Science.gov

Sample records for aero vehicles cavs

  1. Aero-Assisted Pre-Stage for Ballistic and Aero-Assisted Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustinov, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    A concept of an aero-assisted pre-stage is proposed, which enables launch of both ballistic and aero-assisted launch vehicles from conventional runways. The pre-stage can be implemented as a delta-wing with a suitable undercarriage, which is mated with the launch vehicle, so that their flight directions are coaligned. The ample wing area of the pre-stage combined with the thrust of the launch vehicle ensure prompt roll-out and take-off of the stack at airspeeds typical for a conventional jet airliner. The launch vehicle is separated from the pre-stage as soon as safe altitude is achieved, and the desired ascent trajectory is reached. Nominally, the pre-stage is non-powered. As an option, to save the propellant of the launch vehicle, the pre-stage may have its own short-burn propulsion system, whereas the propulsion system of the launch vehicle is activated at the separation point. A general non-dimensional analysis of performance of the pre-stage from roll-out to separation is carried out and applications to existing ballistic launch vehicle and hypothetical aero-assisted vehicles (spaceplanes) are considered.

  2. Vehicle Health Management Communications Requirements for AeroMACS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Clements, Donna J.; Apaza, Rafael D.

    2012-01-01

    As the development of standards for the aeronautical mobile airport communications system (AeroMACS) progresses, the process of identifying and quantifying appropriate uses for the system is progressing. In addition to defining important elements of AeroMACS standards, indentifying the systems uses impacts AeroMACS bandwidth requirements. Although an initial 59 MHz spectrum allocation for AeroMACS was established in 2007, the allocation may be inadequate; studies have indicated that 100 MHz or more of spectrum may be required to support airport surface communications. Hence additional spectrum allocations have been proposed. Vehicle health management (VHM) systems, which can produce large volumes of vehicle health data, were not considered in the original bandwidth requirements analyses, and are therefore of interest in supporting proposals for additional AeroMACS spectrum. VHM systems are an emerging development in air vehicle safety, and preliminary estimates of the amount of data that will be produced and transmitted off an aircraft, both in flight and on the ground, have been prepared based on estimates of data produced by on-board vehicle health sensors and initial concepts of data processing approaches. This allowed an initial estimate of VHM data transmission requirements for the airport surface. More recently, vehicle-level systems designed to process and analyze VHM data and draw conclusions on the current state of vehicle health have been undergoing testing and evaluation. These systems make use of vehicle system data that is mostly different from VHM data considered previously for airport surface transmission, and produce processed system outputs that will be also need to be archived, thus generating additional data load for AeroMACS. This paper provides an analysis of airport surface data transmission requirements resulting from the vehicle level reasoning systems, within the context of overall VHM data requirements.

  3. Common aero vehicle autonomous reentry trajectory optimization satisfying waypoint and no-fly zone constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorris, Timothy R.

    2007-12-01

    To support the Air Force's Global Reach concept, a Common Aero Vehicle is being designed to support the Global Strike mission. "Waypoints" are specified for reconnaissance or multiple payload deployments and "no-fly zones" are specified for geopolitical restrictions or threat avoidance. Due to time critical targets and multiple scenario analysis, an autonomous solution is preferred over a time-intensive, manually iterative one. Thus, a real-time or near real-time autonomous trajectory optimization technique is presented to minimize the flight time, satisfy terminal and intermediate constraints, and remain within the specified vehicle heating and control limitations. This research uses the Hypersonic Cruise Vehicle (HCV) as a simplified two-dimensional platform to compare multiple solution techniques. The solution techniques include a unique geometric approach developed herein, a derived analytical dynamic optimization technique, and a rapidly emerging collocation numerical approach. This up-and-coming numerical technique is a direct solution method involving discretization then dualization, with pseudospectral methods and nonlinear programming used to converge to the optimal solution. This numerical approach is applied to the Common Aero Vehicle (CAV) as the test platform for the full three-dimensional reentry trajectory optimization problem. The culmination of this research is the verification of the optimality of this proposed numerical technique, as shown for both the two-dimensional and three-dimensional models. Additionally, user implementation strategies are presented to improve accuracy and enhance solution convergence. Thus, the contributions of this research are the geometric approach, the user implementation strategies, and the determination and verification of a numerical solution technique for the optimal reentry trajectory problem that minimizes time to target while satisfying vehicle dynamics and control limitation, and heating, waypoint, and no

  4. Fractional Order Modeling of Atmospheric Turbulence - A More Accurate Modeling Methodology for Aero Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2014-01-01

    The presentation covers a recently developed methodology to model atmospheric turbulence as disturbances for aero vehicle gust loads and for controls development like flutter and inlet shock position. The approach models atmospheric turbulence in their natural fractional order form, which provides for more accuracy compared to traditional methods like the Dryden model, especially for high speed vehicle. The presentation provides a historical background on atmospheric turbulence modeling and the approaches utilized for air vehicles. This is followed by the motivation and the methodology utilized to develop the atmospheric turbulence fractional order modeling approach. Some examples covering the application of this method are also provided, followed by concluding remarks.

  5. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  6. Atmospheric Turbulence Modeling for Aero Vehicles: Fractional Order Fits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence models are necessary for the design of both inlet/engine and flight controls, as well as for studying coupling between the propulsion and the vehicle structural dynamics for supersonic vehicles. Models based on the Kolmogorov spectrum have been previously utilized to model atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, a more accurate model is developed in its representative fractional order form, typical of atmospheric disturbances. This is accomplished by first scaling the Kolmogorov spectral to convert them into finite energy von Karman forms and then by deriving an explicit fractional circuit-filter type analog for this model. This circuit model is utilized to develop a generalized formulation in frequency domain to approximate the fractional order with the products of first order transfer functions, which enables accurate time domain simulations. The objective of this work is as follows. Given the parameters describing the conditions of atmospheric disturbances, and utilizing the derived formulations, directly compute the transfer function poles and zeros describing these disturbances for acoustic velocity, temperature, pressure, and density. Time domain simulations of representative atmospheric turbulence can then be developed by utilizing these computed transfer functions together with the disturbance frequencies of interest.

  7. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seiel, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report

  8. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling of the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle for AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Seidel, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the lowboom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural-aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report.

  9. Highly flexible flight vehicle aeroelastic and aero-viscoelastic flutter issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrett, Craig G.; Hilton, Harry H.

    2012-11-01

    Aeroelastic and aero-viscoelastic phenomena arising from the high flexibility of modern flight vehicles are examined, and governing relations are formulated and solved. In particular, the time dependent flight velocities associated with maneuvers and with in-plane bending are considered, which necessitate new derivations of the Theodorsen function, unsteady aerodynamic relations and equations of motion. Under these conditions, simple harmonic motion (SHM) is no longer achievable and different flutter criteria based directly on motion stability are presented. The viscoelastic problem is formulated in terms of integral partial differential equations with variable nonlinear coefficients. Their solutions and evaluations are discussed in detail. One interesting departure from linear responses emerged, which indicates flutter in one bending while the other bending mode and the torsional are both stable. A detailed and extended treatment of these subjects may be found in [1].

  10. Propulsion System Dynamic Modeling for the NASA Supersonic Concept Vehicle: AeroPropulsoServoElasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph; Seidel, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    A summary of the propulsion system modeling under NASA's High Speed Project (HSP) AeroPropulsoServoElasticity (APSE) task is provided with a focus on the propulsion system for the low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. This summary includes details on the effort to date to develop computational models for the various propulsion system components. The objective of this paper is to summarize the model development effort in this task, while providing more detail in the modeling areas that have not been previously published. The purpose of the propulsion system modeling and the overall APSE effort is to develop an integrated dynamic vehicle model to conduct appropriate unsteady analysis of supersonic vehicle performance. This integrated APSE system model concept includes the propulsion system model, and the vehicle structural-aerodynamics model. The development to date of such a preliminary integrated model will also be summarized in this report.propulsion system dynamics, the structural dynamics, and aerodynamics.

  11. Advanced Aero-Propulsive Mid-Lift-to-Drag Ratio Entry Vehicle for Future Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. H.; Stosaric, R. R; Cerimele, C. J.; Wong, K. A.; Valle, G. D.; Garcia, J. A.; Melton, J. E.; Munk, M. M.; Blades, E.; Kuruvila, G.; Picetti, D. J.; Hassan, B.; Kniskern, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    vehicle stage return, thus making ideas reality. These paradigm shifts include the technology maturation of advanced flexible thermal protection materials onto mid lift-to-drag ratio entry vehicles, the development of integrated supersonic aero-propulsive maneuvering, and the implementation of advanced asymmetric launch shrouds. These paradigms have significant overlap with launch vehicle stage return already being developed by the Air Force and several commercial space efforts. Completing the realization of these combined paradigms holds the key to a high-performing entry vehicle system capability that fully leverages multiple technology benefits to accomplish NASA's Exploration missions to atmospheric planetary destinations.

  12. Aero-optical effects of an optical seeker with a supersonic jet for hypersonic vehicles in near space.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guangming; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-10

    The aero-optical effects of an optical seeker with a supersonic jet for hypersonic vehicles in near space were investigated by three suites of cases, in which the altitude, angle of attack, and Mach number were varied in a large range. The direct simulation Monte Carlo based on the Boltzmann equation was used for flow computations and the ray-tracing method was used to simulate beam transmission through the nonuniform flow field over the optical window. Both imaging displacement and phase deviation were proposed as evaluation parameters, and along with Strehl ratio they were used to quantitatively evaluate aero-optical effects. The results show that aero-optical effects are quite weak when the altitude is greater than 30 km, the imaging displacement is related to the incident angle of a beam, and it is minimal when the incident angle is approximately 15°. For reducing the aero-optical effects, the optimal location of an aperture should be in the middle of the optical window. PMID:27409034

  13. Aerodynamic characteristics of generalized bent biconic bodies for aero-assisted, orbital-transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, C. B.; Park, C.

    1983-01-01

    A method was developed to generate the surface coordinates of body shapes suitable for aeroassisted, orbital-transfer vehicles (AOTVs) by extending bent biconic geometries. Lift, drag, and longitudinal moments were calculated for the bodies using Newtonian flow theory. These techniques were applied to symmetric and asymmetric aerobraking vehicles, and to an aeromaneuvering vehicle with high L/D. Results for aerobraking applications indicate that a 70 deg, fore half cone angle with a spherically blunted nose, rounded edges, and a slight asymmetry would be appropriate. Moreover, results show that an aeromaneuvering vehicle with L/D 2.0, and with sufficient stability, is feasible.

  14. Hypersonic airbreathing vehicle conceptual design (focus on aero-space plane)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James L.; Martin, John G.

    1989-01-01

    The airbreathing single stage to orbit (SSTO) vehicle design environment is variable-rich, intricately networked and sensitivity intensive. As such, it represents a tremondous technology challenge. Creating a viable design will require sophisticated configuration/synthesis and the synergistic integration of advanced technologies across the discipline spectrum. In design exercises, reductions in the fuel weight-fraction requirements projected for an orbital vehicle concept can result from improvements in aerodynamics/controls, propulsion efficiencies and trajectory optimization; also, gains in the fuel weight-fraction achievable for such a concept can result from improvements in structural design, heat management techniques, and material properties. As these technology advances take place, closure on a viable vehicle design will be realizable.

  15. Aero-thermo-dynamic analysis of the Spaceliner-7.1 vehicle in high altitude flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppardi, Gennaro; Morsa, Luigi; Sippel, Martin; Schwanekamp, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    SpaceLiner, designed by DLR, is a visionary, extremely fast passenger transportation concept. It consists of two stages: a winged booster, a vehicle. After separation of the two stages, the booster makes a controlled re-entry and returns to the launch site. According to the current project, version 7-1 of SpaceLiner (SpaceLiner-7.1), the vehicle should be brought at an altitude of 75 km and then released, undertaking the descent path. In the perspective that the vehicle of SpaceLiner-7.1 could be brought to altitudes higher than 75 km, e.g. 100 km or above and also for a speculative purpose, in this paper the aerodynamic parameters of the SpaceLiner-7.1 vehicle are calculated in the whole transition regime, from continuum low density to free molecular flows. Computer simulations have been carried out by three codes: two DSMC codes, DS3V in the altitude interval 100-250 km for the evaluation of the global aerodynamic coefficients and DS2V at the altitude of 60 km for the evaluation of the heat flux and pressure distributions along the vehicle nose, and the DLR HOTSOSE code for the evaluation of the global aerodynamic coefficients in continuum, hypersonic flow at the altitude of 44.6 km. The effectiveness of the flaps with deflection angle of -35 deg. was evaluated in the above mentioned altitude interval. The vehicle showed longitudinal stability in the whole altitude interval even with no flap. The global bridging formulae verified to be proper for the evaluation of the aerodynamic coefficients in the altitude interval 80-100 km where the computations cannot be fulfilled either by CFD, because of the failure of the classical equations computing the transport coefficients, or by DSMC because of the requirement of very high computer resources both in terms of the core storage (a high number of simulated molecules is needed) and to the very long processing time.

  16. Attitude Control for an Aero-Vehicle Using Vector Thrusting and Variable Speed Control Moment Gyros

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Lim, K. B.; Moerder, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    Stabilization of passively unstable thrust-levitated vehicles can require significant control inputs. Although thrust vectoring is a straightforward choice for realizing these inputs, this may lead to difficulties discussed in the paper. This paper examines supplementing thrust vectoring with Variable-Speed Control Moment Gyroscopes (VSCMGs). The paper describes how to allocate VSCMGs and the vectored thrust mechanism for attitude stabilization in frequency domain and also shows trade-off between vectored thrust and VSCMGs. Using an H2 control synthesis methodology in LMI optimization, a feedback control law is designed for a thrust-levitated research vehicle and is simulated with the full nonlinear model. It is demonstrated that VSCMGs can reduce the use of vectored thrust variation for stabilizing the hovering platform in the presence of strong wind gusts.

  17. Design and performance analysis of an aero-maneuvering orbital-transfer vehicle concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    Systems requirements for design-optimized, lateral-turn performance were determined for reusable, space-based applications and low-Earth orbits involving large multiple plane-inclination changes. The aerothermodynamic analysis is the most advanced available for rarefield-hypersonic flow over lifting surfaces at incidence. The effects of leading-edge bluntness, low-density viscous phenomena, and finite-rate flow-field chemistry and surface catalysis are accounted for. The predicted aerothermal heating characteristics are correlated with thermal-control and flight-performance capabilities. The mission payload capacity for delivery, retrieval, and combined operations was determined for round-trip sorties extending to polar orbits. Recommendations are given for future design refinements. The results help to identify technology issues required to develop prototype operational vehicles.

  18. Benchmarking of the state-of-the-art in nondestructive testing/evaluation for applicability in the Composite Armored Vehicle (CAV) Advanced Technology Demonstrator (ATD) program, phase 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriveau, Gary W.

    1993-11-01

    This technology assessment report is the result of compilation, review, and assessment of information and data concerning the development and use of NDE/T as applied to advanced composites that may be used in the CAV (Composite Armored Vehicle) ATD (Advanced Technology Demonstrator) Program. This information has been gained from both published literature and as well as work in progress. It includes the results of a detailed bibliographic search using all the data bases held within the Defense Technical Information Center, supplemented wherever possible by other data bases. In addition, direct contacts and academic, industrial, and government research and development centers and applications laboratories were made. Discussions and recommendations contained in this report focus on the current state-of-the-art of composite NDE/T technologies and their capabilities and limitations for both the classical post process and real-time in-process inspection techniques. Furthermore, this effort includes an assessment of future developments and research trends including a projected time line.

  19. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of a Hypersonic Vehicle with Significant Aero-Thermo-Elastic-Propulsion Interactions: Elastic, Thermal and Mass Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Jaidev

    This thesis examines themodeling, analysis, and control system design issues for scramjet powered hypersonic vehicles. A nonlinear three degrees of freedom longitudinal model which includes aero-propulsion-elasticity effects was used for all analyses. This model is based upon classical compressible flow and Euler-Bernouli structural concepts. Higher fidelity computational fluid dynamics and finite element methods are needed for more precise intermediate and final evaluations. The methods presented within this thesis were shown to be useful for guiding initial control relevant design. The model was used to examine the vehicle's static and dynamic characteristics over the vehicle's trimmable region. The vehicle has significant longitudinal coupling between the fuel equivalency ratio (FER) and the flight path angle (FPA). For control system design, a two-input two-output plant (FER - elevator to speed-FPA) with 11 states (including 3 flexible modes) was used. Velocity, FPA, and pitch were assumed to be available for feedback. Aerodynamic heat modeling and design for the assumed TPS was incorporated to original Bolender's model to study the change in static and dynamic properties. De-centralized control stability, feasibility and limitations issues were dealt with the change in TPS elasticity, mass and physical dimension. The impact of elasticity due to TPS mass, TPS physical dimension as well as prolonged heating was also analyzed to understand performance limitations of de-centralized control designed for nominal model.

  20. Aero-optics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Lynn D.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Army Strategic Defense Command (USASDC) has several ongoing and planned programs that utilize optical sensors aboard missiles traveling at hypersonic velocities in the atmosphere. Central to the missile homing problem are aero-optical effects upon a missile-borne sensor/seeker which looks through both an electromagnetic window and the flow field about the vehicle. Aspects of the problem include modeling and simulation of the flow field on incident radiation from a target, and finally, predicting the resultant image imperfections and error in apparent object position as perceived by the sensor.

  1. Transient aero-thermal mapping of passive Thermal Protection system for nose-cap of Reusable Hypersonic Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahulikar, Shripad P.; Khurana, Shashank; Dungarwal, Ritesh; Shevakari, Sushil G.; Subramanian, Jayakumar; Gujarathi, Amit V.

    2008-12-01

    The temperature field history of passive Thermal Protection System (TPS) material at the nose-cap (forward stagnation region) of a Reusable Hypersonic Vehicle (RHV) is generated. The 3-D unsteady heat transfer model couples conduction in the solid with external convection and radiation that are modeled as time-varying boundary conditions on the surface. Results are presented for the following two cases: (1) nose-cap comprised of ablative TPS material only (SIRCA/PICA), and (2) nose-cap comprised of a combination of ablative TPS material with moderate thermal conductivity and insulative TPS material. Comparison of the temperature fields of SIRCA and PICA [Case (1)] indicates lowering of the peak stagnation region temperatures for PICA, due to its higher thermal conductivity. Also, the use of PICA and insulative TPS [Case (2)] for the nose-cap has higher potential for weight reduction than the use of ablative TPS alone.

  2. AeroMACS System Characterization and Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Dimond, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    This The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being developed to provide a new broadband wireless communications capability for safety critical communications in the airport surface domain, providing connectivity to aircraft and other ground vehicles as well as connections between other critical airport fixed assets. AeroMACS development has progressed from requirements definition through technology definition, prototype deployment and testing, and now into national and international standards development. The first prototype AeroMACS system has been deployed at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE) and the adjacent NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). During the past 3 years, extensive technical testing has taken place to characterize the performance of the AeroMACS prototype and provide technical support for the standards development process. The testing has characterized AeroMACS link and network performance over a variety of conditions for both fixed and mobile data transmission and has included basic system performance testing and fixed and mobile applications testing. This paper provides a summary of the AeroMACS performance testing and the status of standardization activities that the testing supports.

  3. AeroMACS System Characterization and Demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Dimond, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being developed to provide a new broadband wireless communications capability for safety critical communications in the airport surface domain, providing connectivity to aircraft and other ground vehicles as well as connections between other critical airport fixed assets. AeroMACS development has progressed from requirements definition through technology definition, prototype deployment and testing, and now into national and international standards development. The first prototype AeroMACS system has been deployed at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE) and the adjacent NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). During the past three years, extensive technical testing has taken place to characterize the performance of the AeroMACS prototype and provide technical support for the standards development process. The testing has characterized AeroMACS link and network performance over a variety of conditions for both fixed and mobile data transmission and has included basic system performance testing and fixed and mobile applications testing. This paper provides a summary of the AeroMACS performance testing and the status of standardization activities that the testing supports.

  4. AeroMACS system characterization and demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerczewski, R. J.; Apaza, R. D.; Dimond, R. P.

    This The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being developed to provide a new broadband wireless communications capability for safety critical communications in the airport surface domain, providing connectivity to aircraft and other ground vehicles as well as connections between other critical airport fixed assets. AeroMACS development has progressed from requirements definition through technology definition, prototype deployment and testing, and now into national and international standards development. The first prototype AeroMACS system has been deployed at the Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE) and the adjacent NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). During the past three years, extensive technical testing has taken place to characterize the performance of the AeroMACS prototype and provide technical support for the standards development process. The testing has characterized AeroMACS link and network performance over a variety of conditions for both fixed and mobile data transmission and has included basic system performance testing and fixed and mobile applications testing. This paper provides a summary of the AeroMACS performance testing and the status of standardization activities that the testing supports.

  5. Numerical modeling of separated flows at moderate Reynolds numbers appropriate for turbine blades and unmanned aero vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglioni, Giacomo

    Flows over airfoils and blades in rotating machinery, for unmanned and micro-aerial vehicles, wind turbines, and propellers consist of a laminar boundary layer near the leading edge that is often followed by a laminar separation bubble and transition to turbulence further downstream. Typical Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence models are inadequate for such flows. Direct numerical simulation is the most reliable, but is also the most computationally expensive alternative. This work assesses the capability of immersed boundary methods and large eddy simulations to reduce the computational requirements for such flows and still provide high quality results. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations of a laminar separation bubble on a NACA-0012 airfoil at Rec = 5x104 and at 5° of incidence have been performed with an immersed boundary code and a commercial code using body fitted grids. Several sub-grid scale models have been implemented in both codes and their performance evaluated. For the two-dimensional simulations with the immersed boundary method the results show good agreement with the direct numerical simulation benchmark data for the pressure coefficient Cp and the friction coefficient Cf, but only when using dissipative numerical schemes. There is evidence that this behavior can be attributed to the ability of dissipative schemes to damp numerical noise coming from the immersed boundary. For the three-dimensional simulations the results show a good prediction of the separation point, but an inaccurate prediction of the reattachment point unless full direct numerical simulation resolution is used. The commercial code shows good agreement with the direct numerical simulation benchmark data in both two and three-dimensional simulations, but the presence of significant, unquantified numerical dissipation prevents a conclusive assessment of the actual prediction capabilities of very coarse large eddy simulations with low order schemes in general

  6. Aero-optimum hovering kinematics.

    PubMed

    Nabawy, Mostafa R A; Crowther, William J

    2015-08-01

    Hovering flight for flapping wing vehicles requires rapid and relatively complex reciprocating movement of a wing relative to a stationary surrounding fluid. This note develops a compact analytical aero-kinematic model that can be used for optimization of flapping wing kinematics against aerodynamic criteria of effectiveness (maximum lift) and efficiency (minimum power for a given amount of lift). It can also be used to make predictions of required flapping frequency for a given geometry and basic aerodynamic parameters. The kinematic treatment is based on a consolidation of an existing formulation that allows explicit derivation of flapping velocity for complex motions whereas the aerodynamic model is based on existing quasi-steady analysis. The combined aero-kinematic model provides novel explicit analytical expressions for both lift and power of a hovering wing in a compact form that enables exploration of a rich kinematic design space. Good agreement is found between model predictions of flapping frequency and observed results for a number of insects and optimal hovering kinematics identified using the model are consistent with results from studies using higher order computational models. For efficient flight, the flapping angle should vary using a triangular profile in time leading to a constant velocity flapping motion, whereas for maximum effectiveness the shape of variation should be sinusoidal. For both cases the wing pitching motion should be rectangular such that pitch change at stroke reversal is as rapid as possible. PMID:26248884

  7. Aero dopes and varnishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, H T S

    1927-01-01

    Before proceeding to discuss the preparation of dope solutions, it will be necessary to consider some of the essential properties which should be possessed of a dope film, deposited in and on the surface of an aero fabric. The first is that it should tighten the material and second it should withstand weathering.

  8. Aero-Assisted Spacecraft Missions Using Hypersonic Waverider Aeroshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knittel, Jeremy

    This work examines the use of high-lift, low drag vehicles which perform orbital transfers within a planet's atmosphere to reduce propulsive requirements. For the foreseeable future, spacecraft mission design will include the objective of limiting the mass of fuel required. One means of accomplishing this is using aerodynamics as a supplemental force, with what is termed an aero-assist maneuver. Further, the use of a lifting body enables a mission designer to explore candidate trajectory types wholly unavailable to non-lifting analogs. Examples include missions to outer planets by way of an aero-gravity assist, aero-assisted plane change, aero-capture, and steady atmospheric periapsis probing missions. Engineering level models are created in order to simulate both atmospheric and extra-atmospheric space flight. Each mission is parameterized using discrete variables which control multiple areas of design. This work combines the areas of hypersonic aerodynamics, re-entry aerothermodynamics, spacecraft orbital mechanics, and vehicle shape optimization. In particular, emphasis is given to the parametric design of vehicles known as "waveriders" which are inversely designed from known shock flowfields. An entirely novel means of generating a class of waveriders known as "starbodies" is presented. A complete analysis is performed of asymmetric starbody forms and compared to a better understood parameterization, "osculating cone" waveriders. This analysis includes characterization of stability behavior, a critical discipline within hypersonic flight. It is shown that asymmetric starbodies have significant stability improvement with only a 10% reduction in the lift-to-drag ratio. By combining the optimization of both the shape of the vehicle and the trajectory it flies, much is learned about the benefit that can be expected from lifting aero-assist missions. While previous studies have conceptually proven the viability, this work provides thorough quantification of the

  9. Aero/structural tailoring of engine blades (AERO/STAEBL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes the Aero/Structural Tailoring of Engine Blades (AERO/STAEBL) program, which is a computer code used to perform engine fan and compressor blade aero/structural numerical optimizations. These optimizations seek a blade design of minimum operating cost that satisfies realistic blade design constraints. This report documents the overall program (i.e., input, optimization procedures, approximate analyses) and also provides a detailed description of the validation test cases.

  10. Aero-optics overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-04-01

    Various aero-optical phenomena are discussed with reference to their effect on airborne high energy lasers. Major emphasis is placed on: compressibility effects induced in the surrounding flow field; viscous effects which manifests themselves as aircraft boundary layers or shear layers; inviscid flow fields surrounding the aircraft due to airflow around protuberance such as laser turret assemblies; and shocks, established whenever local flow exceeds Mach one. The significant physical parameters affecting the interaction of a laser beam with a turbulent boundary layer are also described.

  11. Effect of Cavβ Subunits on Structural Organization of Cav1.2 Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Son Q.; Thomas, Sam; Harry, Jo Beth; Patel, Chirag; Lao, Qi Zong; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated Cav1.2 calcium channels play a crucial role in Ca2+ signaling. The pore-forming α1C subunit is regulated by accessory Cavβ subunits, cytoplasmic proteins of various size encoded by four different genes (Cavβ1 - β4) and expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Methods and Results Here we investigated the effect of three major Cavβ types, β1b, β2d and β3, on the structure of Cav1.2 in the plasma membrane of live cells. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that the tendency of Cav1.2 to form clusters depends on the type of the Cavβ subunit present. The highest density of Cav1.2 clusters in the plasma membrane and the smallest cluster size were observed with neuronal/cardiac β1b present. Cav1.2 channels containing β3, the predominant Cavβ subunit of vascular smooth muscle cells, were organized in a significantly smaller number of larger clusters. The inter- and intramolecular distances between α1C and Cavβ in the plasma membrane of live cells were measured by three-color FRET microscopy. The results confirm that the proximity of Cav1.2 channels in the plasma membrane depends on the Cavβ type. The presence of different Cavβ subunits does not result in significant differences in the intramolecular distance between the termini of α1C, but significantly affects the distance between the termini of neighbor α1C subunits, which varies from 67 Å with β1b to 79 Å with β3. Conclusions Thus, our results show that the structural organization of Cav1.2 channels in the plasma membrane depends on the type of Cavβ subunits present. PMID:19492014

  12. AeroSpace Days 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    At the eighth annual AeroSpace Days, first mom in space, Astronaut AnnaFisher, and Sen. Louise Lucas, interacted with students from Mack BennJr. Elementary School in Suffolk, Va. through NASA’s...

  13. AeroDyn Theory Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, P. J.; Hansen, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    AeroDyn is a set of routines used in conjunction with an aeroelastic simulation code to predict the aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines. These subroutines provide several different models whose theoretical bases are described in this manual. AeroDyn contains two models for calculating the effect of wind turbine wakes: the blade element momentum theory and the generalized dynamic-wake theory. Blade element momentum theory is the classical standard used by many wind turbine designers and generalized dynamic wake theory is a more recent model useful for modeling skewed and unsteady wake dynamics. When using the blade element momentum theory, various corrections are available for the user, such as incorporating the aerodynamic effects of tip losses, hub losses, and skewed wakes. With the generalized dynamic wake, all of these effects are automatically included. Both of these methods are used to calculate the axial induced velocities from the wake in the rotor plane. The user also has the option of calculating the rotational induced velocity. In addition, AeroDyn contains an important model for dynamic stall based on the semi-empirical Beddoes-Leishman model. This model is particularly important for yawed wind turbines. Another aerodynamic model in AeroDyn is a tower shadow model based on potential flow around a cylinder and an expanding wake. Finally, AeroDyn has the ability to read several different formats of wind input, including single-point hub-height wind files or multiple-point turbulent winds.

  14. Hypersonic Interplanetary Flight: Aero Gravity Assist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Al; Banks, Dan; Randolph, Jim

    2006-01-01

    The use of aero-gravity assist during hypersonic interplanetary flights is highlighted. Specifically, the use of large versus small planet for gravity asssist maneuvers, aero-gravity assist trajectories, launch opportunities and planetary waverider performance are addressed.

  15. 2005 PathfinderPlus Aero-Elastic Research Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the 2005 Pathfinder along with an investigation of its aeroelastic responses. The contents include: 1) HALE Class of Vehicles; 2) Aero-elastic Research Flights Overall Objective; 3) General Arrangement; 4) Sensor Locations; 5) NASA Ramp Operations; 6) Lakebed Operations; 7) 1st Flight Data Set; 8) Tool development / data usage; 9) HALE Tool Development & Validation; 10) Building a HALE Foundation; 11) Compelling Needs Drive HALE Efforts; and 12) Team Photo

  16. Aero-thermal analysis of lifting body configurations in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2016-09-01

    The aero-thermal analysis of a hypersonic vehicle is of fundamental interest for designing its thermal protection system. The aero-thermal environment predictions over several critical regions of the hypothesized lifting body vehicle, including the stagnation region of the nose-cap, cylindrically swept leading edges, fuselage-upper, and fuselage-lower surfaces, are discussed. The drag (Λ=70°) and temperature (Λ=80°) minimized sweepback angles are considered in the configuration design of the two hypothesized lifting body shape hypersonic vehicles. The main aim of the present study is to analyze and compare the aero-thermal characteristics of these two lifting body configurations at same heat capacity. Accordingly, a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation has been carried out at Mach number (M∞=7), H=35 km altitude with zero Angle of Attack. Finally, the material selection for thermal protection system based on these predictions and current methodology is described.

  17. Considerations for Improving the Capacity and Performance of AeroMACS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Kamali, Behnam; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Dimond, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    The Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) has progressed from concept through prototype development, testing, and standards development and is now poised for the first operational deployments at nine US airports by the Federal Aviation Administration. These initial deployments will support fixed applications. Mobile applications providing connectivity to and from aircraft and ground-based vehicles on the airport surface will occur at some point in the future. Given that many fixed applications are possible for AeroMACS, it is necessary to now consider whether the existing capacity of AeroMACS will be reached even before the mobile applications are ready to be added, since AeroMACS is constrained by both available bandwidth and transmit power limitations. This paper describes some concepts that may be applied to improve the future capacity of AeroMACS, with a particular emphasis on gains that can be derived from the addition of IEEE 802.16j multihop relays to the AeroMACS standard, where a significant analysis effort has been undertaken.

  18. Functional roles of Cav1.3, Cav3.1 and HCN channels in automaticity of mouse atrioventricular cells

    PubMed Central

    Marger, Laurine; Mesirca, Pietro; Alig, Jacqueline; Torrente, Angelo; Dubel, Stefan; Engeland, Birgit; Kanani, Sandra; Fontanaud, Pierre; Striessnig, Jörg; Shin, Hee-Sup; Isbrandt, Dirk; Ehmke, Heimo; Nargeot, Joël

    2011-01-01

    The atrioventricular node controls cardiac impulse conduction and generates pacemaker activity in case of failure of the sino-atrial node. Understanding the mechanisms of atrioventricular automaticity is important for managing human pathologies of heart rate and conduction. However, the physiology of atrioventricular automaticity is still poorly understood. We have investigated the role of three key ion channel-mediated pacemaker mechanisms namely, Cav1.3, Cav3.1 and HCN channels in automaticity of atrioventricular node cells (AVNCs). We studied atrioventricular conduction and pacemaking of AVNCs in wild-type mice and mice lacking Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−), Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−), channels or both (Cav1.3−/−/Cav3.1−/−). The role of HCN channels in the modulation of atrioventricular cells pacemaking was studied by conditional expression of dominant-negative HCN4 channels lacking cAMP sensitivity. Inactivation of Cav3.1 channels impaired AVNCs pacemaker activity by favoring sporadic block of automaticity leading to cellular arrhythmia. Furthermore, Cav3.1 channels were critical for AVNCs to reach high pacemaking rates under isoproterenol. Unexpectedly, Cav1.3 channels were required for spontaneous automaticity, because Cav1.3−/− and Cav1.3−/−/Cav3.1−/− AVNCs were completely silent under physiological conditions. Abolition of the cAMP sensitivity of HCN channels reduced automaticity under basal conditions, but maximal rates of AVNCs could be restored to that of control mice by isoproterenol. In conclusion, while Cav1.3 channels are required for automaticity, Cav3.1 channels are important for maximal pacing rates of mouse AVNCs. HCN channels are important for basal AVNCs automaticity but do not appear to be determinant for β-adrenergic regulation. PMID:21406960

  19. Nonlinear feedback guidance law for aero-assisted orbit transfer maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K. A.

    1992-01-01

    Aero-assisted orbit transfer vehicles have the potential for significantly reducing the fuel requirements in certain classes of orbit transfer operations. Development of a nonlinear feedback guidance law for performing aero-assisted maneuvers that accomplish simultaneous change of all the orbital elements with least vehicle acceleration magnitude is discussed. The analysis is based on a sixth order nonlinear point-mass vehicle model with lift, bank angle, thrust and drag modulation as the control variables. The guidance law uses detailed vehicle aerodynamic and the atmosphere models in the feedback loop. Higher-order gravitational harmonics, planetary atmosphere rotation and ambient winds are included in the formulation. Due to modest computational requirements, the guidance law is implementable on-board an orbit transfer vehicle. The guidance performance is illustrated for three sets of boundary conditions.

  20. Ankyrin-B Regulates Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 Channel Expression and Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Crystal F.; Scott, John; Curran, Jerry; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    N-type and P/Q-type calcium channels are documented players in the regulation of synaptic function; however, the mechanisms underlying their expression and cellular targeting are poorly understood. Ankyrin polypeptides are essential for normal integral membrane protein expression in a number of cell types, including neurons, cardiomyocytes, epithelia, secretory cells, and erythrocytes. Ankyrin dysfunction has been linked to defects in integral protein expression, abnormal cellular function, and disease. Here, we demonstrate that ankyrin-B associates with Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 in cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. Additionally, using in vitro and in vivo techniques, we demonstrate that ankyrin-B, via its membrane-binding domain, associates with a highly conserved motif in the DII/III loop domain of Cav2.1 and Cav2.2. Further, we demonstrate that this domain is necessary for proper targeting of Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 in a heterologous system. Finally, we demonstrate that mutation of a single conserved tyrosine residue in the ankyrin-binding motif of both Cav2.1 (Y797E) and Cav2.2 (Y788E) results in loss of association with ankyrin-B in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our findings identify an interaction between ankyrin-B and both Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 at the amino acid level that is necessary for proper Cav2.1 and Cav2.2 targeting in vivo. PMID:24394417

  1. National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piland, William M.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the technology development management objectives thus far planned for the DOD/NASA National Aero-Space Plane (NASP). The technology required by NASP will first be developed in ground-based facilities and then integrated during the design and construction of the X-30 experimental aircraft. Five airframe and three powerplant manufacturers are currently engaged in an 18-month effort encompassing design studies and tradeoff analyses. The first flight of the X-30 is scheduled for early 1993.

  2. High-Temperature Adhesives for Thermally Stable Aero-Assist Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberts, Kenneth; Ou, Runqing

    2013-01-01

    Aero-assist technologies are used to control the velocity of exploration vehicles (EVs) when entering Earth or other planetary atmospheres. Since entry of EVs in planetary atmospheres results in significant heating, thermally stable aero-assist technologies are required to avoid the high heating rates while maintaining low mass. Polymer adhesives are used in aero-assist structures because of the need for high flexibility and good bonding between layers of polymer films or fabrics. However, current polymer adhesives cannot withstand temperatures above 400 C. This innovation utilizes nanotechnology capabilities to address this need, leading to the development of high-temperature adhesives that exhibit high thermal conductivity in addition to increased thermal decomposition temperature. Enhanced thermal conductivity will help to dissipate heat quickly and effectively to avoid temperature rising to harmful levels. This, together with increased thermal decomposition temperature, will enable the adhesives to sustain transient high-temperature conditions.

  3. Alcohol Withdrawal-Induced Seizure Susceptibility is Associated with an Upregulation of CaV1.3 Channels in the Rat Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Akinfiresoye, Luli R.; Allard, Joanne S.; Lovinger, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We previously reported increased current density through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV1) channels in inferior colliculus (IC) neurons during alcohol withdrawal. However, the molecular correlate of this increased CaV1 current is currently unknown. Methods: Rats received three daily doses of ethanol every 8 hours for 4 consecutive days; control rats received vehicle. The IC was dissected at various time intervals following alcohol withdrawal, and the mRNA and protein levels of the CaV1.3 and CaV1.2 α1 subunits were measured. In separate experiments, rats were tested for their susceptibility to alcohol withdrawal–induced seizures (AWS) 3, 24, and 48 hours after alcohol withdrawal. Results: In the alcohol-treated group, AWS were observed 24 hours after withdrawal; no seizures were observed at 3 or 48 hours. No seizures were observed at any time in the control-treated rats. Compared to control-treated rats, the mRNA level of the CaV1.3 α1 subunit was increased 1.4-fold, 1.9-fold, and 1.3-fold at 3, 24, and 48 hours, respectively. In contrast, the mRNA level of the CaV1.2 α1 subunit increased 1.5-fold and 1.4-fold at 24 and 48 hours, respectively. At 24 hours, Western blot analyses revealed that the levels of the CaV1.3 and CaV1.2 α1 subunits increased by 52% and 32%, respectively, 24 hours after alcohol withdrawal. In contrast, the CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 α1 subunits were not altered at either 3 or 48 hours during alcohol withdrawal. Conclusions: Expression of the CaV1.3 α1 subunit increased in parallel with AWS development, suggesting that altered L-type CaV1.3 channel expression is an important feature of AWS pathogenesis. PMID:25556199

  4. Regulation of aldosterone secretion by Cav1.3.

    PubMed

    Xie, Catherine B; Haris Shaikh, Lalarukh; Garg, Sumedha; Tanriver, Gizem; Teo, Ada E D; Zhou, Junhua; Maniero, Carmela; Zhao, Wanfeng; Kang, Soosung; Silverman, Richard B; Azizan, Elena A B; Brown, Morris J

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) vary in phenotype and genotype. Zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like APAs frequently have mutations of an L-type calcium channel (LTCC) CaV1.3. Using a novel antagonist of CaV1.3, compound 8, we investigated the role of CaV1.3 on steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical cell line, H295R, and in primary human adrenal cells. This investigational drug was compared with the common antihypertensive drug nifedipine, which has 4.5-fold selectivity for the vascular LTCC, CaV1.2, over CaV1.3. In H295R cells transfected with wild-type or mutant CaV1.3 channels, the latter produced more aldosterone than wild-type, which was ameliorated by 100 μM of compound 8. In primary adrenal and non-transfected H295R cells, compound 8 decreased aldosterone production similar to high concentration of nifedipine (100 μM). Selective CaV1.3 blockade may offer a novel way of treating primary hyperaldosteronism, which avoids the vascular side effects of CaV1.2-blockade, and provides targeted treatment for ZG-like APAs with mutations of CaV1.3. PMID:27098837

  5. Regulation of aldosterone secretion by Cav1.3

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Catherine B.; Haris Shaikh, Lalarukh; Garg, Sumedha; Tanriver, Gizem; Teo, Ada E. D.; Zhou, Junhua; Maniero, Carmela; Zhao, Wanfeng; Kang, Soosung; Silverman, Richard B.; Azizan, Elena A. B.; Brown, Morris J.

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) vary in phenotype and genotype. Zona glomerulosa (ZG)-like APAs frequently have mutations of an L-type calcium channel (LTCC) CaV1.3. Using a novel antagonist of CaV1.3, compound 8, we investigated the role of CaV1.3 on steroidogenesis in the human adrenocortical cell line, H295R, and in primary human adrenal cells. This investigational drug was compared with the common antihypertensive drug nifedipine, which has 4.5-fold selectivity for the vascular LTCC, CaV1.2, over CaV1.3. In H295R cells transfected with wild-type or mutant CaV1.3 channels, the latter produced more aldosterone than wild-type, which was ameliorated by 100 μM of compound 8. In primary adrenal and non-transfected H295R cells, compound 8 decreased aldosterone production similar to high concentration of nifedipine (100 μM). Selective CaV1.3 blockade may offer a novel way of treating primary hyperaldosteronism, which avoids the vascular side effects of CaV1.2-blockade, and provides targeted treatment for ZG-like APAs with mutations of CaV1.3. PMID:27098837

  6. CaV1.2/CaV3.x channels mediate divergent vasomotor responses in human cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Osama F; Visser, Frank; Brett, Suzanne E; Goldman, Daniel; Zechariah, Anil; Hashad, Ahmed M; Menon, Bijoy K; Watson, Tim; Starreveld, Yves; Welsh, Donald G

    2015-05-01

    The regulation of arterial tone is critical in the spatial and temporal control of cerebral blood flow. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) channels are key regulators of excitation-contraction coupling in arterial smooth muscle, and thereby of arterial tone. Although L- and T-type CaV channels have been identified in rodent smooth muscle, little is known about the expression and function of specific CaV subtypes in human arteries. Here, we determined which CaV subtypes are present in human cerebral arteries and defined their roles in determining arterial tone. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, respectively, identified mRNA and protein for L- and T-type channels in smooth muscle of cerebral arteries harvested from patients undergoing resection surgery. Analogous to rodents, CaV1.2 (L-type) and CaV3.2 (T-type) α1 subunits were expressed in human cerebral arterial smooth muscle; intriguingly, the CaV3.1 (T-type) subtype present in rodents was replaced with a different T-type isoform, CaV3.3, in humans. Using established pharmacological and electrophysiological tools, we separated and characterized the unique profiles of Ca(2+) channel subtypes. Pressurized vessel myography identified a key role for CaV1.2 and CaV3.3 channels in mediating cerebral arterial constriction, with the former and latter predominating at higher and lower intraluminal pressures, respectively. In contrast, CaV3.2 antagonized arterial tone through downstream regulation of the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel. Computational analysis indicated that each Ca(2+) channel subtype will uniquely contribute to the dynamic regulation of cerebral blood flow. In conclusion, this study documents the expression of three distinct Ca(2+) channel subtypes in human cerebral arteries and further shows how they act together to orchestrate arterial tone. PMID:25918359

  7. Real-time implementation of structural and aero-optical effects for hypervelocity missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rhoe A.; Krawczyk, Walter J.; Kircher, James R.; Trolier, James W.

    1996-05-01

    The Kinetic-kill-vehicle Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation Facility (KHILS), located at Eglin AFB FL, has been involved in the development and ground testing of Ballistic Missile Defense Organization hit-to-kill interceptor concepts for 10 years. Work is ongoing to characterize the implement hardware-in-the-loop models for missile `environment' effects that are associated with high speed flight in general and endo-atmospheric flight in particular. Two critical areas of interest in endo-atmospheric simulation are: (1) effects on the line-of-sight due to divert thruster firings and the resulting structural vibration, and (2) the line-of-sight aero-optical environment which can be influenced by heated missile flowfields, coolant layers, and thruster fringes. The structural and aero-optical effects manifest themselves as image jitter, blurring, boresight shifts, and increased background radiance. At the KHILS facility, real-time closed-loop simulation techniques are being developed for structural and aero-optical effects presentation. These techniques include both software and hardware solutions. This paper describe the status of activities by describing the issues and the present KHILS solutions. The paper includes discussion of model interfaces with hardware-in-the-loop simulations, timing issues, and data transmittal bandwidth requirements. Image show the effects of structural and aero-optical disturbances on seeker focal plane energy distributions.

  8. Aero Commander in flight - Upswept fuselage study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    The NASA Flight Research Center's Aero Commander 680F is shown in flight with tufts attached to the side and bottom sections of the aircraft. These were placed on the aircraft for a Upswept Fuselage Study to see if the flow separated on the aft section of a small aircraft for comparison of data acquired from a large cargo-type aircraft with an upswept aft section. The photo of the tufts demonstrates that the flow is attached with no turbulence present. (Note the straight lines of tufts). The Aero Commander was used both for support and as a research aircraft. Among other uses, it was flown to outlying dry lakebeds, used as emergency landing sites, before X-15 flights. It could reach the lakebeds quickly and land on the hard-packed surfaces to ensure they were not soft from rainfall or some other cause. Between 1964 and 1966, the Flight Research Center used the aircraft in the Aviation Safety and Operating Problems Program to evaluate the aerodynamics of various light aircraft and to define possible technological improvements. The Aero Commander left what had become the Dryden Flight Research Center on March 14, 1979, and was transferred to the Customs Air Branch in San Diego. The Aero Commander 680F (N6297), built by the Aero Commander Company of Bethany, Oklahoma, is a pressurized five-place aircraft that is powered by two 380-horsepower reciprocating engines built by Lycoming Company. The fuselage length is 24.2 feet with a wing span of 35.98 feet.

  9. Derivation of Aero-Induced Fluctuating Pressure Environments for Ares I-X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Michael Y.; Wilby, John F.

    2008-01-01

    A description is given of the external aero-inducted fluctuating pressure model which was fit and anchored to wind tunnel data from the past 40 years. This model is based upon the assumption that the flow around a vehicle can be divided into discrete flow zones with independent fluctuating pressure properties. The model is then used to derive fluctuating pressure environments during ascent for the Ares I-X test vehicle. A sensitivity study of the structural response to the spatial correlation of the fluctuating pressures is also performed.

  10. PV-1 IS NEGATIVELY REGULATED BY VEGF IN THE LUNG OF CAV-1, BUT NOT CAV-2, NULL MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An N-glycosylated 60-kDa PV-1 protein that binds heparin was detected in mouse lung from a single mRNA transcript. In the absence of disulfide bond reduction PV-1 is detected as a dimer or large molecular weight oligomer. In the lung of Cav-1, but not Cav-2, null mice the amount of PV-1 protein is d...

  11. Aerosciences, Aero-Propulsion and Flight Mechanics Technology Development for NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program, Vehicle Systems Research and Technology (VSR&T) project is pursuing technology advancements in aerothermodynamics, aeropropulsion and flight mechanics to enable development of future reusable launch vehicle (RLV) systems. The current design trade space includes rocket-propelled, hypersonic airbreathing and hybrid systems in two-stage and single-stage configurations. Aerothermodynamics technologies include experimental and computational databases to evaluate stage separation of two-stage vehicles as well as computational and trajectory simulation tools for this problem. Additionally, advancements in high-fidelity computational tools and measurement techniques are being pursued along with the study of flow physics phenomena, such as boundary-layer transition. Aero-propulsion technology development includes scramjet flowpath development and integration, with a current emphasis on hypervelocity (Mach 10 and above) operation, as well as the study of aero-propulsive interactions and the impact on overall vehicle performance. Flight mechanics technology development is focused on advanced guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) algorithms and adaptive flight control systems for both rocket-propelled and airbreathing vehicles.

  12. Overview of NASA Glenn Research Center Programs in Aero-Heat Transfer and Future Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaugler, Raymond E.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation concentrates on an overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center and the projects that are supporting Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Research. The principal areas include the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Project, the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) Revolutionary Turbine Accelerator (RTA) Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) project, and the Propulsion & Power Base R&T - Smart Efficient Components (SEC), and Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concepts (RAC) Projects. In addition, highlights are presented of the turbine aero-heat transfer work currently underway at NASA Glenn, focusing on the use of the Glenn-HT Navier- Stokes code as the vehicle for research in turbulence & transition modeling, grid topology generation, unsteady effects, and conjugate heat transfer.

  13. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca2+ Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca2+) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  14. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca(2+) Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  15. Results of the AEROS satellite program: Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lammerzahl, P.; Rawer, K.; Roemer, N.

    1980-01-01

    Published literature reporting aeronomic data collected on two AEROS missions is summarized. The extreme ultraviolet solar radiation and other significant parameters of the thermosphere/ionosphere were investigated. Kinetic pressure, the quantity of atomic nitrogen, and partial densities of helium, oxygen, nitrogen, argon, and atomic nitrogen were determined. The thermal electron population, superthermal energy distribution, plasma density, ion temperature, and composition according to ion types were measured. The chief energy supply in the thermosphere was calculated. Aeronomic calculations showing that variations in the parameters of the ionosphere cannot be correlated with fluctuations of extreme ultraviolet solar radiation were performed. The AEROS data were compared with data from S3-1, ISIS, and AE-C satellites. Models of the thermosphere and ionosphere were developed.

  16. Transient aero-thermal simulations for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogiatzis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    Aero-thermal simulations are an integral part of the design process for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). These simulations utilize Computational Solid-Fluid Dynamics (CSFD) to estimate wind jitter and blur, dome and mirror seeing, telescope pointing error due to thermal drift, and to predict thermal effects on performance of components such as the primary mirror segments. Design guidance obtained from these simulations is provided to the Telescope, Enclosure, Facilities and Adaptive Optics groups. Computational advances allow for model enhancements and inclusion of phenomena not previously resolved, such as transient effects on wind loading and thermal seeing due to vent operation while observing or long exposure effects, with potentially different flow patterns corresponding to the beginning and end of observation. Accurate knowledge of the Observatory aero-thermal environment will result in developing reliable look-up tables for effective open loop correction of key active optics system elements, and cost efficient operation of the Observatory.

  17. Aero-Engine Condition Monitoring Based on Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxiao; Wang, Nan

    The maintenance and management of civil aero-engine require advanced monitor approaches to estimate aero-engine performance and health in order to increase life of aero-engine and reduce maintenance costs. In this paper, we adopted support vector machine (SVM) regression approach to monitor an aero-engine health and condition by building monitoring models of main aero-engine performance parameters(EGT, N1, N2 and FF). The accuracy of nonlinear baseline models of performance parameters is tested and the maximum relative error does not exceed ±0.3%, which meets the engineering requirements. The results show that SVM nonlinear regression is an effective method in aero-engine monitoring.

  18. AeroValve Experimental Test Data Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, Mark W.

    2014-09-01

    This report documents the collection of experimental test data and presents performance characteristics for the AeroValve brand prototype pneumatic bidirectional solenoid valves tested at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July/August 2014 as part of a validation of AeroValve energy efficiency claims. The test stand and control programs were provided by AeroValve. All raw data and processing are included in the report attachments.

  19. Molecular Determinants of Cav1.2 Calcium Channel Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type Cav1.2 calcium channels couple membrane depolarization to transient increase in cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration that initiates a number of essential cellular functions including cardiac and vascular muscle contraction, gene expression, neuronal plasticity, and exocytosis. Inactivation or spontaneous termination of the calcium current through Cav1.2 is a critical step in regulation of these processes. The pathophysiological significance of this process is manifested in hypertension, heart failure, arrhythmia, and a number of other diseases where acceleration of the calcium current decay should present a benefit function. The central issue of this paper is the inactivation of the Cav1.2 calcium channel mediated by multiple determinants.

  20. Two novel CAV3 gene mutations in Japanese families.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Kazuma; Murayama, Kumiko; Noguchi, Satoru; Murakami, Nobuyuki; Mochizuki, Mika; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nonaka, Ikuya; Nishino, Ichizo

    2004-12-01

    Caveolin-3 deficiency is a rare, autosomal dominant, muscle disorder caused by caveolin-3 gene (CAV3) mutations and consists of four clinical phenotypes: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD-1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy, and familial hyperCKemia. So far, only 13 mutations have been reported. We here report two novel heterozygous mutations, 96C>G (N32K) and 128T>A (V43E), in the CAV3 gene in two unrelated Japanese families with LGMD-1C. Both probands presented with elevated serum CK level with calf muscle hypertrophy in their childhood but without apparent muscle weakness. However, their mothers showed mild limb-girdle weakness in addition to high CK level. Caveolin-3 was deficient and caveolae were lacking in muscles from both patients. Our data confirm that caveolin-3 deficiency causes LGMD-1C and expand the variability in CAV3 gene mutations. PMID:15564037

  1. Aero-optics overview. [laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K. G.

    1980-01-01

    Various aero-optical phenomena are discussed with reference to their effect on airborne high energy lasers. Major emphasis is placed on: compressibility effects induced in the surrounding flow field; viscous effects which manifests themselves as aircraft boundary layers or shear layers; inviscid flow fields surrounding the aircraft due to airflow around protuberance such as laser turret assemblies; and shocks, established whenever local flow exceeds Mach one. The significant physical parameters affecting the interaction of a laser beam with a turbulent boundary layer are also described.

  2. Automated and Cooperative Vehicle Merging at Highway On-Ramps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rios-Torres, Jackeline; Malikopoulos, Andreas A.

    2016-08-05

    Recognition of necessities of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) is gaining momentum. CAVs can improve both transportation network efficiency and safety through control algorithms that can harmonically use all existing information to coordinate the vehicles. This paper addresses the problem of optimally coordinating CAVs at merging roadways to achieve smooth traffic flow without stop-and-go driving. Here we present an optimization framework and an analytical closed-form solution that allows online coordination of vehicles at merging zones. The effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed solution is validated through a simulation, and it is shown that coordination of vehicles can significantly reducemore » both fuel consumption and travel time.« less

  3. Ethnic specific association of the CAV1/CAV2 locus with primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Shi Song; Chen, Li Jia; Leung, Christopher K. S.; Matsushita, Kenji; Jia, Liyun; Miki, Atsuya; Chiang, Sylvia W. Y.; Tam, Pancy O. S.; Hashida, Noriyasu; Young, Alvin L.; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Ningli; Nishida, Kohji; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4236601 at the CAV1/CAV2 locus is associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Rs4236601 is common in Caucasians but rare in East Asians. Here we conducted a haplotype-tagging SNP analysis followed by replication in a total of 848 POAG cases and 1574 controls drawn from 3 cities in China and 1 city in Japan. Two SNPs, rs4236601 (odds ratio [OR] = 6.25; P = 0.0086) and a tagging-SNP rs3801994 (OR = 1.32; P = 0.042), were associated with POAG in the Hong Kong Chinese cohort after age and gender adjustments. Rs4236601 was associated with POAG also in Shantou (OR = 6.09; P = 0.0037) and Beijing (OR = 3.92; P = 0.030) cohorts after age and gender adjustment, with a pooled-OR of 5.26 (P = 9.0 × 10−6) in Chinese; but it is non-polymorphic in the Osaka cohort. SNP rs3801994 showed a similar trend of effect in the Shantou and Beijing cohorts, with a pooled-OR of 1.23 (P = 0.022) and 1.20 (P = 0.063) in Chinese, prior to and after age and gender adjustment, respectively; but it showed a reverse effect in the Osaka cohort (OR = 0.58; P = 0.033) after the adjustments. We have thus confirmed the association of rs4236601 with POAG in different Chinese cohorts. Also, we found a common SNP rs3801994 of diverse associations with POAG between Chinese and Japanese. PMID:27297022

  4. Ethnic specific association of the CAV1/CAV2 locus with primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Rong, Shi Song; Chen, Li Jia; Leung, Christopher K S; Matsushita, Kenji; Jia, Liyun; Miki, Atsuya; Chiang, Sylvia W Y; Tam, Pancy O S; Hashida, Noriyasu; Young, Alvin L; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wang, Ningli; Nishida, Kohji; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4236601 at the CAV1/CAV2 locus is associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Rs4236601 is common in Caucasians but rare in East Asians. Here we conducted a haplotype-tagging SNP analysis followed by replication in a total of 848 POAG cases and 1574 controls drawn from 3 cities in China and 1 city in Japan. Two SNPs, rs4236601 (odds ratio [OR] = 6.25; P = 0.0086) and a tagging-SNP rs3801994 (OR = 1.32; P = 0.042), were associated with POAG in the Hong Kong Chinese cohort after age and gender adjustments. Rs4236601 was associated with POAG also in Shantou (OR = 6.09; P = 0.0037) and Beijing (OR = 3.92; P = 0.030) cohorts after age and gender adjustment, with a pooled-OR of 5.26 (P = 9.0 × 10(-6)) in Chinese; but it is non-polymorphic in the Osaka cohort. SNP rs3801994 showed a similar trend of effect in the Shantou and Beijing cohorts, with a pooled-OR of 1.23 (P = 0.022) and 1.20 (P = 0.063) in Chinese, prior to and after age and gender adjustment, respectively; but it showed a reverse effect in the Osaka cohort (OR = 0.58; P = 0.033) after the adjustments. We have thus confirmed the association of rs4236601 with POAG in different Chinese cohorts. Also, we found a common SNP rs3801994 of diverse associations with POAG between Chinese and Japanese. PMID:27297022

  5. Aeronautical Satellite-Assisted Process for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT) Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Broadband satellite communications for aeronautics marries communication and network technologies to address NASA's goals in information technology base research and development, thereby serving the safety and capacity needs of the National Airspace System. This marriage of technology increases the interactivity between airborne vehicles and ground systems. It improves decision-making and efficiency, reduces operation costs, and improves the safety and capacity of the National Airspace System. To this end, a collaborative project called the Aeronautical Satellite Assisted Process for Information Exchange through Network Technologies, or Aero-SAPIENT, was conducted out of Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, during November and December 2000.

  6. Turbofan Volume Dynamics Model for Investigations of Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic Effects in a Supersonic Commercial Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Lemon, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    A turbofan simulation has been developed for use in aero-propulso-servo-elastic coupling studies, on supersonic vehicles. A one-dimensional lumped volume approach is used whereby each component (fan, high-pressure compressor, combustor, etc.) is represented as a single volume using characteristic performance maps and conservation equations for continuity, momentum and energy. The simulation is developed in the MATLAB/SIMULINK (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment in order to facilitate controls development, and ease of integration with a future aero-servo-elastic vehicle model being developed at NASA Langley. The complete simulation demonstrated steady state results that closely match a proposed engine suitable for a supersonic business jet at the cruise condition. Preliminary investigation of the transient simulation revealed expected trends for fuel flow disturbances as well as upstream pressure disturbances. A framework for system identification enables development of linear models for controller design. Utilizing this framework, a transfer function modeling an upstream pressure disturbance s impacts on the engine speed is developed as an illustrative case of the system identification. This work will eventually enable an overall vehicle aero-propulso-servo-elastic model

  7. Equal sensitivity of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels to the opposing modulations of PKA and PKG in mouse chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Satyajit; Marcantoni, Andrea; Zuccotti, Annalisa; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2012-10-15

    Mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) express high densities of L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), which control pacemaking activity and catecholamine secretion proportionally to their density of expression. In vivo phosphorylation of LTCCs by cAMP-PKA and cGMP–PKG, regulate LTCC gating in two opposing ways: the cAMP-PKA pathway potentiates while the cGMP–PKG cascade inhibits LTCCs. Despite this, no attempts have been made to answer three key questions related to the two Cav1 isoforms expressed in MCCs (Cav1.2 and Cav1.3): (i) how much are the two Cav1 channels basally modulated by PKA and PKG?, (ii) to what extent can Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 be further regulated by PKA or PKG activation?, and (iii) are the effects of both kinases cumulative when simultaneously active? Here, by comparing the size of L-type currents of wild-type (WT; Cav1.2+Cav1.3) and Cav1.3−/− KO (Cav1.2) MCCs, we provide new evidence that both PKA and PKG pathways affect Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 to the same extent either under basal conditions or induced stimulation. Inhibition of PKA by H89 (5 μM) reduced the L-type current in WT and KO MCCs by∼60%,while inhibition of PKG by KT 5823 (1 μM) increased by∼40% the same current in both cell types. Given that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 carry the same quantity of Ca2+ currents, this suggests equal sensitivity of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 to the two basal modulatory pathways. Maximal stimulation of cAMP–PKA by forskolin (100 μM) and activation of cGMP–PKG by pCPT-cGMP (1mM) uncovered a∼25% increase of L-type currents in the first case and∼65% inhibition in the second case in both WT and KO MCCs, suggesting equal sensitivity of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 during maximal PKA or PKG stimulation. The effects of PKA and PKG were cumulative and most evident when one pathway was activated and the other was inhibited. The two extreme combinations(PKA activation–PKG inhibition vs. PKG activation-PKA inhibition) varied the size of L-type currents by one order of magnitude (from 180% to 18

  8. Equal sensitivity of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels to the opposing modulations of PKA and PKG in mouse chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Satyajit; Marcantoni, Andrea; Zuccotti, Annalisa; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) express high densities of L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), which control pacemaking activity and catecholamine secretion proportionally to their density of expression. In vivo phosphorylation of LTCCs by cAMP–PKA and cGMP–PKG, regulate LTCC gating in two opposing ways: the cAMP–PKA pathway potentiates while the cGMP–PKG cascade inhibits LTCCs. Despite this, no attempts have been made to answer three key questions related to the two Cav1 isoforms expressed in MCCs (Cav1.2 and Cav1.3): (i) how much are the two Cav1 channels basally modulated by PKA and PKG?, (ii) to what extent can Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 be further regulated by PKA or PKG activation?, and (iii) are the effects of both kinases cumulative when simultaneously active? Here, by comparing the size of L-type currents of wild-type (WT; Cav1.2 + Cav1.3) and Cav1.3−/− KO (Cav1.2) MCCs, we provide new evidence that both PKA and PKG pathways affect Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 to the same extent either under basal conditions or induced stimulation. Inhibition of PKA by H89 (5 μm) reduced the L-type current in WT and KO MCCs by ∼60%, while inhibition of PKG by KT 5823 (1 μm) increased by ∼40% the same current in both cell types. Given that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 carry the same quantity of Ca2+ currents, this suggests equal sensitivity of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 to the two basal modulatory pathways. Maximal stimulation of cAMP–PKA by forskolin (100 μm) and activation of cGMP–PKG by pCPT-cGMP (1 mm) uncovered a ∼25% increase of L-type currents in the first case and ∼65% inhibition in the second case in both WT and KO MCCs, suggesting equal sensitivity of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 during maximal PKA or PKG stimulation. The effects of PKA and PKG were cumulative and most evident when one pathway was activated and the other was inhibited. The two extreme combinations (PKA activation–PKG inhibition vs. PKG activation–PKA inhibition) varied the size of L-type currents by one order of magnitude

  9. Voltage-gated Cav1 channels in disorders of vision and hearing

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Mei-ling A.; Lee, Amy

    2015-01-01

    Cav1 channels mediate L-type Ca2+ currents that trigger the exocytotic release of glutamate from the specialized “ribbon” synapse of retinal photoreceptors (PRs) and cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs). Genetic evidence from animal models and humans support a role for Cav1.3 and Cav1.4 as the primary Cav channels in IHCs and PRs, respectively. Because of the unique features of transmission at ribbon synapses, Cav1.3 and Cav1.4 exhibit unusual properties that are well-suited for their physiological roles. These properties may be intrinsic to the channel subunit(s) and/or may be conferred by regulatory interactions with synaptic signaling molecules. This review will cover advances in our understanding of the function of Cav1 channels at sensory ribbon synapses, and how dysregulation of these channels leads to disorders of vision and hearing. PMID:25966695

  10. PREFACE: 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Müller, A.

    2015-12-01

    It is our pleasure and privilege to welcome all the participants of the 9th International Symposium on Cavitation (CAV2015) to Lausanne. Since its initiation in 1986 in Sendai, Japan, the CAV symposium has grown to become the world's foremost event dedicated to cavitation. Hosted by EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) and staged at the SwissTech Convention Center, CAV2015 is a unique opportunity to exchange with leading scientists and industry experts about the latest advances in theoretical modelling, numerical simulation and experimentation related to cavitation phenomena with a special emphasis on practical applications. The topics covered by CAV2015 include cavitation in ¬fluid machinery and fuel systems, bubble dynamics, cavitation erosion, advanced numerical simulation, sonochemistery, biomedicine and experimental techniques. CAV2015 will also host an exhibition of leading providers of state of the art measurement equipment, including high-speed imaging systems, non-intrusive velocimetry, pressure sensors, as well as numerical solvers. We have accepted over 190 papers, which will be presented in four parallel sessions. The proceedings will appear in the open access Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS), which is part of the IOP Conference Series. All published papers are fully citable and upon publication will be free to download in perpetuity. We would like to thank all the reviewers for their great help during the selection process. We will also propose six plenary speakers to highlight cavitation issues in different fields. Finally, we would like to warmly thank our sponsors for their valuable support and the local Organizing Committee for the efforts in setting up this important event. We look forward to seeing you in Lausanne!

  11. Aero-servo-viscoelasticity theory: Lifting surfaces, plates, velocity transients, flutter, and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrett, Craig G.

    Modern flight vehicles are fabricated from composite materials resulting in flexible structures that behave differently from the more traditional elastic metal structures. Composite materials offer a number of advantages compared to metals, such as improved strength to mass ratio, and intentional material property anisotropy. Flexible aircraft structures date from the Wright brothers' first aircraft with fabric covered wooden frames. The flexibility of the structure was used to warp the lifting surface for flight control, a concept that has reappeared as aircraft morphing. These early structures occasionally exhibited undesirable characteristics during flight such as interactions between the empennage and the aft fuselage, or control problems with the elevators. The research to discover the cause and correction of these undesirable characteristics formed the first foray into the field of aeroelasticity. Aeroelasticity is the intersection and interaction between aerodynamics, elasticity, and inertia or dynamics. Aeroelasticity is well suited for metal aircraft, but requires expansion to improve its applicability to composite vehicles. The first is a change from elasticity to viscoelasticity to more accurately capture the solid mechanics of the composite material. The second change is to include control systems. While the inclusion of control systems in aeroelasticity lead to aero-servo-elasticity, more control possibilities exist for a viscoelastic composite material. As an example, during the lay-up of carbon-epoxy plies, piezoelectric control patches are inserted between different plies to give a variety of control options. The expanded field is called aero-servo-viscoelasticity. The phenomena of interest in aero-servo-viscoelasticity are best classified according to the type of structure considered, either a lifting surface or a panel, and the type of dynamic stability present. For both types of structures, the governing equations are integral

  12. Proceedings of the Non-Linear Aero Prediction Requirements Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the Non-Linear Aero Prediction Requirements Workshop, held at NASA Langley Research Center on 8-9 Dec. 1993, was to identify and articulate requirements for non-linear aero prediction capabilities during conceptual/preliminary design. The attendees included engineers from industry, government, and academia in a variety of aerospace disciplines, such as advanced design, aerodynamic performance analysis, aero methods development, flight controls, and experimental and theoretical aerodynamics. Presentations by industry and government organizations were followed by panel discussions. This report contains copies of the presentations and the results of the panel discussions.

  13. Alternative Splicing Generates a Novel Truncated Cav1.2 Channel in Neonatal Rat Heart*

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ping; Yu, Dejie; Hu, Zhenyu; Liang, Mui Cheng; Wang, Jue Jin; Yu, Chye Yun; Ng, Gandi; Yong, Tan Fong; Soon, Jia Lin; Chua, Yeow Leng; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2015-01-01

    L-type Cav1.2 Ca2+ channel undergoes extensive alternative splicing, generating functionally different channels. Alternatively spliced Cav1.2 Ca2+ channels have been found to be expressed in a tissue-specific manner or under pathological conditions. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of alternative splicing in Cav1.2 channel, we systematically investigated the splicing patterns in the neonatal and adult rat hearts. The neonatal heart expresses a novel 104-bp exon 33L at the IVS3-4 linker that is generated by the use of an alternative acceptor site. Inclusion of exon 33L causes frameshift and C-terminal truncation. Whole-cell electrophysiological recordings of Cav1.233L channels expressed in HEK 293 cells did not detect any current. However, when co-expressed with wild type Cav1.2 channels, Cav1.233L channels reduced the current density and altered the electrophysiological properties of the wild type Cav1.2 channels. Interestingly, the truncated 3.5-domain Cav1.233L channels also yielded a dominant negative effect on Cav1.3 channels, but not on Cav3.2 channels, suggesting that Cavβ subunits is required for Cav1.233L regulation. A biochemical study provided evidence that Cav1.233L channels enhanced protein degradation of wild type channels via the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Although the physiological significance of the Cav1.233L channels in neonatal heart is still unknown, our report demonstrates the ability of this novel truncated channel to modulate the activity of the functional Cav1.2 channels. Moreover, the human Cav1.2 channel also contains exon 33L that is developmentally regulated in heart. Unexpectedly, human exon 33L has a one-nucleotide insertion that allowed in-frame translation of a full Cav1.2 channel. An electrophysiological study showed that human Cav1.233L channel is a functional channel but conducts Ca2+ ions at a much lower level. PMID:25694430

  14. Inhibition of Cav3.2 T-type Calcium Channels by Its Intracellular I-II Loop.

    PubMed

    Monteil, Arnaud; Chausson, Patrick; Boutourlinsky, Katia; Mezghrani, Alexandre; Huc-Brandt, Sylvaine; Blesneac, Iulia; Bidaud, Isabelle; Lemmers, Céline; Leresche, Nathalie; Lambert, Régis C; Lory, Philippe

    2015-06-26

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (Cav) of the T-type family (Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3) are activated by low threshold membrane depolarization and contribute greatly to neuronal network excitability. Enhanced T-type channel activity, especially Cav3.2, contributes to disease states, including absence epilepsy. Interestingly, the intracellular loop connecting domains I and II (I-II loop) of Cav3.2 channels is implicated in the control of both surface expression and channel gating, indicating that this I-II loop plays an important regulatory role in T-type current. Here we describe that co-expression of this I-II loop or its proximal region (Δ1-Cav3.2; Ser(423)-Pro(542)) together with recombinant full-length Cav3.2 channel inhibited T-type current without affecting channel expression and membrane incorporation. Similar T-type current inhibition was obtained in NG 108-15 neuroblastoma cells that constitutively express Cav3.2 channels. Of interest, Δ1-Cav3.2 inhibited both Cav3.2 and Cav3.1 but not Cav3.3 currents. Efficacy of Δ1-Cav3.2 to inhibit native T-type channels was assessed in thalamic neurons using viral transduction. We describe that T-type current was significantly inhibited in the ventrobasal neurons that express Cav3.1, whereas in nucleus reticularis thalami neurons that express Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 channels, only the fast inactivating T-type current (Cav3.2 component) was significantly inhibited. Altogether, these data describe a new strategy to differentially inhibit Cav3 isoforms of the T-type calcium channels. PMID:25931121

  15. MEMS and mil/aero: technology push and market pull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Thomas H.

    2001-04-01

    MEMS offers attractive solutions to high-density fluidics, inertial, optical, switching and other demanding military/aerospace (mil/aero) challenges. However, full acceptance must confront the realities of production-scale producibility, verifiability, testability, survivability, as well as long-term reliability. Data on these `..ilities' are crucial, and are central in funding and deployment decisions. Similarly, mil/aero users must highlight specific missions, environmental exposures, and procurement issues, as well as the quirks of its designers. These issues are particularly challenging in MEMS, because of the laws of physics and business economics, as well as the risks of deploying leading-edge technology into no-fail applications. This paper highlights mil/aero requirements, and suggests reliability/qualification protocols, to guide development effort and to reassure mil/aero users that MEMS labs are mindful of the necessary realities.

  16. Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James M.; Hall, Edward

    2011-01-01

    To help increase the capacity and efficiency of the nation s airports, a secure wideband wireless communications system is proposed for use on the airport surface. This paper provides an overview of the research and development process for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). AeroMACS is based on a specific commercial profile of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.16 standard known as Wireless Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access or WiMAX (WiMax Forum). The paper includes background on the need for global interoperability in air/ground data communications, describes potential AeroMACS applications, addresses allocated frequency spectrum constraints, summarizes the international standardization process, and provides findings and recommendations from the world s first AeroMACS prototype implemented in Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

  17. High prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus (CAV) type 2 in domestic dog populations in South Africa precludes the use of CAV-based recombinant rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wright, N; Jackson, F R; Niezgoda, M; Ellison, J A; Rupprecht, C E; Nel, L H

    2013-08-28

    Rabies in dogs can be controlled through mass vaccination. Oral vaccination of domestic dogs would be useful in the developing world, where greater vaccination coverage is needed especially in inaccessible areas or places with large numbers of free-roaming dogs. From this perspective, recent research has focused on development of new recombinant vaccines that can be administered orally in a bait to be used as adjunct for parenteral vaccination. One such candidate, a recombinant canine adenovirus type 2 vaccine expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (CAV2-RG), is considered a promising option for dogs, given host specificity and safety. To assess the potential use of this vaccine in domestic dog populations, we investigated the prevalence of antibodies against canine adenovirus type 2 in South African dogs. Blood was collected from 241 dogs from the Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal provinces. Sampled dogs had not previously been vaccinated against canine adenovirus type 1 (CAV1) or canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV2). Animals from both provinces had a high percentage of seropositivity (45% and 62%), suggesting that CAV2 circulates extensively among domestic dog populations in South Africa. Given this finding, we evaluated the effect of pre-existing CAV-specific antibodies on the efficacy of the CAV2-RG vaccine delivered via the oral route in dogs. Purpose-bred Beagle dogs, which received prior vaccination against canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and CAV, were immunized by oral administration of CAV2-RG. After rabies virus (RABV) infection all animals, except one vaccinated dog, developed rabies. This study demonstrated that pre-existing antibodies against CAV, such as naturally occurs in South African dogs, inhibits the development of neutralizing antibodies against RABV when immunized with a CAV-based rabies recombinant vaccine. PMID:23867013

  18. Aero-optical jitter estimation using higher-order wavefronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Matthew R.; Goorskey, David J.; Drye, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Wavefront measurements from wind tunnel or flight testing of an optical system are affected by jitter sources due to the measurement platform, system vibrations, or aero-mechanical buffeting. Depending on the nature of the testing, the wavefront jitter will be a composite of several effects, one of which is the aero-optical jitter; i.e., the wavefront tilt due to random air density fluctuations. To isolate the aero-optical jitter component from recent testing, we have developed an estimation technique that uses only higher-order wavefront measurements to determine the jitter. By analogy with work done previously with free-stream turbulence, we have developed a minimum mean-square error estimator using higher-order wavefront modes to compute the current-frame tilt components through a linear operation. The estimator is determined from computational fluid dynamics evaluation of aero-optical disturbances, but does not depend on the strength of such disturbances. Applying this technique to turret flight test data, we found aero-optical jitter to be 7.7±0.8 μrad and to scale with (ρ/ρSL)M2 (˜1 μrad in the actual test cases examined). The half-power point of the aero-optical jitter variance was found to be ˜2u∞/Dt and to roll off in temporal frequency with a power law between f and f.

  19. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  20. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  1. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  2. Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2006-01-01

    The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS) is a graphical simulation environment designed for the development of advanced control algorithms and rapid testing of these algorithms on a generic computational model of a turbofan engine and its control system. MAPSS is a nonlinear, non-real-time simulation comprising a Component Level Model (CLM) module and a Controller-and-Actuator Dynamics (CAD) module. The CLM module simulates the dynamics of engine components at a sampling rate of 2,500 Hz. The controller submodule of the CAD module simulates a digital controller, which has a typical update rate of 50 Hz. The sampling rate for the actuators in the CAD module is the same as that of the CLM. MAPSS provides a graphical user interface that affords easy access to engine-operation, engine-health, and control parameters; is used to enter such input model parameters as power lever angle (PLA), Mach number, and altitude; and can be used to change controller and engine parameters. Output variables are selectable by the user. Output data as well as any changes to constants and other parameters can be saved and reloaded into the GUI later.

  3. Towards an Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elasticity Analysis of a Commercial Supersonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Chwalowski, Pawel; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Silva, Walt A.; McNamara, Jack

    2016-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and linear structural deformations. The APSE model provides the integration of the following two previously developed nonlinear dynamic simulations: a variable cycle turbofan engine and an elastic supersonic commercial transport vehicle. The primary focus of this study is to provide a means to include relevant dynamics of a turbomachinery propulsion system into the aeroelastic studies conducted during a vehicle design, which have historically neglected propulsion effects. A high fidelity CFD tool is used here for the integration platform. The elastic vehicle neglecting the propulsion system serves as a comparison of traditional approaches to the APSE results. An overview of the methodology is presented for integrating the propulsion system and elastic vehicle. Static aeroelastic analysis comparisons between the traditional and developed APSE models for a wing tip detection indicate that the propulsion system impact on the vehicle elastic response could increase the detection by approximately ten percent.

  4. Zebrafish CaV2.1 calcium channels are tailored for fast synchronous neuromuscular transmission.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, David; Wen, Hua; Brehm, Paul

    2015-02-01

    The CaV2.2 (N-type) and CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-dependent calcium channels are prevalent throughout the nervous system where they mediate synaptic transmission, but the basis for the selective presence at individual synapses still remains an open question. The CaV2.1 channels have been proposed to respond more effectively to brief action potentials (APs), an idea supported by computational modeling. However, the side-by-side comparison of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 kinetics in intact neurons failed to reveal differences. As an alternative means for direct functional comparison we expressed zebrafish CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 α-subunits, along with their accessory subunits, in HEK293 cells. HEK cells lack calcium currents, thereby circumventing the need for pharmacological inhibition of mixed calcium channel isoforms present in neurons. HEK cells also have a simplified morphology compared to neurons, which improves voltage control. Our measurements revealed faster kinetics and shallower voltage-dependence of activation and deactivation for CaV2.1. Additionally, recordings of calcium current in response to a command waveform based on the motorneuron AP show, directly, more effective activation of CaV2.1. Analysis of calcium currents associated with the AP waveform indicate an approximately fourfold greater open probability (PO) for CaV2.1. The efficient activation of CaV2.1 channels during APs may contribute to the highly reliable transmission at zebrafish neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25650925

  5. Zebrafish CaV2.1 Calcium Channels Are Tailored for Fast Synchronous Neuromuscular Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Naranjo, David; Wen, Hua; Brehm, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The CaV2.2 (N-type) and CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) voltage-dependent calcium channels are prevalent throughout the nervous system where they mediate synaptic transmission, but the basis for the selective presence at individual synapses still remains an open question. The CaV2.1 channels have been proposed to respond more effectively to brief action potentials (APs), an idea supported by computational modeling. However, the side-by-side comparison of CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 kinetics in intact neurons failed to reveal differences. As an alternative means for direct functional comparison we expressed zebrafish CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 α-subunits, along with their accessory subunits, in HEK293 cells. HEK cells lack calcium currents, thereby circumventing the need for pharmacological inhibition of mixed calcium channel isoforms present in neurons. HEK cells also have a simplified morphology compared to neurons, which improves voltage control. Our measurements revealed faster kinetics and shallower voltage-dependence of activation and deactivation for CaV2.1. Additionally, recordings of calcium current in response to a command waveform based on the motorneuron AP show, directly, more effective activation of CaV2.1. Analysis of calcium currents associated with the AP waveform indicate an approximately fourfold greater open probability (PO) for CaV2.1. The efficient activation of CaV2.1 channels during APs may contribute to the highly reliable transmission at zebrafish neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25650925

  6. Vibration modelling and verifications for whole aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a new rotor-ball-bearing-casing coupling dynamic model for a practical aero-engine is established. In the coupling system, the rotor and casing systems are modelled using the finite element method, support systems are modelled as lumped parameter models, nonlinear factors of ball bearings and faults are included, and four types of supports and connection models are defined to model the complex rotor-support-casing coupling system of the aero-engine. A new numerical integral method that combines the Newmark-β method and the improved Newmark-β method (Zhai method) is used to obtain the system responses. Finally, the new model is verified in three ways: (1) modal experiment based on rotor-ball bearing rig, (2) modal experiment based on rotor-ball-bearing-casing rig, and (3) fault simulations for a certain type of missile turbofan aero-engine vibration. The results show that the proposed model can not only simulate the natural vibration characteristics of the whole aero-engine but also effectively perform nonlinear dynamic simulations of a whole aero-engine with faults.

  7. Cost effective aero-photogrammetry toys at active volcanoes: On the use of drones, balloons and kites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Thomas R.

    2014-05-01

    The availability of aerial photographs allows spatial mapping of flows and fractures, generation of digital elevation models and other change detection. Therefore aerial photographs significantly improve our understanding of volcanic processes. The common problem is the lack of available data for most volcanoes, and the lack of systematic and chronologic repeat surveys. This work summarizes the current state of knowledge and technical implementations that currently revolutionize the field of aero-photogrammetry. By the use of unmanned vehicles, such as octocopters, helicopters and small airplanes, photo data can be acquired from almost any place at distances up to kilometres from the operator. Moreover, by the use of helium balloons, kites or their hybrid helikites, near field aero-photographs are obtained. In combination with modern stitching procedures and computer vision algorithms, the positioning of the camera and the digital elevation model of the ground can be extracted, and the active volcano and its eruption cloud be imaged from almost any perspective. This field is increasingly gaining flexibility, as lightweight cameras are available from visible, infrared and other spectral bands. Here example data are provided from volcanoes that are difficult to access by regular airplanes, showing the strengths and the limits of these new aero-photogrammetry toys.

  8. Behavior training reverses asymmetry in hippocampal transcriptome of the cav3.2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ni-Chun; Huang, Ying-Hsueh; Chang, Chuan-Hsiung; Liao, James C; Yang, Chih-Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chang; Liu, Ingrid Y

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous Cav3.2 knockout mice, which are defective in the pore-forming subunit of a low voltage activated T-type calcium channel, have been documented to show impaired maintenance of late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and defective retrieval of context-associated fear memory. To investigate the role of Cav3.2 in global gene expression, we performed a microarray transcriptome study on the hippocampi of the Cav3.2-/- mice and their wild-type littermates, either naïve (untrained) or trace fear conditioned. We found a significant left-right asymmetric effect on the hippocampal transcriptome caused by the Cav3.2 knockout. Between the naive Cav3.2-/- and the naive wild-type mice, 3522 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found in the left hippocampus, but only 4 DEGs were found in the right hippocampus. Remarkably, the effect of Cav3.2 knockout was partially reversed by trace fear conditioning. The number of DEGs in the left hippocampus was reduced to 6 in the Cav3.2 knockout mice after trace fear conditioning, compared with the wild-type naïve mice. To our knowledge, these results demonstrate for the first time the asymmetric effects of the Cav3.2 and its partial reversal by behavior training on the hippocampal transcriptome. PMID:25768289

  9. Aero-Structural Interaction, Analysis, and Shape Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., III

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis technique that has been shown to be independent of step-size selection is examined further. The accuracy of this step-size independent technique, which uses complex variables for determining sensitivity derivatives, has been previously established. The primary focus of this work is to validate the aero-structural analysis procedure currently being used. This validation consists of comparing computed and experimental data obtained for an Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2). Since the aero-structural analysis procedure has the complex variable modifications already included into the software, sensitivity derivatives can automatically be computed. Other than for design purposes, sensitivity derivatives can be used for predicting the solution at nearby conditions. The use of sensitivity derivatives for predicting the aero-structural characteristics of this configuration is demonstrated.

  10. 78 FR 32363 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ... FR 14824, March 29, 1999), and adding the following new AD: PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A: Docket No... Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department... propose to rescind an airworthiness directive (AD) for PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A. Model...

  11. Venom peptides as a rich source of cav2.2 channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Silmara R; Vetter, Irina; Lewis, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    Ca(v)2.2 is a calcium channel subtype localized at nerve terminals, including nociceptive fibers, where it initiates neurotransmitter release. Ca(v)2.2 is an important contributor to synaptic transmission in ascending pain pathways, and is up-regulated in the spinal cord in chronic pain states along with the auxiliary α2δ1 subunit. It is therefore not surprising that toxins that inhibit Ca(v)2.2 are analgesic. Venomous animals, such as cone snails, spiders, snakes, assassin bugs, centipedes and scorpions are rich sources of remarkably potent and selective Ca(v)2.2 inhibitors. However, side effects in humans currently limit their clinical use. Here we review Ca(v)2.2 inhibitors from venoms and their potential as drug leads. PMID:23381143

  12. CAV1 Prevents Gallbladder Cholesterol Crystallization by Regulating Biosynthesis and Transport of Bile Salts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoqiang; Li, Yiqiao; Jiang, Xin; Chen, Hongtan

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol gallstone disease (CGD) is a hepatobiliary disorder which results from a biochemical imbalance in the gallbladder bile. Here we show that loss of CAV1 sensitized mice to lithogenic diet-induced gallbladder cholesterol crystallization, which was associated with dysregulation of several hepatic transporters that efflux cholesterol, phospholipids, and bile salts. The combined effect of increased biliary cholesterol concentration and decreased biliary bile salt secretion in CAV1(-/-) mice led to an increased cholesterol saturation index and the formation of cholesterol crystals. At the signaling level, the ERK/AP-1 pathway seems to mediate the effects of CAV1 on biliary BA homeostasis and might be developed as a therapeutic target for CGD. We propose that CAV1 is an anti-lithogenic factor and that the CAV1(-/-) mice may offer a convenient CGD model to develop therapeutic interventions for this disease. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2118-2127, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26875794

  13. State-dependent signaling by Cav1.2 regulates hair follicle stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Gozde; Altindag, Banu; Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Rana, Anshul; Panagiotakos, Georgia; Lara, Maria Fernanda; Dolmetsch, Ricardo; Oro, Anthony E

    2013-06-01

    The signals regulating stem cell activation during tissue regeneration remain poorly understood. We investigated the baldness associated with mutations in the voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) Cav1.2 underlying Timothy syndrome (TS). While hair follicle stem cells express Cav1.2, they lack detectable voltage-dependent calcium currents. Cav1.2(TS) acts in a dominant-negative manner to markedly delay anagen, while L-type channel blockers act through Cav1.2 to induce anagen and overcome the TS phenotype. Cav1.2 regulates production of the bulge-derived BMP inhibitor follistatin-like1 (Fstl1), derepressing stem cell quiescence. Our findings show how channels act in nonexcitable tissues to regulate stem cells and may lead to novel therapeutics for tissue regeneration. PMID:23752588

  14. Rab25 influences functional Cav1.2 channel surface expression in arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bannister, John P; Bulley, Simon; Leo, M Dennis; Kidd, Michael W; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2016-06-01

    Plasma membrane-localized CaV1.2 channels are the primary calcium (Ca(2+)) influx pathway in arterial smooth muscle cells (myocytes). CaV1.2 channels regulate several cellular functions, including contractility and gene expression, but the trafficking pathways that control the surface expression of these proteins are unclear. Similarly, expression and physiological functions of small Rab GTPases, proteins that control vesicular trafficking in arterial myocytes, are poorly understood. Here, we investigated Rab proteins that control functional surface abundance of CaV1.2 channels in cerebral artery myocytes. Western blotting indicated that Rab25, a GTPase previously associated with apical recycling endosomes, is expressed in cerebral artery myocytes. Immunofluorescence Förster resonance energy transfer (immunoFRET) microscopy demonstrated that Rab25 locates in close spatial proximity to CaV1.2 channels in myocytes. Rab25 knockdown using siRNA reduced CaV1.2 surface and intracellular abundance in arteries, as determined using arterial biotinylation. In contrast, CaV1.2 was not located nearby Rab11A or Rab4 and CaV1.2 protein was unaltered by Rab11A or Rab4A knockdown. Rab25 knockdown resulted in CaV1.2 degradation by a mechanism involving both lysosomal and proteasomal pathways and reduced whole cell CaV1.2 current density but did not alter voltage dependence of current activation or inactivation in isolated myocytes. Rab25 knockdown also inhibited depolarization (20-60 mM K(+)) and pressure-induced vasoconstriction (myogenic tone) in cerebral arteries. These data indicate that Rab25 is expressed in arterial myocytes where it promotes surface expression of CaV1.2 channels to control pressure- and depolarization-induced vasoconstriction. PMID:27076616

  15. Overview of NASA Power Technologies for Space and Aero Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Raymond F.

    2014-01-01

    To achieve the ambitious goals that NASA has outlined for the next decades considerable development of power technology will be necessary. This presentation outlines the development objectives for both the space and aero applications. It further looks at the various power technologies that support these objectives and examines drivers that will be a driving force for future development.

  16. Investigation of intelligent measurement system for aero-engine experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weisong

    1990-07-01

    An intelligent aero-engine measurement system has been developed. The system is original and new in its global design. It integrates data acquisition, real-time calibration, displacement control, angle tracking, data processing, and table printing. The system has been used successfully in combustion and turbine testing; its technical and economic effectiveness has been proved remarkable.

  17. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G.; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J.; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  18. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Flavell, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  19. Characterization of C-terminal Splice Variants of Cav1.4 Ca2+ Channels in Human Retina.

    PubMed

    Haeseleer, Françoise; Williams, Brittany; Lee, Amy

    2016-07-22

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (Cav) undergo extensive alternative splicing that greatly enhances their functional diversity in excitable cells. Here, we characterized novel splice variants of the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of Cav1.4 Ca(2+) channels that regulate neurotransmitter release in photoreceptors in the retina. These variants lack a portion of exon 45 and/or the entire exon 47 (Cav1.4Δex p45, Cav1.4Δex 47, Cav1.4Δex p45,47) and are expressed in the retina of primates but not mice. Although the electrophysiological properties of Cav1.4Δex p45 are similar to those of full-length channels (Cav1.4FL), skipping of exon 47 dramatically alters Cav1.4 function. Deletion of exon 47 removes part of a C-terminal automodulatory domain (CTM) previously shown to suppress Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) and to cause a positive shift in the voltage dependence of channel activation. Exon 47 is crucial for these effects of the CTM because variants lacking this exon show intense CDI and activate at more hyperpolarized voltages than Cav1.4FL The robust CDI of Cav1.4Δex 47 is suppressed by CaBP4, a regulator of Cav1.4 channels in photoreceptors. Although CaBP4 enhances activation of Cav1.4FL, Cav1.4Δex 47 shows similar voltage-dependent activation in the presence and absence of CaBP4. We conclude that exon 47 encodes structural determinants that regulate CDI and voltage-dependent activation of Cav1.4, and is necessary for modulation of channel activation by CaBP4. PMID:27226626

  20. Optimization of Return Trajectories for Orbital Transfer Vehicle between Earth and Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funase, Ryu; Tsuda, Yuichi; Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, optimum trajectories in Earth Transfer Orbit (ETO) for a lunar transportation system are proposed. This paper aims at improving the payload ratio of the reusable orbital transfer vehicle (OTV), which transports the payload from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Lunar Low Orbit (LLO) and returns to LEO. In ETO, we discuss ballistic flight using chemical propulsion, multi-impulse flight using electrical propulsion, and aero-assisted flight using aero-brake. The feasibility of the OTV is considered.

  1. Human-Vehicle Interface for Semi-Autonomous Operation of Uninhabited Aero Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry L.; Frew, Eric W.; Woodley, Bruce R.; Rock, Stephen M.

    2001-01-01

    The robustness of autonomous robotic systems to unanticipated circumstances is typically insufficient for use in the field. The many skills of human user often fill this gap in robotic capability. To incorporate the human into the system, a useful interaction between man and machine must exist. This interaction should enable useful communication to be exchanged in a natural way between human and robot on a variety of levels. This report describes the current human-robot interaction for the Stanford HUMMINGBIRD autonomous helicopter. In particular, the report discusses the elements of the system that enable multiple levels of communication. An intelligent system agent manages the different inputs given to the helicopter. An advanced user interface gives the user and helicopter a method for exchanging useful information. Using this human-robot interaction, the HUMMINGBIRD has carried out various autonomous search, tracking, and retrieval missions.

  2. Nonlinear Dynamic Modeling of a Supersonic Commercial Transport Turbo-Machinery Propulsion System for Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elasticity Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joe; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Kopasakis, George; Woolwine, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic model for a variable cycle turbofan engine, supersonic inlet, and convergent-divergent nozzle that can be integrated with an aeroelastic vehicle model to create an overall Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) modeling tool. The primary focus of this study is to provide a means to capture relevant thrust dynamics of a full supersonic propulsion system by using relatively simple quasi-one dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods that will allow for accurate control algorithm development and capture the key aspects of the thrust to feed into an APSE model. Previously, propulsion system component models have been developed and are used for this study of the fully integrated propulsion system. An overview of the methodology is presented for the modeling of each propulsion component, with a focus on its associated coupling for the overall model. To conduct APSE studies the described dynamic propulsion system model is integrated into a high fidelity CFD model of the full vehicle capable of conducting aero-elastic studies. Dynamic thrust analysis for the quasi-one dimensional dynamic propulsion system model is presented along with an initial three dimensional flow field model of the engine integrated into a supersonic commercial transport.

  3. Nonlinear Dynamic Modeling of a Supersonic Commercial Transport Turbo-Machinery Propulsion System for Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elasticity Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Kopasakis, George; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Woolwine, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic model for a variable cycle turbofan engine, supersonic inlet, and convergent-divergent nozzle that can be integrated with an aeroelastic vehicle model to create an overall Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) modeling tool. The primary focus of this study is to provide a means to capture relevant thrust dynamics of a full supersonic propulsion system by using relatively simple quasi-one dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods that will allow for accurate control algorithm development and capture the key aspects of the thrust to feed into an APSE model. Previously, propulsion system component models have been developed and are used for this study of the fully integrated propulsion system. An overview of the methodology is presented for the modeling of each propulsion component, with a focus on its associated coupling for the overall model. To conduct APSE studies the de- scribed dynamic propulsion system model is integrated into a high fidelity CFD model of the full vehicle capable of conducting aero-elastic studies. Dynamic thrust analysis for the quasi-one dimensional dynamic propulsion system model is presented along with an initial three dimensional flow field model of the engine integrated into a supersonic commercial transport.

  4. Environmental perspectives of Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex. Steudel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Jatin; Kalra, Swinder J. S.; Naraian, Ram

    2014-09-01

    Extensive research is being conducted worldwide to find alternative and efficient systems to lessen the impacts of climate change and reduce environmental pollution. The genus Phragmites has proven ability to mitigate the environmental pollution of its surroundings. Common reed ( Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex. Steudel), a graminaceous plant of cosmopolitan nature, has been extensively studied especially for the mitigation of environmental contamination. The capability of common reed to grow well at extreme environmental conditions such as elevated CO2 and high temperature is conferred by several factors such as change of carbon trapping mechanism (from C3 to C4 and vice versa), microbial association and biochemical adaptations. P. australis has been a most preferred unique plant system, especially in ecological engineering for improving the quality of wastewater. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge regarding the suitability of Phragmites australis for environmental remediation and summarizes recent advancements in our understanding of this grass.

  5. National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tank, Ming H.

    1991-01-01

    A program to develop the technology for reusable airbreathing hypersonic/transatmospheric vehicles is addressed. Information on the following topics is presented in viewgraph form: (1) the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program schedule; (2) the NASP program organization; (3) competitive strategy; (4) propulsion options; (5) wind tunnel data available for NASP; (6) ground track of envelope expansion; and (7) altitude vs. Mach number. A NASP/Space Shuttle comparison, NASP configuration matrix, and the propulsion concept of a high speed scramjet are also briefly addressed.

  6. CAV-2--why a canine virus is a neurobiologist's best friend.

    PubMed

    Junyent, Felix; Kremer, Eric J

    2015-10-01

    Canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) vectors are powerful tools for fundamental and applied neurobiology due to their negligible immunogenicity, preferential transduction of neurons, widespread distribution via axonal transport, and duration of expression in the mammalian brain. CAV-2 vectors are internalized in neurons by the selective use of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), which is located at the presynapse in neurons. Neuronal internalization and axonal transport is mediated by CAR, which potentiates vector biodistribution. The above characteristics, together with the ∼30kb cloning capacity of helper-dependent (HD) CAV-2 vectors, optimized CAV-2 vector creation, production and purification, is expanding the therapeutic and fundamental options for CNS gene transfer. PMID:26298516

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: CAV-OX ULTRAVIOLET OXIDATION PROCESS MAGNUM WATER TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CAV-OX® technology (see Fig- ure 1) destroys organic contaminants, including chlorinated hy- drocarbons, in water. The process uses hydrogen peroxide, hy- drodynamic cavitation, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation to photolyze and oxidize organic compounds present in water at ...

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of T-type Calcium Channel CaV3.2

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pernhorst, Katharina; Yaari, Yoel; Beck, Heinz; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2012-01-01

    The pore-forming Ca2+ channel subunit CaV3.2 mediates a low voltage-activated (T-type) Ca2+ current (ICaT) that contributes pivotally to neuronal and cardiac pacemaker activity. Despite the importance of tightly regulated CaV3.2 levels, the mechanisms regulating its transcriptional dynamics are not well understood. Here, we have identified two key factors that up- and down-regulate the expression of the gene encoding CaV3.2 (Cacna1h). First, we determined the promoter region and observed several stimulatory and inhibitory clusters. Furthermore, we found binding sites for the transcription factor early growth response 1 (Egr1/Zif268/Krox-24) to be highly overrepresented within the CaV3.2 promoter region. mRNA expression analyses and dual-luciferase promoter assays revealed that the CaV3.2 promoter was strongly activated by Egr1 overexpression in vitro and in vivo. Subsequent chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in NG108-15 cells and mouse hippocampi confirmed specific Egr1 binding to the CaV3.2 promoter. Congruently, whole-cell ICaT values were significantly larger after Egr1 overexpression. Intriguingly, Egr1-induced activation of the CaV3.2 promoter was effectively counteracted by the repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST). Thus, Egr1 and REST can bi-directionally regulate CaV3.2 promoter activity and mRNA expression and, hence, the size of ICaT. This mechanism has critical implications for the regulation of neuronal and cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis under physiological conditions and in episodic disorders such as arrhythmias and epilepsy. PMID:22431737

  9. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Elies, Jacobo; Scragg, Jason L; Huang, Sha; Dallas, Mark L; Huang, Dongyang; MacDougall, David; Boyle, John P; Gamper, Nikita; Peers, Chris

    2014-12-01

    The importance of H2S as a physiological signaling molecule continues to develop, and ion channels are emerging as a major family of target proteins through which H2S exerts many actions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate its effects on T-type Ca(2+) channels. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we demonstrate that the H2S donor, NaHS (10 μM-1 mM) selectively inhibits Cav3.2 T-type channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells, whereas Cav3.1 and Cav3.3 channels were unaffected. The sensitivity of Cav3.2 channels to H2S required the presence of the redox-sensitive extracellular residue H191, which is also required for tonic binding of Zn(2+) to this channel. Chelation of Zn(2+) with N,N,N',N'-tetra-2-picolylethylenediamine prevented channel inhibition by H2S and also reversed H2S inhibition when applied after H2S exposure, suggesting that H2S may act via increasing the affinity of the channel for extracellular Zn(2+) binding. Inhibition of native T-type channels in 3 cell lines correlated with expression of Cav3.2 and not Cav3.1 channels. Notably, H2S also inhibited native T-type (primarily Cav3.2) channels in sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons. Our data demonstrate a novel target for H2S regulation, the T-type Ca(2+) channel Cav3.2, and suggest that such modulation cannot account for the pronociceptive effects of this gasotransmitter. PMID:25183670

  10. Tetraspanin-13 modulates voltage-gated CaV2.2 Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Mallmann, Robert T.; Wilmes, Thomas; Lichvarova, Lucia; Bührer, Anja; Lohmüller, Barbara; Castonguay, Jan; Lacinova, Lubica; Klugbauer, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Integration of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in a network of protein-interactions is a crucial requirement for proper regulation of channel activity. In this study, we took advantage of the specific properties of the yeast split-ubiquitin system to search for and characterize so far unknown interaction partners of CaV2 Ca2+ channels. We identified tetraspanin-13 (TSPAN-13) as an interaction partner of the α1 subunit of N-type CaV2.2, but not of P/Q-type CaV2.1 or L- and T-type Ca2+ channels. Interaction could be located between domain IV of CaV2.2 and transmembrane segments S1 and S2 of TSPAN-13. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that TSPAN-13 specifically modulates the efficiency of coupling between voltage sensor activation and pore opening of the channel and accelerates the voltage-dependent activation and inactivation of the Ba2+ current through CaV2.2. These data indicate that TSPAN-13 might regulate CaV2.2 Ca2+ channel activity in defined synaptic membrane compartments and thereby influences transmitter release. PMID:23648579

  11. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E.; Yue, David T.

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca2+ channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family.

  12. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E.; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca2+ channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family. PMID:27456671

  13. Protein kinase A modulation of CaV1.4 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Sang, Lingjie; Dick, Ivy E; Yue, David T

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of L-type Ca(2+) channels by protein kinase A (PKA) represents a crucial element within cardiac, skeletal muscle and neurological systems. Although much work has been done to understand this regulation in cardiac CaV1.2 Ca(2+) channels, relatively little is known about the closely related CaV1.4 L-type Ca(2+) channels, which feature prominently in the visual system. Here we find that CaV1.4 channels are indeed modulated by PKA phosphorylation within the inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (ICDI) motif. Phosphorylation of this region promotes the occupancy of calmodulin on the channel, thus increasing channel open probability (PO) and Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. Although this interaction seems specific to CaV1.4 channels, introduction of ICDI1.4 to CaV1.3 or CaV1.2 channels endows these channels with a form of PKA modulation, previously unobserved in heterologous systems. Thus, this mechanism may not only play an important role in the visual system but may be generalizable across the L-type channel family. PMID:27456671

  14. Current Challenges for HTCMC Aero-Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2007-01-01

    In comparison to the best metallic materials, HTCMC aero-propulsion engine components offer the opportunity of reduced weight and higher temperature operation, with corresponding improvements in engine cooling requirements, emissions, thrust, and specific fuel consumption. Although much progress has been made in the development of advanced HTCMC constituent materials and processes, major challenges still remain for their implementation into these components. The objectives of this presentation are to briefly review (1) potential HTCMC aero-propulsion components and their generic material performance requirements, (2) recent progress at NASA and elsewhere concerning advanced constituents and processes for meeting these requirements, (3) key HTCMC component implementation challenges that are currently being encountered, and (4) on-going activities within the new NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that are addressing these challenges.

  15. Sensitivity Analysis for Coupled Aero-structural Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giunta, Anthony A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel method has been developed for calculating gradients of aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for an aeroelastic aircraft model. This method uses the Global Sensitivity Equations (GSE) to account for the aero-structural coupling, and a reduced-order modal analysis approach to condense the coupling bandwidth between the aerodynamic and structural models. Parallel computing is applied to reduce the computational expense of the numerous high fidelity aerodynamic analyses needed for the coupled aero-structural system. Good agreement is obtained between aerodynamic force and moment gradients computed with the GSE/modal analysis approach and the same quantities computed using brute-force, computationally expensive, finite difference approximations. A comparison between the computational expense of the GSE/modal analysis method and a pure finite difference approach is presented. These results show that the GSE/modal analysis approach is the more computationally efficient technique if sensitivity analysis is to be performed for two or more aircraft design parameters.

  16. Improvement of the AeroClipper system for cyclones monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, André; Philippe, Duvel Jean

    2016-07-01

    The AeroClipper developed by the French space agency (Centre National d'Études Spatiales, CNES) is a quasi-lagrangian device drifting with surface wind at about 20-30m above the ocean surface. It is a new and original device for real-time and continuous observation of air-sea surface parameters in open ocean remote regions. This device enables the sampling of the variability of surface parameters in particular under convective systems toward which it is attracted. The AeroClipper is therefore an ideal instrument to monitor Tropical Cyclones (TCs) in which they are likely to converge and provide original observations to evaluate and improve our current understanding and diagnostics of TCs as well as their representation in numerical models. In 2008, the AeroClipper demonstrates its capability to be captured by an Ocean Indian cyclone, as two models have converged, without damages, in the eye of Dora cyclone during the 2008 VASCO campaign. This paper will present the improvements of this balloon system for the international project 'the Year of Maritime Continent'.

  17. Aerosol Comparisons Between Observations and Models: AeroCom and ABC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Schulz, Michael; Kinne, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    I will represent the AeroCom community to the Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) workshop. I will summarize the activities and results from AeroCom Phase I activities in the past 8 years and introduce the new results and activities in the current AeroCom Phase II. We hope to coordinate some activities with the ABC community to share model output and data access for model evaluations, comparisons, and assessment.

  18. Minimum energy-loss guidance for aero-assisted orbital plane change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, D. G.; Giltner, J. M.; Speyer, J. L.; Mapar, J.

    1984-01-01

    Minimum energy-loss guidance for the aero-assisted plane change of an orbiting vehicle is developed and applied to the plane change of a circular orbit. First, trajectories which minimize the fuel required to change the orbital plane are computed for a realistic vehicle. From these trajectories, it is observed that the fuel weight is minimized if the velocity at exit from the atmosphere is maximized. Next, for the atmospheric turn, approximate optimal controls (angle of attack and bank angle) which maximize the exit velocity are derived. Finally, the minimum-fuel problem is resolved using optimal guidance for the atmospheric part of the trajectory, and the optimization problem reduces to a one-dimensional parameter minimization. Successful plane changes up to 40 deg are demonstrated. Optimal guidance requires up to 14 percent more fuel than the 'true' optimum but only 50 percent of the fuel required by the single-impulse maneuver. Finally, the guidance law developed here is implementable because only algebraic manipulations are required.

  19. Integrated Aero-Propulsion CFD Methodology for the Hyper-X Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Engelund, Walter C.; Bittner, Robert D.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Jentink, Tom N.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2000-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have been used extensively in the analysis and development of the X-43A Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). A significant element of this analysis is the prediction of integrated vehicle aero-propulsive performance, which includes an integration of aerodynamic and propulsion flow fields. This paper describes analysis tools used and the methodology for obtaining pre-flight predictions of longitudinal performance increments. The use of higher-fidelity methods to examine flow-field characteristics and scramjet flowpath component performance is also discussed. Limited comparisons with available ground test data are shown to illustrate the approach used to calibrate methods and assess solution accuracy. Inviscid calculations to evaluate lateral-directional stability characteristics are discussed. The methodology behind 3D tip-to-tail calculations is described and the impact of 3D exhaust plume expansion in the afterbody region is illustrated. Finally, future technology development needs in the area of hypersonic propulsion-airframe integration analysis are discussed.

  20. Technology requirements and readiness for very large vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Common concerns of very large vehicles in the areas of economics, transportation system interfaces and operational problems were reviewed regarding their influence on vehicle configurations and technology. Fifty-four technology requirements were identified which are judged to be unique, or particularly critical, to very large vehicles. The requirements were about equally divided among the four general areas of aero/hydrodynamics, propulsion and acoustics, structures, and vehicle systems and operations. The state of technology readiness was judged to be poor to fair for slightly more than one half of the requirements. In the classic disciplinary areas, the state of technology readiness appears to be more advanced than for vehicle systems and operations.

  1. The L-type calcium channel Cav1.3 is required for proper hippocampal neurogenesis and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Marschallinger, Julia; Sah, Anupam; Schmuckermair, Claudia; Unger, Michael; Rotheneichner, Peter; Kharitonova, Maria; Waclawiczek, Alexander; Gerner, Philipp; Jaksch-Bogensperger, Heidi; Berger, Stefan; Striessnig, Jörg; Singewald, Nicolas; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-12-01

    L-type voltage gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) are widely expressed within different brain regions including the hippocampus. The isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 have been shown to be involved in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, cognitive functions that require proper hippocampal neurogenesis. In vitro, functional LTCCs are expressed on neuronal progenitor cells, where they promote neuronal differentiation. Expression of LTCCs on neural stem and progenitor cells within the neurogenic regions in the adult brain in vivo has not been examined so far, and a contribution of the individual isoforms Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 to adult neurogenesis remained to be clarified. To reveal the role of these channels we first evaluated the expression patterns of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) in adult (2- and 3-month old) and middle-aged (15-month old) mice on mRNA and protein levels. We performed immunohistological analysis of hippocampal neurogenesis in adult and middle-aged Cav1.3(-/-) mice and finally addressed the importance of Cav1.3 for hippocampal function by evaluating spatial memory and depression-like behavior in adult Cav1.3(-/-) mice. Our results showed Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 expression at different stages of neuronal differentiation. While Cav1.2 was primarily restricted to mature NeuN(+) granular neurons, Cav1.3 was expressed in Nestin(+) neural stem cells and in mature NeuN(+) granular neurons. Adult and middle-aged Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed severe impairments in dentate gyrus neurogenesis, with significantly smaller dentate gyrus volume, reduced survival of newly generated cells, and reduced neuronal differentiation. Further, Cav1.3(-/-) mice showed impairment in the hippocampus dependent object location memory test, implicating Cav1.3 as an essential element for hippocampus-associated cognitive functions. Thus, modulation of LTCC activities may have a crucial impact on neurogenic responses and cognition, which should be

  2. Aero-optical interaction mechanisms and resolution robustness in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, Fazlul Rahim

    Turbulence is a fundamental phenomena found is a wide variety of large Reynolds number flows with many practical and theoretical applications. This dissertation will outline studies done on turbulent free shear layers in order to gain a greater fundamental understanding of more complex turbulent flow fields. This study will focus on directed energy propagation through turbulence, imaging and image resolution robustness of turbulence, and the multi-fractal nature of turbulent scalar interfaces. In the first part of this study, aero-optical interactions along laser beam propagation paths in turbulent compressible separated shear layers are examined on the basis of combined experiments and computations of the aero-optical phenomena. We introduce the idea of the interaction optical path difference (IOPD), and its associated r.m.s. value (IOPD rms), and we investigate these quantities as functions of the laser beam propagation distance throughout the flow and also as functions of the laser aperture size. Evidence of non-monotonic behavior of the IOPDrms , shown by partial reductions in the aperture-averaged laser aberrations, as a function of propagation distance in the flow is observed for individual realizations. The extent of this non-monotonic behavior depends on the orientation of, and gradients across, the refractive turbulent interfaces. These observations of non-monotonic behavior suggest the presence of a fundamental turbulence-induced self-correction mechanism, determined by the geometrical and physical properties of the high-gradient refractive interfaces, that can be utilized to optimize aero-optical effects in airborne directed energy applications. In addition, this work investigates the extent of aero-optical resolution robustness, i.e. the effects of resolution reduction on the aero-optical interactions, using combined experiments and computations. High-resolution images of the refractive index field in turbulent compressible separated shear layers at

  3. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype. PMID:23321639

  4. Expression and Roles of Cav1.3 (α1D) L-Type Ca2+ Channel in Atrioventricular Node Automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Timofeyev, Valeriy; Qiu, Hong; Lu, Ling; Li, Ning; Singapuri, Anil; Torado, Cyril L.; Shin, Hee-Sup; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2010-01-01

    Atrioventricular node (AV node) is the hub where electrical input from the atria is propagated and conveyed to the ventricles. Despite its strategic position and role in governing impulse conduction between atria and ventricles, there is paucity of data regarding the contribution of specific ion channels to the function of the AV node. Here, we examined the roles of Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channel in AV node by taking advantage of a mouse model with null mutation of Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−). Cav1.3 null mutant mice show evidence of AV node dysfunction with AV block, suggesting the tissue-specific function of the Cav1.3 channel. In keeping with this assertion, we demonstrate that Cav1.3 isoform is highly expressed in the isolated AV node cells. Furthermore, AV node isolated from Cav1.3 null mutant mice show a significant decrease in the firing frequency of spontaneous action potentials suggesting that Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channel plays significant roles in the automaticity of the AV node. Because of the distinct voltage-dependence of Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 Ca2+ channels, Cav1.2 alone does not suffice to maintain normal AV node function. Cav1.3 currents activate at more hyperpolarizing voltage compared to Cav1.2 currents. Consequently, Cav1.2 Ca2+ channel cannot functionally substitute for Cav1.3 isoform in the AV node of Cav1.3 null mutant mice. Thus, our study demonstrates that the distinct biophysical properties of Cav1.3 Ca2+ channel play critical roles in the firing frequency of AV node tissues. PMID:20951705

  5. Physicochemical properties of tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) hydrocolloid fractions.

    PubMed

    Gannasin, Sri Puvanesvari; Adzahan, Noranizan Mohd; Hamzah, Mohd Yusof; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Muhammad, Kharidah

    2015-09-01

    Tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) is an underutilised fruit in Malaysia. The fruit, however, contains good proportions of soluble fibre, protein, starch, anthocyanins and carotenoids. Amongst the fruits, only tamarillo mesocarp contains both polar (anthocyanins) and non-polar (carotenoids) pigments. The ability to retain both polar and non-polar pigments in the mesocarp could be related to the unique properties of its hydrocolloids. To understand the pigment-hydrocolloid interaction in the fruit, information on the physicochemical characteristics of the hydrocolloids is required. Therefore, hydrocolloids from the anthocyanin-rich seed mucilage fraction of the tamarillo and its carotenoid-rich pulp fraction were extracted and characterised. Water and 1% citric acid were used to extract the seed mucilage hydrocolloid while 72% ethanol and 20mM HEPES buffer were used for pulp hydrocolloid extraction. Seed mucilage hydrocolloid was primarily composed of arabinogalactan protein-associated pectin whereas pulp hydrocolloid was composed of hemicellulosic polysaccharides with some naturally interacting proteins and neutral polysaccharides. PMID:25842340

  6. Composition and Antidiarrheal Activity of Bidens odorata Cav.

    PubMed Central

    Zavala-Mendoza, Daniel; Alarcon-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Pérez-Gutierrez, Salud; Escobar-Villanueva, M. Carmen; Zavala-Sánchez, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    The antidiarrheal effects of chloroform, methanol, and aqueous extracts of Bidens odorata Cav. were investigated at doses of 200 mg/kg on castor-oil-induced diarrhea. The chloroform extract of B. odorata (CBO) reduced diarrhea by 72.72%. The effect of CBO was evaluated on mice with diarrhea induced by castor oil, MgSO4, arachidonic acid, or prostaglandin E2. CBO inhibited the contraction induced by carbachol chloride on ileum (100 µg/mL) and intestinal transit (200 mg/kg) in Wistar rats. The active fraction of CBO (F4) at doses of 100 mg/kg inhibited the diarrhea induced by castor oil (90.1%) or arachidonic acid (72.9%) but did not inhibit the diarrhea induced by PGE2. The active fraction of F4 (FR5) only was tested on diarrhea induced with castor oil and inhibited this diarrhea by 92.1%. The compositions of F4 and FR5 were determined by GC-MS, and oleic, palmitic, linoleic, and stearic acids were found. F4 and a mixture of the four fatty acids inhibited diarrhea at doses of 100 mg/kg (90.1% and 70.6%, resp.). The results of this study show that B. odorata has antidiarrheal effects, as is claimed by folk medicine, and could possibly be used for the production of a phytomedicine. PMID:24282432

  7. Research on the aero-thermal effects by 3D analysis model of the optical window of the infrared imaging guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bo; Li, Lin; Zhu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    Researches on hypersonic vehicles have been a hotspot in the field of aerospace because of the pursuits for higher speed by human being. Infrared imaging guidance is playing a very important role in modern warfare. When an Infrared Ray(IR) imaging guided missile is flying in the air at high speed, its optical dome suffers from serious aero-optic effects because of air flow. The turbulence around the dome and the thermal effects of the optical window would cause disturbance to the wavefront from the target. Therefore, detected images will be biased, dithered and blurred, and the capabilities of the seeker for detecting, tracking and recognizing are weakened. In this paper, methods for thermal and structural analysis with Heat Transfer and Elastic Mechanics are introduced. By studying the aero-thermal effects and aero-thermal radiation effects of the optical window, a 3D analysis model of the optical window is established by using finite element method. The direct coupling analysis is employed as a solving strategy. The variation regularity of the temperature field is obtained. For light with different incident angles, the influence on the ray propagation caused by window deformation is analyzed with theoretical calculation and optical/thermal/structural integrated analysis method respectively.

  8. Mechanism of direct Cav2.2 channel block by the κ-opioid receptor agonist U50488H.

    PubMed

    Berecki, Géza; Motin, Leonid; Adams, David J

    2016-10-01

    U50488H is a benzeneacetamide κ-opioid receptor (κ-OR) agonist analgesic, widely used for investigating the pharmacology of G protein-coupled κ-ORs. However, U50488H is also known to directly block various voltage-gated ion channels in a G protein-independent manner. We investigated the direct actions of U50488H on various high voltage-activated (HVA) and low voltage-activated (LVA) neuronal Ca(2+) channels heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. U50488H inhibited HVA rat Cav1.3 (rCav1.3), human Cav2.1 (hCav2.1), hCav2.2, hCav2.3, and LVA hCav3.1 and hCav3.2 channels in a concentration-dependent manner, with similar potencies characterised with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of ∼30 μM. U50488H concentrations causing direct Cav inhibition are typically >100 times higher than those producing κ-OR activation. Investigation of the mechanism of U50488H block of the Cav2.2 channel revealed that U50488H interacted with all major kinetic states of the channel - resting, open, and inactivated. U50488H did not affect the voltage dependence of activation but shifted the steady-state inactivation curve by ∼11 mV to more hyperpolarized potentials. U50488H also increased the rate of Ba(2+) current inactivation during a step depolarization and significantly delayed recovery from slow inactivation, compared with control. Cav2.2 current inhibition was frequency dependent during repetitive step depolarization at 1 Hz and 3 Hz, consistent with use-dependent block. In summary, our results suggest that preferential interaction of U50488H with inactivated Cav2.2 channels significantly contributes to reduced Cav2.2 channel availability and slow recovery form inactivation. We conclude that U50488H non-selectively blocks heterologously expressed neuronal HVA and LVA Cav channels in the absence of κ-ORs. This cross-reactivity also suggests potentially common U50488H binding motifs across Cav channel targets. PMID:27245500

  9. 78 FR 69600 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Industries S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... (AD) for certain Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes. This proposed AD results from... proposed AD, contact Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A--Airworthiness Office, Via Luigi Cibrario,...

  10. 78 FR 69597 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ...-16169 (75 FR 904, January 7, 2010). (c) Applicability This AD applies to PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A... Industries S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... (AD) for Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A Model P-180 airplanes that would supersede an existing AD....

  11. 77 FR 35888 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department... new airworthiness directive (AD) for PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes....

  12. 48 CFR 1852.235-70 - Center for AeroSpace Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Center for AeroSpace... SPACE ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-70 Center for AeroSpace Information. As prescribed in 1835.070(a), insert...

  13. 48 CFR 1852.235-70 - Center for AeroSpace Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Center for AeroSpace... SPACE ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-70 Center for AeroSpace Information. As prescribed in 1835.070(a), insert...

  14. 48 CFR 1852.235-70 - Center for AeroSpace Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Center for AeroSpace... SPACE ADMINISTRATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-70 Center for AeroSpace Information. As prescribed in 1835.070(a), insert...

  15. Future NASA Power Technologies for Space and Aero Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the ambitious goals that NASA has outlined for the next decades considerable development of power technology will be necessary. This presentation outlines the development objectives for both space and aero applications. It further looks at the various power technologies that support these objectives and examines drivers that will be a driving force for future development. Finally, the presentation examines what type of non-traditional learning areas should be emphasized in student curriculum so that the engineering needs of the third decade of the 21st Century are met.

  16. Unsteady fluid and optical simulation of transonic aero-windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    The time-varying fluid and optical fields of several cavity configurations have been computed on overset mesh systems using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and geometric optics. Comparisons between numerical results and Airborne Optical Adjunct (AOA) flight data are made in two-dimensions for a quieted cavity geometry with two lip-blowing rates. In three-dimensions, two proposed aero-window locations for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) are discussed. The simulations indicate that convection of large shear layer structures across the aperture cause the blur circle diameter to be three times the diffraction-limited diameter in the near-infrared band.

  17. Development of a computational aero/fluids analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, P. B.

    1987-01-01

    The Computational Aero/Fluids Analysis System (AFAS) provides the analytical capability to perform state-of-the-art computational analyses in two difficult fluid dynamics disciplines associated with the Space Shuttle program. This system provides the analysis tools and techniques for rapidly and efficiently accessing, analyzing, and reformulating the large and expanding external aerodynamic data base while also providing tools for complex fluid flow analyses of the SSME engine components. Both of these fluid flow disciplines, external aerodynamics and internal gasdynamics, required this capability to ensure that MSFC can respond in a timely manner as problems are encountered and operational changes are made in the Space Shuttle.

  18. Exhaust System Experiments at NASA's AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the planned testing in the AeroAcoustic Propulsion Lab (AAPL) in the coming 15 months. It was stressed in the presentation that these are plans that are subject to change due to changes in funding and/or programmatic direction. The first chart shows a simplified schedule of test entries with funding sponsor and dates for each. In subsequent charts are pages devoted to the Objectives and Issues with each test entry, along with a graphic intended to represent the test activity. The chart for each test entry also indicates sponsorship of the activity, and a contact person.!

  19. Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center aero-optics performance predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, George W.; Pond, John E.; Snow, Ronald; Hwang, Yanfang

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Hypersonic Interceptor Performance Evaluation Center's (HIPEC) aerooptics performance predictions capability. It includes code results for three dimensional shapes and comparisons to initial experiments. HIPEC consists of a collection of aerothermal, aerodynamic computational codes which are capable of covering the entire flight regime from subsonic to hypersonic flow and include chemical reactions and turbulence. Heat transfer to the various surfaces is calculated as an input to cooling and ablation processes. HIPEC also has aero-optics codes to determine the effect of the mean flowfield and turbulence on the tracking and imaging capability of on-board optical sensors. The paper concentrates on the latter aspects.

  20. Evaluation of aero commander propeller acoustic data: Taxi operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, A. G.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The acoustic data from ground tests performed on an Aero Commander propeller driven aircraft are analyzed. An array of microphones flush mounted on the side of the fuselage were used to record data. The propeller blade passage noise during operations at several different taxi speeds is considered and calculations of the magnitude and phase of the blade passage tones, the amplitude stability of the tones, and the spatial phase and coherence of the tones are included. The measured results are compared to theoretical predictions for propeller noise and various evaluations which reveal important details of propeller noise characteristics are presented.

  1. Fatigue Life Analysis of Turbine Disks Based on Load Spectra of Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Feng; Lv, Zhiqiang; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Shun-Peng; Huang, Hong-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Load spectra of aero-engines reflect the process of operating aircrafts as well as the changes of parameters of aircrafts. According to flight hours and speed cycle numbers of the aero-engines, the relationship between load spectra and the fatigue life of main components of the aero-engines is obtained. Based on distribution function and a generalized stress-strength interference model, the cumulative fatigue damage of aero-engines is then calculated. After applying the analysis of load spectra and the cumulative fatigue damage theory, the fatigue life of the first-stage turbine disks of the aero-engines is evaluated by using the S-N curve and Miner's rule in this paper.

  2. Interference Analysis Status and Plans for Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Interference issues related to the operation of an aeronautical mobile airport communications system (AeroMACS) in the C-Band (specifically 5091-5150 MHz) is being investigated. The issue of primary interest is co-channel interference from AeroMACS into mobile-satellite system (MSS) feeder uplinks. The effort is focusing on establishing practical limits on AeroMACS transmissions from airports so that the threshold of interference into MSS is not exceeded. The analyses are being performed with the software package Visualyse Professional, developed by Transfinite Systems Limited. Results with omni-directional antennas and plans to extend the models to represent AeroMACS more accurately will be presented. These models should enable realistic analyses of emerging AeroMACS designs to be developed from NASA Test Bed, RTCA 223, and European results.

  3. Ca(v)3.2 calcium channels: the key protagonist in the supraspinal effect of paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Kerckhove, Nicolas; Mallet, Christophe; François, Amaury; Boudes, Mathieu; Chemin, Jean; Voets, Thomas; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Eschalier, Alain

    2014-04-01

    To exert its analgesic action, paracetamol requires complex metabolism to produce a brain-specific lipoamino acid compound, AM404, which targets central transient receptor potential vanilloid receptors (TRPV1). Lipoamino acids are also known to induce analgesia through T-type calcium-channel inhibition (Ca(v)3.2). In this study we show that the antinociceptive effect of paracetamol in mice is lost when supraspinal Ca(v)3.2 channels are inhibited. Therefore, we hypothesized a relationship between supraspinal Ca(v)3.2 and TRPV1, via AM404, which mediates the analgesic effect of paracetamol. AM404 is able to activate TRPV1 and weakly inhibits Ca(v)3.2. Interestingly, activation of TRPV1 induces a strong inhibition of Ca(v)3.2 current. Supporting this, intracerebroventricular administration of AM404 or capsaicin produces antinociception that is lost in Ca(v)3.2(-/-) mice. Our study, for the first time, (1) provides a molecular mechanism for the supraspinal antinociceptive effect of paracetamol; (2) identifies the relationship between TRPV1 and the Ca(v)3.2 channel; and (3) suggests supraspinal Ca(v)3.2 inhibition as a potential pharmacological strategy to alleviate pain. PMID:24447516

  4. Pharmacognostic standardization of stems of Thespesia lampas (Cav.) Dalz & Gibs

    PubMed Central

    Chumbhale, DS; Upasani, CD

    2012-01-01

    Objective To establish the standardization parameters for complete pharmacognostic evaluation of stems of Thespesia lampas (T. lampas) (Cav.) Dalz & Gibs (Malvaceae), an important plant in the Indian system of medicine. Methods Morphological, microscopical, physico-chemical evaluations, florescence analysis of T. lampas stems were investigated and preliminary phytochemical analysis, GC-MS analysis and HPTLC fingerprinting were carried out for qualitative phytochemical evaluation of various extracts of stems of T. lampas. Results Chemo-microscopy revealed the presence of lignin, starch grains and calcium oxalate crystals. Physico-chemical evaluation used to determine numerical standards showed a result with total ash (9.03 ± 0.05) % w/w, acid insoluble ash (1.50 ± 0.01) % w/w, water soluble ash (2.51 ± 0.02) % w/w, sulphated ash (7.50 ± 0.01) % w/w, ethanol soluble extractive (0.24 ± 0.02) % w/w, water soluble extractive (0.08 ± 0.01) % w/w, moisture content (6.03 ± 0.05) % w/w and total crude fibre content of stem powder (47.36 ± 0.32) % w/w. Behavior characteristics of the stem powder showed presence of steroids, starch, alkaloid, flavonoids and proteins. Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed presence of glycosides, phenolic compounds, tannins, steroids, saponins, flavonoids, carbohydrates and proteins. GC-MS analysis showed the presence of fatty acids such as dodecanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid, n-hexadecanoic acid, 9-tetradecenal and HPTLC fingerprinting revealed the presence of β-sitosterol and quercetin in stems of T. lampas. Conclusions The pharmacognostic standardization of T. lampas is useful towards establishing standards for quality, purity and sample identification. PMID:23569930

  5. A retrospective investigation of canine adenovirus (CAV) infection in adult dogs in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gür, S; Acar, A

    2009-06-01

    Canine adenovirus (CAV) type 1 and 2, respectively, cause infectious canine hepatitis and infectious canine laryngotracheitis in members of the families Canidae and Ursidae worldwide. Both of these infections are acute diseases, especially in young dogs. The aim of this study was to conduct a serological investigation of canine adenovirus infection. For this purpose, serum samples were collected from native pure-bred Kangal(n = 11), and Akbash dogs (n = 17) and Turkish Greyhounds (n = 15) in Eskişehir and Konya provinces. None of the dogs were previously vaccinated against CAV types. Indirect ELISA detected 88.2%, 93.3% and 100% prevalences in Akbash, Greyhound and Kangal dogs, respectively. The remainder of the samples (n = 51) were collected at the Afyonkarahisar Municipality Shelter. Fourty-two of these dogs (82.3%) were detected as seropositive. In total, 82 of 94 dogs (87.2%) were found to be positive for CAV serum antibodies. PMID:19831268

  6. Physical interaction between calcineurin and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channel modulates their functions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Hui; Chen, Yong-Cyuan; Chen, Chien-Chang

    2013-06-19

    Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channel is required for the activation of calcineurin/NFAT signaling in cardiac hypertrophy. We aimed to investigate how Cav3.2 and calcineurin interact. We found that Ca(2+) and calmodulin modulate the Cav3.2/calcineurin interaction. Calcineurin binding to Cav3.2 decreases the enzyme's phosphatase activity and diminishes the channel's current density. Phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy in neonatal cardiac myocytes is reduced by a cell-permeable peptide with the calcineurin binding site sequence. These data suggest that Cav3.2 regulates calcineurin/NFAT pathway through both the Ca(2+) influx and calcineurin binding. Our findings unveiled a reciprocal regulation of Ca(2+) signaling which contributes to our understanding of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:23669360

  7. Overview of additive manufacturing activities at MTU aero engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberg, Joachim; Dusel, Karl-Heinz; Satzger, Wilhelm

    2015-03-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a promising technology to produce parts easily and effectively, just by using metallic powder or wire as starting material and a sophisticated melting process. In contrast to milling or turning technologies complex shaped and hollow parts can be built up in one step. That reduces the production costs and allows the implementation of complete new 3D designs. Therefore AM is also of great interest for aerospace and aero engine industry. MTU Aero Engines has focused its AM activities to the selective laser melting technique (SLM). This technique uses metallic powder and a laser for melting and building up the part layer by layer. It is shown which lead part was selected for AM and how the first production line was established. A special focus is set on the quality assurance of the selective laser melting process. In addition to standard non-destructive inspection techniques a new online monitoring tool was developed and integrated into the SLM machines. The basics of this technique is presented.

  8. Mutations in CAV3 cause mechanical hyperirritability of skeletal muscle in rippling muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Betz, R C; Schoser, B G; Kasper, D; Ricker, K; Ramírez, A; Stein, V; Torbergsen, T; Lee, Y A; Nöthen, M M; Wienker, T F; Malin, J P; Propping, P; Reis, A; Mortier, W; Jentsch, T J; Vorgerd, M; Kubisch, C

    2001-07-01

    Hereditary rippling muscle disease (RMD) is an autosomal dominant human disorder characterized by mechanically triggered contractions of skeletal muscle. Genome-wide linkage analysis has identified an RMD locus on chromosome 3p25. We found missense mutations in positional candidate CAV3 (encoding caveolin 3; ref. 5) in all five families analyzed. Mutations in CAV3 have also been described in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C; refs. 6,7), demonstrating the allelism of dystrophic and non-dystrophic muscle diseases. PMID:11431690

  9. Cacna1c (Cav1.2) Modulates Electroencephalographic Rhythm and Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deependra; Dedic, Nina; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Voulé, Stephanie; Deussing, Jan M.; Kimura, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The CACNA1C gene encodes the alpha 1C (α1C) subunit of the Cav1.2 voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel (LTCC). Some of the other voltage-dependent calcium channels, e.g., P-/Q-type, Cav2.1; N-type, Cav2.2; E-/R-type, Cav2.3; and T-type, Cav3.3 have been implicated in sleep modulation. However, the contribution of LTCCs to sleep remains largely unknown. Based on recent genome-wide association studies, CACNA1C emerged as one of potential candidate genes associated with both sleep and psychiatric disorders. Indeed, most patients with mental illnesses have sleep problems and vice versa. Design: To investigate an impact of Cav1.2 on sleep-wake behavior and electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, polysomnography was performed in heterozygous Cacna1c (HET) knockout mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates under baseline and challenging conditions (acute sleep deprivation and restraint stress). Measurements and Results: HET mice displayed significantly lower EEG spectral power than WT mice across high frequency ranges (beta to gamma) during wake and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Although HET mice spent slightly more time asleep in the dark period, daily amounts of sleep did not differ between the two genotypes. However, recovery sleep after exposure to both types of challenging stress conditions differed markedly; HET mice exhibited reduced REM sleep recovery responses compared to WT mice. Conclusions: These results suggest the involvement of Cacna1c (Cav1.2) in fast electroencephalogram oscillations and REM sleep regulatory processes. Lower spectral gamma activity, slightly increased sleep demands, and altered REM sleep responses found in heterozygous Cacna1c knockout mice may rather resemble a sleep phenotype observed in schizophrenia patients. Citation: Kumar D, Dedic N, FLachskamm C, Voulé S, Deussing JM, Kimura M. Cacna1c (Cav1.2) modulates electroencephalographic rhythm and rapid eye movement sleep recovery. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1371–1380. PMID

  10. Alternative Splicing in CaV2.2 Regulates Neuronal Trafficking via Adaptor Protein Complex-1 Adaptor Protein Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Macabuag, Natsuko

    2015-01-01

    N-type voltage-gated calcium (CaV2.2) channels are expressed in neurons and targeted to the plasma membrane of presynaptic terminals, facilitating neurotransmitter release. Here, we find that the adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1) mediates trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface. Examination of splice variants of CaV2.2, containing either exon 37a (selectively expressed in nociceptors) or 37b in the proximal C terminus, reveal that canonical AP-1 binding motifs, YxxΦ and [DE]xxxL[LI], present only in exon 37a, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to the axons and plasma membrane of rat DRG neurons. Finally, we identify differential effects of dopamine-2 receptor (D2R) and its agonist-induced activation on trafficking of CaV2.2 isoforms. D2R slowed the endocytosis of CaV2.2 containing exon 37b, but not exon 37a, and activation by the agonist quinpirole reversed the effect of the D2R. Our work thus reveals key mechanisms involved in the trafficking of N-type calcium channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT CaV2.2 channels are important for neurotransmitter release, but how they are trafficked is still poorly understood. Here, we describe a novel mechanism for trafficking of CaV2.2 from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface which is mediated by the adaptor protein AP-1. Alternative splicing of exon 37 produces CaV2.2-exon 37a, selectively expressed in nociceptors, or CaV2.2-exon 37b, which is the major splice isoform. Our study reveals that canonical AP-1 binding motifs (YxxΦ and [DE]xxxL[LI]), present in exon 37a, but not 37b, enhance intracellular trafficking of exon 37a-containing CaV2.2 to axons and plasma membrane of DRG neurons. Interaction of APs with CaV2.2 channels may also be key underlying mechanisms for differential effects of the dopamine D2 receptor on trafficking of CaV2.2 splice variants. PMID:26511252

  11. Miga Aero Actuator and 2D Machined Mechanical Binary Latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators provide the highest force-to-weight ratio of any known actuator. They can be designed for a wide variety of form factors from flat, thin packages, to form-matching packages for existing actuators. SMA actuators can be operated many thousands of times, so that ground testing is possible. Actuation speed can be accurately controlled from milliseconds to position and hold, and even electronic velocity-profile control is possible. SMA actuators provide a high degree of operational flexibility, and are truly smart actuators capable of being accurately controlled by onboard microprocessors across a wide range of voltages. The Miga Aero actuator is a SMA actuator designed specifically for spaceflight applications. Providing 13 mm of stroke with either 20- or 40-N output force in two different models, the Aero actuator is made from low-outgassing PEEK (polyether ether ketone) plastic, stainless steel, and nickel-titanium SMA wires. The modular actuator weighs less than 28 grams. The dorsal output attachment allows the Aero to be used in either PUSH or PULL modes by inverting the mounting orientation. The SPA1 actuator utilizes commercially available SMA actuator wire to provide 3/8-in. (approx. =.1 cm) of stroke at a force of over 28 lb (approx. = .125 N). The force is provided by a unique packaging of the single SMA wire that provides the output force of four SMA wires mechanically in parallel. The output load is shared by allowing the SMA wire to slip around the output attachment end to adjust or balance the load, preventing any individual wire segment from experiencing high loads during actuation. A built-in end limit switch prevents overheating of the SMA element following actuation when used in conjunction with the Miga Analog Driver [a simple MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) switching circuit]. A simple 2D machined mechanical binary latch has been developed to complement the capabilities of SMA wire

  12. CAV-OX CAVITATION OXIDIATION PROCESS - MAGNUM WATER TECHNOLOGY, INC. - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report evaluates the ability of the CAV-OX cavitation oxidation process to remove volatile organic compounds (VOC) present in aqueous wastes. This report also presents economic data based on the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program demonstration and nine...

  13. Variation in seed traits and germination potential of Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav. Following its invasion in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav. (Silverleaf nightshade) is presently considered to be one of the worst agricultural weeds around the world including the Mediterranean basin. Plant’s native range is considered to be an area expanding from Southern US to Northern Mexico. Introduced unintentionally from so...

  14. CaV1.3 as pacemaker channels in adrenal chromaffin cells: specific role on exo- and endocytosis?

    PubMed

    Comunanza, Valentina; Marcantoni, Andrea; Vandael, David H; Mahapatra, Satyajit; Gavello, Daniela; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are expressed in adrenal chromaffin cells. Besides shaping the action potential (AP), LTCCs are involved in the excitation-secretion coupling controlling catecholamine release and in Ca (2+) -dependent vesicle retrieval. Of the two LTCCs expressed in chromaffin cells (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), CaV1.3 possesses the prerequisites for pacemaking spontaneously firing cells: low-threshold, steep voltage-dependence of activation and slow inactivation. By using CaV1 .3 (-/-) KO mice and the AP-clamp it has been possible to resolve the time course of CaV1.3 pacemaker currents, which is similar to that regulating substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons. In mouse chromaffin cells CaV1.3 is coupled to fast-inactivating BK channels within membrane nanodomains and controls AP repolarization. The ability to carry subthreshold Ca (2+) currents and activate BK channels confers to CaV1.3 the unique feature of driving Ca (2+) loading during long interspike intervals and, possibly, to control the Ca (2+) -dependent exocytosis and endocytosis processes that regulate catecholamine secretion and vesicle recycling. PMID:21084859

  15. The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS) Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation is a flexible turbofan engine simulation environment that provides the user a platform to develop advanced control algorithms. It is capable of testing the performance of control designs on a validated and verified generic engine model. In addition, it is able to generate state-space linear models of the engine model to aid in controller design. The engine model used in MAPSS is a generic high-pressure ratio, dual-spool, lowbypass, military-type, variable cycle turbofan engine with a digital controller. MAPSS is controlled by a graphical user interface (GUI) and this guide explains how to use it to take advantage of the capabilities of MAPSS.

  16. Aero-acoustics of Drag Generating Swirling Exhaust Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, P. N.; Mobed, D.; Spakovszky, Z. S.; Brooks, T. F.; Humphreys, W. M. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft on approach in high-drag and high-lift configuration create unsteady flow structures which inherently generate noise. For devices such as flaps, spoilers and the undercarriage there is a strong correlation between overall noise and drag such that, in the quest for quieter aircraft, one challenge is to generate drag at low noise levels. This paper presents a rigorous aero-acoustic assessment of a novel drag concept. The idea is that a swirling exhaust flow can yield a steady, and thus relatively quiet, streamwise vortex which is supported by a radial pressure gradient responsible for pressure drag. Flows with swirl are naturally limited by instabilities such as vortex breakdown. The paper presents a first aero-acoustic assessment of ram pressure driven swirling exhaust flows and their associated instabilities. The technical approach combines an in-depth aerodynamic analysis, plausibility arguments to qualitatively describe the nature of acoustic sources, and detailed, quantitative acoustic measurements using a medium aperture directional microphone array in combination with a previously established Deconvolution Approach for Mapping of Acoustic Sources (DAMAS). A model scale engine nacelle with stationary swirl vanes was designed and tested in the NASA Langley Quiet Flow Facility at a full-scale approach Mach number of 0.17. The analysis shows that the acoustic signature is comprised of quadrupole-type turbulent mixing noise of the swirling core flow and scattering noise from vane boundary layers and turbulent eddies of the burst vortex structure near sharp edges. The exposed edges are the nacelle and pylon trailing edge and the centerbody supporting the vanes. For the highest stable swirl angle setting a nacelle area based drag coefficient of 0.8 was achieved with a full-scale Overall Sound Pressure Level (OASPL) of about 40dBA at the ICAO approach certification point.

  17. CFD-based aero-optical analysis of flow fields over two-dimensional cavities with active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan

    Prediction and control of optical wave front distortions and aberrations in a high energy laser beam due to interaction with an unsteady highly non-uniform flow field is of great importance in the development of directed energy weapon systems for Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV). The unsteady shear layer over the weapons bay cavity is the primary cause of this distortion of the optical wave front. The large scale vortical structure of the shear layer over the cavity can be significantly reduced by employing an active flow control technique combined with passive flow control. This dissertation explores various active and passive control methods to suppress the cavity oscillations and thereby improve the aero-optics of cavity flow. In active flow control technique, a steady or a pulsed jet is applied at the sharp leading edge of cavities of different aspect ratios L/D (=2, 4, 15), where L and D are the width and the depth of a cavity respectively. In the passive flow control approach, the sharp leading or trailing edge of the cavity is modified into a round edge of different radii. Both of these active and passive flow control approaches are studied independently and in combination. Numerical simulations are performed, with and without active flow control for subsonic free stream flow past two-dimensional sharp and round leading or trailing edge cavities using Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model or a hybrid SST/Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model. Aero-optical analysis is developed and applied to all the simulation cases. Index of refraction and Optical Path Difference (OPD) are compared for flow fields without and with active flow control. Root-Mean-Square (RMS) value of OPD is calculated and compared with the experimental data, where available. The effect of steady and pulsed blowing on buffet loading on the downstream face of the cavity is also computed. Using the numerical

  18. Prediction and control of turbulent aero-optical distortion using large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Robert E.

    1993-06-01

    The problem of aero-optical distortion caused by turbulence in high speed mixing layers was studied using large eddy simulation (LES) as the model of turbulence. The accuracy of LES is established for global features of the mixing layer, such as mean growth rate and statistics of turbulent velocity fluctuations. LES was then used to assess two concepts for suppressing density fluctuations and aero-optical distortion, lateral convergence and streamline curvature, and one of these was found to be reasonably effective.

  19. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2012 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor-Barsi, Christine; Allen, Arrington E.

    2013-01-01

    A full aero-thermal calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) was completed in 2012 following the major modifications to the facility that included replacement of the refrigeration plant and heat exchanger. The calibration test provided data used to fully document the aero-thermal flow quality in the IRT test section and to construct calibration curves for the operation of the IRT.

  20. Conceptual Design and Numerical Simulations of Hypersonic Waverider Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, D. Y.; Zhang, J. B.; Lee, C. H.

    A modularized airframe/propulsion integrated model is established by oblique shock wave theory, engineering method and method of characteristics(MOC). Based on this method, a new design methodology for hypersonic waverider vehicle which integrated scramjets with waverider airframe derived from cone-wedge flow field is presented. Integrated aero-propulsion performance of the waverider vehicle under on-design and off-design conditions is predicted using Euler equations discretized by Harten-Yee non-MUSCL TVD scheme and the combustor flow field is approximated by a quasi-ID cycle analysis, skin friction of vehicle is calculated by reference temperature method.

  1. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake from plasma membrane Cav3.2 protein channels contributes to ischemic toxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Gouriou, Yves; Bijlenga, Philippe; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    T-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitors protect hippocampal CA1 neurons from delayed death after global ischemia in rats, suggesting that Cav3.1, Cav3.2, or Cav3.3 channels generate cytotoxic Ca(2+) elevations during anoxia. To test this hypothesis, we measured the Ca(2+) concentration changes evoked by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in the cytosol and in the mitochondria of PC12 cells. OGD evoked long-lasting cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations that were reduced by Cav3.2 inhibition (50 μm Ni(2+)) and Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing and potentiated by Cav3.2 overexpression. The kinetics of the sustained cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations occurring during OGD directly correlated to the extent of cell death measured 20 h after reoxygenation, which was decreased by Ni(2+) and Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing and increased by Cav3.2 overexpression. Ni(2+) and Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing delayed the decline of cellular ATP during OGD, consistent with a reduction in the Ca(2+) load actively extruded by plasma membrane Ca(2+) pumps. The cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations were paralleled by mitochondrial Ca(2+) elevations that were also increased by Cav3.2 overexpression and decreased by Ni(2+) but not by Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing. Overexpression and silencing of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, the major mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake protein, revealed that the cytotoxicity was correlated to the amplitude of the mitochondrial, rather than the cytosolic, Ca(2+) elevations. Selective activation of T-type Ca(2+) channels evoked both cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) elevations, but only the mitochondrial responses were reduced by Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing. We conclude that the opening of Cav3.2 channels during ischemia contribute to the entry of Ca(2+) ions that are transmitted to mitochondria, resulting in a deleterious mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload. PMID:23508951

  2. Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uptake from Plasma Membrane Cav3.2 Protein Channels Contributes to Ischemic Toxicity in PC12 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Gouriou, Yves; Bijlenga, Philippe; Demaurex, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    T-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors protect hippocampal CA1 neurons from delayed death after global ischemia in rats, suggesting that Cav3.1, Cav3.2, or Cav3.3 channels generate cytotoxic Ca2+ elevations during anoxia. To test this hypothesis, we measured the Ca2+ concentration changes evoked by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in the cytosol and in the mitochondria of PC12 cells. OGD evoked long-lasting cytosolic Ca2+ elevations that were reduced by Cav3.2 inhibition (50 μm Ni2+) and Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing and potentiated by Cav3.2 overexpression. The kinetics of the sustained cytosolic Ca2+ elevations occurring during OGD directly correlated to the extent of cell death measured 20 h after reoxygenation, which was decreased by Ni2+ and Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing and increased by Cav3.2 overexpression. Ni2+ and Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing delayed the decline of cellular ATP during OGD, consistent with a reduction in the Ca2+ load actively extruded by plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps. The cytosolic Ca2+ elevations were paralleled by mitochondrial Ca2+ elevations that were also increased by Cav3.2 overexpression and decreased by Ni2+ but not by Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing. Overexpression and silencing of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, the major mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake protein, revealed that the cytotoxicity was correlated to the amplitude of the mitochondrial, rather than the cytosolic, Ca2+ elevations. Selective activation of T-type Ca2+ channels evoked both cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ elevations, but only the mitochondrial responses were reduced by Cav3.1/Cav3.2 silencing. We conclude that the opening of Cav3.2 channels during ischemia contribute to the entry of Ca2+ ions that are transmitted to mitochondria, resulting in a deleterious mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. PMID:23508951

  3. Phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on S1928 uncouples the L-type Ca2+ channel from the β2 adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Patriarchi, Tommaso; Qian, Hai; Di Biase, Valentina; Malik, Zulfiquar A; Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Price, Jennifer L; Hammes, Erik A; Buonarati, Olivia R; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Catterall, William A; Hofmann, Franz; Xiang, Yang K; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Chen, Chao-Ye; Navedo, Manuel F; Hell, Johannes W

    2016-06-15

    Agonist-triggered downregulation of β-adrenergic receptors (ARs) constitutes vital negative feedback to prevent cellular overexcitation. Here, we report a novel downregulation of β2AR signaling highly specific for Cav1.2. We find that β2-AR binding to Cav1.2 residues 1923-1942 is required for β-adrenergic regulation of Cav1.2. Despite the prominence of PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Cav1.2 S1928 within the newly identified β2AR binding site, its physiological function has so far escaped identification. We show that phosphorylation of S1928 displaces the β2AR from Cav1.2 upon β-adrenergic stimulation rendering Cav1.2 refractory for several minutes from further β-adrenergic stimulation. This effect is lost in S1928A knock-in mice. Although AMPARs are clustered at postsynaptic sites like Cav1.2, β2AR association with and regulation of AMPARs do not show such dissociation. Accordingly, displacement of the β2AR from Cav1.2 is a uniquely specific desensitization mechanism of Cav1.2 regulation by highly localized β2AR/cAMP/PKA/S1928 signaling. The physiological implications of this mechanism are underscored by our finding that LTP induced by prolonged theta tetanus (PTT-LTP) depends on Cav1.2 and its regulation by channel-associated β2AR. PMID:27103070

  4. Optimal Control and Coordination of Connected and Automated Vehicles at Urban Traffic Intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue J.; Malikopoulos, Andreas; Cassandras, Christos G.

    2016-01-01

    We address the problem of coordinating online a continuous flow of connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) crossing two adjacent intersections in an urban area. We present a decentralized optimal control framework whose solution yields for each vehicle the optimal acceleration/deceleration at any time in the sense of minimizing fuel consumption. The solu- tion, when it exists, allows the vehicles to cross the intersections without the use of traffic lights, without creating congestion on the connecting road, and under the hard safety constraint of collision avoidance. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is validated through simulation considering two intersections located in downtown Boston, and it is shown that coordination of CAVs can reduce significantly both fuel consumption and travel time.

  5. Smooth muscle cell α2δ-1 subunits are essential for vasoregulation by CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, John P.; Adebiyi, Adebowale; Zhao, Guiling; Narayanan, Damodaran; Thomas, Candice M.; Feng, Jessie Y.; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Voltage-dependent L-type (CaV1.2) Ca2+ channels are a heteromeric complex formed from pore forming α1 and auxiliary α2δ and β subunits. CaV1.2 channels are the principal Ca2+ influx pathway in arterial myocytes and regulate multiple physiological functions, including contraction. The macromolecular composition of arterial myocyte CaV1.2 channels remains poorly understood, with no studies having examined the molecular identity or physiological functions of α2δ subunits. Objective Investigate the functional significance of α2δ subunits in myocytes of resistance-size (100–200 μm diameter) cerebral arteries. Methods and Results α2δ-1 was the only α2δ isoform expressed in cerebral artery myocytes. Pregabalin, an α2δ-1/-2 ligand, and an α2δ-1 antibody, inhibited CaV1.2 currents in isolated myocytes. Acute pregabalin application reversibly dilated pressurized arteries. Using a novel application of surface biotinylation, data indicated that >95 % of CaV1.2 α1 and α2δ-1 subunits are present in the arterial myocyte plasma membrane. α2δ-1 knockdown using shRNA reduced plasma membrane-localized CaV1.2 α1 subunits, caused a corresponding elevation in cytosolic CaV1.2 α1 subunits, decreased intracellular Ca2+ concentration, inhibited pressure-induced vasoconstriction (“myogenic tone”), and attenuated pregabalin-induced vasodilation. Prolonged (24 hour) pregabalin exposure did not alter total α2δ-1 or CaV1.2 α1 proteins, but decreased plasma membrane expression of each subunit, which reduced myogenic tone. Conclusions α2δ-1 is essential for plasma membrane expression of arterial myocyte CaV1.2 α1 subunits. α2δ-1 targeting can block CaV1.2 channels directly and inhibit surface expression of CaV1.2 α1 subunits, leading to vasodilation. These data identify α2δ-1 as a novel molecular target in arterial myocytes, manipulation of which regulates contractility. PMID:19797702

  6. Volume Dynamics Propulsion System Modeling for Supersonics Vehicle Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Ma, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program, the Supersonics Project is working to overcome the obstacles to supersonic commercial flight. The proposed vehicles are long slim body aircraft with pronounced aero-servo-elastic modes. These modes can potentially couple with propulsion system dynamics; leading to performance challenges such as aircraft ride quality and stability. Other disturbances upstream of the engine generated from atmospheric wind gusts, angle of attack, and yaw can have similar effects. In addition, for optimal propulsion system performance, normal inlet-engine operations are required to be closer to compressor stall and inlet unstart. To study these phenomena an integrated model is needed that includes both airframe structural dynamics as well as the propulsion system dynamics. This paper covers the propulsion system component volume dynamics modeling of a turbojet engine that will be used for an integrated vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic model and for propulsion efficiency studies.

  7. Volume Dynamics Propulsion System Modeling for Supersonics Vehicle Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Ma, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program the Supersonics Project is working to overcome the obstacles to supersonic commercial flight. The proposed vehicles are long slim body aircraft with pronounced aero-servo-elastic modes. These modes can potentially couple with propulsion system dynamics; leading to performance challenges such as aircraft ride quality and stability. Other disturbances upstream of the engine generated from atmospheric wind gusts, angle of attack, and yaw can have similar effects. In addition, for optimal propulsion system performance, normal inlet-engine operations are required to be closer to compressor stall and inlet unstart. To study these phenomena an integrated model is needed that includes both airframe structural dynamics as well as the propulsion system dynamics. This paper covers the propulsion system component volume dynamics modeling of a turbojet engine that will be used for an integrated vehicle Aero- Propulso-Servo-Elastic model and for propulsion efficiency studies.

  8. Volume Dynamics Propulsion System Modeling for Supersonics Vehicle Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Connolly, Joseph W.; Paxson, Daniel E.; Ma, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Under the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program the Supersonics Project is working to overcome the obstacles to supersonic commercial flight. The proposed vehicles are long slim body aircraft with pronounced aero-servo-elastic modes. These modes can potentially couple with propulsion system dynamics; leading to performance challenges such as aircraft ride quality and stability. Other disturbances upstream of the engine generated from atmospheric wind gusts, angle of attack, and yaw can have similar effects. In addition, for optimal propulsion system performance, normal inlet-engine operations are required to be closer to compressor stall and inlet unstart. To study these phenomena an integrated model is needed that includes both airframe structural dynamics as well as the propulsion system dynamics. This paper covers the propulsion system component volume dynamics modeling of a turbojet engine that will be used for an integrated vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic model and for propulsion efficiency studies.

  9. Dual Regulation of R-Type CaV2.3 Channels by M1 Muscarinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Young; Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channels are dynamically modulated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). The M1 muscarinic receptor stimulation is known to enhance CaV2.3 channel gating through the activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Here, we found that M1 receptors also inhibit CaV2.3 currents when the channels are fully activated by PKC. In whole-cell configuration, the application of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, potentiated CaV2.3 currents by ∼two-fold. After the PMA-induced potentiation, stimulation of M1 receptors decreased the CaV2.3 currents by 52 ± 8%. We examined whether the depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) is responsible for the muscarinic suppression of CaV2.3 currents by using two methods: the Danio rerio voltage-sensing phosphatase (Dr-VSP) system and the rapamycin-induced translocatable pseudojanin (PJ) system. First, dephosphorylation of PI(4,5)P2 to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) by Dr-VSP significantly suppressed CaV2.3 currents, by 53 ± 3%. Next, dephosphorylation of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2 to PI by PJ translocation further decreased the current by up to 66 ± 3%. The results suggest that CaV2.3 currents are modulated by the M1 receptor in a dual mode—that is, potentiation through the activation of PKC and suppression by the depletion of membrane PI(4,5)P2. Our results also suggest that there is rapid turnover between PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2 in the plasma membrane. PMID:26923189

  10. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP5 modulates neuropathic and inflammatory pain by enhancing Cav3.2 channel activity.

    PubMed

    García-Caballero, Agustin; Gadotti, Vinicius M; Stemkowski, Patrick; Weiss, Norbert; Souza, Ivana A; Hodgkinson, Victoria; Bladen, Chris; Chen, Lina; Hamid, Jawed; Pizzoccaro, Anne; Deage, Mickael; François, Amaury; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2014-09-01

    T-type calcium channels are essential contributors to the transmission of nociceptive signals in the primary afferent pain pathway. Here, we show that T-type calcium channels are ubiquitinated by WWP1, a plasma-membrane-associated ubiquitin ligase that binds to the intracellular domain III-IV linker region of the Cav3.2 T-type channel and modifies specific lysine residues in this region. A proteomic screen identified the deubiquitinating enzyme USP5 as a Cav3.2 III-IV linker interacting partner. Knockdown of USP5 via shRNA increases Cav3.2 ubiquitination, decreases Cav3.2 protein levels, and reduces Cav3.2 whole-cell currents. In vivo knockdown of USP5 or uncoupling USP5 from native Cav3.2 channels via intrathecal delivery of Tat peptides mediates analgesia in both inflammatory and neuropathic mouse models of mechanical hypersensitivity. Altogether, our experiments reveal a cell signaling pathway that regulates T-type channel activity and their role in nociceptive signaling. PMID:25189210

  11. Thermomechanical repository and shaft response analyses using the CAVS (Cracking And Void Strain) jointed rock model: Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dial, B.W.; Maxwell, D.E.

    1986-12-01

    Numerical studies of the far-field repository and near-field shaft response for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt have been performed with the STEALTH computer code using the CAVS model for jointed rock. CAVS is a constitutive model that can simulate the slip and dilatancy of fracture planes in a jointed rock mass. The initiation and/or propagation of fractures can also be modeled when stress intensity criteria are met. The CAVS models are based on the joint models proposed with appropriate modifications for numerical simulations. The STEALTH/CAVS model has been previously used to model (1) explosive fracturing of a wellbore, (2) earthquake effects on tunnels in a generic nuclear waste repository, (3) horizontal emplacement for a nuclear waste repository in jointed granite, and (4) tunnel response in jointed rock. The use of CAVS to model far-field repository and near-field shaft response was different from previous approaches because it represented a spatially oriented approach to rock response and failure, rather than the traditional stress invariant formulation for yielding. In addition, CAVS tracked the response of the joint apertures to the time-dependent stress changes in the far-field repository and near-field shaft regions. 28 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  13. Mechanism of SNARE protein binding and regulation of Cav2 channels by phosphorylation of the synaptic protein interaction site.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Charles T; Myers, Scott J; Fu, Jian; Mockus, Susan M; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2005-01-01

    Ca(v)2.1 and Ca(v)2.2 channels conduct P/Q-type and N-type Ca(2+) currents that initiate neurotransmission and bind SNARE proteins through a synaptic protein interaction (synprint) site. PKC and CaMKII phosphorylate the synprint site and inhibit SNARE protein binding in vitro. Here we identify two separate microdomains that each bind syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 in vitro and are regulated by PKC phosphorylation at serines 774 and 898 and CaMKII phosphorylation at serines 784 and 896. Activation of PKC resulted in its recruitment to and phosphorylation of Ca(V)2.2 channels, but PKC phosphorylation did not dissociate Ca(V)2.2 channel/syntaxin 1A complexes. Chimeric Ca(V)2.1a channels containing the synprint site of Ca(v)2.2 gain modulation by syntaxin 1A, which is blocked by PKC phosphorylation at the sites identified above. Our results support a bipartite model for the synprint site in which each SNARE-binding microdomain is controlled by a separate PKC and CaMKII phosphorylation site that regulates channel modulation by SNARE proteins. PMID:15607937

  14. Ca2+ entry into neurons is facilitated by cooperative gating of clustered CaV1.3 channels

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Claudia M; Dixon, Rose E; Tajada, Sendoa; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Santana, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels regulate excitability in many neurons. As is the case for all voltage-gated channels, it is widely assumed that individual CaV1.3 channels behave independently with respect to voltage-activation, open probability, and facilitation. Here, we report the results of super-resolution imaging, optogenetic, and electrophysiological measurements that refute this long-held view. We found that the short channel isoform (CaV1.3S), but not the long (CaV1.3L), associates in functional clusters of two or more channels that open cooperatively, facilitating Ca2+ influx. CaV1.3S channels are coupled via a C-terminus-to-C-terminus interaction that requires binding of the incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and subsequent binding of CaM to the pre-IQ domain of the channels. Physically-coupled channels facilitate Ca2+ currents as a consequence of their higher open probabilities, leading to increased firing rates in rat hippocampal neurons. We propose that cooperative gating of CaV1.3S channels represents a mechanism for the regulation of Ca2+ signaling and electrical activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15744.001 PMID:27187148

  15. AeroCOM Biomass Burning Emissions Experiment-Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, M. M.; Chin, M.; Kahn, R. A.; Val Martin, M.

    2014-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is one of the major sources of optically and chemically potent carbonaceous aerosols, gaseous aerosol precursors, and volatile organic compounds. It is, therefore, important to represent these emissions as accurately as possible in the global and regional models. To correctly simulate BB emissions from a fire, the model needs two key inputs: emission source strength for the fire and the emission injection height. Based on pilot studies of injection height by M. Val Martin et al. (2010, 2012), and of source strength by M. Petrenko et al. (2012), we proposed an AeroCom-coordinated multi-model BB experiment. The core objectives of the experiment are: To inter-compare and quantify the accuracy and diversity of the AeroCom model simulated BB AOD using a common emissions inventory. To propose a region-by-region emission correction scheme based on the comparisons of model output with satellite snapshots of smoke-plume optical depth from the MODIS and MISR instruments. This will allow us to bring the widely used GFED v3 emissions inventory to the levels needed to improve model-observation comparisons. To test smoke injection height-emission intensity relationships used in global models against MISR multi-angle smoke-plume-height retrievals. With the first stage of the BB experiment focused on the source strength, this talk will provide an update on development and testing the method of using satellite-measured aerosol optical depth snapshots to constrain BB aerosol emissions in the global models. The global datasets of fire-and-smoke events, observed by MISR and MODIS during 2006, 2007 and 2008, to be used for model-satellite comparisons, will also be described. These events were selected according to a number of criteria to be suitable for model-observation comparison at the scales of global model resolution. In addition, we will showcase preliminary results of model inter-comparisons within the BB experiment, outline plans for future output analysis

  16. The CaV2.3 R-Type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channel in Mouse Sleep Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Siwek, Magdalena Elisabeth; Müller, Ralf; Henseler, Christina; Broich, Karl; Papazoglou, Anna; Weiergräber, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) are key elements in mediating thalamocortical rhythmicity. Low-voltage activated (LVA) CaV 3 T-type Ca2+ channels have been related to thalamic rebound burst firing and to generation of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. High-voltage activated (HVA) CaV 1 L-type Ca2+ channels, on the opposite, favor the tonic mode of action associated with higher levels of vigilance. However, the role of the HVA Non-L-type CaV2.3 Ca2+ channels, which are predominantly expressed in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN), still remains unclear. Recently, CaV2.3−/− mice were reported to exhibit altered spike-wave discharge (SWD)/absence seizure susceptibility supported by the observation that CaV2.3 mediated Ca2+ influx into RTN neurons can trigger small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+-channel type 2 (SK2) currents capable of maintaining thalamic burst activity. Based on these studies we investigated the role of CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels in rodent sleep. Methods: The role of CaV2.3 Ca2+ channels was analyzed in CaV2.3−/− mice and controls in both spontaneous and artificial urethane-induced sleep, using implantable video-EEG radiotelemetry. Data were analyzed for alterations in sleep architecture using sleep staging software and time-frequency analysis. Results: CaV2.3 deficient mice exhibited reduced wake duration and increased slow-wave sleep (SWS). Whereas mean sleep stage durations remained unchanged, the total number of SWS epochs was increased in CaV2.3−/− mice. Additional changes were observed for sleep stage transitions and EEG amplitudes. Furthermore, urethane-induced SWS mimicked spontaneous sleep results obtained from CaV2.3 deficient mice. Quantitative Real-time PCR did not reveal changes in thalamic CaV3 T-type Ca2+ channel expression. The detailed mechanisms of SWS increase in CaV2.3−/− mice remain to be determined. Conclusions: Low-voltage activated CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels in the thalamocortical

  17. Deletion of the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 but not CaV1.2 Results in a Diminished sAHP in Mouse CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamelli, Amy E.; McKinney, Brandon C.; White, Jessica A.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2009-01-01

    Trains of action potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons are followed by a prolonged calcium-dependent post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) that serves to limit further firing to a sustained depolarizing input. A reduction in the AHP accompanies acquisition of several types of learning and increases in the AHP are correlated with age-related cognitive impairment. The AHP develops primarily as the result of activation of outward calcium-activated potassium currents; however the precise source of calcium for activation of the AHP remains unclear. There is substantial experimental evidence suggesting that calcium influx via voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (L-VGCCs) contributes to the generation of the AHP. Two L-VGCC subtypes are predominately expressed in the hippocampus, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, however it is not known which L-VGCC subtype is involved in generation of the AHP. This ambiguity is due in large part to the fact that at present there are no subunit-specific agonists or antagonists. Therefore, using mice in which the gene encoding CaV1.2 or CaV1.3 was deleted, we sought to determine the impact of alterations in levels of these two L-VCGG subtypes on neuronal excitability. No differences in any AHP measure were seen between neurons from CaV1.2 knockout mice and controls. However, the total area of the AHP was significantly smaller in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to neurons from wildtype controls. A significant reduction in the amplitude of the AHP was also seen at the 1 sec time point in neurons from CaV1.3 knockout mice as compared to those from controls. Reductions in both the area and 1 sec amplitude suggest the involvement of calcium influx via CaV1.3 in the slow AHP (sAHP). Thus, the results of our study demonstrate that deletion of CaV1.3, but not CaV1.2, significantly impacts the generation of the sAHP. PMID:20014384

  18. CAV3 mutations causing exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis: Expanding the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies.

    PubMed

    Scalco, Renata Siciliani; Gardiner, Alice R; Pitceathly, Robert D S; Hilton-Jones, David; Schapira, Anthony H; Turner, Chris; Parton, Matt; Desikan, Mahalekshmi; Barresi, Rita; Marsh, Julie; Manzur, Adnan Y; Childs, Anne-Marie; Feng, Lucy; Murphy, Elaine; Lamont, Phillipa J; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Wallefeld, William; Davis, Mark R; Laing, Nigel G; Holton, Janice L; Fialho, Doreen; Bushby, Kate; Hanna, Michael G; Phadke, Rahul; Jungbluth, Heinz; Houlden, Henry; Quinlivan, Ros

    2016-08-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is often due to a combination of environmental trigger(s) and genetic predisposition; however, the underlying genetic cause remains elusive in many cases. Mutations in CAV3 lead to various neuromuscular phenotypes with partial overlap, including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD1C), rippling muscle disease, distal myopathy and isolated hyperCKemia. Here we present a series of eight patients from seven families presenting with exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis caused by mutations in CAV3 diagnosed by next generation sequencing (NGS) (n = 6). Symptoms included myalgia (n = 7), exercise intolerance (n = 7) and episodes of rhabdomyolysis (n = 2). Percussion-induced rapid muscle contractions (PIRCs) were seen in five out of six patients examined. A previously reported heterozygous mutation in CAV3 (p.T78M) and three novel variants (p.V14I, p.F41S, p.F54V) were identified. Caveolin-3 immunolabeling in muscle was normal in 3/4 patients; however, immunoblotting showed more than 50% reduction of caveolin-3 in five patients compared with controls. This case series demonstrates that exercise intolerance, myalgia and rhabdomyolysis may be caused by CAV3 mutations and broadens the phenotypic spectrum of caveolinopathies. In our series, immunoblotting was a more sensitive method to detect reduced caveolin-3 levels than immunohistochemistry in skeletal muscle. Patients presenting with muscle pain, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis should be routinely tested for PIRCs as this may be an important clinical clue for caveolinopathies, even in the absence of other "typical" features. The use of NGS may expand current knowledge concerning inherited diseases, and unexpected/atypical phenotypes may be attributed to well-known human disease genes. PMID:27312022

  19. Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei; Lavelle, Thomas; Litt, Jonathan; Csank, Jeffrey; May, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    The Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) software package is a nonlinear dynamic simulation of a 40,000-pound (approximately equals 178-kN) thrust class commercial turbofan engine, written in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The model has been tuned to capture the behavior of flight test data, and is capable of running at any point in the flight envelope [up to 40,000 ft (approximately equals 12,200 m) and Mach 0.8]. In addition to the open-loop engine, the simulation includes a controller whose architecture is representative of that found in industry. C-MAPSS40k fills the need for an easy-to-use, realistic, transient simulation of a medium-size commercial turbofan engine with a representative controller. It is a detailed component level model (CLM) written in the industry-standard graphical MATLAB/Simulink environment to allow for easy modification and portability. At the time of this reporting, no other such model exists in the public domain.

  20. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization on Conceptual Design of Aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Zhan-xue; Zhou, Li; Liu, Zeng-wen

    2016-06-01

    In order to obtain better integrated performance of aero-engine during the conceptual design stage, multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, weight, and aircraft mission are required. Unfortunately, the couplings between these disciplines make it difficult to model or solve by conventional method. MDO (Multidisciplinary Design Optimization) methodology which can well deal with couplings of disciplines is considered to solve this coupled problem. Approximation method, optimization method, coordination method, and modeling method for MDO framework are deeply analyzed. For obtaining the more efficient MDO framework, an improved CSSO (Concurrent Subspace Optimization) strategy which is based on DOE (Design Of Experiment) and RSM (Response Surface Model) methods is proposed in this paper; and an improved DE (Differential Evolution) algorithm is recommended to solve the system-level and discipline-level optimization problems in MDO framework. The improved CSSO strategy and DE algorithm are evaluated by utilizing the numerical test problem. The result shows that the efficiency of improved methods proposed by this paper is significantly increased. The coupled problem of VCE (Variable Cycle Engine) conceptual design is solved by utilizing improved CSSO strategy, and the design parameter given by improved CSSO strategy is better than the original one. The integrated performance of VCE is significantly improved.

  1. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate elicits Ca2+ spike in MCF-7 breast cancer cells: essential role of Cav3.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Ranzato, Elia; Magnelli, Valeria; Martinotti, Simona; Waheed, Zeina; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Marchetti, Carla; Burlando, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    We used MCF-7 human breast cancer cells that endogenously express Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels toward a mechanistic study on the effect of EGCG on [Ca(2+)]i. Confocal Ca(2+) imaging showed that EGCG induces a [Ca(2+)]i spike which is due to extracellular Ca(2+) entry and is sensitive to catalase and to low-specificity (mibefradil) and high-specificity (Z944) T-type Ca(2+)channel blockers. siRNA knockdown of T-type Ca(2+) channels indicated the involvement of Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1. Application of EGCG to HEK cells expressing either Cav3.2 or Cav3.1 induced enhancement of Cav3.2 and inhibition of Cav3.1 channel activity. Measurements of K(+) currents in MCF-7 cells showed a reversible, catalase-sensitive inhibitory effect of EGCG, while siRNA for the Kv1.1 K(+) channel induced a reduction of the EGCG [Ca(2+)]i spike. siRNA for Cav3.2 reduced EGCG cytotoxicity to MCF-7 cells, as measured by calcein viability assay. Together, data suggest that EGCG promotes the activation of Cav3.2 channels through K(+) current inhibition leading to membrane depolarization, and in addition increases Cav3.2 currents. Cav3.2 channels are in part responsible for EGCG inhibition of MCF-7 viability, suggesting that deregulation of [Ca(2+)]i by EGCG may be relevant in breast cancer treatment. PMID:25260713

  2. IFITM1 promotes the metastasis of human colorectal cancer via CAV-1.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Xie, Dan; Ng, Samuel S; Lum, Ching Tung; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cheung, William K; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Guimiao; Wang, Xiaomei; Lin, Marie C

    2015-11-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) is one of the interferon-induced transmembrane protein family members. In this study, we reported that the elevated IFITM1 expression in human colorectal cancer (CRC) significantly correlated with CRC lymph node and distance metastasis as well as a more advanced clinical stage. Importantly, elevated IFITM1 expression is an independent prognostic factor for poor survival. To investigate the molecular mechanisms, we showed that over-expression of IFITM1 in CRC cells promoted, whereas knockdown of IFITM1 expression inhibited, cell migration/invasion and tumorigenicity in vitro. Furthermore, we identified Caveolin-1 (CAV1) as a downstream target of IFITM1-induced cell invasion, as knockdown of CAV1 abrogated siIFITM1 mediated inhibition of cell invasion in CRC cells. In addition, in a CRC cohort of 229 patients, the expression of IFITM1 inversely correlated with the expression of CAV1. These results suggested that IFITM1 promotes the aggressiveness of CRC cells, and it is a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:26259513

  3. New Determinant for the CaVβ2 Subunit Modulation of the CaV1.2 Calcium Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Qi Zong; Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Harry, Jo Beth; Ravindran, Arippa; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2008-01-01

    Cavβ subunits support voltage gating of Cav1.2 calcium channels and play important role in excitation-contraction coupling. The common central membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) region of Cavβ binds to the α-interaction domain (AID) and the IQ motif of the pore-forming α1C subunit, but these two interactions do not explain why the cardiac Cavβ2 subunit splice variants differentially modulate inactivation of Ca2+ currents (ICa). Previously we described β2Δg, a functionally active splice variant of human Cavβ2 lacking MAGUK. By deletion analysis of β2Δg, we have now identified a 41-amino acid C-terminal essential determinant (β2CED) that stimulates ICa in the absence of Cavβ subunits and conveys a +20-mV shift in the peak of the ICa-voltage relationship. The β2CED is targeted by α1C to the plasma membrane, forms a complex with α1C but does not bind to AID. Electrophysiology and binding studies point to the calmodulin-interacting LA/IQ region in the α1C subunit C terminus as a functionally relevant β2CED binding site. The β2CED interacts with LA/IQ in a Ca2+- and calmodulin-independent manner and need LA, but not IQ, to activate the channel. Deletion/mutation analyses indicated that each of the three Cavβ2/α1C interactions is sufficient to support ICa. However, β2CED does not support Ca2+-dependent inactivation, suggesting that interactions of MAGUK with AID and IQ are crucial for Ca2+-induced inactivation. The β2CED is conserved only in Cavβ2 subunits. Thus, β2CED constitutes a previously unknown integrative part of the multifactorial mechanism of Cavβ2-subunit differential modulation of the Cav1.2 calcium channel that in β2Δg occurs without MAGUK. PMID:18411278

  4. Down-regulation of CaV1.2 channels during hypertension: how fewer CaV1.2 channels allow more Ca2+ into hypertensive arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tajada, Sendoa; Cidad, Pilar; Colinas, Olaia; Santana, L Fernando; López-López, José R; Pérez-García, M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a clinical syndrome characterized by increased arterial tone. Although the mechanisms are varied, the generally accepted view is that increased CaV1.2 channel function is a common feature of this pathological condition. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying vascular dysfunction in a mouse model of genetic hypertension. Contrary to expectation, we found that whole-cell CaV1.2 currents (ICa) were lower in hypertensive (BPH line) than normotensive (BPN line) myocytes. However, local CaV1.2 sparklet activity was higher in BPH cells, suggesting that the relatively low ICa in these cells was produced by a few hyperactive CaV1.2 channels. Furthermore, our data suggest that while the lower expression of the pore-forming α1c subunit of CaV1.2 currents underlies the lower ICa in BPH myocytes, the increased sparklet activity was due to a different composition in the auxiliary subunits of the CaV1.2 complexes. ICa currents in BPN cells were produced by channels composed of α1c/α2δ/β3 subunits, while in BPH myocytes currents were probably generated by the opening of channels formed by α1c/α2δ/β2 subunits. In addition, Ca2+ sparks evoked large conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents of lower magnitude in BPH than in BPN myocytes, because BK channels were less sensitive to Ca2+. Our data are consistent with a model in which a decrease in the global number of CaV1.2 currents coexist with the existence of a subpopulation of highly active channels that dominate the resting Ca2+ influx. The decrease in BK channel activity makes the hyperpolarizing brake ineffective and leads BPH myocytes to a more contracted resting state. PMID:24167226

  5. Taking advantage of surface proximity effects with aero-marine vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trillo, Robert L.

    A comprehensive account is given of the operational characteristics and limiting operational conditions of 'wing-in-ground' surface effect marine aircraft. It is emphasized that operation must be restricted to the calmest of river and lake waters, not merely for the sake of safety margin enhancement but for the maximization of air cushion effect efficiency, and its consequent economic benefits. Quietness of operation in these environments is also essential, strongly recommending reliance on shrouded propellers as the primary means of propulsion.

  6. Observation and analysis of aero-optic effects on the ORCA laser communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, David T.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Andrews, Larry C.; Leclerc, Troy; Sauer, Paul

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we show evidence of aero-optic effects on the measured beacon beam as the gimbal angle of a nosemounted turret changes from 0 to 90 degrees and greater with respect to the line of flight. Data from the beacon beam was collected with a new technology 3-aperture scintillometer over a 82km to 104km air-to-ground downlink during field testing of the ORCA system in Nevada in May 2009. In this paper we present data analysis on the impact of an aero-optic boundary layer on a laser link between an aircraft and a ground-based stationary node. Particularly we look at the impact of an aero-optic boundary layer on the mean, variance, scintillation, probability density function (PDF), power spectral density (PSD), and fading of the received irradiance. We find that the most compelling argument for the presence of strong aero-optic effects comes from calculating the PSD of the received beacon intensity. We also find the cumulative effect of the aero-optic boundary layer differs depending on the transmitted beam parameters, i.e. collimated or divergent.

  7. Fault Diagnosis of Demountable Disk-Drum Aero-Engine Rotor Using Customized Multiwavelet Method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinglong; Wang, Yu; He, Zhengjia; Wang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor is an important piece of equipment that greatly impacts the safe operation of aircraft. However, assembly looseness or crack fault has led to several unscheduled breakdowns and serious accidents. Thus, condition monitoring and fault diagnosis technique are required for identifying abnormal conditions. Customized ensemble multiwavelet method for aero-engine rotor condition identification, using measured vibration data, is developed in this paper. First, customized multiwavelet basis function with strong adaptivity is constructed via symmetric multiwavelet lifting scheme. Then vibration signal is processed by customized ensemble multiwavelet transform. Next, normalized information entropy of multiwavelet decomposition coefficients is computed to directly reflect and evaluate the condition. The proposed approach is first applied to fault detection of an experimental aero-engine rotor. Finally, the proposed approach is used in an engineering application, where it successfully identified the crack fault of a demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor. The results show that the proposed method possesses excellent performance in fault detection of aero-engine rotor. Moreover, the robustness of the multiwavelet method against noise is also tested and verified by simulation and field experiments. PMID:26512668

  8. Fault Diagnosis of Demountable Disk-Drum Aero-Engine Rotor Using Customized Multiwavelet Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinglong; Wang, Yu; He, Zhengjia; Wang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor is an important piece of equipment that greatly impacts the safe operation of aircraft. However, assembly looseness or crack fault has led to several unscheduled breakdowns and serious accidents. Thus, condition monitoring and fault diagnosis technique are required for identifying abnormal conditions. Customized ensemble multiwavelet method for aero-engine rotor condition identification, using measured vibration data, is developed in this paper. First, customized multiwavelet basis function with strong adaptivity is constructed via symmetric multiwavelet lifting scheme. Then vibration signal is processed by customized ensemble multiwavelet transform. Next, normalized information entropy of multiwavelet decomposition coefficients is computed to directly reflect and evaluate the condition. The proposed approach is first applied to fault detection of an experimental aero-engine rotor. Finally, the proposed approach is used in an engineering application, where it successfully identified the crack fault of a demountable disk-drum aero-engine rotor. The results show that the proposed method possesses excellent performance in fault detection of aero-engine rotor. Moreover, the robustness of the multiwavelet method against noise is also tested and verified by simulation and field experiments. PMID:26512668

  9. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2012 Test)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor-Barsi, Christine M.; Arrington, E. Allen; VanZante, Judith Foss

    2012-01-01

    A major modification of the refrigeration plant and heat exchanger at the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) occurred in autumn of 2011. It is standard practice at NASA Glenn to perform a full aero-thermal calibration of the test section of a wind tunnel facility upon completion of major modifications. This paper will discuss the tools and techniques used to complete an aero-thermal calibration of the IRT and the results that were acquired. The goal of this test entry was to complete a flow quality survey and aero-thermal calibration measurements in the test section of the IRT. Test hardware that was used includes the 2D Resistive Temperature Detector (RTD) array, 9-ft pressure survey rake, hot wire survey rake, and the quick check survey rake. This test hardware provides a map of the velocity, Mach number, total and static pressure, total temperature, flow angle and turbulence intensity. The data acquired were then reduced to examine pressure, temperature, velocity, flow angle, and turbulence intensity. Reduced data has been evaluated to assess how the facility meets flow quality goals. No icing conditions were tested as part of the aero-thermal calibration. However, the effects of the spray bar air injections on the flow quality and aero-thermal calibration measurements were examined as part of this calibration.

  10. Orbital transfer vehicle - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caluori, V. A.; Saxton, D. R.

    1981-05-01

    A summary is given of the concept definition phase of NASA's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV) program. The mission requirements are threefold: (1) the ability to deliver payloads well beyond the capability of any current system at low acceleration levels, (2) the extension of the cost effectiveness from reusability and operational flexibility provided by the Shuttle at LEO to the geosynchronous altitude, and (3) the provision of the round trip capability needed to service and maintain this expanded and more valuable resource at GEO. The initial Shuttle-matched, reusable OTV is shown to be cost effective with low development cost, relatively short development period and high projected reliability. The performance enhancement provided by aero-assist is discussed, which will enable the difficult round trip to be flown in a single Shuttle launch. Two methods of reducing vehicle velocity are available: (1) aeromaneuvering, which uses vehicle lift to climb or descend and thereby correct for density variations, and (2) aerobraking which varies vehicle drag directly to correct for density.

  11. Characterization of Cav1.4 Complexes (α11.4, β2, and α2δ4) in HEK293T Cells and in the Retina*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amy; Wang, Shiyi; Williams, Brittany; Hagen, Jussara; Scheetz, Todd E.; Haeseleer, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In photoreceptor synaptic terminals, voltage-gated Cav1.4 channels mediate Ca2+ signals required for transmission of visual stimuli. Like other high voltage-activated Cav channels, Cav1.4 channels are composed of a main pore-forming Cav1.4 α1 subunit and auxiliary β and α2δ subunits. Of the four distinct classes of β and α2δ, β2 and α2δ4 are thought to co-assemble with Cav1.4 α1 subunits in photoreceptors. However, an understanding of the functional properties of this combination of Cav subunits is lacking. Here, we provide evidence that Cav1.4 α1, β2, and α2δ4 contribute to Cav1.4 channel complexes in the retina and describe their properties in electrophysiological recordings. In addition, we identified a variant of β2, named here β2X13, which, along with β2a, is present in photoreceptor terminals. Cav1.4 α1, β2, and α2δ4 were coimmunoprecipitated from lysates of transfected HEK293 cells and mouse retina and were found to interact in the outer plexiform layer of the retina containing the photoreceptor synaptic terminals, by proximity ligation assays. In whole-cell patch clamp recordings of transfected HEK293T cells, channels (Cav1.4 α1 + β2X13) containing α2δ4 exhibited weaker voltage-dependent activation than those with α2δ1. Moreover, compared with channels (Cav1.4 α1 + α2δ4) with β2a, β2X13-containing channels exhibited greater voltage-dependent inactivation. The latter effect was specific to Cav1.4 because it was not seen for Cav1.2 channels. Our results provide the first detailed functional analysis of the Cav1.4 subunits that form native photoreceptor Cav1.4 channels and indicate potential heterogeneity in these channels conferred by β2a and β2X13 variants. PMID:25468907

  12. Characterization of the substituted N-triazole oxindole TROX-1, a small-molecule, state-dependent inhibitor of Ca(V)2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Andrew M; Herrington, James; Bugianesi, Randal M; Dai, Ge; Haedo, Rodolfo J; Ratliff, Kevin S; Smith, McHardy M; Warren, Vivien A; Arneric, Stephen P; Eduljee, Cyrus; Parker, David; Snutch, Terrance P; Hoyt, Scott B; London, Clare; Duffy, Joseph L; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; McManus, Owen B

    2012-03-01

    Biological, genetic, and clinical evidence provide validation for N-type calcium channels (Ca(V)2.2) as therapeutic targets for chronic pain. A state-dependent Ca(V)2.2 inhibitor may provide an improved therapeutic window over ziconotide, the peptidyl Ca(V)2.2 inhibitor used clinically. Supporting this notion, we recently reported that in preclinical models, the state-dependent Ca(V)2 inhibitor (3R)-5-(3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl)-3-methyl-3-(pyrimidin-5-ylmethyl)-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (TROX-1) has an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconotide. Here we characterize TROX-1 inhibition of Cav2.2 channels in more detail. When channels are biased toward open/inactivated states by depolarizing the membrane potential under voltage-clamp electrophysiology, TROX-1 inhibits Ca(V)2.2 channels with an IC(50) of 0.11 μM. The voltage dependence of Ca(V)2.2 inhibition was examined using automated electrophysiology. TROX-1 IC(50) values were 4.2, 0.90, and 0.36 μM at -110, -90, and -70 mV, respectively. TROX-1 displayed use-dependent inhibition of Ca(V)2.2 with a 10-fold IC(50) separation between first (27 μM) and last (2.7 μM) pulses in a train. In a fluorescence-based calcium influx assay, TROX-1 inhibited Ca(V)2.2 channels with an IC(50) of 9.5 μM under hyperpolarized conditions and 0.69 μM under depolarized conditions. Finally, TROX-1 potency was examined across the Ca(V)2 subfamily. Depolarized IC(50) values were 0.29, 0.19, and 0.28 μM by manual electrophysiology using matched conditions and 1.8, 0.69, and 1.1 μM by calcium influx for Ca(V)2.1, Ca(V)2.2, and Ca(V)2.3, respectively. Together, these in vitro data support the idea that a state-dependent, non-subtype-selective Ca(V)2 channel inhibitor can achieve an improved therapeutic window over the relatively state-independent Ca(V)2.2-selective inhibitor ziconotide in preclinical models of chronic pain. PMID:22188924

  13. Uncoupling of Cav1.2 From Ca2+-Induced Ca2+ Release and SK Channel Regulation in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuchen; Jarrard, Rachel E.; Pratt, Evan P.S.; Guerra, Marcy L.; Salyer, Amy E.; Lange, Allison M.; Soderling, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of Cav1.2 in pancreatic β-cell function by expressing a Cav1.2 II-III loop/green fluorescent protein fusion in INS-1 cells (Cav1.2/II-III cells) to disrupt channel-protein interactions. Neither block of KATP channels nor stimulation of membrane depolarization by tolbutamide was different in INS-1 cells compared with Cav1.2/II-III cells, but whole-cell Cav current density was significantly increased in Cav1.2/II-III cells. Tolbutamide (200 μM) stimulated insulin secretion and Ca2+ transients in INS-1 cells, and Cav1.2/II-III cells were completely blocked by nicardipine (2 μM), but thapsigargin (1 μM) blocked tolbutamide-stimulated secretion and Ca2+ transients only in INS-1 cells. Tolbutamide-stimulated endoplasmic reticulum [Ca2+] decrease was reduced in Cav1.2/II-III cells compared with INS-1 cells. However, Ca2+ transients in both INS-1 cells and Cav1.2/II-III cells were significantly potentiated by 8-pCPT-2′-O-Me-cAMP (5 μM), FPL-64176 (0.5 μM), or replacement of extracellular Ca2+ with Sr2+. Glucose (10 mM) + glucagon-like peptide-1 (10 nM) stimulated discrete spikes in [Ca2+]i in the presence of verapamil at a higher frequency in INS-1 cells than in Cav1.2/II-II cells. Glucose (18 mM) stimulated more frequent action potentials in Cav1.2/II-III cells and primary rat β-cells expressing the Cav1.2/II-II loop than in control cells. Further, apamin (1 μM) increased glucose-stimulated action potential frequency in INS-1 cells, but not Cav1.2/II-III cells, suggesting that SK channels were not activated under these conditions in Cav1.2/II-III loop-expressing cells. We propose the II-III loop of Cav1.2 as a key molecular determinant that couples the channel to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and activation of SK channels in pancreatic β-cells. PMID:24506535

  14. Transcriptomic Profiling of Virus-Host Cell Interactions following Chicken Anaemia Virus (CAV) Infection in an In Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Giotis, Efstathios S.; Rothwell, Lisa; Scott, Alistair; Hu, Tuanjun; Talbot, Richard; Todd, Daniel; Burt, David W.; Glass, Elizabeth J.; Kaiser, Pete

    2015-01-01

    Chicken Anaemia Virus (CAV) is an economically important virus that targets lymphoid and erythroblastoid progenitor cells leading to immunosuppression. This study aimed to investigate the interplay between viral infection and the host’s immune response to better understand the pathways that lead to CAV-induced immunosuppression. To mimic vertical transmission of CAV in the absence of maternally-derived antibody, day-old chicks were infected and their responses measured at various time-points post-infection by qRT-PCR and gene expression microarrays. The kinetics of mRNA expression levels of signature cytokines of innate and adaptive immune responses were determined by qRT-PCR. The global gene expression profiles of mock-infected (control) and CAV-infected chickens at 14 dpi were also compared using a chicken immune-related 5K microarray. Although in the thymus there was evidence of induction of an innate immune response following CAV infection, this was limited in magnitude. There was little evidence of a Th1 adaptive immune response in any lymphoid tissue, as would normally be expected in response to viral infection. Most cytokines associated with Th1, Th2 or Treg subsets were down-regulated, except IL-2, IL-13, IL-10 and IFNγ, which were all up-regulated in thymus and bone marrow. From the microarray studies, genes that exhibited significant (greater than 1.5-fold, false discovery rate <0.05) changes in expression in thymus and bone marrow on CAV infection were mainly associated with T-cell receptor signalling, immune response, transcriptional regulation, intracellular signalling and regulation of apoptosis. Expression levels of a number of adaptor proteins, such as src-like adaptor protein (SLA), a negative regulator of T-cell receptor signalling and the transcription factor Special AT-rich Binding Protein 1 (SATB1), were significantly down-regulated by CAV infection, suggesting potential roles for these genes as regulators of viral infection or cell defence

  15. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P; Stornetta, Ruth L; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P; Zhu, J Julius

    2015-07-15

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE. PMID:26220996

  16. Cav1.3 (CACNA1D) L‐type Ca2+ channel dysfunction in CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pinggera, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cav1.3 belongs to the family of voltage‐gated L‐type Ca2+ channels and is encoded by the CACNA1D gene. Cav1.3 channels are not only essential for cardiac pacemaking, hearing and hormone secretion but are also expressed postsynaptically in neurons, where they shape neuronal firing and plasticity. Recent findings provide evidence that human mutations in the CACNA1D gene can confer risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disease and perhaps also epilepsy. Loss of Cav1.3 function, as shown in knock‐out mouse models and by human mutations, does not result in neuropsychiatric or neurological disease symptoms, whereas their acute selective pharmacological activation results in a depressive‐like behaviour in mice. Therefore it is likely that CACNA1D mutations enhancing activity may be disease relevant also in humans. Indeed, whole exome sequencing studies, originally prompted to identify mutations in primary aldosteronism, revealed de novo CACNA1D missense mutations permitting enhanced Ca2+ signalling through Cav1.3. Remarkably, apart from primary aldosteronism, heterozygous carriers of these mutations also showed seizures and neurological abnormalities. Different missense mutations with very similar gain‐of‐function properties were recently reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). These data strongly suggest that CACNA1D mutations enhancing Cav1.3 activity confer a strong risk for – or even cause – CNS disorders, such as ASD. PMID:26842699

  17. Progress in the structural understanding of voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) function and modulation.

    PubMed

    Minor, Daniel L; Findeisen, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (CaVs) are large, transmembrane multiprotein complexes that couple membrane depolarization to cellular calcium entry. These channels are central to cardiac action potential propagation, neurotransmitter and hormone release, muscle contraction, and calcium-dependent gene transcription. Over the past six years, the advent of high-resolution structural studies of CaV components from different isoforms and CaV modulators has begun to reveal the architecture that underlies the exceptionally rich feedback modulation that controls CaV action. These descriptions of CaV molecular anatomy have provided new, structure-based insights into the mechanisms by which particular channel elements affect voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), calcium‑dependent inactivation (CDI), and calcium‑dependent facilitation (CDF). The initial successes have been achieved through structural studies of soluble channel domains and modulator proteins and have proven most powerful when paired with biochemical and functional studies that validate ideas inspired by the structures. Here, we review the progress in this growing area and highlight some key open challenges for future efforts. PMID:21139419

  18. Low-Voltage-Activated CaV3.1 Calcium Channels Shape T Helper Cell Cytokine Profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiyun; Zhang, Xuexin; Xue, Li; Xing, Juan; Jouvin, Marie-Hélène; Putney, James W; Anderson, Matthew P; Trebak, Mohamed; Kinet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-19

    Activation of T cells is mediated by the engagement of T cell receptors (TCRs) followed by calcium entry via store-operated calcium channels. Here we have shown an additional route for calcium entry into T cells-through the low-voltage-activated T-type CaV3.1 calcium channel. CaV3.1 mediated a substantial current at resting membrane potentials, and its deficiency had no effect on TCR-initiated calcium entry. Mice deficient for CaV3.1 were resistant to the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and had reduced productions of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by central nervous system (CNS)-infiltrating T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells. CaV3.1 deficiency led to decreased secretion of GM-CSF from in vitro polarized Th1 and Th17 cells. Nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) was also reduced in CaV3.1-deficient T cells. These data provide evidence for T-type channels in immune cells and their potential role in shaping the autoimmune response. PMID:27037192

  19. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A.; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J.; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2015-01-01

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE. PMID:26220996

  20. Cell-type-specific tuning of Cav1.3 Ca2+-channels by a C-terminal automodulatory domain

    PubMed Central

    Scharinger, Anja; Eckrich, Stephanie; Vandael, David H.; Schönig, Kai; Koschak, Alexandra; Hecker, Dietmar; Kaur, Gurjot; Lee, Amy; Sah, Anupam; Bartsch, Dusan; Benedetti, Bruno; Lieb, Andreas; Schick, Bernhard; Singewald, Nicolas; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Carbone, Emilio; Engel, Jutta; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+-channel function is regulated by a C-terminal automodulatory domain (CTM). It affects channel binding of calmodulin and thereby tunes channel activity by interfering with Ca2+- and voltage-dependent gating. Alternative splicing generates short C-terminal channel variants lacking the CTM resulting in enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation and stronger voltage-sensitivity upon heterologous expression. However, the role of this modulatory domain for channel function in its native environment is unkown. To determine its functional significance in vivo, we interrupted the CTM with a hemagglutinin tag in mutant mice (Cav1.3DCRDHA/HA). Using these mice we provide biochemical evidence for the existence of long (CTM-containing) and short (CTM-deficient) Cav1.3 α1-subunits in brain. The long (HA-labeled) Cav1.3 isoform was present in all ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells. CTM-elimination impaired Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca2+-currents in hair cells but increased it in chromaffin cells, resulting in hyperpolarized resting potentials and reduced pacemaking. CTM disruption did not affect hearing thresholds. We show that the modulatory function of the CTM is affected by its native environment in different cells and thus occurs in a cell-type specific manner in vivo. It stabilizes gating properties of Cav1.3 channels required for normal electrical excitability. PMID:26379493

  1. Molecular and biophysical basis of glutamate and trace metal modulation of voltage-gated Cav2.3 calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Vitko, Iuliia; Lazarenko, Roman M.; Orestes, Peihan; Todorovic, Slobodan M.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we describe a new mechanism by which glutamate (Glu) and trace metals reciprocally modulate activity of the Cav2.3 channel by profoundly shifting its voltage-dependent gating. We show that zinc and copper, at physiologically relevant concentrations, occupy an extracellular binding site on the surface of Cav2.3 and hold the threshold for activation of these channels in a depolarized voltage range. Abolishing this binding by chelation or the substitution of key amino acid residues in IS1–IS2 (H111) and IS2–IS3 (H179 and H183) loops potentiates Cav2.3 by shifting the voltage dependence of activation toward more negative membrane potentials. We demonstrate that copper regulates the voltage dependence of Cav2.3 by affecting gating charge movements. Thus, in the presence of copper, gating charges transition into the “ON” position slower, delaying activation and reducing the voltage sensitivity of the channel. Overall, our results suggest a new mechanism by which Glu and trace metals transiently modulate voltage-dependent gating of Cav2.3, potentially affecting synaptic transmission and plasticity in the brain. PMID:22371363

  2. Impact of virus load on immunocytological and histopathological parameters during clinical chicken anemia virus (CAV) infection in poultry.

    PubMed

    Wani, Mohd Yaqoob; Dhama, Kuldeep; Malik, Yashpal Singh

    2016-07-01

    Chicken anemia virus (CAV) is one the important pathogen affecting commercial poultry sector globally by causing mortality, production losses, immunosuppression, aggravating co-infections and vaccination failures. Here, we describe the effects of CAV load on hematological, histopathological and immunocytochemical alterations in 1-day old infected chicks. The effects of CAV on cytokine expression profiles and generation of virus specific antibody titer were also studied and compared with viral clearance in various tissues. The results clearly confirmed that peak viral load was achieved mainly in lymphoid tissues between 10 and 20 days post infection (dpi), being highest in the blood (log1010.63 ±0.87/ml) and thymus (log1010.29 ±0.94/g) followed by spleen, liver, bone marrow and bursa. The histopathology and immunoflowcytometric analysis indicated specific degeneration of T lymphoid cells in the thymus, spleen and blood at 15 dpi. While the transcript levels of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-2, IL-12 decreased at all dpi, interferon (IFN)-γ increased (3-15 fold) during early stages of infection and the appearance of virus specific antibodies were found to be strongly associated with virus clearance in all the tissues. Our findings support the immunosuppressive nature of CAV and provide the relation between the virus load in the various body tissues and the immunopathological changes during clinical CAV infections. PMID:27165537

  3. Technology requirements and readiness for very large vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Common concerns of very large vehicles (VLV) in the areas of economics, transportation system interfaces, and operational problems are reviewed with respect to the influence of these factors on aircraft configurations and technolgoy. Fifty-four technology requirements for VLVs have been identified and rated with regard to technology readiness. The requirements were about equally divided among the four general areas of aero/hydrodynamics, propulsion and acoustics, structures, and vehicle systems and operations. None of the requirements were considered to have an excellent technology readiness.

  4. Side-mounted IR window aero-optic and aerothermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, John E.; Welch, Charles T.; Sutton, George W.

    1999-07-01

    Addition of a side mounted IR seeker, to an existing missile design, introduces new issues involving the aerodynamic flow over the optical window and its near field effect on the ability of the seeker to view the target. Image aberration, distortion and boresight shift vary according to flow conditions and the thermal state of the window system. A detailed analysis of the aerodynamic flow and its aero-optic effect for a side mounted IR window was performed to quantify target image degradation, window heating and bending, and window structural failure probability due to aerothermal and aero-optical effects.

  5. Aero-Thermal Calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (2004 and 2005 Tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, E. Allen; Pastor, Christine M.; Gonsalez, Jose C.; Curry, Monroe R., III

    2010-01-01

    A full aero-thermal calibration of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel was completed in 2004 following the replacement of the inlet guide vanes upstream of the tunnel drive system and improvement to the facility total temperature instrumentation. This calibration test provided data used to fully document the aero-thermal flow quality in the IRT test section and to construct calibration curves for the operation of the IRT. The 2004 test was also the first to use the 2-D RTD array, an improved total temperature calibration measurement platform.

  6. Critical role of CAV1/caveolin-1 in cell stress responses in human breast cancer cells via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yin; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Na-Di; Koo, Gi-Bang; McMahon, Kerrie-Ann; Parton, Robert G; Hill, Michelle M; del Pozo, Miguel A; Kim, You-Sun; Shen, Han-Ming

    2015-01-01

    CAV1 (caveolin 1, caveolae protein, 22kDa) is well known as a principal scaffolding protein of caveolae, a specialized plasma membrane structure. Relatively, the caveolae-independent function of CAV1 is less studied. Autophagy is a process known to involve various membrane structures, including autophagosomes, lysosomes, and autolysosomes for degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles. Currently, the function of CAV1 in autophagy remains largely elusive. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that CAV1 deficiency promotes both basal and inducible autophagy. Interestingly, the promoting effect was found mainly in the late stage of autophagy via enhancing lysosomal function and autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Notably, the regulatory function of CAV1 in lysosome and autophagy was found to be caveolae-independent, and acts through lipid rafts. Furthermore, the elevated autophagy level induced by CAV1 deficiency serves as a cell survival mechanism under starvation. Importantly, downregulation of CAV1 and enhanced autophagy level were observed in human breast cancer cells and tissues. Taken together, our data reveal a novel function of CAV1 and lipid rafts in breast cancer development via modulation of lysosomal function and autophagy. PMID:25945613

  7. Silencing of the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene in sensory neurons demonstrates its major role in nociception

    PubMed Central

    Bourinet, Emmanuel; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Monteil, Arnaud; Barrère, Christian; Couette, Brigitte; Poirot, Olivier; Pages, Anne; McRory, John; Snutch, Terrance P; Eschalier, Alain; Nargeot, Joël

    2005-01-01

    Analgesic therapies are still limited and sometimes poorly effective, therefore finding new targets for the development of innovative drugs is urgently needed. In order to validate the potential utility of blocking T-type calcium channels to reduce nociception, we explored the effects of intrathecally administered oligodeoxynucleotide antisenses, specific to the recently identified T-type calcium channel family (CaV3.1, CaV3.2, and CaV3.3), on reactions to noxious stimuli in healthy and mononeuropathic rats. Our results demonstrate that the antisense targeting CaV3.2 induced a knockdown of the CaV3.2 mRNA and protein expression as well as a large reduction of ‘CaV3.2-like' T-type currents in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons. Concomitantly, the antisense treatment resulted in major antinociceptive, anti-hyperalgesic, and anti-allodynic effects, suggesting that CaV3.2 plays a major pronociceptive role in acute and chronic pain states. Taken together, the results provide direct evidence linking CaV3.2 T-type channels to pain perception and suggest that CaV3.2 may offer a specific molecular target for the treatment of pain. PMID:15616581

  8. A Mission Concept: Re-Entry Hopper-Aero-Space-Craft System on-Mars (REARM-Mars)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoodi, Faranak

    2013-01-01

    Future missions to Mars that would need a sophisticated lander, hopper, or rover could benefit from the REARM Architecture. The mission concept REARM Architecture is designed to provide unprecedented capabilities for future Mars exploration missions, including human exploration and possible sample-return missions, as a reusable lander, ascend/descend vehicle, refuelable hopper, multiple-location sample-return collector, laboratory, and a cargo system for assets and humans. These could all be possible by adding just a single customized Re-Entry-Hopper-Aero-Space-Craft System, called REARM-spacecraft, and a docking station at the Martian orbit, called REARM-dock. REARM could dramatically decrease the time and the expense required to launch new exploratory missions on Mars by making them less dependent on Earth and by reusing the assets already designed, built, and sent to Mars. REARM would introduce a new class of Mars exploration missions, which could explore much larger expanses of Mars in a much faster fashion and with much more sophisticated lab instruments. The proposed REARM architecture consists of the following subsystems: REARM-dock, REARM-spacecraft, sky-crane, secure-attached-compartment, sample-return container, agile rover, scalable orbital lab, and on-the-road robotic handymen.

  9. Benefits to the Simulation Training Community of a New ANSI Standard for the Exchange of Aero Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildreth, Bruce L.; Jackson, E. Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The American Institute of Aeronautics Astronautics (AIAA) Modeling and Simulation Technical Committee is in final preparation of a new standard for the exchange of flight dynamics models. The standard will become an ANSI standard and is under consideration for submission to ISO for acceptance by the international community. The standard has some a spects that should provide benefits to the simulation training community. Use of the new standard by the training simulation community will reduce development, maintenance and technical refresh investment on each device. Furthermore, it will significantly lower the cost of performing model updates to improve fidelity or expand the envelope of the training device. Higher flight fidelity should result in better transfer of training, a direct benefit to the pilots under instruction. Costs of adopting the standard are minimal and should be paid back within the cost of the first use for that training device. The standard achie ves these advantages by making it easier to update the aerodynamic model. It provides a standard format for the model in a custom eXtensible Markup Language (XML) grammar, the Dynamic Aerospace Vehicle Exchange Markup Language (DAVE-ML). It employs an existing XML grammar, MathML, to describe the aerodynamic model in an input data file, eliminating the requirement for actual software compilation. The major components of the aero model become simply an input data file, and updates are simply new XML input files. It includes naming and axis system conventions to further simplify the exchange of information.

  10. CaV3.2 KO mice have altered retinal waves but normal direction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hamby, Aaron M; Rosa, Juliana M; Hsu, Ching-Hsiu; Feller, Marla B

    2015-01-01

    Early in development, before the onset of vision, the retina establishes direction-selective responses. During this time period, the retina spontaneously generates bursts of action potentials that propagate across its extent. The precise spatial and temporal properties of these "retinal waves" have been implicated in the formation of retinal projections to the brain. However, their role in the development of direction selective circuits within the retina has not yet been determined. We addressed this issue by combining multielectrode array and cell-attached recordings to examine mice that lack the CaV3.2 subunit of T-type Ca2+ channels (CaV3.2 KO) because these mice exhibit disrupted waves during the period that direction selective circuits are established. We found that the spontaneous activity of these mice displays wave-associated bursts of action potentials that are altered from that of control mice: the frequency of these bursts is significantly decreased and the firing rate within each burst is reduced. Moreover, the projection patterns of the retina demonstrate decreased eye-specific segregation in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). However, after eye-opening, the direction selective responses of CaV3.2 KO direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) are indistinguishable from those of wild-type DSGCs. Our data indicate that although the temporal properties of the action potential bursts associated with retinal waves are important for activity-dependent refining of retinal projections to central targets, they are not critical for establishing direction selectivity in the retina. PMID:25873107

  11. Mechanism of osthole inhibition of vascular Ca(v)1.2 current.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Fabio; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Ha, Le Minh; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Saponara, Simona

    2012-04-01

    Osthole is a coumarin extracted from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson. The medicinal plant is widely used in Vietnamese as well as Chinese traditional medicine as a vasodilating and antihypertensive agent. Here we have tested the proposition that the block of Ca(v)1.2 channels is mainly responsible for its vascular activity. An in-depth analysis of the effect of osthole on Ca(v)1.2 current (I(Ca1.2)) was performed in rat tail artery myocytes using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Osthole decreased I(Ca1.2) in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. At holding potentials of -50 and -80mV, the pIC(50) values were 4.78±0.07 and 4.36±0.08, respectively; the latter corresponded to the drug apparent dissociation constant for resting channels, K(R), of 47.8μM. Osthole speeded up the inactivation kinetics of I(Ca1.2) and shifted the voltage dependence of the inactivation curve to more negative potentials in a concentration-dependent manner, with an apparent dissociation constant for inactivated channels (K(I)) of 6.88μM. Block of I(Ca1.2) was frequency-dependent and the rate of recovery from inactivation was slowed down. In conclusion, osthole is a vascular Ca(v)1.2 channel antagonist stabilizing the channel in its inactivated state. This mechanism may account for the systolic blood pressure reduction induced by the drug in animal models of hypertension and points to osthole as a lead for the development of novel antihypertensive agents. PMID:22329900

  12. Aero-optic characteristics of turbulent compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckham, Christopher Mark

    promising results over a very wide range of Mach numbers and conditions when used to compare the current work as well as previous work by others, and may prove to be a crucial tool in the study of boundary layer aero-optic behavior.

  13. Global dust model intercomparison in AeroCom phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Huneeus, N.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Griesfeller, J.; Prospero, J.; Kinne, S.; Bauer, S.; Boucher, O.; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, S.; Ginoux, P.; Grini, A.; Horowitz, L.; Koch, D.; Krol, M. C.; Landing, W.; Liu, X.; Mahowald, N.; Miller, R.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Myhre, G.; Penner, J.; Perlwitz, J.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Zender, C. S.

    2011-08-01

    This study presents the results of a broad intercomparison of a total of 15 global aerosol models within the AeroCom project. Each model is compared to observations related to desert dust aerosols, their direct radiative effect, and their impact on the biogeochemical cycle, i.e., aerosol optical depth (AOD) and dust deposition. Additional comparisons to Angström exponent (AE), coarse mode AOD and dust surface concentrations are included to extend the assessment of model performance and to identify common biases present in models. These data comprise a benchmark dataset that is proposed for model inspection and future dust model development. There are large differences among the global models that simulate the dust cycle and its impact on climate. In general, models simulate the climatology of vertically integrated parameters (AOD and AE) within a factor of two whereas the total deposition and surface concentration are reproduced within a factor of 10. In addition, smaller mean normalized bias and root mean square errors are obtained for the climatology of AOD and AE than for total deposition and surface concentration. Characteristics of the datasets used and their uncertainties may influence these differences. Large uncertainties still exist with respect to the deposition fluxes in the southern oceans. Further measurements and model studies are necessary to assess the general model performance to reproduce dust deposition in ocean regions sensible to iron contributions. Models overestimate the wet deposition in regions dominated by dry deposition. They generally simulate more realistic surface concentration at stations downwind of the main sources than at remote ones. Most models simulate the gradient in AOD and AE between the different dusty regions. However the seasonality and magnitude of both variables is better simulated at African stations than Middle East ones. The models simulate the offshore transport of West Africa throughout the year but they

  14. Phosphorylation of the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel directly regulates its gating properties.

    PubMed

    Blesneac, Iulia; Chemin, Jean; Bidaud, Isabelle; Huc-Brandt, Sylvaine; Vandermoere, Franck; Lory, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Phosphorylation is a major mechanism regulating the activity of ion channels that remains poorly understood with respect to T-type calcium channels (Cav3). These channels are low voltage-activated calcium channels that play a key role in cellular excitability and various physiological functions. Their dysfunction has been linked to several neurological disorders, including absence epilepsy and neuropathic pain. Recent studies have revealed that T-type channels are modulated by a variety of serine/threonine protein kinase pathways, which indicates the need for a systematic analysis of T-type channel phosphorylation. Here, we immunopurified Cav3.2 channels from rat brain, and we used high-resolution MS to construct the first, to our knowledge, in vivo phosphorylation map of a voltage-gated calcium channel in a mammalian brain. We identified as many as 34 phosphorylation sites, and we show that the vast majority of these sites are also phosphorylated on the human Cav3.2 expressed in HEK293T cells. In patch-clamp studies, treatment of the channel with alkaline phosphatase as well as analysis of dephosphomimetic mutants revealed that phosphorylation regulates important functional properties of Cav3.2 channels, including voltage-dependent activation and inactivation and kinetics. We also identified that the phosphorylation of a locus situated in the loop I-II S442/S445/T446 is crucial for this regulation. Our data show that Cav3.2 channels are highly phosphorylated in the mammalian brain and establish phosphorylation as an important mechanism involved in the dynamic regulation of Cav3.2 channel gating properties. PMID:26483470

  15. Transcription factor Sp1 regulates T-type Ca(2+) channel CaV 3.1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Martínez-Hernández, Elizabeth; Sandoval, Alejandro; Felix, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+) (CaV 3) channels mediate a number of physiological events in developing and mature cells, and are implicated in neurological and cardiovascular diseases. In mammals, there are three distinct T-channel genes (CACNA1G, CACNA1H, and CACNA1I) encoding proteins (CaV 3.1-CaV 3.3) that differ in their localization as well as in molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties. The CACNA1G is a large gene that contains 38 exons and is localized in chromosome 17q22. Only basic characteristics of the CACNA1G gene promoter region have been investigated classifying it as a TATA-less sequence containing several potential transcription factor-binding motifs. Here, we cloned and characterized a proximal promoter region and initiated the analysis of transcription factors that control CaV 3.1 channel expression using the murine Cacna1g gene as a model. We isolated a ∼1.5 kb 5'-upstream region of Cacna1g and verified its transcriptional activity in the mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cell line. In silico analysis revealed that this region possesses a TATA-less minimal promoter that includes two potential transcription start sites and four binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1. The ability of one of these sites to interact with the transcription factor was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Consistent with this, Sp1 over-expression enhanced promoter activity while siRNA-mediated Sp1 silencing significantly decreased the level of CaV 3.1 protein and reduced the amplitude of whole-cell T-type Ca(2+) currents expressed in the N1E-115 cells. These results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms that control CaV 3.1 channel expression. PMID:23868804

  16. Carbon monoxide inhibition of Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels reveals tonic modulation by thioredoxin.

    PubMed

    Boycott, Hannah E; Dallas, Mark L; Elies, Jacobo; Pettinger, Louisa; Boyle, John P; Scragg, Jason L; Gamper, Nikita; Peers, Chris

    2013-08-01

    T-type Ca(2+) channels play diverse roles in tissues such as sensory neurons, vascular smooth muscle, and cancers, where increased expression of the cytoprotective enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is often found. Here, we report regulation of T-type Ca(2+) channels by carbon monoxide (CO) a HO-1 by-product. CO (applied as CORM-2) caused a concentration-dependent, poorly reversible inhibition of all T-type channel isoforms (Cav3.1-3.3, IC50 ∼3 μM) expressed in HEK293 cells, and native T-type channels in NG108-15 cells and primary rat sensory neurons. No recognized CO-sensitive signaling pathway could account for the CO inhibition of Cav3.2. Instead, CO sensitivity was mediated by an extracellular redox-sensitive site, which was also highly sensitive to thioredoxin (Trx). Trx depletion (using auranofin, 2-5 μM) reduced Cav3.2 currents and their CO sensitivity by >50% but increased sensitivity to dithiothreitol ∼3-fold. By contrast, Cav3.1 and Cav3.3 channels, and their sensitivity to CO, were unaffected in identical experiments. Our data propose a novel signaling pathway in which Trx acts as a tonic, endogenous regulator of Cav3.2 channels, while HO-1-derived CO disrupts this regulation, causing channel inhibition. CO modulation of T-type channels has widespread implications for diverse physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms, such as excitability, contractility, and proliferation. PMID:23671274

  17. Mosaic synaptopathy and functional defects in Cav1.4 heterozygous mice and human carriers of CSNB2

    PubMed Central

    Michalakis, Stylianos; Shaltiel, Lior; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Koch, Susanne; Schludi, Verena; Krause, Stefanie; Zeitz, Christina; Audo, Isabelle; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Hamel, Christian; Meunier, Isabelle; Preising, Markus N.; Friedburg, Christoph; Lorenz, Birgit; Zabouri, Nawal; Haverkamp, Silke; Garrido, Marina Garcia; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Seeliger, Mathias W.; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in CACNA1F encoding the α1-subunit of the retinal Cav1.4 L-type calcium channel have been linked to Cav1.4 channelopathies including incomplete congenital stationary night blindness type 2A (CSNB2), Åland Island eye disease (AIED) and cone-rod dystrophy type 3 (CORDX3). Since CACNA1F is located on the X chromosome, Cav1.4 channelopathies are typically affecting male patients via X-chromosomal recessive inheritance. Occasionally, clinical symptoms have been observed in female carriers, too. It is currently unknown how these mutations lead to symptoms in carriers and how the retinal network in these females is affected. To investigate these clinically important issues, we compared retinal phenotypes in Cav1.4-deficient and Cav1.4 heterozygous mice and in human female carrier patients. Heterozygous Cacna1f carrier mice have a retinal mosaic consistent with differential X-chromosomal inactivation, characterized by adjacent vertical columns of affected and non-affected wild-type-like retinal network. Vertical columns in heterozygous mice are well comparable to either the wild-type retinal network of normal mice or to the retina of homozygous mice. Affected retinal columns display pronounced rod and cone photoreceptor synaptopathy and cone degeneration. These changes lead to vastly impaired vision-guided navigation under dark and normal light conditions and reduced retinal electroretinography (ERG) responses in Cacna1f carrier mice. Similar abnormal ERG responses were found in five human CACNA1F carriers, four of which had novel mutations. In conclusion, our data on Cav1.4 deficient mice and human female carriers of mutations in CACNA1F are consistent with a phenotype of mosaic CSNB2. PMID:24163243

  18. An automated electrophysiological assay for differentiating Ca(v)2.2 inhibitors based on state dependence and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Andrew M; Niforatos, Wende; Vortherms, Timothy A; Perner, Richard J; Li, Tao; Schrimpf, Michael R; Scott, Victoria E; Lee, Lance; Jarvis, Michael F; McGaraughty, Steve

    2012-12-01

    Ca(V)2.2 (N-type) calcium channels are key regulators of neurotransmission. Evidence from knockout animals and localization studies suggest that Ca(V)2.2 channels play a critical role in nociceptive transmission. Additionally, ziconotide, a selective peptide inhibitor of Ca(V)2.2 channels, is clinically used to treat refractory pain. However, the use of ziconotide is limited by its low therapeutic index, which is believed, at least in part, to be a consequence of ziconotide inhibiting Ca(V)2.2 channels regardless of the channel state. Subsequent efforts have focused on the discovery of state-dependent inhibitors that preferentially bind to the inactivated state of Ca(V)2.2 channels in order to achieve an improved safety profile relative to ziconotide. Much less attention has been paid to understanding the binding kinetics of these state-dependent inhibitors. Here, we describe a novel electrophysiology-based assay on an automated patch platform designed to differentiate Ca(V)2.2 inhibitors based on their combined state dependence and kinetics. More specifically, this assay assesses inactivated state block, closed state block, and monitors the kinetics of recovery from block when channels move between states. Additionally, a use-dependent assay is described that uses a train of depolarizing pulses to drive channels to a similar level of inactivation for comparison. This use-dependent protocol also provides information on the kinetics of block development. Data are provided to show how these assays can be utilized to screen for kinetic diversity within and across chemical classes. PMID:22428804

  19. CaV1.2 beta-subunit coordinates CaMKII-triggered cardiomyocyte death and afterdepolarizations.

    PubMed

    Koval, Olha M; Guan, Xiaoquan; Wu, Yuejin; Joiner, Mei-Ling; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Grumbach, Isabella M; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Colbran, Roger J; Song, Long-Sheng; Hund, Thomas J; Mohler, Peter J; Anderson, Mark E

    2010-03-16

    Excessive activation of calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) causes arrhythmias and heart failure, but the cellular mechanisms for CaMKII-targeted proteins causing disordered cell membrane excitability and myocardial dysfunction remain uncertain. Failing human cardiomyocytes exhibit increased CaMKII and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (Ca(V)1.2) activity, and enhanced expression of a specific Ca(V)1.2 beta-subunit protein isoform (beta(2a)). We recently identified Ca(V)1.2 beta(2a) residues critical for CaMKII phosphorylation (Thr 498) and binding (Leu 493), suggesting the hypothesis that these amino acids are crucial for cardiomyopathic consequences of CaMKII signaling. Here we show WT beta(2a) expression causes cellular Ca(2+) overload, arrhythmia-triggering cell membrane potential oscillations called early afterdepolarizations (EADs), and premature death in paced adult rabbit ventricular myocytes. Prevention of intracellular Ca(2+) release by ryanodine or global cellular CaMKII inhibition reduced EADs and improved cell survival to control levels in WT beta(2a)-expressing ventricular myocytes. In contrast, expression of beta(2a) T498A or L493A mutants mimicked the protective effects of ryanodine or global cellular CaMKII inhibition by reducing Ca(2+) entry through Ca(V)1.2 and inhibiting EADs. Furthermore, Ca(V)1.2 currents recorded from cells overexpressing CaMKII phosphorylation- or binding-incompetent beta(2a) subunits were incapable of entering a CaMKII-dependent high-activity gating mode (mode 2), indicating that beta(2a) Thr 498 and Leu 493 are required for Ca(V)1.2 activation by CaMKII in native cells. These data show that CaMKII binding and phosphorylation sites on beta(2a) are concise but pivotal components of a molecular and biophysical and mechanism for EADs and impaired survival in adult cardiomyocytes. PMID:20194790

  20. Improved Cav2.2 Channel Inhibitors through a gem-Dimethylsulfone Bioisostere Replacement of a Labile Sulfonamide.

    PubMed

    Shao, Pengcheng P; Ye, Feng; Chakravarty, Prasun K; Herrington, James B; Dai, Ge; Bugianesi, Randal M; Haedo, Rodolfo J; Swensen, Andrew M; Warren, Vivien A; Smith, McHardy M; Garcia, Maria L; McManus, Owen B; Lyons, Kathryn A; Li, Xiaohua; Green, Mitchell; Jochnowitz, Nina; McGowan, Erin; Mistry, Shruti; Sun, Shu-Yu; Abbadie, Catherine; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Duffy, Joseph L

    2013-11-14

    We report the investigation of sulfonamide-derived Cav2.2 inhibitors to address drug-metabolism liabilities with this lead class of analgesics. Modification of the benzamide substituent provided improvements in both potency and selectivity. However, we discovered that formation of the persistent 3-(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonamide metabolite was an endemic problem in the sulfonamide series and that the replacement of the center aminopiperidine scaffold failed to prevent this metabolic pathway. This issue was eventually addressed by application of a bioisostere strategy. The new gem-dimethyl sulfone series retained Cav2.2 potency without the liability of the circulating sulfonamide metabolite. PMID:24900606

  1. Improved Cav2.2 Channel Inhibitors through a gem-Dimethylsulfone Bioisostere Replacement of a Labile Sulfonamide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report the investigation of sulfonamide-derived Cav2.2 inhibitors to address drug-metabolism liabilities with this lead class of analgesics. Modification of the benzamide substituent provided improvements in both potency and selectivity. However, we discovered that formation of the persistent 3-(trifluoromethyl)benzenesulfonamide metabolite was an endemic problem in the sulfonamide series and that the replacement of the center aminopiperidine scaffold failed to prevent this metabolic pathway. This issue was eventually addressed by application of a bioisostere strategy. The new gem-dimethyl sulfone series retained Cav2.2 potency without the liability of the circulating sulfonamide metabolite. PMID:24900606

  2. Altered thalamocortical rhythmicity and connectivity in mice lacking CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Lee, Seongwon; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2015-01-01

    In unconscious status (e.g., deep sleep and anesthetic unconsciousness) where cognitive functions are not generated there is still a significant level of brain activity present. Indeed, the electrophysiology of the unconscious brain is characterized by well-defined thalamocortical rhythmicity. Here we address the ionic basis for such thalamocortical rhythms during unconsciousness. In particular, we address the role of CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels, which are richly expressed in thalamic neurons. Toward this aim, we examined the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice lacking CaV3.1 channels (CaV3.1 knockout) during unconsciousness induced by ketamine or ethanol administration. Our findings indicate that CaV3.1 KO mice displayed attenuated low-frequency oscillations in thalamocortical loops, especially in the 1- to 4-Hz delta band, compared with control mice (CaV3.1 WT). Intriguingly, we also found that CaV3.1 KO mice exhibited augmented high-frequency oscillations during unconsciousness. In a behavioral measure of unconsciousness dynamics, CaV3.1 KO mice took longer to fall into the unconscious state than controls. In addition, such unconscious events had a shorter duration than those of control mice. The thalamocortical interaction level between mediodorsal thalamus and frontal cortex in CaV3.1 KO mice was significantly lower, especially for delta band oscillations, compared with that of CaV3.1 WT mice, during unconsciousness. These results suggest that the CaV3.1 channel is required for the generation of a given set of thalamocortical rhythms during unconsciousness. Further, that thalamocortical resonant neuronal activity supported by this channel is important for the control of vigilance states. PMID:26056284

  3. OC3 -- Benchmark Exercise of Aero-Elastic Offshore Wind Turbine Codes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Passon, P.; Kuhn, M.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Camp, T.; Larsen, T. J.

    2007-08-01

    This paper introduces the work content and status of the first international investigation and verification of aero-elastic codes for offshore wind turbines as performed by the "Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration" (OC3) within the "IEA Wind Annex XXIII -- Subtask 2".

  4. Application of Multihop Relay for Performance Enhancement of AeroMACS Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamali, Behnam; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    A new transmission technology, based on IEEE 802.16-2009 (WiMAX), is currently being developed for airport surface communications. A C-band spectrum allocation at 5091-5150 MHz has been created by ITU to carry this application. The proposed technology, known as AeroMACS, will be used to support fixed and mobile ground to ground applications and services. This article proposes and demonstrates that IEEE 802.16j-amendment-based WiMAX is most feasible for AeroMACS applications. This amendment introduces multihop relay as an optional deployment that may be used to provide additional coverage and/or enhance the capacity of the network. Particular airport surface radio coverage situations for which IEEE 802.16-2009-WiMAX provides resolutions that are inefficient, costly, or excessively power consuming are discussed. In all these cases, it is argued that 16j technology offers a much better alternative. A major concern about deployment of AeroMACS is interference to co-allocated applications such as the Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder link. Our initial simulation results suggest that no additional interference to MSS feeder link is caused by deployment of IEEE 802.16j-based AeroMACS.

  5. The aero optics effect on near space laser communication optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuan; Fu, Yuegang; Jiang, Huilin

    2013-08-01

    With the developing of the space laser communication link, the performance index including higher transfer speed, extending transfer distance, and environmental adaptability, all ask the system accuracy and indexes improving. Special the developing near space platform, its environmental is extremes, the near space drone and other airplane flight speed is very quickly from the subsonic to supersonic. The aero optics effect caused by high speed will generate a thin turbulent air layer. It affects the performance of laser communication optical system by laser light vibration, deviation and so on, further more affects the performance of laser communication system working performance, even can't communication. Therefore, for achieving optical system indexes, we need do more research in optical system near space aero optics environmental adaptability. In this paper, near space link environmental characteristic are researched. And on the base of the aero optics theory, computer simulating method is applied to analyze the relationship among the altitude, the flight speed and the image dispersion. The result shows that, the aero optics effect cannot be ignored when the terminal is in low altitude or is moving with supersonic speed. The effect must be taken into considered from overall design. The result will provide the basis of research design.

  6. Swept Blade Aero-Elastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-07-01

    A preprocessor for analyzing preswept wind turbines using the in-house aero-elastic tool coupled with a multibody dynamic simulator was developed. A baseline 10-kW small wind turbine with straight blades and various configurations that featured bend-torsion coupling via blade-tip sweep were investigated to study their impact on ultimate loads and fatigue damage equivalent loads.

  7. Aero-optic image degradation through Gaussian and non-Gaussian turbulent media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shui, Ven H.

    1993-09-01

    Propagation of electro-optical signals through a turbulent medium such as the atmosphere or the boundary/shear layer around an aircraft or a missile, causes image degradation. This paper examines the characteristics of such aero-optical degradation, including blur and strehl distribution. In particular, the effect of using different turbulence correlation approximations is analyzed.

  8. 76 FR 60396 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Industries S.p.A. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... (AD) for certain Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes. This proposed AD results...

  9. 77 FR 67764 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    ... 12866, (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... INDUSTRIES S.p.A Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule; request... Aero Industries S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes. That AD currently requires replacement of any...

  10. 76 FR 27872 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model P- 180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ] ACTION: Final... known U.S. owners and operators of PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A (Piaggio) Model PIAGGIO P-180 airplanes... fuselage on a number of Piaggio Model P.180 aeroplanes, which resulted in jamming of the flight...

  11. 76 FR 77369 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... Industries S.p.A. Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT... Industries S.p.A. Model P-180 airplanes. This AD results from mandatory continuing airworthiness information.... For service information identified in this AD, contact Piaggio Aero Industries...

  12. Efficacy of predictive wavefront control for compensating aero-optical aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorskey, David J.; Schmidt, Jason; Whiteley, Matthew R.

    2013-07-01

    Imaging and laser beam propagation from airborne platforms are degraded by dynamic aberrations due to air flow around the aircraft, aero-mechanical distortions and jitter, and free atmospheric turbulence. For certain applications, like dim-object imaging, free-space optical communications, and laser weapons, adaptive optics (AO) is necessary to compensate for the aberrations in real time. Aero-optical flow is a particularly interesting source of aberrations whose flowing structures can be exploited by adaptive and predictive AO controllers, thereby realizing significant performance gains. We analyze dynamic aero-optical wavefronts to determine the pointing angles at which predictive wavefront control is more effective than conventional, fixed-gain, linear-filter control. It was found that properties of the spatial decompositions and temporal statistics of the wavefronts are directly traceable to specific features in the air flow. Furthermore, the aero-optical wavefront aberrations at the side- and aft-looking angles were the most severe, but they also benefited the most from predictive AO.

  13. Dependence of AeroMACS Interference on Airport Radiation Pattern Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    AeroMACS (Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System), which is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard, is expected to be implemented in the 5091 to 5150 MHz frequency band. As this band is also occupied by Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. In this study, the cumulative interference power distribution at low earth orbit from AeroMACS transmitters at the 497 major airports in the contiguous United States was simulated with the Visualyse Professional software. The dependence of the interference power on the number of antenna beams per airport, gain patterns, and beam direction orientations was simulated. As a function of these parameters, the simulation results are presented in terms of the limitations on transmitter power required to maintain the cumulative interference power under the established threshold.

  14. Dependence of AeroMACS Interference on Airport Radiation Pattern Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    AeroMACS (Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System), which is based upon the IEEE 802.16e mobile wireless standard, is expected to be implemented in the 5091-5150 MHz frequency band. As this band is also occupied by Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder uplinks, AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. The aspects of AeroMACS operation that present potential interference are under analysis in order to enable the definition of standards that assure that such interference will be avoided. In this study, the cumulative interference power distribution at low earth orbit from AeroMACS transmitters at the 497 major airports in the contiguous United States was simulated with the Visualyse Professional software. The dependence of the interference power on the number of antenna beams per airport, gain patterns, and beam direction orientations was simulated. As a function of these parameters, the simulation results are presented in terms of the limitations on transmitter power required to maintain the cumulative interference power under the established threshold.

  15. AERO: A Decision Support Tool for Wind Erosion Assessment in Rangelands and Croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloza, M.; Webb, N.; Herrick, J.

    2015-12-01

    Wind erosion is a key driver of global land degradation, with on- and off-site impacts on agricultural production, air quality, ecosystem services and climate. Measuring rates of wind erosion and dust emission across land use and land cover types is important for quantifying the impacts and identifying and testing practical management options. This process can be assisted by the application of predictive models, which can be a powerful tool for land management agencies. The Aeolian EROsion (AERO) model, a wind erosion and dust emission model interface provides access by non-expert land managers to a sophisticated wind erosion decision-support tool. AERO incorporates land surface processes and sediment transport equations from existing wind erosion models and was designed for application with available national long-term monitoring datasets (e.g. USDI BLM Assessment, Inventory and Monitoring, USDA NRCS Natural Resources Inventory) and monitoring protocols. Ongoing AERO model calibration and validation are supported by geographically diverse data on wind erosion rates and land surface conditions collected by the new National Wind Erosion Research Network. Here we present the new AERO interface, describe parameterization of the underpinning wind erosion model, and provide a summary of the model applications across agricultural lands and rangelands in the United States.

  16. Application of Multihop Relay for Performance Enhancement of AeroMACS Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamali, Behnam; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    A new transmission technology, based on IEEE 802.16-2009 (WiMAX), is currently being developed for airport surface communications. A C-band spectrum allocation at 5091 to 5150 MHz has been created by International Telecommunications Union (ITU) to carry this application. The proposed technology, known as AeroMACS, will be used to support fixed and mobile ground to ground applications and services. This article proposes and demonstrates that IEEE 802.16j-amendment-based WiMAX is most feasible for AeroMACS applications. This amendment introduces multihop relay as an optional deployment that may be used to provide additional coverage and/or enhance the capacity of the network. Particular airport surface radio coverage situations for which IEEE 802.16-2009-WiMAX provides resolutions that are inefficient, costly, or excessively power consuming are discussed. In all these cases, it is argued that 16j technology offers a much better alternative. A major concern about deployment of AeroMACS is interference to co-allocated applications such as the Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) feeder link. Our initial simulation results suggest that no additional interference to MSS feeder link is caused by deployment of IEEE 802.16j-based AeroMACS.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of aero-optical distortion and turbulent structure in a heated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley; Smith, Adam; Gordeyev, Stanislav

    2014-11-01

    This study examines the relationship between turbulent structures and the aero-optical distortion of a laser beam passing through a turbulent boundary layer. Previous studies by Smith et al. (AIAA, 2014--2491) have found a bulk convection velocity of 0 . 8U∞ for aero-optical distortion in turbulent boundary layers, motivating a comparison of the distortion with the outer boundary layer. In this study, a turbulent boundary layer is developed over a flat plate with a moderately-heated section of length 25 δ . Density variation in the thermal boundary layer leads to aero-optical distortion, which is measured with a Malley probe (Smith et al., AIAA, 2013--3133). Simultaneously, 2D PIV measurements are recorded in a wall-normal, streamwise plane centered on the Malley probe location. Experiments are run at Reθ = 2100 and at a Mach number of 0.03, with the heated wall 10 to 20°C above the free stream temperature. Correlations and conditional averages are carried out between Malley probe distortion angles and flow features in the PIV vector fields. Aero-optical distortion in this study will be compared to distortion in higher Mach number flows studied by Gordeyev et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014), with the aim of extending conclusions into compressible flows. This research is made possible by the Department of Defense through the National Defense & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Grant # FA9550-12-1-0060.

  18. FJ44 Turbofan Engine Test at NASA Glenn Research Center's Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, Joel T.; McAllister, Joseph; Loew, Raymond A.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Harley, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    A Williams International FJ44-3A 3000-lb thrust class turbofan engine was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory. This report presents the test set-up and documents the test conditions. Farfield directivity, in-duct unsteady pressures, duct mode data, and phased-array data were taken and are reported separately.

  19. Aero/aeroderivative engines - Internal transducers offer potential for enhanced condition monitoring and vibration diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Malcolm J.

    1990-06-01

    Gas turbine aero engines and their ground based derivatives can benefit greatly from the enhanced condition and diagnostic data available from internal vibration transducers. This paper discusses transducer selection, illustrates typical transducer locations and mounting, and describes some of the rotor malfunctions that can be diagnosed from the vibrations data.

  20. 78 FR 1776 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will not affect... Engines AG Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed... Aero Engines AG (IAE), V2525-D5 and V2528-D5 turbofan engines, with a certain number (No.) 4...

  1. Turret optimization using passive flow control to minimize aero-optic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crahan, Grady C.

    Over the past several decades, optical systems have begun to be deployed regularly on aircraft that fly at compressible flow speeds. During this time, these optical systems have also moved towards shorter operating wavelengths that can deliver a higher peak irradiance in the focused spot on a distant target, and the assumption is that future systems will use even shorter-wavelength lasers. As this trend towards short-wavelength systems continues, the need to take into account the effect of flow-induced, or "aero-optic," aberrations that occur in the vicinity of the parent aircraft has become progressively more important. The conventional method for mounting an optical system is to place it in a hemispherical turret; however, from an aero-optic standpoint, there are two problems with this mounting arrangement. First, shocks begin to form on the surface of a sphere (or hemisphere) at a critical Mach number of only around 0.55. Furthermore, a shear layer is produced due to flow separation on the aft side of the sphere; both of these flows, shocks and separated shear layers, involve strong index-of-refraction variations in the flow that would severely aberrate the outgoing beam. One approach to the problem would be to employ adaptive-optic (AO) methods in which the conjugate of the aberration is applied to the outgoing beam before it transmits through the aero-optic flow; however, state-of-the-art AO systems are generally unable to match the high temporal frequencies associated with aero-optic flows. As such, there is a need for innovative mounting strategies for optical systems that avoid or mitigate the formation of optically-aberrating flows in the first place. This dissertation outlines an investigation into aerodynamic shaping of turrets to mitigate the aero-optic aberrations produced by shock waves and shear layers. Specifically, a computational and experimental investigation into the "virtual duct" concept, which is a passive flow-control approach to mitigating

  2. Ascent Heating Thermal Analysis on the Spacecraft Adaptor (SA) Fairings and the Interface with the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Yuko, James; Motil, Brian

    2009-01-01

    When the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) is launched, the spacecraft adaptor (SA) fairings that cover the CEV service module (SM) are exposed to aero heating. Thermal analysis is performed to compute the fairing temperatures and to investigate whether the temperatures are within the material limits for nominal ascent aero heating case. Heating rates from Thermal Environment (TE) 3 aero heating analysis computed by engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are used in the thermal analysis. Both MSC Patran 2007r1b/Pthermal and C&R Thermal Desktop 5.1/Sinda models are built to validate each other. The numerical results are also compared with those reported by Lockheed Martin (LM) and show a reasonably good agreement.

  3. PREFACE: 2013 International Conferences on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences (AeroEarth 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    The 2013 International Conferences on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences (AeroEarth 2013), was held at the Swiss Bell Mangga Besar, Jakarta, Indonesia, on 23 December 2013. The AeroEarth conference aims to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. AeroEarth 2013 promotes interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that high-level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Earth Science. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 91 papers and after rigorous review, 17 papers were accepted. The participants come from 8 countries. There are 3 (three) Plenary Sessions and two invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contribution. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of AeroEarth 2013. The AeroEarth 2013 Proceedings Editors Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Dr. Benfano Soewito Dr. Amit Desai Further information on the invited plenary speakers and photographs from the conference can be found in the pdf.

  4. Effect of structurally related flavonoids from Zuccagnia punctata Cav. on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    D'Almeida, Romina E; Alberto, María R; Morgan, Phillip; Sedensky, Margaret; Isla, María I

    2014-03-01

    Zuccagnia punctata Cav. (Fabaceae), commonly called jarilla macho or pus-pus, is being used in traditional medicine as an antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and to relieve muscle and bone pain. The aim of this work was to study the anthelmintic effects of three structurally related flavonoids present in aerial parts of Z. punctata Cav. The biological activity of the flavonoids 7-hydroxyflavanone (HF), 3,7-dihydroxyflavone (DHF) and 2´,4´-dihydroxychalcone (DHC) was examined in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results showed that among the assayed flavonoids, only DHC showed an anthelmintic effect and alteration of egg hatching and larval development processes in C. elegans. DHC was able to kill 50% of adult nematodes at a concentration of 17 μg/mL. The effect on larval development was observed after 48 h in the presence of 25 and 50 μg/mL DHC, where 33.4 and 73.4% of nematodes remained in the L3 stage or younger. New therapeutic drugs with good efficacy against drug-resistant nematodes are urgently needed. Therefore, DHC, a natural compound present in Z. punctata, is proposed as a potential anthelmintic drug. PMID:26204036

  5. Understanding Aero-Fractures using optics and acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Kvalheim Eriksen, Fredrik; Zecevic, Megan; Daniel, Guillaume; Grude Flekkøy, Eirik; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2016-04-01

    exponent p value around 0.5. An analytical model of overpressure diffusion predicting p = 0.5 and two other free parameters of the Omori Law (prefactor and origin time) is developed. The spatial density of the seismic events, and the time of end of formation of the channels can also be predicted using this developed model. Using direct simulations of acoustic emissions due to the air vibration in opening fractal cavities, the evolution in the power spectrum is investigated. 1. Turkaya S, Toussaint R, Eriksen FK, Zecevic M, Daniel G, Flekkøy EG, Måløy KJ. "Bridging aero-fracture evolution with the characteristics of the acoustic emissions in a porous medium." Front. Phys.3:70. 2015 doi: 10.3389/fphy.2015.00070

  6. Alterations of Ca(v)1.2 and 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat hearts after positional asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Li, X-F; Huang, Q-Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated alterations of cardiac Ca(v)1.2 and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) associated with positional asphyxia. Male rats were divided into five groups: a control group with no restraint, group 1 restrained for 1 h, group 2 restrained for 2 h, group 3 restrained for 4 h, and group 4 restrained for 8 h. The rats that were restrained for 8 h ultimately suffered fatal asphyxia. After the restraint periods, the rats were sacrificed and immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the expressions of Ca(v)1.2 and 5-HT in the heart. Sections were analyzed by digital image analysis. Cardiac expression of Ca(v)1.2 and 5-HT proteins were significantly decreased by positional asphyxia in the rat, shown by integrated optical density (IOD) compared to controls. Our findings indicate that Ca(v)1.2 and 5-HT alterations could cause abnormal cardiac function, and the proteins investigated here may be useful for investigating the mechanisms underlying positional asphyxia. PMID:26471941

  7. Graded Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This 'functional coupling' facilitates Ca(2+) influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca(2+) to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca(2+)/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca(2+)]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for 'molecular memory'. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca(2+)-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca(2+) signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. PMID:25714924

  8. Graded Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent coupling of voltage-gated CaV1.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Rose E; Moreno, Claudia M; Yuan, Can; Opitz-Araya, Ximena; Binder, Marc D; Navedo, Manuel F; Santana, Luis F

    2015-01-01

    In the heart, reliable activation of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum during the plateau of the ventricular action potential requires synchronous opening of multiple CaV1.2 channels. Yet the mechanisms that coordinate this simultaneous opening during every heartbeat are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CaV1.2 channels form clusters that undergo dynamic, reciprocal, allosteric interactions. This ‘functional coupling’ facilitates Ca2+ influx by increasing activation of adjoined channels and occurs through C-terminal-to-C-terminal interactions. These interactions are initiated by binding of incoming Ca2+ to calmodulin (CaM) and proceed through Ca2+/CaM binding to the CaV1.2 pre-IQ domain. Coupling fades as [Ca2+]i decreases, but persists longer than the current that evoked it, providing evidence for ‘molecular memory’. Our findings suggest a model for CaV1.2 channel gating and Ca2+-influx amplification that unifies diverse observations about Ca2+ signaling in the heart, and challenges the long-held view that voltage-gated channels open and close independently. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05608.001 PMID:25714924

  9. Fine-tuning synaptic plasticity by modulation of Ca(V)2.1 channels with Ca2+ sensor proteins.

    PubMed

    Leal, Karina; Mochida, Sumiko; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2012-10-16

    Modulation of P/Q-type Ca(2+) currents through presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(V)2.1) by binding of Ca(2+)/calmodulin contributes to short-term synaptic plasticity. Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (CaBP1) and Visinin-like protein-2 (VILIP-2) are neurospecific calmodulin-like Ca(2+) sensor proteins that differentially modulate Ca(V)2.1 channels, but how they contribute to short-term synaptic plasticity is unknown. Here, we show that activity-dependent modulation of presynaptic Ca(V)2.1 channels by CaBP1 and VILIP-2 has opposing effects on short-term synaptic plasticity in superior cervical ganglion neurons. Expression of CaBP1, which blocks Ca(2+)-dependent facilitation of P/Q-type Ca(2+) current, markedly reduced facilitation of synaptic transmission. VILIP-2, which blocks Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of P/Q-type Ca(2+) current, reduced synaptic depression and increased facilitation under conditions of high release probability. These results demonstrate that activity-dependent regulation of presynaptic Ca(V)2.1 channels by differentially expressed Ca(2+) sensor proteins can fine-tune synaptic responses to trains of action potentials and thereby contribute to the diversity of short-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:23027954

  10. Pathophysiological implication of CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channels in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soonwook; Yu, Eunah; Hwang, Eunjin; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2016-01-01

    A crucial pathophysiological issue concerning central neuropathic pain is the modification of sensory processing by abnormally increased low-frequency brain rhythms. Here we explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for such abnormal rhythmicity and its relation to neuropathic pain syndrome. Toward this aim, we investigated the behavioral and electrophysiological consequences of trigeminal neuropathic pain following infraorbital nerve ligations in CaV3.1 T-type Ca2+ channel knockout and wild-type mice. CaV3.1 knockout mice had decreased mechanical hypersensitivity and reduced low-frequency rhythms in the primary somatosensory cortex and related thalamic nuclei than wild-type mice. Lateral inhibition of gamma rhythm in primary somatosensory cortex layer 4, reflecting intact sensory contrast, was present in knockout mice but severely impaired in wild-type mice. Moreover, cross-frequency coupling between low-frequency and gamma rhythms, which may serve in sensory processing, was pronounced in wild-type mice but not in CaV3.1 knockout mice. Our results suggest that the presence of CaV3.1 channels is a key element in the pathophysiology of trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:26858455

  11. Adiponectin at Physiologically Relevant Concentrations Enhances the Vasorelaxative Effect of Acetylcholine via Cav-1/AdipoR-1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunhui; Li, Rui; Lau, Wayne Bigond; Zhao, Jianli; Lopez, Bernard; Christopher, Theodore A.; Ma, Xin-Liang; Wang, Yajing

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have identified hypoadiponectinemia as an independent hypertension risk factor. It is known that adiponectin (APN) can directly cause vasodilation, but the doses required exceed physiologic levels several fold. In the current study, we determine the effect of physiologically relevant APN concentrations upon vascular tone, and investigate the mechanism(s) responsible. Physiologic APN concentrations alone induced no significant vasorelaxation. Interestingly, pretreatment of wild type mouse aortae with physiologic APN levels significantly enhanced acetylcholine (ACh)-induced vasorelaxation (P<0.01), an endothelium-dependent and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated process. Knockout of adiponectin receptor 1 (AdipoR1) or caveolin-1 (Cav-1, a cell signaling facilitating molecule), but not adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) abolished APN-enhanced ACh-induced vasorelaxation. Immunoblot assay revealed APN promoted the AdipoR1/Cav1 signaling complex in human endothelial cells. Treatment of HUVECs with physiologic APN concentrations caused significant eNOS phosphorylation and nitric oxide (NO) production (P<0.01), an effect abolished in knockdown of either AdipoR1 or Cav-1. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time physiologic APN levels enhance the vasorelaxative response to ACh by inducing NO production through AdipoR1/Cav-1 mediated signaling. In physiologic conditions, APN plays an important function of maintaining vascular tone. PMID:27023866

  12. Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel is required for the NFAT-dependent Sox9 expression in tracheal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Shiou; Tzeng, Bing-Hsiean; Lee, Kuan-Rong; Smith, Richard J H; Campbell, Kevin P; Chen, Chien-Chang

    2014-05-13

    Intracellular Ca(2+) transient is crucial in initiating the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into chondrocytes, but whether voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are involved remains uncertain. Here, we show that the T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel Cav3.2 is essential for tracheal chondrogenesis. Mice lacking this channel (Cav3.2(-/-)) show congenital tracheal stenosis because of incomplete formation of cartilaginous tracheal support. Conversely, Cav3.2 overexpression in ATDC5 cells enhances chondrogenesis, which could be blunted by both blocking T-type Ca(2+) channels and inhibiting calcineurin and suggests that Cav3.2 is responsible for Ca(2+) influx during chondrogenesis. Finally, the expression of sex determination region of Y chromosome (SRY)-related high-mobility group-Box gene 9 (Sox9), one of the earliest markers of committed chondrogenic cells, is reduced in Cav3.2(-/-) tracheas. Mechanistically, Ca(2+) influx via Cav3.2 activates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of the activated T-cell (NFAT) signaling pathway, and a previously unidentified NFAT binding site is identified within the mouse Sox9 promoter using a luciferase reporter assay and gel shift and ChIP studies. Our findings define a previously unidentified mechanism that Ca(2+) influx via the Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channel regulates Sox9 expression through the calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathway during tracheal chondrogenesis. PMID:24778262

  13. Results of investigations conducted in the LaRC 8-foot transonic pressure tunnel using the 0.010-scale 72-OTS model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle (IA93), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Test procedures, history, and plotted coefficient data are presented for an aero-loads investigation on the updated configuration-5 space shuttle launch vehicle at Mach numbers from 0.600 to 1.205. Six-component vehicle forces and moments, base and sting-cavity pressures, elevon hinge moments, wing-root bending and torsion moments, and normal shear force data were obtained. Full simulation of updated vehicle protuberances and attach hardware was employed.

  14. Large Ca2+-dependent facilitation of CaV2.1 channels revealed by Ca2+ photo-uncaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin-Rong; Adams, Paul J; Yue, David T

    2015-01-01

    Key points CaV2.1 channels constitute a dominant Ca2+ entry pathway into brain neurons, triggering downstream Ca2+-dependent processes such as neurotransmitter release. CaV2.1 is itself modulated by Ca2+, resulting in activity-dependent enhancement of channel opening termed Ca2+-dependent facilitation (CDF). Real-time Ca2+ imaging and Ca2+ uncaging here reveal that CDF turns out to be strikingly faster, more Ca2+ sensitive, and larger than anticipated on previous grounds. Robust resolution of the quantitative profile of CDF enables deduction of a realistic biophysical model for this process. These results suggest that CaV2.1 CDF would figure most prominently in short-term synaptic plasticity and cerebellar Purkinje cell rhythmicity. Abstract CaV2.1 (P-type) voltage-gated Ca2+ channels constitute a major source of neuronal Ca2+ current, strongly influencing rhythmicity and triggering neurotransmitter release throughout the central nervous system. Fitting with such stature among Ca2+ entry pathways, CaV2.1 is itself feedback regulated by intracellular Ca2+, acting through calmodulin to facilitate channel opening. The precise neurophysiological role of this calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF) remains uncertain, however, in large measure because the very magnitude, Ca2+ dependence and kinetics of CDF have resisted quantification by conventional means. Here, we utilize the photo-uncaging of Ca2+ with CaV2.1 channels fluxing Li+ currents, so that voltage-dependent activation of channel gating is no longer conflated with Ca2+ entry, and CDF is then driven solely by light-induced increases in Ca2+. By using this strategy, we now find that CDF can be unexpectedly large, enhancing currents by as much as twofold at physiological voltages. CDF is steeply Ca2+ dependent, with a Hill coefficient of approximately two, a half-maximal effect reached by nearly 500 nm Ca2+, and Ca2+ on/off kinetics in the order of milliseconds to tens of milliseconds. These properties were

  15. Improvement of Aerodynamic Performance of the Aero-Train by Controlling Wing-Wing Interaction Using Single-Slotted Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Dong-Hee; Kohama, Yasuaki; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Kato, Takuma

    Aero-train is a new driving concept using aerodynamic technology under development by the Kohama Laboratory, Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University. It employs the wing-in-ground effect to enable travel at high speeds over land. Aero-train makes use of the ground effects of lift and side force between the wings and a U-shaped guideway for stability. The main wings have vertical wings at the tips, which are arranged in tandem to regulate the roll and yaw stability in the U-shaped guideway. However, the vertical wings deteriorate the lift-to-drag ratio of the Aero-train by aerodynamic interaction with the main wings. The present study was performed to improve the aerodynamic performance of the Aero-train by controlling wing-wing interaction. Installation of a single-slotted flap on the wings considerably improved the aerodynamic performance of the wings.

  16. CACNA1D De Novo Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorders Activate Cav1.3 L-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Pinggera, Alexandra; Lieb, Andreas; Benedetti, Bruno; Lampert, Michaela; Monteleone, Stefania; Liedl, Klaus R.; Tuluc, Petronel; Striessnig, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Background Cav1.3 voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are part of postsynaptic neuronal signaling networks. They play a key role in brain function, including fear memory and emotional and drug-taking behaviors. A whole-exome sequencing study identified a de novo mutation, p.A749G, in Cav1.3 α1-subunits (CACNA1D), the second main LTCC in the brain, as 1 of 62 high risk–conferring mutations in a cohort of patients with autism and intellectual disability. We screened all published genetic information available from whole-exome sequencing studies and identified a second de novo CACNA1D mutation, p.G407R. Both mutations are present only in the probands and not in their unaffected parents or siblings. Methods We functionally expressed both mutations in tsA-201 cells to study their functional consequences using whole-cell patch-clamp. Results The mutations p.A749G and p.G407R caused dramatic changes in channel gating by shifting (~15 mV) the voltage dependence for steady-state activation and inactivation to more negative voltages (p.A749G) or by pronounced slowing of current inactivation during depolarizing stimuli (p.G407R). In both cases, these changes are compatible with a gain-of-function phenotype. Conclusions Our data, together with the discovery that Cav1.3 gain-of-function causes primary aldosteronism with seizures, neurologic abnormalities, and intellectual disability, suggest that Cav1.3 gain-of-function mutations confer a major part of the risk for autism in the two probands and may even cause the disease. Our findings have immediate clinical relevance because blockers of LTCCs are available for therapeutic attempts in affected individuals. Patients should also be explored for other symptoms likely resulting from Cav1.3 hyperactivity, in particular, primary aldosteronism. PMID:25620733

  17. MiR-103 inhibits osteoblast proliferation mainly through suppressing Cav1.2 expression in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyang; Cao, Xinsheng; Hu, Zebing; Zhang, Lianchang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Hua; Li, Dongtao; Zhang, Shu; Xie, Manjiang

    2015-07-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in modulating osteoblast function and bone formation. However, the influence of miRNA on osteoblast proliferation and the possible mechanisms underlying remain to be defined. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether miR-103 regulates osteoblast proliferation under simulated microgravity condition through regulating Cav1.2, the primary subunit of L-type voltage sensitive calcium channels (LTCCs). We first investigated the effect of simulated microgravity on osteoblast proliferation and the outcomes clearly demonstrated that the mechanical unloading inhibits MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell proliferation. Using quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR), we provided data showing that miR-103 was up-regulated in response to simulated microgravity. In addition, we observed that up-regulation of miR-103 inhibited and down-regulation of miR-103 promoted osteoblast proliferation under simulated microgravity condition. Furthermore, knocking-down or over-expressing miR-103, respectively, up- or down-regulated the level of Cav1.2 expression and LTCC currents, suggesting that miR-103 acts as an endogenous attenuator of Cav1.2 in osteoblasts under simulated microgravity condition. More importantly, we showed that the effect of miR-103 on osteoblast proliferation was diminished in simulated microgravity, when co-transfecting miR-103 mimic or inhibitor with Cav1.2 siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-103 inhibits osteoblast proliferation mainly through suppression of Cav1.2 expression under simulated microgravity condition. This work may provide a novel mechanism of microgravity-induced detrimental effects on osteoblast proliferation, identifying miR-103 as a novel possible therapeutic target in bone remodeling disorders in this mechanical unloading. PMID:25868801

  18. Modulation of CaV2.1 channels by neuronal calcium sensor-1 induces short-term synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Leal, Karina; Magupalli, Venkat G; Nanou, Evanthia; Martinez, Gilbert Q; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2014-11-01

    Facilitation and inactivation of P/Q-type Ca2+ currents mediated by Ca2+/calmodulin binding to Ca(V)2.1 channels contribute to facilitation and rapid depression of synaptic transmission, respectively. Other calcium sensor proteins displace calmodulin from its binding site and differentially modulate P/Q-type Ca2 + currents, resulting in diverse patterns of short-term synaptic plasticity. Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1, frequenin) has been shown to enhance synaptic facilitation, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We report here that NCS-1 directly interacts with IQ-like motif and calmodulin-binding domain in the C-terminal domain of Ca(V)2.1 channel. NCS-1 reduces Ca2 +-dependent inactivation of P/Q-type Ca2+ current through interaction with the IQ-like motif and calmodulin-binding domain without affecting peak current or activation kinetics. Expression of NCS-1 in presynaptic superior cervical ganglion neurons has no effect on synaptic transmission, eliminating effects of this calcium sensor protein on endogenous N-type Ca2+ currents and the endogenous neurotransmitter release machinery. However, in superior cervical ganglion neurons expressing wild-type Ca(V)2.1 channels, co-expression of NCS-1 induces facilitation of synaptic transmission in response to paired pulses and trains of depolarizing stimuli, and this effect is lost in Ca(V)2.1 channels with mutations in the IQ-like motif and calmodulin-binding domain. These results reveal that NCS-1 directly modulates Ca(V)2.1 channels to induce short-term synaptic facilitation and further demonstrate that CaS proteins are crucial in fine-tuning short-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:25447945

  19. Current Progress of a Finite Element Computational Fluid Dynamics Prediction of Flutter for the AeroStructures Test Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This progress report focuses on the use of the STructural Analysis RoutineS suite program, SOLIDS, input for the AeroStructures Test Wing. The AeroStructures Test Wing project as a whole is described. The use of the SOLIDS code to find the mode shapes of a structure is discussed. The frequencies, and the structural dynamics to which they relate are examined. The results of the CFD predictions are compared to experimental data from a Ground Vibration Test.

  20. Study on aero-optical effect of a hypersonic missile infrared image guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Zhao, Yuejin; Hu, Xinqi

    2009-11-01

    When a hypersonic missile with a side mounted IR seeker is launched in the atmosphere, a serious aero-optical effect is formed and affects the quality of the detector's imaging. And in the course of the missile flight time,aero-optical effects changes over time, which makes real-time, accurate correction of optical distortion becomes very difficult. Therefore, it is necessary to study the relationship between the optical distortion and time.In this paper, Fluent,a computational fluid dynamics(CFD) internet applications is used to make researches on effect of optical transmission of the flow field outside the IR window. And a thermal finite element analysis (FEA) of an IR window is used to study the aerodynamic heat effect.

  1. Influence of aero-optical transmission on infrared imaging optical system in the supersonic flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Meng, Weihua; Li, Yun; Dai, Xiaobing; Zuo, Zhiyong

    2015-01-01

    Aero-optical transmission effect is becoming a crucial issue in the supersonic flight. In our study, the joint influences of the non-uniform aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamically heated optical window on imaging quality of an airborne infrared optical system are investigated in depth. Both the laminar and turbulent viscous models are used in the simulation of aerodynamic flow because of their distinct influences on aero-optical transmission. On the basis of the computed density field, the ray tracing method is applied to calculate the point spread functions of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamically heated window. The imaging quality is evaluated by using the point spread functions and modulation transfer functions. Experimental results show that the optical transmission through the aerodynamically heated window has a much severer influence on the imaging quality than that through the aerodynamic flow field.

  2. The aero-acoustic Galbrun equation in the time domain with perfectly matched layer boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xue; Ben Tahar, Mabrouk; Baccouche, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a solution for aero-acoustic problems using the Galbrun equation in the time domain with a non-uniform steady mean flow in a two-dimensional coordinate system and the perfectly matched layer technique as the boundary conditions corresponding to an unbounded domain. This approach is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian description corresponding to a wave equation written only in terms of the Lagrangian perturbation of the displacement. It is an alternative to the Linearized Euler Equations for solving aero-acoustic problems. The Galbrun equation is solved using a mixed pressure-displacement Finite Element Method. A complex Laplace transform scheme is used to study the time dependent variables. Several numerical examples are presented to validate and illustrate the efficiency of the proposed approach. PMID:26827028

  3. Computational Aero-acoustics As a Tool For Turbo-machinery Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2003-01-01

    This talk will provide an overview of the field of computational aero-acoustics and its use in fan noise prediction. After a brief history of computational fluid dynamics, some of the recent developments in computational aero-acoustics will be explored. Computational issues concerning sound wave production, propagation, and reflection in practical turbo-machinery applications will be discussed including: (a) High order/High Resolution Numerical Techniques. (b) High Resolution Boundary Conditions. [c] MIMD Parallel Computing. [d] Form of Governing Equations Useful for Simulations. In addition, the basic design of our Broadband Analysis Stator Simulator (BASS) code and its application to a 2 D rotor wake-stator interaction will be shown. An example of the noise produced by the wakes from a rotor impinging upon a stator cascade will be shown.

  4. Global Mobile Satellite Service Interference Analysis for the AeroMACS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Hall, Ward; Phillips, Brent

    2013-01-01

    The AeroMACS (Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System), which is based on the IEEE 802.16-2009 mobile wireless standard, is envisioned as the wireless network which will cover all areas of airport surfaces for next generation air transportation. It is expected to be implemented in the 5091-5150 MHz frequency band which is also occupied by mobile satellite service uplinks. Thus the AeroMACS must be designed to avoid interference with this incumbent service. Simulations using Visualyse software were performed utilizing a global database of 6207 airports. Variations in base station and subscriber antenna distribution and gain pattern were examined. Based on these simulations, recommendations for global airport base station and subscriber antenna power transmission limitations are provided.

  5. Spectrum of Cav1.4 dysfunction in congenital stationary night blindness type 2☆

    PubMed Central

    Burtscher, Verena; Schicker, Klaus; Novikova, Elena; Pöhn, Birgit; Stockner, Thomas; Kugler, Christof; Singh, Anamika; Zeitz, Christina; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Audo, Isabelle; Leroy, Bart Peter; Freissmuth, Michael; Herzig, Stefan; Matthes, Jan; Koschak, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Defective retinal synaptic transmission in patients affected with congenital stationary night blindness type 2 (CSNB2) can result from different dysfunction phenotypes in Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels. Here we investigated two prototypical Cav1.4 variants from either end of the functional spectrum. Using whole-cell and single-channel patch-clamp techniques, we provide analysis of the biophysical characteristics of the point mutation L860P and the C-terminal truncating mutation R1827X. L860P showed a typical loss-of-function phenotype attributed to a reduced number of functional channels expressed at the plasma membrane as implied by gating current and non-stationary noise analyses. This phenotype can be rationalized, because the inserted proline is predicted to break an amphipatic helix close to the transmembrane segment IIIS1 and thus to reduce channel stability and promote misfolding. In fact, L860P was subject to an increased turnover. In contrast, R1827X displayed an apparent gain-of-function phenotype, i.e., due to a hyperpolarizing shift of the IV-curve and increased single-channel activity. However, truncation also resulted in the loss of functional C-terminal modulation and thus unmasked calcium-dependent inactivation. Thus R1827X failed to support continuous calcium influx. Current inactivation curtails the dynamic range of photoreceptors (e.g., when adapting to variation in illumination). Taken together, the analysis of two representative mutations that occur in CSNB2 patients revealed fundamental differences in the underlying defect. These may explain subtle variations in the clinical manifestation and must be taken into account, if channel function is to be restored by pharmacochaperones or related approaches. PMID:24796500

  6. CaV1.2 Signaling Complexes in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Robert D.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2012-01-01

    L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) are essential for generation of the electrical and mechanical properties of cardiac muscle. Furthermore, regulation of LTCC activity plays a central role in mediating the effects of sympathetic stimulation on the heart. The primary mechanism responsible for this regulation involves β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulation of cAMP production and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Although it is well established that PKA-dependent phosphorylation regulates LTCC function, there is still much we do not understand. However, it has recently become clear that the interaction of the various signaling proteins involved is not left to completely stochastic events due to random diffusion. The primary LTCC expressed in cardiac muscle, CaV1.2, forms a supramolecular signaling complex that includes the β2AR, G proteins, adenylyl cyclases, phosphodiesterases, PKA, and protein phosphatases. In some cases, the protein interactions with CaV1.2 appear to be direct, in other cases they involve scaffolding proteins such as A kinase anchoring proteins and caveolin-3. Functional evidence also suggests that the targeting of these signaling proteins to specific membrane domains plays a critical role in maintaining the fidelity of receptor mediated LTCC regulation. This information helps explain the phenomenon of compartmentation, whereby different receptors, all linked to the production of a common diffusible second messenger, can vary in their ability to regulate LTCC activity. The purpose of this review is to examine our current understanding of the signaling complexes involved in cardiac LTCC regulation. PMID:23266596

  7. Influence of aero-optical disturbances on acquisition, tracking, and pointing performance characteristics in laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteley, Matthew R.; Goorskey, David J.

    2011-05-01

    We have modeled the imaging performance of an acquisition, tracking, and pointing (ATP) sensor when operating on a high-speed aircraft platform through a turreted laser beam director/telescope. We applied standard scaling relations to wavefront sensor (WFS) data collected from the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory (AAOL) test platform operating at Mach 0.5 to model aero-optical aberrations for a λ = 1 μm wavelength laser system with a Dap = 30 cm aperture diameter and a 90 cm turret diameter on a platform operating at 30 kft and for speeds of Mach 0.4-0.8. Using these data, we quantified the imaging point spread function (PSF) for each aircraft speed. Our simulation results show Strehl ratios between 0.1-0.8 with substantial scattering of energy out to 7.5× the diffraction-limited core. Analysis of the imaging modulation transfer function (MTF) shows a rapid reduction of contrast for low-to-mid range spatial frequencies with increasing Mach number. Low modulation contrast at higher spatial frequencies limits imaging resolution to > 2× diffraction-limit at Mach 0.5 and approximately 5× diffraction-limit at Mach 0.8. Practical limits to usable spatial frequencies require higher image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the presence of aero-optical disturbances at high Mach number. Propagation of an illuminator laser through these aero-optical aberrations produces intensity modulation in the incident target illumination on scale sizes near the diffraction-limit of the transmitting laser aperture, thereby producing illumination artifacts which can degrade image-contrast-based tracking algorithms.

  8. Analysis of MMIC arrays for use in the ACTS Aero Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M.; Lee, R.; Rho, E.; Zaman, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The Aero Experiment is designed to demonstrate communication from an aircraft to an Earth terminal via the ACTS. This paper describes the link budget and antenna requirements for a 4.8 kbps full-duplex voice link at Ka-Band frequencies. Three arrays, one transmit array developed by TI and two receive arrays developed by GE and Boeing, were analyzed. The predicted performance characteristics of these arrays are presented and discussed in the paper.

  9. Characterization of Surface Treated Aero Engine Alloys by Rayleigh Wave Velocity Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, B.; Barth, M.; Schubert, F.; Bamberg, J.; Baron, H.-U.

    2010-02-01

    In aero engines mechanically high stressed components made of high-strength alloys like IN718 and Ti6Al4V are usually surface treated by shot-peening. Other methods, e.g. laser-peening, deep rolling and low plasticity burnishing are also available. All methods introduce compres-sive residual stress desired for minimize sensitivity to fatigue or stress corrosion failure mechanisms, resulting in improved performance and increased lifetime of components. Beside that, also cold work is introduced in an amount varying from method to method. To determine the remaining life time of critical aero engine components like compressor and turbine discs, a quantitative non-destructive determination of compressive stresses is required. The opportunity to estimate residual stress in surface treated aero engine alloys by SAW phase velocity measurements has been re-examined. For that original engine relevant material IN718 has been used. Contrary to other publications a significant effect of the surface treatment to the sound velocity was observed which disappeared after thermal treatment. Also preliminary measurements of the acousto-elastic coefficient fit into this picture.

  10. Optimization of the genomic DNA extraction method of silverleaf nightshade/ (Solanum elaeagnifolium /Cav.), an invasive plant in the cultivated areas within the Mediterranean region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The geographical origin of an invasive in the cultivated area within the Mediterranean region, silverleaf nightshade, Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav, (Solanaceae) should be identified through the analysis of genetic similarities between native and introduced populations using microsatellite markers. Bef...

  11. Endogenous and exogenous hydrogen sulfide facilitates T-type calcium channel currents in Cav3.2-expressing HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Miyamoto, Yosuke; Kanaoka, Daiki; Ide, Hiroki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Ohkubo, Tsuyako; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2014-02-28

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gasotransmitter, is formed from l-cysteine by multiple enzymes including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). We have shown that an H2S donor, NaHS, causes hyperalgesia in rodents, an effect inhibited by knockdown of Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T-channels), and that NaHS facilitates T-channel-dependent currents (T-currents) in NG108-15 cells that naturally express Cav3.2. In the present study, we asked if endogenous and exogenous H2S participates in regulation of the channel functions in Cav3.2-transfected HEK293 (Cav3.2-HEK293) cells. dl-Propargylglycine (PPG), a CSE inhibitor, significantly decreased T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, but not in NG108-15 cells. NaHS at 1.5mM did not affect T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, but enhanced T-currents in NG108-15 cells. In the presence of PPG, NaHS at 1.5mM, but not 0.1-0.3mM, increased T-currents in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells. Similarly, Na2S, another H2S donor, at 0.1-0.3mM significantly increased T-currents in the presence, but not absence, of PPG in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells. Expression of CSE was detected at protein and mRNA levels in HEK293 cells. Intraplantar administration of Na2S, like NaHS, caused mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect blocked by NNC 55-0396, a T-channel inhibitor. The in vivo potency of Na2S was higher than NaHS. These results suggest that the function of Cav3.2 T-channels is tonically enhanced by endogenous H2S synthesized by CSE in Cav3.2-HEK293 cells, and that exogenous H2S is capable of enhancing Cav3.2 function when endogenous H2S production by CSE is inhibited. In addition, Na2S is considered a more potent H2S donor than NaHS in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:24508802

  12. Altered synaptic transmission at olfactory and vomeronasal nerve terminals in mice lacking N-type calcium channel Cav2.2.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jan; Pyrski, Martina; Weissgerber, Petra; Zufall, Frank

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the role of voltage-activated calcium (Cav) channels for synaptic transmission at mouse olfactory and vomeronasal nerve terminals at the first synapse of the main and accessory olfactory pathways, respectively. We provided evidence for a central role of the N-type Cav channel subunit Cav2.2 in presynaptic transmitter release at these synapses. Striking Cav2.2 immunoreactivity was localised to the glomerular neuropil of the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), and co-localised with presynaptic molecules such as bassoon. Voltage-clamp recordings of sensory nerve-evoked, excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in mitral/tufted (M/T) and superficial tufted cells of the MOB and mitral cells of the AOB, in combination with established subtype-specific Cav channel toxins, indicated a predominant role of N-type channels in transmitter release at these synapses, whereas L-type, P/Q-type, and R-type channels had either no or only relatively minor contributions. In Cacna1b mutant mice lacking the Cav2.2 (α1B) subunit of N-type channels, olfactory nerve-evoked M/T cell EPSCs were not reduced but became blocker-resistant, thus indicating a major reorganisation and compensation of Cav channel subunits as a result of the Cav2.2 deletion at this synapse. Cav2.2-deficient mice also revealed that Cav2.2 was critically required for paired-pulse depression of olfactory nerve-evoked EPSCs in M/T cells of the MOB, and they demonstrated an essential requirement for Cav2.2 in vomeronasal nerve-evoked EPSCs of AOB mitral cells. Thus, Cacna1b loss-of-function mutations are unlikely to cause general anosmia but Cacna1b emerges as a strong candidate in the search for mutations causing altered olfactory perception, such as changes in general olfactory sensitivity and altered social responses to chemostimuli. PMID:25195871

  13. Characterization of a Synaptic Vesicle Binding Motif on the Distal CaV2.2 Channel C-terminal

    PubMed Central

    Gardezi, Sabiha R.; Nath, Arup R.; Li, Qi; Stanley, Elise F.

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles (SVs) that are gated to fuse with the presynaptic membrane by calcium ions that enter through voltage-gated calcium channels (CaVs). There is compelling evidence that SVs associate closely with the CaVs but the molecular linking mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using a cell-free, synaptic vesicle-pull-down assay method (SV-PD) we have recently demonstrated that SVs can bind both to the intact CaV2.2 channel and also to a fusion protein comprising the distal third, C3 segment, of its long C-terminal. This site was localized to a 49 amino acid region just proximal to the C-terminal tip. To further restrict the SV binding site we generated five, 10 amino acid mimetic blocking peptides spanning this region. Of these, HQARRVPNGY effectively inhibited SV-PD and also inhibited SV recycling when cryoloaded into chick brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Further, SV-PD was markedly reduced using a C3 fusion protein that lacked the HQARRVPNGY sequence, C3HQless. We zeroed in on the SV binding motif within HQARRVPNGY by means of a palette of mutant blocking peptides. To our surprise, peptides that lacked the highly conserved VPNGY sequence still blocked SV-PD. However, substitution of the HQ and RR amino acids markedly reduced block. Of these, the RR pair was essential but not sufficient as the full block was not observed without H suggesting a CaV2.2 SV binding motif of HxxRR. Interestingly, CaV2.1, the other primary presynaptic calcium channel, exhibits a similar motif, RHxRR, that likely serves the same function. Bioinformatic analysis showed that variations of this binding motif, +(+) xRR (where + is a positively charged aa H or R), are conserved from lung-fish to man. Further studies will be necessary to identify the C terminal motif binding partner on the SV itself and to determine the role of this molecular interaction in synaptic transmission. We hypothesize that the distal C-terminal participates in the capture

  14. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    PubMed

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels. PMID:24561180

  15. Inhibition of CaV2.3 channels by NK1 receptors is sensitive to membrane cholesterol but insensitive to caveolin-1.

    PubMed

    Licon, Yamhilette; Leandro, Deniss; Romero-Mendez, Catalina; Rodriguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Sanchez-Armass, Sergio; Meza, Ulises

    2015-08-01

    Voltage-gated, CaV2.3 calcium channels and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors are both present in nuclei of the central nervous system. When transiently coexpressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, CaV2.3 is primarily inhibited during strong, agonist-dependent activation of NK1 receptors. NK1 receptors localize to plasma membrane rafts, and their modulation by Gq/11 protein-coupled signaling is sensitive to plasma membrane cholesterol. Here, we show that inhibition of CaV2.3 by NK1 receptors is attenuated following methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD)-mediated depletion of membrane cholesterol. By contrast, inhibition of CaV2.3 was unaffected by intracellular diffusion of caveolin-1 scaffolding peptide or by overexpression of caveolin-1. Interestingly, MΒCD treatment had no effect on the macroscopic biophysical properties of CaV2.3, though it significantly decreased whole-cell membrane capacitance. Our data indicate that (1) cholesterol supports at least one component of the NK1 receptor-linked signaling pathway that inhibits CaV2.3 and (2) caveolin-1 is dispensable within this pathway. Our findings suggest that NK1 receptors reside within non-caveolar membrane rafts and that CaV2.3 resides nearby but outside the rafts. Raft-dependent modulation of CaV2.3 could be important in the physiological and pathophysiological processes in which these channels participate, including neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, epilepsy, and chronic pain. PMID:25204428

  16. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  17. Functional properties of the Cav1.2 calcium channel activated by calmodulin in the absence of α2δ subunits

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Arippa; Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Lao, Qi Zong; Soldatov, Nikolai M.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-activated Cav1.2 calcium channels require association of the pore-forming α1C subunit with accessory Cavβ and α2δ subunits. Binding of a single calmodulin (CaM) to α1C supports Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI). The human Cav1.2 channel is silent in the absence of Cavβ and/or α2δ. Recently, we found that coexpression of exogenous CaM (CaMex) supports plasma membrane targeting, gating facilitation and CDI of the channel in the absence of Cavβ. Here we discovered that CaMex and its Ca2+-insensitive mutant (CaM1234) rendered active α1C/Cavβ channel in the absence of α2δ. Coexpression of CaMex with α1C and β2d in calcium-channel-free COS-1 cells recovered gating of the channel and supported CDI. Voltage-dependence of activation was shifted by ≈ +40 mV to depolarization potentials. The calcium current reached maximum at +40 mV (20 mM Ca2+) and exhibited approximately 3 times slower activation and 5 times slower inactivation kinetics compared to the wild-type channel. Furthermore, both CaMex and CaM1234 accelerated recovery from inactivation and induced facilitation of the calcium current by strong depolarization prepulse, the properties absent from the human vascular/neuronal Cav1.2 channel. The data suggest a previously unknown action of CaM that in the presence of Cavβ translates into activation of the α2δ-deficient calcium channel and alteration of its properties. PMID:19106618

  18. Gain-of-function nature of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels alters firing properties of mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Knoflach, Dagmar; Schicker, Klaus; Glösmann, Martin; Koschak, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Proper function of Cav1.4 L-type calcium channels is crucial for neurotransmitter release in the retina. Our understanding about how different levels of Cav1.4 channel activity affect retinal function is still limited. In the gain-of-function mouse model Cav1.4-IT we expected a reduction in the photoreceptor dynamic range but still transmission toward retinal ganglion cells. A fraction of Cav1.4-IT ganglion cells responded to light stimulation in multielectrode array recordings from whole-mounted retinas, but showed a significantly delayed response onset. Another significant number of cells showed higher activity in darkness. In addition to structural remodeling observed at the first retinal synapse of Cav1.4-IT mice the functional data suggested a loss of contrast enhancement, a fundamental feature of our visual system. In fact, Cav1.4-IT mouse retinas showed a decline in spatial response and changes in their contrast sensitivity profile. Photoreceptor degeneration was obvious from the nodular structure of cone axons and enlarged pedicles which partly moved toward the outer nuclear layer. Loss of photoreceptors was also expressed as reduced expression of proteins involved in chemical and electrical transmission, as such metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR6 and the gap junction protein Connexin 36. Such gross changes in retinal structure and function could also explain the diminished visual performance of CSNB2 patients. The expression pattern of the plasma-membrane calcium ATPase 1 which participates in the maintenance of the intracellular calcium homeostasis in photoreceptors was changed in Cav1.4-IT mice. This might be part of a protection mechanism against increased calcium influx, as this is suggested for Cav1.4-IT channels. PMID:26274509

  19. A CaV2.1 N-terminal fragment relieves the dominant-negative inhibition by an Episodic ataxia 2 mutant.

    PubMed

    Dahimene, Shehrazade; Page, Karen M; Nieto-Rostro, Manuela; Pratt, Wendy S; D'Arco, Marianna; Dolphin, Annette C

    2016-09-01

    Episodic ataxia 2 (EA2) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in the gene CACNA1A that encodes the pore-forming CaV2.1 calcium channel subunit. The majority of EA2 mutations reported so far are nonsense or deletion/insertion mutations predicted to form truncated proteins. Heterologous expression of wild-type CaV2.1, together with truncated constructs that mimic EA2 mutants, significantly suppressed wild-type calcium channel function, indicating that the truncated protein produces a dominant-negative effect (Jouvenceau et al., 2001; Page et al., 2004). A similar finding has been shown for CaV2.2 (Raghib et al., 2001). We show here that a highly conserved sequence in the cytoplasmic N-terminus is involved in this process, for both CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 channels. Additionally, we were able to interfere with the suppressive effect of an EA2 construct by mutating key N-terminal residues within it. We postulate that the N-terminus of the truncated channel plays an essential part in its interaction with the full-length CaV2.1, which prevents the correct folding of the wild-type channel. In agreement with this, we were able to disrupt the interaction between EA2 and the full length channel by co-expressing a free N-terminal peptide. PMID:27260834

  20. T-type calcium channel Cav3.2 deficient mice show elevated anxiety, impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to psychostimulants.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Laffray, Sophie; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The fine-tuning of neuronal excitability relies on a tight control of Ca(2+) homeostasis. The low voltage-activated (LVA) T-type calcium channels (Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 isoforms) play a critical role in regulating these processes. Despite their wide expression throughout the central nervous system, the implication of T-type Cav3.2 isoform in brain functions is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigate the effect of genetic ablation of this isoform in affective disorders, including anxiety, cognitive functions as well as sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Using a wide range of behavioral assays we show that genetic ablation of the cacna1h gene results in an anxiety-like phenotype, whereas novelty-induced locomotor activity is unaffected. Deletion of the T-type channel Cav3.2 also triggers impairment of hippocampus-dependent recognition memories. Acute and sensitized hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and cocaine are dramatically reduced in T-type Cav3.2 deficient mice. In addition, the administration of the T-type blocker TTA-A2 prevented the expression of locomotor sensitization observed in wildtype mice. In conclusion, our data reveal that physiological activity of this specific Ca(2+) channel is required for affective and cognitive behaviors. Moreover, our work highlights the interest of T-type channel blockers as therapeutic strategies to reverse drug-associated alterations. PMID:24672455

  1. Expression of CaV3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channels in a subpopulation of retinal type-3 cone bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Ivanova, E; Qi, L; Pan, Z-H

    2012-11-01

    Retinal bipolar cells and ganglion cells are known to possess voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+) channels. Previous electrophysiological recording studies suggested that there is differential expression of different T-type Ca(2+) channel α1 subunits among bipolar cells. The detailed expression patterns of the individual T-type Ca(2+) channel subunits in the retina, however, remain unknown. In this study, we examined the expression of the Ca(V)3.2 Ca(2+) channel α1 subunit in the mouse retina using immunohistochemical analysis and patch-clamp recordings together with a Ca(V)3.2 knock out (KO) mouse line. The specificity of a Ca(V)3.2 Ca(2+) channel antibody was first confirmed in recombinant T-type Ca(2+) channels expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells and in Ca(V)3.2 KO mice. Our immunohistochemical analysis indicates that the Ca(V)3.2 antibody labels a subgroup of type-3 cone bipolar cells (CBCs), the PKAβII-immunopositive type-3 CBCs. The labeling was observed throughout the cell including dendrites and axon terminals. Our patch-clamp recording results further demonstrate that Ca(V)3.2 Ca(2+) channels contribute to the T-type Ca(2+) current in a subpopulation of type-3 CBCs. The findings of this study provide new insights into understanding the functional roles of T-type Ca(2+) channels in retinal processing. PMID:22909426

  2. Prevalence of antibody to chicken anaemia virus (CAV) in Swedish chicken breeding flocks correlated to outbreaks of blue wing disease (BWD) in their progeny.

    PubMed

    Engström, B E

    1999-01-01

    A serological survey for antibody to Chicken Anaemia Virus (CAV) was performed on broiler breeders as well as layer breeding birds in Sweden at the end of their rearing period. Grandparents (GP) of both types leaving quarantine were in 21 out of 26 cases free from antibody to CAV, but often became infected soon thereafter. A total of 10 outbreaks of blue wing disease (BWD) in 3 series were recorded in the broiler and layer parent generation, all of which were progeny of 3 late seroconverting GP-flocks. All but one of 22 layer parent flocks had been infected and had seroconverted during the rearing period. Subsequently BWD was not recorded from commercial layers. Broiler parent flocks were more protected from CAV infection during rearing. Eighteen out of 94 broiler parent flocks had not developed antibody to CAV before coming into lay. Outbreaks of BWD were reported in progeny flocks from all these broiler breeders, with the exception of those that had been vaccinated. Good hygienic routines along with isolation of the birds delayed the seroconversion to CAV in broiler breeders and vaccination of these breeders protected their progeny from outbreaks of BWD. Broiler flocks in houses where BWD had occurred recently had always antibodies to CAV at slaughter. It was possible to eradicate the infection from the house and prevent the infection between flocks by proper cleaning and disinfection of the broiler houses. PMID:10605126

  3. T-type calcium channel Cav3.2 deficient mice show elevated anxiety, impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to psychostimulants

    PubMed Central

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Laffray, Sophie; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The fine-tuning of neuronal excitability relies on a tight control of Ca2+ homeostasis. The low voltage-activated (LVA) T-type calcium channels (Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3 isoforms) play a critical role in regulating these processes. Despite their wide expression throughout the central nervous system, the implication of T-type Cav3.2 isoform in brain functions is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigate the effect of genetic ablation of this isoform in affective disorders, including anxiety, cognitive functions as well as sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Using a wide range of behavioral assays we show that genetic ablation of the cacna1h gene results in an anxiety-like phenotype, whereas novelty-induced locomotor activity is unaffected. Deletion of the T-type channel Cav3.2 also triggers impairment of hippocampus-dependent recognition memories. Acute and sensitized hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and cocaine are dramatically reduced in T-type Cav3.2 deficient mice. In addition, the administration of the T-type blocker TTA-A2 prevented the expression of locomotor sensitization observed in wildtype mice. In conclusion, our data reveal that physiological activity of this specific Ca2+ channel is required for affective and cognitive behaviors. Moreover, our work highlights the interest of T-type channel blockers as therapeutic strategies to reverse drug-associated alterations. PMID:24672455

  4. Divergent biophysical properties, gating mechanisms, and possible functions of the two skeletal muscle CaV1.1 calcium channel splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Tuluc, Petronel; Flucher, Bernhard E.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes that specifically allow calcium ions to enter the cell in response to membrane depolarization. But, for many years it seemed that the skeletal muscle calcium channel CaV1.1 is the exception. The classical splice variant CaV1.1a activates slowly, has a very small current amplitude and poor voltage sensitivity. In fact adult muscle fibers work perfectly well even in the absence of calcium influx. Recently a new splice variant of the skeletal muscle calcium channel CaV1.1e has been characterized. The lack of the 19 amino acid exon 29 in this splice variant results in a rapidly activating calcium channel with high current amplitude and good voltage sensitivity. CaV1.1e is the dominant channel in embryonic muscle, where the expression of this high calcium-conducting CaV1.1 isoform readily explains developmental processes depending on L-type calcium currents. Moreover, the availability of these two structurally similar but functionally distinct channel variants facilitates the analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique current properties of the classical CaV1.1a channel. PMID:22057633

  5. Limited Efficacy of α-Conopeptides, Vc1.1 and RgIA, To Inhibit Sensory Neuron CaV Current1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Andrew B.; Norimatsu, Yohei; McIntosh, J. Michael; Elmslie, Keith S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain is very difficult to treat. Thus, novel analgesics are a critical area of research. Strong preclinical evidence supports the analgesic effects of α-conopeptides, Vc1.1 and RgIA, which block α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). However, the analgesic mechanism is controversial. Some evidence supports the block of α9α10 nAChRs as an analgesic mechanism, while other evidence supports the inhibition of N-type CaV (CaV2.2) current via activation of GABAB receptors. Here, we reassess the effect of Vc1.1 and RgIA on CaV current in rat sensory neurons. Unlike the previous findings, we found highly variable effects among individual sensory neurons, but on average only minimal inhibition induced by Vc1.1, and no significant effect on the current by RgIA. We also investigated the potential involvement of GABAB receptors in the Vc1.1-induced inhibition, and found no correlation between the size of CaV current inhibition induced by baclofen (GABAB agonist) versus that induced by Vc1.1. Thus, GABAB receptors are unlikely to mediate the Vc1.1-induced CaV current inhibition. Based on the present findings, CaV current inhibition in dorsal root ganglia is unlikely to be the predominant mechanism by which either Vc1.1 or RgIA induce analgesia. PMID:26078999

  6. National Aero-Space Plane team selects design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandebo, Stanley W.

    1990-10-01

    The selection of a design configuration for the NASP currently favors a directionally stable lifting body that incorporates dual stabilizers, short wings, and a two-man, dorsal crew compartment. The X-30 is expected to be 150-200 ft long and to have a takeoff gross weight of 250,000-300,000 lb. Three to five scramjet engines and a single 50,000 to 70,000 lb thrust rocket integrated into the airframe are expected to power the vehicle. The rocket will provide the X-30 with the burst of energy it will require to obtain orbital velocity and also to maneuver the craft out of earth orbit. Continuing propulsion and technical advances that include materials, aerodynamics, and simulations areas are being developed by program researchers. One of the most important achievements has been the progress made in locating the boundary-layer transition point on the NASP; engine, airframe integration, and flight-test issues are being addressed in separate study programs.

  7. Complex regulation of voltage-dependent activation and inactivation properties of retinal voltage-gated Cav1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels by Ca2+-binding protein 4 (CaBP4).

    PubMed

    Shaltiel, Lior; Paparizos, Christos; Fenske, Stefanie; Hassan, Sami; Gruner, Christian; Rötzer, Katrin; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian A

    2012-10-19

    Cav1.4 L-type Ca(2+) channels are crucial for synaptic transmission in retinal photoreceptors and bipolar neurons. Recent studies suggest that the activity of this channel is regulated by the Ca(2+)-binding protein 4 (CaBP4). In the present study, we explored this issue by examining functional effects of CaBP4 on heterologously expressed Cav1.4. We show that CaBP4 dramatically increases Cav1.4 channel availability. This effect crucially depends on the presence of the C-terminal ICDI (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation) domain of Cav1.4 and is absent in a Cav1.4 mutant lacking the ICDI. Using FRET experiments, we demonstrate that CaBP4 interacts with the IQ motif of Cav1.4 and that it interferes with the binding of the ICDI domain. Based on these findings, we suggest that CaBP4 increases Cav1.4 channel availability by relieving the inhibitory effects of the ICDI domain on voltage-dependent Cav1.4 channel gating. We also functionally characterized two CaBP4 mutants that are associated with a congenital variant of human night blindness and other closely related nonstationary retinal diseases. Although both mutants interact with Cav1.4 channels, the functional effects of CaBP4 mutants are only partially preserved, leading to a reduction of Cav1.4 channel availability and loss of function. In conclusion, our study sheds new light on the functional interaction between CaBP4 and Cav1.4. Moreover, it provides insights into the mechanism by which CaBP4 mutants lead to loss of Cav1.4 function and to retinal disease. PMID:22936811

  8. Cav1.4 L-Type Calcium Channels Contribute to Calpain Activation in Degenerating Photoreceptors of rd1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schön, Christian; Paquet-Durand, François; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited blinding disorder characterized by progressive degeneration and loss of photoreceptors. The exact mechanism of degeneration and cell death of photoreceptors is not known, but is thought to involve disturbed Ca2+—signaling. Ca2+ can enter the photoreceptor cell via outer segment cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels or synaptic Cav1.4 L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Previously, we have shown that genetic ablation of the Cngb1 gene encoding the B subunit of the rod CNG channel delays the fast progressing degeneration in the rd1 mutant mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. In this study, we crossbred rd1 mice with the Cacna1f-deficient mouse lacking the Cav1.4 α1 subunit of the L-type VGCC. Longitudinal in vivo examinations of photoreceptor layer thickness by optical coherence tomography revealed a significant, but not sustained delay of retinal degeneration in Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice compared to rd1 mice. This was accompanied by a reduction of TUNEL positive cells in the early phase of rod degeneration. Remarkably, Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice displayed a strong decrease in the activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain during photoreceptor loss. Our results show that genetic deletion of the synaptic Cav1.4 L-type VGCCs impairs calpain activation and leads to a short-term preservation of photoreceptors in the rd1 mouse. PMID:27270916

  9. Modulation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel permeability by asparagine-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Ondacova, Katarina; Karmazinova, Maria; Lazniewska, Joanna; Weiss, Norbert; Lacinova, Lubica

    2016-05-01

    Low-voltage-gated T-type calcium channels are expressed throughout the nervous system where they play an essential role in shaping neuronal excitability. Defects in T-type channel expression have been linked to various neuronal disorders including neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Currently, little is known about the cellular mechanisms controlling the expression and function of T-type channels. Asparagine-linked glycosylation has recently emerged as an essential signaling pathway by which the cellular environment can control expression of T-type channels. However, the role of N-glycans in the conducting function of T-type channels remains elusive. In the present study, we used human Cav3.2 glycosylation-deficient channels to assess the role of N-glycosylation on the gating of the channel. Patch-clamp recordings of gating currents revealed that N-glycans attached to hCav3.2 channels have a minimal effect on the functioning of the channel voltage-sensor. In contrast, N-glycosylation on specific asparagine residues may have an essential role in the conducting function of the channel by enhancing the channel permeability and / or the pore opening of the channel. Our data suggest that modulation of N-linked glycosylation of hCav3.2 channels may play an important physiological role, and could also support the alteration of T-type currents observed in disease states. PMID:26745591

  10. Cav1.4 L-Type Calcium Channels Contribute to Calpain Activation in Degenerating Photoreceptors of rd1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Schön, Christian; Paquet-Durand, François; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is an inherited blinding disorder characterized by progressive degeneration and loss of photoreceptors. The exact mechanism of degeneration and cell death of photoreceptors is not known, but is thought to involve disturbed Ca2+-signaling. Ca2+ can enter the photoreceptor cell via outer segment cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels or synaptic Cav1.4 L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Previously, we have shown that genetic ablation of the Cngb1 gene encoding the B subunit of the rod CNG channel delays the fast progressing degeneration in the rd1 mutant mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. In this study, we crossbred rd1 mice with the Cacna1f-deficient mouse lacking the Cav1.4 α1 subunit of the L-type VGCC. Longitudinal in vivo examinations of photoreceptor layer thickness by optical coherence tomography revealed a significant, but not sustained delay of retinal degeneration in Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice compared to rd1 mice. This was accompanied by a reduction of TUNEL positive cells in the early phase of rod degeneration. Remarkably, Cacna1f x rd1 double mutant mice displayed a strong decrease in the activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain during photoreceptor loss. Our results show that genetic deletion of the synaptic Cav1.4 L-type VGCCs impairs calpain activation and leads to a short-term preservation of photoreceptors in the rd1 mouse. PMID:27270916

  11. Crystal spectroscopy of silicon aero-gel end-caps driven by a dynamic hohlraum on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James E.; Gilliland, Terrance Leo; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Lake, Patrick Wayne; Nash, Thomas J.; Idzorek, George C.; Apruzese, John P.; Moore, Tracy Croft; McKenney, John Lee; Torres, Jose A.; Schroen, Diana Grace; Jobe, Daniel Olarry; Chrien, Robert E.; Nielsen, Daniel Scott; Mock, Raymond Cecil; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Leeper, Ramon Joe; McGurn, John Stephen; Peterson, Darrell L.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Lucas, Joshua M.; Watt, Robert G.; Russell, Christopher Owen; Seamen, Johann Franz

    2003-07-01

    We present results from crystal spectroscopic analysis of silicon aero-gel foams heated by dynamic hohlraums on Z. The dynamic hohlraum on Z creates a radiation source with a 230-eV average temperature over a 2.4-mm diameter. In these experiments silicon aero-gel foams with 10-mg/cm{sup 3} densities and 1.7-mm lengths were placed on both ends of the dynamic hohlraum. Several crystal spectrometers were placed both above and below the z-pinch to diagnose the temperature of the silicon aero-gel foam using the K-shell lines of silicon. The crystal spectrometers were (1) temporally integrated and spatially resolved, (2) temporally resolved and spatially integrated, and (3) both temporally and spatially resolved. The results indicate that the dynamic hohlraum heats the silicon aero-gel to approximately 150-eV at peak power. As the dynamic hohlraum source cools after peak power the silicon aero-gel continues to heat and jets axially at an average velocity of approximately 50-cm/{micro}s. The spectroscopy has also shown that the reason for the up/down asymmetry in radiated power on Z is that tungsten enters the line-of-sight on the bottom of the machine much more than on the top.

  12. Expression and Regulation of Cav3.2 T-Type Calcium Channels during Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaya; Ueda, Takashi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kumamoto, Natsuko; Shimada, Shoichi; Ugawa, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The Cav3.2 isoform of the T-type calcium channel is expressed in primary sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), and these channels contribute to nociceptive and neuropathic pain in rats. However, there are conflicting reports on the roles of these channels in pain processing in rats and mice. In addition, the function of T-type channels in persistent inflammatory hyperalgesia is poorly understood. We performed behavioral and comprehensive histochemical analyses to characterize Cav3.2-expressing DRG neurons and examined the regulation of T-type channels in DRGs from C57BL/6 mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. We show that approximately 20% of mouse DRG neurons express Cav3.2 mRNA and protein. The size of the majority of Cav3.2-positive DRG neurons (69 ± 8%) ranged from 300 to 700 μm2 in cross-sectional area and 20 to 30 μm in estimated diameter. These channels co-localized with either neurofilament-H (NF-H) or peripherin. The peripherin-positive cells also overlapped with neurons that were positive for isolectin B4 (IB4) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) but were distinct from transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-positive neurons during normal mouse states. In mice with carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia, Cav3.2 channels, but not Cav3.1 or Cav3.3 channels, were upregulated in ipsilateral DRG neurons during the sub-acute phase. The increased Cav3.2 expression partially resulted from an increased number of Cav3.2-immunoreactive neurons; this increase in number was particularly significant for TRPV1-positive neurons. Finally, preceding and periodic intraplantar treatment with the T-type calcium channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 markedly reduced and reversed mechanical hyperalgesia during the acute and sub-acute phases, respectively, in mice. These data suggest that Cav3.2 T-type channels participate in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia, and this channel might play an even greater

  13. Colocalization of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor and T type Cav3.2 channel in dorsal root ganglia in chronic inflammatory pain mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Wang, Bing; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Sun, Yan-Gang; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is a neurotrophic factor and plays important roles in the nervous system. Increasing evidence supports that IGF-1 contributes to pain hypersensitivity through its insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) by activating IGF-1R/Akt or MAPK signaling pathways, whereas T-type Cav3.2 channel can facilitate and amplify pain signals originating from the sensory periphery. A recent study showed that activated IGF-1R can increase T-type Cav3.2 channel currents and further activate the G protein-dependent PKCα pathway to contribute to inflammatory pain sensitivity. However, the colocalization of IGF-1R and Cav3.2 in mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) under chronic inflammatory pain conditions remains elusive. In this study, we investigated changes in the expression of IGF-1R and the Cav3.2 channel, and their colocalization in mouse DRGs in chronic inflammatory pain condition (induced by complete Freund's adjuvant intraplanter injection) using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry approaches to confirm that Cav3.2 channel can mediate pain facilitation following IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling. We found that IGF-1R was expressed extensively in DRG neurons including small-, medium-, and large-sized neurons, whereas Cav3.2 channel was expressed exclusively in small-sized DRG neurons of naive mice. Expression of Cav3.2, but not IGF-1R, and colocalization of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R were increased in lumbar (L)4-L6 primary sensory neurons in DRGs of mice in chronic inflammatory pain. Moreover, the increased colocalization of IGF-1R and Cav3.2 is exclusively localized in small- and medium-sized primary sensory neurons. Our findings provided morphological evidence that T-type Cav3.2 channel, at least partially, mediates the pain facilitation of IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in chronic inflammatory pain condition. PMID:27213932

  14. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  15. Expression patterns of T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice after sciatic nerve axotomy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Si-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Xiao-Ya; Wang, Bing; Li, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yan-Gang; Liu, Xing-Jun

    2016-10-19

    Substantial evidence indicates that T-type Cav3.2 channel and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) contribute to pain hypersensitivity within primary sensory nerves. A recent study suggested that activation of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) could increase Cav3.2 channel currents and further contribute to inflammatory pain sensitivity. However, the expression patterns of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R and their colocalization in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in chronic neuropathic pain condition remain unknown. In this study, we explored expression patterns of Cav3.2, IGF-1R and their colocalization, and whether phenotypic switch occurs in a subpopulation of Cav3.2 or IGF-1R neurons in mouse DRGs after sciatic nerve axotomy with immunofluorescence, real-time reverse transcription-PCR, and western blot assays. We found that expressions of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R, and their colocalization were not increased in DRGs of mice following axotomy. In addition, Cav3.2 or IGF-1R subpopulation neurons did not acquire significant switch in expression phenotype after sciatic nerve axotomy. Our findings argue for an upregulation of Cav3.2 and IGF-1R expression in lumbar DRGs post-sciatic nerve axotomy and provided an insight for understanding the functions of peripheral afferent Cav3.2 channel and IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:27571431

  16. Cav 1.3 (α1D) Ca2+ currents in neonatal outer hair cells of mice

    PubMed Central

    Michna, Marcus; Knirsch, Martina; Hoda, Jean-Charles; Muenkner, Stefan; Langer, Patricia; Platzer, Josef; Striessnig, Jörg; Engel, Jutta

    2003-01-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) serve as electromechanical amplifiers that guarantee the unique sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian cochlea. It is unknown whether the afferent fibres connected to adult OHCs are functional. If so, voltage-activated Ca2+ channels would be required for afferent synaptic transmission. In neonatal OHCs, Ca2+ channels seem to play a role in maturation since OHCs from Cav1.3-deficient (Cav1.3−/−) mice degenerate shortly after the onset of hearing. We therefore studied whole-cell Ca2+ currents in outer hair cells aged between postnatal day 1 (P1) and P8. OHCs showed a rapidly activating inward current that was 1.8 times larger with 10 mm Ba2+ as charge carrier (IBa) than with equimolar Ca2+ (ICa). IBa started activating at −50 mV with Vmax = −1.9 ± 6.9 mV, V0.5 = −15.0 ± 7.1 mV and k = 8.2± 1.1 mV (n = 34). The peak IBa showed negligible inactivation (3.6 % after 300 ms) whereas the ICa (10 mm Ca2+) was inactivated by 50.7 %. OHC IBa was reduced by 33.5 ± 10.3 % (n = 14) with 10 μm nifedipine and increased to 178.5 ± 57.8 % (n = 14) by 5 μm Bay K 8644. A dose-response curve for nifedipine revealed an IC50 of 2.3 μm, a Hill coefficient of 2.7 and a maximum block of 36 %. Average IBa density in OHCs was 24.4 ± 10.8 pA pF−1 (n = 105) which is only 38 % of the value in inner hair cells. Single cell RT-PCR revealed expression of Cav1.3 in OHCs. In OHCs from Cav1.3−/− mice, Ba2+ current density was reduced to 0.6 ± 0.5 pA pF−1 (n = 9) indicating that > 97 % of the Ca2+ channel current in OHCs flows through Cav1.3. PMID:14514878

  17. Cav1.3 (alpha1D) Ca2+ currents in neonatal outer hair cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Michna, Marcus; Knirsch, Martina; Hoda, Jean-Charles; Muenkner, Stefan; Langer, Patricia; Platzer, Josef; Striessnig, Jorg; Engel, Jutta

    2003-12-15

    Outer hair cells (OHC) serve as electromechanical amplifiers that guarantee the unique sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the mammalian cochlea. It is unknown whether the afferent fibres connected to adult OHCs are functional. If so, voltage-activated Ca2+ channels would be required for afferent synaptic transmission. In neonatal OHCs, Ca2+ channels seem to play a role in maturation since OHCs from Cav1.3-deficient (Cav1.3-/-) mice degenerate shortly after the onset of hearing. We therefore studied whole-cell Ca2+ currents in outer hair cells aged between postnatal day 1 (P1) and P8. OHCs showed a rapidly activating inward current that was 1.8 times larger with 10 mM Ba2+ as charge carrier (IBa) than with equimolar Ca2+ (ICa). IBa started activating at -50 mV with Vmax = -1.9 +/- 6.9 mV, V0.5 = -15.0 +/- 7.1 mV and k = 8.2 +/- 1.1 mV (n = 34). The peak IBa showed negligible inactivation (3.6 % after 300 ms) whereas the ICa (10 mM Ca2+) was inactivated by 50.7 %. OHC IBa was reduced by 33.5 +/- 10.3 % (n = 14) with 10 microM nifedipine and increased to 178.5 +/- 57.8 % (n = 14) by 5 microM Bay K 8644. A dose-response curve for nifedipine revealed an IC50 of 2.3 microM, a Hill coefficient of 2.7 and a maximum block of 36 %. Average IBa density in OHCs was 24.4 +/- 10.8 pA pF-1 (n = 105) which is only 38 % of the value in inner hair cells. Single cell RT-PCR revealed expression of Cav1.3 in OHCs. In OHCs from Cav1.3-/- mice, Ba2+ current density was reduced to 0.6 +/- 0.5 pA pF-1 (n = 9) indicating that > 97 % of the Ca2+ channel current in OHCs flows through Cav1.3. PMID:14514878

  18. Alternative splicing at C terminus of Ca(V)1.4 calcium channel modulates calcium-dependent inactivation, activation potential, and current density.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gregory Ming Yeong; Yu, Dejie; Wang, Juejin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The Ca(V)1.4 voltage-gated calcium channel is predominantly expressed in the retina, and mutations to this channel have been associated with human congenital stationary night blindness type-2. The L-type Ca(V)1.4 channel displays distinct properties such as absence of calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and slow voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) due to the presence of an autoinhibitory domain (inhibitor of CDI) in the distal C terminus. We hypothesized that native Ca(V)1.4 is subjected to extensive alternative splicing, much like the other voltage-gated calcium channels, and employed the transcript scanning method to identify alternatively spliced exons within the Ca(V)1.4 transcripts isolated from the human retina. In total, we identified 19 alternative splice variations, of which 16 variations have not been previously reported. Characterization of the C terminus alternatively spliced exons using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology revealed a splice variant that exhibits robust CDI. This splice variant arose from the splicing of a novel alternate exon (43*) that can be found in 13.6% of the full-length transcripts screened. Inclusion of exon 43* inserts a stop codon that truncates half the C terminus. The Ca(V)1.4 43* channel exhibited robust CDI, a larger current density, a hyperpolarized shift in activation potential by ∼10 mV, and a slower VDI. Through deletional experiments, we showed that the inhibitor of CDI was responsible for modulating channel activation and VDI, in addition to CDI. Calcium currents in the photoreceptors were observed to exhibit CDI and are more negatively activated as compared with currents elicited from heterologously expressed full-length Ca(V)1.4. Naturally occurring alternative splice variants may in part contribute to the properties of the native Ca(V)1.4 channels. PMID:22069316

  19. Altered short-term synaptic plasticity and reduced muscle strength in mice with impaired regulation of presynaptic CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Nanou, Evanthia; Yan, Jin; Whitehead, Nicholas P; Kim, Min Jeong; Froehner, Stanley C; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2016-01-26

    Facilitation and inactivation of P/Q-type calcium (Ca(2+)) currents through the regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV) 2.1 channels by Ca(2+) sensor (CaS) proteins contributes to the facilitation and rapid depression of synaptic transmission in cultured neurons that transiently express CaV2.1 channels. To examine the modulation of endogenous CaV2.1 channels by CaS proteins in native synapses, we introduced a mutation (IM-AA) into the CaS protein-binding site in the C-terminal domain of CaV2.1 channels in mice, and tested synaptic facilitation and depression in neuromuscular junction synapses that use exclusively CaV2.1 channels for Ca(2+) entry that triggers synaptic transmission. Even though basal synaptic transmission was unaltered in the neuromuscular synapses in IM-AA mice, we found reduced short-term facilitation in response to paired stimuli at short interstimulus intervals in IM-AA synapses. In response to trains of action potentials, we found increased facilitation at lower frequencies (10-30 Hz) in IM-AA synapses accompanied by slowed synaptic depression, whereas synaptic facilitation was reduced at high stimulus frequencies (50-100 Hz) that would induce strong muscle contraction. As a consequence of altered regulation of CaV2.1 channels, the hindlimb tibialis anterior muscle in IM-AA mice exhibited reduced peak force in response to 50 Hz stimulation and increased muscle fatigue. The IM-AA mice also had impaired motor control, exercise capacity, and grip strength. Taken together, our results indicate that regulation of CaV2.1 channels by CaS proteins is essential for normal synaptic plasticity at the neuromuscular junction and for muscle strength, endurance, and motor coordination in mice in vivo. PMID:26755585

  20. The neuronal splicing factor Nova controls alternative splicing in N-type and P-type CaV2 calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Allen, Summer E; Darnell, Robert B; Lipscombe, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Many cellular processes are involved in optimizing protein function for specific neuronal tasks; here we focus on alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing gives cells the capacity to modify and selectively re-balance their existing pool of transcripts in a coordinated way across multiple mRNAs, thereby effecting relatively rapid and relatively stable changes in protein activity. Here we report on and discuss the coordinated regulation of two sites of alternative splicing, e24a and e31a, in P-type CaV2.1 and N-type CaV2.2 channels. These two exons encode 4 and 2 amino acids, respectively, in the extracellular linker regions between transmembrane spanning segments S3 and S4 in domains III and IV of each CaV2 subunit. Recent genome-wide screens of splicing factor-RNA binding events by Darnell and colleagues show that Nova-2 promotes inclusion of e24a in CaV2.2 mRNAs in brain. We review these studies and show that a homologous e24a is present in theCaV2 .1 gene, Cacna1a, and that it is expressed in different regions of the nervous system. Nova-2 enhances inclusion of e24a but represses e31a inclusion in CaV2.1 and CaV2.2 mRNAs in brain. It is likely that coordinated alternative pre-mRNA splicing across related CaV2 genes by common splicing factors, allows neurons to orchestrate changes in synaptic protein function while maintaining a balanced and functioning system. PMID:21150296

  1. The spectral analysis of an aero-engine assembly incorporating a squeeze-film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R.; Dede, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aero-engine structures have very low inherent damping and so artificial damping is often introduced by pumping oil into annular gaps between the casings and the outer races of some or all of the rolling-element bearings supporting the rotors. The thin oil films so formed are called squeeze film dampers and they can be beneficial in reducing rotor vibration due to unbalance and keeping to reasonable limits the forces transmitted to the engine casing. However, squeeze-film dampers are notoriously non-linear and as a result can introduce into the assembly such phenomena as subharmonic oscillations, jumps and combination frequencies. The purpose of the research is to investigate such phenomena both theoretically and experimentally on a test facility reproducing the essential features of a medium-size aero engine. The forerunner of this work was published. It was concerned with the examination of a squeeze-film damper in series with housing flexibility when supporting a rotor. The structure represented to a limited extent the essentials of the projected Rolls Royce RB401 engine. That research demonstrated the ability to calculate the oil-film forces arising from the squeeze film from known motions of the bearing components and showed that the dynamics of a shaft fitted with a squeeze film bearing can be predicted reasonably accurately. An aero-engine will normally have at least two shafts and so in addition to the excitation forces which are synchronous with the rotation of one shaft, there will also be forces at other frequencies from other shafts operating on the squeeze-film damper. Theoretical and experimental work to consider severe loading of squeeze-film dampers and to include these additional effects are examined.

  2. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  3. Development and Validation of a New Blade Element Momentum Skewed-Wake Model within AeroDyn: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, S. A.; Hayman, G.; Damiani, R.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-12-01

    Blade element momentum methods, though conceptually simple, are highly useful for analyzing wind turbines aerodynamics and are widely used in many design and analysis applications. A new version of AeroDyn is being developed to take advantage of new robust solution methodologies, conform to a new modularization framework for National Renewable Energy Laboratory's FAST, utilize advanced skewed-wake analysis methods, fix limitations with previous implementations, and to enable modeling of highly flexible and nonstraight blades. This paper reviews blade element momentum theory and several of the options available for analyzing skewed inflow. AeroDyn implementation details are described for the benefit of users and developers. These new options are compared to solutions from the previous version of AeroDyn and to experimental data. Finally, recommendations are given on how one might select from the various available solution approaches.

  4. Advanced technologies for rocket single-stage-to-orbit vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhite, Alan W.; Bush, Lance B.; Cruz, Christopher I.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Morris, W. Douglas; Stanley, Douglas O.; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    1991-01-01

    A single-stage-to-orbit vertical takeoff/horizontal landing rocket vehicle was studied to determine the benefits of advanced technology. Advanced technologies that were included in the study were variable mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen rocket engines and materials, structures, and subsystem technologies currently being developed in the National Aero-Space Plane Program. The application of advanced technology results in an 85 percent reduction in vehicle dry weight. With advanced materials, an external thermal protection system, like the Space Shuttle tiles, was not required. Compared to an all-airbreathing horizontal takeoff/horizontal landing vehicle using the same advanced technologies and mission requirements, the rocket vehicle is lighter in dry weight and has fewer subsystems. To increase reliability and safety, operational features were included in the rocket vehicle-robust subsystems, 5 percent additional margin, no slush hydrogen, fail-operational with an engine out, and a crew escape module. The resulting vehicle grew in dry weight and was still lower in dry weight than the airbreathing vehicle.

  5. Structured grid generation using a CAD solid model for an aero-gas turbine combustion system

    SciTech Connect

    Eccles, N.C.; Manners, A.P.

    1996-12-31

    An aero-gas turbine combustion system was used to demonstrate the problems of creating a single block structured grid suitable for CFD predictions from a designer`s parametric solid model. The solid model had to be filtered of sub-grid detail and computational fluid volumes generated from the solid model of the metal. Alternative methods of transferring the geometry from the CAD package to the grid generator were considered. The type and method of grid generation was found to influence all stages in manipulating the geometry.

  6. The Brief Introduction of Different Laser Diagnostics Methods Used in Aero-Engine Combustion Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Fei; Song, Ge; Ruan, Can; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Yongjun

    2016-06-01

    Combustion test diagnose has always been one of the most important technologies for the development of aerospace engineering. Laser diagnostics techniques developed quickly in the past several years. They are used to measure the parameters of the combustion flow field such as velocity, temperature, components concentration with high space and time resolution and brought no disturbance. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence, Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering, Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy and Raman Scattering were introduced systemically in this paper. After analysis their own advantages and disadvantages, it is believed that Raman Scattering system is more suitable for research activities on aero-engine combustion systems.

  7. AeroPropulsoServoElasticity: Dynamic Modeling of the Variable Cycle Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2012-01-01

    This presentation was made at the 2012 Fundamental Aeronautics Program Technical Conference and it covers research work for the Dynamic Modeling of the Variable cycle Propulsion System that was done under the Supersonics Project, in the area of AeroPropulsoServoElasticity. The presentation covers the objective for the propulsion system dynamic modeling work, followed by the work that has been done so far to model the variable Cycle Engine, modeling of the inlet, the nozzle, the modeling that has been done to model the affects of flow distortion, and finally presenting some concluding remarks and future plans.

  8. Aero-acoustic performance characteristics of duct burning turbofan exhaust nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, H.; Packman, A. B.; Gutierrez, O.

    1976-01-01

    A recent experimental investigation has identified the aero/acoustic characteristics of exhaust nozzles for duct heating turbofan engines over a range of simulated flow conditions. Jet noise and performance levels are summarized for a series of coannular nozzles representing both acoustically suppressed and unsuppressed designs operating in a static environment. The basic coannular nozzles were found to provide inherent noise suppression. Multi-element suppressor nozzles provided additional noise suppression, but with appreciable thrust loss. The impact of these results on the advanced supersonic transport studies is also presented, indicating potentially large reductions in take-off gross weight or community noise footprints.

  9. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  10. Population genetic structure of Sisyrinchium micranthum Cav. (Iridaceae) in Itapuã State Park, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tacuatiá, Luana Olinda; Eggers, Lilian; Kaltchuk-Santos, Eliane; Souza-Chies, Tatiana T

    2012-01-01

    Sisyrinchium micranthum Cav. is a member of the family Iridaceae, which is distributed over the American continent. In Brazil, this species is found, not only in disturbed areas and coastal regions, but is also very common in urban centers, such as public parks, during the spring. Chromosome counts for North American specimens are 2n = 32 and 2n = 48, whereas in southern Brazil, there is a polyploidy series with three chromosome numbers, 2n = 16, 2n = 32, and 2n = 48. Population analyses using DNA molecular markers are inexistent for this species, in spite of its wide distribution and morphological variation. To study the genetic population structure of S. micranthum, five natural populations were accessed in a conservation park within the Atlantic Rain Forest Biome in southern Brazil. Here, the chromosome numbers 2n = 16 and 2n = 48 had already been described. Molecular analysis showed that the populations are highly structured with low gene flow among them. The population with 2n = 48 was genetically less variable than and distinct from the other populations. Population genetics in relation to cytogenetic data provided new insights regarding the genetic diversification and mating system of S. micranthum. PMID:22481881

  11. A comparative study of mucilage and pulp polysaccharides from tamarillo fruit (Solanum betaceum Cav.).

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Georgia Erdmann; Iacomini, Marcello; Cordeiro, Lucimara M C

    2016-07-01

    A comparative study of mucilage (locular tissue) and pulp polysaccharides from ripe tamarillo fruits (Solanum betaceum Cav.) was carried out. After aqueous and alkaline extractions and various purification steps (freeze-thaw and α-amylase - EC 3.2.1.1 treatments, Fehling precipitation and ultrafiltration through 50 kDa cut-off membrane), the obtained fractions from mucilage were analyzed by sugar composition, HPSEC, and NMR spectroscopy analyses. The results showed that the mucilage of tamarillo contains a highly methoxylated homogalacturonans mixed with type I arabinogalactans, a linear (1 → 5)-linked α-L-arabinan, and a linear (1 → 4)-β-D-xylan. A comparison with polysaccharides extracted from the pulp revealed that differences were observed in the yield and in the ratio of extracted polysaccharides. Moreover, structural differences between pulp and mucilage polysaccharides were also observed, such as in the length of side chains of the pectins, and in the degree of branching of the xylans. PMID:27163609

  12. Agronomical and chemical characterisation of Thymbra capitata (L.) Cav. biotypes from Sicily, Italy.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Teresa; Dugo, Giacomo; Leto, Claudio; Cicero, Nicola; Tropea, Alessia; Virga, Giuseppe; Leone, Raffaele; Licata, Mario; La Bella, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the agronomical and chemical characterisation of 13 Sicilian biotypes of Thymbra capitata (L.) Cav., grown under the same agricultural and environmental condition, are reported. The main morpho-productive parameters and quali-quantitative profile of essential oils (EOs) were determined. The EOs were analysed by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis statistical methods were used to group biotypes according to the EOs chemical composition. The EO yield ranged between 4.6 and 8.1 (v/w). A total of 38 EO compounds have been identified. The compounds mostly represented were α-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, p-cymene, γ-terpinene, borneol, carvacrol and β-caryophyllene. In all biotypes, the carvacrol (67.4-79.5%) was the main compound, confirming that T. capitata is a carvacrol chemotype. The results showed that all Sicilian Thymbra biotypes have a good adaptation to the climatic conditions of the test environment. PMID:25600887

  13. Antifungal activity of Zuccagnia punctata Cav.: evidence for the mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Svetaz, Laura; Agüero, María Belén; Alvarez, Sandra; Luna, Lorena; Feresin, Gabriela; Derita, Marcos; Tapia, Alejandro; Zacchino, Susana

    2007-08-01

    Petroleum ether and dichloromethane extracts of fruits, aerial parts and exudate of Zuccagnia punctata Cav. (Fabaceae) showed moderate antifungal activities against the yeasts C. albicans, S. cerevisiae and C. neoformans (MICs: 62.5 - 250 microg/mL) and very strong antifungal activities against the dermatophytes M. gypseum, T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes (MICs: 8 - 16 microg/mL) thus supporting the ethnopharmacological use of this plant. Antifungal activity-directed fractionation of active extracts by using bioautography led to the isolation of 2',4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxychalcone (1) and 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone (2) as the compounds responsible for the antifungal activity. Second-order studies included MIC (80), MIC (50) and MFC of both chalcones in an extended panel of clinical isolates of the most sensitive fungi, and also comprised a series of targeted assays. They showed that the most active chalcone 2 is fungicidal rather than fungistatic, does not disrupt the fungal membranes up to 4 x MFC and does not act by inhibiting the fungal cell wall. So, 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone would act by a different mechanism of action than the antifungal drugs in current clinical use, such as amphotericin B, azoles or echinocandins, and thus appears to be very promising as a novel antifungal agent. PMID:17628836

  14. Argentinean propolis from Zuccagnia punctata Cav. (Caesalpinieae) exudates: phytochemical characterization and antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Agüero, María Belén; Gonzalez, Mariela; Lima, Beatriz; Svetaz, Laura; Sánchez, Marianela; Zacchino, Susana; Feresin, Gabriela Egly; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Palermo, Jorge; Wunderlin, Daniel; Tapia, Alejandro

    2010-01-13

    This paper reports the in vitro antifungal activity of propolis extracts from the province of Tucuman (Argentina) as well as the identification of their main antifungal compounds and botanical origin. The antifungal activity was determined by the microdilution technique, using reference microorganisms and clinical isolates. All dermatophytes and yeasts tested were strongly inhibited by different propolis extracts (MICs between 16 and 125 microg mL(-1)). The most susceptible species were Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, and Trichophyton rubrum. The main bioactive compounds were 2',4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxychalcone 2 and 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone 3. Both displayed strong activity against clinical isolates of T. rubrum and T. mentagrophytes (MICs and MFCs between 1.9 and 2.9 microg mL(-1)). Additionally, galangin 5, pinocembrin 6, and 7-hydroxy-8-methoxyflavanone 9 were isolated from propolis samples and Zuccagnia punctata exudates, showing moderate antifungal activity. This is the first study matching the chemical profile of Z. punctata Cav. exudates with their corresponding propolis, giving strong evidence on the botanical origin of the studied propolis. PMID:19916546

  15. Chemical constituents and biological activities of Galinsoga parviflora cav. (Asteraceae) from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Islam; Abd El-Aziz, Ehsan; Hafez, Samia; El-Shazly, Assem

    2013-01-01

    The phytochemical investigation of an aqueous ethanolic extract of Galinsoga parviflora Cav. (Asteraceae) resulted in the isolation and identification of eleven compounds namely: triacontanol, phytol, beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol, 7-hydroxy-beta-sitosterol, 7-hydroxystigmasterol, beta-sitosterol-3-O-beta-D-glucoside, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid, protocatechuic acid, fumaric acid, and uracil. Furthermore, 48 volatile constituents were identified in the hydrodistilled oil of the aerial parts. The ethanolic extract at a content of 400 mg/kg body weight (BW) exerted 87% reduction in the alanine aminotransferase enzyme level in cirrhotic rats compared with the standard silymarin (150 mg/kg BW) and also exerted a reduction in the blood glucose level equivalent to that of glibenclamide (5 mg/kg BW) in diabetic rats. The ethanolic extract, light petroleum and ethyl acetate fractions exhibited substantial antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans. The ethyl acetate fraction showed strong antioxidant activity at a concentration of 150 mg/mL as compared with 0.1 M ascorbic acid. The cytotoxic effect against the MCF-7 cell line was found to be weak. PMID:24066513

  16. Aero Spacelines B377PG Pregnant Guppy on ramp in preparation for flight tests and pilot evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The Aero Spacelines B377PG Pregnant Guppy was flown by Aero Spacelines pilots to Dryden for tests and evaluation by pilots Joe Vensel and Stan Butchart in October 1962. The outsized cargo aircraft incorporated the wings, engines, lower fuselage and tail from a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser with a huge upper fuselage more than 20 feet in diameter. The modified aircraft was built to transport outsized cargo for NASA's Apollo program, primarily to carry portions of the Saturn V rockets from the manufacturer to Cape Canaveral. Later versions of the aircraft, including the Super Guppy and the Super Guppy Turbine, are still in use.

  17. Airborne Laser Laboratory departure from Kirtland Air Force Base and a brief history of aero-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrazis, Demos T.

    2013-07-01

    We discuss aspects of the development of the Airborne Laser Laboratory. Our discussion is historical in nature and consists of the text from a speech given on the occasion of the Airborne Laser Laboratory leaving Kirtland Air Force Base (AFB) to fly to Wright-Patterson AFB to become an exhibit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. The last part of the discussion concerns the inception of the study of aero-optics as an area of research and some of the milestones in the understanding of the causes and prediction of aero-optical effects.

  18. RIM1/2-Mediated Facilitation of Cav1.4 Channel Opening Is Required for Ca2+-Stimulated Release in Mouse Rod Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Chad P; Gandini, Maria A; Rehak, Renata; Le, Yun; Zamponi, Gerald W; Schmitz, Frank

    2015-09-23

    Night blindness can result from impaired photoreceptor function and a subset of cases have been linked to dysfunction of Cav1.4 calcium channels and in turn compromised synaptic transmission. Here, we show that active zone proteins RIM1/2 are important regulators of Cav1.4 channel function in mouse rod photoreceptors and thus synaptic activity. The conditional double knock-out (cdko) of RIM1 and RIM2 from rods starting a few weeks after birth did not change Cav1.4 protein expression at rod ribbon synapses nor was the morphology of the ribbon altered. Heterologous overexpression of RIM2 with Cav1.4 had no significant influence on current density when examined with BaCl2 as the charge carrier. Nonetheless, whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from cdko rods revealed a profound reduction in Ca(2+) currents. Concomitantly, we observed a 4-fold reduction in spontaneous miniature release events from the cdko rod terminals and an almost complete absence of evoked responses when monitoring changes in membrane incorporation after strong step depolarizations. Under control conditions, 49 and 83 vesicles were released with 0.2 and 1 s depolarizations, respectively, which is close to the maximal number of vesicles estimated to be docked at the base of the ribbon active zone, but without RIM1/2, only a few vesicles were stimulated for release after a 1 s stimulation. In conclusion, our study shows that RIM1/2 potently enhance the influx of Ca(2+) into rod terminals through Cav1.4 channels, which is vitally important for the release of vesicles from the rod ribbon. Significance statement: Active zone scaffolding proteins are thought to bring multiple components involved in Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis into functional interactions. We show that removal of scaffolding proteins RIM1/2 from rod photoreceptor ribbon synapses causes a dramatic loss of Ca(2+) influx through Cav1.4 channels and a correlated reduction in evoked release, yet the channels remain localized to synaptic ribbons

  19. Functional upregulation of the H2S/Cav3.2 channel pathway accelerates secretory function in neuroendocrine-differentiated human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukami, Kazuki; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Yasukawa, Miku; Asano, Erina; Kasamatsu, Ryuji; Ueda, Mai; Yoshida, Shigeru; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-10-01

    Neuroendocrine-differentiated prostate cancer cells may contribute to androgen-independent proliferation of surrounding cells through Ca(2+)-dependent secretion of mitogenic factors. Human prostate cancer LNCaP cells, when neuroendocrine-differentiated, overexpress Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels that contribute to Ca(2+)-dependent secretion. Given evidence for the acceleration of Cav3.2 activity by hydrogen sulfide (H2S), we examined the roles of the H2S/Cav3.2 pathway and then analyzed the molecular mechanisms of the Cav3.2 overexpression in neuroendocrine-differentiated LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells were differentiated by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protein levels and T-type Ca(2+) channel-dependent currents (T-currents) were measured by immunoblotting and whole-cell pacth-clamp technique, respectively. Spontaneous release of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) was monitored to evaluate secretory function. The differentiated LNCaP cells exhibited neurite outgrowth, androgen-independent proliferation and upregulation of mitogenic factors, and also showed elevation of Cav3.2 expression or T-currents. Expression of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), H2S-forming enzymes, and spontaneous secretion of PAP increased following the differentiation. The augmented T-currents were enhanced by H2S donors and suppressed by inhibitors of CSE, but not CBS. The PAP secretion was reduced by inhibition of CSE or T-type Ca(2+) channels. During differentiation, Egr-1 and REST, positive and negative transcriptional regulators for Cav3.2, were upregulated and downregulated, respectively, and Egr-1 knockdown prevented the Cav3.2 overexpression. Our data suggest that, in neuroendocrine-differentiated LNCaP cells, H2S formed by the upregulated CSE promotes the activity of the upregulated Cav3.2, leading to the elevated secretory functions. The overexpression of Cav3.2 appears to involve upregulation of Egr-1 and downregulation of REST. PMID:26256074

  20. Descent vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popov, Y. I.

    1985-01-01

    The creation of descent vehicles marked a new stage in the development of cosmonautics, involving the beginning of manned space flight and substantial progress in space research on the distant bodies of the Solar System. This booklet describes these vehicles and their structures, systems, and purposes. It is intended for the general public interested in modern problems of space technology.

  1. Vehicle systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Tom; Modlin, Tom; Suddreth, Jack; Wheeler, Tom; Tenney, Darrel R.; Bayless, Ernest O.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bolstad, Donald A.; Croop, Harold; Dyer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Perspectives of the subpanel on expendable launch vehicle structures and cryotanks are: (1) new materials which provide the primary weight savings effect on vehicle mass/size; (2) today's investment; (3) typically 10-20 years to mature and fully characterize new materials.

  2. Pharmacological modulation of the AKT/microRNA-199a-5p/CAV1 pathway ameliorates cystic fibrosis lung hyper-inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping-xia; Cheng, Jijun; Zou, Siying; D’Souza, Anthony D.; Koff, Jonathan L.; Lu, Jun; Lee, Patty J.; Krause, Diane S.; Egan, Marie E.; Bruscia, Emanuela M.

    2015-01-01

    In Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients, hyper-inflammation is a key factor in lung destruction and disease morbidity. We have previously demonstrated that macrophages drive the lung hyper-inflammatory response to LPS in CF mice, due to reduced levels of the scaffold protein CAV1 with subsequent uncontrolled TLR4 signaling. Here we show that reduced CAV1 and, consequently, increased TLR4 signaling, in human and murine CF macrophages and murine CF lungs, is caused by high microRNA-199a-5p levels, which are PI3K/AKT-dependent. Down-regulation of microRNA-199a-5p or increased AKT signaling restores CAV1 expression and reduces hyper-inflammation in CF macrophages. Importantly, the FDA approved drug celecoxib reestablishes the AKT/miR-199a-5p/CAV1 axis in CF macrophages, and ameliorates lung hyper-inflammation in Cftr-deficient mice. Thus, we identify the AKT/miR-199a-5p/CAV1 pathway as a regulator of innate immunity, which is dysfunctional in CF macrophages contributing to lung hyper-inflammation. Importantly, this pathway is targeted by celecoxib. PMID:25665524

  3. Structural basis for the differential effects of CaBP1 and calmodulin on CaV1.2 calcium-dependent inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Felix; Minor, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1), a calmodulin (CaM) homolog, endows certain voltage-gated calcium channels (CaVs) with unusual properties. CaBP1 inhibits CaV1.2 calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and introduces calcium-dependent facilitation (CDF). Here, we show that the ability of CaBP1 to inhibit CaV1.2 CDI and induce CDF arises from interaction between the CaBP1 N-lobe and interlobe linker residue Glu94. Unlike CaM, where functional EF hands are essential for channel modulation, CDI inhibition does not require functional CaBP1 EF-hands. Furthermore, CaBP1-mediated CDF has different molecular requirements than CaM-mediated CDF. Overall, the data show that CaBP1 comprises two structural modules having separate functions: similar to CaM, the CaBP1 C-lobe serves as a high-affinity anchor that binds the CaV1.2 IQ domain at a site that overlaps with the Ca2+/CaM C-lobe site, whereas the N-lobe/linker module houses the elements required for channel modulation. Discovery of this division provides the framework for understanding how CaBP1 regulates CaVs. PMID:21134641

  4. A rapid method to achieve aero-engine blade form detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a rapid method to detect aero-engine blade form, according to the characteristics of an aero-engine blade surface. This method first deduces an inclination error model in free-form surface measurements based on the non-contact laser triangulation principle. Then a four-coordinate measuring system was independently developed, a special fixture was designed according to the blade shape features, and a fast measurement of the blade features path was planned. Finally, by using the inclination error model for correction of acquired data, the measurement error that was caused by tilt form is compensated. As a result the measurement accuracy of the Laser Displacement Sensor was less than 10 μm. After the experimental verification, this method makes full use of optical non-contact measurement fast speed, high precision and wide measuring range of features. Using a standard gauge block as a measurement reference, the coordinate system conversion data is simple and practical. It not only improves the measurement accuracy of the blade surface, but also its measurement efficiency. Therefore, this method increases the value of the measurement of complex surfaces. PMID:26039420

  5. Aero-Propulsion Technology (APT) Task V Low Noise ADP Engine Definition Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcombe, V.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify and evaluate noise reduction technologies for advanced ducted prop propulsion systems that would allow increased capacity operation and result in an economically competitive commercial transport. The study investigated the aero/acoustic/structural advancements in fan and nacelle technology required to match or exceed the fuel burned and economic benefits of a constrained diameter large Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) compared to an unconstrained ADP propulsion system with a noise goal of 5 to 10 EPNDB reduction relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 at each of the three measuring stations namely, takeoff (cutback), approach and sideline. A second generation ADP was selected to operate within the maximum nacelle diameter constrain of 160 deg to allow installation under the wing. The impact of fan and nacelle technologies of the second generation ADP on fuel burn and direct operating costs for a typical 3000 nm mission was evaluated through use of a large, twin engine commercial airplane simulation model. The major emphasis of this study focused on fan blade aero/acoustic and structural technology evaluations and advanced nacelle designs. Results of this study have identified the testing required to verify the interactive performance of these components, along with noise characteristics, by wind tunnel testing utilizing and advanced interaction rig.

  6. Dynamics of fine particles and photo-oxidants in the Eastern Mediterranean (SUB-AERO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaridis, M.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Smolik, J.; Colbeck, I.; Kallos, G.; Drossinos, Y.; Zdimal, V.; Vecera, Z.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Mikuska, P.; Bryant, C.; Housiadas, C.; Spyridaki, A.; Astitha, Marina; Havranek, V.

    As part of the European project SUB-AERO, comprehensive aerosol and gaseous pollutant measurement campaigns were performed at the Finokalia station (July 2000 and January 2001) on the island of Crete (Greece) in combination with boat measurements in the eastern part of the Mediterranean area. The measurements were performed with the participation of nine European research institutions. The objective of the measurement campaigns was to evaluate and assess the spatial and temporal variability of photochemical pollutants and fine particles. The current overview paper presents the framework and main results of the measurements and modelling studies performed during the project. Extensive measurements of gaseous and atmospheric-aerosol physical, chemical and optical characteristics were performed during the measurement campaigns in conjunction with detailed chemical analyses of the aerosol species. Along with the experimental work mesoscale modelling, using a combination of the UAM-AERO air quality model together with the RAMS prognostic meteorological model, was used to reveal the dynamics of particulate matter and photo-oxidants. Furthermore, regional chemistry transport models were applied to determine the background and initial conditions for the mesoscale modelling.

  7. Aero-thermo-mechanical characteristics of imperfect shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hesham Hamed; Yoo, Hong Hee; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2009-08-01

    A nonlinear finite element model is provided to predict the static aero-thermal deflection and the vibration behavior of geometrically imperfect shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels under the combined effect of thermal and aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear governing equations are obtained using Marguerre curved plate theory and the principle of virtual work taking into account the temperature-dependence of material properties. The effect of large deflection is included in the formulation through the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations. The thermal load is assumed to be a steady-state constant-temperature distribution, whereas the aerodynamic pressure is modeled using the quasi-steady first-order piston theory. The Newton-Raphson iteration method is employed to obtain the nonlinear aero-thermal deflections, while an eigenvalue problem is solved at each temperature step and static aerodynamic load to predict the free vibration frequencies about the deflected equilibrium position. Finally, the nonlinear deflection and free vibration characteristics of a composite panel are presented, illustrating the effects of geometric imperfection, temperature rise, aerodynamic pressure, boundary conditions and shape memory alloy fiber embeddings on the panel response.

  8. A Rapid Method to Achieve Aero-Engine Blade Form Detection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Li, Bing

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a rapid method to detect aero-engine blade form, according to the characteristics of an aero-engine blade surface. This method first deduces an inclination error model in free-form surface measurements based on the non-contact laser triangulation principle. Then a four-coordinate measuring system was independently developed, a special fixture was designed according to the blade shape features, and a fast measurement of the blade features path was planned. Finally, by using the inclination error model for correction of acquired data, the measurement error that was caused by tilt form is compensated. As a result the measurement accuracy of the Laser Displacement Sensor was less than 10 μm. After the experimental verification, this method makes full use of optical non-contact measurement fast speed, high precision and wide measuring range of features. Using a standard gauge block as a measurement reference, the coordinate system conversion data is simple and practical. It not only improves the measurement accuracy of the blade surface, but also its measurement efficiency. Therefore, this method increases the value of the measurement of complex surfaces. PMID:26039420

  9. Development of the Abbott MATRIX Aero assay for the measurement of specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, R E; Anawis, M A; Bailey, M; Mangat, D; Frank, P M; Hrusovsky, I G; Hooyman, L; Putterman, C; Defreese, J D

    1991-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay has been developed for the quantitation of specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) in human serum to a panel of allergens. The assay system, called the Abbott MATRIX Aero, includes an instrument, reagents and test cell disposables. Each test cell contains fourteen airborne allergens individually localized on a nitrocellulose solid phase. Individual calibration curves for each allergen are established by the manufacturer and included in barcode form with each test kit. Stable factory calibration eliminates the need to establish a calibration curve with each assay run. The instrument automatically incubates, washes, and reads the test cell and prints each result, which ensures assay reproducibility and provides ease-of-use. Analysis of test results shows good agreement with another in vitro assay for specific IgE. The Abbott MATRIX Aero is a sensitive, reproducible and easy-to-use system for the measurement of specific IgE to a panel of fourteen allergens simultaneously using a single, small volume of serum. PMID:1806584

  10. Chronic hypoxia selectively enhances L- and T-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel activity in pulmonary artery by upregulating Cav1.2 and Cav3.2.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jun; Yamamura, Aya; Zimnicka, Adriana M; Voiriot, Guillaume; Smith, Kimberly A; Tang, Haiyang; Ayon, Ramon J; Choudhury, Moumita S R; Ko, Eun A; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen; Makino, Ayako; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2013-07-15

    Hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is characterized by sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling, both of which are mediated by pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) contraction and proliferation, respectively. An increase in cytosolic Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]cyt) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and an important stimulus for cell proliferation in PASMCs. Ca²⁺ influx through voltage-dependent Ca²⁺ channels (VDCC) is an important pathway for the regulation of [Ca²⁺]cyt. The potential role for L- and T-type VDCC in the development of HPH is still unclear. Using a hypoxic-induced pulmonary hypertension mouse model, we undertook this study to identify if VDCC in pulmonary artery (PA) are functionally upregulated and determine which type of VDCC are altered in HPH. Mice subjected to chronic hypoxia developed pulmonary hypertension within 4 wk, and high-K⁺- and U-46619-induced contraction of PA was greater in chronic hypoxic mice than that in normoxic control mice. Additionally, we demonstrate that high-K⁺- and U-46619-induced Ca²⁺ influx in PASMC is significantly increased in the hypoxic group. The VDCC activator, Bay K8864, induced greater contraction of the PA of hypoxic mice than in that of normoxic mice in isometric force measurements. L-type and T-type VDCC blockers significantly attenuated absolute contraction of the PA in hypoxic mice. Chronic hypoxia did not increase high-K⁺- and U-46619-induced contraction of mesenteric artery (MA). Compared with MA, PA displayed higher expression of calcium channel voltage-dependent L-type α1C-subunit (Cav1.2) and T-type α1H-subunit (Cav3.2) upon exposure to chronic hypoxia. In conclusion, both L-type and T-type VDCC were functionally upregulated in PA, but not MA, in HPH mice, which could result from selectively increased expression of Cav1.2 and Cav3.2. PMID:23686856

  11. Heat pipes for wing leading edges of hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boman, B. L.; Citrin, K. M.; Garner, E. C.; Stone, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    Wing leading edge heat pipes were conceptually designed for three types of vehicle: an entry research vehicle, aero-space plane, and advanced shuttle. A full scale, internally instrumented sodium/Hastelloy X heat pipe was successfully designed and fabricated for the advanced shuttle application. The 69.4 inch long heat pipe reduces peak leading edge temperatures from 3500 F to 1800 F. It is internally instrumented with thermocouples and pressure transducers to measure sodium vapor qualities. Large thermal gradients and consequently large thermal stresses, which have the potential of limiting heat pipe life, were predicted to occur during startup. A test stand and test plan were developed for subsequent testing of this heat pipe. Heat pipe manufacturing technology was advanced during this program, including the development of an innovative technique for wick installation.

  12. Space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A space vehicle having an improved ascent configuration for use in traveling in space is presented. Components of the vehicle are: (1) a winged orbiter having an elongater fuselage and rearwardly directed main engines fixed to the fuselage; (2) an elongated tank assembly of an improved configuration disposed forwardly of the fuselage and connected with the main engines of the vehicle for supplying liquid propellants; and (3) a booster stage comprising a pair of integrated solid rocket boosters connected with the orbiter immediately beneath the fuselage and extended in substantial parallelism.

  13. Aero Spacelines B377SG Super Guppy on Ramp Loading the X-24B and HL-10 Lifting Bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Aero Spacelines B377SG Super Guppy was at Dryden in May, 1976, to ferry the X-24 and HL-10 lifting bodies from the Center to the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The oversized cargo aircraft is a further modification of the B377PG Pregnant Guppy, which was built to transport outsized cargo for NASA's Apollo program, primarily to carry portions of the Saturn V rockets from the manufacturer to Cape Canaveral. The original Guppy modification incorporated the wings, engines, lower fuselage and tail from a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser with a huge upper fuselage more than 20 feet in diameter. The Super Guppy further expanded the fuselage added a taller vertical tail for better lateral stability. A later version, the Super Guppy Turbine, is still in occasional use by NASA to transport oversize structures. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered

  14. Aero Spacelines B377SG Super Guppy on Ramp Loading the X-24B and HL-10 Lifting Bodies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Aero Spacelines B377SG Super Guppy was at Dryden in May, 1976, to ferry the X-24 and HL-10 lifting bodies from the Center to the Air Force Museum at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The oversized cargo aircraft is a further modification of the B377PG Pregnant Guppy, which was built to transport outsized cargo for NASA's Apollo program, primarily to carry portions of the Saturn V rockets from the manufacturer to Cape Canaveral. The original Guppy modification incorporated the wings, engines, lower fuselage and tail from a Boeing 377 Stratocruiser with a huge upper fuselage more than 20 feet in diameter. The Super Guppy further expanded the fuselage added a taller vertical tail for better lateral stability. A later version, the Super Guppy Turbine, is still in occasional use by NASA to transport oversize structures. The X-24 was one of a group of lifting bodies flown by the NASA Flight Research Center (now Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, in a joint program with the U.S. Air Force at Edwards Air Force Base from 1963 to 1975. The lifting bodies were used to demonstrate the ability of pilots to maneuver and safely land wingless vehicles designed to fly back to Earth from space and be landed like an airplane at a predetermined site. Lifting bodies' aerodynamic lift, essential to flight in the atmosphere, was obtained from their shape. The addition of fins and control surfaces allowed the pilots to stabilize and control the vehicles and regulate their flight paths. Built by Martin Aircraft Company, Maryland, for the U.S. Air Force, the X-24A was a bulbous vehicle shaped like a teardrop with three vertical fins at the rear for directional control. It weighed 6,270 pounds, was 24.5 feet long and 11.5 feet wide (measuring just the fuselage, not the distance between the tips of the outboard fins). Its first unpowered glide flight was on April 17, 1969, with Air Force Maj. Jerauld Gentry at the controls. Gentry also piloted its first powered

  15. Investigation of biological activity of polar extracts isolated from Phlomis crinita Cav ssp. mauritanica Munby.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sghaïer, Mohamed; Neffati, Aicha; Bhouri, Wissem; Bouhlel, Ines; Chouchane, Nabil; Kilani, Soumaya; Guedon, Emmanuel; Ghoul, Mohamed; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-01-01

    The lyophilized infusion, the methanol, the ethyl acetate, and the total oligomer flavonoid (TOF)-enriched extracts prepared from the dried leaves of Phlomis crinita Cav. ssp. mauritanica Munby were investigated for the contents of flavonoids, tannins, coumarines and steroids. Antibacterial activity was investigated toward five bacterial strains. An inhibitory effect was observed against Staphyllococcus aureus and Enterococcus feacalis, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 5 mg/mL of extract. The tested extracts exhibit an important free radical scavenging activity toward the 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical; with IC(50) values of 30.5, 6, 32, and 31.5 microg/mL, respectively, in the presence of lyophilized infusion, the TOF, the methanol, and the ethyl acetate extracts. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties of the different extracts were studied by using the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli PQ37. The lyophilized infusion and TOF extracts obtained from P. crinita ssp. mauritanica showed no genotoxicity, whereas methanol and ethyl acetate extracts are considered as marginally genotoxic. On the other hand, we showed that each extract inhibited the mutagenicity induced by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) (10 microg/assay) and nifuroxazide (NF) (10 microg/assay). The ethyl acetate extract showed the strongest level of protection toward the genotoxicity induced by both directly and indirectly genotoxic NF and AFB1. These tests proved that the lyophilized infusion possesses an antiradical activity likewise, it showed no genotoxic effect; that is why we choose this extract to assess its antiulcerogenic activity by using an ethanol-induced ulcerogenesis model in the rat. This test demonstrates that 300 mg/kg of a P. crinita ssp. mauritanica lyophilized infusion was more effective than the reference compound, cimetidine. PMID:19514937

  16. Antidepressant-like effect of Tagetes lucida Cav. extract in rats: involvement of the serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Gabriela, Guadarrama-Cruz; Javier, Alarcón-Aguilar Francisco; Elisa, Vega-Avila; Gonzalo, Vázquez-Palacios; Herlinda, Bonilla-Jaime

    2012-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the decoction of the aerial parts of Tagetes lucida Cav. produces an antidepressant effect during the forced swimming test (FST) in rats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different organic extracts and one aqueous extract of the aerial parts of T. lucida on the FST. In addition, the possible involvement of the serotonergic system in the antidepressant-like effect of T. lucida in the FST was evaluated, as was its potential toxicological effect. The different extracts of T. lucida (methanol, hexane, dichloromethane and aqueous, 10 and 50 mg/kg), as well as fluoxetine (FLX, 5 mg/kg), were administered per os (p.o.) to rats for 14 days. All animals were subjected to the FST. Only the aqueous extract of T. lucida at a dose of 50 mg/kg significantly reduced immobility behavior and increased swimming in the FST, similar to FLX. Later, the aqueous extract of T. lucida (50mg/kg) was administered for 1, 7 and 14 days. An antidepressant effect was observed after 7 days of treatment. To evaluate the participation of the serotoninergic system, the animals were pretreated with PCPA, an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis (100 mg/kg/day for 4 consecutive days). The animals were treated with the aqueous extract of T. lucida (50 mg/kg) and FLX (5 mg/kg) 24 h after the final injection and were then subjected to the FST. Pretreatment with PCPA inhibited the antidepressant effect of both T. lucida and FLX. Finally, T. lucida was administered p.o. and intraperitoneal route to evaluate its acute toxicological effect. The aqueous extract of T. lucida, administered p.o., did not produce lethality or any significant changes in behavior. In conclusion, the aqueous extract of T. lucida manifested an antidepressant-like effect in the FST mediated by the serotonergic system, with no adverse effects when administered p.o. PMID:22809029

  17. Evaluation of genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of hydroalcoholic extracts of Zuccagnia punctata Cav.

    PubMed

    Zampini, Iris Catiana; Villarini, Milena; Moretti, Massimo; Dominici, Luca; Isla, María Inés

    2008-01-17

    Zuccagnia punctata Cav. (Fabaceae), a widely used plant species in Argentine folk medicine, has been shown to have a broad spectrum of antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant and cytoprotective activities. In this study, the hydroalcoholic extract of Zuccagnia punctata and 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone isolated from it were investigated for genotoxicity/antigenotoxicity in the in vitro comet assay test on human hepatoma HepG2 cells. No acute toxicity of the extract could be determined. HepG2 cells were treated with three different concentrations (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 microg/mL) or 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone (0.01, 0.10 and 1.00 microg/mL). To explore the potential mechanisms of action, two approaches were followed: co-treatment with 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxyde (4-NQO), a direct genotoxic compound, and a pre-treatment protocol with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), an indirect genotoxic compound. The natural products neither affected cell viability nor induced DNA damage in the concentration range tested. Zuccagnia punctata tinctures were able to diminish the DNA damage induced in HepG2 cells by 4-NQO and B[a]P in 31% and 10%, respectively at 10 microg/mL. Pre-treatment of HepG2 cells with 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone was highly effective in decreasing B[a]P-induced DNA damage at a statistically significant level, with an almost clear dose-response relationship. The inhibition values were 28.2-43.9% for the tested concentrations of 0.01-1 microg/mL, respectively. The results clearly indicate that the phytoextract from Zuccagnia punctata, under the experimental conditions tested, is not genotoxic and that 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone contributes to a high degree to the antigenotoxic effects of Zuccagnia punctata tincture. PMID:18023546

  18. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of gasotransmitters to itch sensation are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a ubiquitous gasotransmitter, in itch signaling. We found that intradermal injection of H2S donors NaHS or Na2S, but not GYY4137 (a slow-releasing H2S donor), dose-dependently induced scratching behavior in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent and histamine-independent manner in mice. Interestingly, NaHS induced itch via unique mechanisms that involved capsaicin-insensitive A-fibers, but not TRPV1-expressing C-fibers that are traditionally considered for mediating itch, revealed by depletion of TRPV1-expressing C-fibers by systemic resiniferatoxin treatment. Moreover, local application of capsaizapine (TRPV1 blocker) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 blocker) had no effects on NaHS-evoked scratching. Strikingly, pharmacological blockade and silencing of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel by mibefradil, ascorbic acid, zinc chloride or Cav3.2 siRNA dramatically decreased NaHS-evoked scratching. NaHS induced robust alloknesis (touch-evoked itch), which was inhibited by T-type calcium channels blocker mibefradil. Compound 48/80-induced itch was enhanced by an endogenous precursor of H2S (L-cysteine) but attenuated by inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. These results indicated that H2S, as a novel nonhistaminergic itch mediator, may activates Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, probably located at A-fibers, to induce scratching and alloknesis in mice. PMID:26602811

  19. Hydrogen sulfide-induced itch requires activation of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Long; Tian, Bin; Huang, Ya; Peng, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Li-Hua; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of gasotransmitters to itch sensation are largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a ubiquitous gasotransmitter, in itch signaling. We found that intradermal injection of H2S donors NaHS or Na2S, but not GYY4137 (a slow-releasing H2S donor), dose-dependently induced scratching behavior in a μ-opioid receptor-dependent and histamine-independent manner in mice. Interestingly, NaHS induced itch via unique mechanisms that involved capsaicin-insensitive A-fibers, but not TRPV1-expressing C-fibers that are traditionally considered for mediating itch, revealed by depletion of TRPV1-expressing C-fibers by systemic resiniferatoxin treatment. Moreover, local application of capsaizapine (TRPV1 blocker) or HC-030031 (TRPA1 blocker) had no effects on NaHS-evoked scratching. Strikingly, pharmacological blockade and silencing of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel by mibefradil, ascorbic acid, zinc chloride or Cav3.2 siRNA dramatically decreased NaHS-evoked scratching. NaHS induced robust alloknesis (touch-evoked itch), which was inhibited by T-type calcium channels blocker mibefradil. Compound 48/80-induced itch was enhanced by an endogenous precursor of H2S (L-cysteine) but attenuated by inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase and cystathionine β-synthase. These results indicated that H2S, as a novel nonhistaminergic itch mediator, may activates Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel, probably located at A-fibers, to induce scratching and alloknesis in mice. PMID:26602811

  20. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Ca(v)2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, R; Rutten, K; Valdor, M; Schiene, K; Wigge, S; Schunk, S; Damann, N; Christoph, T; Dickenson, A H

    2015-06-25

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Ca(v)2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Ca(v)2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Ca(v)2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury. PMID:25839150

  1. Electrophysiological characterization of activation state-dependent Cav2 channel antagonist TROX-1 in spinal nerve injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R.; Rutten, K.; Valdor, M.; Schiene, K.; Wigge, S.; Schunk, S.; Damann, N.; Christoph, T.; Dickenson, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Prialt, a synthetic version of Cav2.2 antagonist ω-conotoxin MVIIA derived from Conus magus, is the first clinically approved voltage-gated calcium channel blocker for refractory chronic pain. However, due to the narrow therapeutic window and considerable side effects associated with systemic dosing, Prialt is only administered intrathecally. N-triazole oxindole (TROX-1) is a novel use-dependent and activation state-selective small-molecule inhibitor of Cav2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 calcium channels designed to overcome the limitations of Prialt. We have examined the neurophysiological and behavioral effects of blocking calcium channels with TROX-1. In vitro, TROX-1, in contrast to state-independent antagonist Prialt, preferentially inhibits Cav2.2 currents in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons under depolarized conditions. In vivo electrophysiology was performed to record from deep dorsal horn lamina V/VI wide dynamic range neurons in non-sentient spinal nerve-ligated (SNL) and sham-operated rats. In SNL rats, spinal neurons exhibited reduced responses to innocuous and noxious punctate mechanical stimulation of the receptive field following subcutaneous administration of TROX-1, an effect that was absent in sham-operated animals. No effect was observed on neuronal responses evoked by dynamic brushing, heat or cold stimulation in SNL or sham rats. The wind-up response of spinal neurons following repeated electrical stimulation of the receptive field was also unaffected. Spinally applied TROX-1 dose dependently inhibited mechanically evoked neuronal responses in SNL but not sham-operated rats, consistent with behavioral observations. This study confirms the pathological state-dependent actions of TROX-1 through a likely spinal mechanism and reveals a modality selective change in calcium channel function following nerve injury. PMID:25839150

  2. 75 FR 67639 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or... Industries S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... maintenance requirements and/or airworthiness limitations developed by Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A....

  3. 76 FR 10224 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... this AD, contact Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A., Via Cibrario, 4-16154 Genoa, Italy; phone: +39 010... NPRM was published in the Federal Register on November 3, 2010 (75 FR 67639). That NPRM proposed...

  4. 75 FR 68172 - Airworthiness Directives; Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.A. Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and (3) Will not have a... Industries S.p.A. Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... identified in this AD, contact Piaggio Aero Industries S.p.a., Via Cibrario, 4-16154 Genoa, Italy; phone:...

  5. 75 FR 904 - Airworthiness Directives; PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... INDUSTRIES S.p.A Model PIAGGIO P-180 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of... Directive (AD) 2009-21-08, which applies to PIAGGIO AERO INDUSTRIES S.p.A. (Piaggio) Model PIAGGIO P-180... as AD 2009-21-08. As of December 14, 2009 (74 FR 57561, November 9, 2009), the Director of...

  6. Development of a temporal evolution model for aero-optical effects caused by vortices in the supersonic mixing layer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guangming; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The vortices inside mixing layers impose remarkable aero-optical distortions on a beam even at moderate subsonic speeds. Knowledge about aero-optical effects caused by vortices in the flow field, especially their spatial and temporal evolution, is limited for supersonic mixing layers because the flows have very high speeds. In this paper, the temporal evolution of aero-optical effects caused by vortices in the supersonic mixing layer was investigated. A large eddy simulation was used to simulate the supersonic flow. A novel approach, coordinate extraction of vortex core, which is based on the relationship between vortices and the profile of the optical path length over the flow field, was proposed to quantitatively calculate the radii and convective speeds of vortices. A model used to quantitatively describe the temporal evolution of aero-optical effects caused by vortices in the supersonic mixing layer was developed and validated with data of numerical calculation. The results indicated that the model is available. Finally, several conclusions drawn from this work were presented. PMID:27139676

  7. Results From Simulations of an Ensemble of Global Aerosol Models Using the Same Emission Data Within AeroCom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Textor, C.; Schulz, M.; Guibert, S.; Kinne, S.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in many important environmental issues including stratospheric ozone depletion, smog, acid rain, and climate change. The AeroCom exercise aims to identify weak components in aerosol modeling and to decrease the uncertainty of aerosol radiative forcing. AeroCom is an open international initiative of scientists interested in the advancement of the understanding of the global aerosol and its impact on climate. A variety of observations and simulation results from 16 global aerosol models have been assembled in the frame of AeroCom. In this study, results from two series of experiments are presented. In a first experiment, each model was run with different emission data. In a second experiment, all models used the same emission data sets. These data include temporal and spatial (including injection height) information, and particle sizes. We examine the parameters and processes that determine the aerosol fields and life cycles, and discuss new radiative forcing estimates from the AeroCom exercise. The diversities among the models for sea salt, dust, black carbon, particulate organic matter, and sulfate are quantified. We can show that harmonizing the emissions has little effect on the diversity among models.

  8. Cav1.2 splice variant with exon 9* is critical for regulation of cerebral artery diameter

    PubMed Central

    Nystoriak, Matthew A.; Murakami, Kentaro; Penar, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) are essential for numerous processes in the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Alternative splicing modulates proteomic composition of Cav1.2 to generate functional variation between channel isoforms. Here, we describe expression and function of Cav1.2 channels containing alternatively spliced exon 9* in cerebral artery myocytes. RT-PCR showed expression of Cav1.2 splice variants both containing (α1C9/9*/10) and lacking (α1C9/10) exon 9* in intact rabbit and human cerebral arteries. With the use of laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR, expression of mRNA for both α1C9/9*/10 and α1C9/10 was demonstrated in isolated cerebral artery myocytes. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed significantly greater α1C9/9*/10 expression relative to α1C9/10 in intact rabbit cerebral arteries compared with cardiac tissue and cerebral cortex. To demonstrate a functional role for α1C9/9*/10, smooth muscle of intact cerebral arteries was treated with antisense oligonucleotides targeting α1C9/9*/10 (α1C9/9*/10-AS) or exon 9 (α1C-AS), expressed in all Cav1.2 splice variants, by reversible permeabilization and organ cultured for 1–4 days. Treatment with α1C9/9*/10-AS reduced maximal constriction induced by elevated extracellular K+ ([K+]o) by ∼75% compared with α1C9/9*/10-sense-treated arteries. Maximal constriction in response to the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin and [K+]o EC50 values were not altered by antisense treatment. Decreases in maximal [K+]o-induced constriction were similar between α1C9/9*/10-AS and α1C-AS groups (22.7 ± 9% and 25.6 ± 4% constriction, respectively). We conclude that although cerebral artery myocytes express both α1C9/9*/10 and α1C9/10 VDCC splice variants, α1C9/9*/10 is functionally dominant in the control of cerebral artery diameter. PMID:19717733

  9. Inhibitory and excitatory axon terminals share a common nano-architecture of their Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Althof, Daniel; Baehrens, David; Watanabe, Masahiko; Suzuki, Noboru; Fakler, Bernd; Kulik, Ákos

    2015-01-01

    Tuning of the time course and strength of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter release is fundamental for the precise operation of cortical network activity and is controlled by Ca2+ influx into presynaptic terminals through the high voltage-activated P/Q-type Ca2+ (Cav2.1) channels. Proper channel-mediated Ca2+-signaling critically depends on the topographical arrangement of the channels in the presynaptic membrane. Here, we used high-resolution SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica immunoelectron microscopy together with automatized computational analysis of Cav2.1 immunogold labeling to determine the precise subcellular organization of Cav2.1 channels in both inhibitory and excitatory terminals. Immunoparticles labeling the pore-forming α1 subunit of Cav2.1 channels were enriched over the active zone of the boutons with the number of channels (3–62) correlated with the area of the synaptic membrane. Detailed analysis showed that Cav2.1 channels are non-uniformly distributed over the presynaptic membrane specialization where they are arranged in clusters of an average five channels per cluster covering a mean area with a diameter of about 70 nm. Importantly, clustered arrangement and cluster properties did not show any significant difference between GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals. Our data demonstrate a common nano-architecture of Cav2.1 channels in inhibitory and excitatory boutons in stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 area suggesting that the cluster arrangement is crucial for the precise release of transmitters from the axonal boutons. PMID:26321916

  10. Suppression of peripheral pain by blockade of Cav2.2 channels in nociceptors induces RANKL and impairs recovery from inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Baddack, Uta; Frahm, Silke; Antolin-Fontes, Beatriz; Grobe, Jenny; Lipp, Martin; Müller, Gerd; Ibañez-Tallon, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objective A hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the chronic pain that accompanies the inflammation and joint deformation. Patients with RA rate pain relief with highest priority, however, few studies have addressed the efficacy and safety of therapies directed specifically towards pain pathways. The conotoxin MVIIA (Prialt/Ziconotide) is used in humans to alleviate persistent pain syndromes because it specifically blocks the CaV2.2 voltage-gated calcium channel, which mediates the release of neurotransmitters and proinflammatory mediators from peripheral nociceptor nerve terminals. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether block of CaV2.2 can suppress arthritic pain, and to examine the progression of induced arthritis during persistent CaV2.2 blockade. Methods Transgenic mice (Tg-MVIIA) expressing a membrane-tethered form of the ω-conotoxin MVIIA, under the control of a nociceptor-specific gene, were employed. These mice were subjected to unilateral induction of joint inflammation using the Antigen- and Collagen-Induced Arthritis (ACIA) model. Results We observed that CaV2.2-blockade mediated by t-MVIIA effectively suppressed arthritis-induced pain; however, in contrast to their wild-type littermates, which ultimately regained use of their injured joint as inflammation subsides, Tg-MVIIA mice showed continued inflammation with an up-regulation of the osteoclast activator RANKL and concomitant joint and bone destruction. Conclusion Altogether, our results indicate that alleviation of peripheral pain by blockade of CaV2.2- mediated calcium influx and signaling in nociceptor sensory neurons, impairs recovery from induced arthritis and point to the potentially devastating effects of using CaV2.2 channel blockers as analgesics during inflammation. PMID:25733371

  11. Inhibitory and excitatory axon terminals share a common nano-architecture of their Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Althof, Daniel; Baehrens, David; Watanabe, Masahiko; Suzuki, Noboru; Fakler, Bernd; Kulik, Ákos

    2015-01-01

    Tuning of the time course and strength of inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitter release is fundamental for the precise operation of cortical network activity and is controlled by Ca(2+) influx into presynaptic terminals through the high voltage-activated P/Q-type Ca(2+) (Cav2.1) channels. Proper channel-mediated Ca(2+)-signaling critically depends on the topographical arrangement of the channels in the presynaptic membrane. Here, we used high-resolution SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica immunoelectron microscopy together with automatized computational analysis of Cav2.1 immunogold labeling to determine the precise subcellular organization of Cav2.1 channels in both inhibitory and excitatory terminals. Immunoparticles labeling the pore-forming α1 subunit of Cav2.1 channels were enriched over the active zone of the boutons with the number of channels (3-62) correlated with the area of the synaptic membrane. Detailed analysis showed that Cav2.1 channels are non-uniformly distributed over the presynaptic membrane specialization where they are arranged in clusters of an average five channels per cluster covering a mean area with a diameter of about 70 nm. Importantly, clustered arrangement and cluster properties did not show any significant difference between GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals. Our data demonstrate a common nano-architecture of Cav2.1 channels in inhibitory and excitatory boutons in stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 area suggesting that the cluster arrangement is crucial for the precise release of transmitters from the axonal boutons. PMID:26321916

  12. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1998-08-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendible appendages, each of which is radially extendible relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendible members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  13. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1997-02-11

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle. 20 figs.

  14. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1998-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  15. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1997-01-01

    A robotic vehicle for travel through a conduit. The robotic vehicle includes forward and rear housings each having a hub portion, and each being provided with surface engaging mechanisms for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit such that the housings can be selectively held in stationary positions within the conduit. The surface engaging mechanisms of each housing includes a plurality of extendable appendages, each of which is radially extendable relative to the operatively associated hub portion between a retracted position and a radially extended position. The robotic vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members extending between the forward and rear housings, for selectively changing the distance between the forward and rear housings to effect movement of the robotic vehicle.

  16. Radiative Forcing of the Direct Aerosol Effect from AeroCom Phase II Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; vanNoije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 W m(sup-2), with a mean of -0.27 W m(sup-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 W m(sup-2). Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study.We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results

  17. Numerical Study of a Fuel Centrifugal Pump with Variable Impeller Width for Aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Guan, Huasheng; Ye, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    As typical pump with large flow rate and high reliability, centrifugal pumps in fuel system of aero-engines mostly regulate flow rate by flow bypass, which leads to low efficiency and large fuel temperature rise especially at low flow rate. An innovative fuel centrifugal pump with variable impeller width is a more effective way to regulate flow rate than flow bypass. To find external characteristics of the centrifugal pump with variable impeller width proposed in this paper, flow domain within the pump is simulated numerically and some primary performance parameters and their correlation are analyzed. Results show that flow rate of the pump can be regulated by variable impeller width and that efficiency for this scheme is higher than that for flow bypass. The higher outlet static pressure the pump runs at, the wider range of flow rates can be obtained with stronger nonlinear relationship between flow rate and impeller width.

  18. Ultrasonic evaluation of residual stresses in aero engine materials using bulk and Rayleigh surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubel, Sebastian; Dillhöfer, Alexander; Rieder, Hans; Spies, Martin; Bamberg, Joachim; Götz, Joshua; Hessert, Roland; Preikszas, Christina

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of residual stresses using ultrasound can be a very complex issue, because different material properties may effect the propagation of ultrasonic waves. Nevertheless, in the manufacturing of modern aero engines it is essential to benefit from the full potential of the employed materials. In this context, it is indispensable to test whether ultrasonic stress measurement is applicable for the highly developed nickel- and titanium-based alloys. This contribution contains basic investigations on the achievable measurement effect in samples made of Inconel IN718 and the Titanium alloy Ti 6-2-4-6. Furthermore, we give an overview over the principles of ultrasonic stress measurement using bulk and Rayleigh waves and present first results which are discussed with respect to texture effects and future work.

  19. A Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation of a Large Commercial Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Frederick, Dean K.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation of a commercial engine has been developed in a graphical environment to meet the increasing need across the controls and health management community for a common research and development platform. This paper describes the Commercial Modular Aero Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS), which is representative of a 90,000-lb thrust class two spool, high bypass ratio commercial turbofan engine. A control law resembling the state-of-the-art on board modern aircraft engines is included, consisting of a fan-speed control loop supplemented by relevant engine limit protection regulator loops. The objective of this paper is to provide a top-down overview of the complete engine simulation package.

  20. Aero-acoustic performance comparison of core engine noise suppressors on NASA quiet engine C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Schaefer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The relative aero-acoustic effectiveness of two core engine suppressors, a contractor-designed suppressor delivered with the Quiet Engine, and a NASA-designed suppressor was evaluated. The NASA suppressor was tested with and without a splitter making a total of three configurations being reported in addition to the baseline hardwall case. The aerodynamic results are presented in terms of tailpipe pressure loss, corrected net thrust, and corrected specific fuel consumption as functions of engine power setting. The acoustic results are divided into duct and far-field acoustic data. The NASA-designed core suppressor did the better job of suppressing aft end noise, but the splitter associated with it caused a significant engine performance penality. The NASA core suppressor without the spltter suppressed most of the core noise without any engine performance penalty.

  1. A Summary of the Slush Hydrogen Technology Program for the National Aero-Space Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnelis, Nancy B.; Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.; Kudlac, Maureen T.; Moran, Matthew E.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; Haberbusch, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    Slush hydrogen, a mixture of solid and liquid hydrogen, offers advantages of higher density (16 percent) and higher heat capacity (18 percent) than normal boiling point hydrogen. The combination of increased density and heat capacity of slush hydrogen provided a potential to decrease the gross takeoff weight of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) and therefore slush hydrogen was selected as the propellant. However, no large-scale data was available on the production, transfer and tank pressure control characteristics required to use slush hydrogen as a fuel. Extensive testing has been performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center K-Site and Small Scale Hydrogen Test Facility between 1990 and the present to provide a database for the use of slush hydrogen. This paper summarizes the results of this testing.

  2. Aero-acoustic performance comparison of core engine noise suppressors on NASA quiet engine 'C'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomer, H. E.; Schaefer, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the experimental program reported herein was to evaluate and compare the relative aero-acoustic effectiveness of two core engine suppressors, a contractor-designed suppressor delivered with the Quiet Engine, and a NASA-designed suppressor, designed and built subsequently. The NASA suppressor was tested with and without a splitter making a total of three configurations being reported in addition to the baseline hardwall case. The aerodynamic results are presented in terms of tailpipe pressure loss, corrected net thrust, and corrected specific fuel consumption as functions of engine power setting. The acoustic results are divided into duct and far-field acoustic data. The NASA-designed core suppressor did the better job of suppressing aft end noise, but the splitter associated with it caused a significant engine performance penalty. The NASA core suppressor without the splitter suppressed most of the core noise without any engine performance penalty.

  3. User's manual for UCAP: Unified Counter-Rotation Aero-Acoustics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culver, E. M.; Mccolgan, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    This is the user's manual for the Unified Counter-rotation Aeroacoustics Program (UCAP), the counter-rotation derivative of the UAAP (Unified Aero-Acoustic Program). The purpose of this program is to predict steady and unsteady air loading on the blades and the noise produced by a counter-rotation Prop-Fan. The aerodynamic method is based on linear potential theory with corrections for nonlinearity associated with axial flux induction, vortex lift on the blades, and rotor-to-rotor interference. The theory for acoustics and the theory for individual blade loading and wakes are derived in Unified Aeroacoustics Analysis for High Speed Turboprop Aerodynamics and Noise, Volume 1 (NASA CR-4329). This user's manual also includes a brief explanation of the theory used for the modelling of counter-rotation.

  4. An AeroCom Assessment of Black Carbon in Arctic Snow and Sea Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Bernsten, T. K.; Bian, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; DeLuca, N.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Koch, D.; Liu, X.; Mann, G. W.; Penner, J. E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, O; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, S. D.; Stier, P.; Tkemura, T.

    2014-01-01

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea ice. Here, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within-snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004 to 2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng/g for an earlier phase of AeroCom models (phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng/g for a more recent phase of AeroCom models (phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng/g. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model-measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60-90degN) atmospheric residence time for BC in phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with the fact that most Arctic BC deposition originates

  5. An AeroCom assessment of black carbon in Arctic snow and sea ice

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; De Luca, N.; Diehl, T.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Koch, D.; Liu, X.; Mann, G. W.; Penner, J. E.; Pitari, G.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Steenrod, S. D.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; van Noije, T.; Yun, Y.; Zhang, K.

    2014-01-01

    Though many global aerosols models prognose surface deposition, only a few models have been used to directly simulate the radiative effect from black carbon (BC) deposition to snow and sea ice. In this paper, we apply aerosol deposition fields from 25 models contributing to two phases of the Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) project to simulate and evaluate within-snow BC concentrations and radiative effect in the Arctic. We accomplish this by driving the offline land and sea ice components of the Community Earth System Model with different deposition fields and meteorological conditions from 2004 to 2009, during which an extensive field campaign of BC measurements in Arctic snow occurred. We find that models generally underestimate BC concentrations in snow in northern Russia and Norway, while overestimating BC amounts elsewhere in the Arctic. Although simulated BC distributions in snow are poorly correlated with measurements, mean values are reasonable. The multi-model mean (range) bias in BC concentrations, sampled over the same grid cells, snow depths, and months of measurements, are -4.4 (-13.2 to +10.7) ng g-1 for an earlier phase of AeroCom models (phase I), and +4.1 (-13.0 to +21.4) ng g-1 for a more recent phase of AeroCom models (phase II), compared to the observational mean of 19.2 ng g-1. Factors determining model BC concentrations in Arctic snow include Arctic BC emissions, transport of extra-Arctic aerosols, precipitation, deposition efficiency of aerosols within the Arctic, and meltwater removal of particles in snow. Sensitivity studies show that the model–measurement evaluation is only weakly affected by meltwater scavenging efficiency because most measurements were conducted in non-melting snow. The Arctic (60–90° N) atmospheric residence time for BC in phase II models ranges from 3.7 to 23.2 days, implying large inter-model variation in local BC deposition efficiency. Combined with

  6. Unified Multi-speed analysis (UMA) for the condition monitoring of aero-engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nembhard, Adrian D.; Sinha, Jyoti K.

    2015-12-01

    For rotating machinery in which speeds and dynamics constantly change, performing vibration-based condition monitoring can be challenging. Thus, an effort is made here to develop a Unified Multi-speed fault diagnosis technique that can exploit useful vibration information available at various speeds from a rotating machine in a single analysis. Commonly applied indicators are computed from data collected from a rig at different speeds for a baseline case and different faults. Four separate analyses are performed: single speed at a single bearing, integrated features from multiple speeds at a single bearing, single speed for integrated features from multiple bearings and the proposed Unified Multi-speed analysis. The Unified Multi-speed approach produces the most conspicuous separation and isolation among the conditions tested. Observations made here suggest integration of more dynamic features available at different speeds improves the learning process of the tool which could prove useful for aero-engine condition monitoring.

  7. Cadmium tolerance and accumulation of Althaea rosea Cav. and its potential as a hyperaccumulator under chemical enhancement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia Nv; Zhou, Qi Xing; Wang, Song; Sun, Ting

    2009-02-01

    The role of ornamental plants has drawn much attention as the urban pollution levels exacerbate. Althaea rosea Cav. had showed its strong tolerance and accumulation ability of Cd in our previous work, thus, the effects of ethylenediamine triacetic acid (EDTA), ethylenegluatarotriacetic acid (EGTA) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on its Cd phytoremediation capacity were further investigated in this work. It reconfirmed that the species had strong tolerance and accumulation ability of Cd. Particularly, the species can be regarded as a potential Cd-hyperaccumulator through applying chemical agents. However, different chelators and surfactants had great differences in affecting hyperaccumulating characteristics of the species. EGTA and SDS could not only increase the dry biomass of the plants, but also promote Cd accumulation in shoots and roots. On the contrary, EDTA was toxic to the species by restraining the growth of plants, although it could promote Cd accumulation in shoots and roots of the plants to a certain extent. Thus, EGTA and SDS were effective in enhancing phytoremediation with Althaea rosea Cav. for Cd contaminated soils, while EDTA is ineffective in this regard. PMID:18259884

  8. Spheroid formation of human thyroid cancer cells under simulated microgravity: a possible role of CTGF and CAV1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) formed scaffold-free under microgravity are of high interest for research and medicine. Their formation mechanism can be studied in space in real microgravity or on Earth using ground-based facilities (GBF), which simulate microgravity. On Earth, these experiments are more cost-efficient and easily performable. However, each GBF might exert device-specific and altered superimposingly gravity-dependent effects on the cells. Results FTC-133 human thyroid cancer cells were cultivated on a 2D clinostat (CN) and a random positioning machine (RPM) and compared with corresponding 1 g control cells. Harvested cell samples were investigated by microscopy, quantitative realtime-PCR and Multi-Analyte Profiling. Spheroid formation and growth occurred during 72 h of cultivation on both devices. Cytokine secretion and gene activation patterns frequently altered in different ways, when the cells were cultured either on the RPM or the CN. A decreased expression of CAV1 and CTGF in MCTS compared to adherent cells was observed after cultivation on both machines. Conclusion The development of MCTS proceeds similarly on the RPM and the CN resembling the situation observed under real microgravity conditions, while no MCTS formation was observed at 1 g under identical experimental conditions. Simultaneously, changes in the regulation of CTGF and CAV1 appeared in a comparable manner on both machines. A relationship between these molecules and MCTS formation is discussed. PMID:24885050

  9. Aero-Structural Optimization of HSCT Configurations in Transonic and Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso, Juan J.

    1999-01-01

    This document outlines the progress made under NASA Cooperative Research Agreement NCC2- 5226 for the period 10/01/97-09/30/98. The work statement originally proposed was meant to extend over the period of two complete years of which only one was funded. Consequently, only a portion of the goals were achieved. Similar work will continue in our group under different sponsorship and will be available in the form of conference and journal publications. The following sections summarize the technical accomplishments obtained during the last year. Details of these accomplishments can be found in the accompanying paper that was presented at the AIAA 37th Aerospace Sciences and Exhibit Meeting which was held in Reno, NV in January of this year. The original proposal outlined a research program meant to lay down the foundation for the development of high-fidelity, fully-coupled aerodynamic/structural optimization methods applicable to a variety of aerospace applications including the design optimization of High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) configurations. The necessary research and development work was divided into two main efforts which addressed the necessities of the long term goal. Initially, our experience in the simulation of unsteady aeroelastic flows was directly applied to existing aerodynamic optimization techniques in order to provide insight into the effects of aeroelastic deformations on the performance of aircraft which have been designed based on purely aerodynamic cost functions. The intention was to follow up this work with a detailed investigation into the basic research work that has to be completed for the development of an optimization framework which efficiently allows the truly coupled design of aero-structural systems. This follow-up effort was not funded. The outcome of our efforts during the past year was the development of a coupled aero-structural analysis and design environment that was applied to the design of a complete aircraft configuration.

  10. Integrated line-of-sight Modeling of the Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, S.; Blackburn, J.; Thordahl, J.; Wittich, D.; Gordeyev, S.; Jumper, E.

    2013-09-01

    The Airborne Aero-Optics Laboratory (AAOL) is a recently completed research effort to measure the effects of turbulent flow on the wavefront of a laser projected from an airplane in flight. The flight-test system consists of two Cessna Citation Bravo aircraft flying in formation at a distance of approximately 50 m. One aircraft projects a laser beam to the other aircraft which receives the beam using an inertially stabilized turret with a high bandwidth track loop. In addition to its benefit in providing a means for understanding and correcting optical wavefront distortion due to turbulence, AAOL also provides an ideal platform for predicting line-of-sight jitter and comparing it to measured results. AAOL has the essential elements of an airborne optical beam control system and is subject to relevant aero-loading, but operates at low power and provides a relatively inexpensive platform for collecting flight data. This paper presents the integrated AAOL line-of-sight model for prediction of optical jitter due to flight disturbances. To accomplish this, a dynamic simulation model was derived from a finite element model of the system, optical sensitivities and control loops for calculation of closed loop, line-of-sight jitter. Disturbance inputs include measured in-flight base loading and pressure loading on the turret generated from an unsteady computational fluid dynamics model. The influence of model uncertainty was also addressed by considering two separate models. The first model was based on the initial hardware design before hardware assembly. The second model was updated based on modal tests performed on the assembled flight hardware. Frequency-varying model uncertainty factors for both models required to accurately predict the measured flight data were calculated. Predicted results with and without model uncertainty factors will be compared with measured flight data from AAOL.

  11. Ka-band MMIC array system for ACTS aeronautical terminal experiment (Aero-X)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A.; Zakrajsek, Robert J.; Lee, Richard Q.; Andro, Monty; Turtle, John P.

    1995-01-01

    During the summer of 1994, the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) Aeronautical Terminal Experiment (Aero-X) was successfully completed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). 4.8 and 9.6 Kbps duplex voice links were established between the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS Link Evaluation Terminal (LET) in Cleveland, Ohio, via the ACTS. The antenna system used in this demonstration was developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and US Air Force experimental arrays using GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The antenna system consisted of three arrays mounted inside the LeRC Learjet, pointing out through the windows. An open loop tracking controller developed by LeRC used information from the aircraft position and attitude sensors to automatically steer the arrays toward ACTS during flight JPL ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) system hardware was used as transceivers both on the aircraft and at the LET. The single 32 element MMIC transmit array developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments has an EIRP of 23.4 dBW at boresight. The two 20 GHz MMIC receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the USAF Rome Laboratory/Electronic System Center, taking advantage of existing USAF array development contracts with Boeing and Martin Marietta. The Boeing array has 23 elements and a G/T of 16/6 db/degK at boresight. The Martin Marietta array has 16 elements and a G/T of 16.1 db/degK at boresight. The three proof-of-concept arrays, the array control system and their integration and operation in the Learjet for Aero-X are described.

  12. Advanced Engineering Methods for Assessing Welding Distortion in Aero-Engine Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Kathryn; Darlington, Roger

    2011-12-01

    Welding remains an attractive fabrication method for aero-engine assemblies, offering high production rates and reduced total cost, particularly for large complex assemblies. However, distortion generated during the welding process continues to provide a major challenge in terms of the control of geometric tolerances and residual stress. The welding distortion is influenced by the sequence and position of joints, the clamping configuration and the design of the assembly. For large complex assemblies the range of these options may be large. Hence the use of numerical simulation at an early stage of the product development process is valuable to enable a wide range of these factors to be explored with the aim of minimising welding distortions before production commences, and thereby reducing the product development time. In this paper, a new technique for simulation of welding distortions based on a shrinkage analysis is evaluated for an aero-engine assembly. The shrinkage simulations were built and solved using the ESI Group software Weld Planner. The rapid simulation speed enabled a wide range of welding plans to be explored, leading to recommendations for the fabrication process. The sensitivity of the model to mesh size and material properties is reported. The results of the shrinkage analysis were found to be similar to those of a transient analysis generated using ESI Group software SysWeld. The solution times were found to be significantly lower for the shrinkage analysis than the transient analysis. Hence it has been demonstrated that shrinkage analysis is a valuable tool for exploring the fabrication process of a welded assembly at an early stage of the product development process.

  13. Autonomous vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Meyrowitz, A.L.; Blidberg, D.R.; Michelson, R.C. |

    1996-08-01

    There are various kinds of autonomous vehicles (AV`s) which can operate with varying levels of autonomy. This paper is concerned with underwater, ground, and aerial vehicles operating in a fully autonomous (nonteleoperated) mode. Further, this paper deals with AV`s as a special kind of device, rather than full-scale manned vehicles operating unmanned. The distinction is one in which the AV is likely to be designed for autonomous operation rather than being adapted for it as would be the case for manned vehicles. The authors provide a survey of the technological progress that has been made in AV`s, the current research issues and approaches that are continuing that progress, and the applications which motivate this work. It should be noted that issues of control are pervasive regardless of the kind of AV being considered, but that there are special considerations in the design and operation of AV`s depending on whether the focus is on vehicles underwater, on the ground, or in the air. The authors have separated the discussion into sections treating each of these categories.

  14. Cavβ2 transcription start site variants modulate calcium handling in newborn rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Cristian; Hermosilla, Tamara; Morales, Danna; Encina, Matías; Torres-Díaz, Leandro; Díaz, Pablo; Sarmiento, Daniela; Simon, Felipe; Varela, Diego

    2015-12-01

    In the heart, the main pathway for calcium influx is mediated by L-type calcium channels, a multi-subunit complex composed of the pore-forming subunit CaV1.2 and the auxiliary subunits CaVα2δ1 and CaVβ2. To date, five distinct CaVβ2 transcriptional start site (TSS) variants (CaVβ2a-e) varying only in the composition and length of the N-terminal domain have been described, each of them granting distinct biophysical properties to the L-type current. However, the physiological role of these variants in Ca(2+) handling in the native tissue has not been explored. Our results show that four of these variants are present in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. The contribution of those CaVβ2 TSS variants on endogenous L-type current and Ca(2+) handling was explored by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of each CaVβ2 variant in cultured newborn rat cardiomyocytes. As expected, all CaVβ2 TSS variants increased L-type current density and produced distinctive changes on L-type calcium channel (LTCC) current activation and inactivation kinetics. The characteristics of the induced calcium transients were dependent on the TSS variant overexpressed. Moreover, the amplitude of the calcium transients varied depending on the subunit involved, being higher in cardiomyocytes transduced with CaVβ2a and smaller in CaVβ2d. Interestingly, the contribution of Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+) release on total calcium transients, as well as the sarcoplasmic calcium content, was found to be TSS-variant-dependent. Remarkably, determination of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance and cell size change indicates that CaVβ2 TSS variants modulate the cardiomyocyte hypertrophic state. In summary, we demonstrate that expression of individual CaVβ2 TSS variants regulates calcium handling in cardiomyocytes and, consequently, has significant repercussion in the development of hypertrophy. PMID:26265381

  15. Future orbital transfer vehicle technology study. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Missions for future orbit transfer vehicles (1995-2010) are identified and the technology, operations and vehicle concepts that satisfy the transportation requirements are defined. Comparison of reusable space and ground based LO2/LH2 OTV's was made. Both vehicles used advanced space engines and aero assist capability. The SB OTV provided advantages in life cycle cost, performance and potential for improvement. Comparison of an all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet with a fleet of LO2/LH2 OTVs and electric OTV's was also made. The normal growth technology electric OTV used silicon cells with heavy shielding and argon ion thrusters. This provided a 23% advantage in total transportation cost. The impact of accelerated technology was considered in terms of improvements in performance and cost effectiveness. The accelerated technology electric vehicle used GaAs cells and annealing but did not result in the mixed fleet being any cheaper than an all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet. It is concluded that reusable LO2/LH2 OTV's can serve all general purpose cargo roles between LEO and GEO for the forseeable future. The most significant technology for the second generation vehicle would be space debris protection, on-orbit propellant storage and transfer and on-orbit maintenance capability.

  16. A CACNA1F mutation identified in an X-linked retinal disorder shifts the voltage dependence of Cav1.4 channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Hemara-Wahanui, Ariana; Berjukow, Stanislav; Hope, Carolyn I.; Dearden, Peter K.; Wu, Shu-Biao; Wilson-Wheeler, Jane; Sharp, Dianne M.; Lundon-Treweek, Patricia; Clover, Gillian M.; Hoda, Jean-Charles; Striessnig, Jörg; Marksteiner, Rainer; Hering, Steffen; Maw, Marion A.

    2005-01-01

    Light stimuli produce graded hyperpolarizations of the photoreceptor plasma membrane and an associated decrease in a voltagegated calcium channel conductance that mediates release of glutamate neurotransmitter. The Cav1.4 channel is thought to be involved in this process. The CACNA1F gene encodes the poreforming subunit of the Cav1.4 channel and various mutations in CACNA1F cause X-linked incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB2). The molecular mechanism of the pathology underlying the CSNB2 phenotype remains to be established. Recent clinical investigations of a New Zealand family found a severe visual disorder that has some clinical similarities to, but is clearly distinct from, CSNB2. Here, we report investigations into the molecular mechanism of the pathology of this condition. Molecular genetic analyses identified a previously undescribed nucleotide substitution in CACNA1F that is predicted to encode an isoleucine to threonine substitution at CACNA1F residue 745. The I745T CACNA1F allele produced a remarkable approximately –30-mV shift in the voltage dependence of Cav1.4 channel activation and significantly slower inactivation kinetics in an expression system. These findings imply that substitution of this wild-type residue in transmembrane segment IIS6 may have decreased the energy required to open the channel. Collectively, these findings suggest that a gain-of-function mechanism involving increased Cav1.4 channel activity is likely to cause the unusual phenotype. PMID:15897456

  17. Surface expression and function of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels are controlled by asparagine-linked glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Black, Stefanie A G; Bladen, Chris; Chen, Lina; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2013-08-01

    Low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels play important roles in neuronal physiology where they control cellular excitability and synaptic transmission. Alteration in T-type channel expression has been linked to various pathophysiological conditions such as pain arising from diabetic neuropathy. In the present study, we looked at the role of asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation on human Cav3.2 T-type channel expression and function. Manipulation of N-glycans on cells expressing a recombinant Cav3.2 channel revealed that N-linked glycosylation is critical for proper functional expression of the channel. Using site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt the canonical N-linked glycosylation sites of Cav3.2 channel, we show that glycosylation at asparagine N192 is critical for channel expression at the surface, whereas glycosylation at asparagine N1466 controls channel activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that N-linked glycosylation of Cav3.2 not only controls surface expression and activity of the channel but also underlies glucose-dependent potentiation of T-type Ca(2+) current. Our data suggest that N-linked glycosylation of T-type channels may play an important role in aberrant upregulation of T-type channel activity in response to glucose elevations. PMID:23503728

  18. Reversal of neuropathic pain in diabetes by targeting glycosylation of Ca(V)3.2 T-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Orestes, Peihan; Osuru, Hari Prasad; McIntire, William E; Jacus, Megan O; Salajegheh, Reza; Jagodic, Miljen M; Choe, Wonjoo; Lee, Jeonghan; Lee, Sang-Soo; Rose, Kirstin E; Poiro, Nathan; Digruccio, Michael R; Krishnan, Katiresan; Covey, Douglas F; Lee, Jung-Ha; Barrett, Paula Q; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2013-11-01

    It has been established that Ca(V)3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (T-channels) play a key role in the sensitized (hyperexcitable) state of nociceptive sensory neurons (nociceptors) in response to hyperglycemia associated with diabetes, which in turn can be a basis for painful symptoms of peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN). Unfortunately, current treatment for painful PDN has been limited by nonspecific systemic drugs with significant side effects or potential for abuse. We studied in vitro and in vivo mechanisms of plasticity of Ca(V)3.2 T-channel in a leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mouse model of PDN. We demonstrate that posttranslational glycosylation of specific extracellular asparagine residues in Ca(V)3.2 channels accelerates current kinetics, increases current density, and augments channel membrane expression. Importantly, deglycosylation treatment with neuraminidase inhibits native T-currents in nociceptors and in so doing completely and selectively reverses hyperalgesia in diabetic ob/ob mice without altering baseline pain responses in healthy mice. Our study describes a new mechanism for the regulation of Ca(V)3.2 activity and suggests that modulating the glycosylation state of T-channels in nociceptors may provide a way to suppress peripheral sensitization. Understanding the details of this regulatory pathway could facilitate the development of novel specific therapies for the treatment of painful PDN. PMID:23835327

  19. Resveratrol Ameliorates High Glucose and High-Fat/Sucrose Diet-Induced Vascular Hyperpermeability Involving Cav-1/eNOS Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiao lin; Qu, Wei; Wang, Lin zhi; Huang, Bin qing; Ying, Chen jiang; Sun, Xiu fa; Hao, Li ping

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial hyperpermeability is one of the manifestations of endothelial dysfunction. Resveratrol (Res) is considered to be beneficial in protecting endothelial function. However, currently, the exact protective effect and involved mechanisms of Res on endothelial dysfunction-hyperpermeability have not been completely clarified. The aim of present study is to investigate the effects of Res on amelioration of endothelial hyperpermeability and the role of caveolin-1 (Cav-1)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with a normal or high-fat/sucrose diet (HFS) with or without Res for 13 weeks. HFS and in vitro treatment with high glucose increased hyperpermeability in rat aorta, heart, liver and kidney and cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), respectively, which was attenuated by Res treatment. Application of Res reversed the changes in eNOS and Cav-1 expressions in aorta and heart of rats fed HFS and in BAECs incubated with high glucose. Res stimulated the formation of NO inhibited by high glucose in BAECs. Beta-Cyclodextrin (β-CD), caveolae inhibitor, showed the better beneficial effect than Res alone to up-regulate eNOS phosphorylative levels, while NG-Nitro-77 L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), eNOS inhibitor, had no effect on Cav-1 expression. Our studies suggested that HFS and in vitro treatment with high glucose caused endothelial hyperpermeability, which were ameliorated by Res at least involving Cav-1/eNOS regulation. PMID:25419974

  20. An autism-associated mutation in CaV1.3 channels has opposing effects on voltage- and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation.

    PubMed

    Limpitikul, Worawan B; Dick, Ivy E; Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, David T

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels are a major class of L-type Ca(2+) channels which contribute to the rhythmicity of the heart and brain. In the brain, these channels are vital for excitation-transcription coupling, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal firing. Moreover, disruption of CaV1.3 function has been associated with several neurological disorders. Here, we focus on the de novo missense mutation A760G which has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To explore the role of this mutation in ASD pathogenesis, we examined the effects of A760G on CaV1.3 channel gating and regulation. Introduction of the mutation severely diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI) of CaV1.3 channels, an important feedback system required for Ca(2+) homeostasis. This reduction in CDI was observed in two major channel splice variants, though to different extents. Using an allosteric model of channel gating, we found that the underlying mechanism of CDI reduction is likely due to enhanced channel opening within the Ca(2+)-inactivated mode. Remarkably, the A760G mutation also caused an opposite increase in voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), resulting in a multifaceted mechanism underlying ASD. When combined, these regulatory deficits appear to increase the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, thus potentially disrupting neuronal development and synapse formation, ultimately leading to ASD. PMID:27255217

  1. An autism-associated mutation in CaV1.3 channels has opposing effects on voltage- and Ca2+-dependent regulation

    PubMed Central

    Limpitikul, Worawan B.; Dick, Ivy E.; Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    CaV1.3 channels are a major class of L-type Ca2+ channels which contribute to the rhythmicity of the heart and brain. In the brain, these channels are vital for excitation-transcription coupling, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal firing. Moreover, disruption of CaV1.3 function has been associated with several neurological disorders. Here, we focus on the de novo missense mutation A760G which has been linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To explore the role of this mutation in ASD pathogenesis, we examined the effects of A760G on CaV1.3 channel gating and regulation. Introduction of the mutation severely diminished the Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of CaV1.3 channels, an important feedback system required for Ca2+ homeostasis. This reduction in CDI was observed in two major channel splice variants, though to different extents. Using an allosteric model of channel gating, we found that the underlying mechanism of CDI reduction is likely due to enhanced channel opening within the Ca2+-inactivated mode. Remarkably, the A760G mutation also caused an opposite increase in voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI), resulting in a multifaceted mechanism underlying ASD. When combined, these regulatory deficits appear to increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, thus potentially disrupting neuronal development and synapse formation, ultimately leading to ASD. PMID:27255217

  2. Combined anti-ages and antioxidant activities of different solvent extracts of Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav (Solanacea) fruits during ripening and related to their phytochemical compositions

    PubMed Central

    Houda, Mejri; Derbré, Séverine; Jedy, Ahmed; Tlili, Nizar; Legault, Jean; Richomme, Pascal; Limam, Ferid; Saidani-Tounsi, Moufida

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are known as key factors for the development of diabetic complications such as retinopathy, cataract as well as atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s diseases. In this context, natural products have been previously identified as promising sources for antioxidant and anti-glycation compounds. The current study focuses on the evaluation of antioxidant and glycation inhibitory activities of different solvent extracts of Solanum elaeagnifolium Cav (Solanaceae) fruits at different ripening stages. The results showed that antioxidant and anti-AGEs activities were significantly influenced by solvents polarities and ripening stages of S. elaeagnifolium Cav. With one exception, methanolic extract of overripe S. elaeagnifolium Cav fruit showed important protective effects against cellular oxidative stress. The aqueous extract showed the highest ABTS+ scavenging ability. Principal component analysis showed that total phenolic and flavonoid contents correlated well with observed antioxidants and anti-glycation activities. These results bring attention to the possible use of S. elaeagnifolium Cav as a valuable source of bioactive compounds exhibiting antioxidant effects and potentially alleviating diabetic complications. PMID:26417319

  3. Stantonia pallida (Ashmead)(Hymenoptera: Braconidae) reared from Neomusotima conspurcatalis Warren (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), a classical biological control agent of Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.)R.Br.(Polypodiales: Lygodiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stantonia pallida (Ashmead) sensu Braet and Quicke (2004) and an undetermined species of Cotesia are reported from Neomusotima conspurcatalis Warren, a classical biological control agent of Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.) R. Br. in Florida. They are the first reported parasitoids of N. conspurcatalis. ...

  4. Solution NMR and calorimetric analysis of Rem2 binding to the Ca2+ channel β4 subunit: a low affinity interaction is required for inhibition of Cav2.1 Ca2+ currents.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingfu; Zhang, Fangxiong; Zamponi, Gerald W; Horne, William A

    2015-05-01

    Rem, Rad, Kir/Gem (RGK) proteins, including Rem2, mediate profound inhibition of high-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels containing intracellular regulatory β subunits. All RGK proteins bind to voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel β subunit (Cavβ) subunits in vitro, but the necessity of the interaction for current inhibition remains controversial. This study applies NMR and calorimetric techniques to map the binding site for Rem2 on human Cavβ4a and measure its binding affinity. Our experiments revealed 2 binding surfaces on the β4 guanylate kinase domain contributing to a 156 ± 18 µM Kd interaction: a hydrophobic pocket lined by 4 critical residues (L173, N261, H262, and V303), mutation of any of which completely disrupted binding, and a nearby surface containing 3 residues (D206, L209, and D258) that when individually mutated decreased affinity. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel α1A subunit (Cav2.1) Ca(2+) currents were completely inhibited by Rem2 when co-expressed with wild-type Cavβ4a, but were unaffected by Rem2 when coexpressed with a Cavβ4a site 1 (L173A/V303A) or site 2 (D258A) mutant. These results provide direct evidence for a low-affinity Rem2/Cavβ4 interaction and show definitively that the interaction is required for Cav2.1 inhibition. PMID:25563298

  5. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 2: Test Bed Performance Evaluation and Final AeroMACS Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Magner, James

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II (this document) describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  6. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Standards Development. Phase II Final Report. Volume 1: Concepts of Use, Initial System Requirements, Architecture, and AeroMACS Design Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward; Isaacs, James; Henriksen, Steve; Zelkin, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    This report is provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development and was based on direction provided by FAA project-level agreements for New ATM Requirements-Future Communications. Task 7 included two subtasks. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed and prototype development, and tests and demonstrations to establish operational capability for the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2 focused on systems engineering and development support of the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS). Subtask 7-1 consisted of two phases. Phase I included development of AeroMACS concepts of use, requirements, architecture, and initial high-level safety risk assessment. Phase II builds on Phase I results and is presented in two volumes. Volume I (this document) is devoted to concepts of use, system requirements, and architecture, including AeroMACS design considerations. Volume II describes an AeroMACS prototype evaluation and presents final AeroMACS recommendations. This report also describes airport categorization and channelization methodologies. The purposes of the airport categorization task were (1) to facilitate initial AeroMACS architecture designs and enable budgetary projections by creating a set of airport categories based on common airport characteristics and design objectives, and (2) to offer high-level guidance to potential AeroMACS technology and policy development sponsors and service providers. A channelization plan methodology was developed because a common global methodology is needed to assure seamless interoperability among diverse AeroMACS services potentially supplied by multiple service providers.

  7. 75 FR 9140 - Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... International Aero Engines AG, ``Docket No. FAA-2009-0544'' is corrected to read ``Docket No. FAA- 2009-1100... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; International Aero Engines AG (IAE) V2500-A1, V2522-A5, V2524-A5, V2525-D5, V2527-A5, V2527E-A5, V2527M-A5, V2528-D5,...

  8. Loss of Cav1.3 channels reveals the critical role of L-type and BK channel coupling in pacemaking mouse adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Marcantoni, Andrea; Vandael, David H F; Mahapatra, Satyajit; Carabelli, Valentina; Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J; Striessnig, Joerg; Carbone, Emilio

    2010-01-13

    We studied wild-type (WT) and Cav1.3(-/-) mouse chromaffin cells (MCCs) with the aim to determine the isoform of L-type Ca(2+) channel (LTCC) and BK channels that underlie the pacemaker current controlling spontaneous firing. Most WT-MCCs (80%) were spontaneously active (1.5 Hz) and highly sensitive to nifedipine and BayK-8644 (1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-3-pyridinecarboxylic acid, methyl ester). Nifedipine blocked the firing, whereas BayK-8644 increased threefold the firing rate. The two dihydropyridines and the BK channel blocker paxilline altered the shape of action potentials (APs), suggesting close coupling of LTCCs to BK channels. WT-MCCs expressed equal fractions of functionally active Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels. Cav1.3 channel deficiency decreased the number of normally firing MCCs (30%; 2.0 Hz), suggesting a critical role of these channels on firing, which derived from their slow inactivation rate, sizeable activation at subthreshold potentials, and close coupling to fast inactivating BK channels as determined by using EGTA and BAPTA Ca(2+) buffering. By means of the action potential clamp, in TTX-treated WT-MCCs, we found that the interpulse pacemaker current was always net inward and dominated by LTCCs. Fast inactivating and non-inactivating BK currents sustained mainly the afterhyperpolarization of the short APs (2-3 ms) and only partially the pacemaker current during the long interspike (300-500 ms). Deletion of Cav1.3 channels reduced drastically the inward Ca(2+) current and the corresponding Ca(2+)-activated BK current during spikes. Our data highlight the role of Cav1.3, and to a minor degree of Cav1.2, as subthreshold pacemaker channels in MCCs and open new interesting features about their role in the control of firing and catecholamine secretion at rest and during sustained stimulations matching acute stress. PMID:20071512

  9. Roles of Cav3.2 and TRPA1 channels targeted by hydrogen sulfide in pancreatic nociceptive processing in mice with or without acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuka; Fujimura, Mayuko; Nishimura, Sachiyo; Tsubota, Maho; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), formed by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), targets Ca(v)3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T channels) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), facilitating somatic pain. Pancreatitis-related pain also appears to involve activation of T channels by H(2)S formed by the upregulated CSE. Therefore, this study investigates the roles of the Ca(v)3.2 isoform and/or TRPA1 in pancreatic nociception in the absence and presence of pancreatitis. In anesthetized mice, AP18, a TRPA1 inhibitor, abolished the Fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn caused by injection of a TRPA1 agonist into the pancreatic duct. As did mibefradil, a T-channel inhibitor, in our previous report, AP18 prevented the Fos expression following ductal NaHS, an H(2)S donor. In the mice with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, the referred hyperalgesia was suppressed by NNC 55-0396 (NNC), a selective T-channel inhibitor; zinc chloride; or ascorbic acid, known to inhibit Ca(v)3.2 selectively among three T-channel isoforms; and knockdown of Ca(v)3.2. In contrast, AP18 and knockdown of TRPA1 had no significant effect on the cerulein-induced referred hyperalgesia, although they significantly potentiated the antihyperalgesic effect of NNC at a subeffective dose. TRPA1 but not Ca(v)3.2 in the dorsal root ganglia was downregulated at a protein level in mice with cerulein-induced pancreatitis. The data indicate that TRPA1 and Ca(v)3.2 mediate the exogenous H(2)S-induced pancreatic nociception in naïve mice and suggest that, in the mice with pancreatitis, Ca(v)3.2 targeted by H(2)S primarily participates in the pancreatic pain, whereas TRPA1 is downregulated and plays a secondary role in pancreatic nociceptive signaling. PMID:25267397

  10. Electrophysiological evidence for voltage-gated calcium channel 2 (Cav2) modulation of mechano- and thermosensitive spinal neuronal responses in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, W; Patel, R; Dickenson, A H

    2015-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) remains one of the greatest healthcare burdens in western society, with chronic debilitating pain-dominating clinical presentation yet therapeutic strategies are inadequate in many patients. Development of better analgesics is contingent on improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating OA pain. Voltage-gated calcium channels 2.2 (Cav2.2) play a critical role in spinal nociceptive transmission, therefore blocking Cav2.2 activity represents an attractive opportunity for OA pain treatment, but the only available licensed Cav2.2 antagonist ziconitide (PrilatTM) is of limited use. TROX-1 is an orally available, use dependent and state-selective Cav2 antagonist, exerting its analgesic effect primarily via Cav2.2 blockade, with an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconitide. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), 2 mg, induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of spinal or systemic administration of TROX-1 on the evoked activity of wide dynamic range spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, natural mechanical (dynamic brush and von Frey 2, 8, 26 and 6 g) and thermal (40, 45 and 45 °C) stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. MIA injection into the knee joint resulted in mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral hind paw and weight-bearing asymmetry. Spinal administration of TROX-1 (0.1 and 1 μg/50 μl) produced a significant dose-related inhibition of dynamic brush, mechanical (von Frey filament (vF) 8, 26 and 60 g) and noxious thermal-(45 and 48 °C) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats only. Systemic administration of TROX-1 produced a significant inhibition of the mechanical-(vF 8, 26 and 60 g) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats. TROX-1 did not produce any significant effect on any neuronal measure in Sham controls. Our in vivo electrophysiological results demonstrate a pathological state-dependent effect of TROX-1, which suggests an increased functional

  11. Electrophysiological evidence for voltage-gated calcium channel 2 (Cav2) modulation of mechano- and thermosensitive spinal neuronal responses in a rat model of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, W.; Patel, R.; Dickenson, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) remains one of the greatest healthcare burdens in western society, with chronic debilitating pain-dominating clinical presentation yet therapeutic strategies are inadequate in many patients. Development of better analgesics is contingent on improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating OA pain. Voltage-gated calcium channels 2.2 (Cav2.2) play a critical role in spinal nociceptive transmission, therefore blocking Cav2.2 activity represents an attractive opportunity for OA pain treatment, but the only available licensed Cav2.2 antagonist ziconitide (PrilatTM) is of limited use. TROX-1 is an orally available, use dependent and state-selective Cav2 antagonist, exerting its analgesic effect primarily via Cav2.2 blockade, with an improved therapeutic window compared with ziconitide. Using a rat model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA), 2 mg, induced OA we used in vivo electrophysiology to assess the effects of spinal or systemic administration of TROX-1 on the evoked activity of wide dynamic range spinal dorsal horn neurons in response to electrical, natural mechanical (dynamic brush and von Frey 2, 8, 26 and 6 g) and thermal (40, 45 and 45 °C) stimuli applied to the peripheral receptive field. MIA injection into the knee joint resulted in mechanical hypersensitivity of the ipsilateral hind paw and weight-bearing asymmetry. Spinal administration of TROX-1 (0.1 and 1 μg/50 μl) produced a significant dose-related inhibition of dynamic brush, mechanical (von Frey filament (vF) 8, 26 and 60 g) and noxious thermal-(45 and 48 °C) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats only. Systemic administration of TROX-1 produced a significant inhibition of the mechanical-(vF 8, 26 and 60 g) evoked neuronal responses in MIA rats. TROX-1 did not produce any significant effect on any neuronal measure in Sham controls. Our in vivo electrophysiological results demonstrate a pathological state-dependent effect of TROX-1, which suggests an increased

  12. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1994-03-15

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 11 figures.

  13. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W.D.

    1996-03-12

    A robotic vehicle is described for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle comprises forward and rear housings each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle also includes at least three selectively extendable members, each of which defines a cavity therein. The forward end portion of each extendable member is secured to the forward housing and the rear end portion of each housing is secured to the rear housing. Each of the extendable members is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing and the rear housing can be selectively decreased. 14 figs.

  14. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1996-01-01

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  15. Robotic vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Box, W. Donald

    1994-01-01

    A robotic vehicle (10) for travel through an enclosed or partially enclosed conduit or pipe including vertical and/or horizontal conduit or pipe. The robotic vehicle (10) comprises forward and rear housings (32 and 12) each provided with a surface engaging mechanism for selectively engaging the walls of the conduit through which the vehicle is travelling, whereby the housings (32 and 12) are selectively held in a stationary position within the conduit. The vehicle (10) also includes at least three selectively extendable members (46), each of which defines a cavity (56) therein. The forward end portion (50) of each extendable member (46) is secured to the forward housing (32) and the rear end portion (48) of each housing is secured to the rear housing (12). Each of the extendable members (46) is independently extendable from a retracted position to an extended position upon the injection of a gas under pressure into the cavity (56) of the extendable member such that the distance between the forward housing (32 ) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively increased. Further, each of the extendable members (46) is independently retractable from the extended position to the retracted position upon the application of a vacuum to the cavity (56) of the extendable member (46) such that the distance between the forward housing (32) and the rear housing (12) can be selectively decreased.

  16. Mechanism underlying unaltered cortical inhibitory synaptic transmission in contrast with enhanced excitatory transmission in CaV2.1 knockin migraine mice.

    PubMed

    Vecchia, Dania; Tottene, Angelita; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pietrobon, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), a monogenic subtype of migraine with aura, is caused by gain-of-function mutations in CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels. In FHM1 knockin mice, excitatory neurotransmission at cortical pyramidal cell synapses is enhanced, but inhibitory neurotransmission at connected pairs of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and pyramidal cells is unaltered, despite being initiated by CaV2.1 channels. The mechanism underlying the unaltered GABA release at cortical FS interneuron synapses remains unknown. Here, we show that the FHM1 R192Q mutation does not affect inhibitory transmission at autapses of cortical FS and other types of multipolar interneurons in microculture from R192Q knockin mice, and investigate the underlying mechanism. Lowering the extracellular [Ca(2+)] did not reveal gain-of-function of evoked transmission neither in control nor after prolongation of the action potential (AP) with tetraethylammonium, indicating unaltered AP-evoked presynaptic calcium influx at inhibitory autapses in FHM1 KI mice. Neither saturation of the presynaptic calcium sensor nor short duration of the AP can explain the unaltered inhibitory transmission in the mutant mice. Recordings of the P/Q-type calcium current in multipolar interneurons in microculture revealed that the current density and the gating properties of the CaV2.1 channels expressed in these interneurons are barely affected by the FHM1 mutation, in contrast with the enhanced current density and left-shifted activation gating of mutant CaV2.1 channels in cortical pyramidal cells. Our findings suggest that expression of specific CaV2.1 channels differentially sensitive to modulation by FHM1 mutations in inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons underlies the gain-of-function of excitatory but unaltered inhibitory synaptic transmission and the likely consequent dysregulation of the cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance in FHM1. PMID:24907493

  17. Calcium sensor regulation of the CaV2.1 Ca2+ channel contributes to short-term synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Nanou, Evanthia; Sullivan, Jane M; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2016-01-26

    Short-term synaptic plasticity is induced by calcium (Ca(2+)) accumulating in presynaptic nerve terminals during repetitive action potentials. Regulation of voltage-gated CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels by Ca(2+) sensor proteins induces facilitation of Ca(2+) currents and synaptic facilitation in cultured neurons expressing exogenous CaV2.1 channels. However, it is unknown whether this mechanism contributes to facilitation in native synapses. We introduced the IM-AA mutation into the IQ-like motif (IM) of the Ca(2+) sensor binding site. This mutation does not alter voltage dependence or kinetics of CaV2.1 currents, or frequency or amplitude of spontaneous miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs); however, synaptic facilitation is completely blocked in excitatory glutamatergic synapses in hippocampal autaptic cultures. In acutely prepared hippocampal slices, frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs and amplitudes of evoked EPSCs are unaltered. In contrast, short-term synaptic facilitation in response to paired stimuli is reduced by ∼ 50%. In the presence of EGTA-AM to prevent global increases in free Ca(2+), the IM-AA mutation completely blocks short-term synaptic facilitation, indicating that synaptic facilitation by brief, local increases in Ca(2+) is dependent upon regulation of CaV2.1 channels by Ca(2+) sensor proteins. In response to trains of action potentials, synaptic facilitation is reduced in IM-AA synapses in initial stimuli, consistent with results of paired-pulse experiments; however, synaptic depression is also delayed, resulting in sustained increases in amplitudes of later EPSCs during trains of 10 stimuli at 10-20 Hz. Evidently, regulation of CaV2.1 channels by CaS proteins is required for normal short-term plasticity and normal encoding of information in native hippocampal synapses. PMID:26755594

  18. CaMKII associates with CaV1.2 L-type calcium channels via selected β subunits to enhance regulatory phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Abiria, Sunday A.; Colbran, Roger J.

    2010-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) facilitates L-type Calcium Channel (LTCC) activity physiologically, but may exacerbate LTCC-dependent pathophysiology. We previously showed that CaMKII forms stable complexes with voltage-gated calcium channel β1b or β2a subunits, but not with the β3 or β4 subunits (Grueter et al 2008, Biochemistry, 47:1760–1767). CaMKII-dependent facilitation of CaV1.2 LTCCs requires Thr498 phosphorylation in the β2a subunit (Grueter et al, 2006, Mol Cell, 23:641–650), but the relationship of this modulation to CaMKII interactions with LTCC subunits is unknown. Here we show that CaMKII co-immunoprecipitates with forebrain LTCCs that contain CaV1.2α1 and β1 or β2 subunits, but is not detected in LTCC complexes containing β4 subunits.4 CaMKIIα can be specifically tethered to the I/II linker of CaV1.2α1 subunits in vitro by the β1b or β2a subunits. Efficient targeting of CaMKIIα to the full-length CaV1.2α1 subunit in transfected HEK293 cells requires CaMKII binding to the β2a subunit. Moreover, disruption of CaMKII binding substantially reduced phosphorylation of β2a at Thr498 within the LTCC complex, without altering overall phosphorylation of Cav1.2α1 and β subunits. These findings demonstrate a biochemical mechanism underlying LTCC facilitation by CaMKII. PMID:19840220

  19. Significant Association Between CAV1 Variant rs3807989 on 7p31 and Atrial Fibrillation in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Wang, Chuchu; Wang, Xiaojing; Xu, Chengqi; Wu, Manman; Wang, Pengxia; Tu, Xin; Wang, Qing K

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in European ancestry populations revealed several genomic loci for atrial fibrillation (AF). We previously replicated the 4q25 locus (PITX2) and 16q22 locus (ZFHX3) in the Chinese population, but not the KCNN3 locus on 1q21. With single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3807989 in CAV1 encoding caveolin-1, however, controversial results were reported in 2 Chinese replication studies. Methods and Results Six remaining AF genetic loci from GWAS, including rs3807989/CAV1, rs593479/PRRX1, rs6479562/C9orf3, rs10824026/SYNPO2L, rs1152591/SYNE2, and rs7164883/HCN4, were analyzed in a Chinese Han population with 941 cases and 562 controls. Only rs3807989 showed significant association with AF (Padj=4.77×10−5), and the finding was replicated in 2 other independent populations with 709 cases and 2175 controls, 463 cases and 644 controls, and the combined population with a total of 2113 cases and 3381 controls (Padj=2.20×10−9; odds ratio [OR]=1.34 for major allele G). Meta-analysis, together with data from previous reports in Chinese and Japanese populations, also showed a significant association between rs3807989 and AF (P=3.40×10−4; OR=1.24 for allele G). We also found that rs3807989 showed a significant association with lone AF in 3 independent populations and in the combined population (Padj=3.85×10−8; OR=1.43 for major allele G). Conclusions The data in this study revealed a significant association between rs3807989 and AF in the Chinese Han population. Together with the findings that caveolin-1 interacts with potassium channels Kir2.1, KCNH2, and HCN4 and sodium channels Nav1.5 and Nav1.8, CAV1 becomes a strong candidate susceptibility gene for AF across different ethnic populations. This study is the first to show a significant association between rs3807989 and lone AF. PMID:25953654

  20. Demonstration of Binding of Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 to the Cav2.1 P/Q-Type Calcium Channel

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In neurons, entry of extracellular calcium (Ca2+) into synaptic terminals through Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca2+ channels is the driving force for exocytosis of neurotransmitter-containing synaptic vesicles. This class of Ca2+ channel is, therefore, pivotal during normal neurotransmission in higher organisms. In response to channel opening and Ca2+ influx, specific Ca2+-binding proteins associate with cytoplasmic regulatory domains of the P/Q channel to modulate subsequent channel opening. Channel modulation in this way influences synaptic plasticity with consequences for higher-level processes such as learning and memory acquisition. The ubiquitous Ca2+-sensing protein calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of all types of mammalian voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, including the P/Q class, by direct binding to specific regulatory motifs. More recently, experimental evidence has highlighted a role for additional Ca2+-binding proteins, particularly of the CaBP and NCS families in the regulation of P/Q channels. NCS-1 is a protein found from yeast to humans and that regulates a diverse number of cellular functions. Physiological and genetic evidence indicates that NCS-1 regulates P/Q channel activity, including calcium-dependent facilitation, although a direct physical association between the proteins has yet to be demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to determine if there is a direct interaction between NCS-1 and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the Cav2.1 α-subunit. Using distinct but complementary approaches, including in vitro binding of bacterially expressed recombinant proteins, fluorescence spectrophotometry, isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and expression of fluorescently tagged proteins in mammalian cells, we show direct binding and demonstrate that CaM can compete for it. We speculate about how NCS-1/Cav2.1 association might add to the complexity of calcium channel regulation mediated by other known calcium-sensing proteins and how

  1. CONSIDERATIONS ON ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF LYMPH VESSELS OF UPPER AERO DIGESTIVE ORGANS AND CERVICAL SATELLITE LYMPH NODE GROUP.

    PubMed

    Ciupilan, Corina; Stan, C I

    2016-01-01

    The almost constant local regional development of the cancers of upper aero digestive organs requires the same special attention to cervical lymph node metastases, as well as to the primary neoplastic burning point. The surgical therapy alone or associated has a mutilating, damaging character, resulting in loss of an organ and function, most of the times with social implications, involving physical distortions with aesthetic consequences, which make the reintegration of the individual into society questionable. The problem of cervical lymph node metastases is vast and complex, reason why we approached several anatomical and physiological aspects of lymph vessels of the aero digestive organs. Among the available elements during treatment, the headquarters of the tumour, its histologic degree, and its infiltrative nature, each of them significantly influences the possibility of developing metastases. PMID:27483727

  2. The Calmodulin-Binding, Short Linear Motif, NSCaTE Is Conserved in L-Type Channel Ancestors of Vertebrate Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Taiakina, Valentina; Boone, Adrienne N.; Fux, Julia; Senatore, Adriano; Weber-Adrian, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    NSCaTE is a short linear motif of (xWxxx(I or L)xxxx), composed of residues with a high helix-forming propensity within a mostly disordered N-terminus that is conserved in L-type calcium channels from protostome invertebrates to humans. NSCaTE is an optional, lower affinity and calcium-sensitive binding site for calmodulin (CaM) which competes for CaM binding with a more ancient, C-terminal IQ domain on L-type channels. CaM bound to N- and C- terminal tails serve as dual detectors to changing intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, promoting calcium-dependent inactivation of L-type calcium channels. NSCaTE is absent in some arthropod species, and is also lacking in vertebrate L-type isoforms, Cav1.1 and Cav1.4 channels. The pervasiveness of a methionine just downstream from NSCaTE suggests that L-type channels could generate alternative N-termini lacking NSCaTE through the choice of translational start sites. Long N-terminus with an NSCaTE motif in L-type calcium channel homolog LCav1 from pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis has a faster calcium-dependent inactivation than a shortened N-termini lacking NSCaTE. NSCaTE effects are present in low concentrations of internal buffer (0.5 mM EGTA), but disappears in high buffer conditions (10 mM EGTA). Snail and mammalian NSCaTE have an alpha-helical propensity upon binding Ca2+-CaM and can saturate both CaM N-terminal and C-terminal domains in the absence of a competing IQ motif. NSCaTE evolved in ancestors of the first animals with internal organs for promoting a more rapid, calcium-sensitive inactivation of L-type channels. PMID:23626724

  3. The calmodulin-binding, short linear motif, NSCaTE is conserved in L-type channel ancestors of vertebrate Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels.

    PubMed

    Taiakina, Valentina; Boone, Adrienne N; Fux, Julia; Senatore, Adriano; Weber-Adrian, Danielle; Guillemette, J Guy; Spafford, J David

    2013-01-01

    NSCaTE is a short linear motif of (xWxxx(I or L)xxxx), composed of residues with a high helix-forming propensity within a mostly disordered N-terminus that is conserved in L-type calcium channels from protostome invertebrates to humans. NSCaTE is an optional, lower affinity and calcium-sensitive binding site for calmodulin (CaM) which competes for CaM binding with a more ancient, C-terminal IQ domain on L-type channels. CaM bound to N- and C- terminal tails serve as dual detectors to changing intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, promoting calcium-dependent inactivation of L-type calcium channels. NSCaTE is absent in some arthropod species, and is also lacking in vertebrate L-type isoforms, Cav1.1 and Cav1.4 channels. The pervasiveness of a methionine just downstream from NSCaTE suggests that L-type channels could generate alternative N-termini lacking NSCaTE through the choice of translational start sites. Long N-terminus with an NSCaTE motif in L-type calcium channel homolog LCav1 from pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis has a faster calcium-dependent inactivation than a shortened N-termini lacking NSCaTE. NSCaTE effects are present in low concentrations of internal buffer (0.5 mM EGTA), but disappears in high buffer conditions (10 mM EGTA). Snail and mammalian NSCaTE have an alpha-helical propensity upon binding Ca(2+)-CaM and can saturate both CaM N-terminal and C-terminal domains in the absence of a competing IQ motif. NSCaTE evolved in ancestors of the first animals with internal organs for promoting a more rapid, calcium-sensitive inactivation of L-type channels. PMID:23626724

  4. An Innovative Structural Mode Selection Methodology: Application for the X-33 Launch Vehicle Finite Element Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hidalgo, Homero, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative methodology for determining structural target mode selection and mode selection based on a specific criterion is presented. An effective approach to single out modes which interact with specific locations on a structure has been developed for the X-33 Launch Vehicle Finite Element Model (FEM). We presented Root-Sum-Square (RSS) displacement method computes resultant modal displacement for each mode at selected degrees of freedom (DOF) and sorts to locate modes with highest values. This method was used to determine modes, which most influenced specific locations/points on the X-33 flight vehicle such as avionics control components, aero-surface control actuators, propellant valve and engine points for use in flight control stability analysis and for flight POGO stability analysis. Additionally, the modal RSS method allows for primary or global target vehicle modes to also be identified in an accurate and efficient manner.

  5. Singlet oxygen quenching and radical scavenging capacities of structurally-related flavonoids present in Zuccagnia punctata Cav.

    PubMed

    Vieyra, Faustino E Morán; Boggetti, Héctor J; Zampini, Iris C; Ordoñez, Roxana M; Isla, María I; Alvarez, Rosa M S; De Rosso, Veridiana; Mercadante, Adriana Z; Borsarelli, Claudio D

    2009-06-01

    The singlet oxygen (1O2) quenching and free radical (DPPH(*), ABTS(* +) and O2(* -)) scavenging ability of three structurally-related flavonoids (7-hydroxyflavanone HF, 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone DHC and 3,7-dihydroxyflavone DHF) present in the Argentinean native shrub Zuccagnia punctata Cav. were studied in solution by combining electrochemical and kinetic measurements, mass spectroscopy, end-point antioxidant assays and computational calculations. The results showed that the antioxidant properties of these flavonoids depend on several factors, such as their electron- and hydrogen atom donor capacity, the ionization degree of the more acidic group, solvatation effects and electrostatic interactions with the oxidant species. The theoretical calculations for both the gas and solution phases at the B3LYP level of theory for the Osanger reaction field model agreed with the experimental findings, thus supporting the characterization of the antioxidant mechanism of the Z. punctata flavonoids. PMID:19431060

  6. Control of turbulent flow over an articulating turret for reduction of adverse aero-optic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    Force Research Laboratory wind tunnel at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Direct measurements of the aero-optic effects were taken via a Malley probe at a fixed pitch angle with and without suction control at a Mach number 0.3, and a corresponding Reynolds number of 2,000,000. Reduction of the aero-optic effects in this test demonstrated that suction control is a practical control input to reduce the near field wavefront abberations due to the turbulent flow over the aperture.

  7. Integrated approach for stress based lifing of aero gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu, Abdullahi Obonyegba

    In order to analyse the turbine blade life, the damage due to the combined thermal and mechanical loads should be adequately accounted for. This is more challenging when detailed component geometry is limited. Therefore, a compromise between the level of geometric detail and the complexity of the lifing method to be implemented would be necessary. This research focuses on how the life assessment of aero engine turbine blades can be done, considering the balance between available design inputs and adequate level of fidelity. Accordingly, the thesis contributes to developing a generic turbine blade lifing method that is based on the engine thermodynamic cycle; as well as integrating critical design/technological factors and operational parameters that influence the aero engine blade life. To this end, thermo-mechanical fatigue was identified as the critical damage phenomenon driving the life of the turbine blade.. The developed approach integrates software tools and numerical models created using the minimum design information typically available at the early design stages. Using finite element analysis of an idealised blade geometry, the approach captures relevant impacts of thermal gradients and thermal stresses that contribute to the thermo-mechanical fatigue damage on the gas turbine blade. The blade life is evaluated using the Neu/Sehitoglu thermo-mechanical fatigue model that considers damage accumulation due to fatigue, oxidation, and creep. The leading edge is examined as a critical part of the blade to estimate the damage severity for different design factors and operational parameters. The outputs of the research can be used to better understand how the environment and the operating conditions of the aircraft affect the blade life consumption and therefore what is the impact on the maintenance cost and the availability of the propulsion system. This research also finds that the environmental (oxidation) effect drives the blade life and the blade coolant

  8. Cooperative activation of the T-type CaV3.2 channel: interaction between Domains II and III.

    PubMed

    Demers-Giroux, Pierre-Olivier; Bourdin, Benoîte; Sauvé, Rémy; Parent, Lucie

    2013-10-11

    T-type CaV3 channels are important mediators of Ca(2+) entry near the resting membrane potential. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms responsible for channel activation. Homology models based upon the high-resolution structure of bacterial NaV channels predict interaction between the S4-S5 helix of Domain II (IIS4-S5) and the distal S6 pore region of Domain II (IIS6) and Domain III (IIIS6). Functional intra- and inter-domain interactions were investigated with a double mutant cycle analysis. Activation gating and channel kinetics were measured for 47 single mutants and 20 pairs of mutants. Significant coupling energies (ΔΔG(interact) ≥ 1.5 kcal mol(-1)) were measured for 4 specific pairs of mutants introduced between IIS4-S5 and IIS6 and between IIS4-S5 and IIIS6. In agreement with the computer based models, Thr-911 in IIS4-S5 was functionally coupled with Ile-1013 in IIS6 during channel activation. The interaction energy was, however, found to be stronger between Val-907 in IIS4-S5 and Ile-1013 in IIS6. In addition Val-907 was significantly coupled with Asn-1548 in IIIS6 but not with Asn-1853 in IVS6. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the S4-S5 and S6 helices from adjacent domains are energetically coupled during the activation of a low voltage-gated T-type CaV3 channel. PMID:23970551

  9. Redox mechanism of S-nitrosothiol modulation of neuronal CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeonghan; Nelson, Michael T; Rose, Kirstin E; Todorovic, Slobodan M

    2013-10-01

    T-type calcium channels in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) have a central function in tuning neuronal excitability and are implicated in sensory processing including pain. Previous studies have implicated redox agents in control of T-channel activity; however, the mechanisms involved are not completely understood. Here, we recorded T-type calcium currents from acutely dissociated DRG neurons from young rats and investigated the mechanisms of CaV3.2 T-type channel modulation by S-nitrosothiols (SNOs). We found that extracellular application of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine rapidly reduced T-type current amplitudes. GSNO did not affect voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation and macroscopic current kinetics of T-type channels. The effects of GSNO were abolished by pretreatment of the cells with N-ethylmaleimide, an irreversible alkylating agent, but not by pretreatment with 1H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo (4,3-a) quinoxalin-1-one, a specific soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, suggesting a potential effect of GSNO on putative extracellular thiol residues on T-type channels. Expression of wild-type CaV3.2 channels or a quadruple Cys-Ala mutant in human embryonic kidney cells revealed that Cys residues in repeats I and II on the extracellular face of the channel were required for channel inhibition by GSNO. We propose that SNO-related molecules in vivo may lead to alterations of T-type channel-dependent neuronal excitability in sensory neurons and in the central nervous system in both physiological and pathological conditions such as neuronal ischemia/hypoxia. PMID:23813099

  10. Contribution of Ion Channels in Calcium Signaling Regulating Phagocytosis: MaxiK, Cav1.3 and Bestrophin-1.

    PubMed

    Strauß, Olaf; Reichhart, Nadine; Gomez, Nestor Mas; Müller, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the BEST1 gene lead to a variety of retinal degenerations including Best's vitelliforme macular degeneration. The BEST1 gene product, bestrophin-1, is expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). It is likely that mutant bestrophin-1 impairs functions of the RPE which support photoreceptor function and will thus lead to retinal degeneration. However, the RPE function which is influenced by bestrophin-1 is so far not identified. Previously we showed that bestrophin-1 interacts with L-type Ca²⁺ channels of the CaV1.3 subtype and that the endogenously expressed bestrophin-1 is required for intracellular Ca²⁺ regulation. A hallmark of Best's disease is the fast lipofuscin accumulation occurring already at young ages. Therefore, we addressed the hypothesis that bestrophin-1 might influence phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments (POS) by the RPE. Here, siRNA knock-down of bestrophin-1 expression as well as inhibition of L-type Ca²⁺ channel activity modulated the POS phagocytosis in vitro. In vivo CaV1.3 expression appeared to be diurnal regulated with a higher expression rate in the afternoon. Compared to wild-type littermates, Ca V 1.3 (-/-) mice showed a shift in the circadian POS phagocytosis with an increased activity in the afternoon. Thus we suggest that mutant bestrophin-1 leads to an impaired regulation of the POS phagocytosis by the RPE which would explain the fast lipofuscin accumulation in Best patients. PMID:26427483

  11. GDF-15 enhances intracellular Ca2+ by increasing Cav1.3 expression in rat cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun-Mei; Wang, Chang-Ying; Hu, Changlong; Fang, Yan-Jia; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2016-01-01

    GDF-15 (growth/differentiation factor 15) is a novel member of the TGF (transforming growth factor)-β superfamily that has critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems. We reported previously that GDF-15 increased delayed rectifier outward K+ currents and Kv2.1 α subunit expression through TβRII (TGF-β receptor II) to activate Src kinase and Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons). In the present study, we found that treatment of CGNs with GDF-15 for 24 h increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to membrane depolarization, as determined by Ca2+ imaging. Whole-cell current recordings indicated that GDF-15 increased the inward Ca2+ current (ICa) without altering steady-state activation of Ca2+ channels. Treatment with nifedipine, an inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels, abrogated GDF-15-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and ICa. The GDF-15-induced increase in ICa was mediated via up-regulation of the Cav1.3 α subunit, which was attenuated by inhibiting Akt/mTOR and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) pathways and by pharmacological inhibition of Src-mediated TβRII phosphorylation. Given that Cav1.3 is not only a channel for Ca2+ influx, but also a transcriptional regulator, our data confirm that GDF-15 induces protein expression via TβRII and activation of a non-Smad pathway, and provide novel insight into the mechanism of GDF-15 function in neurons. PMID:27114559

  12. PREFACE: 3rd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Science 2015 (AeroEarth 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaol, F. L.

    2016-02-01

    The 3rd International Conferences on Geological, Geographical, Aerospaces and Earth Sciences 2015 (AeroEarth 2015), was held at The DoubleTree Hilton, Jakarta, Indonesia during 26 - 27 September 2015. The 1st AeoroEarth was held succefully in Jakarta in 2013. The success continued to The 2nd AeroEarth 2014 that was held in Kuta Bali, Indonesia. The publications were published by EES IOP in http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/19/1 and http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/23/1 respectively. The AeroEarth 2015 conference aims to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists from around the world. Through research and development, Earth's scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. The theme of AeroEarth 2015 is ''Earth and Aerospace Sciences : Challenges and Opportunities'' Earth provides resources and the exact conditions to make life possible. However, with the advent of technology and industrialization, the Earth's resources are being pushed to the brink of depletion. Non-sustainable industrial practices are not only endangering the supply of the Earth's natural resources, but are also putting burden on life itself by bringing about pollution and climate change. A major role of earth science scholars is to examine the delicate balance between the Earth's resources and the growing demands of industrialization. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 78 papers and after rigorous review, 18 papers were accepted. The participants

  13. Splice-variant changes of the CaV3.2 T-type calcium channel mediate voltage-dependent facilitation and associate with cardiac hypertrophy and development

    PubMed Central

    David, Laurence S; Garcia, Esperanza; Cain, Stuart M; Thau, Elana M; Tyson, John R

    2010-01-01

    Low voltage-activated T-type calcium (Ca) channels contribute to the normal development of the heart and are also implicated in pathophysiological states such as cardiac hypertrophy. Functionally distinct T-type Ca channel isoforms can be generated by alternative splicing from each of three different T-type genes (CaV3.1, CaV3.2, CaV3.3), although it remains to be described whether specific splice variants are associated with developmental states and pathological conditions. We aimed to identify and functionally characterize CaV3.2 T-type Ca channel alternatively spliced variants from newborn animals and to compare with adult normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). DNA sequence analysis of full-length CaV3.2 cDNA generated from newborn heart tissue identified ten major regions of alternative splicing, the more common variants of which were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and also subject to functional examination by whole-cell patch clamp. The main findings are that: (1) cardiac CaV3.2 T-type Ca channels are subject to considerable alternative splicing, (2) there is preferential expression of CaV3.2(−25) splice variant channels in newborn rat heart with a developmental shift in adult heart that results in approximately equal levels of expression of both (+25) and (−25) exon variants, (3) in the adult stage of hypertensive rats there is both an increase in overall CaV3.2 expression and a shift towards expression of CaV3.2(+25) containing channels as the predominant form and (4) alternative splicing confers a variant-specific voltage-dependent facilitation of CaV3.2 channels. We conclude that CaV3.2 alternative splicing generates significant T-type Ca channel structural and functional diversity with potential implications relevant to cardiac developmental and pathophysiological states. PMID:20699644

  14. CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels mediate the augmented calcium influx in carotid body glomus cells by chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Makarenko, Vladislav V; Ahmmed, Gias U; Peng, Ying-Jie; Khan, Shakil A; Nanduri, Jayasri; Kumar, Ganesh K; Fox, Aaron P; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark manifestation of sleep apnea. A heightened carotid body activity and the resulting chemosensory reflex mediate increased sympathetic nerve activity by CIH. However, the mechanisms underlying heightened carotid body activity by CIH are not known. An elevation of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in glomus cells, the primary oxygen-sensing cells, is an essential step for carotid body activation by hypoxia. In the present study, we examined the effects of CIH on the glomus cell [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia and assessed the underlying mechanisms. Glomus cells were harvested from adult rats or wild-type mice treated with 10 days of either room air (control) or CIH (alternating cycles of 15 s of hypoxia and 5 min of room air; 9 episodes/h; 8 h/day). CIH-treated glomus cells exhibited an enhanced [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia, and this effect was absent in the presence of 2-(4-cyclopropylphenyl)-N-((1R)-1-[5-[(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)oxo]-pyridin-2-yl]ethyl)acetamide (TTA-A2), a specific inhibitor of T-type Ca(2+) channels, and in voltage-gated calcium channel, type 3.2 (CaV3.2), null glomus cells. CaV3.2 knockout mice exhibited an absence of CIH-induced hypersensitivity of the carotid body. CIH increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in glomus cells. A ROS scavenger prevented the exaggerated TTA-A2-sensitive [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia. CIH had no effect on CaV3.2 mRNA levels. CIH augmented Ca(2+) currents and increased CaV3.2 protein in plasma membrane fractions of human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably expressing CaV3.2, and either a ROS scavenger or brefeldin-A, an inhibitor of protein trafficking, prevented these effects. These findings suggest that CIH leads to an augmented Ca(2+) influx via ROS-dependent facilitation of CaV3.2 protein trafficking to the plasma membrane. PMID:26561606

  15. Near-field sound radiation of fan tones from an installed turbofan aero-engine.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Alan; Gaffney, James; Kingan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The development of a distributed source model to predict fan tone noise levels of an installed turbofan aero-engine is reported. The key objective is to examine a canonical problem: how to predict the pressure field due to a distributed source located near an infinite, rigid cylinder. This canonical problem is a simple representation of an installed turbofan, where the distributed source is based on the pressure pattern generated by a spinning duct mode, and the rigid cylinder represents an aircraft fuselage. The radiation of fan tones can be modelled in terms of spinning modes. In this analysis, based on duct modes, theoretical expressions for the near-field acoustic pressures on the cylinder, or at the same locations without the cylinder, have been formulated. Simulations of the near-field acoustic pressures are compared against measurements obtained from a fan rig test. Also, the installation effect is quantified by calculating the difference in the sound pressure levels with and without the adjacent cylindrical fuselage. Results are shown for the blade passing frequency fan tone radiated at a supersonic fan operating condition. PMID:26428770

  16. KC-135 aero-optical turbulent boundary layer/shear layer experiment revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, J.; Allen, C.

    1987-01-01

    The aero-optical effects associated with propagating a laser beam through both an aircraft turbulent boundary layer and artificially generated shear layers are examined. The data present comparisons from observed optical performance with those inferred from aerodynamic measurements of unsteady density and correlation lengths within the same random flow fields. Using optical instrumentation with tens of microsecond temporal resolution through a finite aperture, optical performance degradation was determined and contrasted with the infinite aperture time averaged aerodynamic measurement. In addition, the optical data were artificially clipped to compare to theoretical scaling calculations. Optical instrumentation consisted of a custom Q switched Nd:Yag double pulsed laser, and a holographic camera which recorded the random flow field in a double pass, double pulse mode. Aerodynamic parameters were measured using hot film anemometer probes and a five hole pressure probe. Each technique is described with its associated theoretical basis for comparison. The effects of finite aperture and spatial and temporal frequencies of the random flow are considered.

  17. Nonlocal sparse model with adaptive structural clustering for feature extraction of aero-engine bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han; Chen, Xuefeng; Du, Zhaohui; Li, Xiang; Yan, Ruqiang

    2016-04-01

    Fault information of aero-engine bearings presents two particular phenomena, i.e., waveform distortion and impulsive feature frequency band dispersion, which leads to a challenging problem for current techniques of bearing fault diagnosis. Moreover, although many progresses of sparse representation theory have been made in feature extraction of fault information, the theory also confronts inevitable performance degradation due to the fact that relatively weak fault information has not sufficiently prominent and sparse representations. Therefore, a novel nonlocal sparse model (coined NLSM) and its algorithm framework has been proposed in this paper, which goes beyond simple sparsity by introducing more intrinsic structures of feature information. This work adequately exploits the underlying prior information that feature information exhibits nonlocal self-similarity through clustering similar signal fragments and stacking them together into groups. Within this framework, the prior information is transformed into a regularization term and a sparse optimization problem, which could be solved through block coordinate descent method (BCD), is formulated. Additionally, the adaptive structural clustering sparse dictionary learning technique, which utilizes k-Nearest-Neighbor (kNN) clustering and principal component analysis (PCA) learning, is adopted to further enable sufficient sparsity of feature information. Moreover, the selection rule of regularization parameter and computational complexity are described in detail. The performance of the proposed framework is evaluated through numerical experiment and its superiority with respect to the state-of-the-art method in the field is demonstrated through the vibration signals of experimental rig of aircraft engine bearings.

  18. Rotary-Wing Relevant Compressor Aero Research and Technology Development Activities at Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Skoch, Gary J.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Technical challenges of compressors for future rotorcraft engines are driven by engine-level and component-level requirements. Cycle analyses are used to highlight the engine-level challenges for 3000, 7500, and 12000 SHP-class engines, which include retention of performance and stability margin at low corrected flows, and matching compressor type, axial-flow or centrifugal, to the low corrected flows and high temperatures in the aft stages. At the component level: power-to-weight and efficiency requirements impel designs with lower inherent aerodynamic stability margin; and, optimum engine overall pressure ratios lead to small blade heights and the associated challenges of scale, particularly increased clearance-to-span ratios. The technical challenges associated with the aerodynamics of low corrected flows and stability management impel the compressor aero research and development efforts reviewed herein. These activities include development of simple models for clearance sensitivities to improve cycle calculations, full-annulus, unsteady Navier-Stokes simulations used to elucidate stall, its inception, and the physics of stall control by discrete tip-injection, development of an actuator-duct-based model for rapid simulation of nonaxisymmetric flow fields (e.g., due inlet circumferential distortion), advanced centrifugal compressor stage development and experimentation, and application of stall control in a T700 engine.

  19. An AeroCom Initial Assessment - Optical Properties in Aerosol Component Modules of Global Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.; Textor, C.; Guibert, S.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Berglen, T.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Collins, W.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, H.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Grini, A.; Hendricks, J.; Herzog, M.; Horrowitz, L.; Isaksen, I.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevag, A.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Krol, M.; Lauer, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Lesins, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Lohmann, U.; Montanaro, V.; Myhre, G.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tie, X.

    2006-05-29

    The AeroCom exercise diagnoses multi-component aerosol modules in global modeling. In an initial assessment global fields for mass and for mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (aot) were compared among aerosol component modules of 21 different global models. There is general agreement among models for the annual global mean of component combined aot. At 0.12 to 0.14, simulated aot values are at the lower end of global averages suggested by remote sensing from ground (AERONET ca 0.14) and space (MODIS-MISR composite ca 0.16). More detailed comparisons, however, reveal that larger differences in regional distribution and significant differences in compositional mixture have remained. Of particular concern is the large model diversity for contributions by dust and carbon, because it leads to significant uncertainty in aerosol absorption (aab). Since not only aot but also aab influence the aerosol impact on the radiative energy-balance, aerosol (direct) forcing uncertainty in modeling is larger than differences in aot might suggest. New diagnostic approaches are proposed to trace model differences in terms of aerosol processing and transport: These include the prescription of common input (e.g. amount, size and injection of aerosol component emissions) and the use of observational capabilities from ground (e.g. measurements networks) and space (e.g. correlations between retrieved aerosol and cloud properties).

  20. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aero-Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the development and application of ceramic matrix composites consisting of silicon carbide (SiC) based matrices reinforced by small-diameter continuous-length SiC-based fibers. For example, these SiC/SiC composites are now in the early stages of implementation into hot-section components of civil aero-propulsion gas turbine engines, where in comparison to current metallic components they offer multiple advantages due to their lighter weight and higher temperature structural capability. For current production-ready SiC/SiC, this temperature capability for long time structural applications is 1250 degC, which is better than 1100 degC for the best metallic superalloys. Foreseeing that even higher structural reliability and temperature capability would continue to increase the advantages of SiC/SiC composites, progress in recent years has also been made at NASA toward improving the properties of SiC/SiC composites by optimizing the various constituent materials and geometries within composite microstructures. The primary objective of this chapter is to detail this latter progress, both fundamentally and practically, with particular emphasis on recent advancements in the materials and processes for the fiber, fiber coating, fiber architecture, and matrix, and in the design methods for incorporating these constituents into SiC/SiC microstructures with improved thermo-structural performance.

  1. User's Guide for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Dean K.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    This report is a Users Guide for the NASA-developed Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) software, which is a transient simulation of a large commercial turbofan engine (up to 90,000-lb thrust) with a realistic engine control system. The software supports easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface (GUI). C-MAPSS provides the user with a graphical turbofan engine simulation environment in which advanced algorithms can be implemented and tested. C-MAPSS can run user-specified transient simulations, and it can generate state-space linear models of the nonlinear engine model at an operating point. The code has a number of GUI screens that allow point-and-click operation, and have editable fields for user-specified input. The software includes an atmospheric model which allows simulation of engine operation at altitudes from sea level to 40,000 ft, Mach numbers from 0 to 0.90, and ambient temperatures from -60 to 103 F. The package also includes a power-management system that allows the engine to be operated over a wide range of thrust levels throughout the full range of flight conditions.

  2. LES prediction and analysis of the aero-optical environment around a 3-D turret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Edwin; Wang, Kan; Wang, Meng; Jumper, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Using wall-modeled large-eddy simulation, a Mach 0.4 flow over a hemisphere-on-cylinder turret at the experimental Reynolds number of ReD = 2 . 3 ×106 is simulated to study the aero-optical distortions caused by turbulent density fluctuations. The optical distortions are calculated at over 250 viewing angles during the simulation to thoroughly investigate the optical environment around the turret. Flow field and optical results show good comparisons with experimental measurements. A large database of three-dimensional velocity and density fields is generated for study of the connection between global flow dynamics and local optical distortions. Proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition are applied to both the distorted wavefronts and the flow-field database. A method of reconstructing the optical wavefronts from the density field modes is investigated. Relations between prominent flow features and wavefront components including tip/tilt and higher-order effects will be discussed. Supported by HEL-JTO through AFOSR Grant FA9550-13-1-0001.

  3. User's Guide for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS): Version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Frederick, Dean K.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Chan, William W.

    2012-01-01

    This report is a Users Guide for version 2 of the NASA-developed Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) software, which is a transient simulation of a large commercial turbofan engine (up to 90,000-lb thrust) with a realistic engine control system. The software supports easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface (GUI). C-MAPSS v.2 has some enhancements over the original, including three actuators rather than one, the addition of actuator and sensor dynamics, and an improved controller, while retaining or improving on the convenience and user-friendliness of the original. C-MAPSS v.2 provides the user with a graphical turbofan engine simulation environment in which advanced algorithms can be implemented and tested. C-MAPSS can run user-specified transient simulations, and it can generate state-space linear models of the nonlinear engine model at an operating point. The code has a number of GUI screens that allow point-and-click operation, and have editable fields for user-specified input. The software includes an atmospheric model which allows simulation of engine operation at altitudes from sea level to 40,000 ft, Mach numbers from 0 to 0.90, and ambient temperatures from -60 to 103 F. The package also includes a power-management system that allows the engine to be operated over a wide range of thrust levels throughout the full range of flight conditions.

  4. Aero-Thermal Prediction in High Pressure Turbine Cascade using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Rathakrishnan; Lele, Sanjiva

    2008-11-01

    The aero-thermal performance of an uncooled, smooth high pressure (HP) turbine cascade in the presence of free-stream turbulence is studied using a high-order overset mesh Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure. A HP vane cascade designed at the von Karman Institute (VKI) for fluid dynamics, Belgium, is used as the model geometry. Simulations matching experimental conditions, except for the Reynolds number which is about half of the experimental value, have been carried out. Significant enhancement in the blade heat-transfer is seen in the presence of inflow turbulence. Eddies from the free-stream turbulence get stretched around the blade, creating long streaky structures in the blade boundary layer. These structures quickly break down on the suction side, while they persist on the pressure side. The blade heat transfer signature from the simulations does not show transition of the boundary layer at the Reynolds number of the simulation. This is consistent with the trend seen in the experiments where transition is delayed by lowering the Reynolds number. New simulations matching the experimental Reynolds number are currently under way.

  5. Chronic fluoxetine administration increases expression of the L-channel gene Cav1.2 in astrocytes from the brain of treated mice and in culture and augments K(+)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i.

    PubMed

    Du, Ting; Liang, Chunguang; Li, Baoman; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2014-03-01

    We have recently shown that freshly isolated astrocytes from the mouse brain express mRNA for the L-channel gene Cav1.3 to at least the same degree (per mg mRNA) as corresponding neurons. The amount of extracellular Ca(2+) actually entering cultured astrocytes by its opening is modest, but due to secondary Ca(2+)-mediated stimulation of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) the increase in free cytosolic Ca(2+) [Ca(2+)]i is substantial. The other Cav1 subtype expressed in brain is Cav1.2, which is even expressed in higher density. Although the different primers used for the two genes preclude exact quantitative comparison, the present study suggests that this is also the case in the freshly isolated astrocytes and neurons, which express equal Cav1.2 densities. Again, most of the increase in [Ca(2+)]i occurred by RyR activity. In contrast to Cav1.3 the expression of Cav1.2 was greatly increased (doubled) after two weeks of treatment with fluoxetine hydrochloride (10mg/kg). Accordingly [Ca(2+)]i in cultured astrocytes exposed to the addition of 10-60mM KCl increased substantially in cultured astrocytes treated chronically with fluoxetine with the lag time until the effect was observed depending upon the fluoxetine concentration. This effect was inhibited by nifedipine or siRNA against Cav1.2. The increase in K(+)-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]i after fluoxetine treatment is directly opposite to a decrease in [Ca(2+)]i after treatment with any of the anti-bipolar drugs lithium, carbamazepine or valproic acid, due to reduced capacitative Ca(2+) influx. We have previously shown a similar effect after fluoxetine treatment, but it becomes overridden by the Cav1.2 up-regulation. PMID:24513410

  6. Compensatory T-type Ca2+ channel activity alters D2-autoreceptor responses of Substantia nigra dopamine neurons from Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channel KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Poetschke, Christina; Dragicevic, Elena; Duda, Johanna; Benkert, Julia; Dougalis, Antonios; DeZio, Roberta; Snutch, Terrance P.; Striessnig, Joerg; Liss, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The preferential degeneration of Substantia nigra dopamine midbrain neurons (SN DA) causes the motor-symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), especially the Cav1.3-subtype, generate an activity-related oscillatory Ca2+ burden in SN DA neurons, contributing to their degeneration and PD. While LTCC-blockers are already in clinical trials as PD-therapy, age-dependent functional roles of Cav1.3 LTCCs in SN DA neurons remain unclear. Thus, we analysed juvenile and adult Cav1.3-deficient mice with electrophysiological and molecular techniques. To unmask compensatory effects, we compared Cav1.3 KO mice with pharmacological LTCC-inhibition. LTCC-function was not necessary for SN DA pacemaker-activity at either age, but rather contributed to their pacemaker-precision. Moreover, juvenile Cav1.3 KO but not WT mice displayed adult wildtype-like, sensitised inhibitory dopamine-D2-autoreceptor (D2-AR) responses that depended upon both, interaction of the neuronal calcium sensor NCS-1 with D2-ARs, and on voltage-gated T-type calcium channel (TTCC) activity. This functional KO-phenotype was accompanied by cell-specific up-regulation of NCS-1 and Cav3.1-TTCC mRNA. Furthermore, in wildtype we identified an age-dependent switch of TTCC-function from contributing to SN DA pacemaker-precision in juveniles to pacemaker-frequency in adults. This novel interplay of Cav1.3 L-type and Cav3.1 T-type channels, and their modulation of SN DA activity-pattern and D2-AR-sensitisation, provide new insights into flexible age- and calcium-dependent activity-control of SN DA neurons and its pharmacological modulation. PMID:26381090

  7. Characterization of the triazine, T4, a representative from a novel series of CaV2 inhibitors with strong state-dependence, poor use-dependence, and distinctively fast kinetics.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Andrew M; Niforatos, Wende; Lee, Chih-Hung; Jarvis, Michael F; McGaraughty, Steve

    2014-12-15

    There is strong pharmacological, biological, and genetic evidence supporting the role of N-type calcium channels (CaV2.2) in nociception. There is also human validation data from ziconotide, the CaV2.2-selective peptidyl inhibitor used clinically to treat refractory pain. Unfortunately, ziconotide utility is limited by its narrow therapeutic window and required intrathecal route of administration. A major focus has been placed on identifying state-dependent CaV2.2 inhibitors to improve safety margins. Much less attention, however, has been given to characterizing the kinetics of CaV2.2 inhibitors as a means to further differentiate compounds and maximize therapeutic potential. Here we provide a detailed characterization of the CaV2.2 inhibitor T4 in terms of its state-dependence, use-dependence, kinetics, and mechanism of inhibition. Compound T4 displayed a >20-fold difference in potency when measured under inactivating conditions (IC50=1.1 μM) as compared to closed-state conditions (IC50=25 μM). At 3 μM, T4 produced a 15-fold hyperpolarizing shift in the inactivation curve for CaV2.2 while having no effect on channel activation. To assess the kinetic properties of T4 in a more physiological manner, its inhibition kinetics were assessed at 32°C using 2 mM Ca(2+) as the charge carrier. Surprisingly, the repriming rate for CaV2.2 channels at hyperpolarized potentials was similar in both the presence and absence of T4. This was in contrast to other compounds which markedly delayed repriming. Furthermore, T4 inhibited CaV2.2 channels more potently when channel inactivation was driven through a tonic sub-threshold depolarization rather than through a use-dependent protocol, despite similar levels of inactivation. PMID:25446431

  8. Abnormal alterations in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/calmodulin/caMKII signaling pathway in a tremor rat model and in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution

    PubMed Central

    LV, XINTONG; GUO, FENG; XU, XIAOXUE; CHEN, ZAIXING; SUN, XUEFEI; MIN, DONGYU; CAO, YONGGANG; SHI, XIANBAO; WANG, LEI; CHEN, TIANBAO; SHAW, CHRIS; GAO, HUILING; HAO, LIYING; CAI, JIQUN

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) are key elements in epileptogenesis. There are several binding-sites linked to calmodulin (CaM) and several potential CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated phosphorylation sites in CaV1.2. The tremor rat model (TRM) exhibits absence-like seizures from 8 weeks of age. The present study was performed to detect changes in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/CaM/CaMKII pathway in TRMs and in cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution. The expression levels of CaV1.2, CaM and phosphorylated CaMKII (p-CaMKII; Thr-286) in these two models were examined using immunofluorescence and western blotting. Compared with Wistar rats, the expression levels of CaV1.2 and CaM were increased, and the expression of p-CaMKII was decreased in the TRM hippocampus. However, the expression of the targeted proteins was reversed in the TRM temporal cortex. A significant increase in the expression of CaM and decrease in the expression of CaV1.2 were observed in the TRM cerebellum. In the cultured neuron model, p-CaMKII and CaV1.2 were markedly decreased. In addition, neurons exhibiting co-localized expression of CaV1.2 and CaM immunoreactivities were detected. Furthermore, intracellular calcium concentrations were increased in these two models. For the first time, o the best of our knowledge, the data of the present study suggested that abnormal alterations in the Ca2+/CaV1.2/CaM/CaMKII pathway may be involved in epileptogenesis and in the phenotypes of TRMs and cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Mg2+-free solution. PMID:26299765

  9. Vehicle barrier

    DOEpatents

    Hirsh, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    A vehicle security barrier which can be conveniently placed across a gate opening as well as readily removed from the gate opening to allow for easy passage. The security barrier includes a barrier gate in the form of a cable/gate member in combination with laterally attached pipe sections fixed by way of the cable to the gate member and lateral, security fixed vertical pipe posts. The security barrier of the present invention provides for the use of cable restraints across gate openings to provide necessary security while at the same time allowing for quick opening and closing of the gate areas without compromising security.

  10. Cosmeceutical vehicles.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Consumers will pay a premium for high-performance skin and hair care products. The demand exists, and in return for the high cost, consumers expect the product to perform as claimed and to meet aesthetic standards beyond many products found in the mass market. To be successful in this highly competitive market, products must function as claimed or consumers will not repurchase. Effective contemporary high-end products must be properly formulated in nonirritating vehicles that consumers will perceive as elegant. PMID:19695476

  11. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. PMID:26245899

  12. Biophysical characterization of the honeybee DSC1 orthologue reveals a novel voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel subfamily: CaV4.

    PubMed

    Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Moreau, Adrien; Simard, Louis; Cens, Thierry; Rousset, Matthieu; Collet, Claude; Charnet, Pierre; Chahine, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Bilaterian voltage-gated Na(+) channels (NaV) evolved from voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV). The Drosophila melanogaster Na(+) channel 1 (DSC1), which features a D-E-E-A selectivity filter sequence that is intermediate between CaV and NaV channels, is evidence of this evolution. Phylogenetic analysis has classified DSC1 as a Ca(2+)-permeable Na(+) channel belonging to the NaV2 family because of its sequence similarity with NaV channels. This is despite insect NaV2 channels (DSC1 and its orthologue in Blatella germanica, BSC1) being more permeable to Ca(2+) than Na(+) In this study, we report the cloning and molecular characterization of the honeybee (Apis mellifera) DSC1 orthologue. We reveal several sequence variations caused by alternative splicing, RNA editing, and genomic variations. Using the Xenopus oocyte heterologous expression system and the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique, we find that the channel exhibits slow activation and inactivation kinetics, insensitivity to tetrodotoxin, and block by Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) These characteristics are reminiscent of CaV channels. We also show a strong selectivity for Ca(2+) and Ba(2+) ions, marginal permeability to Li(+), and impermeability to Mg(2+) and Na(+) ions. Based on current ion channel nomenclature, the D-E-E-A selectivity filter, and the properties we have uncovered, we propose that DSC1 homologues should be classified as CaV4 rather than NaV2. Indeed, channels that contain the D-E-E-A selectivity sequence are likely to feature the same properties as the honeybee's channel, namely slow activation and inactivation kinetics and strong selectivity for Ca(2+) ions. PMID:27432995

  13. Caveolin-3 is a direct molecular partner of the Cav1.1 subunit of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Couchoux, Harold; Bichraoui, Hicham; Chouabe, Christophe; Altafaj, Xavier; Bonvallet, Robert; Allard, Bruno; Ronjat, Michel; Berthier, Christine

    2011-05-01

    Caveolin-3 is the striated muscle specific isoform of the scaffolding protein family of caveolins and has been shown to interact with a variety of proteins, including ion channels. Mutations in the human CAV3 gene have been associated with several muscle disorders called caveolinopathies and among these, the P104L mutation (Cav-3(P104L)) leads to limb girdle muscular dystrophy of type 1C characterized by the loss of sarcolemmal caveolin. There is still no clear-cut explanation as to specifically how caveolin-3 mutations lead to skeletal muscle wasting. Previous results argued in favor of a role for caveolin-3 in dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) functional regulation and/or T-tubular membrane localization. It appeared worth closely examining such a functional link and investigating if it could result from the direct physical interaction of the two proteins. Transient expression of Cav-3(P104L) or caveolin-3 specific siRNAs in C2C12 myotubes both led to a significant decrease of the L-type Ca(2+) channel maximal conductance. Immunolabeling analysis of adult skeletal muscle fibers revealed the colocalization of a pool of caveolin-3 with the DHPR within the T-tubular membrane. Caveolin-3 was also shown to be present in DHPR-containing triadic membrane preparations from which both proteins co-immunoprecipitated. Using GST-fusion proteins, the I-II loop of Ca(v)1.1 was identified as the domain interacting with caveolin-3, with an apparent affinity of 60nM. The present study thus revealed a direct molecular interaction between caveolin-3 and the DHPR which is likely to underlie their functional link and whose loss might therefore be involved in pathophysiological mechanisms associated to muscle caveolinopathies. PMID:21262376

  14. Calpain inhibition rescues troponin T3 fragmentation, increases Cav1.1, and enhances skeletal muscle force in aging sedentary mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Pereyra, Andrea S; Wang, Zhong-Min; Birbrair, Alexander; Reisz, Julie A; Files, Daniel Clark; Purcell, Lina; Feng, Xin; Messi, Maria L; Feng, Hanzhong; Chalovich, Joseph; Jin, Jian-Ping; Furdui, Cristina; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-06-01

    Loss of strength in human and animal models of aging can be partially attributed to a well-recognized decrease in muscle mass; however, starting at middle-age, the normalized force (force/muscle cross-sectional area) in the knee extensors and single muscle fibers declines in a curvilinear manner. Strength is lost faster than muscle mass and is a more consistent risk factor for disability and death. Reduced expression of the voltage sensor Ca(2+) channel α1 subunit (Cav1.1) with aging leads to excitation-contraction uncoupling, which accounts for a significant fraction of the decrease in skeletal muscle function. We recently reported that in addition to its classical cytoplasmic location, fast skeletal muscle troponin T3 (TnT3) is fragmented in aging mice, and both full-length TnT3 (FL-TnT3) and its carboxyl-terminal (CT-TnT3) fragment shuttle to the nucleus. Here, we demonstrate that it regulates transcription of Cacna1s, the gene encoding Cav1.1. Knocking down TnT3 in vivo downregulated Cav1.1. TnT3 downregulation or overexpression decreased or increased, respectively, Cacna1s promoter activity, and the effect was ablated by truncating the TnT3 nuclear localization sequence. Further, we mapped the Cacna1s promoter region and established the consensus sequence for TnT3 binding to Cacna1s promoter. Systemic administration of BDA-410, a specific calpain inhibitor, prevented TnT3 fragmentation, and Cacna1s and Cav1.1 downregulation and improved muscle force generation in sedentary old mice. PMID:26892246

  15. Persistent increases in Ca(2+) influx through Cav1.2 shortens action potential and causes Ca(2+) overload-induced afterdepolarizations and arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Ai, Xiaojie; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Chen, Biyi; Harris, David M; Tang, Mingxin; Xie, Yuping; Szeto, Christopher; Li, Yingxin; Li, Ying; Zhang, Hongyu; Eckhart, Andrea D; Koch, Walter J; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Chen, Xiongwen

    2016-01-01

    Persistent elevation of Ca(2+) influx due to prolongation of the action potential (AP), chronic activation of the β-adrenergic system and molecular remodeling occurs in stressed and diseased hearts. Increases in Ca(2+) influx are usually linked to prolonged myocyte action potentials and arrhythmias. However, the contribution of chronic enhancement of Cav1.2 activity on cardiac electrical remodeling and arrhythmogenicity has not been completely defined and is the subject of this study. Chronically increased Cav1.2 activity was produced with a cardiac specific, inducible double transgenic (DTG) mouse system overexpressing the β2a subunit of Cav (Cavβ2a). DTG myocytes had increased L-type Ca(2+) current (ICa-L), myocyte shortening, and Ca(2+) transients. DTG mice had enhanced cardiac performance, but died suddenly and prematurely. Telemetric electrocardiograms revealed shortened QT intervals in DTG mice. The action potential duration (APD) was shortened in DTG myocytes due to significant increases of potassium currents and channel abundance. However, shortened AP in DTG myocytes did not fully limit excess Ca(2+) influx and increased the peak and tail ICa-L. Enhanced ICa promoted sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) overload, diastolic Ca(2+) sparks and waves, and increased NCX activity, causing increased occurrence of early and delayed afterdepolarizations (EADs and DADs) that may contribute to premature ventricular beats and ventricular tachycardia. AV blocks that could be related to fibrosis of the AV node were also observed. Our study suggests that increasing ICa-L does not necessarily result in AP prolongation but causes SR Ca(2+) overload and fibrosis of AV node and myocardium to induce cellular arrhythmogenicity, arrhythmias, and conduction abnormalities. PMID:26611208

  16. Low-Threshold Exocytosis Induced by cAMP-Recruited CaV3.2 (α1H) Channels in Rat Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giancippoli, A.; Novara, M.; de Luca, A.; Baldelli, P.; Marcantoni, A.; Carbone, E.; Carabelli, V.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the functional role of CaV3 channels in triggering fast exocytosis in rat chromaffin cells (RCCs). CaV3 T-type channels were selectively recruited by chronic exposures to cAMP (3 days) via an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac)-mediated pathway. Here we show that cAMP-treated cells had increased secretory responses, which could be evoked even at very low depolarizations (−50, −40 mV). Potentiation of exocytosis in cAMP-treated cells did not occur in the presence of 50 μM Ni2+, which selectively blocks T-type currents in RCCs. This suggests that the “low-threshold exocytosis” induced by cAMP is due to increased Ca2+ influx through cAMP-recruited T-type channels, rather than to an enhanced secretion downstream of Ca2+ entry, as previously reported for short-term cAMP treatments (20 min). Newly recruited T-type channels increase the fast secretory response at low voltages without altering the size of the immediately releasable pool. They also preserve the Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis, the initial speed of vesicle depletion, and the mean quantal size of single secretory events. All this indicates that cAMP-recruited CaV3 channels enhance the secretory activity of RCCs at low voltages by coupling to the secretory apparatus with a Ca2+ efficacy similar to that of already existing high-threshold Ca2+ channels. Finally, using RT-PCRs we found that the fast inactivating low-threshold Ca2+ current component recruited by cAMP is selectively associated to the α1H (CaV3.2) channel isoform. PMID:16361341

  17. Low-threshold exocytosis induced by cAMP-recruited CaV3.2 (alpha1H) channels in rat chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Giancippoli, A; Novara, M; de Luca, A; Baldelli, P; Marcantoni, A; Carbone, E; Carabelli, V

    2006-03-01

    We have studied the functional role of CaV3 channels in triggering fast exocytosis in rat chromaffin cells (RCCs). CaV3 T-type channels were selectively recruited by chronic exposures to cAMP (3 days) via an exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac)-mediated pathway. Here we show that cAMP-treated cells had increased secretory responses, which could be evoked even at very low depolarizations (-50, -40 mV). Potentiation of exocytosis in cAMP-treated cells did not occur in the presence of 50 microM Ni2+, which selectively blocks T-type currents in RCCs. This suggests that the "low-threshold exocytosis" induced by cAMP is due to increased Ca2+ influx through cAMP-recruited T-type channels, rather than to an enhanced secretion downstream of Ca2+ entry, as previously reported for short-term cAMP treatments (20 min). Newly recruited T-type channels increase the fast secretory response at low voltages without altering the size of the immediately releasable pool. They also preserve the Ca2+ dependence of exocytosis, the initial speed of vesicle depletion, and the mean quantal size of single secretory events. All this indicates that cAMP-recruited CaV3 channels enhance the secretory activity of RCCs at low voltages by coupling to the secretory apparatus with a Ca2+ efficacy similar to that of already existing high-threshold Ca2+ channels. Finally, using RT-PCRs we found that the fast inactivating low-threshold Ca2+ current component recruited by cAMP is selectively associated to the alpha1H (CaV3.2) channel isoform. PMID:16361341

  18. CaV3.2 T-type channels mediate Ca²⁺ entry during oocyte maturation and following fertilization.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Miranda L; Zhang, Yingpei; Erxleben, Christian F; Padilla-Banks, Elizabeth; McDonough, Caitlin E; Miao, Yi-Liang; Armstrong, David L; Williams, Carmen J

    2015-12-01

    Initiation of mouse embryonic development depends upon a series of fertilization-induced rises in intracellular Ca(2+). Complete egg activation requires influx of extracellular Ca(2+); however, the channels that mediate this influx remain unknown. Here, we tested whether the α1 subunit of the T-type channel CaV3.2, encoded by Cacna1h, mediates Ca(2+) entry into oocytes. We show that mouse eggs express a robust voltage-activated Ca(2+) current that is completely absent in Cacna1h(-/-) eggs. Cacna1h(-/-) females have reduced litter sizes, and careful analysis of Ca(2+) oscillation patterns in Cacna1h(-/-) eggs following in vitro fertilization (IVF) revealed reductions in first transient length and oscillation persistence. Total and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) stores were also reduced in Cacna1h(-/-) eggs. Pharmacological inhibition of CaV3.2 in wild-type CF-1 strain eggs using mibefradil or pimozide reduced Ca(2+) store accumulation during oocyte maturation and reduced Ca(2+) oscillation persistence, frequency and number following IVF. Overall, these data show that CaV3.2 T-type channels have prev8iously unrecognized roles in supporting the meiotic-maturation-associated increase in ER Ca(2+) stores and mediating Ca(2+) influx required for the activation of development. PMID:26483387

  19. The α2δ-1 subunit remodels CaV1.2 voltage sensors and allows Ca2+ influx at physiological membrane potentials.

    PubMed

    Savalli, Nicoletta; Pantazis, Antonios; Sigg, Daniel; Weiss, James N; Neely, Alan; Olcese, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    Excitation-evoked calcium influx across cellular membranes is strictly controlled by voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV), which possess four distinct voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) that direct the opening of a central pore. The energetic interactions between the VSDs and the pore are critical for tuning the channel's voltage dependence. The accessory α2δ-1 subunit is known to facilitate CaV1.2 voltage-dependent activation, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, using voltage clamp fluorometry, we track the activation of the four individual VSDs in a human L-type CaV1.2 channel consisting of α1C and β3 subunits. We find that, without α2δ-1, the channel complex displays a right-shifted voltage dependence such that currents mainly develop at nonphysiological membrane potentials because of very weak VSD-pore interactions. The presence of α2δ-1 facilitates channel activation by increasing the voltage sensitivity (i.e., the effective charge) of VSDs I-III. Moreover, the α2δ-1 subunit also makes VSDs I-III more efficient at opening the channel by increasing the coupling energy between VSDs II and III and the pore, thus allowing Ca influx within the range of physiological membrane potentials. PMID:27481713

  20. THE VOLTAGE DEPENDENCE OF GATING CURRENTS OF THE NEURONAL CAV3.3 CHANNEL IS DETERMINED BY THE GATING BRAKE IN THE I-II LOOP

    PubMed Central

    Karmažínová, Mária; Baumgart, Joel; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Lacinová, L'ubica

    2012-01-01

    Low-voltage activated CaV3 Ca2+ channels have an activation threshold around −60 mV, which is lower than the activation threshold of other voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC). The kinetics of their activation at membrane voltages just above the activation threshold is much slower than the activation kinetics of other VDCCs. It was demonstrated recently that the intracellular loop connecting repeats I and II of all three CaV3 channels contains a so-called “gating brake.” Disruption of this brake yields channels that activate at even more hyperpolarized potentials with significantly accelerated kinetics. We have compared gating of a wild type CaV3.3 channel and a mutated ID12 channel, in which the putative gating brake at the proximal part of the I-II loop was removed. Voltage dependence of the gating current activation was shifted by 34.6 mV towards more hyperpolarized potentials in ID12 channel. Kinetics of the on-charge activation was significantly accelerated, while kinetics of the off-charge was not altered. We conclude that the putative gating brake in I-II loop hinders not only the opening of the conducting pore but also the activating movement of voltage sensing S4 segments, stabilizing the channel in its closed state. PMID:21340458

  1. Regulation of neuronal high-voltage activated Ca(V)2 Ca(2+) channels by the small GTPase RhoA.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Matthieu; Cens, Thierry; Menard, Claudine; Bowerman, Melissa; Bellis, Michel; Brusés, Juan; Raoul, Cedric; Scamps, Frédérique; Charnet, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    High-Voltage-Activated (HVA) Ca(2+) channels are known regulators of synapse formation and transmission and play fundamental roles in neuronal pathophysiology. Small GTPases of Rho and RGK families, via their action on both cytoskeleton and Ca(2+) channels are key molecules for these processes. While the effects of RGK GTPases on neuronal HVA Ca(2+) channels have been widely studied, the effects of RhoA on the HVA channels remains however elusive. Using heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we show that RhoA activity reduces Ba(2+) currents through CaV2.1, CaV2.2 and CaV2.3 Ca(2+) channels independently of CaVβ subunit. This inhibition occurs independently of RGKs activity and without modification of biophysical properties and global level of expression of the channel subunit. Instead, we observed a marked decrease in the number of active channels at the plasma membrane. Pharmacological and expression studies suggest that channel expression at the plasma membrane is impaired via a ROCK-sensitive pathway. Expression of constitutively active RhoA in primary culture of spinal motoneurons also drastically reduced HVA Ca(2+) current amplitude. Altogether our data revealed that HVA Ca(2+) channels regulation by RhoA might govern synaptic transmission during development and potentially contribute to pathophysiological processes when axon regeneration and growth cone kinetics are impaired. PMID:26044639

  2. Apo-states of calmodulin and CaBP1 control CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channel function through direct competition for the IQ domain

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Felix; Rumpf, Christine; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, binding of calmodulin (CaM) or calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1) to the CaV1 (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channel IQ domain endows the channel with diametrically opposed properties. CaM causes calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and limits calcium entry, whereas CaBP1 blocks CDI and allows sustained calcium influx. Here, we combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) with cell-based functional measurements and mathematical modeling to show that these calcium sensors behave in a competitive manner that is explained quantitatively by their apo-state binding affinities for the IQ domain. This competition can be completely blocked by covalent tethering of CaM to the channel. Further, we show that Ca2+/CaM has a sub-picomolar affinity for the IQ domain that is achieved without drastic alteration of calcium binding properties. The observation that the apo-forms of CaM and CaBP1 compete with each other demonstrates a simple mechanism for direct modulation of CaV1 function and suggests a means by which excitable cells may dynamically tune CaV activity. PMID:23811053

  3. Muscle weakness in myotonic dystrophy associated with misregulated splicing and altered gating of CaV1.1 calcium channel

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhen Zhi; Yarotskyy, Viktor; Wei, Lan; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Nakamori, Masayuki; Eichinger, Katy; Moxley, Richard T.; Dirksen, Robert T.; Thornton, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 and type 2 (DM1 and DM2) are genetic diseases in which mutant transcripts containing expanded CUG or CCUG repeats cause cellular dysfunction by altering the processing or metabolism of specific mRNAs and miRNAs. The toxic effects of mutant RNA are mediated partly through effects on proteins that regulate alternative splicing. Here we show that alternative splicing of exon 29 (E29) of CaV1.1, a calcium channel that controls skeletal muscle excitation–contraction coupling, is markedly repressed in DM1 and DM2. The extent of E29 skipping correlated with severity of weakness in tibialis anterior muscle of DM1 patients. Two splicing factors previously implicated in DM1, MBNL1 and CUGBP1, participated in the regulation of E29 splicing. In muscle fibers of wild-type mice, the CaV1.1 channel conductance and voltage sensitivity were increased by splice-shifting oligonucleotides that induce E29 skipping. In contrast to human DM1, expression of CUG-expanded RNA caused only a modest increase in E29 skipping in mice. However, forced skipping of E29 in these mice, to levels approaching those observed in human DM1, aggravated the muscle pathology as evidenced by increased central nucleation. Together, these results indicate that DM-associated splicing defects alter CaV1.1 function, with potential for exacerbation of myopathy. PMID:22140091

  4. Analysis and Quantification of the Diversities of Aerosol Life Cycles within AeroCom

    SciTech Connect

    Textor, C.; Schulz, M.; Guibert, S.; Kinne, Stefan; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T.; Berglen, T.; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, M.; Dentener, F.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Feichter, H.; Fillmore, D.; Ghan, Steven J.; Ginoux, P.; Gong, S.; Grini, A.; Hendricks, J.; Horrowitz, L.; Huang, P.; Isaksen, I.; Iversen, T.; Kloster, S.; Koch, D.; Kirkevag, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Krol, M.; Lauer, A.; Lamarque, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Montanaro, V.; Myhre, G.; Penner, Joyce E.; Pitari, G.; Reddy, S.; Seland, O.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tie, X.

    2006-05-29

    Simulation results of global aerosol models have been assembled in the framework of the AeroCom intercomparison exercise. In this paper, we analyze the life cycles of dust, sea salt, sulfate, black carbon and particulate organic matter as simulated by sixteen global aerosol models. The diversities among the models for the sources and sinks, burdens, particle sizes, water uptakes, and spatial dispersals have been established. The AeroCom all-models-average emissions are dominated by the mass of sea salt (SS), followed by dust (DU), sulfate (SO4), particulate organic matter (POM), and finally black carbon (BC). Interactive parameterizations of the emissions and contrasting particles sizes of SS and DU lead generally to higher diversities of these species, and for total aerosol, which they dominate in mass. The lower diversity of the emissions of the fine aerosols, BC, POM, and SO4, is due to the use of similar emission inventories, and does therefore not necessarily indicate a better understanding of their sources. The diversity of SO4-sources is mainly caused by the disagreement on depositional loss of precursor gases and on chemical production. The diversities of the emissions are passed on to the burdens, but the latter are also strongly affected by the model-specific treatments of transport and aerosol processes. The burdens of dry mass decrease along DU, SS, SO4, POM, and BC. The all-models-average residence time was the shortest for sea salt with about half a day, followed by SO4 and DU with four days, and POM and BC with six and seven days, respectively. The wet deposition rate is controlled by the solubility and increases from DU, BC, POM to SO4 and SS. It is the dominant sink for SO4, BC, and POM, and contributes about one third to the total removal rate coefficients of SS and DU species. For SS and DU we find high diversities for the removal rate coefficients and deposition pathways. Models do neither agree on the split between wet and dry deposition, nor

  5. Survey of Aerothermodynamics Facilities Useful for the Design of Hypersonic Vehicles Using Air-Breathing Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, James O.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    The dream of producing an air-breathing, hydrogen fueled, hypervelocity aircraft has been before the aerospace community for decades. However, such a craft has not yet been realized, even in an experimental form. Despite the simplicity and beauty of the concept, many formidable problems must be overcome to make this dream a reality. This paper summarizes the aero/aerothermodynamic issues that must be addressed to make the dream a reality and discusses how aerothermodynamics facilities and their modem companion, real-gas computational fluid dynamics (CFD), can help solve the problems blocking the way to realizing the dream. The approach of the paper is first to outline the concept of an air-breathing hypersonic vehicle and then discuss the nose-to-tail aerothermodynamics issues and special aerodynamic problems that arise with such a craft. Then the utility of aerothermodynamic facilities and companion CFD analysis is illustrated by reviewing results from recent United States publications wherein these problems have been addressed. Papers selected for the discussion have k e n chosen such that the review will serve to survey important U.S. aero/aerothermodynamic real gas and conventional wind tunnel facilities that are useful in the study of hypersonic, hydrogen propelled hypervelocity vehicles.

  6. Forestry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Power Pack II provides an economical means of moving a power source into remote roadless forest areas. It was developed by Prof. Miles and his associates, working in cooperation with the University of California's Department of Forestry. The team combined its own design of an all-terrain vehicle with a suspension system based on the NASA load equalization technology. Result is an intermediate-sized unit which carries a power source and the powered tools to perform a variety of forest management tasks which cannot be done economically with current equipment. Power Pack II can traverse very rough terrain and climb a 60 degree slope; any one of the wheels can move easily over an obstacle larger than itself. Work is being done on a more advanced Power Pack III.

  7. A Neural Network Aero Design System for Advanced Turbo-Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanz, Jose M.

    1999-01-01

    An inverse design method calculates the blade shape that produces a prescribed input pressure distribution. By controlling this input pressure distribution the aerodynamic design objectives can easily be met. Because of the intrinsic relationship between pressure distribution and airfoil physical properties, a Neural Network can be trained to choose the optimal pressure distribution that would meet a set of physical requirements. Neural network systems have been attempted in the context of direct design methods. From properties ascribed to a set of blades the neural network is trained to infer the properties of an 'interpolated' blade shape. The problem is that, especially in transonic regimes where we deal with intrinsically non linear and ill posed problems, small perturbations of the blade shape can produce very large variations of the flow parameters. It is very unlikely that, under these circumstances, a neural network will be able to find the proper solution. The unique situation in the present method is that the neural network can be trained to extract the required input pressure distribution from a database of pressure distributions while the inverse method will still compute the exact blade shape that corresponds to this 'interpolated' input pressure distribution. In other words, the interpolation process is transferred to a smoother problem, namely, finding what pressure distribution would produce the required flow conditions and, once this is done, the inverse method will compute the exact solution for this problem. The use of neural network is, in this context, highly related to the use of proper optimization techniques. The optimization is used essentially as an automation procedure to force the input pressure distributions to achieve the required aero and structural design parameters. A multilayered feed forward network with back-propagation is used to train the system for pattern association and classification.

  8. Novel Framework for Reduced Order Modeling of Aero-engine Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, Ali

    The present study focuses on the popular dynamic reduction methods used in design of complex assemblies (millions of Degrees of Freedom) where numerous iterations are involved to achieve the final design. Aerospace manufacturers such as Rolls Royce and Pratt & Whitney are actively seeking techniques that reduce computational time while maintaining accuracy of the models. This involves modal analysis of components with complex geometries to determine the dynamic behavior due to non-linearity and complicated loading conditions. In such a case the sub-structuring and dynamic reduction techniques prove to be an efficient tool to reduce design cycle time. The components whose designs are finalized can be dynamically reduced to mass and stiffness matrices at the boundary nodes in the assembly. These matrices conserve the dynamics of the component in the assembly, and thus avoid repeated calculations during the analysis runs for design modification of other components. This thesis presents a novel framework in terms of modeling and meshing of any complex structure, in this case an aero-engine casing. In this study the affect of meshing techniques on the run time are highlighted. The modal analysis is carried out using an extremely fine mesh to ensure all minor details in the structure are captured correctly in the Finite Element (FE) model. This is used as the reference model, to compare against the results of the reduced model. The study also shows the conditions/criteria under which dynamic reduction can be implemented effectively, proving the accuracy of Criag-Bampton (C.B.) method and limitations of Static Condensation. The study highlights the longer runtime needed to produce the reduced matrices of components compared to the overall runtime of the complete unreduced model. Although once the components are reduced, the assembly run is significantly. Hence the decision to use Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) is to be taken judiciously considering the number of

  9. Aero-optics: Simultaneous MHz Rate Planar Flow Visualization and Optical Wavefront Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Samimy, Mo; Lempert, Walter; Harris, Scott; Widiker, Jeff; Duncan, Bradley

    2002-11-01

    In response to a need for more detailed understanding of aero-optic effects in realistic flows (high-speed and compressible), we apply very recently developed MHz rate planar diagnostic techniques to simultaneously perform flow visualization and wavefront measurement on a Mach 1.3 rectangular jet. A custom-built pulse burst laser is used to produce 17 pulses (10 nsec duration) with inter-pulse timing of 4 microseconds (250 kHz). The pulses were formed into a laser sheet and illuminated the mixing layer in a streamwise plane of a Mach 1.3 rectangular, aspect ratio 3 jet. Images were captured using a Dalsa 64K1M camera that can record 17 images at framing rates as high as 1 MHz. Optical wavefronts were measured at rates up to 1 MHz using a newly designed Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensor. A 10 mW HeNe laser beam was spatially filtered and expanded to a 2.5 cm diameter and passed through the center of the rectangular jet 8 nozzle exit heights downstream of the nozzle exit. A lenslet array (1.024 mm pitch, 260 mm f. l.) and a -1000 mm f. l. lens are used to form a grid pattern of dots onto a PSI-IV camera capable of capturing 28 frames at 1 MHz framing rates. The camera was operated at 500 kHz and imaged a 6 x 6 pattern of dots. The displacement of each dot corresponds to the local wavefront tilt induced by the jet as the initially planar wavefront passes through the flow. Results are being analyzed to obtain a correlation between turbulence structures contained in the mixing layer of the jet and the optical distortion produced by these structures.

  10. Aeronautical-Satellite-Assisted Process Being Developed for Information Exchange Through Network Technologies (Aero-SAPIENT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernic, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Communications technologies are being developed to address safety issues during aviation travel. Some of these technologies enable the aircraft to be in constant bidirectional communications with necessary systems, people, and other aircraft that are not currently in place today. Networking technologies, wireless datalinks, and advanced avionics techniques are areas of particular importance that the NASA Glenn Research Center has contributed. Glenn, in conjunction with the NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, and NASA Langley Research Center, is investigating methods and applications that would utilize these communications technologies. In mid-June 2000, the flight readiness of the network and communications technologies were demonstrated via a simulated aircraft. A van simulating an aircraft was equipped with advanced phased-array antennas (Advanced Communications/Air Traffic Management (AC/ATM) Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) project) that used commercial Ku-band satellite communications to connect Glenn, Dryden, and Ames in a combined system ground test. This test simulated air-ground bidirectional transport of real-time digital audio, text, and video data via a hybrid network configuration that demonstrated the flight readiness of the network and communications technologies. Specifically, a Controller Pilot Data Link Communications application was used with other applications to demonstrate a multiprotocol capability via Internet-protocol encapsulated ATN (Aeronautical Telecommunications Network) data packets. The significance of this combined ground test is its contribution to the Aero Information Technology Base Program Level I milestone (Software Technology investment area) of a real-time data link for the National Airspace System. The objective of this milestone was to address multiprotocol technology applicable for real-time data links between aircraft, a satellite, and the ground as well as the ability to

  11. Traversing Microphone Track Installed in NASA Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory Dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.; Perusek, Gail P.

    1999-01-01

    The Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory is an acoustically treated, 65-ft-tall dome located at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Inside this laboratory is the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig (NATR), which is used in support of Advanced Subsonics Technology (AST) and High Speed Research (HSR) to test engine exhaust nozzles for thrust and acoustic performance under simulated takeoff conditions. Acoustic measurements had been gathered by a far-field array of microphones located along the dome wall and 10-ft above the floor. Recently, it became desirable to collect acoustic data for engine certifications (as specified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)) that would simulate the noise of an aircraft taking off as heard from an offset ground location. Since nozzles for the High-Speed Civil Transport have straight sides that cause their noise signature to vary radially, an additional plane of acoustic measurement was required. Desired was an arched array of 24 microphones, equally spaced from the nozzle and each other, in a 25 off-vertical plane. The various research requirements made this a challenging task. The microphones needed to be aimed at the nozzle accurately and held firmly in place during testing, but it was also essential that they be easily and routinely lowered to the floor for calibration and servicing. Once serviced, the microphones would have to be returned to their previous location near the ceiling. In addition, there could be no structure could between the microphones and the nozzle, and any structure near the microphones would have to be designed to minimize noise reflections. After many concepts were considered, a single arched truss structure was selected that would be permanently affixed to the dome ceiling and to one end of the dome floor.

  12. Host Model Uncertainties in Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates: Results from the AeroCom Prescribed Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Stier, Phillip; Schutgens, Nick A.; Bellouin, N.; Bian, Huisheng; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, Mian; Ghan, Steven J.; Huneeus, N.; Kinne, Stefan; Lin, G.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Myhre, G.; Penner, J. E.; Randles, Cynthia; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Takemura, T.; Yu, Fangqun; Yu, Hongbin; Zhou, Cheng

    2013-03-20

    Simulated multi-model "diversity" in aerosol direct radiative forcing estimates is often perceived as mea- sure of aerosol uncertainty. However, current models used for aerosol radiative forcing calculations vary considerably in model components relevant for forcing calculations and the associated "host-model uncertainties" are generally convoluted with the actual aerosol uncertainty. In this AeroCom Prescribed intercomparison study we systematically isolate and quantify host model uncertainties on aerosol forcing experiments through prescription of identical aerosol radiative properties in nine participating models. Even with prescribed aerosol radiative properties,simulated clear-sky and all-sky aerosol radiative forcings show significant diversity. For a purely scattering case with globally constant optical depth of 0.2, the global-mean all-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing is -4.51 Wm-2 and the inter-model standard deviation is 0.70 Wm-2, corresponding to a relative standard deviation of 15%. For a case with partially absorbing aerosol with an aerosol optical depth of 0.2 and single scattering albedo of 0.8, the forcing changes to 1.26 Wm-2, and the standard deviation increases to 1.21 W-2, corresponding to a significant relative standard deviation of 96%. However, the top-of-atmosphere forcing variability owing to absorption is low, with relative standard deviations of 9% clear-sky and 12% all-sky. Scaling the forcing standard deviation for a purely scattering case to match the sulfate radiative in the AeroCom Direct Effect experiment, demonstrates that host model uncertain- ties could explain about half of the overall sulfate forcing diversity of 0.13 Wm-2 in the AeroCom Direct Radiative Effect experiment. Host model errors in aerosol radiative forcing are largest in regions of uncertain host model components, such as stratocumulus cloud decks or areas with poorly constrained.

  13. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  14. Transient compartment-like syndrome and normokalaemic periodic paralysis due to a Cav1.1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chunxiang; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Weber, Marc-André; Bednarz, Marcin; Groome, James R.; Jonsson, Malin K. B.

    2013-01-01

    We studied a two-generation family presenting with conditions that included progressive permanent weakness, myopathic myopathy, exercise-induced contracture before normokalaemic periodic paralysis or, if localized to the tibial anterior muscle group, transient compartment-like syndrome (painful acute oedema with neuronal compression and drop foot). 23Na and 1H magnetic resonance imaging displayed myoplasmic sodium overload, and oedema. We identified a novel familial Cav1.1 calcium channel mutation, R1242G, localized to the third positive charge of the domain IV voltage sensor. Functional expression of R1242G in the muscular dysgenesis mouse cell line GLT revealed a 28% reduced central pore inward current and a −20 mV shift of the steady-state inactivation curve. Both changes may be at least partially explained by an outward omega (gating pore) current at positive potentials. Moreover, this outward omega current of 27.5 nS/nF may cause the reduction of the overshoot by 13 mV and slowing of the upstroke of action potentials by 36% that are associated with muscle hypoexcitability (permanent weakness and myopathic myopathy). In addition to the outward omega current, we identified an inward omega pore current of 95 nS/nF at negative membrane potentials after long depolarizing pulses that shifts the R1242G residue above the omega pore constriction. A simulation reveals that the inward current might depolarize the fibre sufficiently to trigger calcium release in the absence of an action potential and therefore cause an electrically silent depolarization-induced muscle contracture. Additionally, evidence of the inward current can be found in 23Na magnetic resonance imaging-detected sodium accumulation and 1H magnetic resonance imaging-detected oedema. We hypothesize that the episodes are normokalaemic because of depolarization-induced compensatory outward potassium flux through both delayed rectifiers and omega pore. We conclude that the position of the R1242G residue

  15. ESA Intermediate Experimental Vehicle. Independent Aerothermodynamic Characterization And Aerodatabase Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufolo, Giuseppe C.; Di Benedetto, Sara; Walpot, Louis; Roncioni, Pietro; Marini, Marco

    2011-05-01

    In the frame of the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) project, the European Space Agency (ESA) is coordinating a series of technical assistance activities aimed at verifying and supporting the IXV industrial design and development process. The technical assistance is operated with the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), by means of the Italian Aerospace Research Center (CIRA), and the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) under the super visioning and coordination of ESA IXV team. One of the purposes of the activity is to develop an independent capability for the assessment and verification of the industrial results with respect to the aerothermodynamic characterization of the IXV vehicle. To this aim CIRA is developing and independent AeroThermodynamics DataBase (ATDB), intended as a tool generating in output the time histories of local quantities (heat flux, pressure, skin friction) for each point of the IXV vehicle and for each trajectory (in a pre-defined envelope), together with an uncertainties model. The reference Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions needed for the development of the tool have been provided by ESA-ESTEC (with the CFD code LORE) and CIRA (with the CFD code H3NS).

  16. Laser Fine-Adjustment Thruster For Space Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezunkov, Yu. A.; Egorov, M. S.; Repina, E. V.; Safronov, A. L.; Rebrov, S. G.

    2010-05-06

    To the present time, a few laser propulsion engine devices have been developed by using dominant mechanisms of laser propulsion. Generally these mechanisms are laser ablation, laser breakdown of gases, and laser detonation waves that are induced due to extraction of the internal energy of polymer propellants. In the paper, we consider the Aero-Space Laser Propulsion Engine (ASLPE) developed earlier, in which all of these mechanisms are realized via interaction of laser radiation with polymers both in continuous wave (CW) and in repetitively pulsed modes of laser operation. The ASLPE is considered to be exploited as a unit of a laser propulsion device being arranged onboard space vehicles moving around the Earth or in interplanetary missions and intended to correct the vehicles orbits. To produce a thrust, a power of the solar pumped lasers designed to the present time is considered in the paper. The problem of increasing the efficiency of the laser propulsion device is analyzed as applied to space missions of vehicles by optimizing the laser propulsion propellant composition.

  17. Small wind turbine performance evaluation using field test data and a coupled aero-electro-mechanical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Brian D.

    A series of field tests and theoretical analyses were performed on various wind turbine rotor designs at two Penn State residential-scale wind-electric facilities. This work involved the prediction and experimental measurement of the electrical and aerodynamic performance of three wind turbines; a 3 kW rated Whisper 175, 2.4 kW rated Skystream 3.7, and the Penn State designed Carolus wind turbine. Both the Skystream and Whisper 175 wind turbines are OEM blades which were originally installed at the facilities. The Carolus rotor is a carbon-fiber composite 2-bladed machine, designed and assembled at Penn State, with the intent of replacing the Whisper 175 rotor at the off-grid system. Rotor aerodynamic performance is modeled using WT_Perf, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed Blade Element Momentum theory based performance prediction code. Steady-state power curves are predicted by coupling experimentally determined electrical characteristics with the aerodynamic performance of the rotor simulated with WT_Perf. A dynamometer test stand is used to establish the electromechanical efficiencies of the wind-electric system generator. Through the coupling of WT_Perf and dynamometer test results, an aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedure is developed and provides accurate predictions of wind system performance. The analysis of three different wind turbines gives a comprehensive assessment of the capability of the field test facilities and the accuracy of aero-electro-mechanical analysis procedures. Results from this study show that the Carolus and Whisper 175 rotors are running at higher tip-speed ratios than are optimum for power production. The aero-electro-mechanical analysis predicted the high operating tip-speed ratios of the rotors and was accurate at predicting output power for the systems. It is shown that the wind turbines operate at high tip-speeds because of a miss-match between the aerodynamic drive torque and the operating torque of the wind

  18. A method for the assessment of operational severity for a high pressure turbine blade of an aero-engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslam, Anthony; Abu, Abdullahi; Laskaridis, Panagiotis

    2015-12-01

    This paper provides a tool for the estimation of the operational severity of a high pressure turbine blade of an aero engine. A multidisciplinary approach using aircraft/ engine performance models which provide inputs to a thermo-mechanical fatigue damage model is presented. In the analysis, account is taken of blade size, blade metal temperature distribution, relevant heat transfer coefficients and mechanical and thermal stresses. The leading edge of the blade is selected as the critical part in the estimation of damage severity for different design and operational parameters. The study also suggests a method for production of operational severity data for the prediction of maintenance intervals.

  19. PREFACE: The 2nd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences 2014 (AeroEarth 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Soewito, Benfano

    2015-01-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences 2014 (AeroEarth 2014), was held at Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel, Kuta, Bali, Indonesia during 11 - 12 October 2014. The AeroEarth 2014 conference aims to bring together researchers and engineers from around the world. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. Earth provides resources and the exact conditions to make life possible. However, with the advent of technology and industrialization, the Earth's resources are being pushed to the brink of depletion. Non-sustainable industrial practices are not only endangering the supply of the Earth's natural resources, but are also putting burden on life itself by bringing about pollution and climate change. A major role of earth science scholars is to examine the delicate balance between the Earth's resources and the growing demands of industrialization. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 98 papers and after rigorous review, 17 papers were accepted. The participants come from eight countries. There are four Parallel Sessions and two invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee

  20. A new method for the estimation of high temperature radiant heat emittance by means of aero-acoustic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffrath, Fabian; Prieler, Robert; Telle, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    A new method for the experimental estimation of radiant heat emittance at high temperatures has been developed which involves aero-acoustic levitation of samples, laser heating and contactless temperature measurement. Radiant heat emittance values are determined from the time dependent development of the sample temperature which requires analysis of both the radiant and convective heat transfer towards the surroundings by means of fluid dynamics calculations. First results for the emittance of a corundum sample obtained with this method are presented in this article and found in good agreement with literature values.

  1. Effects of arginine 10 to lysine substitution on ω-conotoxin CVIE and CVIF block of Cav2.2 channels

    PubMed Central

    Berecki, G; Daly, N L; Huang, Y H; Vink, S; Craik, D J; Alewood, P F; Adams, D J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE ω-Conotoxins CVIE and CVIF (CVIE&F) selectively inhibit Cav2.2 channels and are lead molecules in the development of novel analgesics. At physiological membrane potentials, CVIE&F block of Cav2.2 channels is weakly reversible. To improve reversibility, we designed and synthesized arginine CVIE&F analogues in which arginine was substituted for lysine at position 10 ([R10K]CVIE&F), and investigated their serum stability and pharmacological actions on voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Changes in peptide structure due to R10K substitution were assessed by NMR. Peptide stability in human serum was analysed by reversed-phase HPLC and MS over a 24 h period. Two-electrode voltage-clamp and whole-cell patch clamp techniques were used to study [R10K]CVIE&F effects on VGCC currents in Xenopus oocytes and rat dorsal root ganglion neurons respectively. KEY RESULTS R10K substitution did not change the conserved ω-conotoxin backbone conformations of CVIE&F nor the ω-conotoxin selectivity for recombinant or native Cav2.2 channels, although the inhibitory potency of [R10K]CVIF was better than that of CVIF. At −80 mV, the R10K chemical modification significantly affected ω-conotoxin−channel interaction, resulting in faster onset kinetics than those of CVIE&F. Heterologous and native Cav2.2 channels recovered better from [R10K]CVIE&F block than CVIE&F. In human serum, the ω-conotoxin half-lives were 6−10 h. CVIE&F and [R10K]CVIE&F were more stable than CVID. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS R10K substitution in CVIE&F significantly alters the kinetics of ω-conotoxin action and improves reversibility without diminishing conotoxin potency and specificity for the Cav2.2 channel and without diminishing the serum stability. These results may help generate ω-conotoxins with optimized kinetic profiles for target binding. PMID:24628243

  2. Combination vehicle assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, M.J. Sr.

    1987-03-17

    A combination recreational vehicle assembly is described comprising: two vehicles of a different type, the vehicles comprising a first, leading vehicle having a steering mechanism for maneuvering the assembly and a drivable axle mechanism for propelling the assembly; an independently drivable second vehicle trailing the first vehicle comprising a standard road vehicle having a motor, and an axle mechanism for connecting the motor to the wheels of the second vehicle for providing power to the wheels of the vehicle. A gear means for selectively disconnecting the motor from the axle mechanism to place the vehicle in neutral, and a steering means for maneuvering the second vehicle when driven independently of the first vehicle are included; and a releasable mechanical drive connection between the second vehicle motor and the first vehicle axle mechanism to provide power for driving the assembly. The drive connection comprises a drive pinion projecting from the second vehicle motor to the front of the second vehicle, and a drive shaft projecting from the first vehicle axle mechanism to the rear of the first vehicle.

  3. Immunohistological demonstration of CaV3.2 T-type voltage-gated calcium channel expression in soma of dorsal root ganglion neurons and peripheral axons of rat and mouse.

    PubMed

    Rose, K E; Lunardi, N; Boscolo, A; Dong, X; Erisir, A; Jevtovic-Todorovic, V; Todorovic, S M

    2013-10-10

    Previous behavioral studies have revealed that CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels support peripheral nociceptive transmission and electrophysiological studies have established the presence of T-currents in putative nociceptive sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglion (DRG). To date, however, the localization pattern of this key nociceptive channel in the soma and peripheral axons of these cells has not been demonstrated due to lack of isoform-selective anti-CaV3.2 antibodies. In the present study a new polyclonal CaV3.2 antibody is used to localize CaV3.2 expression in rodent DRG neurons using different staining techniques including confocal and electron microscopy (EM). Confocal microscopy of both acutely dissociated cells and short-term cultures demonstrated strong immunofluorescence of anti-CaV3.2 antibody that was largely confined to smaller diameter DRG neurons where it co-localized with established immuno-markers of unmyelinated nociceptors, such as, CGRP, IB4 and peripherin. In contrast, a smaller proportion of these CaV3.2-labeled DRG cells also co-expressed neurofilament 200 (NF200), a marker of myelinated sensory neurons. In the rat sciatic nerve preparation, confocal microscopy demonstrated anti-CaV3.2 immunofluorescence which was co-localized with both peripherin and NF200. Further, EM revealed immuno-gold labeling of CaV3.2 preferentially in association with unmyelinated sensory fibers from mouse sciatic nerve. Finally, we demonstrated the expression of CaV3.2 channels in peripheral nerve endings of mouse hindpaw skin as shown by co-localization with Mrgpd-GFP-positive fibers. The CaV3.2 expression within the soma and peripheral axons of nociceptive sensory neurons further demonstrates the importance of this channel in peripheral pain transmission. PMID:23867767

  4. Modeling C-Band Co-Channel Interference From AeroMACS Omni-Directional Antennas to Mobile Satellite Service Feeder Uplinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    A new C-band (5091 to 5150 MHz) airport communications system designated as Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS) is being planned under the Federal Aviation Administration s NextGen program. An interference analysis software program, Visualyse Professional (Transfinite Systems Ltd), is being utilized to provide guidelines on limitations for AeroMACS transmitters to avoid interference with other systems. A scenario consisting of a single omni-directional transmitting antenna at each of the major contiguous United States airports is modeled and the steps required to build the model are reported. The results are shown to agree very well with a previous study.

  5. July 2004 Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag: Presentation, Summary of Comments, and Conclusions

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; DeChant, L; Hassan, B; Browand, F; Arcas, D; Ross, J; Heineck, J; Storms, B; Walker, S; Leonard, A; Roy, C; Whitfield, D; Pointer, D; Sofu, T; Englar, R; Funk, R

    2004-08-17

    A Working Group Meeting on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag was held in Portland, Oregon on July 1, 2004. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a summary of achievements, discuss pressing issues, present a general overview of future plans, and to provide a forum for dialogue with the Department of Energy (DOE) and industry representatives. The meeting was held in Portland, because the DOE Aero Team participated in an exclusive session on Heavy Truck Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag at the 34th AIAA Fluid Dynamics Conference and Exhibit in Portland on the morning of July 1st, just preceding our Working Group meeting. Even though the paper session was on the last day of the Conference, the Team presented to a full room of interested attendees.

  6. FY 2004 Annual Report: DOE Project on Heavy Vehicle Aerodynamic Drag

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, R C; Salari, K; Ortega, J; Castellucci, P; Eastwood, C; Whittaker, K; DeChant, L J; Roy, C J; Payne, J L; Hassan, B; Pointer, W D; Browand, F; Hammache, M; Hsu, T; Ross, J; Satran, D; Heineck, J T; Walker, S; Yaste, D; Englar, R; Leonard, A; Rubel, M; Chatelain, P

    2004-11-18

    The objective of this report is: (1) Provide guidance to industry in the reduction of aerodynamic drag of heavy truck vehicles; and (2) Establish a database of experimental, computational, and conceptual design information, and demonstrate potential of new drag-reduction devices. The approaches used were: (1) Develop and demonstrate the ability to simulate and analyze aerodynamic flow around heavy truck vehicles using existing and advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools; (2) Through an extensive experimental effort, generate an experimental data base for code validation; (3) Using experimental data base, validate computations; (4) Provide industry with design guidance and insight into flow phenomena from experiments and computations; and (5) Investigate aero devices (e.g., base flaps, tractor-trailer gap stabilizer, underbody skirts and wedges, blowing and acoustic devices), provide industry with conceptual designs of drag reducing devices, and demonstrate the full-scale fuel economy potential of these devices.

  7. Heat pipes for wing leading edges of hypersonic vehicles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boman, B.L.; Citrin, K.M.; Garner, E.C.; Stone, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Wing leading edge heat pipes were conceptually designed for three types of vehicle: an entry research vehicle, aero-space plane, and advanced shuttle. A full scale, internally instrumented sodium/Hastelloy X heat pipe was successfully designed and fabricated for the advanced shuttle application. The 69.4 inch long heat pipe reduces peak leading edge temperatures from 3500 F to 1800 F. It is internally instrumented with thermocouples and pressure transducers to measure sodium vapor qualities. Large thermal gradients and consequently large thermal stresses, which have the potential of limiting heat pipe life, were predicted to occur during startup. A test stand and test plan were developed for subsequent testing of this heat pipe. Heat pipe manufacturing technology was advanced during this program, including the development of an innovative technique for wick installation.

  8. Overview of the In-Flight Experimentations and Measurements on the IXV Experimental Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosson, E.; Giusto, S.; Del Vecchio, A.; Mancuso, S.

    2009-01-01

    After an assessment and then a trade-off of all the passenger experiments proposed by different partners within Europe, a selection of Core Experiments to be embarked on-board IXV to fulfil the Mission and System Requirements has been made. Some Passenger Experiments have also been identified to be potentially embarked, provided it is compatible with the system allocations, since they could bring valuable additional in-flight data. All those experiments include Thermal Protection System (TPS) experiments (including innovative TPS materials), AeroThermoDynamic (ATD) experiments and Health Monitoring System (HMS) experiments. Aside the previously mentioned experiments, a specific Vehicle Model Identification experiment (VMI) aims at validating in-flight the mathematical models of flight dynamics for a gliding re-entry vehicle. This paper also presents a preliminary version of the in- flight measurement plan, encompassing both conventional instrumentation and advanced sensors or even innovative measurement techniques.

  9. Three-dimensional robust diving guidance for hypersonic vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianwen; Liu, Luhua; Tang, Guojian; Bao, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional robust guidance law based on H∞ filter and H∞ control is proposed to meet the constraints of the impact accuracy and the flight direction under process disturbances for the dive phase of hypersonic vehicle. Complete three-dimensional coupling relative motion equations are established and decoupled into linear ones by feedback linearization to simplify the design process of the further guidance law. Based on the linearized equations, H∞ filter is introduced to eliminate the measurement noises of line-of-sight angles and estimate the angular rates. Furthermore, H∞ robust control is well employed to design guidance law, and the filtered information is used to generate guidance commands to meet the guidance goal accurately and robustly. The simulation results of CAV-H indicate that the proposed three-dimensional equations can describe the coupling character more clearly than the traditional decoupling guidance, and the proposed guidance strategy can guide the vehicle to satisfy different multiple constraints with high accuracy and robustness.

  10. Two heterozygous Cav3.2 channel mutations in a pediatric chronic pain patient: recording condition-dependent biophysical effects.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ivana A; Gandini, Maria A; Wan, Miranda M; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2016-04-01

    We report expression system-dependent effects of heterozygous mutations (P769L and A1059S) in the Cav3.2 CACNA1H gene identified in a pediatric patient with chronic pain and absence seizures. The mutations were introduced individually into recombinant channels and then analyzed by means of electrophysiology. When both mutants were co-expressed in tsA-201 cells, we observed a loss of channel function, with significantly smaller current densities across a wide range of voltages (-40 to +20 mV). In addition, when both mutant channels were co-expressed, the channels opened at a more depolarizing potential with a ~5-mV right shift in the half-activation potential, with no changes in half-inactivation potential and the rate of recovery from inactivation. Interestingly, when both mutants were co-expressed in the neuronal-derived CAD cells in a different extracellular milieu, the effect was remarkably different. Although not statistically significant (p < 0.07), current densities appeared augmented compared to wild-type channels and the difference in the half-activation potential was lost. This could be attributed to the replacement of extracellular sodium and potassium with tetraethylammonium chloride. Our results show that experimental conditions can be a confounding factor in the biophysical effects of T-type calcium channel mutations found in certain neurological disorders. PMID:26706850

  11. Techno-functional properties and in vitro bile acid-binding capacities of tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) hydrocolloids.

    PubMed

    Gannasin, Sri Puvanesvari; Adzahan, Noranizan Mohd; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Muhammad, Kharidah

    2016-04-01

    Hydrocolloids were extracted from seed mucilage and the pulp fractions from red tamarillo (Solanum betaceum Cav.) mesocarp, and characterisation of their techno-functional properties and in vitro bile acid-binding capacities was performed. The seed mucilage hydrocolloids that were extracted, using either 1% citric acid (THC) or water (THW), had a good foaming capacity (32-36%), whereas the pulp hydrocolloids that were extracted, using 72% ethanol (THE) or 20mM HEPES buffer (THH), had no foaming capacity. The pulp hydrocolloid, however, possessed high oil-holding and water-holding capacities in the range of 3.3-3.6 g oil/g dry sample and 25-27 g water/g dry sample, respectively. This enabled the pulp hydrocolloid to entrap more bile acids (35-38% at a hydrocolloid concentration of 2%) in its gelatinous network in comparison to commercial oat fibre and other hydrocolloids studied. The exceptional emulsifying properties (80-96%) of both hydrocolloids suggest their potential applications as food emulsifiers and bile acid binders. PMID:26593571

  12. Physical and chemical characteristics of golden-yellow and purple-red varieties of tamarillo fruit (Solanum betaceum Cav.).

    PubMed

    Vasco, Catalina; Avila, Jenny; Ruales, Jenny; Svanberg, Ulf; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf

    2009-01-01

    Golden-yellow and purple-red tamarillos (Solanum betaceum Cav.) cultivated in Ecuador were studied for their physical properties, proximate composition, pH, degrees Brix, acidity, sugars, organic acids, minerals, vitamin C and beta-carotene content in the edible part. Results were compared with those for Spanish fruits. The golden-yellow and purple-red Ecuadorian fruits were larger (107 and 188 g) than the respective Spanish fruits (43 and 63 g), softer but generally similar in chemical composition except for fat (0.72 and 0.6%) and malic acid (0.32 and 0.53%) contents in the golden-yellow and purple-red Ecuadorian fruits. Tamarillo fruits are a good source of potassium (approximately 400 mg/100 g fresh weight). Total phenolics in the golden-yellow and purple-red varieties were 125 and 187 mg gallic acid equivalents/100 g fresh weight, respectively. The golden-yellow variety had weaker anti-DPPH radical activity than the purple-red variety. Flavonols were only found in the peel of both varieties, while hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives were found in peel and pulp. PMID:19657848

  13. Vehicle/engine integration. [orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, L. P.; Vinopal, T. J.; Florence, D. E.; Michel, R. W.; Brown, J. R.; Bergeron, R. P.; Weldon, V. A.

    1984-01-01

    VEHICLE/ENGINE Integration Issues are explored for orbit transfer vehicles (OTV's). The impact of space basing and aeroassist on VEHICLE/ENGINE integration is discussed. The AOTV structure and thermal protection subsystem weights were scaled as the vehicle length and surface was changed. It is concluded that for increased allowable payload lengths in a ground-based system, lower length-to-diameter (L/D) is as important as higher mixture ration (MR) in the range of mid L/D ATOV's. Scenario validity, geometry constraints, throttle levels, reliability, and servicing are discussed in the context of engine design and engine/vehicle integration.

  14. Effective L/D: A Theoretical Approach to the Measurement of Aero-Structural Efficiency in Aircraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    There are many trade-offs in aircraft design that ultimately impact the overall performance and characteristics of the final design. One well recognized and well understood trade-off is that of wing weight and aerodynamic efficiency. Higher aerodynamic efficiency can be obtained by increasing wing span, usually at the expense of higher wing weight. The proper balance of these two competing factors depends on the objectives of the design. For example, aerodynamic efficiency is preeminent for sailplanes and long slender wings result. Although the wing weight-drag trade is universally recognized, aerodynamic efficiency and structural efficiency are not usually considered in combination. This paper discusses the concept of "aero-structural efficiency," which combines weight and drag characteristics. A metric to quantify aero-structural efficiency, termed effective L/D, is then derived and tested with various scenarios. Effective L/D is found to be a practical and robust means to simultaneously characterize aerodynamic and structural efficiency in the context of aircraft design. The primary value of the effective L/D metric is as a means to better communicate the combined system level impacts of drag and structural weight.

  15. The AERO system: a 3D-like approach for recording gene expression patterns in the whole mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hirohito; Kubo, Atsushi; Uchibe, Kenta; Hashimoto, Megumi; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Takada, Shuji; Mitsuoka, Kazuhiko; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently constructed a web-based database of gene expression in the mouse whole embryo, EMBRYS (http://embrys.jp/embrys/html/MainMenu.html). To allow examination of gene expression patterns to the fullest extent possible, this database provides both photo images and annotation data. However, since embryos develop via an intricate process of morphogenesis, it would be of great value to track embryonic gene expression from a three dimensional perspective. In fact, several methods have been developed to achieve this goal, but highly laborious procedures and specific operational skills are generally required. We utilized a novel microscopic technique that enables the easy capture of rotational, 3D-like images of the whole embryo. In this method, a rotary head equipped with two mirrors that are designed to obtain an image tilted at 45 degrees to the microscope stage captures serial images at 2-degree intervals. By a simple operation, 180 images are automatically collected. These 2D images obtained at multiple angles are then used to reconstruct 3D-like images, termed AERO images. By means of this system, over 800 AERO images of 191 gene expression patterns were captured. These images can be easily rotated on the computer screen using the EMBRYS database so that researchers can view an entire embryo by a virtual viewing on a computer screen in an unbiased or non-predetermined manner. The advantages afforded by this approach make it especially useful for generating data viewed in public databases. PMID:24146773

  16. Soot volume fraction measurements in aero-engine exhausts using extinction-calibrated backward laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhay, J.; Desgroux, P.; Therssen, E.; Bladh, H.; Bengtsson, P.-E.; Hönen, H.; Black, J. D.; Vallet, I.

    2009-06-01

    Control and reduction of soot particle emissions from aeronautic turbines requires a monitoring system suitable for quantification of these emissions. Currently, such emissions are estimated using the technique of smoke number. This is an extractive method, which is not sensitive enough for the low emission levels of modern gas turbines. Within a recent European project, AEROTEST, part of the project aimed at investigating an alternative soot monitoring technique, laser-induced incandescence (LII) as an in-situ optical diagnostic for quantification of soot emissions. For aero-engine applications, especially those involving large-scale turbines, it is necessary to perform the measurements at long distance from the turbine. The LII technique is favourable in this respect as it provides for non-intrusive measurements and, by detecting the isotropic LII signal along the same axis as the incoming laser beam (so called backward LII), both the laser and the detector can be built inside one system located several meters from the turbine. The concept was initiated in the previous European projects, AEROJET I and II. This paper describes the modified version of the system and the procedure developed to achieve reliable and quantitative soot volume fraction measurements in the exhausts of aero-engines. Application of the backward LII technique is demonstrated in the exhaust of a military turbojet engine for different engine speeds.

  17. The AERO System: A 3D-Like Approach for Recording Gene Expression Patterns in the Whole Mouse Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Megumi; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Takada, Shuji; Mitsuoka, Kazuhiko; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We have recently constructed a web-based database of gene expression in the mouse whole embryo, EMBRYS (http://embrys.jp/embrys/html/MainMenu.html). To allow examination of gene expression patterns to the fullest extent possible, this database provides both photo images and annotation data. However, since embryos develop via an intricate process of morphogenesis, it would be of great value to track embryonic gene expression from a three dimensional perspective. In fact, several methods have been developed to achieve this goal, but highly laborious procedures and specific operational skills are generally required. We utilized a novel microscopic technique that enables the easy capture of rotational, 3D-like images of the whole embryo. In this method, a rotary head equipped with two mirrors that are designed to obtain an image tilted at 45 degrees to the microscope stage captures serial images at 2-degree intervals. By a simple operation, 180 images are automatically collected. These 2D images obtained at multiple angles are then used to reconstruct 3D-like images, termed AERO images. By means of this system, over 800 AERO images of 191 gene expression patterns were captured. These images can be easily rotated on the computer screen using the EMBRYS database so that researchers can view an entire embryo by a virtual viewing on a computer screen in an unbiased or non-predetermined manner. The advantages afforded by this approach make it especially useful for generating data viewed in public databases. PMID:24146773

  18. An engineer at AeroVironment's Design Development Center inspects a set of silicon solar cells for p

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    An engineer at AeroVironment's Design Development Center in Simi Valley, California, closely inspects a set of silicon solar cells for potential defects. The cells, fabricated by SunPower, Inc., of Sunnyvale, California, are among 64,000 solar cells which have been installed on the Helios Prototype solar-powered aircraft to provide power to its 14 electric motors and operating systems. Developed by AeroVironment under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude aircraft which can perform atmospheric science missions and serve as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere. Target goals set by NASA for the giant 246-foot span flying wing include reaching and sustaining subsonic horizontal flight at 100,000 feet altitude in 2001, and sustained continuous flight for at least four days and nights in 2003 with the aid of a regenerative fuel cell-based energy storage system now in development.

  19. On the Development of an Efficient Parallel Hybrid Solver with Application to Acoustically Treated Aero-Engine Nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Nark, Douglas M.; Nguyen, Duc T.; Tungkahotara, Siroj

    2006-01-01

    A finite element solution to the convected Helmholtz equation in a nonuniform flow is used to model the noise field within 3-D acoustically treated aero-engine nacelles. Options to select linear or cubic Hermite polynomial basis functions and isoparametric elements are included. However, the key feature of the method is a domain decomposition procedure that is based upon the inter-mixing of an iterative and a direct solve strategy for solving the discrete finite element equations. This procedure is optimized to take full advantage of sparsity and exploit the increased memory and parallel processing capability of modern computer architectures. Example computations are presented for the Langley Flow Impedance Test facility and a rectangular mapping of a full scale, generic aero-engine nacelle. The accuracy and parallel performance of this new solver are tested on both model problems using a supercomputer that contains hundreds of central processing units. Results show that the method gives extremely accurate attenuation predictions, achieves super-linear speedup over hundreds of CPUs, and solves upward of 25 million complex equations in a quarter of an hour.

  20. Modeled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparision. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modeled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  1. Modelled black carbon radiative forcing and atmospheric lifetime in AeroCom Phase II constrained by aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Herber, A.; Kondo, Y.; Li, S.-M.; Moteki, N.; Koike, M.; Oshima, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Schulz, M.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2014-11-01

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) absorbs solar radiation, and exacerbates global warming through exerting positive radiative forcing (RF). However, the contribution of BC to ongoing changes in global climate is under debate. Anthropogenic BC emissions, and the resulting distribution of BC concentration, are highly uncertain. In particular, long-range transport and processes affecting BC atmospheric lifetime are poorly understood. Here we discuss whether recent assessments may have overestimated present-day BC radiative forcing in remote regions. We compare vertical profiles of BC concentration from four recent aircraft measurement campaigns to simulations by 13 aerosol models participating in the AeroCom Phase II intercomparison. An atmospheric lifetime of BC of less than 5 days is shown to be essential for reproducing observations in remote ocean regions, in line with other recent studies. Adjusting model results to measurements in remote regions, and at high altitudes, leads to a 25% reduction in AeroCom Phase II median direct BC forcing, from fossil fuel and biofuel burning, over the industrial era. The sensitivity of modelled forcing to BC vertical profile and lifetime highlights an urgent need for further flight campaigns, close to sources and in remote regions, to provide improved quantification of BC effects for use in climate policy.

  2. Experimental analysis of the aero-acoustic coupling in a plane impinging jet on a slotted plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assoum, Hassan H.; El Hassan, Mouhammad; Abed-Meraïm, Kamel; Martinuzzi, Robert; Sakout, Anas

    2013-08-01

    Impinging jets are encountered in many industrial applications and suppression of the noise generated by these jets is of great fundamental and practical interest. The vortex dynamics and the interaction between the vortical structures and the impinging wall should be understood in order to control the aero-acoustic coupling between shear layer oscillation and the acoustic modes (self-sustained tones). In this study, a plane jet issuing from a rectangular nozzle and impinging on a plate is considered for Re = 3900. The sound pressure, the vibration of the impinged plate and the spatial velocity field are obtained simultaneously using a microphone, an accelerometer and the time-resolved particle image velocimetry technique, respectively. Spectra and cross-correlations are used to educe the role of different vortical structures leading to the aero-acoustic coupling. The results show the evolution of the correlation between acoustic and transverse velocity fields in the longitudinal direction. A pre-whitening technique is used to investigate the coupling between the acoustic and the velocity signals. This method shows that the correlation between the two signals has a centred peak that is not directly related to the passage of the dominant Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  3. Influence of high rotational speeds on heat transfer and oil film thickness in aero-engine bearing chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, S.; Glahn, A.; Himmelsbach, J.

    1994-04-01

    Increasing the thermal loading of bearing chambers in modern aero-engines requires advanced techniques for the determination of heat transfer characteristics. In the present study, film thickness and heat transfer measurements have been carried out for the complex two-phase oil/air flow in bearing chambers. In order to ensure real engine conditions, a new test facility has been built up, designed for rotational speeds up to n = 16,000 rpm and maximum flow temperatures of T(sub max) = 473 K. Sealing air and lubrication oil flow can be varied nearly in the whole range of aero-engine applications. Special interest is directed toward the development of an ultrasonic oil film thickness measuring technique, which can be used without any reaction on the flow inside the chamber. The determination of local heat transfer at the bearing chamber housing is based on a well-known temperature gradient method using surface temperature measurements and a finite element code to determine temperature distributions within the bearing chamber housing. The influence of high rotational speed on the local heat transfer and the oil film thickness is discussed.

  4. Electric and hybrid vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report characterizes state-of-the-art electric and hybrid (combined electric and heat engine) vehicles. Performance data for representative number of these vehicles were obtained from track and dynamometer tests. User experience information was obtained from fleet operators and individual owners of electric vehicles. Data on performance and physical characteristics of large number of vehicles were obtained from manufacturers and available literature.

  5. Remote vehicle controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, John J.

    1992-06-01

    A remote control system is disclosed for use with vehicles having radios. A first vehicle has a controller attached to the radio for use in sending signals to a second vehicle. The second, remotely controlled, vehicle has a receiver connected to the vehicle radio which receives commands from the first radio to effect the desired motion and action of the second vehicle. The receiver and controller have circuitry which allows them to be reprogrammed to function on various military vehicles and also be attached to the different radio systems in use by the U.S. Military.

  6. The AeroCom evaluation and intercomparison of organic aerosol in global models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tsigaridis, K.; Daskalakis, N.; Kanakidou, M.; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, P.; Bahadur, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Benedetti, A.; et al

    2014-10-15

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) in the troposphere and analyzes the differences between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry transport models (CTMs) and general circulation models (GCMs) have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemicalmore » and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over one order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA concentrations that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA / OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing, and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by a few global models. The median global primary OA (POA) source strength is 56 Tg a–1 (range 34–144 Tg a−1) and the median SOA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a–1 (range 13–121 Tg a−1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a–1 (range 16–121 Tg a−1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a–1; range 13–20 Tg a–1, with one model at 37 Tg a−1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0.6–2.0 Tg and 4 between 2.0 and 3.8 Tg), with a median OA lifetime of 5.4 days (range 3.8–9.6 days

  7. The AeroCom evaluation and intercomparison of organic aerosol in global models

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigaridis, K.; Daskalakis, N.; Kanakidou, M.; Adams, P. J.; Artaxo, P.; Bahadur, R.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Bellouin, N.; Benedetti, A.; Bergman, T.; Berntsen, T. K.; Beukes, J. P.; Bian, H.; Carslaw, K. S.; Chin, M.; Curci, G.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Gong, S. L.; Hodzic, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Iversen, T.; Jathar, S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Kaiser, J. W.; Kirkevåg, A.; Koch, D.; Kokkola, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; Mann, G. W.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Morcrette, J. -J.; Müller, J. -F.; Myhre, G.; Myriokefalitakis, S.; Ng, N. L.; O'Donnell, D.; Penner, J. E.; Pozzoli, L.; Pringle, K. J.; Russell, L. M.; Schulz, M.; Sciare, J.; Seland, Ø.; Shindell, D. T.; Sillman, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Spracklen, D.; Stavrakou, T.; Steenrod, S. D.; Takemura, T.; Tiitta, P.; Tilmes, S.; Tost, H.; van Noije, T.; van Zyl, P. G.; von Salzen, K.; Yu, F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Zaveri, R. A.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.

    2014-10-15

    This paper evaluates the current status of global modeling of the organic aerosol (OA) in the troposphere and analyzes the differences between models as well as between models and observations. Thirty-one global chemistry transport models (CTMs) and general circulation models (GCMs) have participated in this intercomparison, in the framework of AeroCom phase II. The simulation of OA varies greatly between models in terms of the magnitude of primary emissions, secondary OA (SOA) formation, the number of OA species used (2 to 62), the complexity of OA parameterizations (gas-particle partitioning, chemical aging, multiphase chemistry, aerosol microphysics), and the OA physical, chemical and optical properties. The diversity of the global OA simulation results has increased since earlier AeroCom experiments, mainly due to the increasing complexity of the SOA parameterization in models, and the implementation of new, highly uncertain, OA sources. Diversity of over one order of magnitude exists in the modeled vertical distribution of OA concentrations that deserves a dedicated future study. Furthermore, although the OA / OC ratio depends on OA sources and atmospheric processing, and is important for model evaluation against OA and OC observations, it is resolved only by a few global models.

    The median global primary OA (POA) source strength is 56 Tg a–1 (range 34–144 Tg a−1) and the median SOA source strength (natural and anthropogenic) is 19 Tg a–1 (range 13–121 Tg a−1). Among the models that take into account the semi-volatile SOA nature, the median source is calculated to be 51 Tg a–1 (range 16–121 Tg a−1), much larger than the median value of the models that calculate SOA in a more simplistic way (19 Tg a–1; range 13–20 Tg a–1, with one model at 37 Tg a−1). The median atmospheric burden of OA is 1.4 Tg (24 models in the range of 0

  8. Trajectory-Based Loads for the Ares I-X Test Flight Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vause, Roland F.; Starr, Brett R.

    2011-01-01

    In trajectory-based loads, the structural engineer treats each point on the trajectory as a load case. Distributed aero, inertial, and propulsion forces are developed for the structural model which are equivalent to the integrated values of the trajectory model. Free-body diagrams are then used to solve for the internal forces, or loads, that keep the applied aero, inertial, and propulsion forces in dynamic equilibrium. There are several advantages to using trajectory-based loads. First, consistency is maintained between the integrated equilibrium equations of the trajectory analysis and the distributed equilibrium equations of the structural analysis. Second, the structural loads equations are tied to the uncertainty model for the trajectory systems analysis model. Atmosphere, aero, propulsion, mass property, and controls uncertainty models all feed into the dispersions that are generated for the trajectory systems analysis model. Changes in any of these input models will affect structural loads response. The trajectory systems model manages these inputs as well as the output from the structural model over thousands of dispersed cases. Large structural models with hundreds of thousands of degrees of freedom would execute too slowly to be an efficient part of several thousand system analyses. Trajectory-based loads provide a means for the structures discipline to be included in the integrated systems analysis. Successful applications of trajectory-based loads methods for the Ares I-X vehicle are covered in this paper. Preliminary design loads were based on 2000 trajectories using Monte Carlo dispersions. Range safety loads were tied to 8423 malfunction turn trajectories. In addition, active control system loads were based on 2000 preflight trajectories using Monte Carlo dispersions.

  9. Evaluation of the aero-optical properties of the SOFIA cavity by means of computional fluid dynamics and a super fast diagnostic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engfer, Christian; Pfüller, Enrico; Wiedemann, Manuel; Wolf, Jürgen; Lutz, Thorsten; Krämer, Ewald; Röser, Hans-Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is a 2.5 m reflecting telescope housed in an open cavity on board of a Boeing 747SP. During observations, the cavity is exposed to transonic flow conditions. The oncoming boundary layer evolves into a free shear layer being responsible for optical aberrations and for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic disturbances within the cavity. While the aero-acoustical excitation of an airborne telescope can be minimized by using passive flow control devices, the aero-optical properties of the flow are difficult to improve. Hence it is important to know how much the image seen through the SOFIA telescope is perturbed by so called seeing effects. Prior to the SOFIA science fights Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations using URANS and DES methods were carried out to determine the flow field within and above the cavity and hence in the optical path in order to provide an assessment of the aero-optical properties under baseline conditions. In addition and for validation purposes, out of focus images have been taken during flight with a Super Fast Diagnostic Camera (SFDC). Depending on the binning factor and the sub-array size, the SFDC is able to take and to read out images at very high frame rates. The paper explains the numerical approach based on CFD to evaluate the aero-optical properties of SOFIA. The CFD data is then compared to the high speed images taken by the SFDC during flight.

  10. A CaV1.1 Ca2+ Channel Splice Variant with High Conductance and Voltage-Sensitivity Alters EC Coupling in Developing Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tuluc, Petronel; Molenda, Natalia; Schlick, Bettina; Obermair, Gerald J.; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Jurkat-Rott, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The Ca2+ channel α1S subunit (CaV1.1) is the voltage sensor in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. Upon membrane depolarization, this sensor rapidly triggers Ca2+ release from internal stores and conducts a slowly activating Ca2+ current. However, this Ca2+ current is not essential for skeletal muscle EC coupling. Here, we identified a CaV1.1 splice variant with greatly distinct current properties. The variant of the CACNA1S gene lacking exon 29 was expressed at low levels in differentiated human and mouse muscle, and up to 80% in myotubes. To test its biophysical properties, we deleted exon 29 in a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged α1S subunit and expressed it in dysgenic (α1S-null) myotubes. GFP-α1SΔ29 was correctly targeted into triads and supported skeletal muscle EC coupling. However, the Ca2+ currents through GFP-α1SΔ29 showed a 30-mV left-shifted voltage dependence of activation and a substantially increased open probability, giving rise to an eightfold increased current density. This robust Ca2+ influx contributed substantially to the depolarization-induced Ca2+ transient that triggers contraction. Moreover, deletion of exon 29 accelerated current kinetics independent of the auxiliary α2δ-1 subunit. Thus, characterizing the CaV1.1Δ29 splice variant revealed the structural bases underlying the specific gating properties of skeletal muscle Ca2+ channels, and it suggests the existence of a distinct mode of EC coupling in developing muscle. PMID:19134469

  11. CaV3.2 T-type Ca²⁺ channels in H₂S-mediated hypoxic response of the carotid body.

    PubMed

    Makarenko, Vladislav V; Peng, Ying-Jie; Yuan, Guoxiang; Fox, Aaron P; Kumar, Ganesh K; Nanduri, Jayasri; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2015-01-15

    Arterial blood O2 levels are detected by specialized sensory organs called carotid bodies. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) are important for carotid body O2 sensing. Given that T-type VGCCs contribute to nociceptive sensation, we hypothesized that they participate in carotid body O2 sensing. The rat carotid body expresses high levels of mRNA encoding the α1H-subunit, and α1H protein is localized to glomus cells, the primary O2-sensing cells in the chemoreceptor tissue, suggesting that CaV3.2 is the major T-type VGCC isoform expressed in the carotid body. Mibefradil and TTA-A2, selective blockers of the T-type VGCC, markedly attenuated elevation of hypoxia-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, secretion of catecholamines from glomus cells, and sensory excitation of the rat carotid body. Similar results were obtained in the carotid body and glomus cells from CaV3.2 knockout (Cacna1h(-/-)) mice. Since cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE)-derived H2S is a critical mediator of the carotid body response to hypoxia, the role of T-type VGCCs in H2S-mediated O2 sensing was examined. Like hypoxia, NaHS, a H2S donor, increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and augmented carotid body sensory nerve activity in wild-type mice, and these effects were markedly attenuated in Cacna1h(-/-) mice. In wild-type mice, TTA-A2 markedly attenuated glomus cell and carotid body sensory nerve responses to hypoxia, and these effects were absent in CSE knockout mice. These results demonstrate that CaV3.2 T-type VGCCs contribute to the H2S-mediated carotid body response to hypoxia. PMID:25377087

  12. Specific functioning of Cav3.2 T-type calcium and TRPV1 channels under different types of STZ-diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Khomula, Eugen V; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav Y; Borisyuk, Anya L; Duzhyy, Dmytro E; Belan, Pavel V; Voitenko, Nana V

    2013-05-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes in rats leads to the development of peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN) manifested as thermal hyperalgesia at early stages (4th week) followed by hypoalgesia after 8weeks of diabetes development. Here we found that 6-7 week STZ-diabetic rats developed either thermal hyper- (18%), hypo- (25%) or normalgesic (57%) types of PDN. These developmentally similar diabetic rats were studied in order to analyze mechanisms potentially underlying different thermal nociception. The proportion of IB4-positive capsaicin-sensitive small DRG neurons, strongly involved in thermal nociception, was not altered under different types of PDN implying differential changes at cellular and molecular level. We further focused on properties of T-type calcium and TRPV1 channels, which are known to be involved in Ca(2+) signaling and pathological nociception. Indeed, TRPV1-mediated signaling in these neurons was downregulated under hypo- and normalgesia and upregulated under hyperalgesia. A complex interplay between diabetes-induced changes in functional expression of Cav3.2 T-type calcium channels and depolarizing shift of their steady-state inactivation resulted in upregulation of these channels under hyper- and normalgesia and their downregulation under hypoalgesia. As a result, T-type window current was increased by several times under hyperalgesia partially underlying the increased resting [Ca(2+)]i observed in the hyperalgesic rats. At the same time Cav3.2-dependent Ca(2+) signaling was upregulated in all types of PDN. These findings indicate that alterations in functioning of Cav3.2 T-type and TRPV1 channels, specific for each type of PDN, may underlie the variety of pain syndromes induced by type 1 diabetes. PMID:23376589

  13. CaBP1 regulates voltage-dependent inactivation and activation of Ca(V)1.2 (L-type) calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Oz, Shimrit; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Christel, Carl J; Lee, Amy; Dascal, Nathan

    2011-04-22

    CaBP1 is a Ca(2+)-binding protein that regulates the gating of voltage-gated (Ca(V)) Ca(2+) channels. In the Ca(V)1.2 channel α(1)-subunit (α(1C)), CaBP1 interacts with cytosolic N- and C-terminal domains and blunts Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation. To clarify the role of the α(1C) N-terminal domain in CaBP1 regulation, we compared the effects of CaBP1 on two alternatively spliced variants of α(1C) containing a long or short N-terminal domain. In both isoforms, CaBP1 inhibited Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation but also caused a depolarizing shift in voltage-dependent activation and enhanced voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI). In binding assays, CaBP1 interacted with the distal third of the N-terminal domain in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. This segment is distinct from the previously identified calmodulin-binding site in the N terminus. However, deletion of a segment in the proximal N-terminal domain of both α(1C) isoforms, which spared the CaBP1-binding site, inhibited the effect of CaBP1 on VDI. This result suggests a modular organization of the α(1C) N-terminal domain, with separate determinants for CaBP1 binding and transduction of the effect on VDI. Our findings expand the diversity and mechanisms of Ca(V) channel regulation by CaBP1 and define a novel modulatory function for the initial segment of the N terminus of α(1C). PMID:21383011

  14. Two mechanistically distinct effects of dihydropyridine nifedipine on CaV1.2 L-type Ca²⁺ channels revealed by Timothy syndrome mutation.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Xiaona; Nakada, Tsutomu; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Kashihara, Toshihide; Shibazaki, Toshihide; Horiuchi-Hirose, Miwa; Gomi, Simmon; Hirose, Masamichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2012-06-15

    Dihydropyridine Ca(2+) channel antagonists (DHPs) block Ca(V)1.2 L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) by stabilizing their voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI); however, it is still not clear how DHPs allosterically interact with the kinetically distinct (fast and slow) VDI. Thus, we analyzed the effect of a prototypical DHP, nifedipine on LTCCs with or without the Timothy syndrome mutation that resides in the I-II linker (L(I)-(II)) of Ca(V)1.2 subunits and impairs VDI. Whole-cell Ba(2+) currents mediated by rabbit Ca(V)1.2 with or without the Timothy mutation (G436R) (analogous to the human G406R mutation) were analyzed in the presence and absence of nifedipine. In the absence of nifedipine, the mutation significantly impaired fast closed- and open-state VDI (CSI and OSI) at -40 and 0 mV, respectively, but did not affect channels' kinetics at -100 mV. Nifedipine equipotently blocked these channels at -80 mV. In wild-type LTCCs, nifedipine promoted fast CSI and OSI at -40 and 0 mV and promoted or stabilized slow CSI at -40 and -100 mV, respectively. In LTCCs with the mutation, nifedipine resumed the impaired fast CSI and OSI at -40 and 0 mV, respectively, and had the same effect on slow CSI as in wild-type LTCCs. Therefore, nifedipine has two mechanistically distinct effects on LTCCs: the promotion of fast CSI/OSI caused by L(I-II) at potentials positive to the sub-threshold potential and the promotion or stabilization of slow CSI caused by different mechanisms at potentials negative to the sub-threshold potential. PMID:22554770

  15. A critical GxxxA motif in the γ6 calcium channel subunit mediates its inhibitory effect on Cav3.1 calcium current

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zuojun; Witschas, Katja; Garcia, Thomas; Chen, Ren-Shiang; Hansen, Jared P; Sellers, Zachary M; Kuzmenkina, Elza; Herzig, Stefan; Best, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    The eight members of the calcium channel γ subunit family are integral membrane proteins that regulate the expression and behaviour of voltage and ligand gated ion channels. While a subgroup consisting of γ2, γ3, γ4 and γ8 (the TARPs) modulate AMPA receptor localization and function, the γ1 and γ6 subunits conform to the original description of these proteins as regulators of voltage gated calcium channels. We have previously shown that the γ6 subunit is highly expressed in atrial myocytes and that it is capable of acting as a negative modulator of low voltage activated calcium current. In this study we extend our understanding of γ6 subunit modulation of low voltage activated calcium current. Using engineered chimeric constructs, we demonstrate that the first transmembrane domain (TM1) of γ6 is necessary for its inhibitory effect on Cav3.1 current. Mutational analysis is then used to identify a unique GxxxA motif within TM1 that is required for the function of the subunit strongly suggesting the involvement of helix–helix interactions in its effects. Results from co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirm a physical association of γ6 with the Cav3.1 channel in both HEK cells and atrial myocytes. Single channel analysis reveals that binding of γ6 reduces channel availability for activation. Taken together, the results of this study provide both a molecular and a mechanistic framework for understanding the unique ability of the γ6 calcium channel subunit to modulate low voltage activated (Cav3.1) calcium current density. PMID:18818244

  16. Functional properties of the CaV1.2 calcium channel activated by calmodulin in the absence of alpha2delta subunits.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Arippa; Kobrinsky, Evgeny; Lao, Qi Zong; Soldatov, Nikolai M

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-activated CaV1.2 calcium channels require association of the pore-forming alpha1C subunit with accessory CaVbeta and alpha2delta subunits. Binding of a single calmodulin (CaM) to alpha1C supports Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI). The human CaV1.2 channel is silent in the absence of CaVbeta and/or alpha2delta. Recently, we found that coexpression of exogenous CaM (CaMex) supports plasma membrane targeting, gating facilitation and CDI of the channel in the absence of CaVbeta. Here we discovered that CaMex and its Ca2+-insensitive mutant (CaM1234) rendered active alpha1C/CaVbeta channel in the absence of alpha2delta. Coexpression of CaMex with alpha1C and beta2d in calcium-channel-free COS-1 cells recovered gating of the channel and supported CDI. Voltage-dependence of activation was shifted by approximately +40 mV to depolarization potentials. The calcium current reached maximum at +40 mV (20 mM Ca2+) and exhibited approximately 3 times slower activation and 5 times slower inactivation kinetics compared to the wild-type channel. Furthermore, both CaMex and CaM1234 accelerated recovery from inactivation and induced facilitation of the calcium current by strong depolarization prepulse, the properties absent from the human vascular/neuronal CaV1.2 channel. The data suggest a previously unknown action of CaM that in the presence of CaVbeta; translates into activation of the alpha2delta-deficient calcium channel and alteration of its properties. PMID:19106618

  17. Presynaptic CaV2.1 calcium channels carrying familial hemiplegic migraine mutation R192Q allow faster recovery from synaptic depression in mouse calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Inchauspe, Carlota González; Urbano, Francisco J.; Di Guilmi, Mariano N.; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Forsythe, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels have a dominant and specific role in initiating fast synaptic transmission at central excitatory synapses, through a close association between release sites and calcium sensors. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal-dominant subtype of migraine with aura, caused by missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A pore-forming subunit of CaV2.1 channel. We used knock-in (KI) transgenic mice harboring the FHM-1 mutation R192Q to study the consequences of this mutation in neurotransmission at the giant synapse of the auditory system formed by the presynaptic calyx of Held terminal and the postsynaptic neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). Although synaptic transmission seems unaffected by low-frequency stimulation in physiological Ca2+ concentration, we observed that with low Ca2+ concentrations (<1 mM) excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) showed increased amplitudes in R192Q KI mice compared with wild type (WT), meaning significant differences in the nonlinear calcium dependence of nerve-evoked transmitter release. In addition, when EPSCs were evoked by broadened presynaptic action potentials (achieved by inhibition of K+ channels) via Cav2.1-triggered exocytosis, R192Q KI mice exhibited further enhancement of EPSC amplitude and charge compared with WT mice. Repetitive stimulation of afferent axons to the MNTB at different frequencies caused short-term depression of EPSCs that recovered significantly faster in R192Q KI mice than in WT mice. Faster recovery in R192Q KI mice was prevented by the calcium chelator EGTA-AM, pointing to enlarged residual calcium as a key factor in accelerating the replenishment of synaptic vesicles. PMID:22956801

  18. Alterations of Excitation–Contraction Coupling and Excitation Coupled Ca2+ Entry in Human Myotubes Carrying CAV3 Mutations Linked to Rippling Muscle Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Nina D; Fischer, Dirk; Kornblum, Cornelia; Walter, Maggie C; Niggli, Ernst; Zorzato, Francesco; Treves, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Rippling muscle disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding caveolin-3 (CAV3), the muscle-specific isoform of the scaffolding protein caveolin, a protein involved in the formation of caveolae. In healthy muscle, caveolin-3 is responsible for the formation of caveolae, which are highly organized sarcolemmal clusters influencing early muscle differentiation, signalling and Ca2+ homeostasis. In the present study we examined Ca2+ homeostasis and excitation–contraction (E-C) coupling in cultured myotubes derived from two patients with Rippling muscle disease with severe reduction in caveolin-3 expression; one patient harboured the heterozygous c.84C>A mutation while the other patient harbored a homozygous splice-site mutation (c.102+ 2T>C) affecting the splice donor site of intron 1 of the CAV3 gene. Our results show that cells from control and rippling muscle disease patients had similar resting [Ca2+]i and 4-chloro-m-cresol-induced Ca2+ release but reduced KCl-induced Ca2+ influx. Detailed analysis of the voltage-dependence of Ca2+ transients revealed a significant shift of Ca2+ release activation to higher depolarization levels in CAV3 mutated cells. High resolution immunofluorescence analysis by Total Internal Fluorescence microscopy supports the hypothesis that loss of caveolin-3 leads to microscopic disarrays in the colocalization of the voltage-sensing dihydropyridine receptor and the ryanodine receptor, thereby reducing the efficiency of excitation–contraction coupling. Hum Mutat 32:309–317, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21294223

  19. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  20. Aero-Thermo-Structural Analysis of Inlet for Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivakumar, K. N.; Challa, Preeti; Sree, Dave; Reddy, Dhanireddy R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA has been developing advanced space transportation concepts and technologies to make access to space less costly. One such concept is the reusable vehicles with short turn-around times. The NASA Glenn Research Center's concept vehicle is the Trailblazer powered by a rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) engine. Inlet is one of the most important components of the RBCC engine. This paper presents fluid flow, thermal, and structural analysis of the inlet for Mach 6 free stream velocity for fully supersonic and supercritical with backpressure conditions. The results concluded that the fully supersonic condition was the most severe case and the largest stresses occur in the ceramic matrix composite layer of the inlet cowl. The maximum tensile and the compressive stresses were at least 3.8 and 3.4, respectively, times less than the associated material strength.