used in developing stress models for critical rotating components is given.

  14. A Neural Network Aero Design System for Advanced Turbo-Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, Jose M.

    1999-01-01

    An inverse design method calculates the blade shape that produces a prescribed input pressure distribution. By controlling this input pressure distribution the aerodynamic design objectives can easily be met. Because of the intrinsic relationship between pressure distribution and airfoil physical properties, a neural network can be trained to choose the optimal pressure distribution that would meet a set of physical requirements. The neural network technique works well not only as an interpolating device but also as an extrapolating device to achieve blade designs from a given database. Two validating test cases are discussed.

  15. Process Improvement Through Tool Integration in Aero-Mechanical Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Clark

    2010-01-01

    Emerging capabilities in commercial design tools promise to significantly improve the multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary design and analysis coverage for aerospace mechanical engineers. This paper explores the analysis process for two example problems of a wing and flap mechanical drive system and an aircraft landing gear door panel. The examples begin with the design solid models and include various analysis disciplines such as structural stress and aerodynamic loads. Analytical methods include CFD, multi-body dynamics with flexible bodies and structural analysis. Elements of analysis data management, data visualization and collaboration are also included.

  16. National Aero-Space Plane team selects design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandebo, Stanley W.

    1990-10-01

    The selection of a design configuration for the NASP currently favors a directionally stable lifting body that incorporates dual stabilizers, short wings, and a two-man, dorsal crew compartment. The X-30 is expected to be 150-200 ft long and to have a takeoff gross weight of 250,000-300,000 lb. Three to five scramjet engines and a single 50,000 to 70,000 lb thrust rocket integrated into the airframe are expected to power the vehicle. The rocket will provide the X-30 with the burst of energy it will require to obtain orbital velocity and also to maneuver the craft out of earth orbit. Continuing propulsion and technical advances that include materials, aerodynamics, and simulations areas are being developed by program researchers. One of the most important achievements has been the progress made in locating the boundary-layer transition point on the NASP; engine, airframe integration, and flight-test issues are being addressed in separate study programs.

  17. Aero-servo-viscoelasticity theory: Lifting surfaces, plates, velocity transients, flutter, and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrett, Craig G.

    Modern flight vehicles are fabricated from composite materials resulting in flexible structures that behave differently from the more traditional elastic metal structures. Composite materials offer a number of advantages compared to metals, such as improved strength to mass ratio, and intentional material property anisotropy. Flexible aircraft structures date from the Wright brothers' first aircraft with fabric covered wooden frames. The flexibility of the structure was used to warp the lifting surface for flight control, a concept that has reappeared as aircraft morphing. These early structures occasionally exhibited undesirable characteristics during flight such as interactions between the empennage and the aft fuselage, or control problems with the elevators. The research to discover the cause and correction of these undesirable characteristics formed the first foray into the field of aeroelasticity. Aeroelasticity is the intersection and interaction between aerodynamics, elasticity, and inertia or dynamics. Aeroelasticity is well suited for metal aircraft, but requires expansion to improve its applicability to composite vehicles. The first is a change from elasticity to viscoelasticity to more accurately capture the solid mechanics of the composite material. The second change is to include control systems. While the inclusion of control systems in aeroelasticity lead to aero-servo-elasticity, more control possibilities exist for a viscoelastic composite material. As an example, during the lay-up of carbon-epoxy plies, piezoelectric control patches are inserted between different plies to give a variety of control options. The expanded field is called aero-servo-viscoelasticity. The phenomena of interest in aero-servo-viscoelasticity are best classified according to the type of structure considered, either a lifting surface or a panel, and the type of dynamic stability present. For both types of structures, the governing equations are integral

  18. The AgNORs.

    PubMed

    Derenzini, M

    2000-04-01

    The structure and the function of interphase AgNORs and the importance of the "AgNOR" parameter in tumor pathology have been reviewed. Interphase AgNORs are structural-functional units of the nucleolus in which all the components necessary for ribosomal RNA synthesis are located. Two argyrophilic proteins involved in rRNA transcription and processing, nucleolin and nucleophosmin, are associated with interphase AgNORs and are responsible for their stainability with silver methods, thus allowing interphase AgNORs to be visulaized at light microscopic level, also in routine cyto-histopathological preparations. The number of interphase AgNORs is strictly related to rRNA transcriptional activity and, in continuously proliferating cells, to the rapidity of cell proliferation. Evaluation of the quantitative distribution of interphase AgNORs has been applied in tumor pathology both for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. The "AgNOR" parameter has been proved to represent a reliable tool for defining the clinical outcome of cancer disease, being an independent prognostic factor in many types of tumors. PMID:10588056

  19. AgRISTARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    An introduction to the overall AgRISTARS program, a general statement on progress, and separate summaries of the activities of each project, with emphasis on the technical highlights are presented. Organizational and management information on AgRISTARS is included in the appendices, as is a complete bibliography of publication and reports.

  20. Solar Tower Experiments for Radiometric Calibration and Validation of Infrared Imaging Assets and Analysis Tools for Entry Aero-Heating Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Horvath, Thomas J.; Mercer, David C.; Ghanbari, Cheryl M.; Ross, Martin N.; Tietjen, Alan; Schwartz, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsored Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurements assessment team has a task to perform radiometric calibration and validation of land-based and airborne infrared imaging assets and tools for remote thermographic imaging. The IR assets and tools will be used for thermographic imaging of the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry aero-heating to provide flight boundary layer transition thermography data that could be utilized for calibration and validation of empirical and theoretical aero-heating tools. A series of tests at the Sandia National Laboratories National Solar Thermal Test Facility were designed for this task where reflected solar radiation from a field of heliostats was used to heat a 4 foot by 4 foot test panel consisting of LI 900 ceramic tiles located on top of the 200 foot tall Solar Tower. The test panel provided an Orbiter-like entry temperature for the purposes of radiometric calibration and validation. The Solar Tower provided an ideal test bed for this series of radiometric calibration and validation tests because it had the potential to rapidly heat the large test panel to spatially uniform and non-uniform elevated temperatures. Also, the unsheltered-open-air environment of the Solar Tower was conducive to obtaining unobstructed radiometric data by land-based and airborne IR imaging assets. Various thermocouples installed on the test panel and an infrared imager located in close proximity to the test panel were used to obtain surface temperature measurements for evaluation and calibration of the radiometric data from the infrared imaging assets. The overall test environment, test article, test approach, and typical test results are discussed.

  1. Results of Aero/Acoustic Tests and Analytical Studies of a Two-Dimensional Eight-Lobe Mixer-Ejector Exhaust Nozzle at Takeoff Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas (Technical Monitor); Schweiger, P.; Stern, A.; Gamble, E.; Barber, T.; Chiappetta, L.; LaBarre, R.; Salikuddin, M.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R.

    2005-01-01

    Hot flow aero-acoustic tests were conducted with Pratt & Whitney's High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) Mixer-Ejector Exhaust Nozzles by General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) in the GEAE Anechoic Freejet Noise Facility (Cell 41) located in Evendale, Ohio. The tests evaluated the impact of various geometric and design parameters on the noise generated by a two-dimensional (2-D) shrouded, 8-lobed, mixer-ejector exhaust nozzle. The shrouded mixer-ejector provides noise suppression by mixing relatively low energy ambient air with the hot, high-speed primary exhaust jet. Additional attenuation was obtained by lining the shroud internal walls with acoustic panels, which absorb acoustic energy generated during the mixing process. Two mixer designs were investigated, the high mixing "vortical" and aligned flow "axial", along with variations in the shroud internal mixing area ratios and shroud length. The shrouds were tested as hardwall or lined with acoustic panels packed with a bulk absorber. A total of 21 model configurations at 1:11.47 scale were tested. The models were tested over a range of primary nozzle pressure ratios and primary exhaust temperatures representative of typical HSCT aero thermodynamic cycles. Static as well as flight simulated data were acquired during testing. A round convergent unshrouded nozzle was tested to provide an acoustic baseline for comparison to the test configurations. Comparisons were made to previous test results obtained with this hardware at NASA Glenn's 9- by 15-foot low-speed wind tunnel (LSWT). Laser velocimetry was used to investigate external as well as ejector internal velocity profiles for comparison to computational predictions. Ejector interior wall static pressure data were also obtained. A significant reduction in exhaust system noise was demonstrated with the 2-D shrouded nozzle designs.

  2. AGS experiments: 1993 - 1994 - 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1996-04-01

    This report contains: FY 1995 AGS Schedule as Run; FY 1996-97 AGE Schedule (working copy); AGS Beams 1995; AGS Experimental Area FY 1993 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1994 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1995 Physics Program; AGS Experimental Area FY 1996 Physics Program (In progress); A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Listing of publications of AGS experiments begins here; and Listing of AGS experimenters begins here. This is the twelfth edition.

  3. Crystal spectroscopy of silicon aero-gel end-caps driven by a dynamic hohlraum on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James E.; Gilliland, Terrance Leo; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Lake, Patrick Wayne; Nash, Thomas J.; Idzorek, George C.; Apruzese, John P.; Moore, Tracy Croft; McKenney, John Lee; Torres, Jose A.; Schroen, Diana Grace; Jobe, Daniel Olarry; Chrien, Robert E.; Nielsen, Daniel Scott; Mock, Raymond Cecil; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Leeper, Ramon Joe; McGurn, John Stephen; Peterson, Darrell L.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Lucas, Joshua M.; Watt, Robert G.; Russell, Christopher Owen; Seamen, Johann Franz

    2003-07-01

    We present results from crystal spectroscopic analysis of silicon aero-gel foams heated by dynamic hohlraums on Z. The dynamic hohlraum on Z creates a radiation source with a 230-eV average temperature over a 2.4-mm diameter. In these experiments silicon aero-gel foams with 10-mg/cm{sup 3} densities and 1.7-mm lengths were placed on both ends of the dynamic hohlraum. Several crystal spectrometers were placed both above and below the z-pinch to diagnose the temperature of the silicon aero-gel foam using the K-shell lines of silicon. The crystal spectrometers were (1) temporally integrated and spatially resolved, (2) temporally resolved and spatially integrated, and (3) both temporally and spatially resolved. The results indicate that the dynamic hohlraum heats the silicon aero-gel to approximately 150-eV at peak power. As the dynamic hohlraum source cools after peak power the silicon aero-gel continues to heat and jets axially at an average velocity of approximately 50-cm/{micro}s. The spectroscopy has also shown that the reason for the up/down asymmetry in radiated power on Z is that tungsten enters the line-of-sight on the bottom of the machine much more than on the top.

  4. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  5. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  6. Static and Wind Tunnel Aero-Performance Tests of NASA AST Separate Flow Nozzle Noise Reduction Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, Kevin L.; McDonald, Timothy J.; Saiyed, Naseem (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the results of cold flow model tests to determine the static and wind tunnel performance of several NASA AST separate flow nozzle noise reduction configurations. The tests were conducted by Aero Systems Engineering, Inc., for NASA Glenn Research Center. The tests were performed in the Channels 14 and 6 static thrust stands and the Channel 10 transonic wind tunnel at the FluiDyne Aerodynamics Laboratory in Plymouth, Minnesota. Facility checkout tests were made using standard ASME long-radius metering nozzles. These tests demonstrated facility data accuracy at flow conditions similar to the model tests. Channel 14 static tests reported here consisted of 21 ASME nozzle facility checkout tests and 57 static model performance tests (including 22 at no charge). Fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.4 to 2.0, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Channel 10 wind tunnel tests consisted of 15 tests at Mach number 0.28 and 31 tests at Mach 0.8. The sting was checked out statically in Channel 6 before the wind tunnel tests. In the Channel 6 facility, 12 ASME nozzle data points were taken and 7 model data points were taken. In the wind tunnel, fan nozzle pressure ratio varied from 1.73 to 2.8, and fan to core total pressure ratio varied from 1.0 to 1.19. Core to fan total temperature ratio was 1.0. Test results include thrust coefficients, thrust vector angle, core and fan nozzle discharge coefficients, total pressure and temperature charging station profiles, and boat-tail static pressure distributions in the wind tunnel.

  7. Active Control of Engine Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    Active control can alleviate design constraints and improve the response to operational requirements in gas turbines. The Course presented the state-of-the-art including experimental, theoretical knowledge and practical information. Topics treated: stability characteristics; active control approaches; robustness and fundamental limits; combustion systems processes; combustor dynamics; compression system dynamics models; diagnostics and control of compression instabilities; sensor and actuator architectures; R&D needs of future prospects. The course has shown that for combustion systems, as well as in actuator and sensor technologies the active control approach is a viable option even at full scale with potential for aero engines and air breathing missiles.

  8. Predicting vibratory stresses from aero-acoustic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Matthew D.

    Sonic fatigue has been a concern of jet aircraft engineers for many years. As engines become more powerful, structures become more lightly damped and complex, and materials become lighter, stiffer, and more complicated, the need to understand and predict structural response to aeroacoustic loads becomes more important. Despite decades of research, vibration in panels caused by random pressure loads, such as those found in a supersonic jet, is still difficult to predict. The work in this research improves on current prediction methods in several ways, in particular for the structural response due to wall pressures induced by supersonic turbulent flows. First, solutions are calculated using time-domain input pressure loads that include shock cells and their interaction with turbulent flow. The solutions include both mean (static) and oscillatory components. Second, the time series of stresses are required for many fatigue assessment counting algorithms. To do this, a method is developed to compute time-dependent solutions in the frequency domain. The method is first applied to a single-degree-of-freedom system. The equations of motion are derived and solved in both the frequency domain and the time domain. The pressure input is a random (broadband) signal representative of jet flow. The method is then applied to a simply-supported beam vibrating in flexure using a line of pressure inputs computed with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A modal summation approach is used to compute structural response. The coupling between the pressure field and the structure, through the joint acceptance, is reviewed and discussed for its application to more complicated structures. Results from the new method and from a direct time domain method are compared for method verification. Because the match is good and the new frequency domain method is faster computationally, it is chosen for use in a more complicated structure. The vibration of a two-dimensional panel loaded by jet

  9. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  10. Development and Validation of a New Blade Element Momentum Skewed-Wake Model within AeroDyn: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, S. A.; Hayman, G.; Damiani, R.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-12-01

    Blade element momentum methods, though conceptually simple, are highly useful for analyzing wind turbines aerodynamics and are widely used in many design and analysis applications. A new version of AeroDyn is being developed to take advantage of new robust solution methodologies, conform to a new modularization framework for National Renewable Energy Laboratory's FAST, utilize advanced skewed-wake analysis methods, fix limitations with previous implementations, and to enable modeling of highly flexible and nonstraight blades. This paper reviews blade element momentum theory and several of the options available for analyzing skewed inflow. AeroDyn implementation details are described for the benefit of users and developers. These new options are compared to solutions from the previous version of AeroDyn and to experimental data. Finally, recommendations are given on how one might select from the various available solution approaches.

  11. Fractional Order Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence - A More Accurate Modeling Methodology for Aero Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    The presentation covers a recently developed methodology to model atmospheric turbulence as disturbances for aero vehicle gust loads and for controls development like flutter and inlet shock position. The approach models atmospheric turbulence in their natural fractional order form, which provides for more accuracy compared to traditional methods like the Dryden model, especially for high speed vehicle. The presentation provides a historical background on atmospheric turbulence modeling and the approaches utilized for air vehicles. This is followed by the motivation and the methodology utilized to develop the atmospheric turbulence fractional order modeling approach. Some examples covering the application of this method are also provided, followed by concluding remarks.

  12. Structured grid generation using a CAD solid model for an aero-gas turbine combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, N.C.; Manners, A.P.

    1996-12-31

    An aero-gas turbine combustion system was used to demonstrate the problems of creating a single block structured grid suitable for CFD predictions from a designer`s parametric solid model. The solid model had to be filtered of sub-grid detail and computational fluid volumes generated from the solid model of the metal. Alternative methods of transferring the geometry from the CAD package to the grid generator were considered. The type and method of grid generation was found to influence all stages in manipulating the geometry.

  13. Aeronautical Satellite-Assisted Process for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT) Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Broadband satellite communications for aeronautics marries communication and network technologies to address NASA's goals in information technology base research and development, thereby serving the safety and capacity needs of the National Airspace System. This marriage of technology increases the interactivity between airborne vehicles and ground systems. It improves decision-making and efficiency, reduces operation costs, and improves the safety and capacity of the National Airspace System. To this end, a collaborative project called the Aeronautical Satellite Assisted Process for Information Exchange through Network Technologies, or Aero-SAPIENT, was conducted out of Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, during November and December 2000.

  14. Derivation of Aero-Induced Fluctuating Pressure Environments for Ares I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Michael Y.; Wilby, John F.

    2008-01-01

    A description is given of the external aero-inducted fluctuating pressure model which was fit and anchored to wind tunnel data from the past 40 years. This model is based upon the assumption that the flow around a vehicle can be divided into discrete flow zones with independent fluctuating pressure properties. The model is then used to derive fluctuating pressure environments during ascent for the Ares I-X test vehicle. A sensitivity study of the structural response to the spatial correlation of the fluctuating pressures is also performed.

  15. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  16. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40,000) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  17. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  18. Airborne Laser Laboratory departure from Kirtland Air Force Base and a brief history of aero-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrazis, Demos T.

    2013-07-01

    We discuss aspects of the development of the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Our discussion is historical in nature and consists of the text from a speech given on the occasion of the Airborne Laser Laboratory leaving Kirtland Air Force Base (AFB) to fly to Wright-Patterson AFB to become an exhibit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. The last part of the discussion concerns the inception of the study of aero-optics as an area of research and some of the milestones in the understanding of the causes and prediction of aero-optical effects.

  19. Dynamics of fine particles and photo-oxidants in the Eastern Mediterranean (SUB-AERO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, M.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Smolik, J.; Colbeck, I.; Kallos, G.; Drossinos, Y.; Zdimal, V.; Vecera, Z.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Mikuska, P.; Bryant, C.; Housiadas, C.; Spyridaki, A.; Astitha, Marina; Havranek, V.

    As part of the European project SUB-AERO, comprehensive aerosol and gaseous pollutant measurement campaigns were performed at the Finokalia station (July 2000 and January 2001) on the island of Crete (Greece) in combination with boat measurements in the eastern part of the Mediterranean area. The measurements were performed with the participation of nine European research institutions. The objective of the measurement campaigns was to evaluate and assess the spatial and temporal variability of photochemical pollutants and fine particles. The current overview paper presents the framework and main results of the measurements and modelling studies performed during the project. Extensive measurements of gaseous and atmospheric-aerosol physical, chemical and optical characteristics were performed during the measurement campaigns in conjunction with detailed chemical analyses of the aerosol species. Along with the experimental work mesoscale modelling, using a combination of the UAM-AERO air quality model together with the RAMS prognostic meteorological model, was used to reveal the dynamics of particulate matter and photo-oxidants. Furthermore, regional chemistry transport models were applied to determine the background and initial conditions for the mesoscale modelling.

  20. Aero-thermo-mechanical characteristics of imperfect shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hesham Hamed; Yoo, Hong Hee; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2009-08-01

    A nonlinear finite element model is provided to predict the static aero-thermal deflection and the vibration behavior of geometrically imperfect shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels under the combined effect of thermal and aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear governing equations are obtained using Marguerre curved plate theory and the principle of virtual work taking into account the temperature-dependence of material properties. The effect of large deflection is included in the formulation through the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations. The thermal load is assumed to be a steady-state constant-temperature distribution, whereas the aerodynamic pressure is modeled using the quasi-steady first-order piston theory. The Newton-Raphson iteration method is employed to obtain the nonlinear aero-thermal deflections, while an eigenvalue problem is solved at each temperature step and static aerodynamic load to predict the free vibration frequencies about the deflected equilibrium position. Finally, the nonlinear deflection and free vibration characteristics of a composite panel are presented, illustrating the effects of geometric imperfection, temperature rise, aerodynamic pressure, boundary conditions and shape memory alloy fiber embeddings on the panel response.

  1. Aerosciences, Aero-Propulsion and Flight Mechanics Technology Development for NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program, Vehicle Systems Research and Technology (VSR&T) project is pursuing technology advancements in aerothermodynamics, aeropropulsion and flight mechanics to enable development of future reusable launch vehicle (RLV) systems. The current design trade space includes rocket-propelled, hypersonic airbreathing and hybrid systems in two-stage and single-stage configurations. Aerothermodynamics technologies include experimental and computational databases to evaluate stage separation of two-stage vehicles as well as computational and trajectory simulation tools for this problem. Additionally, advancements in high-fidelity computational tools and measurement techniques are being pursued along with the study of flow physics phenomena, such as boundary-layer transition. Aero-propulsion technology development includes scramjet flowpath development and integration, with a current emphasis on hypervelocity (Mach 10 and above) operation, as well as the study of aero-propulsive interactions and the impact on overall vehicle performance. Flight mechanics technology development is focused on advanced guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) algorithms and adaptive flight control systems for both rocket-propelled and airbreathing vehicles.

  2. Development of the Abbott MATRIX Aero assay for the measurement of specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, R E; Anawis, M A; Bailey, M; Mangat, D; Frank, P M; Hrusovsky, I G; Hooyman, L; Putterman, C; Defreese, J D

    1991-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay has been developed for the quantitation of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in human serum to a panel of allergens. The assay system, called the Abbott MATRIX Aero, includes an instrument, reagents and test cell disposables. Each test cell contains fourteen airborne allergens individually localized on a nitrocellulose solid phase. Individual calibration curves for each allergen are established by the manufacturer and included in barcode form with each test kit. Stable factory calibration eliminates the need to establish a calibration curve with each assay run. The instrument automatically incubates, washes, and reads the test cell and prints each result, which ensures assay reproducibility and provides ease-of-use. Analysis of test results shows good agreement with another in vitro assay for specific IgE. The Abbott MATRIX Aero is a sensitive, reproducible and easy-to-use system for the measurement of specific IgE to a panel of fourteen allergens simultaneously using a single, small volume of serum. PMID:1806584

  3. Ultrasmall Magnetically Engineered Ag2Se Quantum Dots for Instant Efficient Labeling and Whole-Body High-Resolution Multimodal Real-Time Tracking of Cell-Derived Microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Ya; Chen, Gang; Gu, Yi-Ping; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Yu, Zi-Li; Tang, Bo; Zhao, Yi-Fang; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2016-02-17

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs) are natural carriers that can transport biological molecules between cells, which are expected to be promising delivery vehicles for therapeutic purposes. Strategies to label MVs are very important for investigation and application of MVs. Herein, ultrasmall Mn-magnetofunctionalized Ag2Se quantum dots (Ag2Se@Mn QDs) integrated with excellent near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging capabilities have been developed for instant efficient labeling of MVs for their in vivo high-resolution dual-mode tracking. The Ag2Se@Mn QDs were fabricated by controlling the reaction of Mn(2+) with the Ag2Se nanocrystals having been pretreated in 80 °C NaOH solution, with an ultrasmall size of ca. 1.8 nm, water dispersibility, high NIR fluorescence quantum yield of 13.2%, and high longitudinal relaxivity of 12.87 mM(-1) s(-1) (almost four times that of the commercial contrast agent Gd-DTPA). The ultrasmall size of the Ag2Se@Mn QDs enables them to be directly and efficiently loaded into MVs by electroporation, instantly and reliably conferring both NIR fluorescence and MR traceability on MVs. Our method for labeling MVs of different origins is universal and free of unfavorable influence on intrinsic behaviors of MVs. The complementary imaging capabilities of the Ag2Se@Mn QDs have made the long-term noninvasive whole-body high-resolution dual-mode tracking of MVs in vivo realized, by which the dynamic biodistribution of MVs has been revealed in a real-time and in situ quantitative manner. This work not only opens a new window for labeling with QDs, but also facilitates greatly the investigation and application of MVs. PMID:26804745

  4. Aero-optical effects of an optical seeker with a supersonic jet for hypersonic vehicles in near space.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guangming; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-10

    The aero-optical effects of an optical seeker with a supersonic jet for hypersonic vehicles in near space were investigated by three suites of cases, in which the altitude, angle of attack, and Mach number were varied in a large range. The direct simulation Monte Carlo based on the Boltzmann equation was used for flow computations and the ray-tracing method was used to simulate beam transmission through the nonuniform flow field over the optical window. Both imaging displacement and phase deviation were proposed as evaluation parameters, and along with Strehl ratio they were used to quantitatively evaluate aero-optical effects. The results show that aero-optical effects are quite weak when the altitude is greater than 30 km, the imaging displacement is related to the incident angle of a beam, and it is minimal when the incident angle is approximately 15°. For reducing the aero-optical effects, the optimal location of an aperture should be in the middle of the optical window. PMID:27409034

  5. 75 FR 67639 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Industries S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... maintenance requirements and/or airworthiness limitations developed by Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A....

  6. 76 FR 10224 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... this AD, contact Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A., Via Cibrario, 4-16154 Genoa, Italy; phone: +39 010... NPRM was published in the Federal Register on November 3, 2010 (75 FR 67639). That NPRM proposed...

  7. 75 FR 68172 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a... Industries S.p.A. Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... identified in this AD, contact Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.a., Via Cibrario, 4-16154 Genoa, Italy; phone:...

  8. 75 FR 904 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Directive (AD) 2009-21-08, which applies to PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A. (Piaggio) Model PIAGGIO P-180... as AD 2009-21-08. As of December 14, 2009 (74 FR 57561, November 9, 2009), the Director of...

  9. Development of a temporal evolution model for aero-optical effects caused by vortices in the supersonic mixing layer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guangming; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The vortices inside mixing layers impose remarkable aero-optical distortions on a beam even at moderate subsonic speeds. Knowledge about aero-optical effects caused by vortices in the flow field, especially their spatial and temporal evolution, is limited for supersonic mixing layers because the flows have very high speeds. In this paper, the temporal evolution of aero-optical effects caused by vortices in the supersonic mixing layer was investigated. A large eddy simulation was used to simulate the supersonic flow. A novel approach, coordinate extraction of vortex core, which is based on the relationship between vortices and the profile of the optical path length over the flow field, was proposed to quantitatively calculate the radii and convective speeds of vortices. A model used to quantitatively describe the temporal evolution of aero-optical effects caused by vortices in the supersonic mixing layer was developed and validated with data of numerical calculation. The results indicated that the model is available. Finally, several conclusions drawn from this work were presented. PMID:27139676

  10. Results From Simulations of an Ensemble of Global Aerosol Models Using the Same Emission Data Within AeroCom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Textor, C.; Schulz, M.; Guibert, S.; Kinne, S.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in many important environmental issues including stratospheric ozone depletion, smog, acid rain, and climate change. The AeroCom exercise aims to identify weak components in aerosol modeling and to decrease the uncertainty of aerosol radiative forcing. AeroCom is an open international initiative of scientists interested in the advancement of the understanding of the global aerosol and its impact on climate. A variety of observations and simulation results from 16 global aerosol models have been assembled in the frame of AeroCom. In this study, results from two series of experiments are presented. In a first experiment, each model was run with different emission data. In a second experiment, all models used the same emission data sets. These data include temporal and spatial (including injection height) information, and particle sizes. We examine the parameters and processes that determine the aerosol fields and life cycles, and discuss new radiative forcing estimates from the AeroCom exercise. The diversities among the models for sea salt, dust, black carbon, particulate organic matter, and sulfate are quantified. We can show that harmonizing the emissions has little effect on the diversity among models.

  11. Acoustics and Thrust of Separate Flow Exhaust Nozzles With Mixing Devices Investigated for High Bypass Ratio Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, Naseem H.

    2000-01-01

    Typical installed separate-flow exhaust nozzle system. The jet noise from modern turbofan engines is a major contributor to the overall noise from commercial aircraft. Many of these engines use separate nozzles for exhausting core and fan streams. As a part of NASA s Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program, the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field led an experimental investigation using model-scale nozzles in Glenn s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. The goal of the investigation was to develop technology for reducing the jet noise by 3 EPNdB. Teams of engineers from Glenn, the NASA Langley Research Center, Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Corporation, the Boeing Company, GE Aircraft Engines, Allison Engine Company, and Aero Systems Engineering contributed to the planning and implementation of the test.

  12. Radiative Forcing of the Direct Aerosol Effect from AeroCom Phase II Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; vanNoije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 W m(sup-2), with a mean of -0.27 W m(sup-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 W m(sup-2). Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study.We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results

  13. Fiber-optic system for checking the acoustical parameters of gas-turbine engine flow-through passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Vasiliy Y.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Kuznetzov, Artem A.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we consider the integrated approach to development of the aero-acoustical methods for diagnostics of aircraft gas-turbine engine flow-through passages by using as the base the passive fiber-optic and location technologies.

  14. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seiel, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report

  15. A Summary of the Slush Hydrogen Technology Program for the National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnelis, Nancy B.; Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.; Kudlac, Maureen T.; Moran, Matthew E.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; Haberbusch, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    Slush hydrogen, a mixture of solid and liquid hydrogen, offers advantages of higher density (16 percent) and higher heat capacity (18 percent) than normal boiling point hydrogen. The combination of increased density and heat capacity of slush hydrogen provided a potential to decrease the gross takeoff weight of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) and therefore slush hydrogen was selected as the propellant. However, no large-scale data was available on the production, transfer and tank pressure control characteristics required to use slush hydrogen as a fuel. Extensive testing has been performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center K-Site and Small Scale Hydrogen Test Facility between 1990 and the present to provide a database for the use of slush hydrogen. This paper summarizes the results of this testing.

  16. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seidel, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the lowboom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural-aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report.

  17. User's manual for UCAP: Unified Counter-Rotation Aero-Acoustics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culver, E. M.; Mccolgan, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    This is the user's manual for the Unified Counter-rotation Aeroacoustics Program (UCAP), the counter-rotation derivative of the UAAP (Unified Aero-Acoustic Program). The purpose of this program is to predict steady and unsteady air loading on the blades and the noise produced by a counter-rotation Prop-Fan. The aerodynamic method is based on linear potential theory with corrections for nonlinearity associated with axial flux induction, vortex lift on the blades, and rotor-to-rotor interference. The theory for acoustics and the theory for individual blade loading and wakes are derived in Unified Aeroacoustics Analysis for High Speed Turboprop Aerodynamics and Noise, Volume 1 (NASA CR-4329). This user's manual also includes a brief explanation of the theory used for the modelling of counter-rotation.

  18. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Bernsten, T. K.; Bian, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; DeLuca, N.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, D.; Liu, X.; Mann, G. W.; Penner, J. E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, S. D.; Stier, P.; Tkemura, T.

    2014-01-01

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within-snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004 to 2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng/g for an earlier phase of AeroCom models (phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng/g for a more recent phase of AeroCom models (phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng/g. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model-measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90degN) atmospheric residence time for BC in phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates

  19. An AeroCom assessment of black carbon in Arctic snow and sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; De Luca, N.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Koch, D.; Liu, X.; Mann, G. W.; Penner, J. E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, S. D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; van Noije, T.; Yun, Y.; Zhang, K.

    2014-01-01

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea ice. In this paper, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within-snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004 to 2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g-1 for an earlier phase of AeroCom models (phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g-1 for a more recent phase of AeroCom models (phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g-1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60–90° N) atmospheric residence time for BC in phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with

  20. Highly flexible flight vehicle aeroelastic and aero-viscoelastic flutter issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2012-11-01

    Aeroelastic and aero-viscoelastic phenomena arising from the high flexibility of modern flight vehicles are examined, and governing relations are formulated and solved. In particular, the time dependent flight velocities associated with maneuvers and with in-plane bending are considered, which necessitate new derivations of the Theodorsen function, unsteady aerodynamic relations and equations of motion. Under these conditions, simple harmonic motion (SHM) is no longer achievable and different flutter criteria based directly on motion stability are presented. The viscoelastic problem is formulated in terms of integral partial differential equations with variable nonlinear coefficients. Their solutions and evaluations are discussed in detail. One interesting departure from linear responses emerged, which indicates flutter in one bending while the other bending mode and the torsional are both stable. A detailed and extended treatment of these subjects may be found in [1].

  1. Aero-Structural Optimization of HSCT Configurations in Transonic and Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso, Juan J.

    1999-01-01

    This document outlines the progress made under NASA Cooperative Research Agreement NCC2- 5226 for the period 10/01/97-09/30/98. The work statement originally proposed was meant to extend over the period of two complete years of which only one was funded. Consequently, only a portion of the goals were achieved. Similar work will continue in our group under different sponsorship and will be available in the form of conference and journal publications. The following sections summarize the technical accomplishments obtained during the last year. Details of these accomplishments can be found in the accompanying paper that was presented at the AIAA 37th Aerospace Sciences and Exhibit Meeting which was held in Reno, NV in January of this year. The original proposal outlined a research program meant to lay down the foundation for the development of high-fidelity, fully-coupled aerodynamic/structural optimization methods applicable to a variety of aerospace applications including the design optimization of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configurations. The necessary research and development work was divided into two main efforts which addressed the necessities of the long term goal. Initially, our experience in the simulation of unsteady aeroelastic flows was directly applied to existing aerodynamic optimization techniques in order to provide insight into the effects of aeroelastic deformations on the performance of aircraft which have been designed based on purely aerodynamic cost functions. The intention was to follow up this work with a detailed investigation into the basic research work that has to be completed for the development of an optimization framework which efficiently allows the truly coupled design of aero-structural systems. This follow-up effort was not funded. The outcome of our efforts during the past year was the development of a coupled aero-structural analysis and design environment that was applied to the design of a complete aircraft configuration.

  2. Integrated line-of-sight Modeling of the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, S.; Blackburn, J.; Thordahl, J.; Wittich, D.; Gordeyev, S.; Jumper, E.

    2013-09-01

    The Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory (AAOL) is a recently completed research effort to measure the effects of turbulent flow on the wavefront of a laser projected from an airplane in flight. The flight-test system consists of two Cessna Citation Bravo aircraft flying in formation at a distance of approximately 50 m. One aircraft projects a laser beam to the other aircraft which receives the beam using an inertially stabilized turret with a high bandwidth track loop. In addition to its benefit in providing a means for understanding and correcting optical wavefront distortion due to turbulence, AAOL also provides an ideal platform for predicting line-of-sight jitter and comparing it to measured results. AAOL has the essential elements of an airborne optical beam control system and is subject to relevant aero-loading, but operates at low power and provides a relatively inexpensive platform for collecting flight data. This paper presents the integrated AAOL line-of-sight model for prediction of optical jitter due to flight disturbances. To accomplish this, a dynamic simulation model was derived from a finite element model of the system, optical sensitivities and control loops for calculation of closed loop, line-of-sight jitter. Disturbance inputs include measured in-flight base loading and pressure loading on the turret generated from an unsteady computational fluid dynamics model. The influence of model uncertainty was also addressed by considering two separate models. The first model was based on the initial hardware design before hardware assembly. The second model was updated based on modal tests performed on the assembled flight hardware. Frequency-varying model uncertainty factors for both models required to accurately predict the measured flight data were calculated. Predicted results with and without model uncertainty factors will be compared with measured flight data from AAOL.

  3. Ka-band MMIC array system for ACTS aeronautical terminal experiment (Aero-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A.; Zakrajsek, Robert J.; Lee, Richard Q.; Andro, Monty; Turtle, John P.

    1995-01-01

    During the summer of 1994, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Aeronautical Terminal Experiment (Aero-X) was successfully completed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). 4.8 and 9.6 Kbps duplex voice links were established between the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS Link Evaluation Terminal (LET) in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS. The antenna system used in this demonstration was developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and US Air Force experimental arrays using GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The antenna system consisted of three arrays mounted inside the LeRC Learjet, pointing out through the windows. An open loop tracking controller developed by LeRC used information from the aircraft position and attitude sensors to automatically steer the arrays toward ACTS during flight JPL ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) system hardware was used as transceivers both on the aircraft and at the LET. The single 32 element MMIC transmit array developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments has an EIRP of 23.4 dBW at boresight. The two 20 GHz MMIC receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the USAF Rome Laboratory/Electronic System Center, taking advantage of existing USAF array development contracts with Boeing and Martin Marietta. The Boeing array has 23 elements and a G/T of 16/6 db/degK at boresight. The Martin Marietta array has 16 elements and a G/T of 16.1 db/degK at boresight. The three proof-of-concept arrays, the array control system and their integration and operation in the Learjet for Aero-X are described.

  4. Common aero vehicle autonomous reentry trajectory optimization satisfying waypoint and no-fly zone constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorris, Timothy R.

    2007-12-01

    To support the Air Force's Global Reach concept, a Common Aero Vehicle is being designed to support the Global Strike mission. "Waypoints" are specified for reconnaissance or multiple payload deployments and "no-fly zones" are specified for geopolitical restrictions or threat avoidance. Due to time critical targets and multiple scenario analysis, an autonomous solution is preferred over a time-intensive, manually iterative one. Thus, a real-time or near real-time autonomous trajectory optimization technique is presented to minimize the flight time, satisfy terminal and intermediate constraints, and remain within the specified vehicle heating and control limitations. This research uses the Hypersonic Cruise Vehicle (HCV) as a simplified two-dimensional platform to compare multiple solution techniques. The solution techniques include a unique geometric approach developed herein, a derived analytical dynamic optimization technique, and a rapidly emerging collocation numerical approach. This up-and-coming numerical technique is a direct solution method involving discretization then dualization, with pseudospectral methods and nonlinear programming used to converge to the optimal solution. This numerical approach is applied to the Common Aero Vehicle (CAV) as the test platform for the full three-dimensional reentry trajectory optimization problem. The culmination of this research is the verification of the optimality of this proposed numerical technique, as shown for both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional models. Additionally, user implementation strategies are presented to improve accuracy and enhance solution convergence. Thus, the contributions of this research are the geometric approach, the user implementation strategies, and the determination and verification of a numerical solution technique for the optimal reentry trajectory problem that minimizes time to target while satisfying vehicle dynamics and control limitation, and heating, waypoint, and no

  5. Study of aerodynamic technology for single-cruise-engine VSTOL fighter/attack aircraft, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, W. H.; Sheridan, A. E.; Smith, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual design and analysis on a single engine VSTOL fighter/attack aircraft is completed. The aircraft combines a NASA/deHavilland ejector with vectored thrust and is capable of accomplishing the mission and point performance of type Specification 169, and a flight demonstrator could be built with an existing F101/DFE engine. The aerodynamic, aero/propulsive, and propulsive uncertainties are identified, and a wind tunnel program is proposed to address those uncertainties associated with wing borne flight.

  6. Intercorrelated Superhybrid of AgBr Supported on Graphitic-C3N4-Decorated Nitrogen-Doped Graphene: High Engineering Photocatalytic Activities for Water Purification and CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Gan, Shiyu; Wang, Haoyu; Han, Dongxue; Niu, Li

    2015-11-18

    AgBr nanoparticles supported on graphitic-C3N4-decorated nitrogen-doped graphene intercorrelated ternary superhybrid composites (ACNNG-x) acting as a novel visible-light driven photocatalyst are reported. Because of the fast interfacial charge separation and photoelectrochemical performance, the representative of ACNNG-50 superhybrid structure achieves high efficiency and stable photocatalytic capability for organic contaminant degradation and CO2 reduction. PMID:26422111

  7. Freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ precursors to novel AgBr/AgCl-Ag hybrid nanocrystals for visible-light-driven photodegradation of organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deliang; Chen, Qianqian; Zhang, Wenjie; Ge, Lianfang; Shao, Gang; Fan, Bingbing; Lu, Hongxia; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Daoyuan; Shao, Guosheng

    2015-04-01

    AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals with various molar Br-to-Ag ratios (RBr/Ag = 0, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 1) and different photoreduction times (0-20 min) were synthesized via stepwise liquid-solid reactions using the freeze-dried PVP-Ag+ hybrid as the Ag source, followed by a photoreduction reaction. The AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals obtained take on a spherical morphology with a particle-size range of 58 ± 15 nm. The photocatalytic performance of AgBr/AgCl-Ag nanocrystals was evaluated by photodegrading organic dyes, 4-chlorophenol and isopropanol under artificial visible light (λ ⩾ 420 nm, 100 mW cm-2). For the decomposition of rhodamine B, the AgBr/AgCl-Ag7.5(1:2) nanocrystals has a photodegradation rate of ∼0.87 min-1, ∼159 times higher than that (∼0.0054 min-1) of TiO2 (P25), whereas the AgCl-Ag and AgBr-Ag nanocrystals have photodegradation rates of 0.35 min-1 and 0.45 min-1, respectively. The efficient separation of photogenerated electron-hole pairs in the ternary system consisting of AgBr, AgCl and Ag species plays a key role in the enhancement of photocatalytic performance.

  8. Ag K- and L3-edge XAFS study on Ag species in Ag/Ga2O3 photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Yoshida, T.; Yamamoto, N.; Nomoto, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, H.; Yagi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Ag loaded Ga2O3 (Ag/Ga2O3) shows photocatalytic activity for reduction of CO2 with water. Ag L3-edge XANES and K-edge EXAFS spectra were measured for various Ag/Ga2O3 samples, which suggested that structural and chemical states of Ag species varied with the loading amount of Ag and the preparation method. The Ag species were metallic Ag particles with an AgGaO2-like interface structure in the sample with high loading amount of Ag while predominantly Ag metal clusters in the sample with low loading amount of Ag. The XANES feature just above the edge represented the interaction between the Ag species and the Ga2O3 surface, showing that the Ag metal clusters had more electrons in the d-orbitals by interacting with the Ga2O3 surface, which would contribute the high photocatalytic activity.

  9. THE RHIC/AGS ONLINE MODEL ENVIRONMENT: DESIGN AND OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect

    SATOGATA,T.; BROWN,K.; PILAT,F.; TAFTI,A.A.; TEPIKIAN,S.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    1999-03-29

    An integrated online modeling environment is currently under development for use by AGS and RHIC physicists and commissioners. This environment combines the modeling efforts of both groups in a CDEV [1] client-server design, providing access to expected machine optics and physics parameters based on live and design machine settings. An abstract modeling interface has been designed as a set of adapters [2] around core computational modeling engines such as MAD and UAL/Teapot++ [3]. This approach allows us to leverage existing survey, lattice, and magnet infrastructure, as well as easily incorporate new model engine developments. This paper describes the architecture of the RHIC/AGS modeling environment, including the application interface through CDEV and general tools for graphical interaction with the model using Tcl/Tk. Separate papers at this conference address the specifics of implementation and modeling experience for AGS and RHIC.

  10. AGS experiments -- 1995, 1996 and 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.; Presti, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    This report contains (1) FY 1995 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1996 AGS schedule as run; (3) FY 1997 AGS schedule as run; (4) FY 1998--1999 AGS schedule (proposed); (5) AGS beams 1997; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1995 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1996 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1997 physics program; (9) AGS experimental area FY 1998--1999 physics program (proposed); (10) a listing of experiments by number; (11) two-page summaries of each experiment, in order by number; and (12) listing of publications of AGS experiments.

  11. AGS experiments -- 1991, 1992, 1993. Tenth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains: (1) FY 1993 AGS schedule as run; (2) FY 1994--95 AGS schedule; (3) AGS experiments {ge} FY 1993 (as of 30 March 1994); (4) AGS beams 1993; (5) AGS experimental area FY 1991 physics program; (6) AGS experimental area FY 1992 physics program; (7) AGS experimental area FY 1993 physics program; (8) AGS experimental area FY 1994 physics program (planned); (9) a listing of experiments by number; (10) two-page summaries of each experiment; (11) listing of publications of AGS experiments; and (12) listing of AGS experiments.

  12. Destabilization of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) by adsorbed sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Mingmin; Russell, Selena M.; Liu, Da-Jiang; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2011-10-17

    Sulfur accelerates coarsening of Ag nanoislands on Ag(100) at 300 K, and this effect is enhanced with increasing sulfur coverage over a range spanning a few hundredths of a monolayer, to nearly 0.25 monolayers. We propose that acceleration of coarsening in this system is tied to the formation of AgS{sub 2} clusters primarily at step edges. These clusters can transport Ag more efficiently than can Ag adatoms (due to a lower diffusion barrier and comparable formation energy). The mobility of isolated sulfur on Ag(100) is very low so that formation of the complex is kinetically limited at low sulfur coverages, and thus enhancement is minimal. However, higher sulfur coverages force the population of sites adjacent to step edges, so that formation of the cluster is no longer limited by diffusion of sulfur across terraces. Sulfur exerts a much weaker effect on the rate of coarsening on Ag(100) than it does on Ag(111). This is consistent with theory, which shows that the difference between the total energy barrier for coarsening with and without sulfur is also much smaller on Ag(100) than on Ag(111).

  13. CONSIDERATIONS ON ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF LYMPH VESSELS OF UPPER AERO DIGESTIVE ORGANS AND CERVICAL SATELLITE LYMPH NODE GROUP.

    PubMed

    Ciupilan, Corina; Stan, C I

    2016-01-01

    The almost constant local regional development of the cancers of upper aero digestive organs requires the same special attention to cervical lymph node metastases, as well as to the primary neoplastic burning point. The surgical therapy alone or associated has a mutilating, damaging character, resulting in loss of an organ and function, most of the times with social implications, involving physical distortions with aesthetic consequences, which make the reintegration of the individual into society questionable. The problem of cervical lymph node metastases is vast and complex, reason why we approached several anatomical and physiological aspects of lymph vessels of the aero digestive organs. Among the available elements during treatment, the headquarters of the tumour, its histologic degree, and its infiltrative nature, each of them significantly influences the possibility of developing metastases. PMID:27483727

  14. AGS preinjector improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, H.N.; Brodowski, J.; Gough, R.; Kponou, A.; Prelec, K.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Witkover, R.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, a polarized H/sup -/ source was installed to permit the acceleration of polarized protons in the AGS, using a low current, 750 keV RFQ Linear Accelerator as the preinjector. This RFQ was designed by LANL and has proved to be quite satisfactory and reliable. In order to improve the reliability and simplify maintenance of the overall AGS operations, it has been decided to replace one of the two 750 keV Cockcroft-Waltons (C-W) with an RFQ. The design of a new high current RFQ has been carried out by LBL and is also being constructed there. This paper describes the preinjector improvement project, centered around that RFQ, which is underway at BNL.

  15. Ultra-efficient Engine Diameter Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daggett, David L.; Brown, Stephen T.; Kawai, Ron T.

    2003-01-01

    Engine fan diameter and Bypass Ratio (BPR) optimization studies have been conducted since the beginning of the turbofan age with the recognition that reducing the engine core jet velocity and increasing fan mass flow rate generally increases propulsive efficiency. However, performance tradeoffs limit the amount of fan flow achievable without reducing airplane efficiency. This study identifies the optimum engine fan diameter and BPR, given the advanced Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) powerplant efficiencies, for use on an advanced subsonic airframe. Engine diameter studies have historically focused on specific engine size options, and were limited by existing technology and transportation infrastructure (e.g., ability to fit bare engines through aircraft doors and into cargo holds). This study is unique in defining the optimum fan diameter and drivers for future 2015 (UEET) powerplants while not limiting engine fan diameter by external constraints. This report follows on to a study identifying the system integration issues of UEET engines. This Engine Diameter study was managed by Boeing Phantom Works, Seattle, Washington through the NASA Glenn Revolutionary Aero Space Engine Research (RASER) contract under task order 10. Boeing Phantom Works, Huntington Beach, completed the engine/airplane sizing optimization, while the Boeing Commercial Airplane group (BCA) provided design oversight. A separate subcontract to support the overall project was issued to Tuskegee University.

  16. Cost effective aero-photogrammetry toys at active volcanoes: On the use of drones, balloons and kites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Thomas R.

    2014-05-01

    The availability of aerial photographs allows spatial mapping of flows and fractures, generation of digital elevation models and other change detection. Therefore aerial photographs significantly improve our understanding of volcanic processes. The common problem is the lack of available data for most volcanoes, and the lack of systematic and chronologic repeat surveys. This work summarizes the current state of knowledge and technical implementations that currently revolutionize the field of aero-photogrammetry. By the use of unmanned vehicles, such as octocopters, helicopters and small airplanes, photo data can be acquired from almost any place at distances up to kilometres from the operator. Moreover, by the use of helium balloons, kites or their hybrid helikites, near field aero-photographs are obtained. In combination with modern stitching procedures and computer vision algorithms, the positioning of the camera and the digital elevation model of the ground can be extracted, and the active volcano and its eruption cloud be imaged from almost any perspective. This field is increasingly gaining flexibility, as lightweight cameras are available from visible, infrared and other spectral bands. Here example data are provided from volcanoes that are difficult to access by regular airplanes, showing the strengths and the limits of these new aero-photogrammetry toys.

  17. Control of turbulent flow over an articulating turret for reduction of adverse aero-optic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    Force Research Laboratory wind tunnel at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Direct measurements of the aero-optic effects were taken via a Malley probe at a fixed pitch angle with and without suction control at a Mach number 0.3, and a corresponding Reynolds number of 2,000,000. Reduction of the aero-optic effects in this test demonstrated that suction control is a practical control input to reduce the near field wavefront abberations due to the turbulent flow over the aperture.

  18. Minimum energy-loss guidance for aero-assisted orbital plane change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, D. G.; Giltner, J. M.; Speyer, J. L.; Mapar, J.

    1984-01-01

    Minimum energy-loss guidance for the aero-assisted plane change of an orbiting vehicle is developed and applied to the plane change of a circular orbit. First, trajectories which minimize the fuel required to change the orbital plane are computed for a realistic vehicle. From these trajectories, it is observed that the fuel weight is minimized if the velocity at exit from the atmosphere is maximized. Next, for the atmospheric turn, approximate optimal controls (angle of attack and bank angle) which maximize the exit velocity are derived. Finally, the minimum-fuel problem is resolved using optimal guidance for the atmospheric part of the trajectory, and the optimization problem reduces to a one-dimensional parameter minimization. Successful plane changes up to 40 deg are demonstrated. Optimal guidance requires up to 14 percent more fuel than the 'true' optimum but only 50 percent of the fuel required by the single-impulse maneuver. Finally, the guidance law developed here is implementable because only algebraic manipulations are required.

  19. KC-135 aero-optical turbulent boundary layer/shear layer experiment revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J.; Allen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers are examined. The data present comparisons from observed optical performance with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microsecond temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite aperture time averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q switched Nd:Yag double pulsed laser, and a holographic camera which recorded the random flow field in a double pass, double pulse mode. Aerodynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theoretical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered.

  20. An AeroCom Initial Assessment - Optical Properties in Aerosol Component Modules of Global Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.; Textor, C.; Guibert, S.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Berglen, T.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, H.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Grini, A.; Hendricks, J.; Herzog, M.; Horrowitz, L.; Isaksen, I.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Krol, M.; Lauer, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lesins, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, U.; Montanaro, V.; Myhre, G.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tie, X.

    2006-05-29

    The AeroCom exercise diagnoses multi-component aerosol modules in global modeling. In an initial assessment global fields for mass and for mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (aot) were compared among aerosol component modules of 21 different global models. There is general agreement among models for the annual global mean of component combined aot. At 0.12 to 0.14, simulated aot values are at the lower end of global averages suggested by remote sensing from ground (AERONET ca 0.14) and space (MODIS-MISR composite ca 0.16). More detailed comparisons, however, reveal that larger differences in regional distribution and significant differences in compositional mixture have remained. Of particular concern is the large model diversity for contributions by dust and carbon, because it leads to significant uncertainty in aerosol absorption (aab). Since not only aot but also aab influence the aerosol impact on the radiative energy-balance, aerosol (direct) forcing uncertainty in modeling is larger than differences in aot might suggest. New diagnostic approaches are proposed to trace model differences in terms of aerosol processing and transport: These include the prescription of common input (e.g. amount, size and injection of aerosol component emissions) and the use of observational capabilities from ground (e.g. measurements networks) and space (e.g. correlations between retrieved aerosol and cloud properties).

  1. LES prediction and analysis of the aero-optical environment around a 3-D turret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Edwin; Wang, Kan; Wang, Meng; Jumper, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Using wall-modeled large-eddy simulation, a Mach 0.4 flow over a hemisphere-on-cylinder turret at the experimental Reynolds number of ReD = 2 . 3 ×106 is simulated to study the aero-optical distortions caused by turbulent density fluctuations. The optical distortions are calculated at over 250 viewing angles during the simulation to thoroughly investigate the optical environment around the turret. Flow field and optical results show good comparisons with experimental measurements. A large database of three-dimensional velocity and density fields is generated for study of the connection between global flow dynamics and local optical distortions. Proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition are applied to both the distorted wavefronts and the flow-field database. A method of reconstructing the optical wavefronts from the density field modes is investigated. Relations between prominent flow features and wavefront components including tip/tilt and higher-order effects will be discussed. Supported by HEL-JTO through AFOSR Grant FA9550-13-1-0001.

  2. Integrated Aero-Propulsion CFD Methodology for the Hyper-X Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Engelund, Walter C.; Bittner, Robert D.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Jentink, Tom N.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2000-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have been used extensively in the analysis and development of the X-43A Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). A significant element of this analysis is the prediction of integrated vehicle aero-propulsive performance, which includes an integration of aerodynamic and propulsion flow fields. This paper describes analysis tools used and the methodology for obtaining pre-flight predictions of longitudinal performance increments. The use of higher-fidelity methods to examine flow-field characteristics and scramjet flowpath component performance is also discussed. Limited comparisons with available ground test data are shown to illustrate the approach used to calibrate methods and assess solution accuracy. Inviscid calculations to evaluate lateral-directional stability characteristics are discussed. The methodology behind 3D tip-to-tail calculations is described and the impact of 3D exhaust plume expansion in the afterbody region is illustrated. Finally, future technology development needs in the area of hypersonic propulsion-airframe integration analysis are discussed.

  3. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling for the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle: AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph; Seidel, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural-aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report.propulsion system dynamics, the structural dynamics, and aerodynamics.

  4. Aero-Thermal Prediction in High Pressure Turbine Cascade using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Rathakrishnan; Lele, Sanjiva

    2008-11-01

    The aero-thermal performance of an uncooled, smooth high pressure (HP) turbine cascade in the presence of free-stream turbulence is studied using a high-order overset mesh Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure. A HP vane cascade designed at the von Karman Institute (VKI) for fluid dynamics, Belgium, is used as the model geometry. Simulations matching experimental conditions, except for the Reynolds number which is about half of the experimental value, have been carried out. Significant enhancement in the blade heat-transfer is seen in the presence of inflow turbulence. Eddies from the free-stream turbulence get stretched around the blade, creating long streaky structures in the blade boundary layer. These structures quickly break down on the suction side, while they persist on the pressure side. The blade heat transfer signature from the simulations does not show transition of the boundary layer at the Reynolds number of the simulation. This is consistent with the trend seen in the experiments where transition is delayed by lowering the Reynolds number. New simulations matching the experimental Reynolds number are currently under way.

  5. Preparation and antibacterial activities of Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites made by pomegranate (Punica granatum) rind extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Ren, Yan-yu; Wang, Tao; Wang, Chuang

    Nano-silver and its composite materials are widely used in medicine, food and other industries due to their strong conductivity, size effect and other special performances. So far, more microbial researches have been applied, but a plant method is rarely reported. In order to open up a new way to prepare AgNP composites, pomegranate peel extract was used in this work to reduce Ag+ to prepare Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. UV-Vis was employed to detect and track the reduction of Ag+ and the forming process of AgNPs. The composition, structure and size of the crystal were analyzed by XRD and TEM. Results showed that, under mild conditions, pomegranate peel extract reacted with dilute AgNO3 solution to produce Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticle composites. At pH = 8 and 10 mmol/L of AgNO3 concentration, the size of the achieved composites ranged between 15 and 35 nm with spherical shapes and good crystallinity. The bactericidal experiment indicated that the prepared Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles had strong antibacterial activity against gram positive bacteria and gram negative bacteria. FTIR analysis revealed that biological macromolecules with groups of sbnd NH2, sbnd OH, and others were distributed on the surface of the newly synthesized Ag/Ag+/Ag3+ nanoparticles. This provided a useful clue to further study the AgNP biosynthesis mechanism.

  6. Ag-Air Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Econ, Inc.'s agricultural aerial application, "ag-air," involves more than 10,000 aircraft spreading insecticides, herbicides, fertilizer, seed and other materials over millions of acres of farmland. Difficult for an operator to estimate costs accurately and decide what to charge or which airplane can handle which assignment most efficiently. Computerized service was designed to improve business efficiency in choice of aircraft and determination of charge rates based on realistic operating cost data. Each subscriber fills out a detailed form which pertains to his needs and then receives a custom-tailored computer printout best suited to his particular business mix.

  7. Bimetallic Pt-Ag and Pd-Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Debdutta; Bunker, Bruce; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Zhang, Zhenyuan; Meisel, Dan; Doudna, C. M.; Bertino, M. F.; Blum, Frank D.; Tokuhiro, A. T.; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Terry, Jeff

    2005-04-19

    We report studies of bimetallic nanoparticles with 15%–16% atomic crystal parameters size mismatch. The degree of alloying was also probed in a 2-nm Pt core ssmallest attainable core sized of Pt–Ag nanoparticles scompletely immiscible in bulkd and 20-nm-diameter Pd–Ag nanowires scompletely miscible in bulkd. Particles were synthesized radiolytically, and depending on the initial parameters, they assume spherical or cylindrical snanowired morphologies. In all cases, the metals are seen to follow their bulk alloying characteristics. Also, Pt and Ag segregate in both spherical and wire forms, which indicates that strain due to crystallographic mismatch overcomes the excess surface free energy in the small particles. The Pd–Ag nanowires alloy similar to previously reported spherical Pd–Ag particles of similar diameter and composition

  8. Bimetallic Pt-Ag and Pd-Ag nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Debdutta; Bunker, Bruce; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Zhang, Zhenyuan; Meisel, Dan; Doudna, C.M.; Bertino, M. F.; Blum, Frank D.; Tokuhiro, A.T.; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Shibata, Tomohiro; Terry, Jeff

    2005-05-01

    We report studies of bimetallic nanoparticles with 15%-16% atomic crystal parameters size mismatch. The degree of alloying was probed in a 2-nm Pt core (smallest attainable core size) of Pt-Ag nanoparticles (completely immiscible in bulk) and 20-nm-diameter Pd-Ag nanowires (completely miscible in bulk). Particles were synthesized radiolytically, and depending on the initial parameters, they assume spherical or cylindrical (nanowire) morphologies. In all cases, the metals are seen to follow their bulk alloying characteristics. Pt and Ag segregate in both spherical and wire forms, which indicates that strain due to crystallographic mismatch overcomes the excess surface free energy in the small particles. The Pd-Ag nanowires alloy similar to previously reported spherical Pd-Ag particles of similar diameter and composition.

  9. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Judy

    Ag-Ed is an agricultural education project aimed at upper primary students, held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show (similar to a county fair) in Queensland, Australia. The program achieves its purpose of helping children understand the impact and relevance that agriculture has on their everyday lives through two components, an Ag-Ed day and a…

  10. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule ``as run``; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  11. AGS Experiments: 1989, 1990, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; proposed 1992 schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS Experiments begin here; and list of AGS Experimenters begins here.

  12. Analysis and Quantification of the Diversities of Aerosol Life Cycles within AeroCom

    SciTech Connect

    Textor, C.; Schulz, M.; Guibert, S.; Kinne, Stefan; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Berglen, T.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, H.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Grini, A.; Hendricks, J.; Horrowitz, L.; Huang, P.; Isaksen, I.; Iversen, T.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Kirkevag, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Krol, M.; Lauer, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Montanaro, V.; Myhre, G.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tie, X.

    2006-05-29

    Simulation results of global aerosol models have been assembled in the framework of the AeroCom intercomparison exercise. In this paper, we analyze the life cycles of dust, sea salt, sulfate, black carbon and particulate organic matter as simulated by sixteen global aerosol models. The diversities among the models for the sources and sinks, burdens, particle sizes, water uptakes, and spatial dispersals have been established. The AeroCom all-models-average emissions are dominated by the mass of sea salt (SS), followed by dust (DU), sulfate (SO4), particulate organic matter (POM), and finally black carbon (BC). Interactive parameterizations of the emissions and contrasting particles sizes of SS and DU lead generally to higher diversities of these species, and for total aerosol, which they dominate in mass. The lower diversity of the emissions of the fine aerosols, BC, POM, and SO4, is due to the use of similar emission inventories, and does therefore not necessarily indicate a better understanding of their sources. The diversity of SO4-sources is mainly caused by the disagreement on depositional loss of precursor gases and on chemical production. The diversities of the emissions are passed on to the burdens, but the latter are also strongly affected by the model-specific treatments of transport and aerosol processes. The burdens of dry mass decrease along DU, SS, SO4, POM, and BC. The all-models-average residence time was the shortest for sea salt with about half a day, followed by SO4 and DU with four days, and POM and BC with six and seven days, respectively. The wet deposition rate is controlled by the solubility and increases from DU, BC, POM to SO4 and SS. It is the dominant sink for SO4, BC, and POM, and contributes about one third to the total removal rate coefficients of SS and DU species. For SS and DU we find high diversities for the removal rate coefficients and deposition pathways. Models do neither agree on the split between wet and dry deposition, nor

  13. Impact of clocking on the aero-thermodynamics of a second stator tested in a one and a half stage HP turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billiard, N.; Paniagua, Guillermo; Dénos, R.

    2008-06-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental investigation of the time-averaged and time-accurate aero-thermodynamics of a second stator tested in a 1.5 stage high-pressure turbine. The effect of clocking on aerodynamic and heat transfer are investigated. Tests are performed under engine representative conditions in the VKI compression tube CT3. The test program includes four different clocking positions, i.e. relative pitch-wise positions between the first and the second stator. Probes located upstream and downstream of the second stator provide the thermodynamic conditions of the flow field. On the second stator airfoil, measurements are taken around the blade profile at 15, 50 and 85% span with pressure sensors and thin-film gauges. Both time-averaged and time-resolved aspects of the flow field are addressed. Regarding the time-averaged results, clocking effects are mainly observed within the leading edge region of the second stator, the largest effects being observed at 15% span. The surface static pressure distribution is changed locally, hence affecting the overall airfoil performance. For one clocking position, the thermal load of the airfoil is noticeably reduced. Pressure fluctuations are attributed to the passage of the upstream transonic rotor and its associated pressure gradients. The pattern of these fluctuations changes noticeably as a function of clocking. The time-resolved variations of heat flux and static pressure are analyzed together showing that the major effect is due to a potential interaction. The time-resolved pressure distribution integrated along the second stator surface yields the unsteady forces on the vane. The magnitude of the unsteady force is very dependent on the clocking position.

  14. Aero-optics: Simultaneous MHz Rate Planar Flow Visualization and Optical Wavefront Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Samimy, Mo; Lempert, Walter; Harris, Scott; Widiker, Jeff; Duncan, Bradley

    2002-11-01

    In response to a need for more detailed understanding of aero-optic effects in realistic flows (high-speed and compressible), we apply very recently developed MHz rate planar diagnostic techniques to simultaneously perform flow visualization and wavefront measurement on a Mach 1.3 rectangular jet. A custom-built pulse burst laser is used to produce 17 pulses (10 nsec duration) with inter-pulse timing of 4 microseconds (250 kHz). The pulses were formed into a laser sheet and illuminated the mixing layer in a streamwise plane of a Mach 1.3 rectangular, aspect ratio 3 jet. Images were captured using a Dalsa 64K1M camera that can record 17 images at framing rates as high as 1 MHz. Optical wavefronts were measured at rates up to 1 MHz using a newly designed Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensor. A 10 mW HeNe laser beam was spatially filtered and expanded to a 2.5 cm diameter and passed through the center of the rectangular jet 8 nozzle exit heights downstream of the nozzle exit. A lenslet array (1.024 mm pitch, 260 mm f. l.) and a -1000 mm f. l. lens are used to form a grid pattern of dots onto a PSI-IV camera capable of capturing 28 frames at 1 MHz framing rates. The camera was operated at 500 kHz and imaged a 6 x 6 pattern of dots. The displacement of each dot corresponds to the local wavefront tilt induced by the jet as the initially planar wavefront passes through the flow. Results are being analyzed to obtain a correlation between turbulence structures contained in the mixing layer of the jet and the optical distortion produced by these structures.

  15. Aeronautical-Satellite-Assisted Process Being Developed for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Communications technologies are being developed to address safety issues during aviation travel. Some of these technologies enable the aircraft to be in constant bidirectional communications with necessary systems, people, and other aircraft that are not currently in place today. Networking technologies, wireless datalinks, and advanced avionics techniques are areas of particular importance that the NASA Glenn Research Center has contributed. Glenn, in conjunction with the NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, and NASA Langley Research Center, is investigating methods and applications that would utilize these communications technologies. In mid-June 2000, the flight readiness of the network and communications technologies were demonstrated via a simulated aircraft. A van simulating an aircraft was equipped with advanced phased-array antennas (Advanced Communications/Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) project) that used commercial Ku-band satellite communications to connect Glenn, Dryden, and Ames in a combined system ground test. This test simulated air-ground bidirectional transport of real-time digital audio, text, and video data via a hybrid network configuration that demonstrated the flight readiness of the network and communications technologies. Specifically, a Controller Pilot Data Link Communications application was used with other applications to demonstrate a multiprotocol capability via Internet-protocol encapsulated ATN (Aeronautical Telecommunications Network) data packets. The significance of this combined ground test is its contribution to the Aero Information Technology Base Program Level I milestone (Software Technology investment area) of a real-time data link for the National Airspace System. The objective of this milestone was to address multiprotocol technology applicable for real-time data links between aircraft, a satellite, and the ground as well as the ability to

  16. THE AGS ELECTROSTATIC SEPTUM.

    SciTech Connect

    HOCK,J.RUSSO,T.GLEN,J.BROWN,K.

    2003-05-12

    The previous slow beam extraction electro static septum in the AGS was designed in 1981. Research documented at the Fermi Laboratory was used as the base line for this design. The septum consisted of a ground plane of .002 inch diameter wire tungsten-rhenium alloy (75%W 25%Re) with a hollow welded titanium cathode assembly. The vacuum chamber is stationary and the septum is moved with a pair of high vacuum linear feed throughs. After years of beam time, the frequency of failures increased. The vacuum system design was poor by today's standards and resulted in long pump down times after repairs. The failures ranged from broken septum wires to a twisted cathode. In addition to the failures, the mechanical drive system had too much backlash, making the operating position difficult to repeat. The new septum needed to address all of these issues in order to become a more reliable septum.

  17. EPIDAUROS Biotechnologie AG.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Hans-Peter; Kluge, Peter; Mauch, Simon

    2005-07-01

    EPIDAUROS Biotechnologie AG is a leading provider of pharmacogenetic consulting, genotyping and research services to the international pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, contract research organizations and healthcare providers. The company's mission is to improve safety, efficacy and predictability in drug development and drug therapy. EPIDAUROS determines its customers' needs in the field of pharmacogenetics using an in-depth consultancy process. The development and conduct of genotyping assays for drug-metabolizing enzymes, drug transporters and drug targets (for example, receptors)--all performed under stringent quality standards--are a major activity at EPIDAUROS. The company offers its research services to academic and industrial partners for the development of innovative diagnostic solutions by using its intellectual property. PMID:16014003

  18. Host Model Uncertainties in Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates: Results from the AeroCom Prescribed Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Stier, Phillip; Schutgens, Nick A.; Bellouin, N.; Bian, Huisheng; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, Mian; Ghan, Steven J.; Huneeus, N.; Kinne, Stefan; Lin, G.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Myhre, G.; Penner, J. E.; Randles, Cynthia; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Takemura, T.; Yu, Fangqun; Yu, Hongbin; Zhou, Cheng

    2013-03-20

    Simulated multi-model "diversity" in aerosol direct radiative forcing estimates is often perceived as mea- sure of aerosol uncertainty. However, current models used for aerosol radiative forcing calculations vary considerably in model components relevant for forcing calculations and the associated "host-model uncertainties" are generally convoluted with the actual aerosol uncertainty. In this AeroCom Prescribed intercomparison study we systematically isolate and quantify host model uncertainties on aerosol forcing experiments through prescription of identical aerosol radiative properties in nine participating models. Even with prescribed aerosol radiative properties,simulated clear-sky and all-sky aerosol radiative forcings show significant diversity. For a purely scattering case with globally constant optical depth of 0.2, the global-mean all-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing is -4.51 Wm-2 and the inter-model standard deviation is 0.70 Wm-2, corresponding to a relative standard deviation of 15%. For a case with partially absorbing aerosol with an aerosol optical depth of 0.2 and single scattering albedo of 0.8, the forcing changes to 1.26 Wm-2, and the standard deviation increases to 1.21 W-2, corresponding to a significant relative standard deviation of 96%. However, the top-of-atmosphere forcing variability owing to absorption is low, with relative standard deviations of 9% clear-sky and 12% all-sky. Scaling the forcing standard deviation for a purely scattering case to match the sulfate radiative in the AeroCom Direct Effect experiment, demonstrates that host model uncertain- ties could explain about half of the overall sulfate forcing diversity of 0.13 Wm-2 in the AeroCom Direct Radiative Effect experiment. Host model errors in aerosol radiative forcing are largest in regions of uncertain host model components, such as stratocumulus cloud decks or areas with poorly constrained.

  19. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  20. Engine Icing Modeling and Simulation (Part 2): Performance Simulation of Engine Rollback Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2011-01-01

    Ice buildup in the compressor section of a commercial aircraft gas turbine engine can cause a number of engine failures. One of these failure modes is known as engine rollback: an uncommanded decrease in thrust accompanied by a decrease in fan speed and an increase in turbine temperature. This paper describes the development of a model which simulates the system level impact of engine icing using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k). When an ice blockage is added to C-MAPSS40k, the control system responds in a manner similar to that of an actual engine, and, in cases with severe blockage, an engine rollback is observed. Using this capability to simulate engine rollback, a proof-of-concept detection scheme is developed and tested using only typical engine sensors. This paper concludes that the engine control system s limit protection is the proximate cause of iced engine rollback and that the controller can detect the buildup of ice particles in the compressor section. This work serves as a feasibility study for continued research into the detection and mitigation of engine rollback using the propulsion control system.

  1. AgH, Ag/sub 2/, and AgO revisited: Basis set extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1987-05-01

    An extended basis set has been developed for Ag which significantly improves the agreement between theoretical and experimental spectroscopic parameters for AgH, AgO, and Ag/sub 2/. The major improvement comes about as a result of the improved treatment of electron correlation in the Ag d shell upon the introduction of f functions. Their inclusion produces very slight differences at the SCF level, but significant reductions in r/sub e/ and increases in ..omega../sub e/ and D/sub e/ in the Mo-dash-barller--Plesset perturbation theory expansion. At the MP4(SDTQ) level, typical results are 0.02 A too long for r/sub e/, 4% too low for ..omega../sub e/, and 10 kcal too small for D/sub e/. From a pragmatic standpoint, MP2 give results very similar to this at a much reduced level of effort.

  2. Small wind turbine performance evaluation using field test data and a coupled aero-electro-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Brian D.

    A series of field tests and theoretical analyses were performed on various wind turbine rotor designs at two Penn State residential-scale wind-electric facilities. This work involved the prediction and experimental measurement of the electrical and aerodynamic performance of three wind turbines; a 3 kW rated Whisper 175, 2.4 kW rated Skystream 3.7, and the Penn State designed Carolus wind turbine. Both the Skystream and Whisper 175 wind turbines are OEM blades which were originally installed at the facilities. The Carolus rotor is a carbon-fiber composite 2-bladed machine, designed and assembled at Penn State, with the intent of replacing the Whisper 175 rotor at the off-grid system. Rotor aerodynamic performance is modeled using WT_Perf, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed Blade Element Momentum theory based performance prediction code. Steady-state power curves are predicted by coupling experimentally determined electrical characteristics with the aerodynamic performance of the rotor simulated with WT_Perf. A dynamometer test stand is used to establish the electromechanical efficiencies of the wind-electric system generator. Through the coupling of WT_Perf and dynamometer test results, an aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedure is developed and provides accurate predictions of wind system performance. The analysis of three different wind turbines gives a comprehensive assessment of the capability of the field test facilities and the accuracy of aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedures. Results from this study show that the Carolus and Whisper 175 rotors are running at higher tip-speed ratios than are optimum for power production. The aero-electro-mechanical analysis predicted the high operating tip-speed ratios of the rotors and was accurate at predicting output power for the systems. It is shown that the wind turbines operate at high tip-speeds because of a miss-match between the aerodynamic drive torque and the operating torque of the wind

  3. A new method for the estimation of high temperature radiant heat emittance by means of aero-acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffrath, Fabian; Prieler, Robert; Telle, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    A new method for the experimental estimation of radiant heat emittance at high temperatures has been developed which involves aero-acoustic levitation of samples, laser heating and contactless temperature measurement. Radiant heat emittance values are determined from the time dependent development of the sample temperature which requires analysis of both the radiant and convective heat transfer towards the surroundings by means of fluid dynamics calculations. First results for the emittance of a corundum sample obtained with this method are presented in this article and found in good agreement with literature values.

  4. The AGS-Booster lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Barton, D.S.; Claus, J.; Cottingham, J.G.; Courant, E.D.; Danby, G.T.; Dell, G.F.; Forsyth, E.B.; Gupta, R.C.; Kats, J.

    1987-01-01

    The AGS Booster has three objectives. They are to increase the space charge limit of the AGS, to increase the intensity of the polarized proton beam by accumulating many linac pulses (since the intensity is limited by the polarized ion source), and to reaccelerate heavy ions from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff before injection into the AGS. The machine is capable of accelerating protons at 7.5 Hertz from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV or to lower final energies at faster repetition rates. The machine will also be able to accelerate heavy ions from as low as 1 MeV/nucleon to a magnetic rigidity as high as 17.6 Tesla-meters with a one second repetition rate. As an accumulator for polarized protons, the Booster should be able to store the protons at 200 MeV for several seconds. We expect that the Booster will increase the AGS proton intensity by a factor of four, polarized proton intensity by a factor of twenty to thirty, and will also enable the AGS to accelerate all species of heavy ions (at present the AGS heavy ion program is limited to the elements lighter than sulfur because it can only accelerate fully stripped ions). The construction project started in FY 1985 and is expected to be completed in 1989. The purpose of this paper is to provide a future reference for the AGS Booster lattice.

  5. Modeling C-Band Co-Channel Interference From AeroMACS Omni-Directional Antennas to Mobile Satellite Service Feeder Uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    A new C-band (5091 to 5150 MHz) airport communications system designated as Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being planned under the Federal Aviation Administration s NextGen program. An interference analysis software program, Visualyse Professional (Transfinite Systems Ltd), is being utilized to provide guidelines on limitations for AeroMACS transmitters to avoid interference with other systems. A scenario consisting of a single omni-directional transmitting antenna at each of the major contiguous United States airports is modeled and the steps required to build the model are reported. The results are shown to agree very well with a previous study.

  6. Aero Spacelines B377SG Super Guppy on Ramp Loading the X-24B and HL-10 Lifting Bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Aero Spacelines B377SG Super Guppy was at Dryden in May, 1976, to ferry the X-24 and HL-10 lifting bodies from the Center to the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The oversized cargo aircraft is a further modification of the B377PG Pregnant Guppy, which was built to transport outsized cargo for NASA's Apollo program, primarily to carry portions of the Saturn V rockets from the manufacturer to Cape Canaveral. The original Guppy modification incorporated the wings, engines, lower fuselage and tail from a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser with a huge upper fuselage more than 20 feet in diameter. The Super Guppy further expanded the fuselage added a taller vertical tail for better lateral stability. A later version, the Super Guppy Turbine, is still in occasional use by NASA to transport oversize structures. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered

  7. L-Band System Engineering - Concepts of Use, Systems Performance Requirements, and Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Stephen; Zelkin, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-band and L-band Communications Standard Development. Task 7 was motivated by the five year technology assessment performed for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) under the joint FAA-EUROCONTROL cooperative research Action Plan (AP-17), also known as the Future Communications Study (FCS). It was based on direction provided by the FAA project-level agreement (PLA FY09_G1M.02-02v1) for "New ATM Requirements-Future Communications." Task 7 was separated into two distinct subtasks, each aligned with specific work elements and deliverable items. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed development, and tests/demonstrations to establish operational capability for what is now referred to as the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2, which is the subject of this report, focused on preliminary systems engineering and support of joint FAA/EUROCONTROL development and evaluation of a future L-band (960 to 1164 MHz) air/ground (A/G) communication system known as the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS), which was defined during the FCS. The proposed L-DACS will be capable of providing ATM services in continental airspace in the 2020+ timeframe. Subtask 7-2 was performed in two phases. Phase I featured development of Concepts of Use, high level functional analyses, performance of initial L-band system safety and security risk assessments, and development of high level requirements and architectures. It also included the aforementioned support of joint L-DACS development and evaluation, including inputs to L-DACS design specifications. Phase II provided a refinement of the systems engineering activities performed during Phase I, along

  8. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is

  9. AERO2S - SUBSONIC AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF WINGS WITH LEADING- AND TRAILING-EDGE FLAPS IN COMBINATION WITH CANARD OR HORIZONTAL TAIL SURFACES (CDC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    This code was developed to aid design engineers in the selection and evaluation of aerodynamically efficient wing-canard and wing-horizontal-tail configurations that may employ simple hinged-flap systems. Rapid estimates of the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of conceptual airplane lifting surface arrangements are provided. The method is particularly well suited to configurations which, because of high speed flight requirements, must employ thin wings with highly swept leading edges. The code is applicable to wings with either sharp or rounded leading edges. The code provides theoretical pressure distributions over the wing, the canard or horizontal tail, and the deflected flap surfaces as well as estimates of the wing lift, drag, and pitching moments which account for attainable leading edge thrust and leading edge separation vortex forces. The wing planform information is specified by a series of leading edge and trailing edge breakpoints for a right hand wing panel. Up to 21 pairs of coordinates may be used to describe both the leading edge and the trailing edge. The code has been written to accommodate 2000 right hand panel elements, but can easily be modified to accommodate a larger or smaller number of elements depending on the capacity of the target computer platform. The code provides solutions for wing surfaces composed of all possible combinations of leading edge and trailing edge flap settings provided by the original deflection multipliers and by the flap deflection multipliers. Up to 25 pairs of leading edge and trailing edge flap deflection schedules may thus be treated simultaneously. The code also provides for an improved accounting of hinge-line singularities in determination of wing forces and moments. To determine lifting surface perturbation velocity distributions, the code provides for a maximum of 70 iterations. The program is constructed so that successive runs may be made with a given code entry. To make additional runs, it is

  10. Spin dynamics simulations at AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    To preserve proton polarization through acceleration, it is important to have a correct model of the process. It has been known that with the insertion of the two helical partial Siberian snakes in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the MAD model of AGS can not deal with a field map with offset orbit. The stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi provides a tool to represent the real electromagnetic fields in the modeling of the optics and spin dynamics for the AGS. Numerical experiments of resonance crossing, including spin dynamics in presence of the snakes and Q-jump, have been performed in AGS lattice models, using Zgoubi. This contribution reports on various results so obtained.

  11. NMR investigation of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwanghyo; Jang, Zeehoon

    2013-01-01

    109Ag nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and relaxation measurements have been performed on two powder samples of Ag nanoparticles with average sizes of 20 nm and 80 nm. The measurements have been done in an external field of 9.4 T and in the temperature range 10 K < T < 280 K. The 109Ag NMR spectra for both samples have close to Lorentzian shapes and turn out to be mixtures of homogeneous and inhomogeneous lines. The linewidth Δ ν at room temperature is 1.3 kHz for both samples and gradually increases with decreasing temperature. Both the Knight shift ( K) and the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/ T 1) are observed to be almost identical to the values reported for the bulk Ag metal, whereby the Korringa ratio R(= K 2 T 1 T/S) is found to be 2.0 for both samples in the investigated temperature range.

  12. Effective L/D: A Theoretical Approach to the Measurement of Aero-Structural Efficiency in Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many trade-offs in aircraft design that ultimately impact the overall performance and characteristics of the final design. One well recognized and well understood trade-off is that of wing weight and aerodynamic efficiency. Higher aerodynamic efficiency can be obtained by increasing wing span, usually at the expense of higher wing weight. The proper balance of these two competing factors depends on the objectives of the design. For example, aerodynamic efficiency is preeminent for sailplanes and long slender wings result. Although the wing weight-drag trade is universally recognized, aerodynamic efficiency and structural efficiency are not usually considered in combination. This paper discusses the concept of "aero-structural efficiency," which combines weight and drag characteristics. A metric to quantify aero-structural efficiency, termed effective L/D, is then derived and tested with various scenarios. Effective L/D is found to be a practical and robust means to simultaneously characterize aerodynamic and structural efficiency in the context of aircraft design. The primary value of the effective L/D metric is as a means to better communicate the combined system level impacts of drag and structural weight.

  13. The AERO system: a 3D-like approach for recording gene expression patterns in the whole mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hirohito; Kubo, Atsushi; Uchibe, Kenta; Hashimoto, Megumi; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Takada, Shuji; Mitsuoka, Kazuhiko; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently constructed a web-based database of gene expression in the mouse whole embryo, EMBRYS (http://embrys.jp/embrys/html/MainMenu.html). To allow examination of gene expression patterns to the fullest extent possible, this database provides both photo images and annotation data. However, since embryos develop via an intricate process of morphogenesis, it would be of great value to track embryonic gene expression from a three dimensional perspective. In fact, several methods have been developed to achieve this goal, but highly laborious procedures and specific operational skills are generally required. We utilized a novel microscopic technique that enables the easy capture of rotational, 3D-like images of the whole embryo. In this method, a rotary head equipped with two mirrors that are designed to obtain an image tilted at 45 degrees to the microscope stage captures serial images at 2-degree intervals. By a simple operation, 180 images are automatically collected. These 2D images obtained at multiple angles are then used to reconstruct 3D-like images, termed AERO images. By means of this system, over 800 AERO images of 191 gene expression patterns were captured. These images can be easily rotated on the computer screen using the EMBRYS database so that researchers can view an entire embryo by a virtual viewing on a computer screen in an unbiased or non-predetermined manner. The advantages afforded by this approach make it especially useful for generating data viewed in public databases. PMID:24146773

  14. The AERO System: A 3D-Like Approach for Recording Gene Expression Patterns in the Whole Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Megumi; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Takada, Shuji; Mitsuoka, Kazuhiko; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently constructed a web-based database of gene expression in the mouse whole embryo, EMBRYS (http://embrys.jp/embrys/html/MainMenu.html). To allow examination of gene expression patterns to the fullest extent possible, this database provides both photo images and annotation data. However, since embryos develop via an intricate process of morphogenesis, it would be of great value to track embryonic gene expression from a three dimensional perspective. In fact, several methods have been developed to achieve this goal, but highly laborious procedures and specific operational skills are generally required. We utilized a novel microscopic technique that enables the easy capture of rotational, 3D-like images of the whole embryo. In this method, a rotary head equipped with two mirrors that are designed to obtain an image tilted at 45 degrees to the microscope stage captures serial images at 2-degree intervals. By a simple operation, 180 images are automatically collected. These 2D images obtained at multiple angles are then used to reconstruct 3D-like images, termed AERO images. By means of this system, over 800 AERO images of 191 gene expression patterns were captured. These images can be easily rotated on the computer screen using the EMBRYS database so that researchers can view an entire embryo by a virtual viewing on a computer screen in an unbiased or non-predetermined manner. The advantages afforded by this approach make it especially useful for generating data viewed in public databases. PMID:24146773

  15. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  16. Modelled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long-range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present-day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparison. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modelled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  17. Experimental analysis of the aero-acoustic coupling in a plane impinging jet on a slotted plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoum, Hassan H.; El Hassan, Mouhammad; Abed-Meraïm, Kamel; Martinuzzi, Robert; Sakout, Anas

    2013-08-01

    Impinging jets are encountered in many industrial applications and suppression of the noise generated by these jets is of great fundamental and practical interest. The vortex dynamics and the interaction between the vortical structures and the impinging wall should be understood in order to control the aero-acoustic coupling between shear layer oscillation and the acoustic modes (self-sustained tones). In this study, a plane jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle and impinging on a plate is considered for Re = 3900. The sound pressure, the vibration of the impinged plate and the spatial velocity field are obtained simultaneously using a microphone, an accelerometer and the time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique, respectively. Spectra and cross-correlations are used to educe the role of different vortical structures leading to the aero-acoustic coupling. The results show the evolution of the correlation between acoustic and transverse velocity fields in the longitudinal direction. A pre-whitening technique is used to investigate the coupling between the acoustic and the velocity signals. This method shows that the correlation between the two signals has a centred peak that is not directly related to the passage of the dominant Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  18. Analysis of pulse detonation turbojet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vutthivithayarak, Ronnachai

    2011-12-01

    Research over the last two decades has shown the potential advantages of pulse detonation engines (PDEs) over existing aero-engines in terms of improved thermodynamics efficiency, improved thrust performance, simplicity of design, and flexibility to operate over a wide speed range. The inherently unsteady characteristic of PDEs makes it difficulty to analyze and evaluate their performance. The conventional method that relies on steady-state assumptions cannot be directly applied. PDE studies have to employ unsteady gasdynamics behavior. In this study, the thermodynamic cycle of a PDE, which can be called the ZND cycle, is theoretically analyzed. A parametric analysis of turbojet PDEs is considered for both ideal and non-ideal cases. The conventional turbojet with a Brayton cycle is brought in the comparison to verify that PDEs can provide better performance.

  19. Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Don (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This final report has been prepared by Honeywell Aerospace, Phoenix, Arizona, a unit of Honeywell International, Inc., documenting work performed during the period December 2004 through August 2007 for the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, under the Revolutionary Aero-Space Engine Research (RASER) Program, Contract No. NAS3-01136, Task Order 8, Engine Validation of Noise and Emission Reduction Technology Phase I. The NASA Task Manager was Dr. Joe Grady of the NASA Glenn Research Center. The NASA Contract Officer was Mr. Albert Spence of the NASA Glenn Research Center. This report is for a test program in which NASA funded engine validations of integrated technologies that reduce aircraft engine noise. These technologies address the reduction of engine fan and jet noise, and noise associated with propulsion/airframe integration. The results of these tests will be used by NASA to identify the engineering tradeoffs associated with the technologies that are needed to enable advanced engine systems to meet stringent goals for the reduction of noise. The objectives of this program are to (1) conduct system engineering and integration efforts to define the engine test-bed configuration; (2) develop selected noise reduction technologies to a technical maturity sufficient to enable engine testing and validation of those technologies in the FY06-07 time frame; (3) conduct engine tests designed to gain insight into the sources, mechanisms and characteristics of noise in the engines; and (4) establish baseline engine noise measurements for subsequent use in the evaluation of noise reduction.

  20. Strong magnetization damping induced by Ag nanostructures in Ag/NiFe/Ag trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley Domínguez, D.; da Silva, G. L.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2013-07-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance has been used to investigate the magnetization relaxation in trilayers of Ag(t)/NiFe(10 nm)/Ag(t), sputter deposited on Si(001) where the thickness of the Ag layer varied from 0 nm to 24 nm. In the first stages of formation, the Ag layers form islands that work as mold to imprint defects or inhomogeneities on the NiFe film surface. The magnetic inhomogeneities and defects imprinted on the surface of the NiFe film act as extrinsic sources of magnetization relaxation in addition to the intrinsic Gilbert damping mechanism. Weak inhomogeneities are associated to the two-magnon scattering source and the strong inhomogeneities are associated to the fluctuations of the local magnetization. By adding the three different sources of magnetization damping, we were able to explain the azimuthal dependence of the ferromagnetic resonance linewidth.

  1. The AeroCom evaluation and intercomparison of organic aerosol in global models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tsigaridis, K.; Daskalakis, N.; Kanakidou, M.; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, P.; Bahadur, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Benedetti, A.; et al

    2014-10-15

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) in the troposphere and analyzes the differences between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry transport models (CTMs) and general circulation models (GCMs) have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemicalmore » and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over one order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA concentrations that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA / OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing, and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by a few global models. The median global primary OA (POA) source strength is 56 Tg a–1 (range 34–144 Tg a−1) and the median SOA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a–1 (range 13–121 Tg a−1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a–1 (range 16–121 Tg a−1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a–1; range 13–20 Tg a–1, with one model at 37 Tg a−1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6–2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.0 and 3.8 Tg), with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8–9.6 days

  2. The AeroCom evaluation and intercomparison of organic aerosol in global models

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigaridis, K.; Daskalakis, N.; Kanakidou, M.; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, P.; Bahadur, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Benedetti, A.; Bergman, T.; Berntsen, T. K.; Beukes, J. P.; Bian, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; Curci, G.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Gong, S. L.; Hodzic, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Iversen, T.; Jathar, S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kaiser, J. W.; Kirkevåg, A.; Koch, D.; Kokkola, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; Mann, G. W.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Müller, J. -F.; Myhre, G.; Myriokefalitakis, S.; Ng, N. L.; O'Donnell, D.; Penner, J. E.; Pozzoli, L.; Pringle, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Schulz, M.; Sciare, J.; Seland, Ø.; Shindell, D. T.; Sillman, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Spracklen, D.; Stavrakou, T.; Steenrod, S. D.; Takemura, T.; Tiitta, P.; Tilmes, S.; Tost, H.; van Noije, T.; van Zyl, P. G.; von Salzen, K.; Yu, F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Zaveri, R. A.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2014-10-15

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) in the troposphere and analyzes the differences between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry transport models (CTMs) and general circulation models (GCMs) have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemical and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over one order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA concentrations that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA / OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing, and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by a few global models.

    The median global primary OA (POA) source strength is 56 Tg a–1 (range 34–144 Tg a−1) and the median SOA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a–1 (range 13–121 Tg a−1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a–1 (range 16–121 Tg a−1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a–1; range 13–20 Tg a–1, with one model at 37 Tg a−1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0

  3. Synthesis of Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms and their use as DNA hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ma, Zhanfang

    2011-06-01

    A simple synthetic route to prepare Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms consists of the facile addition of Na(2) S to a solution of triangular Ag nanoprisms. The resulting Ag(2) S-Ag nanoparticles are more stable in solution than the original Ag nanoprisms, and two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of the original Ag nanoprisms still remain. In addition, the SPR bands of the Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms are tunable over a wide range. The Ag(2) S-Ag nanoprisms can be directly bioconjugated via well-established stable Ag(2) S surface chemistry with readily available sulfur coupling agents. The nanoprisms are used in the hybridization of functionalized oligonucleotides, and show promise as probes for future biosensing applications. PMID:21538868

  4. Aero Spacelines B377SG Super Guppy on Ramp Loading the X-24B and HL-10 Lifting Bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Aero Spacelines B377SG Super Guppy was at Dryden in May, 1976, to ferry the X-24 and HL-10 lifting bodies from the Center to the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The oversized cargo aircraft is a further modification of the B377PG Pregnant Guppy, which was built to transport outsized cargo for NASA's Apollo program, primarily to carry portions of the Saturn V rockets from the manufacturer to Cape Canaveral. The original Guppy modification incorporated the wings, engines, lower fuselage and tail from a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser with a huge upper fuselage more than 20 feet in diameter. The Super Guppy further expanded the fuselage added a taller vertical tail for better lateral stability. A later version, the Super Guppy Turbine, is still in occasional use by NASA to transport oversize structures. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered

  5. Study of the oxygen transport through Ag (110), Ag (poly), and Ag 2.0 Zr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, R. A.; Wu, D.; Davidson, M. R.; Hoflund, Gar B.

    1992-01-01

    The transport of oxygen through high-purity membranes of Ag (110), Ag (poly), Ag (nano), and Ag 2.0 Zr has been studied by an ultrahigh vacuum permeation method over the temperature range of 400-800 C. The data show that there are substantial deviations from ordinary diffusion-controlled transport. A surface limitation has been confirmed by glow-discharge studies where the upstream O2 supply has been partially converted to atoms, which, for the same temperature and pressure, gave rise to over an order of magnitude increase in transport flux. Further, the addition of 2.0 wt percent Zr to the Ag has provided increased dissociative adsorption rates, which, in turn, increased the transport flux by a factor of 2. It was also observed that below a temperature of 630 C, the diffusivity exhibits an increase in activation energy of over 4 kcal/mol, which has been attributed to trapping of the atomic oxygen and/or kinetic barriers at the surface and subsurface of the vacuum interface. Above 630 C, the activation barrier decreases to the accepted value of about 11 kcal/mol for Ag (poly), consistent with zero concentration at the vacuum interface.

  6. Evaluation of the aero-optical properties of the SOFIA cavity by means of computional fluid dynamics and a super fast diagnostic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engfer, Christian; Pfüller, Enrico; Wiedemann, Manuel; Wolf, Jürgen; Lutz, Thorsten; Krämer, Ewald; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5 m reflecting telescope housed in an open cavity on board of a Boeing 747SP. During observations, the cavity is exposed to transonic flow conditions. The oncoming boundary layer evolves into a free shear layer being responsible for optical aberrations and for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic disturbances within the cavity. While the aero-acoustical excitation of an airborne telescope can be minimized by using passive flow control devices, the aero-optical properties of the flow are difficult to improve. Hence it is important to know how much the image seen through the SOFIA telescope is perturbed by so called seeing effects. Prior to the SOFIA science fights Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations using URANS and DES methods were carried out to determine the flow field within and above the cavity and hence in the optical path in order to provide an assessment of the aero-optical properties under baseline conditions. In addition and for validation purposes, out of focus images have been taken during flight with a Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC). Depending on the binning factor and the sub-array size, the SFDC is able to take and to read out images at very high frame rates. The paper explains the numerical approach based on CFD to evaluate the aero-optical properties of SOFIA. The CFD data is then compared to the high speed images taken by the SFDC during flight.

  7. Redox-Robust Pentamethylferrocene Polymers and Supramolecular Polymers, and Controlled Self-Assembly of Pentamethylferricenium Polymer-Embedded Ag, AgI, and Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haibin; Ciganda, Roberto; Castel, Patricia; Vax, Amélie; Gregurec, Danijela; Irigoyen, Joseba; Moya, Sergio; Salmon, Lionel; Zhao, Pengxiang; Ruiz, Jaime; Hernández, Ricardo; Astruc, Didier

    2015-12-01

    We report the first pentamethylferrocene (PMF) polymers and the redox chemistry of their robust polycationic pentamethylferricenium (PMFium) analogues. The PMF polymers were synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of a PMF-containing norbornene derivative by using the third-generation Grubbs ruthenium metathesis catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry studies allowed us to determine confidently the number of monomer units in the polymers through the Bard-Anson method. Stoichiometric oxidation by using ferricenium hexafluorophosphate quantitatively and instantaneously provided fully stable (even in aerobic solutions) blue d(5) Fe(III) metallopolymers. Alternatively, oxidation of the PMF-containing polymers was conducted by reactions with Ag(I) or Au(III) , to give PMFium polymer-embedded Ag and Au nanoparticles (NPs). In the presence of I2 , oxidation by using Ag(I) gave polymer-embedded Ag/AgI NPs and AgNPs at the surface of AgI NPs. Oxidation by using Au(III) also produced an Au(I) intermediate that was trapped and characterized. Engineered single-electron transfer reactions of these redox-robust nanomaterial precursors appear to be a new way to control their formation, size, and environment in a supramolecular way. PMID:26494439

  8. An in-situ synthesis of Ag/AgCl/TiO2/hierarchical porous magnesian material and its photocatalytic performance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Fazhou; Shu, Chang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Wenqin; Hu, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    The absorption ability and photocatalytic activity of photocatalytic materials play important roles in improving the pollutants removal effects. Herein, we reported a new kind of photocatalytic material, which was synthesized by simultaneously designing hierarchical porous magnesian (PM) substrate and TiO2 catalyst modification. Particularly, PM substrate could be facilely prepared by controlling its crystal phase (Phase 5, Mg3Cl(OH)5·4H2O), while Ag/AgCl particles modification of TiO2 could be achieved by in situ ion exchange between Ag+ and above crystal Phase. Physiochemical analysis shows that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material has higher visible and ultraviolet light absorption response, and excellent gas absorption performance compared to other controls. These suggested that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material could produce more efficient photocatalytic effects. Its photocatalytic reaction rate was 5.21 and 30.57 times higher than that of TiO2/PM and TiO2/imporous magnesian substrate, respectively. Thus, this material and its intergration synthesis method could provide a novel strategy for high-efficiency application and modification of TiO2 photocatalyst in engineering filed. PMID:26883972

  9. An in-situ synthesis of Ag/AgCl/TiO2/hierarchical porous magnesian material and its photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Fazhou; Shu, Chang; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Wenqin; Hu, Shuguang

    2016-02-01

    The absorption ability and photocatalytic activity of photocatalytic materials play important roles in improving the pollutants removal effects. Herein, we reported a new kind of photocatalytic material, which was synthesized by simultaneously designing hierarchical porous magnesian (PM) substrate and TiO2 catalyst modification. Particularly, PM substrate could be facilely prepared by controlling its crystal phase (Phase 5, Mg3Cl(OH)5·4H2O), while Ag/AgCl particles modification of TiO2 could be achieved by in situ ion exchange between Ag+ and above crystal Phase. Physiochemical analysis shows that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material has higher visible and ultraviolet light absorption response, and excellent gas absorption performance compared to other controls. These suggested that Ag/AgCl/TiO2/PM material could produce more efficient photocatalytic effects. Its photocatalytic reaction rate was 5.21 and 30.57 times higher than that of TiO2/PM and TiO2/imporous magnesian substrate, respectively. Thus, this material and its intergration synthesis method could provide a novel strategy for high-efficiency application and modification of TiO2 photocatalyst in engineering filed.

  10. HSCT noise reduction technology development at GE Aircraft Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majjigi, Rudramuni K.

    1992-04-01

    The topics covered include the following: High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) exhaust nozzle design approaches; GE aircraft engine (GEAE) HSCT acoustics research; 2DCD non-IVP suppressor ejector; key sensitivities from reference aircraft; acoustic experiments; aero-mixing experimental set-up; fluid shield nozzle; HSCT Mach 2.4 flade nozzle; noise prediction; nozzle concept for GE/Boeing joint test; scale model hot core flow path modified to prevent hub-choking CFL3-D solution; HSCT exhaust nozzle status; and key acoustic technology issues for HSCT's.

  11. Sensor Data Qualification Technique Applied to Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies a previously developed sensor data qualification technique to a commercial aircraft engine simulation known as the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (C-MAPSS40k). The sensor data qualification technique is designed to detect, isolate, and accommodate faulty sensor measurements. It features sensor networks, which group various sensors together and relies on an empirically derived analytical model to relate the sensor measurements. Relationships between all member sensors of the network are analyzed to detect and isolate any faulty sensor within the network.

  12. CFD-based aero-optical analysis of flow fields over two-dimensional cavities with active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan

    Prediction and control of optical wave front distortions and aberrations in a high energy laser beam due to interaction with an unsteady highly non-uniform flow field is of great importance in the development of directed energy weapon systems for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV). The unsteady shear layer over the weapons bay cavity is the primary cause of this distortion of the optical wave front. The large scale vortical structure of the shear layer over the cavity can be significantly reduced by employing an active flow control technique combined with passive flow control. This dissertation explores various active and passive control methods to suppress the cavity oscillations and thereby improve the aero-optics of cavity flow. In active flow control technique, a steady or a pulsed jet is applied at the sharp leading edge of cavities of different aspect ratios L/D (=2, 4, 15), where L and D are the width and the depth of a cavity respectively. In the passive flow control approach, the sharp leading or trailing edge of the cavity is modified into a round edge of different radii. Both of these active and passive flow control approaches are studied independently and in combination. Numerical simulations are performed, with and without active flow control for subsonic free stream flow past two-dimensional sharp and round leading or trailing edge cavities using Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model or a hybrid SST/Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. Aero-optical analysis is developed and applied to all the simulation cases. Index of refraction and Optical Path Difference (OPD) are compared for flow fields without and with active flow control. Root-Mean-Square (RMS) value of OPD is calculated and compared with the experimental data, where available. The effect of steady and pulsed blowing on buffet loading on the downstream face of the cavity is also computed. Using the numerical

  13. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-11-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au+ ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  14. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures. PMID:26563266

  15. Comparison of Aero/Propulsion Transition Characteristics for a Joint Strike Fighter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumowicz, Tim; Margason, Richard; Wardwell, Doug; Hange, Craig; Arledge, Tom; Olson, Lawerence E. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Ames conducted a series tests of a large-scale powered model of Lockheed Martin Skunk Works' JSF STOVL configuration at the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. The model uses a modified version of an F-16 fighter engine (a Pratt & Whitney F100-229 engine). To provide vertical flight capability, the Lockheed aircraft incorporates a forward fuselage mounted vertical lift fan in addition to an aft mounted vectoring nozzle all driven by a single engine. The lift fan is driven off the engine by means of a shaft and gear system. The data presented is for STOVL configuration 140, a wing-body-canard planform. The main goal of this testing was to obtain propulsion induced data for evaluating differences between small- and large-scale model testing during the transition flight regime between jet- and wing-borne flight. The data presented is from aerodynamic testing of the model in both the unpowered (engine-off) and powered (engine running) configurations. This data, when combined with the propulsion system thrust calibration data from the NASA Ames' Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility (OARF), is used to determine the propulsion induced effects during transition.

  16. Probing the rupture of a Ag atomic junction in a Ag-Au mixed electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-09-01

    We probed that the atomic junction in Ag part ruptures during stretching of atomic sized contacts of Ag-Au mixed electrodes, resulting in Ag-Ag electrodes through a scanning tunneling microscope breaking junction (STM-BJ) technique. We observed that the conductance and tunneling decay constant for a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions are essentially the same for the Ag-Au mixed and the Ag-Ag electrodes. We also found the molecular plateau length and the evolution patterns with the Ag-Au mixed electrodes are similar to those with Ag-Ag electrodes rather than the Au-Au electrodes in the molecular junction elongation. This result is attributed to the smaller binding energy of Ag atoms compared to that of Au atoms, so the Ag junction part is more easily broken than that of Au part in stretching of Ag-Au mixed electrodes. Furthermore, we successfully observed that the rupture force of the atomic junction for the Ag-Au mixed electrodes was identical to that for the Ag-Ag electrodes and smaller than that for the Au-Au electrodes. This study may advance the understanding of the electrical and the mechanical properties in molecular devices with Ag and Au electrodes in future.

  17. Pressure and heat transfer investigation of a modified NASP baseline configuration at M = 6. [National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reubush, David E.; Omar, M. Emmett

    1989-01-01

    A cooperative NASA Langley-Boeing investigation was conducted in the Langley eight-Foot High Temperature Tunnel to obtain hypersonic pressure and heat transfer data. In this investigation a large scale (1/20), modified version of the National Aero-Space Plane configuration known as the 'Government Baseline' was tested at a nominal Mach number of 6; at two Reynolds numbers (0.6 and 1.6 million per foot); and at angles of attack from about 0 to 15 deg. There were several purposes for the investigation: to provide a windward and leeward pressure and heat transfer data base for a realistic configuration for verification of computational methods, to provide these data for a large-scale model, and to provide these data for true temperature conditions because of concern about data from low temperature tunnels.

  18. The AGS Booster control system

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, R.; Auerbach, E.; Culwick, B.; Clifford, T.; Mandell, S.; Mariotti, R.; Salwen, C.; Schumburg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Although moderate in size, the Booster construction project requires a comprehensive control system. There are three operational modes: as a high intensity proton injector for the AGS, as a heavy ion accelerator and injector supporting a wide range of ions and as a polarized proton storage injector. These requirements are met using a workstation based extension of the existing AGS control system. Since the Booster is joining a complex of existing accelerators, the new system will be capable of supporting multiuser operational scenarios. A short discussion of this system is discussed in this paper.

  19. Photoreduction of Ag+ in Ag/Ag2S/Au memristor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, N. I.; Tabib-Azar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Silver halides and chalcogenides are excellent memristor materials that have been extensively used in the past as photosensitive layers in photography. Here we examine the effect of illumination on the operating voltages and switching speed of Ag/Ag2S/Au memristors using a green laser (473-523 nm). Our results indicate that illumination decreases the average switching time from high to low resistance states by ∼19% and decreases the turn-off voltages dramatically from -0.8 V to -0.25 V that we attribute to the change in sulfur valency and a photo-induced change in its oxidation/reduction potential. Photo-induced reduction of silver in Ag2S may be used in three dimensional optical memories that can be electronically read and reset.

  20. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2011-04-01

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses.

  1. Ag-Ag2S Hybrid Nanoprisms: Structural versus Plasmonic Evolution.

    PubMed

    Shahjamali, Mohammad M; Zhou, Yong; Zaraee, Negin; Xue, Can; Wu, Jinsong; Large, Nicolas; McGuirk, C Michael; Boey, Freddy; Dravid, Vinayak; Cui, Zhifeng; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2016-05-24

    Recently, Ag-Ag2S hybrid nanostructures have attracted a great deal of attention due to their enhanced chemical and thermal stability, in addition to their morphology- and composition-dependent tunable local surface plasmon resonances. Although Ag-Ag2S nanostructures can be synthesized via sulfidation of as-prepared anisotropic Ag nanoparticles, this process is poorly understood, often leading to materials with anomalous compositions, sizes, and shapes and, consequently, optical properties. In this work, we use theory and experiment to investigate the structural and plasmonic evolution of Ag-Ag2S nanoprisms during the sulfidation of Ag precursors. The previously observed red-shifted extinction of the Ag-Ag2S hybrid nanoprism as sulfidation occurs contradicts theoretical predictions, indicating that the reaction does not just occur at the prism tips as previously speculated. Our experiments show that sulfidation can induce either blue or red shifts in the extinction of the dipole plasmon mode, depending on reaction conditions. By elucidating the correlation with the final structure and morphology of the synthesized Ag-Ag2S nanoprisms, we find that, depending on the reaction conditions, sulfidation occurs on the prism tips and/or the (111) surfaces, leading to a core(Ag)-anisotropic shell(Ag2S) prism nanostructure. Additionally, we demonstrate that the direction of the shift in the dipole plasmon is a function of the relative amounts of Ag2S at the prism tips and Ag2S shell thickness around the prism. PMID:27148792

  2. AGS experiments: 1990, 1991, 1992. Ninth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains a description of the following: AGS Experimental Area - High Energy Physics FY 1993 and Heavy Ion Physics FY 1993; Table of Beam Parameters and Fluxes; Experiment Schedule ``as run``; Proposed 1993 Schedule; A listing of experiments by number; Two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; Publications of AGS Experiments; and List of AGS Experimenters.

  3. What Is Ag-Ed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linley, Judy; Mylne, Lee

    1998-01-01

    Ag-Ed, an agricultural education project for upper elementary students, was held in conjunction with the Toowoomba Show in Queensland, Australia. Agriculture industry representatives provided 20 interactive agricultural presentations for class groups, which were supplemented with a teacher resource-package containing a directory and 13 sections of…

  4. AGS experiments, 1988, 1989, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1991-04-01

    This report contains: experimental areas layout; table of beam parameters and fluxes; experiment schedule as run''; experiment long range schedule; a listing of experiments by number; two-page summaries of each experiment begin here, also ordered by number; publications of AGS experiments; and list of experimenters.

  5. AGS experiments: 1985, 1986, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Depken, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains: Experimental areas layout, table of beam parameters and fluxes, experiment schedule ''as run,'' experiment long range schedule, a listing of experiments by number, two-page summaries of each experiment, also ordered by number, and publications of AGS experiments, 1982-1987.

  6. AGS 20th anniversary celebration

    SciTech Connect

    Baggett, N.V.

    1980-05-22

    On May 22, 1980, a symposium was held at Brookhaven to celebrate the 20th birthday of the AGS, to recall its beginnings, and to review major discoveries that have been made with its beams. The talks at the symposium are recorded in this volume.

  7. Fate of Zinc and Silver Engineered Nanoparticles in Sewerage Networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Engineered zinc oxide (ZnO) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) used in consumer products are largely released into the environment through the wastewater stream. Limited information is available regarding the transformations they undergo during their transit through sewerage sy...

  8. Fuel Consumption Reduction and Weight Estimate of an Intercooled-Recuperated Turboprop Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriani, Roberto; Ghezzi, Umberto; Ingenito, Antonella; Gamma, Fausto

    2012-09-01

    The introduction of intercooling and regeneration in a gas turbine engine can lead to performance improvement and fuel consumption reduction. Moreover, as first consequence of the saved fuel, also the pollutant emission can be greatly reduced. Turboprop seems to be the most suitable gas turbine engine to be equipped with intercooler and heat recuperator thanks to the relatively small mass flow rate and the small propulsion power fraction due to the exhaust nozzle. However, the extra weight and drag due to the heat exchangers must be carefully considered. An intercooled-recuperated turboprop engine is studied by means of a thermodynamic numeric code that, computing the thermal cycle, simulates the engine behavior at different operating conditions. The main aero engine performances, as specific power and specific fuel consumption, are then evaluated from the cycle analysis. The saved fuel, the pollution reduction, and the engine weight are then estimated for an example case.

  9. Performance of a Turboprop Engine with Heat Recovery in Off-Design Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriani, Roberto; Ghezzi, Umberto; Gamma, Fausto; Ingenito, Antonella; Agresta, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    The research for fuel consumption and pollution reduction in new generation aero engines has indicated intercooling and regeneration as very effective methods for this purpose. Hence, different countries have joined their efforts in common research programs, to develop new gas turbine engines able to reduce considerably the fuel consumption and the ambient impact by means of these two techniques. To study their effects on the engine performance and characteristics, a thermodynamic numerical program that simulates the behavior of a turboprop engine with intercooling and regeneration in different operating conditions has been developed. After the parametric study, and the definition of the design conditions, the off-design analysis is carried on, comparing the main characteristics of the intercooled-regenerated turboprop with those of a conventional engine. Then, once a particular mission profile was fixed, the engine performance, in particular the equivalent power, the fuel consumption and the heat exchanger weight were discussed.

  10. An efficient photocatalyst for degradation of various organic dyes: Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu-Yang; Lu, Yi; Liu, Jin-Ku

    2016-04-15

    The Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite was prepared by a facile in-situ anion-exchange method, then the Ag nanoparticles were coated on this composite through photodeposition route to form a novel Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite. The in-situ Br(-) replacement in a crystal lattice node position of Ag2MoO4 crystal allows for overcoming the resistance of electron transition effectively. Meanwhile silver nano-particles on the surface of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite could act as electron traps to intensify the photogeneration electron-hole separation and the subsequent transfer of the trapped electron to the adsorbed O2 as an electron acceptor. As an efficient visible light catalyst, the Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite exhibited superior photocatalytic activity for the degradation of various organic dyes. The experimental results demonstrated superior photocatalytic rate of Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite compared to pure AgBr and Ag2MoO4 crystals (37.6% and 348.4% enhancement respectively). The Ag@Ag2MoO4-AgBr composite cloud degraded Rhodamin B, bromophenol blue, and amino black 10b completed in 7min. PMID:26775100

  11. Foliar exposure of the crop Lactuca sativa to silver nanoparticles: evidence for internalization and changes in Ag speciation.

    PubMed

    Larue, Camille; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Sobanska, Sophie; Cécillon, Lauric; Bureau, Sarah; Barthès, Véronique; Ouerdane, Laurent; Carrière, Marie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2014-01-15

    The impact of engineered nanomaterials on plants, which act as a major point of entry of contaminants into trophic chains, is little documented. The foliar pathway is even less known than the soil-root pathway. However, significant inputs of nanoparticles (NPs) on plant foliage may be expected due to deposition of atmospheric particles or application of NP-containing pesticides. The uptake of Ag-NPs in the crop species Lactuca sativa after foliar exposure and their possible biotransformation and phytotoxic effects were studied. In addition to chemical analyses and ecotoxicological tests, micro X-ray fluorescence, micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and electron microscopy were used to localize and determine the speciation of Ag at sub-micrometer resolution. Although no sign of phytotoxicity was observed, Ag was effectively trapped on lettuce leaves and a thorough washing did not decrease Ag content significantly. We provide first evidence for the entrapment of Ag-NPs by the cuticle and penetration in the leaf tissue through stomata, for the diffusion of Ag in leaf tissues, and oxidation of Ag-NPs and complexation of Ag(+) by thiol-containing molecules. Such type of information is crucial for better assessing the risk associated to Ag-NP containing products. PMID:24275476

  12. Stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles: An effective platform for catalytic activity tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yao, Qiaofeng; Cao, Hongbin; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang; Yang, Jun

    2014-02-01

    The usefulness of Pt-based nanomaterials for catalysis can be greatly enhanced by coupling morphology engineering to the strategic presence of a second or even third metal. Here we demonstrate the design and preparation of stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles where significant activity difference between the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) may be realized by relegating Ag to the core or by hollowing out the core. In particular the stellated Pt surface, with an abundance of steps, edges, corner atoms, and {111} facets, is highly effective for the ORR but is ineffective for MOR. MOR activity is only observed in the presence of a Ag core through electronic coupling to the stellated Pt shell. The bimetallic Ag-Pt stellates therefore demonstrate the feasibility of tuning a Pt surface for two very different structure sensitive catalytic reactions. Stellated bimetallics may therefore be an effective platform for highly tunable catalyst designs.

  13. Stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles: An effective platform for catalytic activity tuning

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yao, Qiaofeng; Cao, Hongbin; Xie, Jianping; Lee, Jim Yang; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of Pt-based nanomaterials for catalysis can be greatly enhanced by coupling morphology engineering to the strategic presence of a second or even third metal. Here we demonstrate the design and preparation of stellated Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles where significant activity difference between the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) may be realized by relegating Ag to the core or by hollowing out the core. In particular the stellated Pt surface, with an abundance of steps, edges, corner atoms, and {111} facets, is highly effective for the ORR but is ineffective for MOR. MOR activity is only observed in the presence of a Ag core through electronic coupling to the stellated Pt shell. The bimetallic Ag-Pt stellates therefore demonstrate the feasibility of tuning a Pt surface for two very different structure sensitive catalytic reactions. Stellated bimetallics may therefore be an effective platform for highly tunable catalyst designs. PMID:24495979

  14. Aero-acoustic tests of duct-burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.

    1976-01-01

    The acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several exhaust systems suitable for duct burning turbofan engines are evaluated. Scale models representing unsuppressed coannular exhaust systems are examined statically under varying exhaust conditions. Ejectors with both hardwall and acoustically treated inserts are investigated.

  15. Antibacterial activity and reusability of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ji Dang; Yun, Hyosuk; Kim, Gwui Cheol; Lee, Chul Won; Choi, Hyun Chul

    2013-10-01

    A facile approach to the synthesis of novel CNT-Ag and GO-Ag antibacterial materials, in which thiol groups are utilized as linkers to secure silver (Ag) nanoparticles to the CNT and GO surfaces without agglomeration, is reported. The resulting CNT-Ag and GO-Ag samples were characterized by performing TEM, XRD, Auger, XPS, and Raman measurements, which revealed that in these antibacterial materials size-similar and quasi-spherical Ag nanoparticles are anchored to the CNT and GO surfaces. The Ag nanoparticles in CNT-Ag and GO-Ag have narrow size distributions with average diameters of 2.6 and 3.5 nm respectively. The antibacterial activities of CNT-Ag and GO-Ag against Escherichia coli were assessed with the paper-disk diffusion method and by determining the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). CNT-Ag was found to have higher antibacterial activity than the reference Ag colloid. Moreover, both CNT-Ag and GO-Ag retain more than 50% of their original antibacterial activities after 20 washes with detergent, which indicates their potential as antibacterial materials for laboratory and medical purposes.

  16. Comparative Study of Antimicrobial Activity of AgBr and Ag Nanoparticles (NPs)

    PubMed Central

    Suchomel, Petr; Kvitek, Libor; Panacek, Ales; Prucek, Robert; Hrbac, Jan; Vecerova, Renata; Zboril, Radek

    2015-01-01

    The diverse mechanism of antimicrobial activity of Ag and AgBr nanoparticles against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and also against several strains of candida was explored in this study. The AgBr nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by simple precipitation of silver nitrate by potassium bromide in the presence of stabilizing polymers. The used polymers (PEG, PVP, PVA, and HEC) influence significantly the size of the prepared AgBr NPs dependently on the mode of interaction of polymer with Ag+ ions. Small NPs (diameter of about 60–70 nm) were formed in the presence of the polymer with low interaction as are PEG and HEC, the polymers which interact with Ag+ strongly produce nearly two times bigger NPs (120–130 nm). The prepared AgBr NPs were transformed to Ag NPs by the reduction using NaBH4. The sizes of the produced Ag NPs followed the same trends – the smallest NPs were produced in the presence of PEG and HEC polymers. Prepared AgBr and Ag NPs dispersions were tested for their biological activity. The obtained results of antimicrobial activity of AgBr and Ag NPs are discussed in terms of possible mechanism of the action of these NPs against tested microbial strains. The AgBr NPs are more effective against gram-negative bacteria and tested yeast strains while Ag NPs show the best antibacterial action against gram-positive bacteria strains. PMID:25781988

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of a Ag/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sandwich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Melissa; Alexson, D. M.; Prokes, Sharka; Glembocki, Orest; Vivoni, Alberto; Hosten, Charles

    2011-02-01

    α,ω-Dithiols are a useful class of compounds in molecular electronics because of their ability to easily adsorb to two metal surfaces, producing a molecular junction. We have prepared Ag nanosphere/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sol (AgNS/OPE/Ag sol) and Ag nanowire/oligo(phenyleneethynylene)/Ag sol (AgNW/OPE/Ag sol) sandwiches to simulate the architecture of a molecular electronic device. This was achieved by self-assembly of OPE on the silver nanosurface, deprotection of the terminal sulfur, and deposition of Ag sol atop the monolayer. These sandwiches were then characterized by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The resulting spectra were compared to the bulk spectrum of the dimer and to the Ag nanosurface/OPE SERS spectra. The intensities of the SERS spectra in both systems exhibit a strong dependence on Ag deposition time and the results are also suggestive of intense interparticle coupling of the electromagnetic fields in both the AgNW/OPE/Ag and the AgNS/OPE/Ag systems. Three previously unobserved bands (1219, 1234, 2037 cm -1) arose in the SER spectra of the sandwiches and their presence is attributed to the strong enhancement of the electromagnetic field which is predicted from the COSMOL computational package. The 544 cm -1 disulfide bond which is observed in the spectrum of solid OPE but is absent in the AgNS/OPE/Ag and AgNW/OPE/Ag spectra is indicative of chemisorption of OPE to the nanoparticles through oxidative dissociation of the disulfide bond.

  18. A study of the cleft region using synoptic ionospheric plasma data obtained by the polar orbiting satellites Aeros-B and Isis-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kist, R.; Klumpar, D.

    1980-01-01

    The concentrations of O(+) and NO(+) in the dayside high-latitude cleft region of the ionosphere are investigated based on synoptic particle and plasma measurements obtained by the polar orbiting Aeros-B and Isis-2 satellites. At a time when the orbital planes of the satellites are almost at right angles to each other, three maxima in ion temperature are observed, with two of them accompanied by an increased electron temperature and electron density irregularities, and the density of the molecular ions NO(+) and O2(+) is found to increase at the expense of O(+) density. Results are discussed in terms of a theory relating perpendicular electric fields to oxygen atom reaction rates. Systematic analysis of the Aeros data base reveals 14 additional instances of O(+) to NO(+) conversion, with a large variety of forms and structures reflecting the complex structure and dynamics of the high-latitude dayside ionosphere.

  19. Aerosol single-scattering albedo over the global oceans: Comparing PARASOL retrievals with AERONET, OMI, and AeroCom models estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Bian, Huisheng; Curci, Gabriele; Myhre, Gunnar; van Noije, Twan; Schulz, Michael; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Zhang, Kai

    2015-09-27

    The aerosol Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) over the global oceans is evaluated based on polarimetric measurements by the PARASOL satellite. The retrieved values for SSA and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) agree well with the ground-based measurements of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The global coverage provided by the PARASOL observations represents a unique opportunity to evaluate SSA and AOD simulated by atmospheric transport model runs, as performed in the AeroCom framework. The SSA estimate provided by the AeroCom models is generally higher than the SSA retrieved from both PARASOL and AERONET. On the other hand, the mean simulated AOD is about right or slightly underestimated compared with observations. An overestimate of the SSA by the models would suggest that these simulate an overly strong aerosol radiative cooling at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and underestimate it at surface. This implies that aerosols have a potential stronger impact within the atmosphere than currently simulated.

  20. Aero-acoustic experimental verification of optimum configuration of variable-pitch fans for 40 x 80 foot subsonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lown, H.

    1977-01-01

    The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of two drive fan configurations (low-speed and high-speed variable pitch design) for a 40 x 80 foot wind tunnel were monitored. A 1/7-scale model was utilized. The necessary aero-acoustic data reduction computer program logic was supplied. Test results were evaluated, and the optimum configuration to be employed in the 40 foot full scale fan was recommended.

  1. Evaluation of the aerosol vertical distribution in global aerosol models through comparison against CALIOP measurements: AeroCom phase II results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Brigitte; Schulz, Michael; Bréon, François-Marie; Dentener, Frank; Steensen, Birthe Marie; Griesfeller, Jan; Winker, David; Balkanski, Yves; Bauer, Susanne E.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Berntsen, Terje; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven; Hauglustaine, Didier A.; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevâg, Alf; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, Ulrike; Myhre, Gunnar; Rasch, Phil; Seland, Åyvind; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Stier, Philip; Tackett, Jason; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Vuolo, Maria Raffaella; Yoon, Jinho; Zhang, Kai

    2016-06-01

    The ability of 11 models in simulating the aerosol vertical distribution from regional to global scales, as part of the second phase of the AeroCom model intercomparison initiative (AeroCom II), is assessed and compared to results of the first phase. The evaluation is performed using a global monthly gridded data set of aerosol extinction profiles built for this purpose from the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) Layer Product 3.01. Results over 12 subcontinental regions show that five models improved, whereas three degraded in reproducing the interregional variability in Zα0-6 km, the mean extinction height diagnostic, as computed from the CALIOP aerosol profiles over the 0-6 km altitude range for each studied region and season. While the models' performance remains highly variable, the simulation of the timing of the Zα0-6 km peak season has also improved for all but two models from AeroCom Phase I to Phase II. The biases in Zα0-6 km are smaller in all regions except Central Atlantic, East Asia, and North and South Africa. Most of the models now underestimate Zα0-6 km over land, notably in the dust and biomass burning regions in Asia and Africa. At global scale, the AeroCom II models better reproduce the Zα0-6 km latitudinal variability over ocean than over land. Hypotheses for the performance and evolution of the individual models and for the intermodel diversity are discussed. We also provide an analysis of the CALIOP limitations and uncertainties contributing to the differences between the simulations and observations.

  2. Engine Development Design Margins Briefing Charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentz, Chuck

    2006-01-01

    New engines experience durability problems after entering service. The most prevalent and costly is the hot section, particularly the high-pressure turbine. The origin of durability problems can be traced back to: 1) the basic aero-mechanical design systems, assumptions, and design margins used by the engine designers, 2) the available materials systems, and 3) to a large extent, aggressive marketing in a highly competitive environment that pushes engine components beyond the demonstrated capability of the basic technology available for the hardware designs. Unfortunately the user must operate the engine in the service environment in order to learn the actual thrust loading and the time at max effort take-off conditions used in service are needed to determine the hot section life. Several hundred thousand hours of operational service will be required before the demonstrated reliability of a fleet of engines or the design deficiencies of the engine hot section parts can be determined. Also, it may take three to four engine shop visits for heavy maintenance on the gas path hardware to establish cost effective build standards. Spare parts drive the oerator's engine maintenance costs but spare parts also makes lots of money for the engine manufacturer during the service life of an engine. Unless competition prevails for follow-on engine buys, there is really no motivation for an OEM to spend internal money to improve parts durability and reduce earnings derived from a lucrative spare parts business. If the hot section life is below design goals or promised values, the OEM migh argue that the engine is being operated beyond its basic design intent. On the other hand, the airframer and the operator will continue to remind the OEM that his engine was selected based on a lot of promises to deliver spec thrust with little impact on engine service life if higher thrust is used intermittently. In the end, a standoff prevails and nothing gets fixed. This briefing will propose

  3. Visualizing Redox Dynamics of a Single Ag/AgCl Heterogeneous Nanocatalyst at Atomic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yimin A; Li, Liang; Li, Zheng; Kinaci, Alper; Chan, Maria K Y; Sun, Yugang; Guest, Jeffrey R; McNulty, Ian; Rajh, Tijana; Liu, Yuzi

    2016-03-22

    Operando characterization of gas-solid reactions at the atomic scale is of great importance for determining the mechanism of catalysis. This is especially true in the study of heterostructures because of structural correlation between the different parts. However, such experiments are challenging and have rarely been accomplished. In this work, atomic scale redox dynamics of Ag/AgCl heterostructures have been studied using in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in combination with density function theory (DFT) calculations. The reduction of Ag/AgCl to Ag is likely a result of the formation of Cl vacancies while Ag(+) ions accept electrons. The oxidation process of Ag/AgCl has been observed: rather than direct replacement of Cl by O, the Ag/AgCl nanocatalyst was first reduced to Ag, and then Ag was oxidized to different phases of silver oxide under different O2 partial pressures. Ag2O formed at low O2 partial pressure, whereas AgO formed at atmospheric pressure. By combining in situ ETEM observation and DFT calculations, this structural evolution is characterized in a distinct nanoscale environment. PMID:26937679

  4. Research on the aero-thermal effects by 3D analysis model of the optical window of the infrared imaging guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo; Li, Lin; Zhu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Researches on hypersonic vehicles have been a hotspot in the field of aerospace because of the pursuits for higher speed by human being. Infrared imaging guidance is playing a very important role in modern warfare. When an Infrared Ray(IR) imaging guided missile is flying in the air at high speed, its optical dome suffers from serious aero-optic effects because of air flow. The turbulence around the dome and the thermal effects of the optical window would cause disturbance to the wavefront from the target. Therefore, detected images will be biased, dithered and blurred, and the capabilities of the seeker for detecting, tracking and recognizing are weakened. In this paper, methods for thermal and structural analysis with Heat Transfer and Elastic Mechanics are introduced. By studying the aero-thermal effects and aero-thermal radiation effects of the optical window, a 3D analysis model of the optical window is established by using finite element method. The direct coupling analysis is employed as a solving strategy. The variation regularity of the temperature field is obtained. For light with different incident angles, the influence on the ray propagation caused by window deformation is analyzed with theoretical calculation and optical/thermal/structural integrated analysis method respectively.

  5. Simulating Global AeroMACS Airport Ground Station Antenna Power Transmission Limits to Avoid Interference With Mobile Satellite Service Feeder Uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS), which is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard, is expected to be implemented in the 5091 to 5150 MHz frequency band. As this band is also occupied by Mobile Satellite Service feeder uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. In this study, the cumulative interference power distribution at low Earth orbit from transmitters at global airports was simulated with the Visualyse Professional software. The dependence of the interference power on antenna distribution, gain patterns, duty cycle, and antenna tilt was simulated. As a function of these parameters, the simulation results are presented in terms of the limitations on transmitter power from global airports required to maintain the cumulative interference power under the established threshold.

  6. Visible emission from Ag+ exchanged SOD zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Imakita, K.; Fujii, M.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.; Gordina, N. E.; Saïd, B.; Galarneau, A.

    2015-09-01

    Broad visible emissions dominant at green or red have been observed for the thermally-treated Ag+ exchanged SOD zeolites, determined by the Ag+ loading contents and the excitation wavelengths. Contrary to the notable reversible green/red dominant emission evolution in the Ag+ exchanged LTA zeolites upon hydration/dehydration in air (or water vapor)/vacuum, emission spectra of the Ag+ exchanged SOD zeolites are insensitive to the environmental change. This is most probably due to the difficult H2O permeation in SOD zeolites in comparison with LTA zeolites. By combining the environment dependent emission spectra of the Ag+ exchanged LTA and SOD zeolites, we proposed the following emission mechanisms for Ag+ exchanged LTA and SOD zeolites: the green emission is due to the transition from ligand-to-metal (framework O2- --> Ag+) charge transfer state to the ground state and the red emission is due to the transition from the metal-metal (Ag+-Ag+) charge transfer state to the ground state. The insensitive environment dependent emission characteristics of Ag+ exchanged SOD zeolites may have potential applications as robust phosphors.

  7. Capacitive deionization of seawater effected by nano Ag and Ag@C on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cai, P-F; Su, C-J; Chang, W-T; Chang, F-C; Peng, C-Y; Sun, I-W; Wei, Y-L; Jou, C-J; Wang, H Paul

    2014-08-30

    Drinking water shortage has become worse in recent decades. A new capacitive deionization (CDI) method for increasing water supplies through the effective desalination of seawater has been developed. Silver as nano Ag and Ag@C which was prepared by carbonization of the Ag(+)-β-cyclodextrin complex at 573 K for 30 min can add the antimicrobial function into the CDI process. The Ag@C and Ag nanoparticles dispersed on reduced graphene oxide (Ag@C/rGO and nano Ag/rGO) were used as the CDI electrodes. The nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can reduce the charging resistant, and enhance the electrosorption capability. Better CDI efficiencies with the nano Ag/rGO and Ag@C/rGO electrodes can therefore be obtained. When reversed the voltage, the electrodes can be recovered up to 90% within 5 min. This work presents the feasibility for the nano Ag and Ag@C on rGO electrodes applied in CDI process to produce drinking water from seawater or saline water. PMID:24928455

  8. Ag nanotubes and Ag/AgCl electrodes in nanoporous membranes.

    PubMed

    Davenport, Matthew; Healy, Ken; Siwy, Zuzanna S

    2011-04-15

    Miniaturization of the entire experimental setup is a key requirement for widespread application of nanodevices. For nanopore biosensing, integrating electrodes onto the nanopore membrane and controlling the pore length is important for reducing the complexity and improving the sensitivity of the system. Here we present a method to achieve these goals, which relies on electroless plating to produce Ag nanotubes in track-etched polymer nanopore templates. By plating from one side only, we create a conductive nanotube that does not span the full length of the pore, and thus can act as a nanoelectrode located inside the nanopore. To give optimal electrochemical behavior for sensing, we coat the Ag nanotube with a layer of AgCl. We characterize the behavior of this nanoelectrode by measuring its current-voltage response and find that, in most cases, the response is asymmetric. The plated nanopores have initial diameters between 100 and 300 nm, thus a range suitable for detection of viruses. PMID:21389573

  9. Facile synthesis of S–Ag nanocomposites and Ag2S short nanorods by the interaction of sulfur with AgNO3 in PEG400

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Xie, Xin-Yuan; Liang, Ming; Xie, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jie-Mei; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    A facile, eco-friendly and inexpensive method to prepare Ag2S short nanorods and S–Ag nanocomposites using sublimed sulfur, AgNO3, PVP and PEG400 was studied. According to x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the Ag2S, the products are highly crystalline and pure Ag2S nanorods with diameters of 70–160 nm and lengths of 200–360 nm. X-ray diffraction of the S–Ag nanocomposites shows that we obtained cubic Ag and S nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ plays an important role in controlling the size and morphology of the S–Ag nanocomposites. When the molar ratio of PVP to Ag+ was 10:1, smaller sizes, better dispersibility and narrower distribution of S–Ag nanocomposites with diameters of 10–40 nm were obtained. The formation mechanism of the S–Ag nanocomposites was studied by designing a series of experiments using ultraviolet–visible measurement, and it was found that S nanoparticles are produced first and act as seed crystals; then Ag+ becomes Ag nanocrystals on the surfaces of the S nanoparticles by the reduction of PVP. PEG400 acts as a catalyzer, accelerating the reaction rate, and protects the S–Ag nanocomposites from reacting to produce Ag2S. The antimicrobial experiments show that the S–Ag nanocomposites have greater antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and blue mold than Ag nanoparticles.

  10. A Mission Concept: Re-Entry Hopper-Aero-Space-Craft System on-Mars (REARM-Mars)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoodi, Faranak

    2013-01-01

    Future missions to Mars that would need a sophisticated lander, hopper, or rover could benefit from the REARM Architecture. The mission concept REARM Architecture is designed to provide unprecedented capabilities for future Mars exploration missions, including human exploration and possible sample-return missions, as a reusable lander, ascend/descend vehicle, refuelable hopper, multiple-location sample-return collector, laboratory, and a cargo system for assets and humans. These could all be possible by adding just a single customized Re-Entry-Hopper-Aero-Space-Craft System, called REARM-spacecraft, and a docking station at the Martian orbit, called REARM-dock. REARM could dramatically decrease the time and the expense required to launch new exploratory missions on Mars by making them less dependent on Earth and by reusing the assets already designed, built, and sent to Mars. REARM would introduce a new class of Mars exploration missions, which could explore much larger expanses of Mars in a much faster fashion and with much more sophisticated lab instruments. The proposed REARM architecture consists of the following subsystems: REARM-dock, REARM-spacecraft, sky-crane, secure-attached-compartment, sample-return container, agile rover, scalable orbital lab, and on-the-road robotic handymen.

  11. Benefits to the Simulation Training Community of a New ANSI Standard for the Exchange of Aero Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildreth, Bruce L.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The American Institute of Aeronautics Astronautics (AIAA) Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee is in final preparation of a new standard for the exchange of flight dynamics models. The standard will become an ANSI standard and is under consideration for submission to ISO for acceptance by the international community. The standard has some a spects that should provide benefits to the simulation training community. Use of the new standard by the training simulation community will reduce development, maintenance and technical refresh investment on each device. Furthermore, it will significantly lower the cost of performing model updates to improve fidelity or expand the envelope of the training device. Higher flight fidelity should result in better transfer of training, a direct benefit to the pilots under instruction. Costs of adopting the standard are minimal and should be paid back within the cost of the first use for that training device. The standard achie ves these advantages by making it easier to update the aerodynamic model. It provides a standard format for the model in a custom eXtensible Markup Language (XML) grammar, the Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML). It employs an existing XML grammar, MathML, to describe the aerodynamic model in an input data file, eliminating the requirement for actual software compilation. The major components of the aero model become simply an input data file, and updates are simply new XML input files. It includes naming and axis system conventions to further simplify the exchange of information.

  12. Aero-thermal performances of leakage flows injection from the endwall slot in linear cascade of high-pressure turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghopa, Wan Aizon W.; Harun, Zambri; Funazaki, Ken-ichi; Miura, Takemitsu

    2015-02-01

    The existence of a gap between combustor and turbine endwall in the real gas turbine induces to the leakages phenomenon. However, the leakages could be used as a coolant to protect the endwall surfaces from the hot gas since it could not be completely prevented. Thus, present study investigated the potential of leakage flows as a function of film cooling. In present study, the flow field at the downstream of high-pressure turbine blade has been investigated by 5-holes pitot tube. This is to reveal the aerodynamic performances under the influenced of leakage flows while the temperature measurement was conducted by thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC). Experimental has significantly captured theaerodynamics effect of leakage flows near the blade downstream. Furthermore, TLC measurement illustrated that the film cooling effectiveness contours were strongly influenced by the secondary flows behavior on the endwall region. Aero-thermal results were validated by the numerical simulation adopted by commercial software, ANSYS CFX 13. Both experimental and numerical simulation indicated almost similar trendinaero and also thermal behavior as the amount of leakage flows increases.

  13. Physical model of granule adhesion to the belt-electrodes of a tribo-aero-electrostatic separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Dascalescu, Lucian; Miloudi, Mohamed; Bilici, Mihai; Xu, Zhenming

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of tribo-aero-electrostatic separation technologies, which consist in the selective sorting of mixed granular insulating materials in a fluidized bed affected by an electric field orthogonally oriented to the direction of the fluidization air. The aim of the present paper is to put the theoretical bases for the optimization of this process, i. e. maximize the total mass of the granules collected at the two electrodes that generate the electric field. The various forces that drive a granule of given mass and electric charge through the electric field and make it stick to an electrode are expressed as functions of the several input variables and parameters of the process, such as the applied high-voltage or the surface roughness, the size and the position of the electrodes. The concepts of "critical electrostatic field" and "virtual climbing distance" are introduced. The prediction of the theoretical model are confirmed by the results of three sets of experiments, carried out on samples of a granular mixture consisting of 50% Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) and 50% High Impact Polystyrene (HIPS), originating from the recycling of waste electric and electronic equipment. Higher separation efficiency was obtained when the electric field in the active zone was intensified by the use of an additional electrode connected to the ground and when the collecting electrodes were covered by a thin insulating layer.

  14. Concurrent identification of aero-acoustic scattering and noise sources at a flow duct singularity in low Mach number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovardi, Carlo; Jaensch, Stefan; Polifke, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    A numerical method to concurrently characterize both aeroacoustic scattering and noise sources at a duct singularity is presented. This approach combines Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with techniques of System Identification (SI): In a first step, a highly resolved LES with external broadband acoustic excitation is carried out. Subsequently, time series data extracted from the LES are post-processed by means of SI to model both acoustic propagation and noise generation. The present work studies the aero-acoustic characteristics of an orifice placed in a duct at low flow Mach numbers with the "LES-SI" method. Parametric SI based on the Box-Jenkins mathematical structure is employed, with a prediction error approach that utilizes correlation analysis of the output residuals to avoid overfitting. Uncertainties of model parameters due to the finite length of times series are quantified in terms of confidence intervals. Numerical results for acoustic scattering matrices and power spectral densities of broad-band noise are validated against experimental measurements over a wide range of frequencies below the cut-off frequency of the duct.

  15. Investigation of Landslide from Deformation - Comparison of High Resolution DEM, Aero Photos Using Long Wave Length DInSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuo-Lung; Lin, Jun-Tin; Lin, Meei-Ling; Lin, Ching-Wee; Chen, Tien-Chien; Tseng, Chih-Ming; Chen, Hongey; Lin, Sheng-Chi

    2013-04-01

    Landslide is one of the common natural hazards in Taiwan, especially in central Taiwan with high elevation and steep terrain. Rainfall is increasing both in accumulation and intensity after 2000. Severe landslide events after Chi Chi earthquake are including typhoon Toraj, typhoon Mindulle, 69 heavy rainfall, typhoon Sinlaku, and typhoon Morakot. However, these landslides could be unstable or deformed after rainfall and sliding in next events. The major purpose of this study is to find these deformed but not slide out slopes but slip in following events. For this objective, differential interferometry synthetic aperture radar (DInSAR) is adopted and an event after 69 heavy rainfall is selected for this research. The vegetation in Taiwan is very well thus wave length of SAR needs as long as possible to penetrate vegetation to reach ground surface. ALOS PALSAR HH image is used in this research to derive fringe in study area. The Study area ranges from Puli in south and Wulin in north, including May River basin, Lushan hot spring area, Chingjing area, and Tsuiluan area. The result shows appropriate relationship between the founded deformed slope from DInSAR and landslip in following event. Also high resolution DEM and aero photos are used to derive topography and landslide identification. The results also show that the process can be reference to produce landslide susceptibility map.

  16. Bioaccumulation of Zn and Ag Nanoparticles in the Earthworms (Eisenia fetida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Lee Seung; Sung-Dae, Kim; Yi, Yang Song; Byeong-Gweon, Lee

    2014-05-01

    Many studies are carried out to evaluate environmental effects of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). Most of the previous studies primarily focused on the effects of nanoparticles into the aquatic environment and human. Model studies predict that ENPs released into environment would transferred primarily to the soil of the terrestrial environment. Despite this prediction, biogeochemical behavior of ENPs in soil environment as well as bioavailability of ENPs to soil-dwelling organisms such as earthworm, springtail, isopod and nematodes are poorly understood. The main goal of this study was to compare the bioaccumulation factor (BAFs) and subcellular partitioning of nanoparticles in the soil-dwelling earthworm (Eisenia fetida) from ENP (ZnO and Ag nanoparticles) or ionic metal (Zn2+, Ag+) contaminated soil. And the sequential extraction was also used to determine the mobility of metals in soil which could be used as to predict bioavailability and compare that with bioaccumulation factor. The radiotracer method was employed to trace the transfer of ENPs and ionic metal among different environmental media and animals. Radiolabeled 65ZnO, 110mAgNPs coated with PVP or citrate were synthesized in the laboratory and their chemical and biological behavior was compared to ionic 65Zn and 110mAg. The BAFs of Zn and Ag in the earthworms were determined after animals exposed to the contaminated soils. After the 7 days of elimination phase, subcellular partitioning of metals were also obtained. BAF for ZnO(0.06) was 31 times lower than that for Zn ion (1.86), suggesting that ZnO was less bioavailable than its ionic form from contaminated soil. On the other hands, BAFs for AgNPs coated with PVP (0.12) or with citrate (0.11) were comparable to those for Ag ion (0.17), indicating that Ag from contaminated soil was bioavailable in a similar rate regardless of chemical forms. The subcellular partitioning results showed that bioaccumulated Zn from Zn ion and ZnO contaminated soil were

  17. Acceleration of polarized proton at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y Y

    1980-01-01

    The unexpected importance of high energy spin effects and the success of the ZGS in correcting many intrinsic and imperfection depolarizing resonances led us to attempt to accelerate polarized protons in the AGS. A collaborative effort is underway by the groups in Argonne, Michigan, Rice, Yale and Brookhaven to improve and modify the AGS to accelerate polarized protons. With the appropriate funding the first polarized proton acceleration at the AGS should be possible by 1983.

  18. The cardiovascular response to the AGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardus, David; Mctaggart, Wesley G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results of experiments on human subjects conducted to study the cardiovascular response to various g-levels and exposure times using an artificial gravity simulator (AGS). The AGS is a short arm centrifuge consisting of a turntable, a traction system, a platform and four beds. Data collection hardware is part of the communication system. The AGS provides a steep acceleration gradient in subjects in the supine position.

  19. AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids with highly efficient visible-light driven photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Masanao; Suzuki, Tohru; Kaneco, Satoshi

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid was prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} displays the excellent photocatalytic activity under visible light. • AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transforms to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system. • h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization over AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. • The activity enhancement is ascribed to a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI. - Abstract: Highly efficient visible-light-driven AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrid photocatalysts with different mole ratios of AgI were prepared via an in situ anion-exchange method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) technique. Under visible light irradiation (>420 nm), the AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} photocatalysts displayed the higher photocatalytic activity than pure Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and AgI for the decolorization of acid orange 7 (AO 7). Among the hybrid photocatalysts, AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with 80% of AgI exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity for the decolorization of AO 7. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} readily transformed to be Ag@AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} system while the photocatalytic activity of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} remained after 5 recycling runs. In addition, the quenching effects of different scavengers displayed that the reactive h{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup ·−} play the major role in the AO 7 decolorization. The photocatalytic activity enhancement of AgI/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} hybrids can be ascribed to the efficient separation of electron–hole pairs through a Z-scheme system composed of Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, Ag and AgI, in which Ag nanoparticles act as the charge separation center.

  20. Visible-light-driven photocatalysts Ag/AgCl dispersed on mesoporous Al2O3 with enhanced photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhouzhou; Yu, Jiajie; Sun, Dongping; Wang, Tianhe

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, Ag/AgCl and Ag/AgCl/Al2O3 photocatalysts were synthesized via a precipitation reaction between NaCl and CH3COOAg or Ag(NH3)2NO3, wherein Ag/AgCl was immobilized into mesoporous Al2O3 medium. The Ag/AgCl-based nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and so on. The photocatalysts displayed excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradations of methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB) pollutants under visible light irradiation. The Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg)/Al2O3 sample exhibited the best photocatalytic performance, degrading 99% MO after 9min of irradiation, which was 1.1 times, 1.22 times and 1.65 times higher than that of Ag/AgCl(Ag(NH3)2NO3)/Al2O3, Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg) and Ag/AgCl(Ag(NH3)2NO3) photocatalyst, respectively. Meanwhile, Ag/AgCl(CH3COOAg)/Al2O3 also showed excellent capability of MB degradation. Compared to the data reported for Ag/AgCl/TiO2, the Ag/AgCl/Al2O3 prepared in this work exhibited a good performance for the degradation of methyl orange (MO). The results suggest that the dispersion of Ag/AgCl on mesoporous Al2O3 strongly affected their photocatalytic activities. O2(-), OH radicals and Cl(0) atoms are main active species during photocatalysis. PMID:27442145

  1. Multiple Partial Siberian Snakes in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, J.; Ahrens, L. A.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.; Courant, E. D.; Gardner, C. J.; Glenn, J. W.; Huang, H.; Luccio, A. U.; MacKay, W. W.; Okamura, M.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Hattori, T.; Lin, F.

    2007-06-13

    Polarized protons are accelerated up to 24.3 GeV in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). To accelerate the beam with preserving the polarization, two different types of helical dipole partial Siberian snake have been installed to the AGS. One is a superconducting magnet (Cold Snake, CSNK), and the other is a normal conducting one (Warm Snake, WSNK). With these snake magnets, the polarization at the AGS extraction achieved 65%. However, the AGS has spin mismatches at the injection and extraction. This description shows calculated results to have better spin matching with using two or three snakes.

  2. Synthesis of Cu-Ag@Ag particles using hyperbranched polyester as template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen-Song

    2015-07-01

    In this manuscript, the third-generation hyperbranched polyester was synthesized with 2, 2-dimethylol propionic acid as AB2 monomer and pentaerythrite as core molecule by using step by step polymerization process at first. Then, the Cu-Ag particles were prepared by co-reduction of silver nitrate and copper nitrate with ascorbic acid in the aqueous solution using hyperbranched polyester as template. Finally, the Cu-Ag@Ag particles were prepared by coating silver on the surface of Cu-Ag particles by reduction of silver nitrate. The synthesized hyperbranched polyester and Cu-Ag@Ag particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, UV-vis spectra, x-ray diffraction, Laser light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and SEM. UV-vis spectra results showed that the Cu-Ag@Ag particles had a strong absorption band at around 420 nm. Laser light scattering and SEM studies confirmed that the most frequent particle sizes of Cu-Ag@Ag particles were 1.2 um. TGA results indicated that the Cu-Ag@Ag particles had good thermal stability. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Antibacterial action of Ag-containing MFI zeolite at low Ag loadings.

    PubMed

    Lalueza, Patricia; Monzón, Marta; Arruebo, Manuel; Santamaria, Jesus

    2011-01-14

    We show that Ag-containing zeolites are highly effective against Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacteria even at low Ag loadings and in the presence of high (10(9) CFU per mL) bacterial concentrations. At short contact times the bactericidal efficiency correlates strongly with Ag(+) release. At longer times data dispersion is higher, probably as a consequence of bacterial metabolism. PMID:21103583

  4. 78 FR 30965 - AG Valley Railroad, LLC-Operation Exemption-Ag Valley Holdings, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board AG Valley Railroad, LLC--Operation Exemption--Ag Valley Holdings, LLC AG... original and 10 copies of all pleadings, referring to Docket No. FD 35736, must be filed with the...

  5. Progress with the AGS Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Rare K-decay, neutrino and heavy ion physics demands that a rapid- cycling high vacuum and high intensity Booster be built for the AGS at Brookhaven. For each mode of operation there are corresponding accelerator physics and design issues needing special attention. Problems pertinent to any single mode of operation have been encountered and solved before, but putting high intensity proton requirements and high vacuum heavy ion requirements into one machine demands careful design considerations and decisions. The lattice design and magnet characteristics will be briefly reviewed. Major design issues will be discussed and design choices explained. Finally, the construction status and schedule will be presented. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Polarization preservation in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.

    1983-01-01

    The successful operation of a high energy polarized beam at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS) with the concommitant development of depolarizing resonance correction techniques has led to the present project of commissioning such a beam at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). A description of the project was presented at the 1981 National Accelerator Conference. I would like to now present a more detailed description of how we plan to preserve the polarization during acceleration, and to present our game plan for tuning through some 50 resonances and reaching our goal of a 26 GeV polarized proton beam with greater than 60% polarization.

  7. Hypernuclear research at the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    Although the field of hypernuclear research is over 30 years old, progress in exploring the detailed behavior of hypernuclei has been slow. This fact is due mainly to the technical problems of producing and studying these strange objects. Indeed each step in the improvement of technique has been accompanied by a breakthrough in our understanding of this fascinating subject. In this paper, the aim is to describe the evolution of hypernuclear research, stressing especially the contributions of the program based on the Brookhaven AGS. 23 references, 17 figures, 1 table.

  8. New AGS fast extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.

    1980-09-01

    Both the high energy physics program and ISA injection require an improved fast extraction system from the AGS. The proposed new system consists of a fast kicker at H5 and an ejector magnet at H10. The H5 kicker is capable of producing 1.2 mrad deflection and rising up to 99% strength in 150 nsec with flat top ripple within +- 1%. It is found that the focusing strengths and positions of UQ3-UQ7 have to be modified to achieve an achromatic condition at the end of 8/sup 0/-bend. Also, the conceptual design of the H5 magnet and the pulser system are discussed.

  9. Toxicokinetics of Ag in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus exposed to Ag NPs and AgNO₃ via soil and food.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Morgan, A John; Kille, Peter; Svendsen, Claus; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Mosselmans, J Fred W; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2016-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been used in numerous consumer products and may enter the soil through the land application of biosolids. However, little is known about the relationship between Ag NP exposure and their bioavailability for soil organisms. This study aims at comparing the uptake and elimination kinetics of Ag upon exposures to different Ag forms (NPs and ionic Ag (as AgNO3)) in the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus. Isopods were exposed to contaminated Lufa 2.2 soil or alder leaves as food. Uptake and elimination rate constants for soil exposure did not significantly differ between Ag NPs and ionic Ag at 30 and 60 mg Ag/kg. For dietary exposure, the uptake rate constant was up to 5 times higher for Ag NPs than for AgNO3, but this was related to feeding activity and exposure concentrations, while no difference in the elimination rate constants was found. When comparing both routes, dietary exposure resulted in lower Ag uptake rate constants but elimination rate constants did not differ. A fast Ag uptake was observed from both routes and most of the Ag taken up seemed not to be eliminated. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence showed Ag in the S-cells of the hepatopancreas, thus supporting the observations from the kinetic experiment (i.e. low elimination). In addition, our results show that isopods have an extremely high Ag accumulation capacity, suggesting the presence of an efficient Ag storage compartment. PMID:26581474

  10. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-→1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-←1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(υ)→1Ag-(υ) emission and the 3Ag-(υ)←1Ag-(υ) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of υ = 2 → 1 → 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  11. Dendritic cell vaccine modified by Ag85A gene enhances anti-tumor immunity against bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Wang, Jinyan; Wang, Danan; Wang, Huan; Shan, Fengping; Chen, Liudan; Hou, Ying; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Chang-Long

    2012-11-01

    The ability of dendritic cells to provide all the signals required for T-cell activation makes them an ideal cancer vaccine platform. With the use of established DC2.4 cell line, originated from C57BL/6 mice and developed by superinfecting GM-CSF transduced bone marrow cells with myc and raf oncogenes, we investigated whether the DC 2.4 cell line transfected with Ag85A gene could enhance immunity against bladder cancer. Both phenotypic and functional analyses of Ag85A-DCs were done with use of FCM and T cell proliferation test. The cytotoxicity of Ag85A-DCs loaded with tumor cell lysate was verified by LDH. Finally, the production of interferon gamma was assayed by both ELISA and FCM. The immunotherapeutic effect of DC vaccine on murine bladder cancer was assessed pharmacologically and pathologically. Our results showed that Ag85A gene transfected DCs expressed high levels of key surface markers such as CD80, CD86 and MHC-II. The CTL primed with MB49 lysate-pulsed Ag85A-DCs elicits higher activity against MB49 tumor cells and upregulated level of IFN-γ production. Furthermore, the significant inhibitive effect on tumor growth in mice was found in the group of Ag85A-DC vaccine. The infiltration of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cell within established tumor treated by Ag85A-DC vaccine significantly increased as compared with control groups. It is therefore concluded that DCs engineered by Ag85A gene exerts enhanced anti-tumor immunity against bladder cancer and this study might provide a meaningful mode of action with the use of Ag85A engineered DC vaccination in anti-cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22884511

  12. Layered Systems Engineering Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breidenthal, Julian C.; Overman, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    A notation is described for depicting the relationships between multiple, contemporaneous systems engineering efforts undertaken within a multi-layer system-of-systems hierarchy. We combined the concepts of remoteness of activity from the end customer, depiction of activity on a timeline, and data flow to create a new kind of diagram which we call a "Layered Vee Diagram." This notation is an advance over previous notations because it is able to be simultaneously precise about activity, level of granularity, product exchanges, and timing; these advances provide systems engineering managers a significantly improved ability to express and understand the relationships between many systems engineering efforts. Using the new notation, we obtain a key insight into the relationship between project duration and the strategy selected for chaining the systems engineering effort between layers, as well as insights into the costs, opportunities, and risks associated with alternate chaining strategies.

  13. Intracellular Uptake: A Possible Mechanism for Silver Engineered Nanoparticle Toxicity to a Freshwater Alga Ochromonas danica

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ai-Jun; Luo, Zhiping; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Chin, Wei-Chun; Santschi, Peter H.; Quigg, Antonietta

    2010-01-01

    The behavior and toxicity of silver engineered nanoparticles (Ag-ENs) to the mixotrophic freshwater alga Ochromonas danica were examined in the present study to determine whether any other mechanisms are involved in their algal toxicity besides Ag+ liberation outside the cells. Despite their good dispersability, the Ag-ENs were found to continuously aggregate and dissolve rapidly. When the initial nanoparticle concentration was lower than 10 µM, the total dissolved Ag+ concentration ([Ag+]T) in the suspending media reached its maximum after 1 d and then decreased suggesting that Ag+ release might be limited by the nanoparticle surface area under these conditions. Furthermore, Ag-EN dissolution extent remarkably increased in the presence of glutathione. In the Ag-EN toxicity experiment, glutathione was also used to eliminate the indirect effects of Ag+ that was released. However, remarkable toxicity was still observed although the free Ag+ concentration in the media was orders of magnitude lower than the non-observed effect concentration of Ag+ itself. Such inhibitive effects were mitigated when more glutathione was added, but could never be completely eliminated. Most importantly, we demonstrate, for the first time, that Ag-ENs can be taken in and accumulated inside the algal cells, where they exerted their toxic effects. Therefore, nanoparticle internalization may be an alternative pathway through which algal growth can be influenced. PMID:21203552

  14. Cold Aero Performance of a Two-Dimensional Mixer Ejector Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balan, C.

    2005-01-01

    Since 1986, NASA and the U.S. aerospace industry have been assessing the economic viability and environmental acceptability of a second-generation supersonic civil transport, or High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Environmental acceptability in terms of airport community noise and economic viability are critical elements in this endeavor. Development of a propulsion system that satisfies strict airport noise regulations (FAR36 Stage III levels), at acceptable performance and weight, is critical to the success of any HSCT program. Two-dimensional mixer-ejector (2DME) exhaust systems are one approach in achieving this goal. In support of HSCT development, GEAE (GE Aircraft Engines), under contract to the NASA Glenn Research Center, conducted this test program at the NASA Langley 16 ft transonic wind tunnel to evaluate the cold aerodynamic performance aspects of the 2DME exhaust system concept. The effects of SAR (SAR, suppressor area ratio, = mixed-flow area/primary nozzle throat area), MAR (MAR = overall exhaust system exit/mixing-plane area), flap length, CER (suppressor chute expansion ratio), chute alignment, and free stream Mach number were investigated on a 1/11th cold aerodynamic scale model of a 2DME exhaust system.

  15. Unsteady Aero Computation of a 1 1/2 Stage Large Scale Rotating Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    To, Wai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This report is the documentation of the work performed for the Subsonic Rotary Wing Project under the NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. It was funded through Task Number NNC10E420T under GESS-2 Contract NNC06BA07B in the period of 10/1/2010 to 8/31/2011. The objective of the task is to provide support for the development of variable speed power turbine technology through application of computational fluid dynamics analyses. This includes work elements in mesh generation, multistage URANS simulations, and post-processing of the simulation results for comparison with the experimental data. The unsteady CFD calculations were performed with the TURBO code running in multistage single passage (phase lag) mode. Meshes for the blade rows were generated with the NASA developed TCGRID code. The CFD performance is assessed and improvements are recommended for future research in this area. For that, the United Technologies Research Center's 1 1/2 stage Large Scale Rotating Turbine was selected to be the candidate engine configuration for this computational effort because of the completeness and availability of the data.

  16. Sound Generation in the Presence of Moving Surfaces with Application to Internally Generated Aircraft Engine Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Envia, E.

    2002-01-01

    In many cases of technological interest solid boundaries play a direct role in the aerodynamic sound generation process and their presence often results in a large increase in the acoustic radiation. A generalized treatment of the emission of sound from moving boundaries is presented. The approach is similar to that of Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (1969) but the effect of the surrounding mean flow is explicitly accounted for. The results are used to develop a rational framework for the prediction of internally generated aero-engine noise. The final formulas suggest some new noise sources that may be of practical significance.

  17. Prediction of rotating disc flow and heat transfer in gas turbine engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, John W.

    Motivated by the need to improve design techniques for aero engines considerable effort has been put into developing predictive techniques for rotating disc flow and heat transfer. Some notable advances have been made recently and these are reviewed here. The theoretical techniques employed include analytical solutions for laminar flow, momentum-integral methods for turbulent flow, and finite difference solutions of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Each of these methods is discussed and predictive capability is illustrated through comparisons with experimental data.

  18. Visible light driven photocatalysis and antibacterial activity of AgVO{sub 3} and Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anamika; Dutta, Dimple P.; Ballal, A.; Tyagi, A.K.; Fulekar, M.H.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ag/AgVO{sub 3} and pure AgVO{sub 3} nanowires synthesized by sonochemical process. • Characterization done using XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and BET analysis. • Visible light degradation of RhB by Ag/AgVO{sub 3} within 45 min. • Antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} demonstrated. - Abstract: Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires and AgVO{sub 3} nanorods were synthesized in aqueous media via a facile sonochemical route. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis, scanning electron microscopy together with an energy dispersion X-ray spectrum analysis, transmission electron microscopy and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The results revealed that inert atmosphere promotes the formation of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires. The photocatalytic studies revealed that the Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires exhibited complete photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B within 45 min under visible light irradiation. The antibacterial activity of Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires was tested against Escherechia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The minimum growth inhibitory concentration value was found to be 50 and 10 folds lower than for the antibiotic ciprofloxacin for E. coli and B. subtilis, respectively. The antibacterial properties of the β-AgVO{sub 3} nanorods prove that in case of the Ag dispersed Ag/AgVO{sub 3} nanowires, the enhanced antibacterial action is also due to contribution from the AgVO{sub 3} support.

  19. The AGS synchrotron with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas N.; Huang, H.; Roser, T.; MacKay, W.W.; Trbojevic, D.

    2012-05-20

    The idea of using two partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. The placement of four helical magnets in the AGS ring provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS which uses two partial helical magnets. First, the symmetric placement of the four helical magnets allows for a better control of the AGS optics with reduced values of the beta functions especially near beam injection, second, the vertical spin direction during beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, and third, it provides for a larger 'spin tune gap', which allows the vertical and horizontal tunes to be placed, and prevent the horizontal and vertical intrinsic spin resonances of the AGS to occur during the acceleration cycle. Although the same spin gap can be obtained with a single or two partial helices, the required high field strength of a single helix makes its use impractical, and that of the double helix rather difficult. In this paper we will provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  20. Acceleration of heavy ions in the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, M.Q.

    1983-01-01

    It is possible to use the Brookhaven AGS as a heavy ion machine by adding a cyclotron to the Tandem and using this combination as injector. An intermediate step for lighter ions might consist of injecting the Tandem beam directly into the AGS. In either case, quite high intensities should be possible.

  1. Tribological properties of ag-based amphiphiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most ag-based materials are amphiphilic because they comprise polar and non-polar groups within the same molecule. One of the major categories of amphiphilic ag-based materials are seed oils, which are actively investigated as substitutes for petroleum in a wide variety of consumer and industrial a...

  2. AgRISTARS documents tracking list report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A quarterly listing of documents issued and placed in the AgRISTARS tracking system is provided. The technical publications are arranged by type of documents. The reference AgRISTARS document number, title and date of publication, the issuing organization, and the National Technical Information Service reference number is given.

  3. Recent hypernuclear research at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Recent AGS experiments contributing to our knowledge of hypernuclei are reviewed. These experiments have suggested new areas of research on hypernuclei. With the proper beam line facilities, the AGS will be able to perform experiments in these areas and provide a transition to the future era of ''kaon factories''. 20 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Effects of soil and dietary exposures to Ag nanoparticles and AgNO₃ in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Ag-NPs and AgNO3 on the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus were determined upon soil and dietary exposures. Isopods avoided Ag in soil, with EC50 values of ∼16.0 and 14.0 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. Feeding inhibition tests in soil showed EC50s for effects on consumption ratio of 127 and 56.7 mg Ag/kg, respectively. Although similar EC50s for effects on biomass were observed for nanoparticulate and ionic Ag (114 and 120 mg Ag/kg dry soil, respectively), at higher concentrations greater biomass loss was found for AgNO3. Upon dietary exposure, AgNO3 was more toxic, with EC50 for effects on biomass change being >1500 and 233 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. The difference in toxicity between Ag-NPs and AgNO3 could not be explained from Ag body concentrations. This suggests that the relation between toxicity and bioavailability of Ag-NPs differs from that of ionic Ag in soils. PMID:26071943

  5. Laser generated Ag and Ag-Au composite nanoparticles for refractive index sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, M. P.; Soni, R. K.

    2014-09-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is highly sensitive to size, shape and the surrounding medium. Metal targets were laser ablated in liquid for preparation of spherical Ag and Ag@Au core-shell NP colloidal solution for refractive index sensing. The LSPR peak wavelength and broadening of the NPs were monitored in different refractive index liquid. Quasi-static Mie theory simulation results show that refractive index sensitivity of Ag, Ag-Au alloy and Ag@Au core-shell NPs increases nearly linearly with size and shell thickness. However, the increased broadening of the LSPR peak with size, alloy concentration and Au shell thickness restricts the sensing resolution of these NPs. Figure-of-merit (FOM) was calculated to optimize the size of Ag NPs, concentration of Ag-Au alloy NPs and Au shell thickness of Ag@Au core-shell NPs. The refractive index sensitivity (RIS) and FOM were optimum in the size range 20-40 nm for Ag NPs. Laser generated Ag@Au NPs of Au shell thickness in the range of 1-2 nm showed optimum FOM, where thin layer of Au coating can improve the stability of Ag NPs.

  6. Raman scattering enhanced within the plasmonic gap between an isolated Ag triangular nanoplate and Ag film.

    PubMed

    Li, Kuanguo; Jiang, Kang; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yong; Mao, Lei; Zeng, Jie; Lu, Yonghua; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-22

    Enhanced electromagnetic field in the tiny gaps between metallic nanostructures holds great promise in optical applications. Herein, we report novel out-of-plane nanogaps composed of micrometer-sized Ag triangular nanoplates (AgTN) on Ag films. Notably, the new coupled plasmonic structure can dramatically enhance the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by visible laser excitation, although the micrometer-sized AgTN has localized plasmon resonance at infrared wavelength. This enhancement is derived from the gap plasmon polariton between the AgTN and Ag film, which is excited via the antenna effect of the corner and edge of the AgTN. Systematic SERS studies indicated that the plasmon enhancement was on the order of corner > edge > face. These results were further verified by theoretical simulations. Our device paves the way for rational design of sensitive SERS substrates by judiciously choosing appropriate nanoparticles and optimizing the gap distance. PMID:26939539

  7. Raman scattering enhanced within the plasmonic gap between an isolated Ag triangular nanoplate and Ag film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kuanguo; Jiang, Kang; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yong; Mao, Lei; Zeng, Jie; Lu, Yonghua; Wang, Pei

    2016-04-01

    Enhanced electromagnetic field in the tiny gaps between metallic nanostructures holds great promise in optical applications. Herein, we report novel out-of-plane nanogaps composed of micrometer-sized Ag triangular nanoplates (AgTN) on Ag films. Notably, the new coupled plasmonic structure can dramatically enhance the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by visible laser excitation, although the micrometer-sized AgTN has localized plasmon resonance at infrared wavelength. This enhancement is derived from the gap plasmon polariton between the AgTN and Ag film, which is excited via the antenna effect of the corner and edge of the AgTN. Systematic SERS studies indicated that the plasmon enhancement was on the order of corner > edge > face. These results were further verified by theoretical simulations. Our device paves the way for rational design of sensitive SERS substrates by judiciously choosing appropriate nanoparticles and optimizing the gap distance.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of AgI/Ag hollow fibers for near-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xuan; Liu, Bing-Hong; He, Yu-Jing; Sun, Bang-Shan; Iwai, Katsumasa; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei

    2013-07-01

    AgI/Ag hollow fibers have found applications in mid- and far-infrared regions owing to the properties of low loss and high power capability. It has been a challenge to fabricate low-loss AgI/Ag hollow fiber in the near-infrared laser light. In this paper, we report on improvements of the fabrication technology. In order to coat a thin and smooth AgI film, ethanol was used as the solvent of iodine and the iodination process is carried out in low temperatures with high flow-rate of iodine solution. Low-loss AgI/Ag hollow fibers with various inner diameters were firstly obtained for 1 μm wavelength band. Fabrication parameters were discussed in detail and transmission properties were characterized.

  9. Atomic-level observation of Ag-ion hopping motion in AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Komatsuda, S.; Mizuuchi, R.; Irioka, N.; Kawata, S.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2015-04-01

    Applicability of the 111mCd(→111Cd) and 111In(→111Cd) probes to the study of dynamics in polycrystalline silver iodide (AgI) was examined by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique. It was found that the 111mCd(→111Cd) probe occupies a unique site in γ-AgI and exhibits nuclear relaxation caused by dynamic perturbation arising from Ag + hopping motion in α-AgI; while the residential sites of 111In(→111Cd) vary, suggesting that 111In ions can not settle themselves in a fixed site in the AgI crystal structure. We here demonstrate that 111mCd(→111Cd) can be a potential nucleus to probe the Ag +-ion dynamic motion in α-AgI.

  10. Studies on electronic structure of interfaces between Ag and gelatin for stabilization of Ag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Tadaaki; Uchida, Takayuki

    2015-06-01

    Extremely high stability of Ag nanoparticles in photographic materials has forced us to study the electronic structures of the interfaces between thin layers of Ag, Au, and Pt and their surface membranes in ambient atmosphere by photoelectron yield spectroscopy in air and Kelvin probe method. Owing to the Fermi level equalization between a metal layer and a membrane coming from air, the electron transfer took place from the membrane to Pt and Au layers and from an Ag layer to the membrane, giving the reason for poor stability of Ag nanoparticles in air. The control of the Fermi level of an Ag layer with respect to that of a gelatin membrane in air could be widely made according to Nernst’s equation by changing the pH and pAg values of an aqueous gelatin solution used to form the membrane, and thus available to stabilize Ag nanoparticles in a gelatin matrix.

  11. Nonlinear and chaotic vibration and stability analysis of an aero-elastic piezoelectric FG plate under parametric and primary excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaee, Mousa; Jahangiri, Reza

    2015-05-01

    In this study, in the presence of supersonic aerodynamic loading, the nonlinear and chaotic vibrations and stability of a simply supported Functionally Graded Piezoelectric (FGP) rectangular plate with bonded piezoelectric layer have been investigated. It is assumed that the plate is simultaneously exposed to the effects of harmonic uniaxial in-plane force and transverse piezoelectric excitations and aerodynamic loading. It is considered that the potential distribution varies linearly through the piezoelectric layer thickness, and the aerodynamic load is modeled by the first order piston theory. The von-Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations are used to consider the geometrical nonlinearity. Based on the Classical Plate Theory (CPT) and applying the Hamilton's principle, the nonlinear coupled partial differential equations of motion are derived. The Galerkin's procedure is used to reduce the equations of motion to nonlinear ordinary differential Mathieu equations. The validity of the formulation for analyzing the Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO), aero-elastic stability boundaries is accomplished by comparing the results with those of the literature, and the convergence study of the FGP plate is performed. By applying the Multiple Scales Method, the case of 1:2 internal resonance and primary parametric resonance are taken into account and the corresponding averaged equations are derived and analyzed numerically. The results are provided to investigate the effects of the forcing/piezoelectric detuning parameter, amplitude of forcing/piezoelectric excitation and dynamic pressure, on the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of the FGP plate. It is revealed that under the certain conditions, due to the existence of bi-stable region of non-trivial solutions, system shows the hysteretic behavior. Moreover, in absence of airflow, it is observed that variation of control parameters leads to the multi periodic and chaotic motions.

  12. Electrically actuated regulation valves for rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promper, Chr. F.

    2001-09-01

    From technical point of view, Liquid propellant Rocket Engine (LRE) control architectures have to be designed in such a way that: (i) complexity/weight for control and actuation power of valves is minimal, (ii) the engine working point is as far as possible adapted to actual requirements throughout the mission, and (iii) RAMS requirements are complied with. In this context, investigations related to proportional electrically actuated LRE valves are of particular interest in order to investigate the implications of "All Electric Engine control" or in-flight control of the LRE operating point, identify mechanism and electronic controller architectures which present a maximum potential for standardisation and growth, and provide a hardware demonstration of a representative electric valve which can be used for a LRE firing test. As part of the ESA-GSTP2 program, Techspace Aero conducted a market survey identifying the needs for proportional actuation. Based on these considerations, a Technical Specification has been established and a valve demonstrator has been designed and successfully tested (Alcatel ETCA for electronic aspects).

  13. AgPO2F2 and Ag9(PO2F2)14: the first Ag(i) and Ag(i)/Ag(ii) difluorophosphates with complex crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Kurzydłowski, Dominik; Grochala, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    The reaction of AgF2 with P2O3F4 yields a mixed valence Ag(I)/Ag(II) difluorophosphate salt with AgAg(PO2F2)14 stoichiometry - the first Ag(ii)-PO2F2 system known. This highly moisture sensitive brown solid is thermally stable up to 120 °C, which points at further feasible extension of the chemistry of Ag(ii)-PO2F2 systems. The crystal structure shows a very complex bonding pattern, comprising of polymeric Ag(PO2F2)14(4-) anions and two types of Ag(I) cations. One particular Ag(II) site present in the crystal structure of Ag9(PO2F2)14 is the first known example of square pyramidal penta-coordinated Ag(ii) in an oxo-ligand environment. Ag(i)PO2F2 - the product of the thermal decomposition of Ag9(PO2F2)14 - has also been characterized by thermal analysis, IR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. It has a complicated crystal structure as well, which consists of infinite 1D [Ag(I)O4/2] chains which are linked to more complex 3D structures via OPO bridges. The PO2F2(-) anions bind to cations in both compounds as bidentate oxo-ligands. The terminal F atoms tend to point inside the van der Waals cavities in the crystal structure of both compounds. All important structural details of both title compounds were corroborated by DFT calculations. PMID:26200921

  14. Using Satellite Observations to Evaluate the AeroCOM Volcanic Emissions Inventory and the Dispersal of Volcanic SO2 Clouds in MERRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Eric J.; Krotkov, Nickolay; da Silva, Arlindo; Colarco, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Simulation of volcanic emissions in climate models requires information that describes the eruption of the emissions into the atmosphere. While the total amount of gases and aerosols released from a volcanic eruption can be readily estimated from satellite observations, information about the source parameters, like injection altitude, eruption time and duration, is often not directly known. The AeroCOM volcanic emissions inventory provides estimates of eruption source parameters and has been used to initialize volcanic emissions in reanalysis projects, like MERRA. The AeroCOM volcanic emission inventory provides an eruptions daily SO2 flux and plume top altitude, yet an eruption can be very short lived, lasting only a few hours, and emit clouds at multiple altitudes. Case studies comparing the satellite observed dispersal of volcanic SO2 clouds to simulations in MERRA have shown mixed results. Some cases show good agreement with observations Okmok (2008), while for other eruptions the observed initial SO2 mass is half of that in the simulations, Sierra Negra (2005). In other cases, the initial SO2 amount agrees with the observations but shows very different dispersal rates, Soufriere Hills (2006). In the aviation hazards community, deriving accurate source terms is crucial for monitoring and short-term forecasting (24-h) of volcanic clouds. Back trajectory methods have been developed which use satellite observations and transport models to estimate the injection altitude, eruption time, and eruption duration of observed volcanic clouds. These methods can provide eruption timing estimates on a 2-hour temporal resolution and estimate the altitude and depth of a volcanic cloud. To better understand the differences between MERRA simulations and volcanic SO2 observations, back trajectory methods are used to estimate the source term parameters for a few volcanic eruptions and compared to their corresponding entry in the AeroCOM volcanic emission inventory. The nature of

  15. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys.

    PubMed

    Tie, D; Feyerabend, F; Müller, W D; Schade, R; Liefeith, K; Kainer, K U; Willumeit, R

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4) and aging (T6) heat treatment. The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH)₂ and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7), revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269), and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials. PMID:23771512

  16. Planar Waveguides Formed by Ag Na Ion Exchange in Nonlinear Optical Glasses: Diffusion and Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Marc; Videau, Jean J.; Canioni, Lionel; Adamietz, Frédéric; Sarger, Laurent; Le Flem, Gilles

    2000-01-01

    All-optical communication systems are the subject of intense research related to the integration of nonlinear optical materials. In sodiocalcic borophosphate glasses that contain niobium oxide and exhibit high nonlinear optical indices, planar waveguides have been formed by a Ag Na ion-exchange technique. WKB analysis has been used to characterize the diffusion profiles of silver ions exchanged in glass substrate samples chemically by an electron microprobe technique and optically by an M -line technique. These methods permit the Ag penetration depth and diffusion profile shape and index profiles to be determined. The results are analyzed and discussed in relation to Ca 2 concentration and exchange conditions in glasses. The Ag diffusion in these glasses can be almost entirely controlled for index-profile engineering.

  17. Tribological properties of Ag/Ti films on Al2O3 ceramic substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1991-01-01

    Ag solid lubricant films, with a thin Ti interlayer for enhanced adhesion, were sputter deposited on Al2O3 substrate disks to reduce friction and wear. The dual Ag/Ti films were tested at room temperature in a pin-on-disk tribometer sliding against bare, uncoated Al2O3 pins under a 4.9 N load at a sliding velocity of 1 m/s. The Ag/Ti films reduced the friction coefficient by 50 percent to about 0.41 compared to unlubricated baseline specimens. Pin wear was reduced by a factor of 140 and disk wear was reduced by a factor of 2.5 compared to the baseline. These films retain their good tribological properties including adhesion after heat treatments at 850 C and thus may be able to lubricate over a wide temperature range. This lubrication technique is applicable to space lubrication, advanced heat engines, and advanced transportation systems.

  18. Ag(I)-binding to phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Mehra, R K; Tran, K; Scott, G W; Mulchandani, P; Saini, S S

    1996-02-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are glutathione-derived peptides with the general structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)nGly, where n varies from 2 to 11. A variety of metal ions such as Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), and Ag(I) induce PC synthesis in plants and some yeasts. It has generally been assumed that the inducer metals also bind PCs. However, very little information is available on the binding of metals other than Cu(I) and Cd(II) to PCs. In this paper, we describe the Ag(I)-binding characteristics of PCs with the structure (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly. The Ag(I)-binding stoichiometries of these three peptides were determined by (i) UV/VIS spectrophotometry, (ii) luminescence spectroscopy at 77 K, and (iii) reverse-phase HPLC. The three techniques yielded similar results. ApoPCs exhibit featureless absorption in the 220-340 nm range. The binding of Ag(I) to PCs induced the appearance of specific absorption shoulders. The titration end point was indicated by the flattening of the characteristic absorption shoulders. Similarly, luminescence at 77 K due to Ag(I)-thiolate clusters increased with the addition of graded Ag(I) equivalents. The luminescence declined when Ag(I) equivalents in excess of the saturating amounts were added to the peptides. At neutral pH, (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly, (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly, and (gamma-Glu-Cys)4Gly bind 1.0, 1.5, and 4.0 equivalents of Ag(I), respectively. The Ag(I)-binding capacity of (gamma-Glu-Cys)2Gly and (gamma-Glu-Cys)3Gly was increased at pH 5.0 and below so that Ag(I)/-SH ratio approached 1.0. A similar pH-dependent binding of Ag(I) to glutathione was also observed. The increased Ag(I)-binding to PCs at lower pH is of physiological significance as these peptides accumulate in acidic vacuoles. We also report lifetime data on Ag(I)-PCs. The relatively long decay-times (approximately 0.1-0.3 msec) accompanied with a large Stokes shift in the emission band are indicative of spin-forbidden phosphorescence. PMID

  19. Kinetic trapping through coalescence and the formation of patterned Ag-Cu nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Kioseoglou, Joseph; Galea, Antony; Vernieres, Jerome; Benelmekki, Maria; Diaz, Rosa E.; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, due to its inherent flexibility, magnetron-sputtering has been widely used to synthesise bi-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) via subsequent inert-gas cooling and gas-phase condensation of the sputtered atomic vapour. Utilising two separate sputter targets allows for good control over composition. Simultaneously, it involves fast kinetics and non-equilibrium processes, which can trap the nascent NPs into metastable configurations. In this study, we observed such configurations in immiscible, bi-metallic Ag-Cu NPs by scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and noticed a marked difference in the shape of NPs belonging to Ag- and Cu-rich samples. We explained the formation of Janus or Ag@Cu core/shell metastable structures on the grounds of in-flight mixed NP coalescence. We utilised molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations to demonstrate that such configurations cannot occur as a result of nanoalloy segregation. Instead, sintering at relatively low temperatures can give rise to metastable structures, which eventually can be stabilised by subsequent quenching. Furthermore, we compared the heteroepitaxial diffusivities along various surfaces of both Ag and Cu NPs, and emphasised the differences between the sintering mechanisms of Ag- and Cu-rich NP compositions: small Cu NPs deform as coherent objects on large Ag NPs, whereas small Ag NPs dissolve into large Cu NPs, with their atoms diffusing along specific directions. Taking advantage of this observation, we propose controlled NP coalescence as a method to engineer mixed NPs of a unique, patterned core@partial-shell structure, which we refer to as a ``glass-float'' (ukidama) structure.In recent years, due to its inherent flexibility, magnetron-sputtering has been widely used to synthesise bi-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) via subsequent inert-gas cooling and gas-phase condensation of the sputtered atomic vapour. Utilising two

  20. Macroporous/mesoporous bioglasses doped with Ag/TiO(2) for dual drug action property and bone repair.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P; Qu, F; Lin, H; Wu, X; Xing, R; Zhang, J

    2012-09-01

    A series of macroporous-mesoporous bioglasses (MMBGs) doped with Ag, TiO(2) and Ag/TiO(2) have been successfully prepared using the nature plants as the macroporous templates and P123 as the mesoporous one. The dual drug action (antifungus and anti-inflammatory) and bone regeneration systems have been obtained by Ibuprofen (Ibu) loaded. Meanwhile, the antifungus as well as drug control release profiles of these materials have been investigated. Compared with pure MMBGs, MMBGs-Ag, MMBGs-TiO(2) and MMBGs-Ag/TiO(2) showed much higher antimicrobial efficiency, faster hydroxyapatite-forming ability and better drug sustained release performance. The multifunctional hierarchical porous bioglasses materials may have potential applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:22894533

  1. Study of antibacterial activity of Ag and Ag2CO3 nanoparticles stabilized over montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabnezhad, Sh.; Pourahmad, A.; Mehdipour Moghaddam, M. J.; Sadeghi, A.

    2015-02-01

    Silver carbonate and silver nanoparticles (NPs) over of stabilizer montmorillonite (MMT) have been synthesized in aqueous and polyol solvent, respectively. Dispersions of silver nanoparticles have been prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate over of MMT in presence and absence of Na2CO3 compound in ethylene glycol. It was observed that montmorillonite was capable of stabilizing formed Ag nanoparticles through the reduction of Ag+ ions in ethylene glycol. Na2CO3 was used as carbonate source in synthesis of Ag2CO3 NPs in water solvent and also for controlling of Ag nanoparticles size in ethylene glycol medium. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). The TEM images showed that Ag NPs size in presence Na2CO3 salts was smaller than without that. The results indicated intercalation of Ag and Ag2CO3 nanoparticles into the montmorillonite clay layers. The diffuse reflectance spectra exhibited a strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) adsorption peak in the visible region, resulting from Ag nanoparticles. The antibacterial testing results showed that the Ag2CO3-MMT nanocomposite exhibited an antibacterial activity higher than Ag-MMT sample against Escherichia coli.

  2. Spectroscopic Study on Eu3+ Doped Borate Glasses Containing Ag Nanoparticles and Ag Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shaobo; Zheng, Hui; Zhang, Jinsu; Li, Xiangping; Sun, Jiashi; Hua, Ruinian; Dong, Bin; Xia, Haiping; Chen, Baojiu

    2015-01-01

    Transparent Eu(3+)-doped borate glasses containing Ag nanoparticles and Ag aggregates with composition (40 - x) CaO-59.5B2O3-0.5Eu2O3-xAgNO3 were prepared by a simple one-step melt-quenching technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the glasses reveal amorphous structural properties and no diffraction peaks belonging to metal Ag particles. Ag particles and Ag aggregates were observed from the absorption spectra. Effective energy transfers from the Ag aggregates to the Eu3+ ions were observed in the excitation spectra from monitoring the intrinsic emission of Eu3+x .5D0 --> 7F2. The glasses with higher Ag content can be effectively excited by light in a wide wavelength region, indicating that these glasses have potential application in the solid state lighting driven by semiconductor light emitting diodes (LEDs). The emission spectra of the samples with higher Ag contents exhibit plenteous spectral components covering the full visible region from violet to red, thus indicating that these glass materials possess an excellent and tunable color rendering index. The color coordinates for all the glass samples were calculated by using the intensity-corrected emission spectra and the standard data issued by the CIE (Commission International de l' Eclairage) in 1931. It was found that the color coordinates for most samples with higher Ag contents fall into the white region in the color space. PMID:26328363

  3. The AGS with four helical magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-02-25

    The idea of using multiple partial helical magnets was applied successfully to the AGS synchrotron, to preserve the proton beam polarization. In this paper we explore in details the idea of using four helical magnets placed symmetrically in the AGS ring. This modification provides many advantages over the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets. First, it provides a larger 'spin tune gap' for the placement of the vertical betatron tune of the AGS during acceleration, second, the vertical spin direction during the beam injection and extraction is closer to vertical, third, the symmetric placement of the snakes allows for a better control of the AGS optics, and for reduced values of the beta and eta functions, especially near injection, fourth, the optical properties of the helical magnets also favor the placement of the horizontal betatron tune in the 'spin tune gap', thus eliminating the horizontal spin resonances. In this paper we provide results on the spin tune and on the optics of the AGS with four partial helical magnets, and we compare these results with the present setup of the AGS that uses two partial helical magnets.

  4. Ceramic Composite Development for Gas Turbine Engine Hot Section Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; VANrOODE, mARK

    2006-01-01

    The development of ceramic materials for incorporation into the hot section of gas turbine engines has been ongoing for about fifty years. Researchers have designed, developed, and tested ceramic gas turbine components in rigs and engines for automotive, aero-propulsion, industrial, and utility power applications. Today, primarily because of materials limitations and/or economic factors, major challenges still remain for the implementation of ceramic components in gas turbines. For example, because of low fracture toughness, monolithic ceramics continue to suffer from the risk of failure due to unknown extrinsic damage events during engine service. On the other hand, ceramic matrix composites (CMC) with their ability to display much higher damage tolerance appear to be the materials of choice for current and future engine components. The objective of this paper is to briefly review the design and property status of CMC materials for implementation within the combustor and turbine sections for gas turbine engine applications. It is shown that although CMC systems have advanced significantly in thermo-structural performance within recent years, certain challenges still exist in terms of producibility, design, and affordability for commercial CMC turbine components. Nevertheless, there exist some recent successful efforts for prototype CMC components within different engine types.

  5. Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed $1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

  6. Enhancement of the visible light activity and stability of Ag2CO3 by formation of AgI/Ag2CO3 heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changlin; Wei, Longfu; Zhou, Wanqin; Chen, Jianchai; Fan, Qizhe; Liu, Hong

    2014-11-01

    An insurmountable problem for silver-based semiconductor photocatalysts is their poor stability. Here, at room temperature, AgI with different concentrations (5%, 10%, 20% and 30%) were coupled into Ag2CO3, producing a series of novel AgI/Ag2CO3 composite photocatalysts. The effects of AgI addition on the Ag2CO3 catalyst for photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange (MO) under visible light irradiation have been investigated. Some physicochemical technologies like N2 physical adsorption/desorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS) were applied to characterize these products. Results show that the photocatalytic degradation activity of AgI/Ag2CO3 photocatalyst is much higher than that of pure AgI and Ag2CO3. With the optimal content of AgI (20 wt%), the AgI/Ag2CO3 exhibits the highest photocatalytic degradation efficiency. Its first order reaction rate constant (0.54 h-1) is 20 times of that of AgI (0.026 h-1) and 3.6 times of that of Ag2CO3 (0.15 h-1). The characterizations and theory calculation show that AgI and Ag2CO3 have suitably matched band gap structures. The formation of AgI/Ag2CO3 heterojunction with intimate interface could effectively increase the separation efficiency of the e-/h+ pairs and promote the production of •OH and O2•- radicals, which brings about the fast degradation rate of the dye and an increase in photocatalytic stability.

  7. Kinetic trapping through coalescence and the formation of patterned Ag-Cu nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Kioseoglou, Joseph; Galea, Antony; Vernieres, Jerome; Benelmekki, Maria; Diaz, Rosa E; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2016-05-14

    In recent years, due to its inherent flexibility, magnetron-sputtering has been widely used to synthesise bi-metallic nanoparticles (NPs) via subsequent inert-gas cooling and gas-phase condensation of the sputtered atomic vapour. Utilising two separate sputter targets allows for good control over composition. Simultaneously, it involves fast kinetics and non-equilibrium processes, which can trap the nascent NPs into metastable configurations. In this study, we observed such configurations in immiscible, bi-metallic Ag-Cu NPs by scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and noticed a marked difference in the shape of NPs belonging to Ag- and Cu-rich samples. We explained the formation of Janus or Ag@Cu core/shell metastable structures on the grounds of in-flight mixed NP coalescence. We utilised molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations to demonstrate that such configurations cannot occur as a result of nanoalloy segregation. Instead, sintering at relatively low temperatures can give rise to metastable structures, which eventually can be stabilised by subsequent quenching. Furthermore, we compared the heteroepitaxial diffusivities along various surfaces of both Ag and Cu NPs, and emphasised the differences between the sintering mechanisms of Ag- and Cu-rich NP compositions: small Cu NPs deform as coherent objects on large Ag NPs, whereas small Ag NPs dissolve into large Cu NPs, with their atoms diffusing along specific directions. Taking advantage of this observation, we propose controlled NP coalescence as a method to engineer mixed NPs of a unique, patterned core@partial-shell structure, which we refer to as a "glass-float" (ukidama) structure. PMID:27119383

  8. Demonstration and partial characterization of 22-nm HBsAg and Dane particles of subtype HBsAg/ady.

    PubMed

    Hess, G; Shih, J W; Arnold, W; Gerin, J L; zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1979-09-01

    The present paper describes the demonstration of d, y, w, and r HBsAg determinants in one serum. It was shown that there are two populations of HBsAg particles: HBsAg/ad and HBsAg/ady. All complete Dane particles were of subtype HBsAg/ady. Further characterization of HBsAg/ady particles did not reveal morphologic differences when they were compared with HBsAg/ad and HBsAg/ay particles. An HBsAg/ady phenotype may be the result of a double infection with hepatitis B viruses or exchanges of DNA sequences that determine HBsAg/ay and HBsAg/ad to form a new genotype. PMID:89163

  9. Hierarchically plasmonic photocatalysts of Ag/AgCl nanocrystals coupled with single-crystalline WO3 nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Deliang; Li, Tao; Chen, Qianqian; Gao, Jiabing; Fan, Bingbing; Li, Jian; Li, Xinjian; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian

    2012-08-01

    The hierarchical photocatalysts of Ag/AgCl@plate-WO3 have been synthesized by anchoring Ag/AgCl nanocrystals on the surfaces of single-crystalline WO3 nanoplates that were obtained via an intercalation and topochemical approach. The heterogeneous precipitation process of the PVP-Ag+-WO3 suspensions with a Cl- solution added drop-wise was developed to synthesize AgCl@WO3 composites, which were then photoreduced to form Ag/AgCl@WO3 nanostructures in situ. WO3 nanocrystals with various shapes (i.e., nanoplates, nanorods, and nanoparticles) were used as the substrates to synthesize Ag/AgCl@WO3 photocatalysts, and the effects of the WO3 contents and photoreduction times on their visible-light-driven photocatalytic performance were investigated. The techniques of TEM, SEM, XPS, EDS, XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption and UV-vis DR spectra were used to characterize the compositions, phases and microstructures of the samples. The RhB aqueous solutions were used as the model system to estimate the photocatalytic performance of the as-obtained Ag/AgCl@WO3 nanostructures under visible light (λ >= 420 nm) and sunlight. The results indicated that the hierarchical Ag/AgCl@plate-WO3 photocatalyst has a higher photodegradation rate than Ag/AgCl, AgCl, AgCl@WO3 and TiO2 (P25). The contents and morphologies of the WO3 substrates in the Ag/AgCl@plate-WO3 photocatalysts have important effects on their photocatalytic performance. The related mechanisms for the enhancement in visible-light-driven photodegradation of RhB molecules were analyzed.The hierarchical photocatalysts of Ag/AgCl@plate-WO3 have been synthesized by anchoring Ag/AgCl nanocrystals on the surfaces of single-crystalline WO3 nanoplates that were obtained via an intercalation and topochemical approach. The heterogeneous precipitation process of the PVP-Ag+-WO3 suspensions with a Cl- solution added drop-wise was developed to synthesize AgCl@WO3 composites, which were then photoreduced to form Ag/AgCl@WO3 nanostructures in

  10. Agent planning in AgScala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tošić, Saša; Mitrović, Dejan; Ivanović, Mirjana

    2013-10-01

    Agent-oriented programming languages are designed to simplify the development of software agents, especially those that exhibit complex, intelligent behavior. This paper presents recent improvements of AgScala, an agent-oriented programming language based on Scala. AgScala includes declarative constructs for managing beliefs, actions and goals of intelligent agents. Combined with object-oriented and functional programming paradigms offered by Scala, it aims to be an efficient framework for developing both purely reactive, and more complex, deliberate agents. Instead of the Prolog back-end used initially, the new version of AgScala relies on Agent Planning Package, a more advanced system for automated planning and reasoning.

  11. A FLYING WIRE SYSTEM IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.; BUXTON,W.; MAHLER,G.; MARUSIC,A.; ROSER,T.; SMITH,G.; SYPHERS,M.; WILLIAMS,N.; WITKOVER,R.

    1999-03-29

    As the AGS prepares to serve as the injector for RHIC, monitoring and control of the beam transverse emittance become a major and important topic. Before the installation of the flying wire system, the emittance was measured with ionization profile monitors in the AGS, which require correction for space charge effects. It is desirable to have a second means of measuring profile that is less depend on intensity. A flying wire system has been installed in the AGS recently to perform this task. This paper discusses the hardware and software setup and the capabilities of the system.

  12. Ag induced enhancement of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shern, C. S.; Su, C. W.; Wu, Y. E.; Chen, S. H.

    2001-12-01

    Some interesting magnetic properties were observed after Ag ultrathin films were deposited on Co/Pt(1 1 1). The spin reversal of Co can be prevented when Ag atoms cap Co on Pt(1 1 1). The out-of-plane magnetization has a significant enhancement after annealing at high temperature. The Curie temperature increases from 625 to 710 K as 1 ML of Ag is deposited on 1 ML Co/Pt(1 1 1). The change of surface anisotropy and the formation of a Co-Pt alloy are possible mechanisms for the magnetization enhancement.

  13. 50-kHz-rate 2D imaging of temperature and H2O concentration at the exhaust plane of a J85 engine using hyperspectral tomography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Li, Xuesong; Sanders, Scott T; Caswell, Andrew W; Roy, Sukesh; Plemmons, David H; Gord, James R

    2013-01-14

    This paper describes a novel laser diagnostic and its demonstration in a practical aero-propulsion engine (General Electric J85). The diagnostic technique, named hyperspectral tomography (HT), enables simultaneous 2-dimensional (2D) imaging of temperature and water-vapor concentration at 225 spatial grid points with a temporal response up to 50 kHz. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such sensing capabilities have been reported. This paper introduces the principles of the HT techniques, reports its operation and application in a J85 engine, and discusses its perspective for the study of high-speed reactive flows. PMID:23389008

  14. Engineering and Software Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Michael

    The phrase ‘software engineering' has many meanings. One central meaning is the reliable development of dependable computer-based systems, especially those for critical applications. This is not a solved problem. Failures in software development have played a large part in many fatalities and in huge economic losses. While some of these failures may be attributable to programming errors in the narrowest sense—a program's failure to satisfy a given formal specification—there is good reason to think that most of them have other roots. These roots are located in the problem of software engineering rather than in the problem of program correctness. The famous 1968 conference was motivated by the belief that software development should be based on “the types of theoretical foundations and practical disciplines that are traditional in the established branches of engineering.” Yet after forty years of currency the phrase ‘software engineering' still denotes no more than a vague and largely unfulfilled aspiration. Two major causes of this disappointment are immediately clear. First, too many areas of software development are inadequately specialised, and consequently have not developed the repertoires of normal designs that are the indispensable basis of reliable engineering success. Second, the relationship between structural design and formal analytical techniques for software has rarely been one of fruitful synergy: too often it has defined a boundary between competing dogmas, at which mutual distrust and incomprehension deprive both sides of advantages that should be within their grasp. This paper discusses these causes and their effects. Whether the common practice of software development will eventually satisfy the broad aspiration of 1968 is hard to predict; but an understanding of past failure is surely a prerequisite of future success.

  15. Extranuclear dynamics of 111Ag(→111Cd) doped in AgI nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Mizuuchi, R.; Irioka, N.; Komatsuda, S.; Kawata, S.; Taoka, A.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic behavior of the extranuclear field relative to the 111Ag(→111Cd) probe nucleus introduced in a superionic conductor silver iodide (AgI) was investigated by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation technique. For poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP)-coated AgI nanoparticles, we observed nuclear spin relaxation of the probe at room temperature. This result signifies that Ag+ ions in the polymer-coated sample make hopping motion from site to site at this low temperature. The activation energy for the dynamic motion was successfully estimated to be 46(10) meV. The first atomic-level observation of the temperature-dependent dynamic behavior of Ag+ ions in the polymer-coated AgI is reported.

  16. Ag induced electromagnetic interference shielding of Ag-graphite/PVDF flexible nanocomposites thinfilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, R.; Alagar, M.; Dinesh Kumar, S.; Subramanian, V.; Dinakaran, K.

    2015-09-01

    We report Ag nanoparticle induced Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) shielding in a flexible composite films of Ag nanoparticles incorporated graphite/poly-vinylidene difluoride (PVDF). PVDF nanocomposite thin-films were synthesized by intercalating Ag in Graphite (GIC) followed by dispersing GIC in PVDF. The X-ray diffraction analysis and the high-resolution transmission electron microscope clearly dictate the microstructure of silver nanoparticles in graphite intercalated composite of PVDF matrix. The conductivity values of nanocomposites are increased upto 2.5 times when compared to neat PVDF having a value of 2.70 S/cm at 1 MHz. The presence of Ag broadly enhanced the dielectric constant and lowers the dielectric loss of PVDF matrix proportional to Ag content. The EMI shielding effectiveness of the composites is 29.1 dB at 12.4 GHz for the sample having 5 wt. % Ag and 10 wt. % graphite in PVDF.

  17. Mineralogy and characterization of deposited particles of the aero sediments collected in the vicinity of power plants and the open pit coal mine: Kolubara (Serbia).

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Željko; Logar, Mihovil; Rosić, Aleksandra

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, particular attention was paid to the presence of aerosol solid particles, which occurred mainly as a result of exploitation and coal combustion in the thermal power plants of the Kolubara basin. Not all of the particles created by this type of anthropogenic pollution have an equal impact on human health, but it largely depends on their size and shape. The mineralogical composition and particle size distribution in the samples of aero sediments were defined. The samples were collected close to the power plant and open pit coal mine, in the winter and summer period during the year 2007. The sampling was performed by using precipitators placed in eight locations within the territory of the Lazarevac municipality. In order to characterize the sedimentary particles, several methods were applied: microscopy, SEM-EDX and X-ray powder diffraction. The concentration of aero sediments was also determined during the test period. Variety in the mineralogical composition and particle size depends on the position of the measuring sites, geology of the locations, the annual period of collecting as well as possible interactions. By applying the mentioned methods, the presence of inhalational and respiratory particles variously distributed in the winter and in the summer period was established. The most common minerals are quartz and feldspar. The presence of gypsum, clay minerals, calcite and dolomite as secondary minerals was determined, as well as the participation of organic and inorganic amorphic matter. The presence of quartz as a toxic mineral has a particular impact on human health. PMID:23054761

  18. Aerosol single-scattering albedo over the global oceans: Comparing PARASOL retrievals with AERONET, OMI, and AeroCom models estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Bian, Huisheng; Curci, Gabriele; Myhre, Gunnar; Noije, Twan; Schulz, Michael; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Takemura, Toshihiko; Zhang, Kai

    2015-09-01

    The aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) over the global ocean is evaluated based on polarimetric measurements by the PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) satellite. For the first time, global ocean SSA and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) from this instrument are shown and evaluated against other observations (the Aerosol Robotic Network, AERONET, and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument, OMI). The observational data sets compare reasonably well, with the majority of the colocated points within 0.05 of the AERONET measurements. PARASOL shows that SSA is characterized by high spatial and seasonal variability, also over the open ocean far from the inland emission regions. The near global coverage in the visible spectral range provided by the PARASOL retrievals represents a unique opportunity to evaluate aerosol optical properties simulated by global aerosol models, as performed in the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) framework. The SSA (AAOD) estimated by the AeroCom models is generally higher (smaller) than the SSA (AAOD) retrieved from PARASOL. On the other hand, the mean simulated aerosol optical depth is consistent or slightly underestimated compared with observations. An overestimate of the aerosol scattering, compared to absorption, by the models would suggest that these simulate an overly strong aerosol radiative cooling at top of atmosphere, over most of the ocean surfaces. This implies that aerosols have a potentially stronger direct and semidirect impact within the atmosphere than currently simulated.

  19. Highly luminescent Ag+ nanoclusters for Hg2+ ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xun; Yeow, Teik Jin; Zhang, Qingbo; Lee, Jim Yang; Xie, Jianping

    2012-03-01

    A simple, low-cost and label-free Hg2+ ion sensor has been developed by using novel luminescent Ag+ nanoclusters (NCs) with an excellent optical property (quantum yield = 15%), an ultra-high ratio of active Ag+ species in the NC surface (~100%), and an ultra-short diffusion path length of Hg2+ ions to access the NC surface (~0.5 nm).A simple, low-cost and label-free Hg2+ ion sensor has been developed by using novel luminescent Ag+ nanoclusters (NCs) with an excellent optical property (quantum yield = 15%), an ultra-high ratio of active Ag+ species in the NC surface (~100%), and an ultra-short diffusion path length of Hg2+ ions to access the NC surface (~0.5 nm). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details of the synthesis of b-Ag NCs; time-resolved evolution of photoemission spectra of the b-Ag NCs in toluene; photoexcitation spectrum of the b-Ag NCs in toluene; comparison of the luminescence of b-Ag NCs at different temperatures (4 and 25 °C) TEM image of the b-Ag NCs in toluene; optical properties of r-Ag NCs obtained by the reduction of b-Ag NCs in toluene; XPS spectra of b-Ag NCs, thiolate-Ag+ complexes, r-Ag NCs, and large Ag nanoparticles; TEM image of the Hg2+-Ag NCs; photostability of the b-Ag NCs; tolerance studies of the b-Ag NCs over other metal ions; tolerance studies of the b-Ag NCs over common thiol ligands (e.g., GSH) and anions; relative luminescence of the b-Ag NCs in different real water samples in the presence of Hg2+ ions; and relative luminescence of the b-Ag NCs in NaCl solution with different concentrations. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11999d

  20. Facile synthesis of S-Ag nanocomposites and Ag2S short nanorods by the interaction of sulfur with AgNO3 in PEG400.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Li; Xie, Xin-Yuan; Liang, Ming; Xie, Shu-Ming; Chen, Jie-Mei; Zheng, Wen-Jie

    2016-06-01

    A facile, eco-friendly and inexpensive method to prepare Ag2S short nanorods and S-Ag nanocomposites using sublimed sulfur, AgNO3, PVP and PEG400 was studied. According to x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the Ag2S, the products are highly crystalline and pure Ag2S nanorods with diameters of 70-160 nm and lengths of 200-360 nm. X-ray diffraction of the S-Ag nanocomposites shows that we obtained cubic Ag and S nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the molar ratio of PVP to Ag(+) plays an important role in controlling the size and morphology of the S-Ag nanocomposites. When the molar ratio of PVP to Ag(+) was 10:1, smaller sizes, better dispersibility and narrower distribution of S-Ag nanocomposites with diameters of 10-40 nm were obtained. The formation mechanism of the S-Ag nanocomposites was studied by designing a series of experiments using ultraviolet-visible measurement, and it was found that S nanoparticles are produced first and act as seed crystals; then Ag(+) becomes Ag nanocrystals on the surfaces of the S nanoparticles by the reduction of PVP. PEG400 acts as a catalyzer, accelerating the reaction rate, and protects the S-Ag nanocomposites from reacting to produce Ag2S. The antimicrobial experiments show that the S-Ag nanocomposites have greater antimicrobial activity on Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger and blue mold than Ag nanoparticles. PMID:27109417

  1. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-06-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  2. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  3. Redetermination of AgPO(3).

    PubMed

    Terebilenko, Katherina V; Zatovsky, Igor V; Ogorodnyk, Ivan V; Baumer, Vyacheslav N; Slobodyanik, Nikolay S

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of silver(I) polyphosphate(V), AgPO(3), were prepared via a phospho-ric acid melt method using a solution of Ag(3)PO(4) in H(3)PO(4). In comparison with the previous study based on single-crystal Weissenberg photographs [Jost (1961 ▶). Acta Cryst. 14, 779-784], the results were mainly confirmed, but with much higher precision and with all displacement parameters refined anisotropically. The structure is built up from two types of distorted edge- and corner-sharing [AgO(5)] polyhedra, giving rise to multidirectional ribbons, and from two types of PO(4) tetra-hedra linked into meandering chains (PO(3))(n) spreading parallel to the b axis with a repeat unit of four tetra-hedra. The calculated bond-valence sum value of one of the two Ag(I) ions indicates a significant strain of the structure. PMID:21522230

  4. Nanoporous Ag prepared from the melt-spun Cu-Ag alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guijing; Song, Xiaoping; Sun, Zhanbo; Yang, Shengchun; Ding, Bingjun; Yang, Sen; Yang, Zhimao; Wang, Fei

    2011-07-01

    Nanoporous Ag ribbons with different morphology and porosity were achieved by the electrochemical corrosion of the melt-spun Cu-Ag alloys. The Cu-rich phase in the alloys was removed, resulting in the formation of the nanopores distributed across the whole ribbon. It is found that the structures, morphology and porosity of the nanoporous Ag ribbons were dependent on the microstructures of the parent alloys. The most of ligaments presented a rod-like shape due to the formation of pseudoeutectic microstructure in the melt-spun Cu 55Ag 45 and Cu 70Ag 30 alloys. For nanoporous Ag prepared from Cu 85Ag 15 alloys, the ligaments were camber-like because of the appearance of the divorced microstructures. Especially, a novel bamboo-grove-like structure could be observed at the cross-section of the nanoporous Ag ribbons. The experiment reveals that nanoporous Ag ribbons exhibited excellent enhancement of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect, but a slight difference existed due to the discrepancy of their morphology.

  5. Surface migration and volume diffusion in the AgGaSe2-Ag2Se system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, N.-H.; Feigelson, R. S.; Route, R. K.

    1992-01-01

    Surface migration and volume diffusion in the Ag2Se-AgGaSe2 system were investigated using reactive diffusion couples which were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. The surface diffusivities of all mobile species are found to be much larger than volume diffusivities. The results of the study suggest that Se moves together with Ag and Ga to maintain binary (Ag2Se and Ga2Se3) stoichiometry and electroneutrality. The dominance of surface migration kinetics can account for the uniform annihilation of second-phase precipitates during heat treatments.

  6. A surface plasmon model for laser ablation of Ag sup + ions from a roughened Ag surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.H. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics); Manson, J.R. . Dept. of Physics); Echenique, P.M. . Faculdad de Quimica)

    1991-01-01

    Experimental work by Shea and Compton suggests that Ag{sup +} ions emitted from a roughened Ag surface irradiated by a nanosecond or picosecond laser beam may absorb the full energy of the Ag surface plasmon. We have modeled this process under the assumption that it proceeds through an inverse bremsstrahlung-type absorption of the SP quantum by Ag{sup +} ion which also undergoes a small-impact parameter collision with another ion or atom in the vicinity of the surface. We give a quantitative estimate of the absorption probability and find reasonable agreement with the Shea-Compton results. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Mechanical and electrical properties of ZnO/Ag nanocomposites.

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Y.

    1998-08-27

    Effects of Ag particle dispersions on microstructural development and some properties were investigated for ZnO/Ag nanocomposites. They were fabricated by Pulse Electric Current Sintering (PECS) Process to achieve finer and densified microstructure. ZnO/Ag nanocomposites with novel microstructure which were prepared by a reduction process using Ag{sub 2}O fine powders were compared with microcomposites prepared by mixing of Ag and ZnO powders. SEM observation indicated that fine Ag particles were homogeneously dispersed within the ZnO matrix grains and at the grain boundaries for ZnO/Ag nanocomposites prepared by the reduction process using Ag{sub 2}O fine powder. Hardness and fracture toughness increased with increasing the Ag volume fraction. Linear resistivity was decreased with increasing Ag volume fraction. However, the mechanical and electrical properties appeared to the significantly different for composites prepared by two different powder processes.

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  10. The Effect of Faster Engine Response on the Lateral Directional Control of a Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Lemon, Kimberly A.; Csank, Jeffrey T.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2012-01-01

    The integration of flight control and propulsion control has been a much discussed topic, especially for emergencies where the engines may be able to help stabilize and safely land a damaged aircraft. Previous research has shown that for the engines to be effective as flight control actuators, the response time to throttle commands must be improved. Other work has developed control modes that accept a higher risk of engine failure in exchange for improved engine response during an emergency. In this effort, a nonlinear engine model (the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k) has been integrated with a nonlinear airframe model (the Generic Transport Model) in order to evaluate the use of enhanced-response engines as alternative yaw rate control effectors. Tests of disturbance rejection and command tracking were used to determine the impact of the engines on the aircraft's dynamical behavior. Three engine control enhancements that improve the response time of the engine were implemented and tested in the integrated simulation. The enhancements were shown to increase the engine s effectiveness as a yaw rate control effector when used in an automatic feedback loop. The improvement is highly dependent upon flight condition; the airframe behavior is markedly improved at low altitude, low speed conditions, and relatively unchanged at high altitude, high speed.

  11. Plasmonic TiO2/AgBr/Ag ternary composite nanosphere with heterojunction structure for advanced visible light photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Kai; Li, Dongpei; Lu, Luhua; Liu, Qi; Liang, Changhao; Lv, Jiali; Zhu, Guangping

    2014-09-01

    In this work, TiO2/AgBr/Ag ternary composite nanosphere photocatalyst has been synthesized by in situ deposition of AgBr onto hollow spherical TiO2 template and followed by sun light reduction of AgBr into AgBr/Ag. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images have shown that the diameter of hollow TiO2 nanospheres is 250-350 nm and AgBr/Ag nanoparticles are well dispersed on the outer surface of TiO2 nanosphere. UV-vis spectrum analysis has shown largely improved visible light absorption of this ternary composite, in comparison to pure TiO2 and AgBr. The building-in AgBr/Ag, TiO2/AgBr and TiO2/Ag junctions within the ternary composite enhanced the visible light absorption because of plasmonic resonance and narrow bandgap. The pseudo-first-order rate constant kapp of the TiO2/AgBr/Ag ternary composite for methylene blue photodegradation displays 24.5 times and 3.3 times than the pure TiO2 nanosphere and AgBr/Ag nanoparticles, respectively. Furthermore, the stability of TiO2/AgBr/Ag ternary composite is characterized through cyclic photocatalytic test. Results indicate that 92.7% of photocatalytic degradation can be achieved by TiO2/AgBr/Ag ternary composite even after five recycles.

  12. 20% PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKE IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H; Bai, M; Brown, K A; Glenn, W; Luccio, A U; Mackay, W W; Montag, C; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T; Tsoupas, N; Zeno, K; Ranjbar, V; Spinka, H; Underwood, D

    2002-11-06

    An 11.4% partial Siberian snake was used to successfully accelerate polarized proton through a strong intrinsic depolarizing spin resonance in the AGS. No noticeable depolarization was observed. This opens up the possibility of using a 20% to 30% partial Siberian snake in the AGS to overcome all weak and strong depolarizing spin resonances. Some design and operation issues of the new partial Siberian snake are discussed.

  13. AgRISTARS documents tracking list report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A quarterly listing of those documents and related publications that have been issued and placed in the AgRISTARS tracking system is presented. The Tracking List Report provides a catalog, by project, of technical publications arranged by type of document and gives the reference AgRISTARS document numbers, title and date of publication, the issuing organization, and the National Technical Information Service reference number.

  14. AGS polarized proton operation in run 8.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,H.; Ahrens, L.; Bai, M.; Brown, K.A.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Lin, F.; Luccio, A.U.; MacKay, W.W.; Roser, T.; Tepikian, S.; Tsoupas, N.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.

    2008-06-23

    Dual partial snake scheme has been used for the Brookhaven AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) polarized proton operation for several years. It has provided polarized proton beams with 1.5 x 10{sup 11} intensity and 65% polarization for RHIC spin program. There is still residual polarization loss. Several schemes such as putting horizontal tune into the spin tune gap, and injection-on-the-fly were tested in the AGS to mitigate the loss. This paper presents the experiment results and analysis.

  15. Exposure-dependent Ag+ release from silver nanoparticles and its complexation in AgS2 sites in primary murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronesi, G.; Aude-Garcia, C.; Kieffer, I.; Gallon, T.; Delangle, P.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Rabilloud, T.; Carrière, M.

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity is related to their dissolution in biological environments and to the binding of the released Ag+ ions in cellulo; the chemical environment of recombined Ag+ ions is responsible for their toxicological outcome, moreover it is indicative of the cellular response to AgNP exposure, and can therefore shed light on the mechanisms governing AgNP toxicity. This study probes the chemistry of Ag species in primary murine macrophages exposed to AgNPs by making use of X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy under cryogenic conditions: the linear combination analysis of the near-edge region of the spectra provides the fraction of Ag+ ions released from the AgNPs under a given exposure condition and highlights their complexation with thiolate groups; the ab initio modelling of the extended spectra allows measuring the Ag-S bond length in cellulo. Dissolution rates depend on the exposure scenario, chronicity leading to higher Ag+ release than acute exposure; Ag-S bond lengths are 2.41 +/- 0.03 Å and 2.38 +/- 0.01 Å in acute and chronic exposure respectively, compatible with digonal AgS2 coordination. Glutathione is identified as the most likely putative ligand for Ag+. The proposed method offers a scope for the investigation of metallic nanoparticle dissolution and recombination in cellular models.Silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity is related to their dissolution in biological environments and to the binding of the released Ag+ ions in cellulo; the chemical environment of recombined Ag+ ions is responsible for their toxicological outcome, moreover it is indicative of the cellular response to AgNP exposure, and can therefore shed light on the mechanisms governing AgNP toxicity. This study probes the chemistry of Ag species in primary murine macrophages exposed to AgNPs by making use of X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy under cryogenic conditions: the linear combination analysis of the near-edge region of the spectra provides

  16. Near-infrared emitting AgInTe2 and Zn-Ag-In-Te colloidal nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Marc-Antoine; Pons, Thomas; Ritcey, Anna M.; Nì. Allen, Claudine

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of AgInTe2 nanocrystals emitting between 1095 nm and 1160 nm is presented. Evolution of the Ag:In:Te ratio shows progressive incorporation of In3+ in Ag2Te, leading to the formation of orthorhombic AgInTe2. When zinc is added to the synthesis, the photoluminescence quantum yield reaches 3.4 %.

  17. A Stretcher for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Foelsche, H.W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is proposing to add a Stretcher ring to increase the capacity and the quality of the experimental physics program at the AGS. At the present time a typical AGS cycle is about equally divided between the task of accelerating the beam to full energy and the task of distributing it on a 30 GeV flattop. The Stretcher, a 30 GeV dc storage ring, will take over from the AGS the distribution of the high energy beam with a continuous slow spill, and the AGS can then provide beam for the program at more than twice the present repetition rate. In this manner the average current delivered to the experimenters will be more than doubled, and the duty cycle of the spill will increase from the present optimum of about 40% to nearly 100%. The Stretcher proposal continues the gradual evolution of the AGS toward a high intensity hadron factory. At the present time the AGS provides about 1 ..mu..A average proton current. With the booster alone, now under construction, this is expected to increase to above 4 ..mu..A, and with the Stretcher to about 8-10 ..mu..A, an order of magnitude higher than now. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Energy Efficient Engine Low Pressure Subsystem Flow Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Lynn, Sean R.; Heidegger, Nathan J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide the capability to analyze the aerodynamic performance of the complete low pressure subsystem (LPS) of the Energy Efficient Engine (EEE). The analyses were performed using three-dimensional Navier-Stokes numerical models employing advanced clustered processor computing platforms. The analysis evaluates the impact of steady aerodynamic interaction effects between the components of the LPS at design and off-design operating conditions. Mechanical coupling is provided by adjusting the rotational speed of common shaft-mounted components until a power balance is achieved. The Navier-Stokes modeling of the complete low pressure subsystem provides critical knowledge of component aero/mechanical interactions that previously were unknown to the designer until after hardware testing.

  19. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Reader, G.T.; Hooper

    1983-01-01

    The Stirling engine was invented by a Scottish clergyman in 1816, but fell into disuse with the coming of the diesel engine. Advances in materials science and the energy crisis have made a hot air engine economically attractive. Explanations are full and understandable. Includes coverage of the underlying thermodynamics and an interesting historical section. Topics include: Introduction to Stirling engine technology, Theoretical concepts--practical realities, Analysis, simulation and design, Practical aspects, Some alternative energy sources, Present research and development, Stirling engine literature.

  20. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  1. Association of hepatitis Be antigen (HBeAg) with the core of the hepatitis B virus (HBcAg).

    PubMed

    Slusarczyk, J; Hess, G; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1985-02-01

    Three substances (pronase E, sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and guanidine hydrochloride) with different chemical actions partially convert HBcAg to HBeAg. This process retains the integrity of the HBcAg particle, which was not different between HBcAg subpopulations, and does not generate HBcAg or HBeAg sub-units. DNA polymerase activity was destroyed by SDS and guanidine hydrochloride, but not by pronase E. Serum HBeAg could not be converted into HBcAg, suggesting that this might be an irreversible process. The data are consistent with the assumption that HBcAg and HBeAg are coded for by the same gene (C gene of the HBV-DNA). PMID:3982243

  2. Ternary Ag/epoxy adhesive with excellent overall performance.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-Hong; Liu, Yu; Huang, Gui-Wen; Shen, Xiao-Jun; Xiao, Hong-Mei; Fu, Shao-Yun

    2015-04-22

    Excellent electrical conductivity (EC) generally conflicts with high lap shear strength (LSS) for electrically conductive adhesives (ECAs) since EC increases while LSS decreases with increasing conductive filler content. In this work, the ECAs with the excellent overall performance are developed based on the ternary hybrid of Ag microflakes (Ag-MFs), Ag nanospheres (Ag-NSs), and Ag nanowires (Ag-NWs). First, a low silver content adhesive system is determined. Then, the effects of the relative contents of Ag fillers on the EC and the LSS are studied. It is shown that a small amount of Ag-NSs or Ag-NWs can dramatically improve the EC for the Ag-MF/epoxy adhesives. The Ag-NSs and Ag-NWs with appropriate contents have a synergistic effect in improving the EC. Meanwhile, the LSS of the as-prepared adhesive with the appropriate Ag contents reaches an optimal value. Both the EC and the LSS of the as-prepared ternary hybrid ECA with a low content of 40 wt % Ag are higher than those of the commercial ECAs filled with the Ag-MF content over 60 wt %. Finally, the ternary hybrid ECA with the optimal formulation is shown to be promising for printing the radio frequency identification tag antennas as an immediate application example. PMID:25835391

  3. An Ab Initio Study of the Low-Lying Doublet States of AgO and AgS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1990-01-01

    Spectroscopic constants (D(sub o), r(sub e), mu(sub e), T(sub e)) are determined for the doublet states of AgO and AgS below approx. = 30000/cm. Large valence basis sets are employed in conjunction with relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs). Electron correlation is included using the modified coupled-pair functional (MCPF) and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) methods. The A(sup 2)Sigma(sup +) - X(sup 2)Pi band system is found to occur in the near infrared (approx. = 9000/cm) and to be relatively weak with a radiative lifetime of 900 microns for A(sup 2)Sigma(sup +) (upsilon = 0). The weakly bound C(sup 2)Pi state (our notation), the upper state of the blue system, is found to require high levels of theoretical treatment to determine a quantitatively accurate potential. The red system is assigned as a transition from the C(sup 2)Pi state to the previously unobserved A(sup 2)Sigma(sup +) state. Several additional transitions are identified that should be detectable experimentally. A more limited study is performed for the vertical excitation spectrum of AgS. In addition, a detailed all-electron study of the X(sup 2)Pi and A(sup 2)Sigma(sup +) states of AgO is carried out using large atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets. Our best calculated D(sub o) value for AgO is significantly less than the experimental value, which suggests that there may be some systematic error in the experimental determination.

  4. A visible-light-driven core-shell like Ag2S@Ag2CO3 composite photocatalyst with high performance in pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changlin; Wei, Longfu; Zhou, Wanqin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Zhu, Lihua; Shu, Qing; Liu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    A series of Ag2S-Ag2CO3 (4%, 8%, 16%, 32% and 40% Ag2S), Ag2CO3@Ag2S (32%Ag2S) and Ag2S@Ag2CO3 (32%Ag2S) composite photocatalysts were fabricated by coprecipitation or successive precipitation reaction. The obtained catalysts were analyzed by N2 physical adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and photocurrent test. Under visible light irradiation, the influences of Ag2S content and core-shell property on photocatalytic activity and stability were evaluated in studies focused on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye, phenol, and bisphenol A. Results showed that excellent photocatalytic performance was obtained over Ag2S/Ag2CO3 composite photocatalysts with respect to Ag2S and Ag2CO3. With optimal content of Ag2S (32 wt%), the Ag2S-Ag2CO3 showed the highest photocatalytic degradation efficiency. Moreover, the structured property of Ag2S/Ag2CO3 greatly influenced the activity. Compared with Ag2S-Ag2CO3 and Ag2CO3@Ag2S, core-shell like Ag2S@Ag2CO3 demonstrated the highest activity and stability. The main reason for the boosting of photocatalytic performance was due to the formation of Ag2S/Ag2CO3 well contacted interface and unique electron structures. Ag2S/Ag2CO3 interface could significantly increase the separation efficiency of the photo-generated electrons (e(-)) and holes (h(+)), and production of OH radicals. More importantly, the low solubility of Ag2S shell could effectively protect the core of Ag2CO3, which further guarantees the stability of Ag2CO3. PMID:27236845

  5. Facile synthesis of sunlight-driven AgCI:Ag plasmonic nanophotocatalyst.

    SciTech Connect

    An, C.; Peng, S.; Sun, Y.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-06-18

    Highly efficient plasmonic photocatalysts of AgCl:Ag hybrid nanoparticles are successfully synthesized via a one-pot synthetic approach involving a precipitation reaction followed by polyol reduction. The as-synthesized nanoparticles exhibit high catalytic performance under visible light and sunlight for decomposing organics, such as methylene blue.

  6. EXAFS Studies of Bimetallic Ag-Pt and Ag-Pd Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, D.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Bunker, B.A.; Doudna, C.M.; Bertino, M.F.; Blum, F.; Tokuhiro, A.; Terry, J.

    2008-10-30

    Nanoparticles of Ag-Pt and Ag-Pd with high aspect ratios were synthesized using a radiolysis method. Gamma rays at dose rates below 0.5 kGy/h were used for irradiation. The nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), optical absorption spectroscopy and x-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Bright field micrographs show that Ag-Pt nanowires are composed of large particles with diameters ranging from 20-30 nm and joined by filaments of diameter between 2-5 nm. The Ag-Pd nanowires have diameters of 20-25 nm and lengths of 1.5 {micro}m. For XAFS measurements, the Pt L3 edge (11.564 keV), Ag K-edge (25.514 keV) and Pd K-edge (24.350 keV) were excited to determine the local structure around the respective atoms in the cluster. The Ag-Pt particles were found to possess a distinct core-shell structure with Pt in the core surrounded by Ag shell, with no indication of alloy formation. However, nanorods of Ag-Pd have formed an alloy for all the alloy compositions.

  7. Charge-transfer interactions between TCNQ and silver clusters Ag20 and Ag13.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Hanyu; Liu, Xianhu; Yuan, Chengqian; Jia, Meiye; Luo, Zhixun; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-03-14

    Interactions between tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and two typical silver clusters Ag13 and Ag20 are studied by first-principles DFT calculations. Charge transfer (CT) from silver clusters to TCNQ molecules initiates the Ag-N bond formation at selective sites resulting in the formation of different isomers of Ag13-TCNQ and Ag20-TCNQ complexes. We show here a comprehensive spectroscopic analysis for the two CT complexes on the basis of Raman and infrared activities. Furthermore, frontier molecular orbital (FMO) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of the complexes provides a vivid illustration of electron cloud overlap and interactions. The behavior of TCNQ adsorbed on the tetrahedral Ag20 cluster was even found in good agreement with the experimental measurement of TCNQ molecules on a single-crystal Ag(111) surface. This study not only endeavors to clarify the charge-transfer interactions of TCNQ with silver, but also presents a finding of enhanced charge transfer between Ag13 and TCNQ indicating potential for candidate building blocks of granular materials. PMID:26888771

  8. New data for AG haplotype frequencies in Caucasoid populations and selective neutrality of the AG polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mazas, A; Bütler-Brunner, E; Excoffier, L; Ghanem, N; Ben Salem, M; Breguet, G; Dard, P; Pellegrini, B; Tikkanen, M J; Langaney, A

    1994-02-01

    We present the results of AG antigen typings of three Caucasoid population samples: Lebanese, Tunisians, and Finns. AG haplotype frequencies estimated by maximum-likelihood methods are compared with the frequencies observed in 13 world populations previously tested for AG specificities by computing a genetic distance matrix used in a multivariate analysis. A high degree of polymorphism characterizes the three samples, with 10 haplotypes detected in the Lebanese and 11 haplotypes detected in the Tunisians and Finns; high heterozygosity levels are also present in the three populations. The genetic distance analysis shows that the three populations possess a genetic structure intermediate between those observed in sub-Saharan Africans and in Caucasoids from the Near East and India. This tight correspondence between AG differentiation and geography is confirmed by a highly significant correlation coefficient found between genetic and geographic distances computed worldwide, suggesting that an isolation by distance model of evolution applies to the AG system. The Ewens-Watterson test for selective neutrality on all world populations tested for AG specificities also supports the hypothesis that the AG system behaves like a neutral polymorphism. Overall, the AG differentiation pattern appears to be close to the patterns observed for other serological polymorphisms, such as RH, GM, and HLA, whose evolutionary mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:8157263

  9. Beet Juice-Induced Green Fabrication of Plasmonic AgCl/Ag Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple, green, and fast approach (complete within 5 min) was explored for the fabrication of hybrid AgCl/Ag plasmonic nanoparticles under microwave (MW) irradiation. In this method, beet juice served as a reducing reagent, which is an abundant sugar-rich agricultural produce. I...

  10. Ultra-Fast Synthesis for Ag2Se and CuAgSe Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DUAN, H. Z.; LI, Y. L.; ZHAO, K. P.; QIU, P. F.; SHI, X.; CHEN, L. D.

    2016-06-01

    Ag2Se and CuAgSe have been recently reported as promising thermoelectric materials at room temperature. The traditional melting-annealing-sintering processes are used to grow Ag2Se and CuAgSe materials with the disadvantages of high costs of energy and time. In this work, phase-pure polycrystalline Ag2Se and CuAgSe compounds were synthesized from raw elemental powders directly by manual mixing followed by spark plasma sintering (MM-SPS) in a few minutes. The influence of SPS heating rate on the phase composition, microstructure, and thermoelectric properties, including Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity, were investigated. The zTs of 0.8 at 390 K and 0.6 at 450 K are obtained for Ag2Se and CuAgSe, respectively, which is comparable with the values in the materials prepared by the traditional method. Furthermore, this ultrafast sample synthesis can significantly save material synthesis time and thus has the obvious advantage for large-scale production.

  11. Ultra-sensitive detection of Ag+ ions based on Ag+-assisted isothermal exponential degradation reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Fan, Qi; Zhu, Sha; Duan, Aiping; Yin, Yongmei; Li, Genxi

    2013-01-15

    Ag(+) ions are greatly toxic to a lot of algae, fungi, viruses and bacteria, which can also induce harmful side-effects to environments and human health. Herein we report an ultra-sensitive method for the selective detection of Ag(+) ions with electrochemical technique based on Ag(+)-assisted isothermal exponential degradation reaction. In the presence of Ag(+), mismatched trigger DNA can transiently bind to template DNA immobilized on an electrode surface through the formation of C-Ag(+)-C base pair, which then initiates the isothermal exponential degradation reaction. As a result, the mismatched trigger DNA may melt off the cleaved template DNA to trigger rounds of elongation and cutting. After the cyclic degradation reactions, removal of the template DNA immobilized on the electrode surface can be efficiently monitored by using electrochemical technique to show the status of the electrode surface, which can be then used to determine the presence of Ag(+). Further studies reveal that the proposed method can be ultra-sensitive to detect Ag(+) at a picomolar level. The selectivity of the detection can also be satisfactory, thus the proposed method for the Ag(+) ions detection may be potentially useful in the future. PMID:22921090

  12. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10‑5 Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains.

  13. Noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains: annealing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shao Hui; Fei, Guang Tao; You, Qiao; Gao, Xu Dong; Huo, Peng Cheng; De Zhang, Li

    2016-09-16

    One-dimensional noble-metal Ag nanoparticle chains have been prepared by electrodepositing Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires in a porous anodic alumina oxide (AAO) template and following an annealing process in vacuum. It is found that Bi, as a sacrificial metal, can be removed completely after annealing at 450 °C with a vacuum degree of 10(-5) Torr. The regulation of particle size, shape and interparticle spacing of Ag NP chains has been realized by adjusting the segment length of the Ag/Bi superlattice nanowires and the annealing condition. With an extension of the annealing time, it is observed that Ag particles display the transform trend from ellipsoid to sphere. Our findings could inspire further investigation on the design and fabrication of metal nanoparticle chains. PMID:27487089

  14. Effect of MWNT electroless Ag plating on field emission properties of MWNT/Ag nanocomposite cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yun; Guo, Tailiang

    2013-01-01

    Field emission properties of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) electroless Ag plating nanocomposite cathodes fabricated using screen printing were studied. The MWNT was purified and electroless plated with Ag. The results of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) showed that the morphology of Ag electroless plating on the surface of MWNT depended on the temperature of electroless plating. Experiments showed that the stability of MWNT/Ag nanocomposite cathodes had no more than 10% degradation, achieving a field emission current density of 4.0 mA/cm2 at an applied electric field of 0.5 V/μm for 50 h. The proposed MWNT/Ag nanocomposite cathodes possess good field emission properties and have potential for application in field emission displays.

  15. Strongly visible-light responsive plasmonic shaped AgX:Ag (X = Cl, Br) nanoparticles for reduction of CO2 to methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Changhua; Wang, Jizhuang; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Meiyu; Ming, Xijuan; Wang, Shutao; Zhang, Qinhui

    2012-08-01

    Plasmonic shaped AgX:Ag (X = Cl, Br) nanoparticles have been synthesized by a facile and versatile glycerol-mediated solution route. The as-prepared AgX:Ag nanoparticles exhibit regular shapes, i.e., cube-tetrapod-like AgCl:Ag nanoparticles and AgBr:Ag nanoplates. Compared with the pristine AgX, AgX:Ag nanocomposites display stronger absorption in the visible region due to the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles. The calculation of bandgaps and band positions indicates the as-achieved AgX:Ag nanoparticles can be used as a class of potential photocatalyst for the reduction of CO2. For example, reduction of CO2 under visible light irradiation with the assistance of the anisotropic AgX:Ag nanoparticles yields as much as 100 μmol methanol in the products. Furthermore, the AgX:Ag nanoparticles can maintain its structure and activity after 3 runs of reactions. Therefore, the present route opens an avenue to acquire plasmonic photocatalysts for conversion of CO2 into useful organic compounds.Plasmonic shaped AgX:Ag (X = Cl, Br) nanoparticles have been synthesized by a facile and versatile glycerol-mediated solution route. The as-prepared AgX:Ag nanoparticles exhibit regular shapes, i.e., cube-tetrapod-like AgCl:Ag nanoparticles and AgBr:Ag nanoplates. Compared with the pristine AgX, AgX:Ag nanocomposites display stronger absorption in the visible region due to the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles. The calculation of bandgaps and band positions indicates the as-achieved AgX:Ag nanoparticles can be used as a class of potential photocatalyst for the reduction of CO2. For example, reduction of CO2 under visible light irradiation with the assistance of the anisotropic AgX:Ag nanoparticles yields as much as 100 μmol methanol in the products. Furthermore, the AgX:Ag nanoparticles can maintain its structure and activity after 3 runs of reactions. Therefore, the present route opens an avenue to acquire plasmonic photocatalysts for conversion of CO2

  16. [Study on the development of Ag-nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 porous scaffolds with surface mineralization].

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianbo; Chang, Shan; Dong, Mina; Huang, Di; Li, Jidong; Jiang, Dianming

    2012-12-01

    Bacterial infection after implantation of bone tissue engineering scaffolds is still a serious clinical problem. Ag-nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 (Ag-nHA/PA66) antibacterial composite scaffold were prepared with phase-inversion method in this study. The scaffolds were mineralized in saturated calcium phosphate solution at 37 degrees C for 1 day. The microstructure and the newly formed nano-apatite deposition on the scaffolds before and after mineralization were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In order to investigate the release behaviors of Ag+, the Ag-nHA/PA66 scaffolds were immersed into 5 ml PBS at 37 degrees C for a different period between 3 h and 168 h before and after mineralization. Then the samples were cultured with E. coli (8099) to test the antibacterial effect of the scaffolds. The results showed that, after mineralization, Ag-nHA/PA66 porous scaffolds still possessed a good inter-connection and a new apatite layer was formed on the surface of the scaffolds. The average macropore size was 626.61 +/- 141.94 microm, the porosity was 76.89 +/- 8.21% and the compressive strength was 2.94 +/- 1.12 MPa. All these physical parameters had no significant difference from those of the un-mineralized scaffolds. The Ag+ release of the scaffolds with and without mineralization was fast within 1 day and then kept slow and stable after 1 day. The antibacterial test confirmed that after mineralization the scaffolds had good antibacterial effects on E. coli. PMID:23469542

  17. 75 FR 12971 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines (IAE) V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525-D5...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-18

    ... (74 FR 19904), and a supplemental proposed AD on December 23, 2009 (74 FR 68192). That action proposed... 12866; (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... high-pressure (HP) compressor stage 3-8 drum and subsequent damage to the airplane. DATES: This...

  18. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of CdO : Ag nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Linjie; Wang, Shufang; Liu, Ran; Zha, Xinyu; Sun, Niefeng; Wang, Shujie; Wang, Jianglong; Fu, Guangsheng

    2016-07-26

    CdO : Ag nanocomposites with metallic Ag nanoparticles embedded in the polycrystalline CdO matrix were synthesized by the solid-state reaction method. The addition of Ag led to increased grain boundaries of CdO and created numerous CdO/Ag interfaces. By incorporating Ag into the CdO matrix, the power factor was increased which was probably due to the carrier energy filtering effect induced by the enhanced energy-dependent scattering of electrons. In addition, reduced thermal conductivity was also achieved by stronger phonon scattering from grain boundaries, CdO/Ag interfaces and Ag nanoparticles. These concomitant effects resulted in enhanced ZT values for all CdO : Ag nanocomposites, demonstrating that the strategy of introducing metallic Ag nanoparticles into the CdO host was very effective in optimizing the thermoelectric performance. PMID:27411573

  19. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured Ag on porous titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ming; Li, Yanqiong; Zhang, Junmin; Guan, Weiming; Li, Yuncang; Wen, Cui'e.; Hodgson, Peter

    2011-03-01

    In this work, porous titania was prepared on bulk Ti by chemical oxidation, and then nanostructured silver (Ag) was deposited on titania surface by ion beam sputtering. After annealing treatment, Ag/TiO 2 composites were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results indicated that a nano-porous titania layer with mean pore size of 150 nm and thickness of 1 μm was formed by chemical oxidation at 80 °C for 45 min. There were three Ag species (Ag (0), Ag (1+), and Ag (2+)) on composites surface after annealing treatment, and metallic Ag content achieved maximum value with annealing temperature of 500 °C in air. Ag showed high thermal stability being partly attributed to the inhibiting the diffusion of Ag by the underlying porous titania.

  20. Ag on Si(111) from basic science to application

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Aleksey

    2012-01-01

    In our work we revisit Ag and Au adsorbates on Si(111)-7x7, as well as experiment with a ternary system of Pentacene, Ag and Si(111). Of particular interest to us is the Si(111)-(√3x√3)R30°}–Ag (Ag-Si-√3 hereafter). In this thesis I systematically explore effects of Ag deposition on the Ag-Si-√3 at different temperatures, film thicknesses and deposition fluxes. The generated insight of the Ag system on the Si(111) is then applied to generate novel methods of nanostructuring and nanowire growth. I then extend our expertise to the Au system on the Ag-Si(111) to gain insight into Au-Si eutectic silicide formation. Finally we explore behavior and growth modes of an organic molecule on the Ag-Si interface.

  1. Fate of zinc and silver engineered nanoparticles in sewerage networks.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Gianluca; Donner, Erica; Laera, Giuseppe; Sekine, Ryo; Scheckel, Kirk G; Khaksar, Maryam; Vasilev, Krasimir; De Mastro, Giuseppe; Lombi, Enzo

    2015-06-15

    Engineered zinc oxide (ZnO) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NPs) used in consumer products are largely released into the environment through the wastewater stream. Limited information is available regarding the transformations they undergo during their transit through sewerage systems before reaching wastewater treatment plants. To address this knowledge gap, laboratory-scale systems fed with raw wastewater were used to evaluate the transformation of ZnO- and Ag-NPs within sewerage transfer networks. Two experimental systems were established and spiked with either Ag- and ZnO-NPs or with their dissolved salts, and the wastewater influent and effluent samples from both systems were thoroughly characterised. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to assess the extent of the chemical transformation of both forms of Zn and Ag during transport through the model systems. The results indicated that both ZnO- and Ag-NPs underwent significant transformation during their transport through the sewerage network. Reduced sulphur species represented the most important endpoint for these NPs in the sewer with slight differences in terms of speciation; ZnO converted largely to Zn sulfide, while Ag was also sorbed to cysteine and histidine. Importantly, both ionic Ag and Ag-NPs formed secondary Ag sulfide nanoparticles in the sewerage network as revealed by TEM analysis. Ag-cysteine was also shown to be a major species in biofilms. These results were verified in the field using recently developed nanoparticle in situ deployment devices (nIDDs) which were exposed directly to sewerage network conditions by immersing them into a municipal wastewater network trunk sewer and then retrieving them for XAS analysis. PMID:25841090

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of BSA Conjugated Silver Nanoparticles (Ag/BSA Nanoparticles) and Evaluation of Biological Properties of Ag/BSA Nanoparticles and Ag/BSA Nanoparticles Loaded Poly(hydroxy butyrate valerate) PHBV Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaye, Almaz

    Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the etiological agents of several infectious diseases. Antibiotic resistance by these three microbes has emerged as a prevalent problem due in part to the misuse of existing antibiotics and the lack of novel antibiotics. Nanoparticles have emerged as an alternative antibacterial agents to conventional antibiotics owing to their high surface area to volume ratio and their unique chemical and physical properties. Among the nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles have gained increasing attention because silver nanoparticles exhibit antibacterial activity against a range of gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Nanoparticles of well-defined chemistry and morphology can be used in broad biomedical applications, especially in bone tissue engineering applications, where bone infection by bacteria can be acute and lethal. It is commonly noted in the literature that the activity of nanoparticles against microorganisms is dependent upon the size and concentration of the nanoparticles as well as the chemistry of stabilizing agent. To the best of our knowledge, a comprehensive study that evaluates the antibacterial activity of well characterized silver nanoparticles in particular Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) stabilized against S. aureus and E. coli and cytotoxicity level of BSA stabilized silver nanoparticles towards osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) is currently lacking. Therefore, the primary objective of this study was to characterize protein conjugated silver nanoparticles prepared by chemical reduction of AgNO3 and BSA mixture. The formation of Ag/BSA nanoparticles was studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The molar ratio of silver to BSA in the Ag/BSA nanoparticles was established to be 27+/- 3: 1, based on Thermogravimetric Analysis and Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Based on atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering,and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) measurements, the particle size (diameter) of

  3. A stretcher for the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Foelsche, H.W.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes the conceptual design of a 30 GeV Stretcher ring, which is designed to increase the capacity and the quality of the experimental physics program at the AGS. In a typical 3 second operating cycle the AGS now accomplishes two functions: accelerating the beam to full energy and then providing a slow spill on a 30 GeV flattop. These tasks consume approximately equal time. The proposed Stretcher, a dc storage ring, will take up the task of distributing the high energy beam with a continuous slow spill, making it possible for the AGS to provide beam for the program at more than twice the present repetition rate. Thus the average current delivered to the experimenters will be more than doubled, and the duty cycle of the spill will increase from the present optimum of about 40% to nearly 100%. The Stretcher will continue the gradual evolution of the AGS toward a kaon factory. At present, the AGS provides about 1 {mu}A average proton current. A Booster, now under construction, is expected to increase the current to above 4 {mu}a, and the Stretcher to about 8-10 {mu}A, an order of magnitude higher than now. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. First-principles study of electronic and dynamic properties of AgMg and AgZn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arıkan, Nihat; Bayhan, Ülkü

    2012-05-01

    The structural, electronic, and phonon properties of AgMg and AgZn in the cesium-chloride phase have been investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA). The calculated ground state properties such as lattice constant and bulk modulus agree well with the previous theoretical calculations. The electronic band structure is also presented for AgMg and AgZn. The calculated DOS at the Fermi energy are 0.49{states}/{eV cell} for AgMg and 0.43{states}/{eV cell} for AgZn. A linear-response approach to the density functional theory is used to derive phonon dispersion curves and the total and partial density of states for AgMg and AgZn. The high-frequency region of AgMg is mainly due to the vibrations of Mg atoms.

  5. Spin coating of Ag nanoparticles: Effect of reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, A. A. Sartale, S. D.

    2014-04-24

    A surfactant free method for the growth of Ag nanoparticles on glass substrate by spin coating of Ag ions solution followed by chemical reduction in aqueous hydrazine hydrate (HyH) solution has been presented. Appearance of surface plasmon resonance confirms the formation of Ag nanoparticles. Morphology and absorbance spectra of Ag nanoparticles films are used to examine effect of hydrazine concentration on the growth of Ag nanoparticles. SEM images show uniformly distributed Ag nanoparticles. Rate constant was found to be dependent on HyH concentration as a consequence influence particle size.

  6. Bipolar Ag-Zn battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giltner, L. John

    1994-02-01

    The silver-zinc (AgZn) battery system has been unique in its ability to safely satisfy high power demand applications with low mass and volume. However, a new generation of defense, aerospace, and commercial applications will impose even higher power demands. These new power demands can be satisfied by the development of a bipolar battery design. In this configuration the power consuming, interelectrode current conductors are eliminated while the current is then conducted via the large cross-section electrode substrate. Negative and positive active materials are applied to opposite sides of a solid silver foil substrate. In addition to reducing the weight and volume required for a specified power level, the output voltage performance is also improved as follows. Reduced weight through: elimination of the plastic cell container; elimination of plate leads and intercell connector; and elimination of internal plate current collector. Increased voltage through: elimination of resistance of current collector; elimination of resistance of plate lead; and elimination of resistance of intercell connector. EPI worked previously on development of a secondary bipolar silver zinc battery. This development demonstrated the electrical capability of the system and manufacturing techniques. One difficulty with this development was mechanical problems with the seals. However, recent improvements in plastics and adhesives should eliminate the major problem of maintaining a seal around the periphery of the bipolar module. The seal problem is not as significant for a primary battery application or for a requirement for only a few discharge cycles. A second difficulty encountered was with activation (introducing electrolyte into the cell) and with venting gas from the cell without loss of electrolyte. During previous work, the following projections for energy density were made from test data for a high power system which demonstrated in excess of 50 discharge/charge cycles. Projected

  7. Bipolar Ag-Zn battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giltner, L. John

    1994-01-01

    The silver-zinc (AgZn) battery system has been unique in its ability to safely satisfy high power demand applications with low mass and volume. However, a new generation of defense, aerospace, and commercial applications will impose even higher power demands. These new power demands can be satisfied by the development of a bipolar battery design. In this configuration the power consuming, interelectrode current conductors are eliminated while the current is then conducted via the large cross-section electrode substrate. Negative and positive active materials are applied to opposite sides of a solid silver foil substrate. In addition to reducing the weight and volume required for a specified power level, the output voltage performance is also improved as follows. Reduced weight through: elimination of the plastic cell container; elimination of plate leads and intercell connector; and elimination of internal plate current collector. Increased voltage through: elimination of resistance of current collector; elimination of resistance of plate lead; and elimination of resistance of intercell connector. EPI worked previously on development of a secondary bipolar silver zinc battery. This development demonstrated the electrical capability of the system and manufacturing techniques. One difficulty with this development was mechanical problems with the seals. However, recent improvements in plastics and adhesives should eliminate the major problem of maintaining a seal around the periphery of the bipolar module. The seal problem is not as significant for a primary battery application or for a requirement for only a few discharge cycles. A second difficulty encountered was with activation (introducing electrolyte into the cell) and with venting gas from the cell without loss of electrolyte. During previous work, the following projections for energy density were made from test data for a high power system which demonstrated in excess of 50 discharge/charge cycles. Projected

  8. Exploratory tests of a simple aero-mechanical ride comfort system for lightly loaded aircraft. [evaluation of gust alleviating aircraft control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewes, D. E.; Stewart, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Some exploratory wind tunnel and radio-controlled free-flight tests were made with a small high-wing airplane model (1.23m wing span) to study the concept of a simple aero mechanical system intended to alleviate gust loads and improve ride comfort of lightly loaded aircraft. The system consisted essentially of the outer portions of each wing being hinged in the chordwise direction and connected directly to the wing flaps using internal counter weights to provide neutral mass balance. When the wing experienced a change in velocity or angle of attack, the movable wing panels, acting as sensors and flap actuators, deflected in response to the changes in lift on the wing. The corresponding movements of the interconnected flaps tended to reduce the changes in the wing lift.

  9. Real-time analysis of ambient organic aerosols using aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow mass spectrometry (AeroFAPA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüggemann, Martin; Karu, Einar; Stelzer, Torsten; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2015-04-01

    Organic aerosol accounts for a major fraction of atmospheric aerosols and has implications on the earth's climate and human health. However, due to the chemical complexity its measurement remains a major challenge for analytical instrumentation.1 Here, we present the development, characterization and application of a new soft ionization technique that allows mass spectrometric real-time detection of organic compounds in ambient aerosols. The aerosol flowing atmospheric-pressure afterglow (AeroFAPA) ion source utilizes a helium glow discharge plasma to produce excited helium species and primary reagent ions. Ionization of the analytes occurs in the afterglow region after thermal desorption and results mainly in intact molecular ions, facilitating the interpretation of the acquired mass spectra. In the past, similar approaches were used to detect pesticides, explosives or illicit drugs on a variety of surfaces.2,3 In contrast, the AeroFAPA source operates 'online' and allows the detection of organic compounds in aerosols without a prior precipitation or sampling step. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an atmospheric-pressure glow discharge ionization technique to ambient aerosol samples. We illustrate that changes in aerosol composition and concentration are detected on the time scale of seconds and in the ng-m-3 range. Additionally, the successful application of AeroFAPA-MS during a field study in a mixed forest region in Central Europe is presented. Several oxidation products of monoterpenes were clearly identified using the possibility to perform tandem MS experiments. The acquired data are in agreement with previous studies and demonstrate that AeroFAPA-MS is a suitable tool for organic aerosol analysis. Furthermore, these results reveal the potential of this technique to enable new insights into aerosol formation, growth and transformation in the atmosphere. References: 1) IPCC, 2013: Summary for Policymakers. In: Climate Change 2013: The

  10. Futurepath: The Story of Research and Technology at NASA Lewis Research Center. Structures for Flight Propulsion, ARC Sprayed Monotape, National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The story of research and technology at NASA Lewis Research Center's Structures Division is presented. The job and designs of the Structures Division needed for flight propulsion is described including structural mechanics, structural dynamics, fatigue, and fracture. The video briefly explains why properties of metals used in structural mechanics need to be tested. Examples of tests and simulations used in structural dynamics (bodies in motion) are briefly described. Destructive and non-destructive fatigue/fracture analysis is also described. The arc sprayed monotape (a composite material) is explained, as are the programs in which monotape plays a roll. Finally, the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP or x-30) is introduced, including the material development and metal matrix as well as how NASP will reduce costs for NASA.

  11. Design, development, and in-flight testing of a pointer/tracker for in-flight experiments to measure aero-optical effects over a scaled turret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizo, Matthew J.; Cusumano, Salvatore J.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Heap, Ryan; Velten, Victor; Brown, Joshua; Bartell, Richard J.

    2013-07-01

    We address the design, development, and testing of a pointer/tracker as a probe beam for the purpose of making high-speed, aero-optical measurements of the flow over a scaled beam director turret. The tracker uses retro-reflection of the probe beam off of a Reflexite annulus surrounding the turret. The constraints of the design required a near-total-commercial off the shelf system that could be quickly installed and removed in a rented aircraft. Baseline measurements of environmental vibrations are used to predict pointing performance; mitigation of line-of-sight jitter on the probe beam is achieved through passive isolation and the design of relay optics. Accommodation of ambient light is made with the use of wavelength filters and track algorithms. Postanalysis of measured data is compared to design estimates.

  12. BiPO4 photocatalyst employing synergistic action of Ag/Ag3PO4 nanostructure and graphene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, N.; Rahimi, E.

    2016-06-01

    Graphene-supported BiPO4/Ag/Ag3PO4 photocatalyst has been fabricated by simple hydrothermal and impregnation reaction. In BiPO4/Ag/Ag3PO4 based on Reduced Graphene Oxide (RGO), this network renders numerous pathways for rapid mass transport, strong adsorption and multireflection of incident light; meanwhile, the interface between BiPO4/Ag/Ag3PO4 and RGO increases the active sites and electron transfer rate. BiPO4/Ag/Ag3PO4 based on RGO noticeably exhibited high photocatalytic activity than that of BiPO4/Ag/Ag3PO4 and P25 under visible light irradiation for cationic dye (Rhodamine B), anionic dye (methyl orange) and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) as a neutral pollutant, which are usually difficult to be degraded over the other catalysts. This enhanced photocatalytic activity of Graphene-supported BiPO4/Ag/Ag3PO4 for all pollutants could be mainly ascribed to the reinforced charge transfer from BiPO4/Ag/Ag3PO4 to RGO, which suppresses the recombination of electron/hole pairs. Besides that, this photocatalyst can be used repetitively with a high photocatalytic activity and no apparent loss of activity occurs. The results reveal that the RGO nanosheets work as a photocatalyst promoter during the photocatalytic reaction, leading to an improved photocatalytic activity.

  13. Template synthesis of Ag/AgCl microrods and their efficient visible light-driven photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hua; Xiao, Liang; Huang, Jianhua

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Preparation ofAg/AgCl microrods by reaction of Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} microrods with NaCl solution. • Generation of metallic Ag is induced by the ambient light in the synthesis process. • Ag/AgCl shows excellent visible light-driven photodegradation of organic dyes. - Abstract: Ag/AgCl microrods, aggregated by nanoparticles with a diameter ranging from 100 nm to 2 μm, were prepared by an ion-exchange reaction at 80 °C between Ag{sub 2}WO{sub 4} template and NaCl solution. The existence of metallic Ag species was confirmed by XRD, DRS and XPS measurements. Ag/AgCl microrods showed excellent photocatalytic activity for the degradation of rhodamine B and methylene blue under visible light irradiation. The degradation rate constants of rhodamine B and methylene blue are 0.176 and 0.114 min{sup −1}, respectively. The cycling photodegradation experiments suggest that Ag/AgCl microds could be employed as stable plasmonic photocatalysts for the degradation of organic dyes under visible light irradiation.

  14. Preparation of Ag2O/Ag2CO3/MWNTs composite photocatalysts for enhancement of ciprofloxacin degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huiqin; Li, Jinze; Huo, Pengwei; Yan, Yongsheng; Guan, Qingfeng

    2016-03-01

    The Ag2O/Ag2CO3/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNTs) composite photocatalysts were prepared by calcination of the obtained precipitate. The structures and morphology of as-prepared composite photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Ag2O/Ag2CO3/MWNTs composite photocatalysts exhibit higher degradation rate of ciprofloxacin (CIP) than the pure Ag2CO3, Ag2O/Ag2CO3 and Ag2CO3/MWNTs under visible light irradiation. The amount of loaded Ag2CO3 onto MWNTs and calcined time for Ag2CO3/MWNTs were systematically investigated, and the optimal amount of loaded Ag2CO3 and calcined time of Ag2CO3/MWNTs are 150 wt% and 10 min, respectively. The highest photocatalytic degradation rate of CIP could reach 76% under optimal conditions. The active species trapping experiments were also analyzed, the results show that the holes are main contributor for the degradation processes of CIP, furthermore the electrons, rad O2- and rad OH are also crucially influenced the photocatalytic degradation processes of CIP. The possible photocatalytic processes of CIP with Ag2O/Ag2CO3/MWNTs composite photocatalyst are also proposed.

  15. Thinking Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Stu; Sharp, Janet; Zachary, Loren

    2004-01-01

    Most people think that engineering and mathematics go hand in hand. To many, being an engineer means manipulating equations and calculating measurements to design and build structures of all kinds. And they are right. Engineering does involve a great deal of mathematics. But, building structures to withstand certain environmental conditions or…

  16. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.

    1980-01-01

    Stirling engines exist in a bewildering array of mechanical arrangements. This book attempts to describe and classify the systems in a rational way, to explain the intricacies of the cycle, and to present a large amount of detailed information related to Stirling engines such as design, heat exchangers, working fluids, operation and performance, control equipment, recently developed engines, and current and proposed uses. (LCL)

  17. AeroADL: applying the integration of the Suomi-NPP science algorithms with the Algorithm Development Library to the calibration and validation task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houchin, J. S.

    2014-09-01

    A common problem for the off-line validation of the calibration algorithms and algorithm coefficients is being able to run science data through the exact same software used for on-line calibration of that data. The Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program solved part of this problem by making the Algorithm Development Library (ADL) available, which allows the operational algorithm code to be compiled and run on a desktop Linux workstation using flat file input and output. However, this solved only part of the problem, as the toolkit and methods to initiate the processing of data through the algorithms were geared specifically toward the algorithm developer, not the calibration analyst. In algorithm development mode, a limited number of sets of test data are staged for the algorithm once, and then run through the algorithm over and over as the software is developed and debugged. In calibration analyst mode, we are continually running new data sets through the algorithm, which requires significant effort to stage each of those data sets for the algorithm without additional tools. AeroADL solves this second problem by providing a set of scripts that wrap the ADL tools, providing both efficient means to stage and process an input data set, to override static calibration coefficient look-up-tables (LUT) with experimental versions of those tables, and to manage a library containing multiple versions of each of the static LUT files in such a way that the correct set of LUTs required for each algorithm are automatically provided to the algorithm without analyst effort. Using AeroADL, The Aerospace Corporation's analyst team has demonstrated the ability to quickly and efficiently perform analysis tasks for both the VIIRS and OMPS sensors with minimal training on the software tools.

  18. Mussel-inspired green synthesis of polydopamine-Ag-AgCl composites with efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Aijun; Wang, Xiuping; Guo, Aiying; Chang, Yongfang

    2016-09-01

    Polydopamine-Ag-AgCl composites (PDA-Ag-AgCl) were synthesized using a mussel-inspired method at room temperature, where PDA acts as a reducing agent to obtain the noble Ag nanoparticles from a precursor. The morphologies and structures of the as-prepared PDA-Ag-AgCl were characterized by several techniques including field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectra, and X-Ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS). The morphological observation depicts formation of nanoparticles with various micrometer size diameters and surface XPS analysis shows presence of various elements including Ag, N, Cl, and O. The enhanced absorbance of the PDA-Ag-AgCl particles in the visible light region is confirmed through UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), and the charge transfer is demonstrated by photoluminescence (PL) and photocurrent response. The synthesized PDA-Ag-AgCl composites could be used as visible-light-driven photocatalysts for the degradation of Rhodamine B. The elevated photocatalytic activity is ascribed to the effective charge transfer from plasmon-excited Ag to AgCl that can improve the efficiency of the charge separation during the photocatalytic reaction. Furthermore, differences in the photocatalytic performance among the different PDA-Ag-AgCl composites are noticed that could be attributed to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area, which benefits to capture the visible light efficiently. The PDA-Ag-AgCl exhibits excellent stability without a significant loss in activity after 5cycles. The proposed method is low-cost and environmentally friendly, hence a promising new way to fabricate plasmon photocatalysts. PMID:27450302

  19. Sonosynthesis of an Ag/AgBr/Graphene-oxide nanocomposite as a solar photocatalyst for efficient degradation of methyl orange.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, A; Entezari, M H

    2016-03-15

    In this study, a new method has developed for the synthesis of Ag/AgBr/Graphene-oxide (Ag/AgBr/GO) nanocomposite with high adsorption capacity and high photocatalytic activity in degradation of methyl orange (MO). In this method, ultrasound was applied in the synthesis and it was facilitated the process. The samples prepared under ultrasound were shown as Ag/AgBr/GO-U, and the samples under conventional method as Ag/AgBr/GO-C. The results of FT-IR, XRD, Raman, DRS and SEM confirmed the structure of the nanocomposites very well. Ultrasound played a key role in the formation of nanocomposite with smaller size of GO sheets and particles. Different amount of GO was used in the nanocomposite composition and their photocatalytic activities were compared. The MO in solution was completely degraded in 15 min, 30 min, and 45 min with Ag/AgBr/GO-U-1 that contained 1 mg mL(-1) GO, Ag/AgBr/GO-U-0.5 that contained 0.5 mg mL(-1) GO and Ag/AgBr/GO-C-0.5 that contained 0.5 mg mL(-1) GO, respectively. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements displayed a complete mineralization in 30 min for Ag/AgBr/GO-U-0.5. The data obtained from the degradation experiments were fitted to the first-order kinetics and the adsorption obeyed the Langmuir model. The nanocatalyst did not exhibit significant loss of activity even after four cycles of successive uses. To determine the mechanism of photocatalytic degradation of MO, different scavengers were used. Based on the results, the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical and hole had a key role in the degradation process. The Ag/AgBr/GO-U-1 nanocomposite exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity due to its high adsorption capacity and enhanced charge transfer. PMID:26724706

  20. Environmentally friendly ultrosound synthesis and antibacterial activity of cellulose/Ag/AgCl hybrids.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yan-Yan; Deng, Fu; Zhao, Jin-Jin; He, Jing; Ma, Ming-Guo; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the fabrication and property of cellulose/Ag/AgCl hybrids. In this article, preparation of cellulose/Ag/AgCl hybrids was reported using the cellulose solution, AgNO₃, AlCl₃·6H₂O with ultrasound agitation method. The cellulose solution was synthesized by the dissolution of the microcrystalline cellulose in NaOH/urea aqueous solution. Influences of the experimental parameters of ultrasound treatment time and ultrasonic intermittent on the hybrids were investigated. The phase, microstructure, thermal stability, and morphology of the hybrids were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed the successful synthesis of cellulose/Ag/AgCl hybrids with good thermal stability. Moreover, the hybrids displayed desirable antimicrobial activities. Compared with other conventional methods, the rapid, green, and environmentally friendly ultrasound agitation method opens a new window to the high value-added applications of biomass. PMID:24274493