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Sample records for aero-propulsion system simulation

  1. Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2006-01-01

    The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS) is a graphical simulation environment designed for the development of advanced control algorithms and rapid testing of these algorithms on a generic computational model of a turbofan engine and its control system. MAPSS is a nonlinear, non-real-time simulation comprising a Component Level Model (CLM) module and a Controller-and-Actuator Dynamics (CAD) module. The CLM module simulates the dynamics of engine components at a sampling rate of 2,500 Hz. The controller submodule of the CAD module simulates a digital controller, which has a typical update rate of 50 Hz. The sampling rate for the actuators in the CAD module is the same as that of the CLM. MAPSS provides a graphical user interface that affords easy access to engine-operation, engine-health, and control parameters; is used to enter such input model parameters as power lever angle (PLA), Mach number, and altitude; and can be used to change controller and engine parameters. Output variables are selectable by the user. Output data as well as any changes to constants and other parameters can be saved and reloaded into the GUI later.

  2. The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS) Users' Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    The Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation is a flexible turbofan engine simulation environment that provides the user a platform to develop advanced control algorithms. It is capable of testing the performance of control designs on a validated and verified generic engine model. In addition, it is able to generate state-space linear models of the engine model to aid in controller design. The engine model used in MAPSS is a generic high-pressure ratio, dual-spool, lowbypass, military-type, variable cycle turbofan engine with a digital controller. MAPSS is controlled by a graphical user interface (GUI) and this guide explains how to use it to take advantage of the capabilities of MAPSS.

  3. Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei; Lavelle, Thomas; Litt, Jonathan; Csank, Jeffrey; May, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    The Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) software package is a nonlinear dynamic simulation of a 40,000-pound (approximately equals 178-kN) thrust class commercial turbofan engine, written in the MATLAB/Simulink environment. The model has been tuned to capture the behavior of flight test data, and is capable of running at any point in the flight envelope [up to 40,000 ft (approximately equals 12,200 m) and Mach 0.8]. In addition to the open-loop engine, the simulation includes a controller whose architecture is representative of that found in industry. C-MAPSS40k fills the need for an easy-to-use, realistic, transient simulation of a medium-size commercial turbofan engine with a representative controller. It is a detailed component level model (CLM) written in the industry-standard graphical MATLAB/Simulink environment to allow for easy modification and portability. At the time of this reporting, no other such model exists in the public domain.

  4. A Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation of a Large Commercial Aircraft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Frederick, Dean K.

    2008-01-01

    A simulation of a commercial engine has been developed in a graphical environment to meet the increasing need across the controls and health management community for a common research and development platform. This paper describes the Commercial Modular Aero Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS), which is representative of a 90,000-lb thrust class two spool, high bypass ratio commercial turbofan engine. A control law resembling the state-of-the-art on board modern aircraft engines is included, consisting of a fan-speed control loop supplemented by relevant engine limit protection regulator loops. The objective of this paper is to provide a top-down overview of the complete engine simulation package.

  5. User's Guide for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Dean K.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2007-01-01

    This report is a Users Guide for the NASA-developed Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) software, which is a transient simulation of a large commercial turbofan engine (up to 90,000-lb thrust) with a realistic engine control system. The software supports easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface (GUI). C-MAPSS provides the user with a graphical turbofan engine simulation environment in which advanced algorithms can be implemented and tested. C-MAPSS can run user-specified transient simulations, and it can generate state-space linear models of the nonlinear engine model at an operating point. The code has a number of GUI screens that allow point-and-click operation, and have editable fields for user-specified input. The software includes an atmospheric model which allows simulation of engine operation at altitudes from sea level to 40,000 ft, Mach numbers from 0 to 0.90, and ambient temperatures from -60 to 103 F. The package also includes a power-management system that allows the engine to be operated over a wide range of thrust levels throughout the full range of flight conditions.

  6. User's Guide for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS): Version 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan; Frederick, Dean K.; DeCastro, Jonathan A.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Chan, William W.

    2012-01-01

    This report is a Users Guide for version 2 of the NASA-developed Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) software, which is a transient simulation of a large commercial turbofan engine (up to 90,000-lb thrust) with a realistic engine control system. The software supports easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface (GUI). C-MAPSS v.2 has some enhancements over the original, including three actuators rather than one, the addition of actuator and sensor dynamics, and an improved controller, while retaining or improving on the convenience and user-friendliness of the original. C-MAPSS v.2 provides the user with a graphical turbofan engine simulation environment in which advanced algorithms can be implemented and tested. C-MAPSS can run user-specified transient simulations, and it can generate state-space linear models of the nonlinear engine model at an operating point. The code has a number of GUI screens that allow point-and-click operation, and have editable fields for user-specified input. The software includes an atmospheric model which allows simulation of engine operation at altitudes from sea level to 40,000 ft, Mach numbers from 0 to 0.90, and ambient temperatures from -60 to 103 F. The package also includes a power-management system that allows the engine to be operated over a wide range of thrust levels throughout the full range of flight conditions.

  7. Dynamic Systems Analysis for Turbine Based Aero Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The aircraft engine design process seeks to optimize the overall system-level performance, weight, and cost for a given concept. Steady-state simulations and data are used to identify trade-offs that should be balanced to optimize the system in a process known as systems analysis. These systems analysis simulations and data may not adequately capture the true performance trade-offs that exist during transient operation. Dynamic systems analysis provides the capability for assessing the dynamic tradeoffs at an earlier stage of the engine design process. The dynamic systems analysis concept, developed tools, and potential benefit are presented in this paper. To provide this capability, the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) was developed to provide the user with an estimate of the closed-loop performance (response time) and operability (high pressure compressor surge margin) for a given engine design and set of control design requirements. TTECTrA along with engine deterioration information, can be used to develop a more generic relationship between performance and operability that can impact the engine design constraints and potentially lead to a more efficient engine.

  8. Aerosciences, Aero-Propulsion and Flight Mechanics Technology Development for NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program, Vehicle Systems Research and Technology (VSR&T) project is pursuing technology advancements in aerothermodynamics, aeropropulsion and flight mechanics to enable development of future reusable launch vehicle (RLV) systems. The current design trade space includes rocket-propelled, hypersonic airbreathing and hybrid systems in two-stage and single-stage configurations. Aerothermodynamics technologies include experimental and computational databases to evaluate stage separation of two-stage vehicles as well as computational and trajectory simulation tools for this problem. Additionally, advancements in high-fidelity computational tools and measurement techniques are being pursued along with the study of flow physics phenomena, such as boundary-layer transition. Aero-propulsion technology development includes scramjet flowpath development and integration, with a current emphasis on hypervelocity (Mach 10 and above) operation, as well as the study of aero-propulsive interactions and the impact on overall vehicle performance. Flight mechanics technology development is focused on advanced guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) algorithms and adaptive flight control systems for both rocket-propelled and airbreathing vehicles.

  9. Current Challenges for HTCMC Aero-Propulsion Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2007-01-01

    In comparison to the best metallic materials, HTCMC aero-propulsion engine components offer the opportunity of reduced weight and higher temperature operation, with corresponding improvements in engine cooling requirements, emissions, thrust, and specific fuel consumption. Although much progress has been made in the development of advanced HTCMC constituent materials and processes, major challenges still remain for their implementation into these components. The objectives of this presentation are to briefly review (1) potential HTCMC aero-propulsion components and their generic material performance requirements, (2) recent progress at NASA and elsewhere concerning advanced constituents and processes for meeting these requirements, (3) key HTCMC component implementation challenges that are currently being encountered, and (4) on-going activities within the new NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program that are addressing these challenges.

  10. Advanced Aero-Propulsive Mid-Lift-to-Drag Ratio Entry Vehicle for Future Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. H.; Stosaric, R. R; Cerimele, C. J.; Wong, K. A.; Valle, G. D.; Garcia, J. A.; Melton, J. E.; Munk, M. M.; Blades, E.; Kuruvila, G.; Picetti, D. J.; Hassan, B.; Kniskern, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    vehicle stage return, thus making ideas reality. These paradigm shifts include the technology maturation of advanced flexible thermal protection materials onto mid lift-to-drag ratio entry vehicles, the development of integrated supersonic aero-propulsive maneuvering, and the implementation of advanced asymmetric launch shrouds. These paradigms have significant overlap with launch vehicle stage return already being developed by the Air Force and several commercial space efforts. Completing the realization of these combined paradigms holds the key to a high-performing entry vehicle system capability that fully leverages multiple technology benefits to accomplish NASA's Exploration missions to atmospheric planetary destinations.

  11. Micro-optical Distributed Sensors for Aero Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S.; Otugen, V.; Seasholtz, Richard G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop micro-opto-mechanical system (MOMS)-based sensors for time- and space-resolved measurements of flow properties in aerodynamics applications. The measurement technique we propose uses optical resonances in dielectric micro-spheres that can be excited by radiation tunneling from optical fibers. It exploits the tunneling-induced and morphology-dependent shifts in the resonant frequencies. The shift in the resonant frequency is dependent on the size, shape, and index of refraction of the micro-sphere. A physical change in the environment surrounding a micro-bead can change one or more of these properties of the sphere thereby causing a shift in frequency of resonance. The change of the resonance frequency can be detected with high resolution by scanning a frequency-tunable laser that is coupled into the fiber and observing the transmission spectrum at the output of the fiber. It is expected that, in the future, the measurement concept will lead to a system of distributed micro-sensors providing spatial data resolved in time and space. The present project focuses on the development and demonstration of temperature sensors using the morphology-dependent optical resonances although in the latter part of the work, we will also develop a pressure sensor. During the period covered in this report, the optical and electronic equipment necessary for the experimental work was assembled and the experimental setup was designed for the single sensor temperature measurements. Software was developed for real-time tracking of the optical resonance shifts. Some preliminary experiments were also carried out to detect temperature using a single bead in a water bath.

  12. Integrated Aero-Propulsion CFD Methodology for the Hyper-X Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, Charles E., Jr.; Engelund, Walter C.; Bittner, Robert D.; Dilley, Arthur D.; Jentink, Tom N.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2000-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have been used extensively in the analysis and development of the X-43A Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). A significant element of this analysis is the prediction of integrated vehicle aero-propulsive performance, which includes an integration of aerodynamic and propulsion flow fields. This paper describes analysis tools used and the methodology for obtaining pre-flight predictions of longitudinal performance increments. The use of higher-fidelity methods to examine flow-field characteristics and scramjet flowpath component performance is also discussed. Limited comparisons with available ground test data are shown to illustrate the approach used to calibrate methods and assess solution accuracy. Inviscid calculations to evaluate lateral-directional stability characteristics are discussed. The methodology behind 3D tip-to-tail calculations is described and the impact of 3D exhaust plume expansion in the afterbody region is illustrated. Finally, future technology development needs in the area of hypersonic propulsion-airframe integration analysis are discussed.

  13. Advances in SiC/SiC Composites for Aero-Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the development and application of ceramic matrix composites consisting of silicon carbide (SiC) based matrices reinforced by small-diameter continuous-length SiC-based fibers. For example, these SiC/SiC composites are now in the early stages of implementation into hot-section components of civil aero-propulsion gas turbine engines, where in comparison to current metallic components they offer multiple advantages due to their lighter weight and higher temperature structural capability. For current production-ready SiC/SiC, this temperature capability for long time structural applications is 1250 degC, which is better than 1100 degC for the best metallic superalloys. Foreseeing that even higher structural reliability and temperature capability would continue to increase the advantages of SiC/SiC composites, progress in recent years has also been made at NASA toward improving the properties of SiC/SiC composites by optimizing the various constituent materials and geometries within composite microstructures. The primary objective of this chapter is to detail this latter progress, both fundamentally and practically, with particular emphasis on recent advancements in the materials and processes for the fiber, fiber coating, fiber architecture, and matrix, and in the design methods for incorporating these constituents into SiC/SiC microstructures with improved thermo-structural performance.

  14. Past, Present and Future Contribution on Research and Development of Aero-Propulsion Systems in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Changduk

    Korean government has recently allocated and invested large research and development fund in both engineering and science related projects including, information technology, marine, aerospace and high speed train transportation etc.

  15. Aero-Propulsion Technology (APT) Task V Low Noise ADP Engine Definition Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcombe, V.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify and evaluate noise reduction technologies for advanced ducted prop propulsion systems that would allow increased capacity operation and result in an economically competitive commercial transport. The study investigated the aero/acoustic/structural advancements in fan and nacelle technology required to match or exceed the fuel burned and economic benefits of a constrained diameter large Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) compared to an unconstrained ADP propulsion system with a noise goal of 5 to 10 EPNDB reduction relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 at each of the three measuring stations namely, takeoff (cutback), approach and sideline. A second generation ADP was selected to operate within the maximum nacelle diameter constrain of 160 deg to allow installation under the wing. The impact of fan and nacelle technologies of the second generation ADP on fuel burn and direct operating costs for a typical 3000 nm mission was evaluated through use of a large, twin engine commercial airplane simulation model. The major emphasis of this study focused on fan blade aero/acoustic and structural technology evaluations and advanced nacelle designs. Results of this study have identified the testing required to verify the interactive performance of these components, along with noise characteristics, by wind tunnel testing utilizing and advanced interaction rig.

  16. A Study on the Installed Performance Seeking Control for Aero-Propulsion under Supersonic State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fengyong; Miao, Lizhen; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-12-01

    An integrated model including inlet, engine and nozzle with their internal and external characteristics was built to simulate the propulsion installed performance. With the integrated model, a new performance seeking control scheme under supersonic state is firstly proposed, taking inlet ramp angle as optimizing variable, which is equally important to fuel flow rate, nozzle throat area, guided vane angle of fan and compressor. Specially, engine installed thrust replaces its total thrust as one crucial factor for performance seeking control. Installed performances under supersonic state are significantly improved with the new scheme, as installed thrust increases of up to 4.9% in the maximum thrust mode, installed specific fuel consumption improvements of up to 3.8% in the minimum fuel consumption mode, and turbine temperature decreases of up to 0.6% in the minimum turbine temperature mode. The simulation results also indicates that, the performance seeking control scheme proposed shows superiority in restraining of the increasing of rotational speed and turbine temperature in performance seeking control.

  17. Comparison of Aero/Propulsion Transition Characteristics for a Joint Strike Fighter Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumowicz, Tim; Margason, Richard; Wardwell, Doug; Hange, Craig; Arledge, Tom; Olson, Lawerence E. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Ames conducted a series tests of a large-scale powered model of Lockheed Martin Skunk Works' JSF STOVL configuration at the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. The model uses a modified version of an F-16 fighter engine (a Pratt & Whitney F100-229 engine). To provide vertical flight capability, the Lockheed aircraft incorporates a forward fuselage mounted vertical lift fan in addition to an aft mounted vectoring nozzle all driven by a single engine. The lift fan is driven off the engine by means of a shaft and gear system. The data presented is for STOVL configuration 140, a wing-body-canard planform. The main goal of this testing was to obtain propulsion induced data for evaluating differences between small- and large-scale model testing during the transition flight regime between jet- and wing-borne flight. The data presented is from aerodynamic testing of the model in both the unpowered (engine-off) and powered (engine running) configurations. This data, when combined with the propulsion system thrust calibration data from the NASA Ames' Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility (OARF), is used to determine the propulsion induced effects during transition.

  18. Benchmarking Model Variants in Development of a Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.; Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Kratz, Jonathan L.; Culley, Dennis E.; Thomas, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Distributed engine control architecture presents a significant increase in complexity over traditional implementations when viewed from the perspective of system simulation and hardware design and test. Even if the overall function of the control scheme remains the same, the hardware implementation can have a significant effect on the overall system performance due to differences in the creation and flow of data between control elements. A Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) simulation system is under development at NASA Glenn Research Center that enables the exploration of these hardware dependent issues. The system is based on, but not limited to, the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k). This paper describes the step-by-step conversion from the self-contained baseline model to the hardware in the loop model, and the validation of each step. As the control model hardware fidelity was improved during HIL system development, benchmarking simulations were performed to verify that engine system performance characteristics remained the same. The results demonstrate the goal of the effort; the new HIL configurations have similar functionality and performance compared to the baseline C-MAPSS40k system.

  19. Design and Benchmarking of a Network-In-the-Loop Simulation for Use in a Hardware-In-the-Loop System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.; Thomas, George Lindsey; Culley, Dennis E.; Kratz, Jonathan L.

    2017-01-01

    Distributed engine control (DEC) systems alter aircraft engine design constraints be- cause of fundamental differences in the input and output communication between DEC and centralized control architectures. The change in the way communication is implemented may create new optimum engine-aircraft configurations. This paper continues the exploration of digital network communication by demonstrating a Network-In-the-Loop simulation at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This simulation incorporates a real-time network protocol, the Engine Area Distributed Interconnect Network Lite (EADIN Lite), with the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) software. The objective of this study is to assess digital control network impact to the control system. Performance is evaluated relative to a truth model for large transient maneuvers and a typical flight profile for commercial aircraft. Results show that a decrease in network bandwidth from 250 Kbps (sampling all sensors every time step) to 40 Kbps, resulted in very small differences in control system performance.

  20. Development of a Twin-Spool Turbofan Engine Simulation Using the Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for the Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) is a tool that has been developed to allow a user to build custom models of systems governed by thermodynamic principles using a template to model each basic process. Validation of this tool in an engine model application was performed through reconstruction of the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) (v2) using the building blocks from the T-MATS (v1) library. In order to match the two engine models, it was necessary to address differences in several assumptions made in the two modeling approaches. After these modifications were made, validation of the engine model continued by integrating both a steady-state and dynamic iterative solver with the engine plant and comparing results from steady-state and transient simulation of the T-MATS and C-MAPSS models. The results show that the T-MATS engine model was accurate within 3% of the C-MAPSS model, with inaccuracy attributed to the increased dimension of the iterative solver solution space required by the engine model constructed using the T-MATS library. This demonstrates that, given an understanding of the modeling assumptions made in T-MATS and a baseline model, the T-MATS tool provides a viable option for constructing a computational model of a twin-spool turbofan engine that may be used in simulation studies.

  1. Development of a Twin-spool Turbofan Engine Simulation Using the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Chapman, Jeffryes W.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Litt, Johathan S.

    2014-01-01

    The Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS) is a tool that has been developed to allow a user to build custom models of systems governed by thermodynamic principles using a template to model each basic process. Validation of this tool in an engine model application was performed through reconstruction of the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (C-MAPSS) (v2) using the building blocks from the T-MATS (v1) library. In order to match the two engine models, it was necessary to address differences in several assumptions made in the two modeling approaches. After these modifications were made, validation of the engine model continued by integrating both a steady-state and dynamic iterative solver with the engine plant and comparing results from steady-state and transient simulation of the T-MATS and C-MAPSS models. The results show that the T-MATS engine model was accurate within 3 of the C-MAPSS model, with inaccuracy attributed to the increased dimension of the iterative solver solution space required by the engine model constructed using the T-MATS library. This demonstrates that, given an understanding of the modeling assumptions made in T-MATS and a baseline model, the T-MATS tool provides a viable option for constructing a computational model of a twin-spool turbofan engine that may be used in simulation studies.

  2. Engine Icing Modeling and Simulation (Part 2): Performance Simulation of Engine Rollback Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Guo, Ten-Huei; Veres, Joseph P.; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2011-01-01

    Ice buildup in the compressor section of a commercial aircraft gas turbine engine can cause a number of engine failures. One of these failure modes is known as engine rollback: an uncommanded decrease in thrust accompanied by a decrease in fan speed and an increase in turbine temperature. This paper describes the development of a model which simulates the system level impact of engine icing using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k). When an ice blockage is added to C-MAPSS40k, the control system responds in a manner similar to that of an actual engine, and, in cases with severe blockage, an engine rollback is observed. Using this capability to simulate engine rollback, a proof-of-concept detection scheme is developed and tested using only typical engine sensors. This paper concludes that the engine control system s limit protection is the proximate cause of iced engine rollback and that the controller can detect the buildup of ice particles in the compressor section. This work serves as a feasibility study for continued research into the detection and mitigation of engine rollback using the propulsion control system.

  3. Future Air Force aircraft propulsion control systems: The extended summary paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skira, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Hydromechanical control technology simply cannot compete against the performance benefits offered by electronics. Future military aircraft propulsion control systems will be full authority, digital electronic, microprocessor base systems. Anticipating the day when microprocessor technology will permit the integration and management of aircraft flight control, fire control and propulsion control systems, the Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory is developing control logic algorithms for a real time, adaptive control and diagnostic information system.

  4. Extending the Capabilities of Closed-loop Distributed Engine Control Simulations Using LAN Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.; Zinnecker, Alicia Mae; Culley, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    Distributed Engine Control (DEC) is an enabling technology that has the potential to advance the state-of-the-art in gas turbine engine control. To analyze the capabilities that DEC offers, a Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) test bed is being developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. This test bed will support a systems-level analysis of control capabilities in closed-loop engine simulations. The structure of the HIL emulates a virtual test cell by implementing the operator functions, control system, and engine on three separate computers. This implementation increases the flexibility and extensibility of the HIL. Here, a method is discussed for implementing these interfaces by connecting the three platforms over a dedicated Local Area Network (LAN). This approach is verified using the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k), which is typically implemented on one computer. There are marginal differences between the results from simulation of the typical and the three-computer implementation. Additional analysis of the LAN network, including characterization of network load, packet drop, and latency, is presented. The three-computer setup supports the incorporation of complex control models and proprietary engine models into the HIL framework.

  5. Simulating the ARES Aircraft in the Mars Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, P. Sean; Croom, Mark A.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Langley proposed the Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) of Mars science mission in response to the NASA Office of Space Science 2002 Mars Scout Opportunity. The science-driven mission proposal began with trade studies and determined that a rocket powered aircraft was the best suited platform to complete the ARES science objectives. A high fidelity six degree of freedom flight simulation was required to provide credible evidence that the aircraft design fulfilled mission objectives and to support the aircraft design process by providing performance evaluations. The aircraft was initially modeled using the aero, propulsion, and flight control system components of other aircraft models. As the proposed aircraft design evolved, the borrowed components were replaced with new models. This allowed performance evaluations to be performed as the design was maturing. Basic autopilot features were also developed for the ARES aircraft model. Altitude hold and track hold modes allowed different mission scenarios to be evaluated for both science merit and aircraft performance. Platform stability and data rate requirements were identified for each of the instruments and the aircraft performance was evaluated against those requirements. The results of the simulation evaluations indicate that the ARES design and mission profiles are sound and meet the science objectives.

  6. Aircraft Hydraulic System Dynamic Analysis. Volume I. - Transient Analysis (HYTRAN) Computer Program User Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    AIRCRAFT COMPANY MCDONNELL DOUGLAS CORPORATION ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI February 1977 TECHNICAL REPORT AFAPL-TR-76-43, VOLUME I D D C This document has been...is not to be regarded by implication or otherwise as in any manner licensing the holder or any other person or corporation , or conveying any rights or...Douglas Corporation , under contract P3615-74-C-2016. The effort was sponsored by the Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory, Air Force Systems Command, Wright

  7. Model-Based Control of a Nonlinear Aircraft Engine Simulation using an Optimal Tuner Kalman Filter Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Csank, Jeffrey Thomas; Chicatelli, Amy; Kilver, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    This paper covers the development of a model-based engine control (MBEC) methodology featuring a self tuning on-board model applied to an aircraft turbofan engine simulation. Here, the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS40k) serves as the MBEC application engine. CMAPSS40k is capable of modeling realistic engine performance, allowing for a verification of the MBEC over a wide range of operating points. The on-board model is a piece-wise linear model derived from CMAPSS40k and updated using an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) estimation routine, which enables the on-board model to self-tune to account for engine performance variations. The focus here is on developing a methodology for MBEC with direct control of estimated parameters of interest such as thrust and stall margins. Investigations using the MBEC to provide a stall margin limit for the controller protection logic are presented that could provide benefits over a simple acceleration schedule that is currently used in traditional engine control architectures.

  8. Application of the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) for Dynamic Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey Thomas; Zinnecker, Alicia Mae

    2014-01-01

    Systems analysis involves steady-state simulations of combined components to evaluate the steady-state performance, weight, and cost of a system; dynamic considerations are not included until later in the design process. The Dynamic Systems Analysis task, under NASAs Fixed Wing project, is developing the capability for assessing dynamic issues at earlier stages during systems analysis. To provide this capability the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) has been developed to design a single flight condition controller (defined as altitude and Mach number) and, ultimately, provide an estimate of the closed-loop performance of the engine model. This tool has been integrated with the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (CMAPSS 40k) engine model to demonstrate the additional information TTECTrA makes available for dynamic systems analysis. This dynamic data can be used to evaluate the trade-off between performance and safety, which could not be done with steady-state systems analysis data. TTECTrA has been designed to integrate with any turbine engine model that is compatible with the MATLAB Simulink (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment.

  9. Application of the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) for Dynamic Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey; Zinnecker, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Systems analysis involves steady-state simulations of combined components to evaluate the steady-state performance, weight, and cost of a system; dynamic considerations are not included until later in the design process. The Dynamic Systems Analysis task, under NASAs Fixed Wing project, is developing the capability for assessing dynamic issues at earlier stages during systems analysis. To provide this capability the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) has been developed to design a single flight condition controller (defined as altitude and Mach number) and, ultimately, provide an estimate of the closed-loop performance of the engine model. This tool has been integrated with the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000(CMAPSS40k) engine model to demonstrate the additional information TTECTrA makes available for dynamic systems analysis. This dynamic data can be used to evaluate the trade-off between performance and safety, which could not be done with steady-state systems analysis data. TTECTrA has been designed to integrate with any turbine engine model that is compatible with the MATLABSimulink (The MathWorks, Inc.) environment.

  10. Distribution system simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, K. A.; Kirkham, H.; Rahman, S.

    1986-01-01

    In a series of tests performed under the Department of Energy auspices, power line carrier propagation was observed to be anomalous under certain circumstances. To investigate the cause, a distribution system simulator was constructed. The simulator was a physical simulator that accurately represented the distribution system from below power frequency to above 50 kHz. Effects such as phase-to-phase coupling and skin effect were modeled. Construction details of the simulator, and experimental results from its use are presented.

  11. Megawatt Fuel Cell Systems Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    ELECTE JUN1 I 3I FiOAL IPST VS TF E PIOW SIPTEIER 111 To AT 1112 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION WNLINITED A. k Propulsion Laboratory Air Force...Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Air Force System Comnd Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. 4433 8 " 06 13 Q1 - M P M M FIR Wham, Goer-mmst *avg.j...06074 - 1I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Aero Propulsion Laboratory (AFWAL/POOtC) February 1983 Air Force Wright Aeronautical

  12. Task-5 Heat Pipe Life Test Study; Facilities Upgrading and Maintenance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Aero Propulsion and Power Laboratory PLEASE RETURN TO: Wright Laboratory Air Force Systems Command BMO...Power Division Aero Propulsion and Power Directorate Aero Propulsion and Power Directorate FOR THE COMMANDER William U. Borger (/ Chief, Aerospace...Power Division Aero Propulsion and Power Directorate IF YOUR ADDRESS HAS CHANGED, IF YOU WISH TO BE REMOVED FROM OUR MAIUNG LIST, OR IF THE ADDRESSEE IS

  13. Instrumented Architectural Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delagi, B. A.; Saraiya, N.; Nishimura, S.; Byrd, G.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation of systems at an architectural level can offer an effective way to study critical design choices if (1) the performance of the simulator is adequate to examine designs executing significant code bodies, not just toy problems or small application fragements, (2) the details of the simulation include the critical details of the design, (3) the view of the design presented by the simulator instrumentation leads to useful insights on the problems with the design, and (4) there is enough flexibility in the simulation system so that the asking of unplanned questions is not suppressed by the weight of the mechanics involved in making changes either in the design or its measurement. A simulation system with these goals is described together with the approach to its implementation. Its application to the study of a particular class of multiprocessor hardware system architectures is illustrated.

  14. A Modular Framework for Modeling Hardware Elements in Distributed Engine Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Culley, Dennis E.; Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.

    2015-01-01

    Progress toward the implementation of distributed engine control in an aerospace application may be accelerated through the development of a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) system for testing new control architectures and hardware outside of a physical test cell environment. One component required in an HIL simulation system is a high-fidelity model of the control platform: sensors, actuators, and the control law. The control system developed for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) provides a verifiable baseline for development of a model for simulating a distributed control architecture. This distributed controller model will contain enhanced hardware models, capturing the dynamics of the transducer and the effects of data processing, and a model of the controller network. A multilevel framework is presented that establishes three sets of interfaces in the control platform: communication with the engine (through sensors and actuators), communication between hardware and controller (over a network), and the physical connections within individual pieces of hardware. This introduces modularity at each level of the model, encouraging collaboration in the development and testing of various control schemes or hardware designs. At the hardware level, this modularity is leveraged through the creation of a SimulinkR library containing blocks for constructing smart transducer models complying with the IEEE 1451 specification. These hardware models were incorporated in a distributed version of the baseline C-MAPSS40k controller and simulations were run to compare the performance of the two models. The overall tracking ability differed only due to quantization effects in the feedback measurements in the distributed controller. Additionally, it was also found that the added complexity of the smart transducer models did not prevent real-time operation of the distributed controller model, a requirement of an HIL system.

  15. A Modular Framework for Modeling Hardware Elements in Distributed Engine Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia M.; Culley, Dennis E.; Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.

    2014-01-01

    Progress toward the implementation of distributed engine control in an aerospace application may be accelerated through the development of a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) system for testing new control architectures and hardware outside of a physical test cell environment. One component required in an HIL simulation system is a high-fidelity model of the control platform: sensors, actuators, and the control law. The control system developed for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (C-MAPSS40k) provides a verifiable baseline for development of a model for simulating a distributed control architecture. This distributed controller model will contain enhanced hardware models, capturing the dynamics of the transducer and the effects of data processing, and a model of the controller network. A multilevel framework is presented that establishes three sets of interfaces in the control platform: communication with the engine (through sensors and actuators), communication between hardware and controller (over a network), and the physical connections within individual pieces of hardware. This introduces modularity at each level of the model, encouraging collaboration in the development and testing of various control schemes or hardware designs. At the hardware level, this modularity is leveraged through the creation of a Simulink(R) library containing blocks for constructing smart transducer models complying with the IEEE 1451 specification. These hardware models were incorporated in a distributed version of the baseline C-MAPSS40k controller and simulations were run to compare the performance of the two models. The overall tracking ability differed only due to quantization effects in the feedback measurements in the distributed controller. Additionally, it was also found that the added complexity of the smart transducer models did not prevent real-time operation of the distributed controller model, a requirement of an HIL system.

  16. A Modular Framework for Modeling Hardware Elements in Distributed Engine Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinnecker, Alicia Mae; Culley, Dennis E.; Aretskin-Hariton, Eliot D.

    2014-01-01

    Progress toward the implementation of distributed engine control in an aerospace application may be accelerated through the development of a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) system for testing new control architectures and hardware outside of a physical test cell environment. One component required in an HIL simulation system is a high-fidelity model of the control platform: sensors, actuators, and the control law. The control system developed for the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (40,000 pound force thrust) (C-MAPSS40k) provides a verifiable baseline for development of a model for simulating a distributed control architecture. This distributed controller model will contain enhanced hardware models, capturing the dynamics of the transducer and the effects of data processing, and a model of the controller network. A multilevel framework is presented that establishes three sets of interfaces in the control platform: communication with the engine (through sensors and actuators), communication between hardware and controller (over a network), and the physical connections within individual pieces of hardware. This introduces modularity at each level of the model, encouraging collaboration in the development and testing of various control schemes or hardware designs. At the hardware level, this modularity is leveraged through the creation of a Simulink (R) library containing blocks for constructing smart transducer models complying with the IEEE 1451 specification. These hardware models were incorporated in a distributed version of the baseline C-MAPSS40k controller and simulations were run to compare the performance of the two models. The overall tracking ability differed only due to quantization effects in the feedback measurements in the distributed controller. Additionally, it was also found that the added complexity of the smart transducer models did not prevent real-time operation of the distributed controller model, a requirement of an HIL

  17. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with the aerospace industry, other government agencies, and academia, is leading the effort to develop an advanced multidisciplinary analysis environment for aerospace propulsion systems called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. The initial development of NPSS focused on the analysis and design of airbreathing aircraft engines, but the resulting NPSS framework may be applied to any system, for example: aerospace, rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and even human system modeling. NPSS provides increased flexibility for the user, which reduces the total development time and cost. It is currently being extended to support the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Fundamental Aeronautics Program and the Advanced Virtual Engine Test Cell (AVETeC). NPSS focuses on the integration of multiple disciplines such as aerodynamics, structure, and heat transfer with numerical zooming on component codes. Zooming is the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail. NPSS development includes capabilities to facilitate collaborative engineering. The NPSS will provide improved tools to develop custom components and to use capability for zooming to higher fidelity codes, coupling to multidiscipline codes, transmitting secure data, and distributing simulations across different platforms. These powerful capabilities extend NPSS from a zero-dimensional simulation tool to a multi-fidelity, multidiscipline system-level simulation tool for the full development life cycle.

  18. Air Force Research in Aero Propulsion Technology (AFRAPT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-27

    impact on rotordynamic stability. Air (or other gas) flowing through the clearances of labyrinth seals can induce an asymmetric pressure distribution... Rotordynamic Instability, College Station, TX, May 1990. 17 B Ih=o.166 KgIS (baeJ A i6O.137 KgIS el r0.1S@ Kg/S

  19. Future NASA Power Technologies for Space and Aero Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.

    2015-01-01

    To achieve the ambitious goals that NASA has outlined for the next decades considerable development of power technology will be necessary. This presentation outlines the development objectives for both space and aero applications. It further looks at the various power technologies that support these objectives and examines drivers that will be a driving force for future development. Finally, the presentation examines what type of non-traditional learning areas should be emphasized in student curriculum so that the engineering needs of the third decade of the 21st Century are met.

  20. Software simulator for multiple computer simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogrady, E. P.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of the structure and use of a computer program that simulates the operation of a parallel processor simulation system. The program is part of an investigation to determine algorithms that are suitable for simulating continous systems on a parallel processor configuration. The simulator is designed to accurately simulate the problem-solving phase of a simulation study. Care has been taken to ensure the integrity and correctness of data exchanges and to correctly sequence periods of computation and periods of data exchange. It is pointed out that the functions performed during a problem-setup phase or a reset phase are not simulated. In particular, there is no attempt to simulate the downloading process that loads object code into the local, transfer, and mapping memories of processing elements or the memories of the run control processor and the system control processor. The main program of the simulator carries out some problem-setup functions of the system control processor in that it requests the user to enter values for simulation system parameters and problem parameters. The method by which these values are transferred to the other processors, however, is not simulated.

  1. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouff, Christopher; Clark, Melana; Davenport, Bill; Message, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The Data System Dynamic Simulator (DSDS) is a discrete event simulation tool. It was developed for NASA for the specific purpose of evaluating candidate architectures for data systems of the Space Station era. DSDS provides three methods for meeting this requirement. First, the user has access to a library of standard pre-programmed elements. These elements represent tailorable components of NASA data systems and can be connected in any logical manner. Secondly, DSDS supports the development of additional elements. This allows the more sophisticated DSDS user the option of extending the standard element set. Thirdly, DSDS supports the use of data streams simulation. Data streams is the name given to a technique that ignores packet boundaries, but is sensitive to rate changes. Because rate changes are rare compared to packet arrivals in a typical NASA data system, data stream simulations require a fraction of the CPU run time. Additionally, the data stream technique is considerably more accurate than another commonly-used optimization technique.

  2. Coupling expert systems and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawamura, K.; Beale, G.; Padalkar, S.; Rodriguez-Moscoso, J.; Hsieh, B. J.; Vinz, F.; Fernandez, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    A prototype coupled system called NESS (NASA Expert Simulation System) is described. NESS assists the user in running digital simulations of dynamic systems, interprets the output data to performance specifications, and recommends a suitable series compensator to be added to the simulation model.

  3. Transportation Anslysis Simulation System

    SciTech Connect

    2004-08-23

    TRANSIMS version 3.1 is an integrated set of analytical and simulation models and supporting databases. The system is designed to create a virtual metropolitan region with representation of each of the region’s individuals, their activities and the transportation infrastructure they use. TRANSIMS puts into practice a new, disaggregate approach to travel demand modeling using agent-based micro-simulation technology. TRANSIMS methodology creates a virtual metropolitan region with representation of the transportation infrastructure and the population, at the level of households and individual travelers. Trips a planned to satisfy the population’s activity pattems at the individual traveler level. TRANSIMS then simulates the movement of travelers and vehicles across the transportation network using multiple modes, including car, transit, bike and walk, on a second-by-second basis. Metropolitan planners must plan growth of their cities according to the stringent transportation system planning requirements of the Interniodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and other similar laws and regulations. These require each state and its metropotitan regions to work together to develop short and long term transportation improvement plans. The plans must (1) estimate the future transportation needs for travelers and goods movements, (2) evaluate ways to manage and reduce congestion, (3) examine the effectiveness of building new roads and transit systems, and (4) limit the environmental impact of the various strategies. The needed consistent and accurate transportation improvement plans require an analytical capability that properly accounts for travel demand, human behavior, traffic and transit operations, major investments, and environmental effects. Other existing planning tools use aggregated information and representative behavior to predict average response and average use of transportation facilities. They do not account

  4. Simulating neural systems with Xyce.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Warrender, Christina E.; Aimone, James Bradley; Teeter, Corinne; Duda, Alex M.

    2012-12-01

    Sandias parallel circuit simulator, Xyce, can address large scale neuron simulations in a new way extending the range within which one can perform high-fidelity, multi-compartment neuron simulations. This report documents the implementation of neuron devices in Xyce, their use in simulation and analysis of neuron systems.

  5. Turbofan Engine Simulated in a Graphical Simulation Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2004-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increase in the development of intelligent engine technology with advanced active component control. The computer engine models used in these control studies are component-level models (CLM), models that link individual component models of state space and nonlinear algebraic equations, written in a computer language such as Fortran. The difficulty faced in performing control studies on Fortran-based models is that Fortran is not supported with control design and analysis tools, so there is no means for implementing real-time control. It is desirable to have a simulation environment that is straightforward, has modular graphical components, and allows easy access to health, control, and engine parameters through a graphical user interface. Such a tool should also provide the ability to convert a control design into real-time code, helping to make it an extremely powerful tool in control and diagnostic system development. Simulation time management is shown: Mach number versus time, power level angle versus time, altitude versus time, ambient temperature change versus time, afterburner fuel flow versus time, controller and actuator dynamics, collect initial conditions, CAD output, and component-level model: CLM sensor, CAD input, and model output. The Controls and Dynamics Technologies Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed and demonstrated a flexible, generic turbofan engine simulation platform that can meet these objectives, known as the Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation (MAPSS). MAPSS is a Simulink-based implementation of a Fortran-based, modern high pressure ratio, dual-spool, low-bypass, military-type variable-cycle engine with a digital controller. Simulink (The Mathworks, Natick, MA) is a computer-aided control design and simulation package allows the graphical representation of dynamic systems in a block diagram form. MAPSS is a nonlinear, non-real-time system composed of controller and actuator dynamics

  6. Block Oriented Simulation System (BOSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, Jaimie

    1988-01-01

    Computer simulation is assuming greater importance as a flexible and expedient approach to modeling system and subsystem behavior. Simulation has played a key role in the growth of complex, multiple access space communications such as those used by the space shuttle and the TRW-built Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS). A powerful new simulator for use in designing and modeling the communication system of NASA's planned Space Station is being developed. Progress to date on the Block (Diagram) Oriented Simulation System (BOSS) is described.

  7. Simulating The SSF Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Govind K.; Kleine, Henry; Younger, Joseph C.; Sanders, Felicia A.; Smith, Jeffrey L.; Aster, Robert W.; Olivieri, Jerry M.; Paul, Lori L.

    1993-01-01

    Freedom Operations Simulation Test (FROST) computer program simulates operation of SSF information system, tracking every packet of data from generation to destination, for both uplinks and downlinks. Collects various statistics concerning operation of system and provides reports of statistics at intervals specified by user. FROST also incorporates graphical-display capability to enhance interpretation of these statistics. Written in SIMSCRIPT 11.5.

  8. A multiprocessor operating system simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, G.M.; Campbell, R.H. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a multiprocessor operating system simulator that was developed by the authors in the Fall of 1987. The simulator was built in response to the need to provide students with an environment in which to build and test operating system concepts as part of the coursework of a third-year undergraduate operating systems course. Written in C++, the simulator uses the co-routine style task package that is distributed with the AT and T C++ Translator to provide a hierarchy of classes that represents a broad range of operating system software and hardware components. The class hierarchy closely follows that of the Choices family of operating systems for loosely and tightly coupled multiprocessors. During an operating system course, these classes are refined and specialized by students in homework assignments to facilitate experimentation with different aspects of operating system design and policy decisions. The current implementation runs on the IBM RT PC under 4.3bsd UNIX.

  9. A Multiprocessor Operating System Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Gary M.; Campbell, Roy H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a multiprocessor operating system simulator that was developed by the authors in the Fall semester of 1987. The simulator was built in response to the need to provide students with an environment in which to build and test operating system concepts as part of the coursework of a third-year undergraduate operating systems course. Written in C++, the simulator uses the co-routine style task package that is distributed with the AT&T C++ Translator to provide a hierarchy of classes that represents a broad range of operating system software and hardware components. The class hierarchy closely follows that of the 'Choices' family of operating systems for loosely- and tightly-coupled multiprocessors. During an operating system course, these classes are refined and specialized by students in homework assignments to facilitate experimentation with different aspects of operating system design and policy decisions. The current implementation runs on the IBM RT PC under 4.3bsd UNIX.

  10. Torque Simulator for Rotating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    New torque brake simulates varying levels of friction in bearings of rotating body. Rolling-tail torque brake uses magnetic force to produce friction between rotating part and stationary part. Simulator electronics produce positive or negative feedback signal, depending on direction of rotation. New system allows for first time in-depth study of effects of tail-fin spin rates on pitch-, yaw-, and roll-control characteristics.

  11. Simulation Systems for Cognitive Psychology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    the deve )pment of SNOBOL). 5.1 The First Generation Of Psychological Simulation Languages Therefore, the first generatiov’ of specialized languages...SIMULATION SYSTEMS FOR COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY Robert Neche University of Pittsburgh. August 1982 Technical Report No. UPITT/LRDC/ONR/APS-12 This...research was sponsored by the Personnel and Training Research Programs, Psychological Sciences Division, Office of Naval Research, under Contract No. N00014

  12. Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) Simulator Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarlane, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The simulation process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the SES. The Simulator Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their engineering personnel in simulation planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the simulation process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, facility interfaces, and inputs necessary to define scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  13. Real time digital propulsion system simulation for manned flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihaloew, J. R.; Hart, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A real time digital simulation of a STOL propulsion system was developed which generates significant dynamics and internal variables needed to evaluate system performance and aircraft interactions using manned flight simulators. The simulation ran at a real-to-execution time ratio of 8.8. The model was used in a piloted NASA flight simulator program to evaluate the simulation technique and the propulsion system digital control. The simulation is described and results shown. Limited results of the flight simulation program are also presented.

  14. Systems simulations supporting NASA telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, F. W., Jr.; Pennington, J. E.

    1987-01-01

    Two simulation and analysis environments have been developed to support telerobotics research at the Langley Research Center. One is a high-fidelity, nonreal-time, interactive model called ROBSIM, which combines user-generated models of workspace environment, robots, and loads into a working system and simulates the interaction among the system components. Models include user-specified actuator, sensor, and control parameters, as well as kinematic and dynamic characteristics. Kinematic, dynamic, and response analyses can be selected, with system configuration, task trajectories, and arm states displayed using computer graphics. The second environment is a real-time, manned Telerobotic Systems Simulation (TRSS) which uses the facilities of the Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory (ISRL). It utilizes a hierarchical structure of functionally distributed computers communicating over both parallel and high-speed serial data paths to enable studies of advanced telerobotic systems. Multiple processes perform motion planning, operator communications, forward and inverse kinematics, control/sensor fusion, and I/O processing while communicating via common memory. Both ROBSIM and TRSS, including their capability, status, and future plans are discussed. Also described is the architecture of ISRL and recent telerobotic system studies in ISRL.

  15. Automated calculation and simulation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Thorsten

    2003-04-01

    I briefly summarize the parallel sessions on Automated Calculation and Simulation Systems for high-energy particle physics phenomenology at ACAT 2002 (Moscow State University, June 2002) and present a short overview over the current status of the field and try to identify the important trends.

  16. Simulation of Biomolecular Nanomechanical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Funding for this effort came from the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency’s Simulation of Biological System ( SIMBIOSYS ) Program. The work can...DNA Hybridization Efficiency Based on the discussions at a SIMBIOSYS Principal Investigator’s Meeting (Sept. 2003 in Monterrey, CA), experiments

  17. Aided targeting system simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demaio, Joe; Becker, Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Simulation research was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility on the effectiveness and ease of use of three targeting systems. A manual system required the aviator to scan a target array area with a simulated second generation forward looking infrared (FLIR) sensor, locate and categorize targets, and construct a target hand-off list. The interface between the aviator and the system was like that of an advanced scout helicopter (manual mode). Two aided systems detected and categorized targets automatically. One system used only the FLIR sensor and the second used FLIR fused with Longbow radar. The interface for both was like that of an advanced scout helicopter aided mode. Exposure time while performing the task was reduced substantially with the aided systems, with no loss of target hand-off list accuracy. The fused sensor system showed lower time to construct the target hand-off list and a slightly lower false alarm rate than the other systems. A number of issues regarding system sensitivity and criterion, and operator interface design are discussed.

  18. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2004-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a framework for performing analysis of complex systems. Because the NPSS was developed using the object-oriented paradigm, the resulting architecture is an extensible and flexible framework that is currently being used by a diverse set of participants in government, academia, and the aerospace industry. NPSS is being used by over 15 different institutions to support rockets, hypersonics, power and propulsion, fuel cells, ground based power, and aerospace. Full system-level simulations as well as subsystems may be modeled using NPSS. The NPSS architecture enables the coupling of analyses at various levels of detail, which is called numerical zooming. The middleware used to enable zooming and distributed simulations is the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). The NPSS Developer's Kit offers tools for the developer to generate CORBA-based components and wrap codes. The Developer's Kit enables distributed multi-fidelity and multi-discipline simulations, preserves proprietary and legacy codes, and facilitates addition of customized codes. The platforms supported are PC, Linux, HP, Sun, and SGI.

  19. Simulator verification techniques study. Integrated simulator self test system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, G.; Wenglinski, T. H.

    1974-01-01

    Software and hardware requirements for implementing hardware self tests are presented in support of the development of training and procedures development simulators for the space shuttle program. Self test techniques for simulation hardware and the validation of simulation performance are stipulated. The requirements of an integrated simulator self system are analyzed. Readiness tests, fault isolation tests, and incipient fault detection tests are covered.

  20. Stochastic simulation in systems biology

    PubMed Central

    Székely, Tamás; Burrage, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Natural systems are, almost by definition, heterogeneous: this can be either a boon or an obstacle to be overcome, depending on the situation. Traditionally, when constructing mathematical models of these systems, heterogeneity has typically been ignored, despite its critical role. However, in recent years, stochastic computational methods have become commonplace in science. They are able to appropriately account for heterogeneity; indeed, they are based around the premise that systems inherently contain at least one source of heterogeneity (namely, intrinsic heterogeneity). In this mini-review, we give a brief introduction to theoretical modelling and simulation in systems biology and discuss the three different sources of heterogeneity in natural systems. Our main topic is an overview of stochastic simulation methods in systems biology. There are many different types of stochastic methods. We focus on one group that has become especially popular in systems biology, biochemistry, chemistry and physics. These discrete-state stochastic methods do not follow individuals over time; rather they track only total populations. They also assume that the volume of interest is spatially homogeneous. We give an overview of these methods, with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each, and suggest when each is more appropriate to use. We also include references to software implementations of them, so that beginners can quickly start using stochastic methods for practical problems of interest. PMID:25505503

  1. Stochastic simulation in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Székely, Tamás; Burrage, Kevin

    2014-11-01

    Natural systems are, almost by definition, heterogeneous: this can be either a boon or an obstacle to be overcome, depending on the situation. Traditionally, when constructing mathematical models of these systems, heterogeneity has typically been ignored, despite its critical role. However, in recent years, stochastic computational methods have become commonplace in science. They are able to appropriately account for heterogeneity; indeed, they are based around the premise that systems inherently contain at least one source of heterogeneity (namely, intrinsic heterogeneity). In this mini-review, we give a brief introduction to theoretical modelling and simulation in systems biology and discuss the three different sources of heterogeneity in natural systems. Our main topic is an overview of stochastic simulation methods in systems biology. There are many different types of stochastic methods. We focus on one group that has become especially popular in systems biology, biochemistry, chemistry and physics. These discrete-state stochastic methods do not follow individuals over time; rather they track only total populations. They also assume that the volume of interest is spatially homogeneous. We give an overview of these methods, with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each, and suggest when each is more appropriate to use. We also include references to software implementations of them, so that beginners can quickly start using stochastic methods for practical problems of interest.

  2. Representing Ground Robotic Systems in Battlefield Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    representations of intelligent system performance for its battlefield simulation tools . These simulation tools differ considerably in their level of...simulation study, 2) the overall fidelity of the target simulation tool , and 3) the elements of the robotic system that are relevant to the...simulation study. In this paper, we discuss a framework for modeling robotic system performance in the context of a battlefield simulation tool . We apply

  3. Simulation of linear mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirlin, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    A dynamics and controls analyst is typically presented with a structural dynamics model and must perform various input/output tests and design control laws. The required time/frequency simulations need to be done many times as models change and control designs evolve. This paper examines some simple ways that open and closed loop frequency and time domain simulations can be done using the special structure of the system equations usually available. Routines were developed to run under Pro-Matlab in a mixture of the Pro-Matlab interpreter and FORTRAN (using the .mex facility). These routines are often orders of magnitude faster than trying the typical 'brute force' approach of using built-in Pro-Matlab routines such as bode. This makes the analyst's job easier since not only does an individual run take less time, but much larger models can be attacked, often allowing the whole model reduction step to be eliminated.

  4. Simulation System Fidelity Assessment at the Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Steven D.; Reardon, Scott E.; Tobias, Eric L.; Aponso, Bimal L.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity is a word that is often used but rarely understood when talking about groundbased simulation. Assessing the cueing fidelity of a ground based flight simulator requires a comparison to actual flight data either directly or indirectly. Two experiments were conducted at the Vertical Motion Simulator using the GenHel UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter math model that was directly compared to flight data. Prior to the experiment the simulator s motion and visual system frequency responses were measured, the aircraft math model was adjusted to account for the simulator motion system delays, and the motion system gains and washouts were tuned for the individual tasks. The tuned motion system fidelity was then assessed against the modified Sinacori criteria. The first experiments showed similar handling qualities ratings (HQRs) to actual flight for a bob-up and sidestep maneuvers. The second experiment showed equivalent HQRs between flight and simulation for the ADS33 slalom maneuver for the two pilot participants. The ADS33 vertical maneuver HQRs were mixed with one pilot rating the flight and simulation the same while the second pilot rated the simulation worse. In addition to recording HQRs on the second experiment, an experimental Simulation Fidelity Rating (SFR) scale developed by the University of Liverpool was tested for applicability to engineering simulators. A discussion of the SFR scale for use on the Vertical Motion Simulator is included in this paper.

  5. DDS: The Dental Diagnostic Simulation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tira, Daniel E.

    The Dental Diagnostic Simulation (DDS) System provides an alternative to simulation systems which represent diagnostic case studies of relatively limited scope. It may be used to generate simulated case studies in all of the dental specialty areas with case materials progressing through the gamut of the diagnostic process. The generation of a…

  6. An Integrated Approach To Payload System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M.; Swartz, R. L., Jr.; Teng, A.; Weidner, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a payload system simulation implemented at JPL as part of a comprehensive mission simulation facility. The flight software function includes communication with other process modules, instrument control, and data management. The payload system simulation software consists of: a camera subsystem, a virtual world, and a mission visualization toolset.

  7. Improvements to information management systems simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilek, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of personnel in the augmentation and improvement of the interactive IMSIM information management simulation model is summarized. With this augmented model, NASA now has even greater capabilities for the simulation of computer system configurations, data processing loads imposed on these configurations, and executive software to control system operations. Through these simulations, NASA has an extremely cost effective capability for the design and analysis of computer-based data management systems.

  8. Method for simulating discontinuous physical systems

    DOEpatents

    Baty, Roy S.; Vaughn, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    The mathematical foundations of conventional numerical simulation of physical systems provide no consistent description of the behavior of such systems when subjected to discontinuous physical influences. As a result, the numerical simulation of such problems requires ad hoc encoding of specific experimental results in order to address the behavior of such discontinuous physical systems. In the present invention, these foundations are replaced by a new combination of generalized function theory and nonstandard analysis. The result is a class of new approaches to the numerical simulation of physical systems which allows the accurate and well-behaved simulation of discontinuous and other difficult physical systems, as well as simpler physical systems. Applications of this new class of numerical simulation techniques to process control, robotics, and apparatus design are outlined.

  9. A computer management system for patient simulations.

    PubMed

    Finkelsteine, M W; Johnson, L A; Lilly, G E

    1991-04-01

    A series of interactive videodisc patient simulations is being used to teach clinical problem-solving skills, including diagnosis and management, to dental students. This series is called Oral Disease Simulations for Diagnosis and Management (ODSDM). A computer management system has been developed in response to the following needs. First, the sequence in which students perform simulations is critical. Second, maintaining records of completed simulations and student performance on each simulation is a time-consuming task for faculty. Third, the simulations require ongoing evaluation to ensure high quality instruction. The primary objective of the management system is to ensure that each student masters diagnosis. Mastery must be obtained at a specific level before advancing to the next level. The management system does this by individualizing the sequence of the simulations to adapt to the needs of each student. The management system generates reports which provide information about students or the simulations. Student reports contain demographic and performance information. System reports include information about individual patient simulations and act as a quality control mechanism for the simulations.

  10. Integrating Existing Simulation Components into a Cohesive Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, Brian J.; Barrett, Larry K.

    2012-01-01

    A tradition of leveraging the re-use of components to help manage costs has evolved in the development of complex system. This tradition continues on in the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Program with the cloning of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite for the JPSS-1 mission, including the instrument complement. One benefit of re-use on a mission is the availability of existing simulation assets from the systems that were previously built. An issue arises in the continual shift of technology over a long mission, or multi-mission, lifecycle. As the missions mature, the requirements for the observatory simulations evolve. The challenge in this environment becomes re-using the existing components in that ever-changing landscape. To meet this challenge, the system must: establish an operational architecture that minimizes impacts on the implementation of individual components, consolidate the satisfaction of new high-impact requirements into system-level infrastructure, and build in a long-term view of system adaptation that spans the full lifecycle of the simulation system. The Flight Vehicle Test Suite (FVTS) within the JPSS Program is defining and executing this approach to ensure a robust simulation capability for the JPSS multi-mission environment

  11. Helmet mounted display systems for helicopter simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loran A.; Bucher, Nancy; Runnings, David

    1989-01-01

    Simulation scientists continually pursue improved flight simulation technology with the goal of closely replicating the 'real world' physical environment. The presentation/display of visual information for flight simulation is one such area enjoying recent technical improvements that are fundamental for conducting simulated operations close to the terrain. Detailed and appropriate visual information is especially critical for Nap-Of-the-Earth (NOE) helicopter flight simulation where the pilot maintains an 'eyes-out' orientation to avoid obstructions and terrain. This paper elaborates on the visually coupled Wide Field Of View Helmet Mounted Display (WFOVHMD) system technology as a viable visual display system for helicopter simulation. In addition the paper discusses research conducted on the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator that examined one critical research issue for helmet mounted displays.

  12. Interoperability Standards for Medical Simulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolk, Andreas; Diallo, Saikou Y.; Padilla, Jose J.

    2012-01-01

    The Modeling and Simulation Community successfully developed and applied interoperability standards like the Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) protocol (IEEE 1278) and the High Level Architecture (HLA) (IEEE 1516). These standards were applied for world-wide distributed simulation events for several years. However, this paper shows that some of the assumptions and constraints underlying the philosophy of these current standards are not valid for Medical Simulation Systems. This paper describes the standards, the philosophy and the limits for medical applications and recommends necessary extensions of the standards to support medical simulation.

  13. Design of penicillin fermentation process simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Zhonghu; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Wenqi

    2011-10-01

    Real-time monitoring for batch process attracts increasing attention. It can ensure safety and provide products with consistent quality. The design of simulation system of batch process fault diagnosis is of great significance. In this paper, penicillin fermentation, a typical non-linear, dynamic, multi-stage batch production process, is taken as the research object. A visual human-machine interactive simulation software system based on Windows operation system is developed. The simulation system can provide an effective platform for the research of batch process fault diagnosis.

  14. An electronic notebook for physical system simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, Robert L.

    2003-09-01

    A scientist who sets up and runs experiments typically keeps notes of this process in a lab notebook. A scientist who runs computer simulations should be no different. Experiments and simulations both require a set-up process which should be documented along with the results of the experiment or simulation. The documentation is important for knowing and understanding what was attempted, what took place, and how to reproduce it in the future. Modern simulations of physical systems have become more complex due in part to larger computational resources and increased understanding of physical systems. These simulations may be performed by combining the results from multiple computer codes. The machines that these simulations are executed on are often massively parallel/distributed systems. The output result of one of these simulations can be a terabyte of data and can require months of computing. All of these things contribute to the difficulty of keeping a useful record of the process of setting up and executing a simulation for a physical system. An electronic notebook for physical system simulations has been designed to help document the set up and execution process. Much of the documenting is done automatically by the simulation rather than the scientist running the simulation. The simulation knows what codes, data, software libraries, and versions thereof it is drawing together. All of these pieces of information become documented in the electronic notebook. The electronic notebook is designed with and uses the eXtensible Markup Language (XML). XML facilitates the representation, storage, interchange, and further use of the documented information.

  15. Global Positioning System Simulator Field Operational Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Quinn, David A.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) simulation is an important activity in the development or qualification of GPS signal receivers for space flight. Because a GPS simulator is a critical resource it is highly desirable to develop a set of field operational procedures to supplement the basic procedures provided by most simulator vendors. Validated field procedures allow better utilization of the GPS simulator in the development of new test scenarios and simulation operations. These procedures expedite simulation scenario development while resulting in scenarios that are more representative of the true design, as well as enabling construction of more complex simulations than previously possible, for example, spacecraft maneuvers. One difficulty in the development of a simulation scenario is specifying various modes of test vehicle motion and associated maneuvers requiring that a user specify some (but not all) of a few closely related simulation parameters. Currently this can only be done by trial and error. A stand-alone procedure that implements the simulator maneuver motion equations and solves for the motion profile transient times, jerk and acceleration would be of considerable value. Another procedure would permit the specification of some configuration parameters that would determine the simulated GPS signal composition. The resulting signal navigation message, for example, would force the receiver under test to use only the intended C-code component of the simulated GPS signal. A representative class of GPS simulation-related field operational procedures is described in this paper. These procedures were developed and used in support of GPS integration and testing for many successful spacecraft missions such as SAC-A, EO-1, AMSAT, VCL, SeaStar, sounding rockets, and by using the industry standard Spirent Global Simulation Systems Incorporated (GSSI) STR series simulators.

  16. Simulation, Design Abstraction, and SystemC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harcourt, Ed

    2007-01-01

    SystemC is a system-level design and simulation language based on C++. We've been using SystemC for computer organization and design projects for the past several years. Because SystemC is embedded in C++ it contains the powerful abstraction mechanisms of C++ not found in traditional hardware description languages, such as support for…

  17. Characteristics of flight simulator visual systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, I. C. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The physical parameters of the flight simulator visual system that characterize the system and determine its fidelity are identified and defined. The characteristics of visual simulation systems are discussed in terms of the basic categories of spatial, energy, and temporal properties corresponding to the three fundamental quantities of length, mass, and time. Each of these parameters are further addressed in relation to its effect, its appropriate units or descriptors, methods of measurement, and its use or importance to image quality.

  18. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  19. EPICS simulation tools for control system development

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.M.; Kerstiens, D.M.; Vaughn, G.D.; Weiss, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    When developing control system software there are many times when the ability to simulate the response of the instrumentation can be very useful. Examples are: (i) when the operator interface is being designed and the users want an idea of what the finished system might took like; (ii) when the interface hardware is not yet available; (iii) when the reaction of the control system to an error condition must be tested, but the actual occurrence of such an error would cause undesirable side effects; (iv) when operators are being trained to use the system; (v) when an improvement or bug fix needs to be tested, but the running system cannot be shut down for long. The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) provides tools for building simple simulations and interfacing to more complex simulations of accelerator hardware. At the lowest level an individual data channel can be switched to take its input from either a simulated data location or from the actual hardware. At a slightly higher level, sequences can be run on the real-time interface processor so that output to the hardware is intercepted and an appropriate substitute value is provided for the corresponding read-back records. At a still higher level a program can use the Channel Access software bus facility of EPICS to control some global aspect of an accelerator or can interface to an external accelerator simulation instead of the actual accelerator. The goal of testing control system software using simulated hardware is to minimize the changes required in shifting between the simulated system and the real system. The degree of success of the EPICS tools in meeting the minimum change goal will be addressed with suggestions for improvements. The implementation of simulated responses using EPICS tools will be discussed and examples of experience using the EPICS tools to create and interface to simulations will be given.

  20. Computer simulation of breathing systems for divers

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, P.G.; Nuckols, M.L.

    1983-02-01

    A powerful new tool for the analysis and design of underwater breathing gas systems is being developed. A versatile computer simulator is described which makes possible the modular ''construction'' of any conceivable breathing gas system from computer memory-resident components. The analysis of a typical breathing gas system is demonstrated using this simulation technique, and the effects of system modifications on performance of the breathing system are shown. This modeling technique will ultimately serve as the foundation for a proposed breathing system simulator under development by the Navy. The marriage of this computer modeling technique with an interactive graphics system will provide the designer with an efficient, cost-effective tool for the development of new and improved diving systems.

  1. Channel simulation for optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is reported for simulating the signal fading that will be experienced by typical optical communication systems. The desired irradiance or amplitude fading statistics can be simulated by incorporating a linearized optical modulator subsystem between the transmitter and receiver. This technique has been implemented in the design and construction of a laboratory channel simulator. The design of the processing electronics is discussed along with the results of tests performed for each mode of operation.

  2. ROBOSIM, a simulator for robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinman, Elaine M.; Fernandez, Ken; Cook, George E.

    1991-01-01

    ROBOSIM, a simulator for robotic systems, was developed by NASA to aid in the rapid prototyping of automation. ROBOSIM has allowed the development of improved robotic systems concepts for both earth-based and proposed on-orbit applications while significantly reducing development costs. In a cooperative effort with an area university, ROBOSIM was further developed for use in the classroom as a safe and cost-effective way of allowing students to study robotic systems. Students have used ROBOSIM to study existing robotic systems and systems which they have designed in the classroom. Since an advanced simulator/trainer of this type is beneficial not only to NASA projects and programs but industry and academia as well, NASA is in the process of developing this technology for wider public use. An update on the simulators's new application areas, the improvements made to the simulator's design, and current efforts to ensure the timely transfer of this technology are presented.

  3. Solar simulator for concentrator photovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, César; Antón, Ignacio; Sala, Gabriel

    2008-09-15

    A solar simulator for measuring performance of large area concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules is presented. Its illumination system is based on a Xenon flash light and a large area collimator mirror, which simulates natural sun light. Quality requirements imposed by the CPV systems have been characterized: irradiance level and uniformity at the receiver, light collimation and spectral distribution. The simulator allows indoor fast and cost-effective performance characterization and classification of CPV systems at the production line as well as module rating carried out by laboratories.

  4. Particle simulation of plasmas and stellar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Clark, A.; Craddock, G.G.; Gilden, D.L.; Leung, W.K.; Li, Y.M.; Robertson, J.A.; Saltzman, B.J.

    1985-04-01

    A computational technique is introduced which allows the student and researcher an opportunity to observe the physical behavior of a class of many-body systems. A series of examples is offered which illustrates the diversity of problems that may be studied using particle simulation. These simulations were in fact assigned as homework in a course on computational physics.

  5. The SAO {AXAF} Simulation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerius, D.; Freeman, M.; Gaetz, T.; Hughes, J. P.; Podgorski, W.

    As part of our efforts to support the AXAF program, the SAO AXAF Mission Support Team has developed a software suite to simulate the AXAF telescope. The software traces the fate of photons through the telescope, from the X-ray source through apertures, baffles, the telescope optics, and finally to the photons' ultimate interactions with the focal plane detectors. We model relevant physical processes, including geometrical reflection, scattering due to surface microroughness, distortions of the optics due to the mirror mounts, attenuation through baffles, etc. The software is composed of programs and scripts, each specialized to a given task, which communicate through UNIX pipes. Software tasks are centered about functional components of the telescope (e.g., apertures, mirrors, detectors) and provide a comfortable and flexible paradigm for performing simulations. The use of separate programs and the UNIX pipe facility allows great flexibility in building different configurations of the telescope and distilling diagnostics from the photon stream through the telescope. We are able to transparently use symmetric multi-processing (e.g., SPARCStation 10s and SGI Challenges) and can easily use sequential multi-processing (via workstation clusters). Some of the tasks are amenable to parallel processing and have been implemented using the MPI standard.

  6. Interactive communication systems simulation model - ICSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, W. D.; Mortara, M. E.; Leong, P. K.; Frost, V. S.

    1984-01-01

    The design of ICSSM, a nonreal time computer-aided simulation and analysis tool for communications systems, is presented, ICSSM is capable of supporting modeling, simulation, and analysis of any system representable in terms of a network of multiport functional blocks. Its applicability is limited only by the modeler's ingenuity to decompose the system to functional blocks and to represent these functional blocks algorithmically. ICSSM has been constructed modularly, consisting of five subsytems to facilitate the tasks of formulating the model, exercising the model, evaluating and showing the simulation results, and storing and maintaining a library of modeling elements, analysis, and utility subroutines. It is written exclusively in ANSI Standard Fortran IV language, and is now operational in a Honeywell DPS 7/80 M computer under the MULTICS Operating System. Description of a recent simulation using ICSSM and some generic modules of general interest developed as a result of the modeling work are also presented.

  7. Water system modeling for dispatcher training simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, S.; Sigari, P.G. ); Allen, J.E.; Assadian, M. )

    1993-08-01

    This paper addresses the existing need for training dispatchers in the operation of power systems where it involves managing large water systems. The problem formulation and implementation of water system modeling for the Dispatcher Training Simulators (DTS) are presented in this paper. The method systematically builds the water network descriptions. The model periodically calculates the water system flows, storage values, and currently available hydro generation capacities. The model is controllable by the instructor and provides the simulated telemetry of water system data to the control center functions in the DTS. The water system modeling enhances the power system modeling subsystem of the DTS. The method is validated on a large water system and power system data. The results and the benefits of water system modeling are discussed.

  8. Digital simulation of stiff linear dynamic systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. D.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.; Kerr, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A method is derived for digital computer simulation of linear time-invariant systems when the insignificant eigenvalues involved in such systems are eliminated by an ALSAP root removal technique. The method is applied to a thirteenth-order dynamic system representing a passive RLC network.

  9. Weightlessness simulation system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, Hubert C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A weightlessness simulator has a chamber and a suit in the chamber. O-rings and valves hermetically seal the chamber. A vacuum pump connected to the chamber establishes a pressure in the chamber less than atmospheric pressure. A water supply tank and water supply line supply a body of water to the chamber as a result of partial vacuum created in the chamber. In use, an astronaut enters the pressure suit through a port, which remains open to ambient atmosphere, thus supplying air to the astronaut during use. The pressure less than atmospheric pressure in the chamber is chosen so that the pressure differential from the inside to the outside of the suit corresponds to the pressure differential with the suit in outer space.

  10. Human Systems Modeling and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    individuals, organizations, and other social forms as systems of practices. A rereading of the propositional and system forms shows that they make no... social inter-dependencies that underwrite human behavior: designing, prototyping, testing and delivering extensions to Synergia’s ACCORD technology for...also and primarily the cognitive and social inter-dependencies that underwrite human behavior. • Develop technology for the computational specification

  11. Numerical propulsion system simulation: An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  12. Numerical propulsion system simulation - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  13. Ultra-High Temperature Metallic Seal/Energizer Development for Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornett, Ken; Newman, Jesse; Datta, Amit

    2009-01-01

    The industry is requiring seals to operate at higher and higher temperatures. Traditional static seal designs and materials experience stress relaxation, losing their ability to maintain contact with moving flanges. Ultra High Temperature seal development program is a multiphase program with incremental increases in seal operating temperatures.

  14. High Temperature Metallic Seal/Energizer Development for Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    More, Greg; Datta, Amit; Cornett, Ken

    2007-01-01

    The Ultra High Temperature seal program has successfully progressed and developed a high temperature static seal solution. The third prototype has successfully combined the first and second prototypes high performance capabilities in a commercially viable solution. Prototype II and Prototype III are viable solutions: Prototype II offers flexible load tune ability and seating load adjustment and Prototype III offers commercial viability for continuous hoop seals.

  15. Aero Propulsion and Power Directorate The McCook Field Years (1917-1927)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    balloons either tethered to the ground or to a boat. Observers perched in baskets suspended below the balloons telegraphed or dropped messages to the...6,750 dropped 15 percent. The Signal Corps formally accepted the airship on August 28, 1908 as Signal Corps Dirigible Number 1. The dirigible was...advance or retard the spark. The oil reservoir held .66 gallons of oil circulated by a small engine-driven pump. The vertical radiator, constructed

  16. Comparison of Aero-Propulsive Performance Predictions for Distributed Propulsion Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borer, Nicholas K.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Deere, Karen A.; Carter, Melissa B.; Viken, Sally A.; Patterson, Michael D.; Litherland, Brandon L.; Stoll, Alex M.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's X-57 "Maxwell" flight demonstrator incorporates distributed electric propulsion technologies in a design that will achieve a significant reduction in energy used in cruise flight. A substantial portion of these energy savings come from beneficial aerodynamic-propulsion interaction. Previous research has shown the benefits of particular instantiations of distributed propulsion, such as the use of wingtip-mounted cruise propellers and leading edge high-lift propellers. However, these benefits have not been reduced to a generalized design or analysis approach suitable for large-scale design exploration. This paper discusses the rapid, "design-order" toolchains developed to investigate the large, complex tradespace of candidate geometries for the X-57. Due to the lack of an appropriate, rigorous set of validation data, the results of these tools were compared to three different computational flow solvers for selected wing and propulsion geometries. The comparisons were conducted using a common input geometry, but otherwise different input grids and, when appropriate, different flow assumptions to bound the comparisons. The results of these studies showed that the X-57 distributed propulsion wing should be able to meet the as-designed performance in cruise flight, while also meeting or exceeding targets for high-lift generation in low-speed flight.

  17. Computer simulator for a mobile telephone system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    A software simulator was developed to assist NASA in the design of the land mobile satellite service. Structured programming techniques were used by developing the algorithm using an ALCOL-like pseudo language and then encoding the algorithm into FORTRAN 4. The basic input data to the system is a sine wave signal although future plans call for actual sampled voice as the input signal. The simulator is capable of studying all the possible combinations of types and modes of calls through the use of five communication scenarios: single hop systems; double hop, signal gateway system; double hop, double gateway system; mobile to wireline system; and wireline to mobile system. The transmitter, fading channel, and interference source simulation are also discussed.

  18. Colorimetric calibration of coupled infrared simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Fei, Jindong; Gao, Yang; Du, Jian

    2015-10-01

    In order to test 2-color infrared sensors, a coupled infrared simulation system can generate radiometric outputs with wavelengths that range from less than 3 microns to more than 12 microns. There are two channels in the coupled simulation system, optically combined by a diachronic beam combiner. Each channel has an infrared blackbody, a filter, a diaphragm, and diaphragm-motors. The system is projected to the sensor under testing by a collimator. This makes it difficult to calibrate the system with only one-band thermal imager. Errors will be caused in the radiance levels measured by the narrow band thermal imager. This paper describes colorimetric temperature measurement techniques that have been developed to perform radiometric calibrations of these infrared simulation systems above. The calibration system consists of two infrared thermal imagers; one is operated at the wavelength range of MW-IR, and the other at the range of LW-IR.

  19. Construction of the real patient simulator system.

    PubMed

    Chan, Richard; Sun, C T

    2012-05-01

    Simulation for perfusion education has been used for at least the past 25 years. The earlier models were either electronic (computer games) or fluid dynamic models and provided invaluable adjuncts to perfusion training and education. In 2009, the *North Shore-LIJ Health System at Great Neck, New York, opened an innovative "Bioskill Center" dedicated to simulated virtual reality advanced hands-on surgical training as well as perfusion simulation. Professional cardiac surgical organizations now show great interest in using simulation for training and recertification. Simulation will continue to be the direction for future perfusion training and education. This manuscript introduces a cost-effective system developed from discarded perfusion products and it is not intended to detail the actual lengthy process of its construction.

  20. Another Program Simulates A Modular Manufacturing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Wang, Jian

    1996-01-01

    SSE5 computer program provides simulation environment for modeling manufacturing systems containing relatively small numbers of stations and operators. Designed to simulate manufacturing of apparel, also used in other manufacturing domains. Valuable for small or medium-size firms, including those lacking expertise to develop detailed mathematical models or have only minimal knowledge in describing manufacturing systems and in analyzing results of simulations on mathematical models. Two other programs available bundled together as SSE (MFS-26245). Each program models slightly different manufacturing scenario. Written in Turbo C v2.0 for IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS and successfully compiled using Turbo C++ v3.0.

  1. PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    stability augmentation system specification; the development of the bridge concept for roll and yaw louver control; support of various hardware tests; the generation of the specification for the DeFlorez point light source visual display; furnishing consolation services during the DeFlorez display installation and testing, and developing the yaw, roll and pitch direction cosine

  2. Electric-Power System Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, R. W.; Grumm, R. L.; Biedebach, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    Shows different combinations of generation, storage, and load components: display, video monitor with keyboard input to microprocessor, and video monitor for display of load curves and power generation. Planning tool for electric utilities, regulatory agencies, and laymen in understanding basics of electric-power systems operation.

  3. TRANSIMS: Transportation analysis and simulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.; Beckman, R.; Baggerly, K.

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes the TRansportation ANalysis and SIMulation System (TRANSIMS) Project, the system`s major modules, and the project`s near-term plans. TRANSIMS will employ advanced computational and analytical techniques to create an integrated regional transportation systems analysis environment. The simulation environment will include a regional population of individual travelers and freight loads with travel activities and plans, whose individual interactions will be simulated on the transportation system, and whose environmental impact will be determined. We will develop an interim operational capability (IOC) for each major TRANSIMS module during the five-year program. When the IOC is ready, we will complete a specific case study to confirm the IOC features, applicability, and readiness.

  4. Space radiator simulation system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, W. Z.; Wulff, W.

    1972-01-01

    A transient heat transfer analysis was carried out on a space radiator heat rejection system exposed to an arbitrarily prescribed combination of aerodynamic heating, solar, albedo, and planetary radiation. A rigorous analysis was carried out for the radiation panel and tubes lying in one plane and an approximate analysis was used to extend the rigorous analysis to the case of a curved panel. The analysis permits the consideration of both gaseous and liquid coolant fluids, including liquid metals, under prescribed, time dependent inlet conditions. The analysis provided a method for predicting: (1) transient and steady-state, two dimensional temperature profiles, (2) local and total heat rejection rates, (3) coolant flow pressure in the flow channel, and (4) total system weight and protection layer thickness.

  5. Numerically simulating the sandwich plate system structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Qing; Li, Gang; Liu, Zhi-Hui; Niu, Huai-Lei; Li, Chen-Feng

    2010-09-01

    Sandwich plate systems (SPS) are advanced materials that have begun to receive extensive attention in naval architecture and ocean engineering. At present, according to the rules of classification societies, a mixture of shell and solid elements are required to simulate an SPS. Based on the principle of stiffness decomposition, a new numerical simulation method for shell elements was proposed. In accordance with the principle of stiffness decomposition, the total stiffness can be decomposed into the bending stiffness and shear stiffness. Displacement and stress response related to bending stiffness was calculated with the laminated shell element. Displacement and stress response due to shear was calculated by use of a computational code write by FORTRAN language. Then the total displacement and stress response for the SPS was obtained by adding together these two parts of total displacement and stress. Finally, a rectangular SPS plate and a double-bottom structure were used for a simulation. The results show that the deflection simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is larger than the same simulated by solid elements and the analytical solution according to Hoff theory and approximate to the same simulated by the mixture of shell-solid elements, and the stress simulated by the elements proposed in the paper is approximate to the other simulating methods. So compared with calculations based on a mixture of shell and solid elements, the numerical simulation method given in the paper is more efficient and easier to do.

  6. Communication Simulations for Power System Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Jason C.; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Hauer, Matthew L.

    2013-05-29

    New smart grid technologies and concepts, such as dynamic pricing, demand response, dynamic state estimation, and wide area monitoring, protection, and control, are expected to require considerable communication resources. As the cost of retrofit can be high, future power grids will require the integration of high-speed, secure connections with legacy communication systems, while still providing adequate system control and security. While considerable work has been performed to create co-simulators for the power domain with load models and market operations, limited work has been performed in integrating communications directly into a power domain solver. The simulation of communication and power systems will become more important as the two systems become more inter-related. This paper will discuss ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to create a flexible, high-speed power and communication system co-simulator for smart grid applications. The framework for the software will be described, including architecture considerations for modular, high performance computing and large-scale scalability (serialization, load balancing, partitioning, cross-platform support, etc.). The current simulator supports the ns-3 (telecommunications) and GridLAB-D (distribution systems) simulators. Ongoing and future work will be described, including planned future expansions for a traditional transmission solver. A test case using the co-simulator, utilizing a transactive demand response system created for the Olympic Peninsula and AEP gridSMART demonstrations, requiring two-way communication between distributed and centralized market devices, will be used to demonstrate the value and intended purpose of the co-simulation environment.

  7. Simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Tentner, A.

    1996-10-01

    A simulation framework has been developed for a large-scale, comprehensive, scaleable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed for running on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems, but can run on standalone workstations for smaller simulations. The simulator currently models instrumented smart vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide two-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factors studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver personality and behavior, and vehicle type. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on parallel computers, such as ANL`s IBM SP-2, for large-scale problems. A novel feature of the approach is that vehicles are represented by autonomous computer processes which exchange messages with other processes. The vehicles have a behavior model which governs route selection and driving behavior, and can react to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, the simulation is scaleable to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  8. Simulation of DKIST solar adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jose; Carlisle, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Solar adaptive optics (AO) simulations are a valuable tool to guide the design and optimization process of current and future solar AO and multi-conjugate AO (MCAO) systems. Solar AO and MCAO systems rely on extended object cross-correlating Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to measure the wavefront. Accurate solar AO simulations require computationally intensive operations, which have until recently presented a prohibitive computational cost. We present an update on the status of a solar AO and MCAO simulation tool being developed at the National Solar Observatory. The simulation tool is a multi-threaded application written in the C++ language that takes advantage of current large multi-core CPU computer systems and fast ethernet connections to provide accurate full simulation of solar AO and MCAO systems. It interfaces with KAOS, a state of the art solar AO control software developed by the Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, that provides reliable AO control. We report on the latest results produced by the solar AO simulation tool.

  9. Observing System Simulation Experiments: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    An overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) will be given, with focus on calibration and validation of OSSE frameworks. Pitfalls and practice will be discussed, including observation error characteristics, incestuousness, and experimental design. The potential use of OSSEs for investigation of the behaviour of data assimilation systems will be explored, including some results from experiments using the NASAGMAO OSSE.

  10. Space shuttle visual simulation system design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The current and near-future state-of-the-art in visual simulation equipment technology is related to the requirements of the space shuttle visual system. Image source, image sensing, and displays are analyzed on a subsystem basis, and the principal conclusions are used in the formulation of a recommended baseline visual system. Perceptibility and visibility are also analyzed.

  11. An Open Source Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    An investigation into the current state of the art of open source real time programming practices. This document includes what technologies are available, how easy is it to obtain, configure, and use them, and some performance measures done on the different systems. A matrix of vendors and their products is included as part of this investigation, but this is not an exhaustive list, and represents only a snapshot of time in a field that is changing rapidly. Specifically, there are three approaches investigated: 1. Completely open source on generic hardware, downloaded from the net. 2. Open source packaged by a vender and provided as free evaluation copy. 3. Proprietary hardware with pre-loaded proprietary source available software provided by the vender as for our evaluation.

  12. Program Simulates A Modular Manufacturing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroer, Bernard J.; Wang, Jian

    1996-01-01

    SSE computer program provides simulation environment for modeling manufacturing systems containing relatively small numbers of stations and operators. Designed to simulate manufacturing of apparel, also used in other manufacturing domains. Excellent for small or medium-size firms including those lacking expertise to develop detailed models or have only minimal knowledge in describing manufacturing systems and in analyzing results of simulations on mathematical models. User does not need to know simulation language to use SSE. Used to design new modules and to evaluate existing modules. Originally written in Turbo C v2.0 for IBM PC-compatible computers running MS-DOS and successfully implemented by use of Turbo C++ v3.0.

  13. Federated Simulations for Systems of Systems Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    It calls for a common definition of requirements via the Mili- tary Missions and Means framework (Sheehan, Dietz, Bray, Harris, and Wong 2004). It... missions and means framework . Technical Report TR-756, Army Material Systems Analysis Activity. Tolk, A., T. Litwin, and R. Kewley. 2008, December. A

  14. Thermal enclosure system functional simulation user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1994-01-01

    A form and function simulation of the thermal enclosure system (TES) for a microgravity protein crystal growth experiment has been developed as part of an investigation of the benefits and limitations of intravehicular telerobotics to aid in microgravity science and production. A user can specify the time, temperature, and sample rate profile for a given experiment, and menu options and status are presented on an LCD display. This report describes the features and operational procedures for the functional simulation.

  15. Multipurpose simulation systems for regional development forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Kostina, N.I.

    1995-09-01

    We examine the development of automaton-modeling multipurpose simulation systems as an efficient form of simulation software for MIS. Such systems constitute a single problem-oriented package of applications based on a general simulation model, which is equipped with a task source language, interaction tools, file management tools, and an output document editor. The simulation models are described by the method of probabilistic-automaton modeling, which ensures standard representation of models and standardization of the modeling algorithm. Examples of such systems include the demographic forecasting system DEPROG, the VOKON system for assessing the quality of consumer services in terms of free time, and the SONET system for servicing partially accessible customers. The development of computer-aided systems for production and economic control is now moving to the second state, namely operationalization of optimization and forecasting problems, whose solution may account for the main economic effect of MIS. Computation and information problems, which were the main focus of the first stage of MIS development, are thus acquiring the role of a source of information for optimization and forecasting problems in addition to their direct contribution to preparation and analysis of current production and economic information.

  16. Spatial Aspects in Biological System Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Resat, Haluk; Costa, Michelle N.; Shankaran, Harish

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models of the dynamical properties of biological systems aim to improve our understanding of the studied system with the ultimate goal of being able to predict system responses in the absence of experimentation. Despite the enormous advances that have been made in biological modeling and simulation, the inherently multiscale character of biological systems and the stochasticity of biological processes continue to present significant computational and conceptual challenges. Biological systems often consist of well-organized structural hierarchies, which inevitably lead to multiscale problems. This chapter introduces and discusses the advantages and shortcomings of several simulation methods that are being used by the scientific community to investigate the spatiotemporal properties of model biological systems. We first describe the foundations of the methods and then describe their relevance and possible application areas with illustrative examples from our own research. Possible ways to address the encountered computational difficulties are also discussed. PMID:21187236

  17. 2001 Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Gregory; Naiman, Cynthia; Veres, Joseph; Owen, Karl; Lopez, Isaac

    2002-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective, high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. Major accomplishments include the first formal release of the NPSS object-oriented architecture (NPSS Version 1) and the demonstration of a one order of magnitude reduction in computing cost-to-performance ratio using a cluster of personal computers. The paper also describes the future NPSS milestones, which include the simulation of space transportation propulsion systems in response to increased emphasis on safe, low cost access to space within NASA's Aerospace Technology Enterprise. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners on the fiscal year 2000 effort and the actions taken over the past year to

  18. 2000 Numerical Propulsion System Simulation Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Greg; Naiman, Cynthia; Veres, Joseph; Owen, Karl; Lopez, Isaac

    2001-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia, and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective. high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. Major accomplishments include the first formal release of the NPSS object-oriented architecture (NPSS Version 1) and the demonstration of a one order of magnitude reduction in computing cost-to-performance ratio using a cluster of personal computers. The paper also describes the future NPSS milestones, which include the simulation of space transportation propulsion systems in response to increased emphasis on safe, low cost access to space within NASA'S Aerospace Technology Enterprise. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners on the fiscal year 1999 effort and the actions taken over the past year to

  19. System Equivalent for Real Time Digital Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xi

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method of making system equivalents for the Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS), which should enhance its capability of simulating large power systems. The proposed equivalent combines a Frequency Dependent Network Equivalent (FDNE) for the high frequency electromagnetic transients and a Transient Stability Analysis (TSA) type simulation block for the electromechanical transients. The frequency dependent characteristic for FDNE is obtained by curve-fitting frequency domain admittance characteristics using the Vector Fitting method. An approach for approximating the frequency dependent characteristic of large power networks from readily available typical power-flow data is also introduced. A new scheme of incorporating TSA solution in RTDS is proposed. This report shows how the TSA algorithm can be adapted to a real time platform. The validity of this method is confirmed with examples, including the study of a multi in-feed HVDC system based network.

  20. Systems simulation for an airport trailing vortex warning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffreys, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    The approach, development, and limited system studies associated with a system simulation for an Airport Trailing Vortex Warning System are documented. The usefulness is shown of a systems engineering approach to the problem of developing a system, as dictated by aircraft vortices, which will increase air-traffic flow in the takeoff/landing corridors of busy airports while maintaining the required safety factor for each operation. The simulation program has been developed in a modular form which permits new, more sophisticated component models, when they become available and are required, to be incorporated into the program with a minimum of program modifications. This report documents a limited system study that has been performed using this Total System Simulation Model. The resulting preliminary system requirements, conclusions, and recommendations are given.

  1. Computer simulations of learning in neural systems.

    PubMed

    Salu, Y

    1983-04-01

    Recent experiments have shown that, in some cases, strengths of synaptic ties are being modified in learning. However, it is not known what the rules that control those modifications are, especially what determines which synapses will be modified and which will remain unchanged during a learning episode. Two postulated rules that may solve that problem are introduced. To check their effectiveness, the rules are tested in many computer models that simulate learning in neural systems. The simulations demonstrate that, theoretically, the two postulated rules are effective in organizing the synaptic changes. If they are found to also exist in biological systems, these postulated rules may be an important element in the learning process.

  2. Simulation of a continuous lignite excavation system

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakopoulos, T.N.; Arvaniti, S.E.; Panagiotou, G.N.

    2005-07-01

    A discrete-event simulation model using the GPSS/H simulation language has been developed for a excavation system at a multi- level terrace mine. The continuous excavation system consists of five bucket wheel excavators and a network of 22 km of belt conveyors. Ways of dealing with the continuous material flow and frequent changes of material type are considered. The principal model output variables are production and arrival rate at the transfer point of mineral and waste. Animation and comparison with previous production data have been used to validate the model. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Expert system for scheduling simulation lab sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Chet

    1990-01-01

    Implementation and results of an expert system used for scheduling session requests for the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are discussed. Weekly session requests are received from astronaut crew trainers, procedures developers, engineering assessment personnel, software developers, and various others who wish to access the computers, scene generators, and other simulation equipment available to them in the SES lab. The expert system under discussion is comprised of a data acquisition portion - two Pascal programs run on a personal computer - and a CLIPS program installed on a minicomputer. A brief introduction to the SES lab and its scheduling background is given. A general overview of the system is provided, followed by a detailed description of the constraint-reduction process and of the scheduler itself. Results from a ten-week trial period using this approach are discussed. Finally, a summary of the expert system's strengths and shortcomings are provided.

  4. Argonne simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Canfield, T.; Brown-VanHoozer, A.; Tentner, A.

    1996-04-01

    A simulation framework has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed to run on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems; however, a version for a stand alone workstation is also available. The ITS simulator includes an Expert Driver Model (EDM) of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units. The EDM is capable of performing optimal route planning and communicating with Traffic Management Centers (TMC). A dynamic road map data base is sued for optimum route planning, where the data is updated periodically to reflect any changes in road or weather conditions. The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces that includes human-factors studies to support safety and operational research. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factor studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver`s personality and behavior and vehicle type. The simulator has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers, but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of the developed simulator is that vehicles will be represented by autonomous computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. Vehicle processes interact with each other and with ITS components by exchanging messages. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  5. Simulating Astronomical Adaptive Optics Systems Using Yao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaut, François; Van Dam, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive Optics systems are at the heart of the coming Extremely Large Telescopes generation. Given the importance, complexity and required advances of these systems, being able to simulate them faithfully is key to their success, and thus to the success of the ELTs. The type of systems envisioned to be built for the ELTs cover most of the AO breeds, from NGS AO to multiple guide star Ground Layer, Laser Tomography and Multi-Conjugate AO systems, with typically a few thousand actuators. This represents a large step up from the current generation of AO systems, and accordingly a challenge for existing AO simulation packages. This is especially true as, in the past years, computer power has not been following Moore's law in its most common understanding; CPU clocks are hovering at about 3GHz. Although the use of super computers is a possible solution to run these simulations, being able to use smaller machines has obvious advantages: cost, access, environmental issues. By using optimised code in an already proven AO simulation platform, we were able to run complex ELT AO simulations on very modest machines, including laptops. The platform is YAO. In this paper, we describe YAO, its architecture, its capabilities, the ELT-specific challenges and optimisations, and finally its performance. As an example, execution speed ranges from 5 iterations per second for a 6 LGS 60x60 subapertures Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor Laser Tomography AO system (including full physical image formation and detector characteristics) up to over 30 iterations/s for a single NGS AO system.

  6. Participatory ergonomics simulation of hospital work systems: The influence of simulation media on simulation outcome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Simone Nyholm; Broberg, Ole

    2015-11-01

    Current application of work system simulation in participatory ergonomics (PE) design includes a variety of different simulation media. However, the actual influence of the media attributes on the simulation outcome has received less attention. This study investigates two simulation media: full-scale mock-ups and table-top models. The aim is to compare, how the media attributes of fidelity and affordance influence the ergonomics identification and evaluation in PE design of hospital work systems. The results illustrate, how the full-scale mock-ups' high fidelity of room layout and affordance of tool operation support ergonomics identification and evaluation related to the work system entities space and technologies & tools. The table-top models' high fidelity of function relations and affordance of a helicopter view support ergonomics identification and evaluation related to the entity organization. Furthermore, the study addresses the form of the identified and evaluated conditions, being either identified challenges or tangible design criteria.

  7. Rover Attitude and Pointing System Simulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanelli, Charles A.; Grinblat, Jonathan F.; Sirlin, Samuel W.; Pfister, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The MER (Mars Exploration Rover) Attitude and Pointing System Simulation Testbed Environment (RAPSSTER) provides a simulation platform used for the development and test of GNC (guidance, navigation, and control) flight algorithm designs for the Mars rovers, which was specifically tailored to the MERs, but has since been used in the development of rover algorithms for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) as well. The software provides an integrated simulation and software testbed environment for the development of Mars rover attitude and pointing flight software. It provides an environment that is able to run the MER GNC flight software directly (as opposed to running an algorithmic model of the MER GNC flight code). This improves simulation fidelity and confidence in the results. Further more, the simulation environment allows the user to single step through its execution, pausing, and restarting at will. The system also provides for the introduction of simulated faults specific to Mars rover environments that cannot be replicated in other testbed platforms, to stress test the GNC flight algorithms under examination. The software provides facilities to do these stress tests in ways that cannot be done in the real-time flight system testbeds, such as time-jumping (both forwards and backwards), and introduction of simulated actuator faults that would be difficult, expensive, and/or destructive to implement in the real-time testbeds. Actual flight-quality codes can be incorporated back into the development-test suite of GNC developers, closing the loop between the GNC developers and the flight software developers. The software provides fully automated scripting, allowing multiple tests to be run with varying parameters, without human supervision.

  8. Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

  9. Photovoltaic-electrolyzer system transient simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.; Metz, P.D.; Michalek, K.

    1986-05-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a Hydrogen Technology Evaluation Center to illustrate advanced hydrogen technology. The first phase of this effort investigated the use of solar energy to produce hydrogen from water via photovoltaic-powered electrolysis. A coordinated program of system testing, computer simulation, and economic analysis has been adopted to characterize and optimize the photovoltaic-electrolyzer system. This paper presents the initial transient simulation results. Innovative features of the modeling include the use of real weather data, detailed hourly modeling of thermal characteristics of the PV array and of system control strategies, and examination of systems over a wide range of power and voltage ratings. The transient simulation system TRNSYS was used, incorporating existing, modified or new component subroutines as required. For directly coupled systems, the authors found the PV array voltage which maximizes hydrogen production to be quite near the nominal electrolyzer voltage for a wide range of PV array powers. The array voltage which maximizes excess electricity production is slightly higher. The use of an ideal (100 percent efficient) maximum power tracking system provides only a six percent increase in annual hydrogen production. An examination of the effect of the PV array tilt indicates, as expected, that annual hydrogen production is insensitive to tilt angle within +-20 deg of latitude. Summer production greatly exceeds winter generation. Tilting the array, even to 90 deg, produces no significant increase in winter hydrogen production.

  10. Theory and Simulations of Solar System Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    "Theory and simulations of solar system plasmas" aims to highlight results from microscopic to global scales, achieved by theoretical investigations and numerical simulations of the plasma dynamics in the solar system. The theoretical approach must allow evidencing the universality of the phenomena being considered, whatever the region is where their role is studied; at the Sun, in the solar corona, in the interplanetary space or in planetary magnetospheres. All possible theoretical issues concerning plasma dynamics are welcome, especially those using numerical models and simulations, since these tools are mandatory whenever analytical treatments fail, in particular when complex nonlinear phenomena are at work. Comparative studies for ongoing missions like Cassini, Cluster, Demeter, Stereo, Wind, SDO, Hinode, as well as those preparing future missions and proposals, like, e.g., MMS and Solar Orbiter, are especially encouraged.

  11. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  12. Electric System Intra-hour Operation Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Meng, PNNL Da; Guillen, PNNL Zoe; PNNL,

    2014-03-07

    ESIOS is a software program developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that performs intra-hour dispatch and automatic generation control (AGC) simulations for electric power system frequency regulation and load/variable generation following. The program dispatches generation resources at minute interval to meet control performance requirements, while incorporating stochastic models of forecast errors and variability with generation, load, interchange and market behaviors. The simulator also contains an operator model that mimics manual actions to adjust resource dispatch and maintain system reserves. Besides simulating generation fleet intra-hour dispatch, ESIOS can also be used as a test platform for the design and verification of energy storage, demand response, and other technologies helping to accommodate variable generation.

  13. A simulation of data acquisition system for SSC experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Watase, Y.; Ikeda, H.

    1989-04-01

    A simulation on some parts of the data acquisition system was performed using a general purpose simulation language GPSS. Several results of the simulation are discussed for the data acquisition system for the SSC experiment.

  14. Introduction to Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prive, Nikki C.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), including what OSSEs are, and how and why they are performed. The intent is to educate the audience in light of the OSSE-related sections of the Forecast Improvement Act (H.R. 2413).

  15. The systems biology simulation core algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the increasing availability of high dimensional time course data for metabolites, genes, and fluxes, the mathematical description of dynamical systems has become an essential aspect of research in systems biology. Models are often encoded in formats such as SBML, whose structure is very complex and difficult to evaluate due to many special cases. Results This article describes an efficient algorithm to solve SBML models that are interpreted in terms of ordinary differential equations. We begin our consideration with a formal representation of the mathematical form of the models and explain all parts of the algorithm in detail, including several preprocessing steps. We provide a flexible reference implementation as part of the Systems Biology Simulation Core Library, a community-driven project providing a large collection of numerical solvers and a sophisticated interface hierarchy for the definition of custom differential equation systems. To demonstrate the capabilities of the new algorithm, it has been tested with the entire SBML Test Suite and all models of BioModels Database. Conclusions The formal description of the mathematics behind the SBML format facilitates the implementation of the algorithm within specifically tailored programs. The reference implementation can be used as a simulation backend for Java™-based programs. Source code, binaries, and documentation can be freely obtained under the terms of the LGPL version 3 from http://simulation-core.sourceforge.net. Feature requests, bug reports, contributions, or any further discussion can be directed to the mailing list simulation-core-development@lists.sourceforge.net. PMID:23826941

  16. Rotor systems research aircraft simulation mathematical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.; Moore, F. L.; Howlett, J. J.; Pollock, K. S.; Browne, M. M.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical model developed for evaluating and verifying advanced rotor concepts is discussed. The model was used during in both open loop and real time man-in-the-loop simulation during the rotor systems research aircraft design. Future applications include: pilot training, preflight of test programs, and the evaluation of promising concepts before their implementation on the flight vehicle.

  17. Plans for wind energy system simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreier, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    A digital computer code and a special purpose hybrid computer, were introduced. The digital computer program, the Root Perturbation Method or RPM, is an implementation of the classic floquet procedure which circumvents numerical problems associated with the extraction of Floquet roots. The hybrid computer, the Wind Energy System Time domain simulator (WEST), yields real time loads and deformation information essential to design and system stability investigations.

  18. Fidelity Optimization of Microprocessor System Simulations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    I. TIT LE (end Su.btitle) 5 TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED " Fidelity Optimization of Microprocessor THESIS /DgW&YON/ System Simulations...MICROPROCESSOR SYSTEM SIHULATIONS Earnest Taylor Landrum, Jr. A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of Auburn University in Partial Fulfillment of the...Taylor Landrum, Jr. Permission is herewith granted to Auburn University to make copies of this thesis at its discretion, upon the request of

  19. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.

    2000-01-01

    Advances in computational technology and in physics-based modeling are making large-scale, detailed simulations of complex systems possible within the design environment. For example, the integration of computing, communications, and aerodynamics has reduced the time required to analyze major propulsion system components from days and weeks to minutes and hours. This breakthrough has enabled the detailed simulation of major propulsion system components to become a routine part of designing systems, providing the designer with critical information about the components early in the design process. This paper describes the development of the numerical propulsion system simulation (NPSS), a modular and extensible framework for the integration of multicomponent and multidisciplinary analysis tools using geographically distributed resources such as computing platforms, data bases, and people. The analysis is currently focused on large-scale modeling of complete aircraft engines. This will provide the product developer with a "virtual wind tunnel" that will reduce the number of hardware builds and tests required during the development of advanced aerospace propulsion systems.

  20. Java simulations of embedded control systems.

    PubMed

    Farias, Gonzalo; Cervin, Anton; Arzén, Karl-Erik; Dormido, Sebastián; Esquembre, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a new Open Source Java library suited for the simulation of embedded control systems. The library is based on the ideas and architecture of TrueTime, a toolbox of Matlab devoted to this topic, and allows Java programmers to simulate the performance of control processes which run in a real time environment. Such simulations can improve considerably the learning and design of multitasking real-time systems. The choice of Java increases considerably the usability of our library, because many educators program already in this language. But also because the library can be easily used by Easy Java Simulations (EJS), a popular modeling and authoring tool that is increasingly used in the field of Control Education. EJS allows instructors, students, and researchers with less programming capabilities to create advanced interactive simulations in Java. The paper describes the ideas, implementation, and sample use of the new library both for pure Java programmers and for EJS users. The JTT library and some examples are online available on http://lab.dia.uned.es/jtt.

  1. Simulation System for Training in Laparoscopic Surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basdogan, Cagatay; Ho, Chih-Hao

    2003-01-01

    A computer-based simulation system creates a visual and haptic virtual environment for training a medical practitioner in laparoscopic surgery. Heretofore, it has been common practice to perform training in partial laparoscopic surgical procedures by use of a laparoscopic training box that encloses a pair of laparoscopic tools, objects to be manipulated by the tools, and an endoscopic video camera. However, the surgical procedures simulated by use of a training box are usually poor imitations of the actual ones. The present computer-based system improves training by presenting a more realistic simulated environment to the trainee. The system includes a computer monitor that displays a real-time image of the affected interior region of the patient, showing laparoscopic instruments interacting with organs and tissues, as would be viewed by use of an endoscopic video camera and displayed to a surgeon during a laparoscopic operation. The system also includes laparoscopic tools that the trainee manipulates while observing the image on the computer monitor (see figure). The instrumentation on the tools consists of (1) position and orientation sensors that provide input data for the simulation and (2) actuators that provide force feedback to simulate the contact forces between the tools and tissues. The simulation software includes components that model the geometries of surgical tools, components that model the geometries and physical behaviors of soft tissues, and components that detect collisions between them. Using the measured positions and orientations of the tools, the software detects whether they are in contact with tissues. In the event of contact, the deformations of the tissues and contact forces are computed by use of the geometric and physical models. The image on the computer screen shows tissues deformed accordingly, while the actuators apply the corresponding forces to the distal ends of the tools. For the purpose of demonstration, the system has been set

  2. Toward simulating complex systems with quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenion-Hanrath, Rachel Lynn

    Quantum effects like tunneling, coherence, and zero point energy often play a significant role in phenomena on the scales of atoms and molecules. However, the exact quantum treatment of a system scales exponentially with dimensionality, making it impractical for characterizing reaction rates and mechanisms in complex systems. An ongoing effort in the field of theoretical chemistry and physics is extending scalable, classical trajectory-based simulation methods capable of capturing quantum effects to describe dynamic processes in many-body systems; in the work presented here we explore two such techniques. First, we detail an explicit electron, path integral (PI)-based simulation protocol for predicting the rate of electron transfer in condensed-phase transition metal complex systems. Using a PI representation of the transferring electron and a classical representation of the transition metal complex and solvent atoms, we compute the outer sphere free energy barrier and dynamical recrossing factor of the electron transfer rate while accounting for quantum tunneling and zero point energy effects. We are able to achieve this employing only a single set of force field parameters to describe the system rather than parameterizing along the reaction coordinate. Following our success in describing a simple model system, we discuss our next steps in extending our protocol to technologically relevant materials systems. The latter half focuses on the Mixed Quantum-Classical Initial Value Representation (MQC-IVR) of real-time correlation functions, a semiclassical method which has demonstrated its ability to "tune'' between quantum- and classical-limit correlation functions while maintaining dynamic consistency. Specifically, this is achieved through a parameter that determines the quantumness of individual degrees of freedom. Here, we derive a semiclassical correction term for the MQC-IVR to systematically characterize the error introduced by different choices of simulation

  3. An Investigation of System Identification Techniques for Simulation Model Abstraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    This report summarizes research into the application of system identification techniques to simulation model abstraction. System identification produces...34Mission Simulation," a simulation of a squadron of aircraft performing battlefield air interdiction. The system identification techniques were...simplified mathematical models that approximate the dynamic behaviors of the underlying stochastic simulations. Four state-space system

  4. Simulation of Flywheel Energy Storage System Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.; Wolff, Frederick J.; Dravid, Narayan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the progress made in the controller design and operation of a flywheel energy storage system. The switching logic for the converter bridge circuit has been redefined to reduce line current harmonics, even at the highest operating speed of the permanent magnet motor-generator. An electromechanical machine model is utilized to simulate charge and discharge operation of the inertial energy in the flywheel. Controlling the magnitude of phase currents regulates the rate of charge and discharge. The resulting improvements are demonstrated by simulation.

  5. Parachute system design, analysis, and simulation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, W.D.; McBride, D.D.; Gwinn, K.W.; Waye, D.E.; Hailey, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    For over twenty years designers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed various parachute simulation codes to model deployment, inflation, loading, trajectories, aircraft downwash and line sail. In addition to these codes, material property data bases have been acquired. Recently we have initiated project to integrate these codes and data bases into a single software tool entitled SPARSYS (Sandia PARachute SYstem Simulation). We have constructed a graphical user interface as the driver and framework for SPARSYS. In this paper we present a status report on SPARSYS describing progress in developing and incorporating independent modules, in developing an integrated trajectory package, and in developing a materials data base including high-rate-of-strain data.

  6. Simulating Complex Window Systems using BSDF Data

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantoglou, Maria; Jonsson, Jacob; Lee, Eleanor

    2009-06-22

    Nowadays, virtual models are commonly used to evaluate the performance of conventional window systems. Complex fenestration systems can be difficult to simulate accurately not only because of their geometry but also because of their optical properties that scatter light in an unpredictable manner. Bi-directional Scattering Distribution Functions (BSDF) have recently been developed based on a mixture of measurements and modelling to characterize the optics of such systems. This paper describes the workflow needed to create then use these BSDF datasets in the Radiance lighting simulation software. Limited comparisons are made between visualizations produced using the standard ray-tracing method, the BSDF method, and that taken in a full-scale outdoor mockup.

  7. A system of infrared scene simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haihe; Li, Yujian; Huo, Yi; Kuang, Wenqing; Zhang, Ting

    2016-10-01

    We propose an integral infrared scene simulation system. The proposed system, which is based on the parameters of the thermal physical property and optical property, computes the radiation distribution of the scenery on the focus plane of the camera according to the scene of the geometrical parameter, the position and intensity of the light source, the location and direction of the camera and so on. Then the radiation distribution is mapped to the space of gray, and we finally obtain the virtual image of the scene. The proposed system includes eight modules namely basic data maintaining, model importing, scene saving, geometry parameters setting and infrared property parameters of the scene, data pre-processing, infrared scene simulation, and scene loading. The proposed system organizes all the data by the mode of database lookup table that stores all relative parameters and computation results of different states to avoid repetitive computation. Experimental results show that the proposed system produces three dimension infrared images in real time to some extent, and can reach 60 frames/second in simple scene drawing and 20 frames/second in complex scene drawing. Experimental results also show that the simulated images can represent infrared features of the scenery to a certain degree.

  8. System-Level Reuse of Space Systems Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, Michael R.; Williams, Joseph C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the best ways to enhance space systems simulation fidelity is to leverage off of (reuse) existing high-fidelity simulations. But what happens when the model you would like to reuse is in a different coding language or other barriers arise that make one want to just start over with a clean sheet of paper? Three diverse system-level simulation reuse case studies are described based on experience to date in the development of NASA's Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. Case studies include (a) the Boeing/Rocketdyne-provided Electrical Power Simulation (EPSIM), (b) the NASA Automation and Robotics Division-provided TRICK robotics systems model, and (c) the Russian Space Agency- provided Russian Segment Trainer. In each case, there was an initial tendency to dismiss simulation reuse candidates based on an apparent lack of suitability. A more careful examination based on a more structured assessment of architectural and requirements-oriented representations of the reuse candidates revealed significant reuse potential. Specific steps used to conduct the detailed assessments are discussed. The steps include the following: 1) Identifying reuse candidates; 2) Requirements compatibility assessment; 3) Maturity assessment; 4) Life-cycle cost determination; and 5) Risk assessment. Observations and conclusions are presented related to the real cost of system-level simulation component reuse. Finally, lessons learned that relate to maximizing the benefits of space systems simulation reuse are shared. These concepts should be directly applicable for use in the development of space systems simulations in the future.

  9. Common modeling system for digital simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, Rick

    1994-01-01

    The Joint Modeling and Simulation System is a tri-service investigation into a common modeling framework for the development digital models. The basis for the success of this framework is an X-window-based, open systems architecture, object-based/oriented methodology, standard interface approach to digital model construction, configuration, execution, and post processing. For years Department of Defense (DOD) agencies have produced various weapon systems/technologies and typically digital representations of the systems/technologies. These digital representations (models) have also been developed for other reasons such as studies and analysis, Cost Effectiveness Analysis (COEA) tradeoffs, etc. Unfortunately, there have been no Modeling and Simulation (M&S) standards, guidelines, or efforts towards commonality in DOD M&S. The typical scenario is an organization hires a contractor to build hardware and in doing so an digital model may be constructed. Until recently, this model was not even obtained by the organization. Even if it was procured, it was on a unique platform, in a unique language, with unique interfaces, and, with the result being UNIQUE maintenance required. Additionally, the constructors of the model expended more effort in writing the 'infrastructure' of the model/simulation (e.g. user interface, database/database management system, data journalizing/archiving, graphical presentations, environment characteristics, other components in the simulation, etc.) than in producing the model of the desired system. Other side effects include: duplication of efforts; varying assumptions; lack of credibility/validation; and decentralization in policy and execution. J-MASS provides the infrastructure, standards, toolset, and architecture to permit M&S developers and analysts to concentrate on the their area of interest.

  10. Problem reporting management system performance simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannatta, David S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper proposes the Problem Reporting Management System (PRMS) model as an effective discrete simulation tool that determines the risks involved during the development phase of a Trouble Tracking Reporting Data Base replacement system. The model considers the type of equipment and networks which will be used in the replacement system as well as varying user loads, size of the database, and expected operational availability. The paper discusses the dynamics, stability, and application of the PRMS and addresses suggested concepts to enhance the service performance and enrich them.

  11. Runway Incursion Prevention System Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.

    2002-01-01

    A Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS) was evaluated in a full mission simulation study at the NASA Langley Research center in March 2002. RIPS integrates airborne and ground-based technologies to provide (1) enhanced surface situational awareness to avoid blunders and (2) alerts of runway conflicts in order to prevent runway incidents while also improving operational capability. A series of test runs was conducted in a high fidelity simulator. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the RIPS airborne incursion detection algorithms and associated alerting and airport surface display concepts. Eight commercial airline crews participated as test subjects completing 467 test runs. This paper gives an overview of the RIPS, simulation study, and test results.

  12. Quantum Simulation of Tunneling in Small Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sornborger, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    A number of quantum algorithms have been performed on small quantum computers; these include Shor's prime factorization algorithm, error correction, Grover's search algorithm and a number of analog and digital quantum simulations. Because of the number of gates and qubits necessary, however, digital quantum particle simulations remain untested. A contributing factor to the system size required is the number of ancillary qubits needed to implement matrix exponentials of the potential operator. Here, we show that a set of tunneling problems may be investigated with no ancillary qubits and a cost of one single-qubit operator per time step for the potential evolution, eliminating at least half of the quantum gates required for the algorithm and more than that in the general case. Such simulations are within reach of current quantum computer architectures. PMID:22916333

  13. Holodeck: Telepresence Dome Visualization System Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hite, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the simulation and consideration of different image-projection strategies for the Holodeck, a dome that will be used for highly immersive telepresence operations in future endeavors of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Its visualization system will include a full 360 degree projection onto the dome's interior walls in order to display video streams from both simulations and recorded video. Because humans innately trust their vision to precisely report their surroundings, the Holodeck's visualization system is crucial to its realism. This system will be rigged with an integrated hardware and software infrastructure-namely, a system of projectors that will relay with a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and computer to both project images onto the dome and correct warping in those projections in real-time. Using both Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and ray-tracing software, virtual models of various dome/projector geometries were created and simulated via tracking and analysis of virtual light sources, leading to the selection of two possible configurations for installation. Research into image warping and the generation of dome-ready video content was also conducted, including generation of fisheye images, distortion correction, and the generation of a reliable content-generation pipeline.

  14. Process simulation in digital camera system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toadere, Florin

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to simulate the functionality of a digital camera system. The simulations cover the conversion from light to numerical signal and the color processing and rendering. We consider the image acquisition system to be linear shift invariant and axial. The light propagation is orthogonal to the system. We use a spectral image processing algorithm in order to simulate the radiometric properties of a digital camera. In the algorithm we take into consideration the transmittances of the: light source, lenses, filters and the quantum efficiency of a CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) sensor. The optical part is characterized by a multiple convolution between the different points spread functions of the optical components. We use a Cooke triplet, the aperture, the light fall off and the optical part of the CMOS sensor. The electrical part consists of the: Bayer sampling, interpolation, signal to noise ratio, dynamic range, analog to digital conversion and JPG compression. We reconstruct the noisy blurred image by blending different light exposed images in order to reduce the photon shot noise, also we filter the fixed pattern noise and we sharpen the image. Then we have the color processing blocks: white balancing, color correction, gamma correction, and conversion from XYZ color space to RGB color space. For the reproduction of color we use an OLED (organic light emitting diode) monitor. The analysis can be useful to assist students and engineers in image quality evaluation and imaging system design. Many other configurations of blocks can be used in our analysis.

  15. HSI Prototypes for Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jokstad, Håkon; McDonald, Rob

    2015-09-01

    This report describes in detail the design and features of three Human System Interface (HSI) prototypes developed by the Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program under Contract 128420 through Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The prototypes are implemented for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator and installed in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL. The three prototypes are: 1) Power Ramp display 2) RCS Heat-up and Cool-down display 3) Estimated time to limit display The power ramp display and the RCS heat-up/cool-down display are designed to provide good visual indications to the operators on how well they are performing their task compared to their target ramp/heat-up/cool-down rate. The estimated time to limit display is designed to help operators restore levels or pressures before automatic or required manual actions are activated.

  16. Data Systems Dynamic Simulation - A total system for data system design assessments and trade studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, J. W.; Rowe, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Data Systems Dynamic Simulation is a simulation system designed to reduce cost and time and increase the confidence and comprehensiveness of Data Systems Simulation. It is designed to simulate large data processing and communications systems from end-to-end or by subsystem. Those features relevant to system timing, control, sizing, personnel support activities, cost and external influences are modeled. Emphasis is placed on ease of use, comprehensive system performance measures, and extensive post simulation analysis capability. The system has been used to support trade studies of the NASA data system needs in the 1985 to 1990 time frame.

  17. Computer Simulation of Shipboard Electrical Distribution Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    variable. If used properly, the Euler Backward method for integrating differential equations approaches the same solution. Fast modes can also be...synchronous machines as well as other elements of a power network. EMTP handles stiff systems by using the Euler Backward method for integration. In general...simulations - 29 - however, there are three methods that work well. The f’irst is the Euler Forward method which is considered an explicit technique since it

  18. Optical simulations for Ambilight TV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyneel, Filip; Lanoye, Lieve

    2012-06-01

    Ambilight is a unique Philips feature, where RGB LEDs are used to create a dynamic light halo around the television. This extends the screen and hence increases the viewing experience, as it draws the viewer more into the action on the screen. The feature receives very positive consumer feedback. However, implementing Ambilight in the increasingly stringent design boundary conditions of a slim and thin TV set is a challenging task. Optical simulations play a vital role in each step of the Ambilight development. Ranging from prototype to final product, we use simulations, next to prototyping, to aid the choice of LEDs, optical materials and optical systems during different phases of the design process. Each step the impact of the optical system on the mechanical design and TV set dimensions needs to be taken into account. Moreover, optical simulations are essential to guarantee the required optical performance given a big spread in LED performance, mechanical tolerances and material properties. Next to performance, optical efficiency is also an important parameter to evaluate an optical design, as it establishes the required number of LEDs and the total LED power. As such optical efficiency defines the thermal power which needs to be dissipated by the LED system. The innovation roadmap does not stop here. For future systems we see a miniaturization trend, where smaller LED packages and smaller dies are used. This evolution makes the impact of mechanical tolerances on the optical design more severe. Consequentially, this approach poses a whole new challenge to the way we use optical simulations in our design process.

  19. Infrared Simulation System (IRSS). Phase I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    Advanced Concepts Development Facility ( ACDF ) nownder construction. I This report covers, in addition to the detailed description of the design...1.2 Purpose and Use . ............... . ........ 1 1 .1. General ......... .............. 1 1.2. 2 Purpose of the ACDF ................... 1 1.2.3...2 1-2 Placement of Apparatus in ACDF Room 102 ................. 3 3-1 Functional Entities in the Infrared Simulation System

  20. Digital system for structural dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.; Lagace, L. J.; Wojnar, M. K.; Glor, C.

    1982-01-01

    State-of-the-art digital hardware and software for the simulation of complex structural dynamic interactions, such as those which occur in rotating structures (engine systems). System were incorporated in a designed to use an array of processors in which the computation for each physical subelement or functional subsystem would be assigned to a single specific processor in the simulator. These node processors are microprogrammed bit-slice microcomputers which function autonomously and can communicate with each other and a central control minicomputer over parallel digital lines. Inter-processor nearest neighbor communications busses pass the constants which represent physical constraints and boundary conditions. The node processors are connected to the six nearest neighbor node processors to simulate the actual physical interface of real substructures. Computer generated finite element mesh and force models can be developed with the aid of the central control minicomputer. The control computer also oversees the animation of a graphics display system, disk-based mass storage along with the individual processing elements.

  1. System Identification and Simulation of a Triaxial Shaker System,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    methods. Results of the system identification process are discussed. Certain methods are found to produce models that are in good agreement with measured response data from the actual shaker system....implemented in the simulation. The first is a physically-based model derived from a finite element analysis together with a model-updating system ... identification scheme; the second is a parametric model without direct physical significance. The advantages and disadvantages of each model for this

  2. Marshall system for aerospace system simulation (MARSYAS), user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ventre, A.; Sevigny, R.; Mccollum, W.; Balentine, T.

    1973-01-01

    The capabilities of the Marshall system for aerospace system simulation (MARSYAS) and how to use it are described. MARSYAS is a software system that allows easy setup and control of the simulation of the dynamics of large physical systems on a digital computer. The physical systems are modeled in the form of block diagrams or equations. The blocks can have multiple inputs and multiple outputs, and they can be nested to form hierarchies. The block diagrams can contain transfer functions, nonlinear and logical functions, equations, analog computer elements and FORTRAN programs. The input format of the equations can be combinations of nonlinear, time-varying differential equations and algebraic equations in their original format. MARSYAS could also serve as a storage and retrieval system for models as a basis for a model configuration control system on a central time-shared computer. The outputs of the simulation system can be not only time-responses but also other analysis data such as frequency response, power spectrum and stability parameters. The MARSYAS translator is written in FORTRAN running on the Univac 1108 computer under the EXEC 8 operating system.

  3. Computational simulation for concurrent engineering of aerospace propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Results are summarized for an investigation to assess the infrastructure available and the technology readiness in order to develop computational simulation methods/software for concurrent engineering. These results demonstrate that development of computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering is timely. Extensive infrastructure, in terms of multi-discipline simulation, component-specific simulation, system simulators, fabrication process simulation, and simulation of uncertainties--fundamental to develop such methods, is available. An approach is recommended which can be used to develop computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering of propulsion systems and systems in general. Benefits and issues needing early attention in the development are outlined.

  4. Computational simulation of concurrent engineering for aerospace propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Singhal, S. N.

    1992-01-01

    Results are summarized of an investigation to assess the infrastructure available and the technology readiness in order to develop computational simulation methods/software for concurrent engineering. These results demonstrate that development of computational simulations methods for concurrent engineering is timely. Extensive infrastructure, in terms of multi-discipline simulation, component-specific simulation, system simulators, fabrication process simulation, and simulation of uncertainties - fundamental in developing such methods, is available. An approach is recommended which can be used to develop computational simulation methods for concurrent engineering for propulsion systems and systems in general. Benefits and facets needing early attention in the development are outlined.

  5. Communication Systems Simulation Laboratory (CSSL): Simulation Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The simulation process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the CSSL. The Simulation Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their engineering personnel in simulation planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the simulation process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, facility interfaces, and inputs necessary to define scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  6. Simulation of paraequilibrium growth in multicomponent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, G.; Olson, G. B.

    2001-03-01

    A methodology to simulate paraequilibrium (PE) growth in multicomponent systems using the DIC-TRA (Diffusion-Controlled Transformation) software is presented. For any given multicomponent system containing substitutional and interstitial elements, the basic approach is to define a hypothetical element Z, whose thermodynamic and mobility parameters are expressed in terms of the weighted average (with respect to site fraction) of the thermodynamic parameters and mobilities of the substitutional alloying elements. This procedure facilitates the calculation of PE phase diagrams and the PE growth simulations directly in the Thermo-Calc and DICTRA software, respectively. The results of two distinct case studies in multicomponent alloys are presented. In the first example, we simulate the isothermal growth of PE cementite in an Fe-C-Co-Cr-Mo-Ni secondary hardening steel during tempering. This is of practical importance in modeling the carbide precipitation kinetics during secondary hardening. In the second example, we have presented the results of PE ferrite growth during continuous cooling from an intercritical temperature in an Fe-Al-C-Mn-Si low-alloy steel. This is of importance to the design of triple-phase steels containing an austenite that has optimum stability, to facilitate stress-induced transformation under dynamic loading. The results of both simulations are in good accord with experimental results. The model calculations do not consider any resistive or dissipative forces, such as the interfacial energy, strain energy, or solute drag, and, as a result, the interface velocities represent an upper limit under the available chemical driving force.

  7. VOCs monitoring system simulation and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldararu, Florin; Vasile, Alexandru; Vatra, Cosmin

    2010-11-01

    The designed and simulated system will be used in the tanning industry, for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) measurements. In this industry, about 90% of the solvent contained in the emulsions evaporates during its application, giving rise to VOC, which are at the same time hazardous atmospheric pollutants and one of the sources of ground level photochemical ozone formation. It results that a monitoring system is necessary in a leather finishing process, in order to detect hazardous VOC concentration and conducting process in order of VOC concentration diminishing. The paper presents the design of a VOC monitoring system, which includes sensors for VOCs and temperature, the conditioning circuitry for these sensors, the suction system of the gas in the hood, the data acquisition and the computing system and graphic interface. The used sensor in the detection system is a semiconductor sensor, produced by Figaro Engineering Inc., characterized by a short response time, high sensitivity at almost all VOC substances. The design of the conditioning circuitry and data acquisition is done in order to compensate the sensor response variation with temperature and to maintain the low response time of the sensor. The temperature compensation is obtained by using a thermistor circuitry, and the compensation is done within the software design. A Mitsubishi PLC is used to receive the output signals of the circuits including the sensor and of the thermistor, respectively. The acquisition and computing system is done using Mitsubishi ALPHA 2 controller and a graphical terminal, GOT 1000.

  8. Computer simulations of athermal and glassy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ning

    2005-12-01

    We performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations to better understand athermal and glassy systems near jamming transitions. We focused on four related projects. In the first project, we decomposed the probability distribution P(φ) of finding a collectively jammed state at packing fraction φ into two distinct contributions: the density of CJ states rho(φ) and their basins of attraction beta(φ). In bidisperse systems, it is likely that rho(φ) controls the shape of P(φ) in the large system size limit, and thus the most likely random jammed state may be used as a protocol independent definition of random close packing in this system. In the second project, we measured the yield stress in two different ensembles: constant shear rate and constant stress. The yield stress measured in the constant stress ensemble is larger than that measured in the constant shear rate ensemble, however, the difference between these two measurements decreases with increasing system size. In the third project, we investigated under what circumstances nonlinear velocity profiles form in frictionless granular systems undergoing boundary driven planar shear flow. Nonlinear velocity profiles occur at short times, but evolve into linear profiles at long times. Nonlinear velocity profiles can be stabilized by vibrating these systems. The velocity profile can become highly localized when the shear stress of the system is below the constant force yield stress, provided that the granular temperature difference across the system is sufficiently large. In the fourth project, we measured the effective temperature defined from equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relations in athermal and glassy systems sheared at constant pressure. We found that the effective temperature is strongly controlled by pressure in the slowly sheared regime. Thus, this effective temperature and pressure are not independent variables in this regime.

  9. Engineering simulations for cancer systems biology.

    PubMed

    Bown, James; Andrews, Paul S; Deeni, Yusuf; Goltsov, Alexey; Idowu, Michael; Polack, Fiona A C; Sampson, Adam T; Shovman, Mark; Stepney, Susan

    2012-11-01

    Computer simulation can be used to inform in vivo and in vitro experimentation, enabling rapid, low-cost hypothesis generation and directing experimental design in order to test those hypotheses. In this way, in silico models become a scientific instrument for investigation, and so should be developed to high standards, be carefully calibrated and their findings presented in such that they may be reproduced. Here, we outline a framework that supports developing simulations as scientific instruments, and we select cancer systems biology as an exemplar domain, with a particular focus on cellular signalling models. We consider the challenges of lack of data, incomplete knowledge and modelling in the context of a rapidly changing knowledge base. Our framework comprises a process to clearly separate scientific and engineering concerns in model and simulation development, and an argumentation approach to documenting models for rigorous way of recording assumptions and knowledge gaps. We propose interactive, dynamic visualisation tools to enable the biological community to interact with cellular signalling models directly for experimental design. There is a mismatch in scale between these cellular models and tissue structures that are affected by tumours, and bridging this gap requires substantial computational resource. We present concurrent programming as a technology to link scales without losing important details through model simplification. We discuss the value of combining this technology, interactive visualisation, argumentation and model separation to support development of multi-scale models that represent biologically plausible cells arranged in biologically plausible structures that model cell behaviour, interactions and response to therapeutic interventions.

  10. Large-scale Intelligent Transporation Systems simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.; Canfield, T.; Hannebutte, U.; Levine, D.; Tentner, A.

    1995-06-01

    A prototype computer system has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) capable of running on massively parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems. The prototype includes the modelling of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of our design is that vehicles will be represented by autonomus computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  11. The GEM Detector projective alignment simulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.; Belser, F.C.; Holdener, F.R.; Roeben, M.D.; Paradiso, J.A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pier-Amory, J.

    1993-07-09

    Precision position knowledge (< 25 microns RMS) of the GEM Detector muon system at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is an important physics requirement necessary to minimize sagitta error in detecting and tracking high energy muons that are deflected by the magnetic field within the GEM Detector. To validate the concept of the sagitta correction function determined by projective alignment of the muon detectors (Cathode Strip Chambers or CSCs), the basis of the proposed GEM alignment scheme, a facility, called the ``Alignment Test Stand`` (ATS), is being constructed. This system simulates the environment that the CSCs and chamber alignment systems are expected to experience in the GEM Detector, albeit without the 0.8 T magnetic field and radiation environment. The ATS experimental program will allow systematic study and characterization of the projective alignment approach, as well as general mechanical engineering of muon chamber mounting concepts, positioning systems and study of the mechanical behavior of the proposed 6 layer CSCs. The ATS will consist of a stable local coordinate system in which mock-ups of muon chambers (i.e., non-working mechanical analogs, representing the three superlayers of a selected barrel and endcap alignment tower) are implemented, together with a sufficient number of alignment monitors to overdetermine the sagitta correction function, providing a self-consistency check. This paper describes the approach to be used for the alignment of the GEM muon system, the design of the ATS, and the experiments to be conducted using the ATS.

  12. Sensor Data Qualification Technique Applied to Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Simon, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper applies a previously developed sensor data qualification technique to a commercial aircraft engine simulation known as the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40,000 (C-MAPSS40k). The sensor data qualification technique is designed to detect, isolate, and accommodate faulty sensor measurements. It features sensor networks, which group various sensors together and relies on an empirically derived analytical model to relate the sensor measurements. Relationships between all member sensors of the network are analyzed to detect and isolate any faulty sensor within the network.

  13. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  14. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  15. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5840 - Radiation therapy simulation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiation therapy simulation system. 892.5840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5840 Radiation therapy simulation system. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy simulation system is a fluoroscopic or radiographic...

  18. Epidemilogical Simulation System, Version 2.4

    SciTech Connect

    2004-01-30

    EpiSims uses a detailed simulation of disease spread to evaluate demographically and geographically targeted biological threat reduction strategies. Abstract: EpiSims simulates the spread of disease and analyzes the consequences of intervention strategies in a large urban area at the level of individuals. The simulation combines models of three dynamical systems: urban social networks, disease transmission, and within-host progression of a disease. Validated population mobility and activity generation technology provides the social network models, Disease models are based on fusion of expert opinion and available data. EpiSims provides a previously unavailable detailed representation of the course of an outbreak in urban area. A letter of August 16, 2002 from the Office of Homeland Security states: "Ability of EpiSims to provide comprehensive data on daily activity patterns of individuals makes it far superior to traditional SIR models — clearly had an impact on pre-attack smallpox vaccination policy." EpiSims leverages a unique Los Alamos National Laboratory resource — the population mobility and activity data developed by TRANSIMS (Transportation Analysis and SiMulation System) — to create epidemiological analyses at an unprecedented level of detail. We create models of microscopic (individual-level) physical and biological processes from which, through simulation, emerge the macroscopic (urban regional level) quantities that are the inputs to alternative models. For example, the contact patterns of individuals in different demographic groups determine the overall mixing rates those groups. The characteristics of a person-to-person transmission together with their contact patterns determine the reproductive numbers — how many people will be infected on average by each case. Mixing rates and reproductive numbers are the basic parameters of other epidemiological models. Because interventions — and people’s reactions to them — are ultimately applied at the

  19. On sequential dynamical systems and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.L.; Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The generic structure of computer simulations motivates a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {r_arrow} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper) which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes. This will be done using both combinatorial/algebraic techniques and probabilistic techniques. Finally the authors give results on dynamical system properties for some special systems.

  20. Simulation Model of Mobile Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Edmunds, T; Faissol, D; Yao, Y

    2009-01-27

    In this paper, we consider a mobile source that we attempt to detect with man-portable, vehicle-mounted or boat-mounted radiation detectors. The source is assumed to transit an area populated with these mobile detectors, and the objective is to detect the source before it reaches a perimeter. We describe a simulation model developed to estimate the probability that one of the mobile detectors will come in to close proximity of the moving source and detect it. We illustrate with a maritime simulation example. Our simulation takes place in a 10 km by 5 km rectangular bay patrolled by boats equipped with 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors. Boats to be inspected enter the bay and randomly proceed to one of seven harbors on the shore. A source-bearing boat enters the mouth of the bay and proceeds to a pier on the opposite side. We wish to determine the probability that the source is detected and its range from target when detected. Patrol boats select the nearest in-bound boat for inspection and initiate an intercept course. Once within an operational range for the detection system, a detection algorithm is started. If the patrol boat confirms the source is not present, it selects the next nearest boat for inspection. Each run of the simulation ends either when a patrol successfully detects a source or when the source reaches its target. Several statistical detection algorithms have been implemented in the simulation model. First, a simple k-sigma algorithm, which alarms with the counts in a time window exceeds the mean background plus k times the standard deviation of background, is available to the user. The time window used is optimized with respect to the signal-to-background ratio for that range and relative speed. Second, a sequential probability ratio test [Wald 1947] is available, and configured in this simulation with a target false positive probability of 0.001 and false negative probability of 0.1. This test is utilized when the mobile detector maintains

  1. Application of control theory to dynamic systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auslander, D. M.; Spear, R. C.; Young, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The application of control theory is applied to dynamic systems simulation. Theory and methodology applicable to controlled ecological life support systems are considered. Spatial effects on system stability, design of control systems with uncertain parameters, and an interactive computing language (PARASOL-II) designed for dynamic system simulation, report quality graphics, data acquisition, and simple real time control are discussed.

  2. Observing System Simulation Experiments for Hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atlas, R. M.; Hoffman, R. N.; Bucci, L. R.; Annane, B.; Murillo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), when done correctly, provide an effective means to evaluate the potential impact of a proposed observing system, as well as to determine tradeoffs in their design, and to evaluate data assimilation methodology. Great care must be taken to ensure the realism of the OSSEs and in the interpretation of OSSE results. While early OSSEs focused on large-scale numerical weather prediction, more recent OSSEs have included evaluation of the impact of proposed observing systems on smaller-scale phenomena. These have included global OSSEs to evaluate impact on hurricane track forecasting and regional OSSEs aimed at evaluating both track and intensity prediction. Two global OSSEs conducted using the fvGCM nature runs showed a substantial impact of space-based lidar wind profiles on hurricane track predictions. Current OSSEs are using multiple nature runs in which the WRF model, at very high resolution, is embedded within a global T511 nature run that had been generated by ECMWF. These OSSEs are evaluating the potential impact of new (proposed) observing systems on hurricane track and intensity prediction and trade-offs in the design and configuration of these observing systems They are also being used to optimize sampling strategies for current and future airborne and spaceborne observing systems and to evaluate and improve data assimilation and vortex initialization methodology for hurricane prediction. Results from recent OSSEs show the relative impact of alternative lidar technologies and the relative impact of global and regional assimilation on hurricane track and intensity prediction. OSSEs are currently underway to evaluate advanced concepts for hyperspectral infrared (IR) sounding from both polar and geostationary orbit, as well as to evaluate a variety of aspects of hurricane predictability.

  3. Cardiovascular system simulation in biomedical engineering education.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rideout, V. C.

    1972-01-01

    Use of complex cardiovascular system models, in conjunction with a large hybrid computer, in biomedical engineering courses. A cardiovascular blood pressure-flow model, driving a compartment model for the study of dye transport, was set up on the computer for use as a laboratory exercise by students who did not have the computer experience or skill to be able to easily set up such a simulation involving some 27 differential equations running at 'real time' rate. The students were given detailed instructions regarding the model, and were then able to study effects such as those due to septal and valve defects upon the pressure, flow, and dye dilution curves. The success of this experiment in the use of involved models in engineering courses was such that it seems that this type of laboratory exercise might be considered for use in physiology courses as an adjunct to animal experiments.

  4. Designing a SCADA system simulator for fast breeder reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, E.; Abdullah, A. G.; Hakim, D. L.

    2016-04-01

    SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system simulator is a Human Machine Interface-based software that is able to visualize the process of a plant. This study describes the results of the process of designing a SCADA system simulator that aims to facilitate the operator in monitoring, controlling, handling the alarm, accessing historical data and historical trend in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) type Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR). This research used simulation to simulate NPP type FBR Kalpakkam in India. This simulator was developed using Wonderware Intouch software 10 and is equipped with main menu, plant overview, area graphics, control display, set point display, alarm system, real-time trending, historical trending and security system. This simulator can properly simulate the principle of energy flow and energy conversion process on NPP type FBR. This SCADA system simulator can be used as training media for NPP type FBR prospective operators.

  5. History of visual systems in the Systems Engineering Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, David C.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) houses a variety of real-time computer generated visual systems. The earliest machine dates from the mid-1960's and is one of the first real-time graphics systems in the world. The latest acquisition is the state-of-the-art Evans and Sutherland CT6. Between the span of time from the mid-1960's to the late 1980's, tremendous strides have been made in the real-time graphics world. These strides include advances in both software and hardware engineering. The purpose is to explore the history of the development of these real-time computer generated image systems from the first machine to the present. Hardware advances as well as software algorithm changes are presented. This history is not only quite interesting but also provides us with a perspective with which we can look backward and forward.

  6. Determining MTF of digital detector system with Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Seon; Lee, Hyung Won; Nam, Sang Hee

    2005-04-01

    We have designed a detector based on a-Se(amorphous Selenium) and done simulation the detector with Monte Carlo method. We will apply the cascaded linear system theory to determine the MTF for whole detector system. For direct comparison with experiment, we have simulated 139um pixel pitch and used simulated X-ray tube spectrum.

  7. Computer simulator for a mobile telephone system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.; Ziegler, C.

    1983-01-01

    A software simulator to help NASA in the design of the LMSS was developed. The simulator will be used to study the characteristics of implementation requirements of the LMSS's configuration with specifications as outlined by NASA.

  8. Simulation of a human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Menon, Vinay

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a mathematically based human circulatory model. The model consists of lumped elements made of venous, arterial, peripheral, pulmonary vein and artery segments. A heart model is simulated using 4 chambers (left and right atriums and ventricles). The heart pump mechanism is operated by a simple piston based models for each of the chambers. The simulation consists of 19 (states) first order differential equations. and simulated with Matlab and Simulink. The simulation computes volume, flow rate and pressures in each segment.

  9. Data simulation for the Associated Particle Imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, L.N.

    1994-06-01

    A data simulation procedure for the Associated Particle Imaging (API) system has been developed by postprocessing output from the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) code. This paper compares the simulated results to our experimental data.

  10. pysimm: A python package for simulation of molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, Michael E.; Colina, Coray M.

    In this work, we present pysimm, a python package designed to facilitate structure generation, simulation, and modification of molecular systems. pysimm provides a collection of simulation tools and smooth integration with highly optimized third party software. Abstraction layers enable a standardized methodology to assign various force field models to molecular systems and perform simple simulations. These features have allowed pysimm to aid the rapid development of new applications specifically in the area of amorphous polymer simulations.

  11. A Unique Software System For Simulation-to-Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Victoria I.; Hutchinson, Brian K.

    2001-01-01

    "Simulation-to-Flight" is a research development concept to reduce costs and increase testing efficiency of future major aeronautical research efforts at NASA. The simulation-to-flight concept is achieved by using common software and hardware, procedures, and processes for both piloted-simulation and flight testing. This concept was applied to the design and development of two full-size transport simulators, a research system installed on a NASA B-757 airplane, and two supporting laboratories. This paper describes the software system that supports the simulation-to-flight facilities. Examples of various simulation-to-flight experimental applications were also provided.

  12. 2003 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    The following reports were included in the 2003 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop:Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP); Overview of NASA Glenn Seal Developments; NASA Ultra Efficient Engine Technology Project Overview; Development of Higher Temperature Abradable Seals for Industrial Gas Turbines; High Misalignment Carbon Seals for the Fan Drive Gear System Technologies; Compliant Foil Seal Investigations; Test Rig for Evaluating Active Turbine Blade Tip Clearance Control Concepts; Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control; Non-Contacting Finger Seal Developments and Design Considerations; Effect of Flow-Induced Radial Load on Brush Seal/Rotor Contact Mechanics; Seal Developments at Flowserve Corporation; Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators With Seal-Like Features; Numerical Investigations of High Pressure Acoustic Waves in Resonators; Feltmetal Seal Material Through-Flow; "Bimodal" Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) Propulsion for Future Human Mars Exploration Missions; High Temperature Propulsion System Structural Seals for Future Space Launch Vehicles; Advanced Control Surface Seal Development for Future Space Vehicles; High Temperature Metallic Seal Development for Aero Propulsion and Gas Turbine Applications; and BrazeFoil Honeycomb.

  13. Simulation of P systems with active membranes on CUDA.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, José M; García, José M; Guerrero, Ginés D; Martínez-del-Amor, Miguel A; Pérez-Hurtado, Ignacio; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J

    2010-05-01

    P systems or Membrane Systems provide a high-level computational modelling framework that combines the structure and dynamic aspects of biological systems in a relevant and understandable way. They are inherently parallel and non-deterministic computing devices. In this article, we discuss the motivation, design principles and key of the implementation of a simulator for the class of recognizer P systems with active membranes running on a (GPU). We compare our parallel simulator for GPUs to the simulator developed for a single central processing unit (CPU), showing that GPUs are better suited than CPUs to simulate P systems due to their highly parallel nature.

  14. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kury, John W.; Anderson, Brian L.

    1999-09-28

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  15. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Bernardin, John David; Kimpland, Robert Herbert; Spernjak, Dusan

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  16. Workflow simulation and its system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Renwang; Zhu, Zefei; Wang, Xianmei; Liu, Lei; Jiang, Xuefeng

    2005-12-01

    Workflow technique is a research hotspot in the field of advanced manufacturing technology. However, up to now workflow simulation still lacks necessary evaluation of rationality and validity. Therefore, a principle of workflow simulation was set forth; a kind of workflow simulation mechanism is proposed. It is divided into presentation layer, business logic layer and database layer. Then, taking process of handling business orders as example, and taking time, quality, cost and service as key factors, a feasible method was developed. Its simulation results of 30 days were listed and analyzed. At last, an amended process of handling business orders is brought forward.

  17. SuperB Simulation Production System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, L.; Bianchi, F.; Ciaschini, V.; Corvo, M.; Del Prete, D.; Di Simone, A.; Donvito, G.; Fella, A.; Franchini, P.; Giacomini, F.; Gianoli, A.; Longo, S.; Luitz, S.; Luppi, E.; Manzali, M.; Pardi, S.; Paolini, A.; Perez, A.; Rama, M.; Russo, G.; Santeramo, B.; Stroili, R.

    2012-12-01

    The SuperB asymmetric e+e- collider and detector to be built at the newly founded Nicola Cabibbo Lab will provide a uniquely sensitive probe of New Physics in the flavor sector of the Standard Model. Studying minute effects in the heavy quark and heavy lepton sectors requires a data sample of 75 ab-1 and a peak luminosity of 1036 cm-2 s-1. The SuperB Computing group is working on developing a simulation production framework capable to satisfy the experiment needs. It provides access to distributed resources in order to support both the detector design definition and its performance evaluation studies. During last year the framework has evolved from the point of view of job workflow, Grid services interfaces and technologies adoption. A complete code refactoring and sub-component language porting now permits the framework to sustain distributed production involving resources from two continents and Grid Flavors. In this paper we will report a complete description of the production system status of the art, its evolution and its integration with Grid services; in particular, we will focus on the utilization of new Grid component features as in LB and WMS version 3. Results from the last official SuperB production cycle will be reported.

  18. Distributed adaptive simulation through standards-based integration of simulators and adaptive learning systems.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan; Cline, Andrew; Shipley, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a distributed, standards-based architecture that enables simulation and simulator designers to leverage adaptive learning systems. Our approach, which incorporates an electronic competency record, open source LMS, and open source microcontroller hardware, is a low-cost, pragmatic option to integrating simulators with traditional courseware.

  19. System Synthesis in Preliminary Aircraft Design using Statistical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaurentis, Daniel; Mavris, Dimitri N.; Schrage, Daniel P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper documents an approach to conceptual and preliminary aircraft design in which system synthesis is achieved using statistical methods, specifically design of experiments (DOE) and response surface methodology (RSM). These methods are employed in order to more efficiently search the design space for optimum configurations. In particular, a methodology incorporating three uses of these techniques is presented. First, response surface equations are formed which represent aerodynamic analyses, in the form of regression polynomials, which are more sophisticated than generally available in early design stages. Next, a regression equation for an overall evaluation criterion is constructed for the purpose of constrained optimization at the system level. This optimization, though achieved in a innovative way, is still traditional in that it is a point design solution. The methodology put forward here remedies this by introducing uncertainty into the problem, resulting a solutions which are probabilistic in nature. DOE/RSM is used for the third time in this setting. The process is demonstrated through a detailed aero-propulsion optimization of a high speed civil transport. Fundamental goals of the methodology, then, are to introduce higher fidelity disciplinary analyses to the conceptual aircraft synthesis and provide a roadmap for transitioning from point solutions to probabalistic designs (and eventually robust ones).

  20. Simulation of thermal aspects of residential photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, G. W.; Raghuraman, P.

    1982-06-01

    A program was developed to simulate the performance of utility interactive residential photovoltaic (PV) energy systems. The PV system is divided into its major functional components, which are individually described with computer models. These models are described in detail. The results of simulation and actual measured data are compared. The thermal influences on the design of such PV energy systems are given particular attention.

  1. A HILS System for the Simulation of MAV Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-17

    A HILS System for the Simulation of MAV Flight In this research a HILS system in which a small autopilot can experience flight stimuli, such as...pitch, roll, yaw, and GPS is investigated. These stimuli are controlled by a flight simulator hosting an airframe model that the autopilot in question...fly’s. Such a system allows the autopilot to fly the virtual model of the flight simulator while experiencing all flight stimuli as if it is in real

  2. A Runtime Verification Framework for Control System Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ciraci, Selim; Fuller, Jason C.; Daily, Jeffrey A.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Callahan, Charles D.

    2014-08-02

    n a standard workflow for the validation of a control system, the control system is implemented as an extension to a simulator. Such simulators are complex software systems, and engineers may unknowingly violate constraints a simulator places on extensions. As such, errors may be introduced in the implementation of either the control system or the simulator leading to invalid simulation results. This paper presents a novel runtime verification approach for verifying control system implementations within simulators. The major contribution of the approach is the two-tier specification process. In the first tier, engineers model constraints using a domain-specific language tailored to modeling a controller’s response to changes in its input. The language is high-level and effectively hides the implementation details of the simulator, allowing engineers to specify design-level constraints independent of low-level simulator interfaces. In the second tier, simulator developers provide mapping rules for mapping design-level constraints to the implementation of the simulator. Using the rules, an automated tool transforms the design-level specifications into simulator-specific runtime verification specifications and generates monitoring code which is injected into the implementation of the simulator. During simulation, these monitors observe the input and output variables of the control system and report changes to the verifier. The verifier checks whether these changes follow the constraints of the control system. We describe application of this approach to the verification of the constraints of an HVAC control system implemented with the power grid simulator GridLAB-D.

  3. A System for Interactive Behaviour Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierschenk, Bernhard

    A psycho-ecological model is used as the basis for a simulation of interactive behavior strategies. The basic unit is an event, and each event has been recorded on closed circuit television videotape. The three basic paradigms of behavioral science--association, structure, and process--are used to anchor the simulations. The empirical foundation…

  4. A View on Future Building System Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    2011-04-01

    This chapter presents what a future environment for building system modeling and simulation may look like. As buildings continue to require increased performance and better comfort, their energy and control systems are becoming more integrated and complex. We therefore focus in this chapter on the modeling, simulation and analysis of building energy and control systems. Such systems can be classified as heterogeneous systems because they involve multiple domains, such as thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, electrical systems, control systems and communication systems. Also, they typically involve multiple temporal and spatial scales, and their evolution can be described by coupled differential equations, discrete equations and events. Modeling and simulating such systems requires a higher level of abstraction and modularisation to manage the increased complexity compared to what is used in today's building simulation programs. Therefore, the trend towards more integrated building systems is likely to be a driving force for changing the status quo of today's building simulation programs. Thischapter discusses evolving modeling requirements and outlines a path toward a future environment for modeling and simulation of heterogeneous building systems.A range of topics that would require many additional pages of discussion has been omitted. Examples include computational fluid dynamics for air and particle flow in and around buildings, people movement, daylight simulation, uncertainty propagation and optimisation methods for building design and controls. For different discussions and perspectives on the future of building modeling and simulation, we refer to Sahlin (2000), Augenbroe (2001) and Malkawi and Augenbroe (2004).

  5. A Process for Comparing Dynamics of Distributed Space Systems Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cures, Edwin Z.; Jackson, Albert A.; Morris, Jeffery C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a process that was developed for comparing the primary orbital dynamics behavior between space systems distributed simulations. This process is used to characterize and understand the fundamental fidelities and compatibilities of the modeling of orbital dynamics between spacecraft simulations. This is required for high-latency distributed simulations such as NASA s Integrated Mission Simulation and must be understood when reporting results from simulation executions. This paper presents 10 principal comparison tests along with their rationale and examples of the results. The Integrated Mission Simulation (IMSim) (formerly know as the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)) is a NASA research and development project focusing on the technologies and processes that are related to the collaborative simulation of complex space systems involved in the exploration of our solar system. Currently, the NASA centers that are actively participating in the IMSim project are the Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Kennedy Space Center, the Langley Research Center and the Marshall Space Flight Center. In concept, each center participating in IMSim has its own set of simulation models and environment(s). These simulation tools are used to build the various simulation products that are used for scientific investigation, engineering analysis, system design, training, planning, operations and more. Working individually, these production simulations provide important data to various NASA projects.

  6. Dshell++: A Component Based, Reusable Space System Simulation Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Christopher S.; Jain, Abhinandan

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the multi-mission Dshell++ simulation framework for high fidelity, physics-based simulation of spacecraft, robotic manipulation and mobility systems. Dshell++ is a C++/Python library which uses modern script driven object-oriented techniques to allow component reuse and a dynamic run-time interface for complex, high-fidelity simulation of spacecraft and robotic systems. The goal of the Dshell++ architecture is to manage the inherent complexity of physicsbased simulations while supporting component model reuse across missions. The framework provides several features that support a large degree of simulation configurability and usability.

  7. Plasma Heating Simulation in the VASIMR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.; ChangDiaz, Franklin R.; Squire, Jared P.; Carter, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the recent development in the simulation of the ion-cyclotron acceleration of the plasma in the VASIMR experiment. The modeling is done using an improved EMIR code for RF field calculation together with particle trajectory code for plasma transport calculat ion. The simulation results correlate with experimental data on the p lasma loading and predict higher ICRH performance for a higher density plasma target. These simulations assist in optimizing the ICRF anten na so as to achieve higher VASIMR efficiency.

  8. Co-simulation of innovative integrated HVAC systems in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Trcka, Marija; Hensena, Jan L.M.; Wetter, Michael

    2010-06-21

    Integrated performance simulation of buildings HVAC systems can help in reducing energy consumption and increasing occupant comfort. However, no single building performance simulation (BPS) tool offers sufficient capabilities and flexibilities to analyze integrated building systems and to enable rapid prototyping of innovative building and system technologies. One way to alleviate this problem is to use co-simulation, as an integrated approach to simulation. This article elaborates on issues important for co-simulation realization and discusses multiple possibilities to justify the particular approach implemented in the here described co-simulation prototype. The prototype is validated with the results obtained from the traditional simulation approach. It is further used in a proof-of-concept case study to demonstrate the applicability of the method and to highlight its benefits. Stability and accuracy of different coupling strategies are analyzed to give a guideline for the required coupling time step.

  9. Model Validation for Simulations of Vehicle Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    a large number of replicate samples via Monte- Carlo simulation. The test data, on the other hand, is usually provided as a collection of point...can be determined by Monte Carlo simulation. Classical hypothesis testing techniques depend on a normality assumption except for the modified...criteria”, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, 197:2517-2539, 2008. [14] S. Ferson, W. L. Oberkampf and L. Ginzburg , “Model

  10. Hybrid Concurrent Constraint Simulation Models of Several Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, Adam

    2003-01-01

    This distribution contains several simulation models created for the hybrid simulation language, Hybrid Concurrent Constraint (HCC). An HCC model contains the information specified in the widely-accepted academic definition of a hybrid system: this includes expressions for the modes of the systems to be simulated and the differential equations that apply in each mode. These expressions are written in the HCC syntax. The models included here were created by either applying basic physical laws or implementing equations listed in previously published papers.

  11. Modeling and Simulation Tools: From Systems Biology to Systems Medicine.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Brett G; Swat, Maciej J; Moné, Martijn J

    2016-01-01

    Modeling is an integral component of modern biology. In this chapter we look into the role of the model, as it pertains to Systems Medicine, and the software that is required to instantiate and run it. We do this by comparing the development, implementation, and characteristics of tools that have been developed to work with two divergent methodologies: Systems Biology and Pharmacometrics. From the Systems Biology perspective we consider the concept of "Software as a Medical Device" and what this may imply for the migration of research-oriented, simulation software into the domain of human health.In our second perspective, we see how in practice hundreds of computational tools already accompany drug discovery and development at every stage of the process. Standardized exchange formats are required to streamline the model exchange between tools, which would minimize translation errors and reduce the required time. With the emergence, almost 15 years ago, of the SBML standard, a large part of the domain of interest is already covered and models can be shared and passed from software to software without recoding them. Until recently the last stage of the process, the pharmacometric analysis used in clinical studies carried out on subject populations, lacked such an exchange medium. We describe a new emerging exchange format in Pharmacometrics which covers the non-linear mixed effects models, the standard statistical model type used in this area. By interfacing these two formats the entire domain can be covered by complementary standards and subsequently the according tools.

  12. The Role of Crop Systems Simulation in Agriculture and Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past 30 to 40 years, simulation of crop systems has advanced from a neophyte science with inadequate computing power into a robust and increasingly accepted science supported by improved software, languages, development tools, and computer capabilities. Crop system simulators contain mathe...

  13. Channel simulation for direct-detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct-detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log-normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean, or chi-square density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the channel simulator are presented.

  14. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Information Retrieval Systems Using Simulated Queries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a simulation method for estimating recall and fallout in a document retrieval system. Earlier research on simulating document retrieval systems is reviewed, examples are presented of the current method, a probabilistic justification of the method is given, theoretical concerns dealing with retrieval precision are discussed, and further…

  15. Channel simulation for direct detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean or chi-squared density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the Channel Simulator are presented.

  16. Ultracold atoms for simulation of many body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, David A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Feynman famously proposed simulating quantum physics using other, better controlled, quantum systems. This vision is now a reality within the realm of ultracold atomic physics. We discuss how these systems can be used to simulate many body physics, concentrating the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in 2D physics and the role of disorder.

  17. Simulation of Electromagnetic-Environment Susceptibility to Jamming Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    antenna modeled was that of a jammer, the pyramidal horn antenna. Once the radiation patterns were obtained the electromagnetic reciprocity...Simulation of Electromagnetic -Environment Susceptibility to Jamming Systems by Berenice Verdin and Patrick Debroux ARL-TR-7170 January...Range, NM 88002-5513 ARL-TR-7170 January 2015 Simulation of Electromagnetic -Environment Susceptibility to Jamming Systems Berenice Verdin

  18. Research in Modeling and Simulation for Airspace Systems Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, Mark G.; Kimmel, William M.; Welch, Sharon S.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of some of the applied research and simulation methodologies at the NASA Langley Research Center that support aerospace systems innovation. Risk assessment methodologies, complex systems design and analysis methodologies, and aer ospace operations simulations are described. Potential areas for future research and collaboration using interactive and distributed simula tions are also proposed.

  19. Simulating Massive Conformation Changes within Polypeptide Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaspinder Paul

    In this dissertation I employ all-atom structure based models with stable energy basins to several existing and novel polypeptide systems (postulated conformation changes of the mammalian prion protein and structurally dual proteins). The common themes are finding unfolding and refolding pathways between highly dissimilar protein structures as a means of understanding exactly how and why a protein may misfold. The modeling is based on the energy funnel landscape theory of protein conformation space. The principle of minimal frustration is considered as the model includes parameters which vary the roughness of the landscape and give rise to off-pathway misfoldings. The dual basin model is applied to the C-terminal (residues 166-226) of the mammalian prion protein. One basin represents the known alpha-helical (aH) structure while the other represents the same residues in a lefthanded beta-helical (LHBH) conformation. The LHBH structure has been proposed to help describe one class of in vitro grown fibrils, as well as possibly self-templating the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to the infectious form. Yet, it is unclear how the protein may make this global rearrangement. Our results demonstrate that the conformation changes are not strongly limited by large-scale geometry modification and that there may exist an overall preference for the LHBH conformation. Furthermore, our model presents novel intermediate trapping conformations with twisted LHBH structure. Polypeptides that display structural duality have primary structures that can give rise to different potential native conformations. We apply the structure-based all-atom model to a leucine zipper protein template with a stable aH structure that has been shown in experiment to switch to a β hairpin structure when exposed to a low-pH environment. We show that the model can be used to perform large-scale temperature-dependent conformational switching by simulating this switching behavior. We augmented

  20. Isotope heat source simulator for testing of space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Smith, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A reliable isotope heat source simulator was designed for use in a Brayton power system. This simulator is composed of an electrically heated tungsten wire which is wound around a boron nitride core and enclosed in a graphite jacket. Simulator testing was performed at the expected operating temperature of the Brayton power system. Endurance testing for 5012 hours was followed by cycling the simulator temperature. The integrity of this simulator was maintained throughout testing. Alumina beads served as a diffusion barrier to prevent interaction between the tungsten heater and boron nitride core. The simulator was designed to maintain a surface temperature of 1311 to 1366 K (1900 to 2000 F) with a power input of approximately 400 watts. The design concept and the materials used in the simulator make possible man different geometries. This flexibility increases its potential use.

  1. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS): An Award Winning Propulsion System Simulation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, Laurel J.; Naiman, Cynthia G.

    2002-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a full propulsion system simulation tool used by aerospace engineers to predict and analyze the aerothermodynamic behavior of commercial jet aircraft, military applications, and space transportation. The NPSS framework was developed to support aerospace, but other applications are already leveraging the initial capabilities, such as aviation safety, ground-based power, and alternative energy conversion devices such as fuel cells. By using the framework and developing the necessary components, future applications that NPSS could support include nuclear power, water treatment, biomedicine, chemical processing, and marine propulsion. NPSS will dramatically reduce the time, effort, and expense necessary to design and test jet engines. It accomplishes that by generating sophisticated computer simulations of an aerospace object or system, thus enabling engineers to "test" various design options without having to conduct costly, time-consuming real-life tests. The ultimate goal of NPSS is to create a numerical "test cell" that enables engineers to create complete engine simulations overnight on cost-effective computing platforms. Using NPSS, engine designers will be able to analyze different parts of the engine simultaneously, perform different types of analysis simultaneously (e.g., aerodynamic and structural), and perform analysis in a more efficient and less costly manner. NPSS will cut the development time of a new engine in half, from 10 years to 5 years. And NPSS will have a similar effect on the cost of development: new jet engines will cost about a billion dollars to develop rather than two billion. NPSS is also being applied to the development of space transportation technologies, and it is expected that similar efficiencies and cost savings will result. Advancements of NPSS in fiscal year 2001 included enhancing the NPSS Developer's Kit to easily integrate external components of varying fidelities, providing

  2. System Simulation by Recursive Feedback: Coupling a Set of Stand-Alone Subsystem Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D. D.

    2001-01-01

    Conventional construction of digital dynamic system simulations often involves collecting differential equations that model each subsystem, arran g them to a standard form, and obtaining their numerical gin solution as a single coupled, total-system simultaneous set. Simulation by numerical coupling of independent stand-alone subsimulations is a fundamentally different approach that is attractive because, among other things, the architecture naturally facilitates high fidelity, broad scope, and discipline independence. Recursive feedback is defined and discussed as a candidate approach to multidiscipline dynamic system simulation by numerical coupling of self-contained, single-discipline subsystem simulations. A satellite motion example containing three subsystems (orbit dynamics, attitude dynamics, and aerodynamics) has been defined and constructed using this approach. Conventional solution methods are used in the subsystem simulations. Distributed and centralized implementations of coupling have been considered. Numerical results are evaluated by direct comparison with a standard total-system, simultaneous-solution approach.

  3. Mathematical simulation of power conditioning systems. Volume 1: Simulation of elementary units. Report on simulation methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prajous, R.; Mazankine, J.; Ippolito, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Methods and algorithms used for the simulation of elementary power conditioning units buck, boost, and buck-boost, as well as shunt PWM are described. Definitions are given of similar converters and reduced parameters. The various parts of the simulation to be carried out are dealt with; local stability, corrective network, measurements of input-output impedance and global stability. A simulation example is given.

  4. Digital computer simulation of synthetic aperture systems and images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporeale, Claudio; Galati, Gaspare

    1991-06-01

    Digital computer simulation is a powerful tool for the design, the mission planning and the image quality analysis of advanced SAR Systems. 'End-to-end' simulators describe the whole process of the SAR imaging including the generation of the coherent echoes and their processing and allow, unlike the 'product simulators', to evaluate the effects of the various impairments on the final image. The main disadvantage of the 'end-to-end' approach, as described in this paper, is the heavy computation burden; therefore, a new type of simulator is presented, attempting to reduce the burden but presenting a greater degree of completeness and realism than the SAR product simulators, already existing.

  5. An Open Simulation System Model for Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Anthony D.

    1995-01-01

    A model for a generic and open environment for running multi-code or multi-application simulations - called the open Simulation System Model (OSSM) - is proposed and defined. This model attempts to meet the requirements of complex systems like the Numerical Propulsion Simulator System (NPSS). OSSM places no restrictions on the types of applications that can be integrated at any state of its evolution. This includes applications of different disciplines, fidelities, etc. An implementation strategy is proposed that starts with a basic prototype, and evolves over time to accommodate an increasing number of applications. Potential (standard) software is also identified which may aid in the design and implementation of the system.

  6. Simulating Hepatic Lesions as Virtual Cellular Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-Liver) project is aimed at reducing the uncertainty in estimating the risk of toxic outcomes in humans by simulating the dose-dependent effects of environmental chemicals in silico. The v-Liver embodies an emerging field of research in computational ti...

  7. Simulating Stochastic Crop Management in Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction -- Crop simulation models are uniquely suitable for examining long term crop responses to environmental variability due to changes in climate or other factors. Long-term studies typically emphasize variability related to weather conditions; certain weather-dependent cropping practices m...

  8. Development of a Prototype Simulation Executive with Zooming in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.

    1995-01-01

    A major difficulty in designing aeropropulsion systems is that of identifying and understanding the interactions between the separate engine components and disciplines (e.g., fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, heat transfer, material properties, etc.). The traditional analysis approach is to decompose the system into separate components with the interaction between components being evaluated by the application of each of the single disciplines in a sequential manner. Here, one discipline uses information from the calculation of another discipline to determine the effects of component coupling. This approach, however, may not properly identify the consequences of these effects during the design phase, leaving the interactions to be discovered and evaluated during engine testing. This contributes to the time and cost of developing new propulsion systems as, typically, several design-build-test cycles are needed to fully identify multidisciplinary effects and reach the desired system performance. The alternative to sequential isolated component analysis is to use multidisciplinary coupling at a more fundamental level. This approach has been made more plausible due to recent advancements in computation simulation along with application of concurrent engineering concepts. Computer simulation systems designed to provide an environment which is capable of integrating the various disciplines into a single simulation system have been proposed and are currently being developed. One such system is being developed by the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project. The NPSS project, being developed at the Interdisciplinary Technology Office at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a 'numerical test cell' designed to provide for comprehensive computational design and analysis of aerospace propulsion systems. It will provide multi-disciplinary analyses on a variety of computational platforms, and a user-interface consisting of expert systems, data base management and

  9. Large liquid rocket engine transient performance simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, J. R.; Southwick, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    A simulation system, ROCETS, was designed and developed to allow cost-effective computer predictions of liquid rocket engine transient performance. The system allows a user to generate a simulation of any rocket engine configuration using component modules stored in a library through high-level input commands. The system library currently contains 24 component modules, 57 sub-modules and maps, and 33 system routines and utilities. FORTRAN models from other sources can be operated in the system upon inclusion of interface information on comment cards. Operation of the simulation is simplified for the user by run, execution, and output processors. The simulation system makes available steady-state trim balance, transient operation, and linear partial generation. The system utilizes a modern equation solver for efficient operation of the simulations. Transient integration methods include integral and differential forms for the trapezoidal, first order Gear, and second order Gear corrector equations. A detailed technology test bed engine (TTBE) model was generated to be used as the acceptance test of the simulation system. The general level of model detail was that reflected in the Space Shuttle Main Engine DTM. The model successfully obtained steady-state balance in main stage operation and simulated throttle transients, including engine starts and shutdown. A NASA FORTRAN control model was obtained, ROCETS interface installed in comment cards, and operated with the TTBE model in closed-loop transient mode.

  10. Driven harmonic oscillator as a quantum simulator for open systems

    SciTech Connect

    Piilo, Jyrki; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2006-09-15

    We show theoretically how a driven harmonic oscillator can be used as a quantum simulator for the non-Markovian damped harmonic oscillator. In the general framework, our results demonstrate the possibility to use a closed system as a simulator for open quantum systems. The quantum simulator is based on sets of controlled drives of the closed harmonic oscillator with appropriately tailored electric field pulses. The non-Markovian dynamics of the damped harmonic oscillator is obtained by using the information about the spectral density of the open system when averaging over the drives of the closed oscillator. We consider single trapped ions as a specific physical implementation of the simulator, and we show how the simulator approach reveals physical insight into the open system dynamics, e.g., the characteristic quantum mechanical non-Markovian oscillatory behavior of the energy of the damped oscillator, usually obtained by the non-Lindblad-type master equation, can have a simple semiclassical interpretation.

  11. Knowledge Based Simulation: An Artificial Intelligence Approach to System Modeling and Automating the Simulation Life Cycle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-13

    Simulation: An Artificial Intelligence Approach to System Modeling and Automating the Simulation Life Cycle Mark S. Fox, Nizwer Husain, Malcolm...years of research in the application of Artificial Intelligence to Simulation. Our focus has been in two areas: the use of Al knowledge representation...this problem by using Artificial Intelligence (Al) knowledge representation techniques, such as frames, to represent the objects and their

  12. Rotor-Bearing Dynamics Technology Design Guide. Part VI. Status of Gas Bearing Technology Applicable to Aero Propulsion Machinery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    a 3.5 lb/ sec Flow Rate Gas Turbine 47 14 Load Chart, 1200 Partial ArcL L/D 1 [6]-----------------------------------------------4 15 Spring-Mounted... Frottement Des Solids. Frottement Dans le Vide", Comptes Rendus, 150, 960-8 (1910). 3. Ferranti, S.Z. de., "Improvements in, and Relating to Methods of and

  13. Atmospheric simulator and calibration system for remote sensing radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A system for calibrating the MAPS (measurement of air pollution from satellites) instruments was developed. The design of the system provides a capability for simulating a broad range of radiant energy source temperatures and a broad range of atmospheric pressures, temperatures, and pollutant concentrations for a single slab atmosphere. The system design and the system operation are described.

  14. A flight simulator control system using electric torque motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musick, R. O.; Wagner, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    Control systems are required in flight simulators to provide representative stick and rudder pedal characteristics. A system has been developed that uses electric dc torque motors instead of the more common hydraulic actuators. The torque motor system overcomes certain disadvantages of hydraulic systems, such as high cost, high power consumption, noise, oil leaks, and safety problems. A description of the torque motor system is presented, including both electrical and mechanical design as well as performance characteristics. The system develops forces sufficiently high for most simulations, and is physically small and light enough to be used in most motion-base cockpits.

  15. Predicting System Accidents with Model Analysis During Hybrid Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Fleming, Land D.; Throop, David R.

    2002-01-01

    Standard discrete event simulation is commonly used to identify system bottlenecks and starving and blocking conditions in resources and services. The CONFIG hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool can simulate such conditions in combination with inputs external to the simulation. This provides a means for evaluating the vulnerability to system accidents of a system's design, operating procedures, and control software. System accidents are brought about by complex unexpected interactions among multiple system failures , faulty or misleading sensor data, and inappropriate responses of human operators or software. The flows of resource and product materials play a central role in the hazardous situations that may arise in fluid transport and processing systems. We describe the capabilities of CONFIG for simulation-time linear circuit analysis of fluid flows in the context of model-based hazard analysis. We focus on how CONFIG simulates the static stresses in systems of flow. Unlike other flow-related properties, static stresses (or static potentials) cannot be represented by a set of state equations. The distribution of static stresses is dependent on the specific history of operations performed on a system. We discuss the use of this type of information in hazard analysis of system designs.

  16. Test and evaluation of the generalized gate logic system simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Paul S.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the initial testing of the Generalized Gate Level Logic Simulator (GGLOSS) are discussed. The simulator is a special purpose fault simulator designed to assist in the analysis of the effects of random hardware failures on fault tolerant digital computer systems. The testing of the simulator covers two main areas. First, the simulation results are compared with data obtained by monitoring the behavior of hardware. The circuit used for these comparisons is an incomplete microprocessor design based upon the MIL-STD-1750A Instruction Set Architecture. In the second area of testing, current simulation results are compared with experimental data obtained using precursors of the current tool. In each case, a portion of the earlier experiment is confirmed. The new results are then viewed from a different perspective in order to evaluate the usefulness of this simulation strategy.

  17. Interactive Electronic Circuit Simulation on Small Computer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    this is the most effective way of completing a computer-aided engineering design cycle. Compar- isons of the interactive versus batch simulation...run on almost any computer system with few if any modifications. Also included are the four benchmark test circuits which were used in many of the...the ensuing FORTRAN version. 2.2 Circuit Simulation Using BIAS-D (BASIC Version) Any circuit-simulation program can be di- vided into three

  18. The Center-TRACON Automation System: Simulation and field testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    A new concept for air traffic management in the terminal area, implemented as the Center-TRACON Automation System, has been under development at NASA Ames in a cooperative program with the FAA since 1991. The development has been strongly influenced by concurrent simulation and field site evaluations. The role of simulation and field activities in the development process will be discussed. Results of recent simulation and field tests will be presented.

  19. Simulation test beds for the Space Station electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and its prime contractor are respnsible for developing the electrical power system on the Space Station. The power system will be controlled by a network of distributed processors. Control software will be verified, validated, and tested in hardware and software test beds. Current plans for the software test bed involve using real time and nonreal time simulations of the power system. This paper will discuss the general simulation objectives and configurations, control architecture, interfaces between simulator and controls, types of tests, and facility configurations.

  20. Simulation test beds for the space station electrical power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, Gerald G.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center and its prime contractor are responsible for developing the electrical power system on the space station. The power system will be controlled by a network of distributed processors. Control software will be verified, validated, and tested in hardware and software test beds. Current plans for the software test bed involve using real time and nonreal time simulations of the power system. This paper will discuss the general simulation objectives and configurations, control architecture, interfaces between simulator and controls, types of tests, and facility configurations.

  1. Reactor Subsystem Simulation for Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; J. Michael Doster; Alan Rominger

    2012-09-01

    Preliminary system models have been developed by Idaho National Laboratory researchers and are currently being enhanced to assess integrated system performance given multiple sources (e.g., nuclear + wind) and multiple applications (i.e., electricity + process heat). Initial efforts to integrate a Fortran-based simulation of a small modular reactor (SMR) with the balance of plant model have been completed in FY12. This initial effort takes advantage of an existing SMR model developed at North Carolina State University to provide initial integrated system simulation for a relatively low cost. The SMR subsystem simulation details are discussed in this report.

  2. Issues in visual support to real-time space system simulation solved in the Systems Engineering Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Vincent K.

    1989-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Simulator has addressed the major issues in providing visual data to its real-time man-in-the-loop simulations. Out-the-window views and CCTV views are provided by three scene systems to give the astronauts their real-world views. To expand the window coverage for the Space Station Freedom workstation a rotating optics system is used to provide the widest field of view possible. To provide video signals to as many viewpoints as possible, windows and CCTVs, with a limited amount of hardware, a video distribution system has been developed to time-share the video channels among viewpoints at the selection of the simulation users. These solutions have provided the visual simulation facility for real-time man-in-the-loop simulations for the NASA space program.

  3. Environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, W. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An environmental fog/rain visual display system for aircraft simulators is described. The electronic elements of the system include a real time digital computer, a caligraphic color display which simulates landing lights of selective intensity, and a color television camera for producing a moving color display of the airport runway as depicted on a model terrain board. The mechanical simulation elements of the system include an environmental chamber which can produce natural fog, nonhomogeneous fog, rain and fog combined, or rain only. A pilot looking through the aircraft wind screen will look through the fog and/or rain generated in the environmental chamber onto a viewing screen with the simulated color image of the airport runway thereon, and observe a very real simulation of actual conditions of a runway as it would appear through actual fog and/or rain.

  4. Simulation of Combustion Systems with Realistic g-jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, William E.; McGrattan, Kevin B.; Baum, Howard R.

    2003-01-01

    In this project a transient, fully three-dimensional computer simulation code was developed to simulate the effects of realistic g-jitter on a number of combustion systems. The simulation code is capable of simulating flame spread on a solid and nonpremixed or premixed gaseous combustion in nonturbulent flow with simple combustion models. Simple combustion models were used to preserve computational efficiency since this is meant to be an engineering code. Also, the use of sophisticated turbulence models was not pursued (a simple Smagorinsky type model can be implemented if deemed appropriate) because if flow velocities are large enough for turbulence to develop in a reduced gravity combustion scenario it is unlikely that g-jitter disturbances (in NASA's reduced gravity facilities) will play an important role in the flame dynamics. Acceleration disturbances of realistic orientation, magnitude, and time dependence can be easily included in the simulation. The simulation algorithm was based on techniques used in an existing large eddy simulation code which has successfully simulated fire dynamics in complex domains. A series of simulations with measured and predicted acceleration disturbances on the International Space Station (ISS) are presented. The results of this series of simulations suggested a passive isolation system and appropriate scheduling of crew activity would provide a sufficiently "quiet" acceleration environment for spherical diffusion flames.

  5. Studies and simulations of the DigiCipher system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayood, K.; Chen, Y. C.; Kipp, G.

    1993-01-01

    During this period the development of simulators for the various high definition television (HDTV) systems proposed to the FCC was continued. The FCC has indicated that it wants the various proposers to collaborate on a single system. Based on all available information this system will look very much like the advanced digital television (ADTV) system with major contributions only from the DigiCipher system. The results of our simulations of the DigiCipher system are described. This simulator was tested using test sequences from the MPEG committee. The results are extrapolated to HDTV video sequences. Once again, some caveats are in order. The sequences used for testing the simulator and generating the results are those used for testing the MPEG algorithm. The sequences are of much lower resolution than the HDTV sequences would be, and therefore the extrapolations are not totally accurate. One would expect to get significantly higher compression in terms of bits per pixel with sequences that are of higher resolution. However, the simulator itself is a valid one, and should HDTV sequences become available, they could be used directly with the simulator. A brief overview of the DigiCipher system is given. Some coding results obtained using the simulator are looked at. These results are compared to those obtained using the ADTV system. These results are evaluated in the context of the CCSDS specifications and make some suggestions as to how the DigiCipher system could be implemented in the NASA network. Simulations such as the ones reported can be biased depending on the particular source sequence used. In order to get more complete information about the system one needs to obtain a reasonable set of models which mirror the various kinds of sources encountered during video coding. A set of models which can be used to effectively model the various possible scenarios is provided. As this is somewhat tangential to the other work reported, the results are included as an

  6. Dynamic Simulation of Airborne High Power Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    42, 43 and 44. These curves give the secondary current of phase A, IL11, the primary K current of phase A, IL22 , and the magnetizing current of phase...A, due to ILll I" and IL22 , PIX. The simulation was for wye-wye connection of three single phase trans- formers. The data used was not for any...plot of a single variable, the statement "PLOT" is used IL11, IL22 , IL33, PLOT K 185 This statement will provide a separate plot of each variable

  7. Characteristics of Flight Simulator Visual Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    reduce these angles. By contrast, the U.S. Air Force’s Advanced Simulator for Pilot Training ( ASPT )’ (Ref. 4) has an irregular field boundary shape with...field. The binocular field size of the human (with head and eyes fixed) is similar to that for the ASPT ; how- ever, the field shape is not. The field...azimuth and elevation angles for a circular shape and a zone. Several other field-of-view boundaries, including that for the ASPT , are plotted in

  8. Computer-aided Instructional System for Transmission Line Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhard, Erwin A.; Roth, Charles H., Jr.

    A computer-aided instructional system has been developed which utilizes dynamic computer-controlled graphic displays and which requires student interaction with a computer simulation in an instructional mode. A numerical scheme has been developed for digital simulation of a uniform, distortionless transmission line with resistive terminations and…

  9. Policy Analysis and Simulation System for Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mecca, Thomas V.; Adams, Charles F.

    Policy Analysis and Simulation System (PASS) is an interactive microcomputer model that can be used by educational administrators, policy-makers, and planners to simulate and forecast, under conditions of environmental uncertainty, the impact of strategic policies on the projected trends and goals of educational performance. PASS generates…

  10. General Aviation Cockpit Weather Information System Simulation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdaragh, Ray; Novacek, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on two experiments on the effectiveness of a cockpit weather information system on a simulated general aviation flight. The presentation covers the simulation hardware configuration, the display device screen layout, a mission scenario, conclusions, and recommendations. The second experiment, with its own scenario and conclusions, is a follow-on experiment.

  11. System-of-Systems Approach for Integrated Energy Systems Modeling and Simulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Saurabh; Ruth, Mark; Pratt, Annabelle; Lunacek, Monte; Krishnamurthy, Dheepak; Jones, Wesley

    2015-08-21

    Today’s electricity grid is the most complex system ever built—and the future grid is likely to be even more complex because it will incorporate distributed energy resources (DERs) such as wind, solar, and various other sources of generation and energy storage. The complexity is further augmented by the possible evolution to new retail market structures that provide incentives to owners of DERs to support the grid. To understand and test new retail market structures and technologies such as DERs, demand-response equipment, and energy management systems while providing reliable electricity to all customers, an Integrated Energy System Model (IESM) is being developed at NREL. The IESM is composed of a power flow simulator (GridLAB-D), home energy management systems implemented using GAMS/Pyomo, a market layer, and hardware-in-the-loop simulation (testing appliances such as HVAC, dishwasher, etc.). The IESM is a system-of-systems (SoS) simulator wherein the constituent systems are brought together in a virtual testbed. We will describe an SoS approach for developing a distributed simulation environment. We will elaborate on the methodology and the control mechanisms used in the co-simulation illustrated by a case study.

  12. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H. R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system; and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  13. ROBOSIM: An intelligent simulator for robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R.; Cook, George E.; Biegl, Csaba; Springfield, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an update of an intelligent robotics simulator package, ROBOSIM, first introduced at Technology 2000 in 1990. ROBOSIM is used for three-dimensional geometrical modeling of robot manipulators and various objects in their workspace, and for the simulation of action sequences performed by the manipulators. Geometric modeling of robot manipulators has an expanding area of interest because it can aid the design and usage of robots in a number of ways, including: design and testing of manipulators, robot action planning, on-line control of robot manipulators, telerobotic user interface, and training and education. NASA developed ROBOSIM between 1985-88 to facilitate the development of robotics, and used the package to develop robotics for welding, coating, and space operations. ROBOSIM has been further developed for academic use by its co-developer Vanderbilt University, and has been in both classroom and laboratory environments for teaching complex robotic concepts. Plans are being formulated to make ROBOSIM available to all U.S. engineering/engineering technology schools (over three hundred total with an estimated 10,000+ users per year).

  14. Simulation studies of improved sounding systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, H.; Wark, D.; Aumann, H.; Evans, N.; Phillips, N.; Susskind, J.; Mcmillin, L.; Goldman, A.; Chahine, M.; Crone, L.

    1989-01-01

    Two instrument designs for indirect satellite sounding of the atmosphere in the infrared are represented by the High Resolution Infra-Red Sounder, Model 2 (HIRS-2) and by the Advanced Meteorological Temperature Sounder (AMTS). The relative capabilities of the two instruments were tested by simulating satellite measurements from a group of temperature soundings, allowing the two participants to retrieve the temperature profiles from the simulated data, and comparing the results with the original temperature profiles. Four data sets were produced from radiosondes data extrapolated to a suitable altitude, representing continents and oceans, between 30S and 30N. From the information available, temperature profiles were retrieved by two different methods, statistical regression and inversion of the radiative transfer equation. Results show the consequence of greater spectral purity, concomitant increase in the number of spectral intervals, and the better spatial resolution in partly clouded areas. At the same time, the limitation of the HIRS-2 without its companion instrument leads to some results which should be ignored in comparing the two instruments. A clear superiority of AMTS results is shown.

  15. Efficient simulation of strong system-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Prior, Javier; Chin, Alex W; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2010-07-30

    Multicomponent quantum systems in strong interaction with their environment are receiving increasing attention due to their importance in a variety of contexts, ranging from solid state quantum information processing to the quantum dynamics of biomolecular aggregates. Unfortunately, these systems are difficult to simulate as the system-bath interactions cannot be treated perturbatively and standard approaches are invalid or inefficient. Here we combine the time-dependent density matrix renormalization group with techniques from the theory of orthogonal polynomials to provide an efficient method for simulating open quantum systems, including spin-boson models and their generalizations to multicomponent systems.

  16. System Simulation by Recursive Feedback: Coupling a Set of Stand-Alone Subsystem Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Douglas D.; Ryan, Stephen G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recursive feedback is defined and discussed as a framework for development of specific algorithms and procedures that propagate the time-domain solution for a dynamical system simulation consisting of multiple numerically coupled, self-contained, stand-alone subsystem simulations. A satellite motion example containing three subsystems (orbit dynamics, attitude dynamics, and aerodynamics) has been defined and constructed using this approach. Conventional solution methods are used in the subsystem simulations. Centralized and distributed versions of coupling structure have been addressed. Numerical results are evaluated by direct comparison with a standard total-system, simultaneous-solution approach.

  17. System Simulation by Recursive Feedback: Coupling A Set of Stand-Alone Subsystem Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Douglas D.; Hanson, John M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recursive feedback is defined and discussed as a framework for development of specific algorithms and procedures that propagate the time-domain solution for a dynamical system simulation consisting of multiple numerically coupled self-contained stand-alone subsystem simulations. A satellite motion example containing three subsystems (other dynamics, attitude dynamics, and aerodynamics) has been defined and constructed using this approach. Conventional solution methods are used in the subsystem simulations. Centralized and distributed versions of coupling structure have been addressed. Numerical results are evaluated by direct comparison with a standard total-system simultaneous-solution approach.

  18. Hybrid simulation theory for a classical nonlinear dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drazin, Paul L.; Govindjee, Sanjay

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid simulation is an experimental and computational technique which allows one to study the time evolution of a system by physically testing a subset of it while the remainder is represented by a numerical model that is attached to the physical portion via sensors and actuators. The technique allows one to study large or complicated mechanical systems while only requiring a subset of the complete system to be present in the laboratory. This results in vast cost savings as well as the ability to study systems that simply can not be tested due to scale. However, the errors that arise from splitting the system in two requires careful attention, if a valid simulation is to be guaranteed. To date, efforts to understand the theoretical limitations of hybrid simulation have been restricted to linear dynamical systems. In this work we consider the behavior of hybrid simulation when applied to nonlinear dynamical systems. As a model problem, we focus on the damped, harmonically-driven nonlinear pendulum. This system offers complex nonlinear characteristics, in particular periodic and chaotic motions. We are able to show that the application of hybrid simulation to nonlinear systems requires a careful understanding of what one expects from such an experiment. In particular, when system response is chaotic we advocate the need for the use of multiple metrics to characterize the difference between two chaotic systems via Lyapunov exponents and Lyapunov dimensions, as well as correlation exponents. When system response is periodic we advocate the use of L2 norms. Further, we are able to show that hybrid simulation can falsely predict chaotic or periodic response when the true system has the opposite characteristic. In certain cases, we are able to show that control system parameters can mitigate this issue.

  19. Modeling and HIL Simulation of Flight Conditions Simulating Control System for the Altitude Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Shen, Li; Zhang, Tianhong

    2016-12-01

    Simulated altitude test is an essential exploring, debugging, verification and validation means during the development of aero-engine. Free-jet engine test can simulate actual working conditions of aero-engine more realistically than direct-connect engine test but with relatively lower cost compared to propulsion wind tunnel test, thus becoming an important developing area of simulated altitude test technology. The Flight Conditions Simulating Control System (FCSCS) is of great importance to the Altitude Test Facility (ATF) but the development of that is a huge challenge. Aiming at improving the design efficiency and reducing risks during the development of FCSCS for ATFs, a Hardware- in-the-Loop (HIL) simulation system was designed and the mathematical models of key components such as the pressure stabilizing chamber, free-jet nozzle, control valve and aero-engine were built in this paper. Moreover, some HIL simulation experiments were carried out. The results show that the HIL simulation system designed and established in this paper is reasonable and effective, which can be used to adjust control parameters conveniently and assess the software and hardware in the control system immediately.

  20. Simulating optoelectronic systems for remote sensing with SENSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerner, Anko

    2003-04-01

    The consistent end-to-end simulation of airborne and spaceborne remote sensing systems is an important task and sometimes the only way for the adaptation and optimization of a sensor and its observation conditions, the choice and test of algorithms for data processing, error estimation and the evaluation of the capabilities of the whole sensor system. The presented software simulator SENSOR (Software ENvironment for the Simulation of Optical Remote sensing systems) includes a full model of the sensor hardware, the observed scene, and the atmosphere in between. It allows the simulation of a wide range of optoelectronic systems for remote sensing. The simulator consists of three parts. The first part describes the geometrical relations between scene, sun, and the remote sensing system using a ray tracing algorithm. The second part of the simulation environment considers the radiometry. It calculates the at-sensor radiance using a pre-calculated multidimensional lookup-table taking the atmospheric influence on the radiation into account. Part three consists of an optical and an electronic sensor model for the generation of digital images. Using SENSOR for an optimization requires the additional application of task-specific data processing algorithms. The principle of the end-to-end-simulation approach is explained, all relevant concepts of SENSOR are discussed, and examples of its use are given. The verification of SENSOR is demonstrated.

  1. A Space Station/Payload Pointing System simulation using TREETOPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ram, Mohan; Shamma, Mohammed

    1990-01-01

    A rigid body model of NASA's Space Station (SS)/Payload Pointing System (PPS) was built and simulated using the multibody, large angle simulation package TREETOPS, whose name refers to the tree-topology class of structures that may be simulated. SS/PPS data from a previous feasibility study utilizing the MultiOptimal Differential Equation language was used as a test case to evaluate the built-in dynamical formulation capabilities of TREETOPS. The simulation results showed close agreement with NASA-Goddard data, demonstrating the validity of the nonlinear, large angle, multi-degree of freedom TREETOPS model.

  2. Real-Time Simulation Computation System. [for digital flight simulation of research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetter, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Real-Time Simulation Computation System, which will provide the flexibility necessary for operation in the research environment at the Ames Research Center is discussed. Designing the system with common subcomponents and using modular construction techniques enhances expandability and maintainability qualities. The 10-MHz series transmission scheme is the basis of the Input/Output Unit System and is the driving force providing the system flexibility. Error checking and detection performed on the transmitted data provide reliability measurements and assurances that accurate data are received at the simulators.

  3. MASSIS: a mass spectrum simulation system 1. Principle and method.

    PubMed

    Chen, HaiFeng; Fan, BoTao; Xia, HaiRong; Petitjean, Michael; Yuan, ShenGang; Panaye, Annick; Doucet, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    A mass spectrum simulation system was developed. The simulated spectrum for a given target structure is computed based on the cleavage knowledge and statistical rules established and stocked in pivot databases: cleavage rule knowledge, function groups, small fragments and fragment-intensity relationships. These databases were constructed from correlation charts and statistical analysis of large population of organic mass spectra using data mining techniques. Since 1980, several systems were proposed for mass spectrum simulation, but in present there is no any commercial software available. This shows the complexity and difficulties in the development of a such system. The reported mass spectral simulation system in this paper could be the first general software for organic chemistry use

  4. Documentation for the token ring network simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peden, Jeffery H.; Weaver, Alfred C.

    1990-01-01

    A manual is presented which describes the language features of the Token Ring Network Simulation System. The simulation system is a powerful simulation tool for token ring networks which allows the specification of various Medium Access Control (MAC) layer protocols as well as the specification of various features of upper layer ISO protocols. In addition to these features, it also allows the user to specify message and station classes virtually to any degree of detail desired. The choice of a language instead of an interactive system to specify network parameters was dictated by both flexibility and time considerations. The language was developed specifically for the simulation system, and is very simple. It is also user friendly in that language elements which do not apply to the case at hand are ignored rather than treated as errors.

  5. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIA INHABITING A WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of chlorination and chloramination treatments on heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) inhabiting a water distribution system simulator was investigated. Notable changes in bacterial densities were observed during this monitoring study. For e...

  6. Analytical simulation of SPS system performance, volume 3, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.; Lindsey, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    The simulation model for the Solar Power Satellite spaceantenna and the associated system imperfections are described. Overall power transfer efficiency, the key performance issue, is discussed as a function of the system imperfections. Other system performance measures discussed include average power pattern, mean beam gain reduction, and pointing error.

  7. KLASS: Kennedy Launch Academy Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Lesley C.

    2007-01-01

    Software provides access to many sophisticated scientific instrumentation (Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), a Light Microscope, a Scanning Probe Microscope (covering Scanning Tunneling, Atomic Force, and Magnetic Force microscopy), and an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer for the SEM). Flash animation videos explain how each of the instruments work. Videos on how they are used at NASA and the sample preparation. Measuring and labeling tools provided with each instrument. Hands on experience of controlling the virtual instrument to conduct investigations, much like the real scientists at NASA do. Very open architecture. Open source on SourceForge. Extensive use of XML Target audience is high school and entry-level college students. "Many beginning students never get closer to an electron microscope than the photos in their textbooks. But anyone can get a sense of what the instrument can do by downloading this simulator from NASA's Kennedy Space Center." Science Magazine, April 8th, 2005

  8. PEP-II RF Feedback System Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.

    2004-03-11

    A model containing the fundamental impedance of the PEP-II cavity along with the longitudinal beam dynamics and feedback system components is in use. It is prepared in a format allowing time-domain as well as frequency-domain analysis and full graphics capability. Matlab and Simulink are control system design and analysis programs (widely available) with many built-in tools. The model allows the use of compiled C-code modules for compute intensive portions.

  9. Development of a system for transition characterization. [for aerodynamic simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, Arild; Graves, Sharon; Diamond, John

    1993-01-01

    The present system for real-time boundary layer transition detection and characterization encompasses aerodynamic simulations, sensor characteristics, and a hybrid analog/digital system for signal analysis, verification, and compression. By using artificial, intermittently laminar/turbulent signals, in conjunction with trajectory simulation, it becomes possible to conduct algorithm development which is independent of, and in advance of, sensor buildup. Attention is given to the illustrative case of the Pegasus launch vehicle's trajectory.

  10. Laser Doppler velocimeter system simulation for sensing aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, J. A. L.; Meng, J. C. S.

    1974-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model of aircraft vortex wakes in an irregular wind shear field near the ground is developed and used as a basis for modeling the characteristics of a laser Doppler detection and vortex location system. The trailing vortex sheet and the wind shear are represented by discrete free vortices distributed over a two-dimensional grid. The time dependent hydrodynamic equations are solved by direct numerical integration in the Boussinesq approximation. The ground boundary is simulated by images, and fast Fourier Transform techniques are used to evaluate the vorticity stream function. The atmospheric turbulence was simulated by constructing specific realizations at time equal to zero, assuming that Kolmogoroff's law applies, and that the dissipation rate is constant throughout the flow field. The response of a simulated laser Doppler velocimeter is analyzed by simulating the signal return from the flow field as sensed by a simulation of the optical/electronic system.

  11. Helmet-mounted display systems for flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haworth, Loren A.; Bucher, Nancy M.

    1989-01-01

    Simulation scientists are continually improving simulation technology with the goal of more closely replicating the physical environment of the real world. The presentation or display of visual information is one area in which recent technical improvements have been made that are fundamental to conducting simulated operations close to the terrain. Detailed and appropriate visual information is especially critical for nap-of-the-earth helicopter flight simulation where the pilot maintains an 'eyes-out' orientation to avoid obstructions and terrain. This paper describes visually coupled wide field of view helmet-mounted display (WFOVHMD) system technology as a viable visual presentation system for helicopter simulation. Tradeoffs associated with this mode of presentation as well as research and training applications are discussed.

  12. Relating Standardized Visual Perception Measures to Simulator Visual System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.; Sweet, Barbara T.

    2013-01-01

    Human vision is quantified through the use of standardized clinical vision measurements. These measurements typically include visual acuity (near and far), contrast sensitivity, color vision, stereopsis (a.k.a. stereo acuity), and visual field periphery. Simulator visual system performance is specified in terms such as brightness, contrast, color depth, color gamut, gamma, resolution, and field-of-view. How do these simulator performance characteristics relate to the perceptual experience of the pilot in the simulator? In this paper, visual acuity and contrast sensitivity will be related to simulator visual system resolution, contrast, and dynamic range; similarly, color vision will be related to color depth/color gamut. Finally, we will consider how some characteristics of human vision not typically included in current clinical assessments could be used to better inform simulator requirements (e.g., relating dynamic characteristics of human vision to update rate and other temporal display characteristics).

  13. Aerodynamic simulation on massively parallel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeuser, Jochem; Simon, Horst D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly addresses the computational requirements for the analysis of complete configurations of aircraft and spacecraft currently under design to be used for advanced transportation in commercial applications as well as in space flight. The discussion clearly shows that massively parallel systems are the only alternative which is both cost effective and on the other hand can provide the necessary TeraFlops, needed to satisfy the narrow design margins of modern vehicles. It is assumed that the solution of the governing physical equations, i.e., the Navier-Stokes equations which may be complemented by chemistry and turbulence models, is done on multiblock grids. This technique is situated between the fully structured approach of classical boundary fitted grids and the fully unstructured tetrahedra grids. A fully structured grid best represents the flow physics, while the unstructured grid gives best geometrical flexibility. The multiblock grid employed is structured within a block, but completely unstructured on the block level. While a completely unstructured grid is not straightforward to parallelize, the above mentioned multiblock grid is inherently parallel, in particular for multiple instruction multiple datastream (MIMD) machines. In this paper guidelines are provided for setting up or modifying an existing sequential code so that a direct parallelization on a massively parallel system is possible. Results are presented for three parallel systems, namely the Intel hypercube, the Ncube hypercube, and the FPS 500 system. Some preliminary results for an 8K CM2 machine will also be mentioned. The code run is the two dimensional grid generation module of Grid, which is a general two dimensional and three dimensional grid generation code for complex geometries. A system of nonlinear Poisson equations is solved. This code is also a good testcase for complex fluid dynamics codes, since the same datastructures are used. All systems provided good speedups, but

  14. Simulation model for a seven-phase BLDCM drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Won-Cheol; Lee, Jung-Hyo; Yu, Jae-Sung; Kim, Gyu-Sik; Won, Chung-Yuen

    2007-12-01

    BLDC motors have many advantages over brushed DC motors and induction motors. So, BLDC motors extend their application to many industrial fields. In this paper, the digital simulation and modeling of a 7-phase brushless DC motor have been presented. The 14-switch inverter and a 7-phase brushless DC motor drive system are simulated using hysteresis current controller and logic of switching pattern with the Boolean¡s function. Through some simulations, we found that our modeling and analysis of a 7-phase BLDCM with PWM inverter would be helpful for the further studies of the multi-phase BLDCM drive systems.

  15. Development of a persistent chemical agent simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A Persistent Chemical Agent Simulation System was developed (PCASS) to simulate, for force-on-force training exercises, the field environment produced by the presence of persistent chemical agents. Such a simulant system must satisfy several requirements to be of value as a training aid. Specifically, it must provide for realistic training which will generate competency in at least the following areas: (1) detection of the persistent agent presence; (2) proper use of protective equipment and procedures; (3) determination of the extent of contamination; and (4) decontamination of equipment and personnel.

  16. Computer Simulation Performed for Columbia Project Cooling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Jasim

    2005-01-01

    This demo shows a high-fidelity simulation of the air flow in the main computer room housing the Columbia (10,024 intel titanium processors) system. The simulation asseses the performance of the cooling system and identified deficiencies, and recommended modifications to eliminate them. It used two in house software packages on NAS supercomputers: Chimera Grid tools to generate a geometric model of the computer room, OVERFLOW-2 code for fluid and thermal simulation. This state-of-the-art technology can be easily extended to provide a general capability for air flow analyses on any modern computer room. Columbia_CFD_black.tiff

  17. A standard interface between simulation programs and systems analysis software.

    PubMed

    Reichert, P

    2006-01-01

    A simple interface between simulation programs and systems analytical software is proposed. This interface is designed to facilitate linkage of environmental simulation programs with systems analytical software and thus can contribute to remedying the deficiency in applying systems analytical techniques to environmental modelling studies. The proposed concept, consisting of a text file interface combined with a batch mode simulation program call, is independent of model structure, operating system and programming language. It is open for implementation by academic and commercial simulation and systems analytical software developers and is very simple to implement. Its practicability is demonstrated by implementations for three environmental simulation packages (AQUASIM, SWAT and LEACHM) and two systems analytical program packages (UNCSIM, SUFI). The properties listed above and the demonstration of the ease of implementation of the approach are prerequisites for the stimulation of a widespread implementation of the proposed interface that would be beneficial for the dissemination of systems analytical techniques in the environmental and engineering sciences. Furthermore, such a development could stimulate the transfer of systems analytical techniques between different fields of application.

  18. Control system software, simulation, and robotic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, Harold P.

    1991-01-01

    All essential existing capabilities needed to create a man-machine interaction dynamics and performance (MMIDAP) capability are reviewed. The multibody system dynamics software program Order N DISCOS will be used for machine and musculo-skeletal dynamics modeling. The program JACK will be used for estimating and animating whole body human response to given loading situations and motion constraints. The basic elements of performance (BEP) task decomposition methodologies associated with the Human Performance Institute database will be used for performance assessment. Techniques for resolving the statically indeterminant muscular load sharing problem will be used for a detailed understanding of potential musculotendon or ligamentous fatigue, pain, discomfort, and trauma. The envisioned capacity is to be used for mechanical system design, human performance assessment, extrapolation of man/machine interaction test data, biomedical engineering, and soft prototyping within a concurrent engineering (CE) system.

  19. Investigations of respiratory control systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    The Grodins' respiratory control model was investigated and it was determined that the following modifications were necessary before the model would be adaptable for current research efforts: (1) the controller equation must be modified to allow for integration of the respiratory system model with other physiological systems; (2) the system must be more closely correlated to the salient physiological functionings; (3) the respiratory frequency and the heart rate should be expanded to illustrate other physiological relationships and dependencies; and (4) the model should be adapted to particular individuals through a better defined set of initial parameter values in addition to relating these parameter values to the desired environmental conditions. Several of Milhorn's respiratory control models were also investigated in hopes of using some of their features as modifications for Grodins' model.

  20. What could we learn from simulations in virtual soil systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderborght, J.; Garré, S.; Ippisch, O.; Bastian, P.; Fahlke, J.; Roth, K.; Schenk, G.; Schelle, H.; Durner, W.; Schlüter, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2012-04-01

    In this contribution, we motivate the use of simulation studies in virtual soil systems using high performance computing systems. We focus on the scale of a field or a field plot, which is the unit cell of land management and of hydrologic simulation models. Processes in the vadose zone of such a unit cell are strongly dependent on the spatial variability of soil properties within this unit cell. Typical for this spatial heterogeneity is its multi-scale or hierarchical nature. A first key question is therefore how heterogeneities at different scales influence the averaged behaviour of the system at a larger scale. In order to address this question using simulation studies, small scale heterogeneities must be resolved while the extent of the simulation domain should be sufficiently large to represent the effect of larger scale heterogeneities. A second key question is what information can be obtained from measurements that are made in such a system. Simulations of the processes in soil system with realistic heterogeneities in combination with simulations of measurements of fluxes and state variables in this system are useful for identifying the information content of measurements. Such measurements can be either local measurements or measurements that integrate local information such as geophysical measurements. A third key question is how parameters of models that describe averaged processes in these unit cells depend on the inner structure of the system. To address these questions, simulations in 3-D heterogeneous soil blocks of a sufficiently large extent are needed leading to problems in the order of 109 unknowns. Methods to simulate and manage the input and output efficiently making use of high performance super computing infrastructure were developed.

  1. Diversity modelling for electrical power system simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharip, R. M.; Abu Zarim, M. A. U. A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper considers diversity of generation and demand profiles against the different future energy scenarios and evaluates these on a technical basis. Compared to previous studies, this research applied a forecasting concept based on possible growth rates from publically electrical distribution scenarios concerning the UK. These scenarios were created by different bodies considering aspects such as environment, policy, regulation, economic and technical. In line with these scenarios, forecasting is on a long term timescale (up to every ten years from 2020 until 2050) in order to create a possible output of generation mix and demand profiles to be used as an appropriate boundary condition for the network simulation. The network considered is a segment of rural LV populated with a mixture of different housing types. The profiles for the 'future' energy and demand have been successfully modelled by applying a forecasting method. The network results under these profiles shows for the cases studied that even though the value of the power produced from each Micro-generation is often in line with the demand requirements of an individual dwelling there will be no problems arising from high penetration of Micro-generation and demand side management for each dwellings considered. The results obtained highlight the technical issues/changes for energy delivery and management to rural customers under the future energy scenarios.

  2. Modeling and Simulation for Mission Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, William I.

    1997-01-01

    For the last two years, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been engaged in the process of re-engineering the way in which it does business. a signigicant portion of this effort is devoted toward improving engineering processes such as the building of advanced spacecraft and the design of scientific missions to investigate the solar system and beyond.

  3. Examining laser triangulation system performance using a software simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Jeffery S.; Nurre, Joseph H.

    1999-03-01

    The invention of the laser diode, the microcomputer and the CCD camera have made possible the new technology of triangulation measurement systems. Current applications range from scanning the insides of old pipes, to a vision tool for the blind. As such, it is important that techniques be developed to minimize the error in laser triangulation measurement systems. Due to the nonlinear nature of the problem and the fact that error is dependent on an ever changing and vast number of subjects, a computer simulation was written to examine the trade-off between occlusion and data quality. A computer simulation allows for a large amount of flexibility. The software gives the user the ability to calculate the error for a given triangulation configuration without having to build and test the actual hardware. This paper describes and demonstrates the use of the simulator. Limitless laser triangulation systems can be modeled and most subjects represented in CAD files can be used in the computer simulation.

  4. Strain System for the Motion Base Shuttle Mission Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, David C.; Van Vossen, Karl G.; Kunkel, Glenn W.; Wells, Larry W.

    2010-01-01

    The Motion Base Shuttle Mission Simulator (MBSMS) Strain System is an innovative engineering tool used to monitor the stresses applied to the MBSMS motion platform tilt pivot frames during motion simulations in real time. The Strain System comprises hardware and software produced by several different companies. The system utilizes a series of strain gages, accelerometers, orientation sensor, rotational meter, scanners, computer, and software packages working in unison. By monitoring and recording the inputs applied to the simulator, data can be analyzed if weld cracks or other problems are found during routine simulator inspections. This will help engineers diagnose problems as well as aid in repair solutions for both current as well as potential problems.

  5. A framework of modeling detector systems for computed tomography simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kim, S. H.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Nam, J.; Kim, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    Ultimate development in computed tomography (CT) technology may be a system that can provide images with excellent lesion conspicuity with the patient dose as low as possible. Imaging simulation tools have been cost-effectively used for these developments and will continue. For a more accurate and realistic imaging simulation, the signal and noise propagation through a CT detector system has been modeled in this study using the cascaded linear-systems theory. The simulation results are validated in comparisons with the measured results using a laboratory flat-panel micro-CT system. Although the image noise obtained from the simulations at higher exposures is slightly smaller than that obtained from the measurements, the difference between them is reasonably acceptable. According to the simulation results for various exposure levels and additive electronic noise levels, x-ray quantum noise is more dominant than the additive electronic noise. The framework of modeling a CT detector system suggested in this study will be helpful for the development of an accurate and realistic projection simulation model.

  6. RAM simulation model for SPH/RSV systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schryver, J.C.; Primm, A.H.; Nelson, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    The US Army`s Project Manager, Crusader is sponsoring the development of technologies that apply to the Self-Propelled Howitzer (SPH), formerly the Advanced Field Artillery System (AFAS), and Resupply Vehicle (RSV), formerly the Future Armored Resupply Vehicle (FARV), weapon system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is currently performing developmental work in support of the SPH/PSV Crusader system. Supportive analyses of reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) aspects were also performed for the SPH/RSV effort. During FY 1994 and FY 1995 OPNL conducted a feasibility study to demonstrate the application of simulation modeling for RAM analysis of the Crusader system. Following completion of the feasibility study, a full-scale RAM simulation model of the Crusader system was developed for both the SPH and PSV. This report provides documentation for the simulation model as well as instructions in the proper execution and utilization of the model for the conduct of RAM analyses.

  7. Mathematical Simulation of the Cardiopulmonary System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    in nature and include Dick and Rideout, (23) Noordergraaf, ( 4 - 7 ) Beneken, (10-12) Hwang, (14) and Croston .(15) 2. Those models addressing the...1971. 15. Croston , R. C., Rummel, J. A. and Kay, F. J. Computer model fo cardiovascular control system responses toexercise, Journal of Dynamic...the Lung. Marcel Dekker, Inc., N.Y., 1977. 37. Carnahan, B., Luther, H1. A. and Wilkes, J. 0. Applied Numerical Methods , John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1969

  8. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. The multinomial simulation algorithm for discrete stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampoudi, Sotiria; Gillespie, Dan T.; Petzold, Linda R.

    2009-03-01

    The Inhomogeneous Stochastic Simulation Algorithm (ISSA) is a variant of the stochastic simulation algorithm in which the spatially inhomogeneous volume of the system is divided into homogeneous subvolumes, and the chemical reactions in those subvolumes are augmented by diffusive transfers of molecules between adjacent subvolumes. The ISSA can be prohibitively slow when the system is such that diffusive transfers occur much more frequently than chemical reactions. In this paper we present the Multinomial Simulation Algorithm (MSA), which is designed to, on the one hand, outperform the ISSA when diffusive transfer events outnumber reaction events, and on the other, to handle small reactant populations with greater accuracy than deterministic-stochastic hybrid algorithms. The MSA treats reactions in the usual ISSA fashion, but uses appropriately conditioned binomial random variables for representing the net numbers of molecules diffusing from any given subvolume to a neighbor within a prescribed distance. Simulation results illustrate the benefits of the algorithm.

  10. Simulator of IRST system with ATR embedded functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzi, B.; Fossati, E.; Barani, G.; Santini, N.; Ondini, A.; Colombi, G.; Quaranta, C.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a soft-real time simulator for IRST (InfraRed Search and Track) systems with ATR (Automatic Target Recognition) embedded functions to test airborne applications performance. The IR camera model includes detector, optics, available Field-of-Regard, etc., and it is integrated with the motion platform local stabilization system to consider all factors impacting IR images. The atmosphere contributions are taken into account by means of a link to ModTran computer program. Sensor simulation allows derivation and assessment of IR Figures of Merit (NEI, NETD, SNR...). IR signatures of targets derive both from data collected in specific trial campaigns and from laboratory built models. The simulation of the scan procedure takes into account different policies (ground points paths or defined angular volume) and different platform motion strategies (continuous or step steering scan). The scan process includes Kalman technique to face unexpected variations of aircraft motion. Track and ATR processors are simulated and run consistently on the output of the sensor model. The simulator functions are developed in MatLab and SIMULINK and then exported in C code to be integrated in soft real-time environment. The use of this simulator supports the definition and design of the IRST systems especially for the evaluation of the most demanding operative requirements. An application of this simulator is for the NEURON UCAV (Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle) technological demonstrator, which accommodates on board both IRST and ATR tasks.

  11. Multi-threaded, discrete event simulation of distributed computing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Iosif; MONARC Collaboration

    2001-10-01

    The LHC experiments have envisaged computing systems of unprecedented complexity, for which is necessary to provide a realistic description and modeling of data access patterns, and of many jobs running concurrently on large scale distributed systems and exchanging very large amounts of data. A process oriented approach for discrete event simulation is well suited to describe various activities running concurrently, as well the stochastic arrival patterns specific for such type of simulation. Threaded objects or "Active Objects" can provide a natural way to map the specific behaviour of distributed data processing into the simulation program. The simulation tool developed within MONARC is based on Java (TM) technology which provides adequate tools for developing a flexible and distributed process oriented simulation. Proper graphics tools, and ways to analyze data interactively, are essential in any simulation project. The design elements, status and features of the MONARC simulation tool are presented. The program allows realistic modeling of complex data access patterns by multiple concurrent users in large scale computing systems in a wide range of possible architectures, from centralized to highly distributed. Comparison between queuing theory and realistic client-server measurements is also presented.

  12. Advanced manned space flight simulation and training: An investigation of simulation host computer system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, Bruce C.; Bishop, Alfred M.; Redfield, Joe B.

    1989-01-01

    The findings of a preliminary investigation by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in simulation host computer concepts is presented. It is designed to aid NASA in evaluating simulation technologies for use in spaceflight training. The focus of the investigation is on the next generation of space simulation systems that will be utilized in training personnel for Space Station Freedom operations. SwRI concludes that NASA should pursue a distributed simulation host computer system architecture for the Space Station Training Facility (SSTF) rather than a centralized mainframe based arrangement. A distributed system offers many advantages and is seen by SwRI as the only architecture that will allow NASA to achieve established functional goals and operational objectives over the life of the Space Station Freedom program. Several distributed, parallel computing systems are available today that offer real-time capabilities for time critical, man-in-the-loop simulation. These systems are flexible in terms of connectivity and configurability, and are easily scaled to meet increasing demands for more computing power.

  13. Synthetic Vision Systems - Operational Considerations Simulation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Lynda J.; Williams, Steven P.; Bailey, Randall E.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic vision is a computer-generated image of the external scene topography that is generated from aircraft attitude, high-precision navigation information, and data of the terrain, obstacles, cultural features, and other required flight information. A synthetic vision system (SVS) enhances this basic functionality with real-time integrity to ensure the validity of the databases, perform obstacle detection and independent navigation accuracy verification, and provide traffic surveillance. Over the last five years, NASA and its industry partners have developed and deployed SVS technologies for commercial, business, and general aviation aircraft which have been shown to provide significant improvements in terrain awareness and reductions in the potential for Controlled-Flight-Into-Terrain incidents/accidents compared to current generation cockpit technologies. It has been hypothesized that SVS displays can greatly improve the safety and operational flexibility of flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) to a level comparable to clear-day Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), regardless of actual weather conditions or time of day. An experiment was conducted to evaluate SVS and SVS-related technologies as well as the influence of where the information is provided to the pilot (e.g., on a Head-Up or Head-Down Display) for consideration in defining landing minima based upon aircraft and airport equipage. The "operational considerations" evaluated under this effort included reduced visibility, decision altitudes, and airport equipage requirements, such as approach lighting systems, for SVS-equipped aircraft. Subjective results from the present study suggest that synthetic vision imagery on both head-up and head-down displays may offer benefits in situation awareness; workload; and approach and landing performance in the visibility levels, approach lighting systems, and decision altitudes tested.

  14. Whole body measurement systems. [for weightlessness simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogle, J. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for measuring the volume and volume variations of a human body under zero gravity conditions is disclosed. An enclosed chamber having a defined volume and arranged for receiving a human body is provided with means for infrasonically varying the volume of the chamber. The changes in volume produce resultant changes in pressure, and under substantially isentropic conditions, an isentropic relationship permits a determination of gas volume which, in turn, when related to total chamber volume permits a determination of the body volume. By comparison techniques, volume changes of a human independent of gravity conditions can be determined.

  15. System and Method for Finite Element Simulation of Helicopter Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, R. E. (Inventor); Dulsenberg, Ken (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a turbulence model that has been developed for blade-element helicopter simulation. This model uses an innovative temporal and geometrical distribution algorithm that preserves the statistical characteristics of the turbulence spectra over the rotor disc, while providing velocity components in real time to each of five blade-element stations along each of four blades. for a total of twenty blade-element stations. The simulator system includes a software implementation of flight dynamics that adheres to the guidelines for turbulence set forth in military specifications. One of the features of the present simulator system is that it applies simulated turbulence to the rotor blades of the helicopter, rather than to its center of gravity. The simulator system accurately models the rotor penetration into a gust field. It includes time correlation between the front and rear of the main rotor, as well as between the side forces felt at the center of gravity and at the tail rotor. It also includes features for added realism, such as patchy turbulence and vertical gusts in to which the rotor disc penetrates. These features are realized by a unique real time implementation of the turbulence filters. The new simulator system uses two arrays one on either side of the main rotor to record the turbulence field and to produce time-correlation from the front to the rear of the rotor disc. The use of Gaussian Interpolation between the two arrays maintains the statistical properties of the turbulence across the rotor disc. The present simulator system and method may be used in future and existing real-time helicopter simulations with minimal increase in computational workload.

  16. Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) 1999 Industry Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John; Follen, Greg; Naiman, Cynthia; Evans, Austin

    2000-01-01

    The technologies necessary to enable detailed numerical simulations of complete propulsion systems are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in cooperation with industry, academia, and other government agencies. Large scale, detailed simulations will be of great value to the nation because they eliminate some of the costly testing required to develop and certify advanced propulsion systems. In addition, time and cost savings will be achieved by enabling design details to be evaluated early in the development process before a commitment is made to a specific design. This concept is called the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS). NPSS consists of three main elements: (1) engineering models that enable multidisciplinary analysis of large subsystems and systems at various levels of detail, (2) a simulation environment that maximizes designer productivity, and (3) a cost-effective, high-performance computing platform. A fundamental requirement of the concept is that the simulations must be capable of overnight execution on easily accessible computing platforms. This will greatly facilitate the use of large-scale simulations in a design environment. This paper describes the current status of the NPSS with specific emphasis on the progress made over the past year on air breathing propulsion applications. In addition, the paper contains a summary of the feedback received from industry partners in the development effort and the actions taken over the past year to respond to that feedback. The NPSS development was supported in FY99 by the High Performance Computing and Communications Program.

  17. Computer simulation of a backscattered X-ray fluorescence system.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghorabie, Fayez H H

    2015-01-01

    An EGSnrc user code is developed to simulate a backscattered geometry in vivo x-ray fluorescence system for the measurement of platinum concentration in head and neck tumours. The user code is fundamentally based on a previous study which used the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. The new user code, which we have developed in this study, has new improvements which made it able to simulate the process of photon transportation through the different components of the modelled x-ray fluorescence system. The simulation process included modelling of the photon source, collimators, phantoms and detector. Simulation results were compared and evaluated against x-ray fluorescence data obtained experimentally from an existing system developed by the Swansea In vivo Analysis and Cancer Research Group. In addition, simulation results of this study were also compared with our previous study in which the EGS4 user code was used. Comparison between results has shown that the new EGSnrc user code was able to reproduce the spectral shape obtained using the experimental x-ray fluorescence system. The area under the Compton peak differs by 2.5% between the experimental measurement and the EGSnrc simulation. Similarly, the area under the two Pt Kα peaks differs by 2.3% and 2.2%.

  18. High Level Architecture Distributed Space System Simulation for Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization Simulation Smackdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zuqun

    2011-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation plays a very important role in mission design. It not only reduces design cost, but also prepares astronauts for their mission tasks. The SISO Smackdown is a simulation event that facilitates modeling and simulation in academia. The scenario of this year s Smackdown was to simulate a lunar base supply mission. The mission objective was to transfer Earth supply cargo to a lunar base supply depot and retrieve He-3 to take back to Earth. Federates for this scenario include the environment federate, Earth-Moon transfer vehicle, lunar shuttle, lunar rover, supply depot, mobile ISRU plant, exploratory hopper, and communication satellite. These federates were built by teams from all around the world, including teams from MIT, JSC, University of Alabama in Huntsville, University of Bordeaux from France, and University of Genoa from Italy. This paper focuses on the lunar shuttle federate, which was programmed by the USRP intern team from NASA JSC. The shuttle was responsible for provide transportation between lunar orbit and the lunar surface. The lunar shuttle federate was built using the NASA standard simulation package called Trick, and it was extended with HLA functions using TrickHLA. HLA functions of the lunar shuttle federate include sending and receiving interaction, publishing and subscribing attributes, and packing and unpacking fixed record data. The dynamics model of the lunar shuttle was modeled with three degrees of freedom, and the state propagation was obeying the law of two body dynamics. The descending trajectory of the lunar shuttle was designed by first defining a unique descending orbit in 2D space, and then defining a unique orbit in 3D space with the assumption of a non-rotating moon. Finally this assumption was taken away to define the initial position of the lunar shuttle so that it will start descending a second after it joins the execution. VPN software from SonicWall was used to connect federates with RTI during testing

  19. Spatial Simulations in Systems Biology: From Molecules to Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klann, Michael; Koeppl, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Cells are highly organized objects containing millions of molecules. Each biomolecule has a specific shape in order to interact with others in the complex machinery. Spatial dynamics emerge in this system on length and time scales which can not yet be modeled with full atomic detail. This review gives an overview of methods which can be used to simulate the complete cell at least with molecular detail, especially Brownian dynamics simulations. Such simulations require correct implementation of the diffusion-controlled reaction scheme occurring on this level. Implementations and applications of spatial simulations are presented, and finally it is discussed how the atomic level can be included for instance in multi-scale simulation methods. PMID:22837728

  20. Nexus: A modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The management of simulation workflows represents a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  1. Prediction and simulation errors in parameter estimation for nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Luis A.; Barbosa, Bruno H. G.; Braga, Antônio P.

    2010-11-01

    This article compares the pros and cons of using prediction error and simulation error to define cost functions for parameter estimation in the context of nonlinear system identification. To avoid being influenced by estimators of the least squares family (e.g. prediction error methods), and in order to be able to solve non-convex optimisation problems (e.g. minimisation of some norm of the free-run simulation error), evolutionary algorithms were used. Simulated examples which include polynomial, rational and neural network models are discussed. Our results—obtained using different model classes—show that, in general the use of simulation error is preferable to prediction error. An interesting exception to this rule seems to be the equation error case when the model structure includes the true model. In the case of error-in-variables, although parameter estimation is biased in both cases, the algorithm based on simulation error is more robust.

  2. Generalized simulation technique for turbojet engine system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seldner, K.; Mihaloew, J. R.; Blaha, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A nonlinear analog simulation of a turbojet engine was developed. The purpose of the study was to establish simulation techniques applicable to propulsion system dynamics and controls research. A schematic model was derived from a physical description of a J85-13 turbojet engine. Basic conservation equations were applied to each component along with their individual performance characteristics to derive a mathematical representation. The simulation was mechanized on an analog computer. The simulation was verified in both steady-state and dynamic modes by comparing analytical results with experimental data obtained from tests performed at the Lewis Research Center with a J85-13 engine. In addition, comparison was also made with performance data obtained from the engine manufacturer. The comparisons established the validity of the simulation technique.

  3. Nexus: a modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2015-08-24

    The management of simulation workflows is a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  4. Nexus: a modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    DOE PAGES

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2015-08-24

    The management of simulation workflows is a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantummore » chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.« less

  5. Hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (heavy) simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, R. A.; Mcgehee, R. K.

    1981-01-01

    A computer program to simulate hybrid and electric advanced vehicle systems (HEAVY) is described. It is intended for use early in the design process: concept evaluation, alternative comparison, preliminary design, control and management strategy development, component sizing, and sensitivity studies. It allows the designer to quickly, conveniently, and economically predict the performance of a proposed drive train. The user defines the system to be simulated using a library of predefined component models that may be connected to represent a wide variety of propulsion systems. The development of three models are discussed as examples.

  6. Simulation and visualization of mechanical systems in immersive virtual environments

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, T. R.

    1998-04-17

    A prototype for doing real-time simulation of mechanical systems in immersive virtual environments has been developed to run in the CAVE and on the ImmersaDesk at Argonne National Laboratory. This system has three principal software components: a visualization component for rendering the model and providing a user interface, communications software, and mechanics simulation software. The system can display the three-dimensional objects in the CAVE and project various scalar fields onto the exterior surface of the objects during real-time execution.

  7. Modeling and Simulation for Mission Operations Work System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sierhuis, Maarten; Clancey, William J.; Seah, Chin; Trimble, Jay P.; Sims, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Work System analysis and design is complex and non-deterministic. In this paper we describe Brahms, a multiagent modeling and simulation environment for designing complex interactions in human-machine systems. Brahms was originally conceived as a business process design tool that simulates work practices, including social systems of work. We describe our modeling and simulation method for mission operations work systems design, based on a research case study in which we used Brahms to design mission operations for a proposed discovery mission to the Moon. We then describe the results of an actual method application project-the Brahms Mars Exploration Rover. Space mission operations are similar to operations of traditional organizations; we show that the application of Brahms for space mission operations design is relevant and transferable to other types of business processes in organizations.

  8. Designing Better Scaffolding in Teaching Complex Systems with Graphical Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Na

    2013-01-01

    Complex systems are an important topic in science education today, but they are usually difficult for secondary-level students to learn. Although graphic simulations have many advantages in teaching complex systems, scaffolding is a critical factor for effective learning. This dissertation study was conducted around two complementary research…

  9. GROWTH OF HETROTROPHIC BIOFILMS IN A WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA has designed and constructed a distribution system simulator (DSS) to evaluate factors which influence water quality within water distribution systems. Six individual 25 meter lengths of 15 cm diameter ductile iron pipe are arranged into loop configurations. Each lo...

  10. Simulations Using a Computer/Videodisc System: Instructional Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrlich, Lisa R.

    Instructional design considerations involved in using level four videodisc systems when designing simulations are explored. Discussion of the hardware and software system characteristics notes that computer based training offers the features of text, graphics, color, animation, and highlighting techniques, while a videodisc player offers all of…

  11. Development of an Intelligent Monitoring and Control System for a Heterogeneous Numerical Propulsion System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, John A.; Afjeh, Abdollah A.; Lewandowski, Henry; Homer, Patrick T.; Schlichting, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) project is exploring the use of computer simulation to facilitate the design of new jet engines. Several key issues raised in this research are being examined in an NPSS-related research project: zooming, monitoring and control, and support for heterogeneity. The design of a simulation executive that addresses each of these issues is described. In this work, the strategy of zooming, which allows codes that model at different levels of fidelity to be integrated within a single simulation, is applied to the fan component of a turbofan propulsion system. A prototype monitoring and control system has been designed for this simulation to support experimentation with expert system techniques for active control of the simulation. An interconnection system provides a transparent means of connecting the heterogeneous systems that comprise the prototype.

  12. Jet aircraft fuel system deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hazlett, R.N.; Hall, J.M.

    1981-03-01

    Deposits samples were from the valve cavity of a fuel nozzle of a CF6-50A engine, from the fuel manifold adjacent to the combustor nozzles of a TR-30 engine, fuel test devices, and heat exchange tubes, operated in the laboratories of the Naval Air Propulsion Center and the Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory. Carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen in the deposits were determined with a Perkin Elmer Elemental Analyzer. Sulfur was determined on a separate sample by modifying ASTM method D3120-75. The high amount of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur found in the deposits is noteworthy. The data reported generally corroborates the information from the literature. All of the deposits from the engines and the test devices point to the importance of compounds containing hereto atoms. The importance of oxidation in triggering solids formation has been reviewed. It would appear that the trace primary oxidation reactions occurring in a fuel system would be insufficient to give the high concentration of oxygen in the deposit. However, if the compounds undergoing oxidation were oxygen-containing compounds rather than hydrocarbons the high oxygen concentrations in the deposit would be more reasonable. The high enhancement factors observed, causes one to conclude that some nitrogen and sulfur compounds found in fuels are very susceptible to oxidation and subsequent deposit formation. The high concentrations of hereto atoms implies that the deposits have highly polar characteristics. Since such material would have little attraction for the non-polar fuel, the insolubility of deposits may be due primarily to polarity differences rather than high molecular weight.

  13. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems. Engineering simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo Program experience from early 1962 to July 1969 with respect to the engineering-simulation support and the problems encountered is summarized in this report. Engineering simulation in support of the Apollo guidance and control system is discussed in terms of design analysis and verification, certification of hardware in closed-loop operation, verification of hardware/software compatibility, and verification of both software and procedures for each mission. The magnitude, time, and cost of the engineering simulations are described with respect to hardware availability, NASA and contractor facilities (for verification of the command module, the lunar module, and the primary guidance, navigation, and control system), and scheduling and planning considerations. Recommendations are made regarding implementation of similar, large-scale simulations for future programs.

  14. Optical Fiber Illumination System for visual flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollow, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    An electronically controlled lighting system simulating runway, aircraft carrier, and landing aid lights for flight simulations is described. The various colored lights that would be visible to a pilot by day, at dusk, or at night are duplicated at the distances the lights would normally become visible. Plastic optical fiber illuminators using tungsten halogen lights are distributed behind the model. The tips of the fibers of illuminators simulating runway lights are bevelled in order that they may be seen from long distances and at low angles. Fibers representing taxiway lights are pointed and polished for omni-directional visibility. The electronic intensity controls, which can be operated either manually or remotely, regulate the intensity of the lights to simulate changes in distance. A dichronic mirror, infrared filter system is used to maintain color integrity.

  15. The GRB Simulator: A System for Testing GOES Rebroadcast (GRB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, K.; Race, R.; Miller, C.; Barnes, K.; Dittberner, G.

    2012-12-01

    GOES Rebroadcast (GRB) signals in the GOES-R era will replace the current legacy GOES Variable (GVAR) signal and will have substantially different characteristics, including a change in data rate from a single 2.1 Mbps stream to two digital streams of 15.5 Mbps each. The GRB Simulator is a portable system that outputs a high-fidelity stream of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) formatted GRB packet data equivalent to live GRB data. The data is used for on-site testing of user ingest and data handling systems known as field terminal sites. The GRB Simulator is a fully self-contained system which includes all hardware units needed for operation. The operator manages configurations to edit preferences, define individual test scenarios, and manage event logs and reports. Simulations are controlled by test scenarios, which are scripts that specify the test data and provide a series of actions for the GRB Simulator to perform when generating GRB output. Scenarios allow for the insertion of errors or modification of GRB packet headers for testing purposes. The GRB Simulator provides a built-in editor for managing scenarios. Data output by the simulator is derived from either proxy data files containing Level 1b (L1b) or GLM L2+ data, test pattern images, or non-image test pattern generation commands specified from within a scenario. The GRB Simulator outputs packets containing both instrument and GRB Information data. Instrument packets contain data simulated from any instrument: the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI), Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS), Extreme Ultraviolet Sensor (EUVS) and X-ray Irradiance Sensor (XRS) called EXIS, Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), or the Magnetometer. The GRB Information packets contain information such as satellite schedules. The GRB Simulator will provide GRB data as either baseband (digital) or Intermediate Frequency (IF) output to the test system. GRB packet data will be sent

  16. System Engineering Strategy for Distributed Multi-Purpose Simulation Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhula, Dlilpkumar; Kurt, Cindy Marie; Luty, Roger

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the system engineering approach used to develop distributed multi-purpose simulations. The multi-purpose simulation architecture focuses on user needs, operations, flexibility, cost and maintenance. This approach was used to develop an International Space Station (ISS) simulator, which is called the International Space Station Integrated Simulation (ISIS)1. The ISIS runs unmodified ISS flight software, system models, and the astronaut command and control interface in an open system design that allows for rapid integration of multiple ISS models. The initial intent of ISIS was to provide a distributed system that allows access to ISS flight software and models for the creation, test, and validation of crew and ground controller procedures. This capability reduces the cost and scheduling issues associated with utilizing standalone simulators in fixed locations, and facilitates discovering unknowns and errors earlier in the development lifecycle. Since its inception, the flexible architecture of the ISIS has allowed its purpose to evolve to include ground operator system and display training, flight software modification testing, and as a realistic test bed for Exploration automation technology research and development.

  17. High Frequency Mechanical Pyroshock Simulations for Payload Systems

    SciTech Connect

    BATEMAN,VESTA I.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; CAP,JEROME S.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.

    1999-12-15

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with components that must survive high frequency shock environments including pyrotechnic shock. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past at the payload system level because of weight limitations of traditional pyroshock mechanical simulations using resonant beams and plates. A new concept utilizing tuned resonators attached to the payload system and driven with the impact of an airgun projectile allow these simulations to be performed in the laboratory with high precision and repeatability without the use of explosives. A tuned resonator has been designed and constructed for a particular payload system. Comparison of laboratory responses with measurements made at the component locations during actual pyrotechnic events show excellent agreement for a bandwidth of DC to 4 kHz. The bases of comparison are shock spectra. This simple concept applies the mechanical pyroshock simulation simultaneously to all components with the correct boundary conditions in the payload system and is a considerable improvement over previous experimental techniques and simulations.

  18. A Distributed Simulation Software System for Multi-Spacecraft Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Richard; Davis, George; Cary, Everett

    2003-01-01

    The paper will provide an overview of the web-based distributed simulation software system developed for end-to-end, multi-spacecraft mission design, analysis, and test at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This software system was developed for an internal research and development (IR&D) activity at GSFC called the Distributed Space Systems (DSS) Distributed Synthesis Environment (DSE). The long-term goal of the DSS-DSE is to integrate existing GSFC stand-alone test beds, models, and simulation systems to create a "hands on", end-to-end simulation environment for mission design, trade studies and simulations. The short-term goal of the DSE was therefore to develop the system architecture, and then to prototype the core software simulation capability based on a distributed computing approach, with demonstrations of some key capabilities by the end of Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). To achieve the DSS-DSE IR&D objective, the team adopted a reference model and mission upon which FY02 capabilities were developed. The software was prototyped according to the reference model, and demonstrations were conducted for the reference mission to validate interfaces, concepts, etc. The reference model, illustrated in Fig. 1, included both space and ground elements, with functional capabilities such as spacecraft dynamics and control, science data collection, space-to-space and space-to-ground communications, mission operations, science operations, and data processing, archival and distribution addressed.

  19. Final Technical Report "Multiscale Simulation Algorithms for Biochemical Systems"

    SciTech Connect

    Petzold, Linda R.

    2012-10-25

    Biochemical systems are inherently multiscale and stochastic. In microscopic systems formed by living cells, the small numbers of reactant molecules can result in dynamical behavior that is discrete and stochastic rather than continuous and deterministic. An analysis tool that respects these dynamical characteristics is the stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA, Gillespie, 1976), a numerical simulation procedure that is essentially exact for chemical systems that are spatially homogeneous or well stirred. Despite recent improvements, as a procedure that simulates every reaction event, the SSA is necessarily inefficient for most realistic problems. There are two main reasons for this, both arising from the multiscale nature of the underlying problem: (1) stiffness, i.e. the presence of multiple timescales, the fastest of which are stable; and (2) the need to include in the simulation both species that are present in relatively small quantities and should be modeled by a discrete stochastic process, and species that are present in larger quantities and are more efficiently modeled by a deterministic differential equation (or at some scale in between). This project has focused on the development of fast and adaptive algorithms, and the fun- damental theory upon which they must be based, for the multiscale simulation of biochemical systems. Areas addressed by this project include: (1) Theoretical and practical foundations for ac- celerated discrete stochastic simulation (tau-leaping); (2) Dealing with stiffness (fast reactions) in an efficient and well-justified manner in discrete stochastic simulation; (3) Development of adaptive multiscale algorithms for spatially homogeneous discrete stochastic simulation; (4) Development of high-performance SSA algorithms.

  20. Simulation of Production Lines Supply within Internal Logistics Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čujan, Zdeněk

    2016-11-01

    Supplying of production lines is a complex logistic process, which is very difficult with regards to the requirements of its operation and scheduling. For this reason, this supplying process demands an increased attention. Application of a computer simulation is an efficient tool suitable for solution of the supplying logistic questions. In this paper the application possibilities of the software Tecnomatix Plant Simumlation specified for simulation of the supplying process by means of the system Milk Run will be presented.

  1. Experimental simulation of quantum tunneling in small systems.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guan-Ru; Lu, Yao; Hao, Liang; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that quantum computers are superior to classical computers in efficiently simulating quantum systems. Here we report the first experimental simulation of quantum tunneling through potential barriers, a widespread phenomenon of a unique quantum nature, via NMR techniques. Our experiment is based on a digital particle simulation algorithm and requires very few spin-1/2 nuclei without the need of ancillary qubits. The occurrence of quantum tunneling through a barrier, together with the oscillation of the state in potential wells, are clearly observed through the experimental results. This experiment has clearly demonstrated the possibility to observe and study profound physical phenomena within even the reach of small quantum computers.

  2. Web-Based Distributed Simulation of Aeronautical Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Desheng; Follen, Gregory J.; Pavlik, William R.; Kim, Chan M.; Liu, Xianyou; Blaser, Tammy M.; Lopez, Isaac

    2001-01-01

    An application was developed to allow users to run and view the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) engine simulations from web browsers. Simulations were performed on multiple INFORMATION POWER GRID (IPG) test beds. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) was used for brokering data exchange among machines and IPG/Globus for job scheduling and remote process invocation. Web server scripting was performed by JavaServer Pages (JSP). This application has proven to be an effective and efficient way to couple heterogeneous distributed components.

  3. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence for optical systems with extended sources.

    PubMed

    Safari, Majid; Hranilovic, Steve

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the method of random wave vectors for simulation of atmospheric turbulence is extended to 2D×2D space to provide spatial degrees of freedom at both input and output planes. The modified technique can thus simultaneously simulate the turbulence-induced log-amplitude and phase distortions for optical systems with extended sources either implemented as a single large aperture or multiple apertures. The reliability of our simulation technique is validated in different conditions and its application is briefly investigated in a multibeam free-space optical communication scenario.

  4. [Activities of System Studies and Simulation, Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Launch Vehicle Interface Work Performed: a. S3 provided to KSC the new launch inclination targets needed for the April '04 launch date. 2. Prelaunch operations work performed: a. S3 updated the staffing plan for MSFC on-console personnel\\during the Final Countdown prior to launch. 3. Software Assessment Work Performed: a. S3 evaluated and recommended approval for Program Control Board (PCB) proposed change 649 for ground software changes, as well as change 650 and 650A for Stored Program Commands. 4. Education and Public Outreach Work Performed: a. S3 continues to coordinate the effort for the design and fabrication of scale models of the GP-3 for use at the launch site, education forums, and management/technical briefings. S3 also prepared a Change Request for additional funds needed for fabrication of additional scale models. S3 drafted the planned uses of these models, including the possibility of participation in the Boston, MA showings of the traveling Einstein Exhibit. 5. Program Management Support Work Performed: a. S3 prepared the input for and closed three MSFC Centerwide Action Item Tracking Systems (CAITS) actions during this period.

  5. Dynamic System Simulation of the KRUSTY Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Kimpland, Robert Herbert

    2016-05-09

    The proposed KRUSTY experiment is a demonstration of a reactor operating at power. The planned experimental configuration includes a highly enriched uranium (HEU) reflected core, cooled by multiple heat pipes leading to Stirling engines for primary heat rejection. Operating power is expected to be approximately four (4) to five (5) kilowatts with a core temperature above 1,000 K. No data is available on any historical reactor employing HEU metal that operated over the temperature range required for the KRUSTY experiment. Further, no reactor has operated with heat pipes as the primary cooling mechanism. Historic power reactors have employed either natural or forced convection so data on their operation is not directly applicable to the KRUSTY experiment. The primary purpose of the system model once developed and refined by data from these component experiments, will be used to plan the KRUSTY experiment. This planning will include expected behavior of the reactor from start-up, through various transient conditions where cooling begins to become present and effective, and finally establishment of steady-state. In addition, the model can provide indicators of anticipated off-normal events and appropriate operator response to those conditions. This information can be used to develop specific experiment operating procedures and aids to guide the operators in conduct of the experiment.

  6. Simulation and simplified design studies of photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.L.; Facinelli, W.A.; Koehler, L.P.

    1980-09-01

    Results of TRNSYS simulations of photovoltaic systems with electrical storage are described. Studies of the sensitivity of system performance, in terms of the fraction of the electrical load supplied by the solar energy system, to variables such as array size, battery size, location, time of year, and load shape are reported. An accurate simplified method for predicting array output of max-power photovoltaic systems is presented. A second simplified method, which estimates the overall performance of max-power systems, is developed. Finally, a preliminary technique for predicting clamped-voltage system performance is discussed.

  7. Providing scalable system software for high-end simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, D.

    1997-12-31

    Detailed, full-system, complex physics simulations have been shown to be feasible on systems containing thousands of processors. In order to manage these computer systems it has been necessary to create scalable system services. In this talk Sandia`s research on scalable systems will be described. The key concepts of low overhead data movement through portals and of flexible services through multi-partition architectures will be illustrated in detail. The talk will conclude with a discussion of how these techniques can be applied outside of the standard monolithic MPP system.

  8. The terminal area simulation system. Volume 2: Verification cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, F. H.

    1987-01-01

    The numerical simulation of five case studies are presented and are compared with available data in order to verify the three-dimensional version of the Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS). A spectrum of convective storm types are selected for the case studies. Included are: a High-Plains supercell hailstorm, a small and relatively short-lived High-Plains cumulonimbus, a convective storm which produced the 2 August 1985 DFW microburst, a South Florida convective complex, and a tornadic Oklahoma thunderstorm. For each of the cases the model results compared reasonably well with observed data. In the simulations of the supercell storms many of their characteristic features were modeled, such as the hook echo, BWER, mesocyclone, gust fronts, giant persistent updraft, wall cloud, flanking-line towers, anvil and radar reflectivity overhang, and rightward veering in the storm propagation. In the simulation of the tornadic storm a horseshoe-shaped updraft configuration and cyclic changes in storm intensity and structure were noted. The simulation of the DFW microburst agreed remarkably well with sparse observed data. The simulated outflow rapidly expanded in a nearly symmetrical pattern and was associated with a ringvortex. A South Florida convective complex was simulated and contained updrafts and downdrafts in the form of discrete bubbles. The numerical simulations, in all cases, always remained stable and bounded with no anomalous trends.

  9. Evaluation of articulation simulation system using artificial maxillectomy models.

    PubMed

    Elbashti, M E; Hattori, M; Sumita, Y I; Taniguchi, H

    2015-09-01

    Acoustic evaluation is valuable for guiding the treatment of maxillofacial defects and determining the effectiveness of rehabilitation with an obturator prosthesis. Model simulations are important in terms of pre-surgical planning and pre- and post-operative speech function. This study aimed to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of voice generated by an articulation simulation system using a vocal tract model with or without artificial maxillectomy defects. More specifically, we aimed to establish a speech simulation system for maxillectomy defect models that both surgeons and maxillofacial prosthodontists can use in guiding treatment planning. Artificially simulated maxillectomy defects were prepared according to Aramany's classification (Classes I-VI) in a three-dimensional vocal tract plaster model of a subject uttering the vowel /a/. Formant and nasalance acoustic data were analysed using Computerized Speech Lab and the Nasometer, respectively. Formants and nasalance of simulated /a/ sounds were successfully detected and analysed. Values of Formants 1 and 2 for the non-defect model were 675.43 and 976.64 Hz, respectively. Median values of Formants 1 and 2 for the defect models were 634.36 and 1026.84 Hz, respectively. Nasalance was 11% in the non-defect model, whereas median nasalance was 28% in the defect models. The results suggest that an articulation simulation system can be used to help surgeons and maxillofacial prosthodontists to plan post-surgical defects that will be facilitate maxillofacial rehabilitation.

  10. Analysis of Aurora's Performance Simulation Engine for Three Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Janine; Simon, Joseph

    2015-07-07

    Aurora Solar Inc. is building a cloud-based optimization platform to automate the design, engineering, and permit generation process of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. They requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validate the performance of the PV system performance simulation engine of Aurora Solar’s solar design platform, Aurora. In previous work, NREL performed a validation of multiple other PV modeling tools 1, so this study builds upon that work by examining all of the same fixed-tilt systems with available module datasheets that NREL selected and used in the aforementioned study. Aurora Solar set up these three operating PV systems in their modeling platform using NREL-provided system specifications and concurrent weather data. NREL then verified the setup of these systems, ran the simulations, and compared the Aurora-predicted performance data to measured performance data for those three systems, as well as to performance data predicted by other PV modeling tools.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Particle Laden Flows in Microfluidic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    wide application and will enable the study of colloidal/macromolecular transport in physiological systems, such as, blood filtration in the kidney... MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Sponsored by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA Order No. E117...Jun 00 – Aug 02 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE LATTICE BOLTZMANN SIMULATION OF PARTICLE LADEN FLOWS IN MICROFLUIDIC SYSTEMS 6. AUTHOR(S) David S

  12. A simulation approach to sizing hybrid photovoltaic and wind systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, L. A.

    1983-12-01

    A simulation approach to sizing hybrid photovoltaic and wind systems provides a combination of components to realize zero downtime and minimum initial or life-cycle cost. Using Dayton, OH as a test site for weather data, cost advantages in the neighborhood of four are predicted for a hybrid system with battery storage when compared to a wind-energy-only system for the same electrical load.

  13. Solar Power Satellite antenna phase control system hardware simulation, phase 4. Volume 2: Analytical simulation of SPS system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Kantak, A. V.; Chie, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The pilot signal parameter optimization and power transponder analyses are presented. The SPS antenna phase control system is modeled and the hardware simulation study described. Ionospheric and system phase error effects and the effects of high power amplifier phase and amplitude jitters are considered. Parameter optimization of the spread spectrum receiver, consisting of the carrier tracking loop and the code tracking loop, is described.

  14. Development of a Persistent Chemical Agent Simulator System (PCASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginness, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a persistent chemical agent simulation system (PCASS) is described. This PCASS is to be used for the military training of troops to simulate actual chemical warfare. The purpose of this system is to facilitate in the determination of chemical contamination and effectiveness of decontamination for training purposes. The fluorescent tracer employed has no daylight activation, but yet is easily removed with a decontaminate solution or water and surfactants. Also employed is a time delayed color developing system. When an individual is subjected to the PCASS and does not decontaminate adequately, red blotches or red coloration will develop as a function of time and temperature. The intent of this is to simulate the delayed chemical reaction of mustard contaminates.

  15. Parallel Signal Processing and System Simulation using aCe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular for both signal processing and system simulation. A new language is ideally suited for parallel signal processing applications and system simulation since it allows the programmer to explicitly express the computations that can be performed concurrently. In addition, the new C based parallel language (ace C) for architecture-adaptive programming allows programmers to implement algorithms and system simulation applications on parallel architectures by providing them with the assurance that future parallel architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of ace C and present a signal processing application (FFT).

  16. A novel load balancing method for hierarchical federation simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Xiao; Xiao, Tian-yuan

    2013-07-01

    In contrast with single HLA federation framework, hierarchical federation framework can improve the performance of large-scale simulation system in a certain degree by distributing load on several RTI. However, in hierarchical federation framework, RTI is still the center of message exchange of federation, and it is still the bottleneck of performance of federation, the data explosion in a large-scale HLA federation may cause overload on RTI, It may suffer HLA federation performance reduction or even fatal error. Towards this problem, this paper proposes a load balancing method for hierarchical federation simulation system based on queuing theory, which is comprised of three main module: queue length predicting, load controlling policy, and controller. The method promotes the usage of resources of federate nodes, and improves the performance of HLA simulation system with balancing load on RTIG and federates. Finally, the experiment results are presented to demonstrate the efficient control of the method.

  17. Simulation of a Flywheel Electrical System for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truong, Long V.; Wolff, Frederick J.; Dravid, Narayan V.

    2000-01-01

    A Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Project was initiated at the NASA Glenn Research Center as a possible replacement for the battery energy storage system on the International Space Station (ISS). While the hardware fabrication work was being performed at a university and contractor's facility, the related simulation activity was begun at Glenn. At the top level, Glenn researchers simulated the operation of the ISS primary electrical system (as described in another paper) with the Flywheel Energy Storage Unit (FESU) replacing one Battery Charge and Discharge Unit (BCDU). The FESU consists of a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor/Generator (PMSM), which is connected to the flywheel; the power electronics that connects the PMSM to the ISS direct-current bus; and the associated controller. The PMSM model is still under development, but this paper describes the rest of the FESU model-the simulation of the converter and the associated control system that regulates energy transfer to and from the flywheel.

  18. A Simulation Base Investigation of High Latency Space Systems Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zu Qun; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul; Moore, Michael

    2017-01-01

    NASA's human space program has developed considerable experience with near Earth space operations. Although NASA has experience with deep space robotic missions, NASA has little substantive experience with human deep space operations. Even in the Apollo program, the missions lasted only a few weeks and the communication latencies were on the order of seconds. Human missions beyond the relatively close confines of the Earth-Moon system will involve missions with durations measured in months and communications latencies measured in minutes. To minimize crew risk and to maximize mission success, NASA needs to develop a better understanding of the implications of these types of mission durations and communication latencies on vehicle design, mission design and flight controller interaction with the crew. To begin to address these needs, NASA performed a study using a physics-based subsystem simulation to investigate the interactions between spacecraft crew and a ground-based mission control center for vehicle subsystem operations across long communication delays. The simulation, built with a subsystem modeling tool developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center, models the life support system of a Mars transit vehicle. The simulation contains models of the cabin atmosphere and pressure control system, electrical power system, drinking and waste water systems, internal and external thermal control systems, and crew metabolic functions. The simulation has three interfaces: 1) a real-time crew interface that can be use to monitor and control the vehicle subsystems; 2) a mission control center interface with data transport delays up to 15 minutes each way; 3) a real-time simulation test conductor interface that can be use to insert subsystem malfunctions and observe the interactions between the crew, ground, and simulated vehicle. The study was conducted at the 21st NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission between July 18th and Aug 3rd of year 2016. The NEEMO

  19. Toward a multi-scale simulation of lipid bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugii, Taisuke; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2006-03-01

    In numerical simulations of lipid bilayer systems, it has become important to treat the membrane molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins, and drug molecules) explicitly for designing medical drugs and for developing drug delivery systems. However, it is difficult to apply straightforwardly a microscopic simulation technique such as the molecular dynamics method to the large-scale bilayer systems, because the length and the time scales of these systems are very large compared to the scales of the molecules. The authors take two approaches for this problem. First, we use the dissipative particle dynamics method and the coarse grained molecular dynamics method in addition to the standard molecular dynamics method. The results are compared with the molecular-dynamics results and experimental data. Secondly we use a molecular dynamics and continuum hybrid simulation method. In this method, the region near the membrane is computed by an atomistic-simulation method and the solvent region is computed by a continuum-simulation method. (In our study, the coarse grained molecular dynamics was used for the atomistic region.) The validity and availability of this later approach will be discussed.

  20. Economical graphics display system for flight simulation avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During the past academic year the focal point of this project has been to enhance the economical flight simulator system by incorporating it into the aero engineering educational environment. To accomplish this goal it was necessary to develop appropriate software modules that provide a foundation for student interaction with the system. In addition experiments had to be developed and tested to determine if they were appropriate for incorporation into the beginning flight simulation course, AERO-41B. For the most part these goals were accomplished. Experiments were developed and evaluated by graduate students. More work needs to be done in this area. The complexity and length of the experiments must be refined to match the programming experience of the target students. It was determined that few undergraduate students are ready to absorb the full extent and complexity of a real-time flight simulation. For this reason the experiments developed are designed to introduce basic computer architectures suitable for simulation, the programming environment and languages, the concept of math modules, evaluation of acquired data, and an introduction to the meaning of real-time. An overview is included of the system environment as it pertains to the students, an example of a flight simulation experiment performed by the students, and a summary of the executive programming modules created by the students to achieve a user-friendly multi-processor system suitable to an aero engineering educational program.

  1. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  2. A Simulation Based Investigation of High Latency Space Systems Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zu Qun; Moore, Michael; Bielski, Paul; Crues, Edwin Z.

    2017-01-01

    This study was the first in a series of planned tests to use physics-based subsystem simulations to investigate the interactions between a spacecraft's crew and a ground-based mission control center for vehicle subsystem operations across long communication delays. The simulation models the life support system of a deep space habitat. It contains models of an environmental control and life support system, an electrical power system, an active thermal control systems, and crew metabolic functions. The simulation has three interfaces: 1) a real-time crew interface that can be use to monitor and control the subsystems; 2) a mission control center interface with data transport delays up to 15 minute each way; and 3) a real-time simulation test conductor interface used to insert subsystem malfunctions and observe the interactions between the crew, ground, and simulated vehicle. The study was conducted at the 21st NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) mission. The NEEMO crew and ground support team performed a number of relevant deep space mission scenarios that included both nominal activities and activities with system malfunctions. While this initial test sequence was focused on test infrastructure and procedures development, the data collected in the study already indicate that long communication delays have notable impacts on the operation of deep space systems. For future human missions beyond cis-lunar, NASA will need to design systems and support tools to meet these challenges. These will be used to train the crew to handle critical malfunctions on their own, to predict malfunctions and assist with vehicle operations. Subsequent more detailed and involved studies will be conducted to continue advancing NASA's understanding of space systems operations across long communications delays.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of an UAS Collision Avoidance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliveros, Edgardo V.; Murray, A. Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a Modeling and Simulation of an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Collision Avoidance System, capable of representing different types of scenarios for UAS collision avoidance. Commercial and military piloted aircraft currently utilize various systems for collision avoidance such as Traffic Alert and Collision A voidance System (TCAS), Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), Radar and ElectroOptical and Infrared Sensors (EO-IR). The integration of information from these systems is done by the pilot in the aircraft to determine the best course of action. In order to operate optimally in the National Airspace System (NAS) UAS have to work in a similar or equivalent manner to a piloted aircraft by applying the principle of "detect-see and avoid" (DSA) to other air traffic. Hence, we have taken these existing sensor technologies into consideration in order to meet the challenge of researching the modeling and simulation of an approximated DSA system. A Schematic Model for a UAS Collision Avoidance System (CAS) has been developed ina closed loop block diagram for that purpose. We have found that the most suitable software to carry out this task is the Satellite Tool Kit (STK) from Analytical Graphics Inc. (AGI). We have used the Aircraft Mission Modeler (AMM) for modeling and simulation of a scenario where a UAS is placed on a possible collision path with an initial intruder and then with a second intruder, but is able to avoid them by executing a right tum maneuver and then climbing. Radars have also been modeled with specific characteristics for the UAS and both intruders. The software provides analytical, graphical user interfaces and data controlling tools which allow the operator to simulate different conditions. Extensive simulations have been carried out which returned excellent results.

  4. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, OH. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turbo alternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  5. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  6. NTP system simulation and detailed nuclear engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) & detailed nuclear engine modeling; modeling and engineering simulation of nuclear thermal rocket systems; nuclear thermal rocket simulation system; INSPI-NTVR core axial flow profiles; INSPI-NTRV core axial flow profiles; specific impulse vs. chamber pressure; turbine pressure ratio vs. chamber pressure; NERVA core axial flow profiles; P&W XNR2000 core axial flow profiles; pump pressure rise vs. chamber pressure; streamline of jet-induced flow in cylindrical chamber; flow pattern of a jet-induced flow in a chamber; and radiative heat transfer models.

  7. Simulation of Naval Guns' Breechblock System Dynamics Based on ADAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bo; Liu, Hui-Min; Liu, Kai

    In order to study the dynamical characteristics of the breechblock system during gun firing, a virtual prototype model was established based on ADAMS, in which motion and force transmission among mechanisms are realized by collision. By simulation, kinematics and dynamics properties of main components are obtained, and the relationships between the motion of breechblock and the position of breechblock opening plate are analyzed. According to the simulation results, the collision among the breechblock opening plate and the roller is discontinuous, which may make the breechblock system fail to hitch the breechblock reliably. And within allowable scope of the structure, the breechblock opening template should be installed near the upside as much as possible.

  8. Effect of simulated weightlessness on the immune system in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caren, L. D.; Mandel, A. D.; Nunes, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Rats suspended in a model system designed to simulate many aspects of weightlessness were immunized with sheep red blood cells. Parameters measured on these and control rats included titers of anti-sheep red blood cell antibodies, serum immunoglobulin levels, spleen and thymus weights, hematocrits, and leukocyte differential counts on peripheral blood. No significant differences were found between test and weight-bearing, harnessed controls; however, the thymuses of animals in both these groups were significantly smaller than untreated cage controls. The lack of an effect of simulated weightlessness on the immune system is an interesting result, and its significance is discussed.

  9. Object-oriented programming, C++ and power system simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, E.Z.

    1996-02-01

    Application of OOP concepts and the C++ programming language to power system simulation has been explored. An efficient platform for power system simulation applications has been proposed. By emulating a physical power lab, a generic power network container has been built. A module, which can be used to solve sparse matrix equations of any data types, has been implemented. Two load flow applications: a dc load flow and an ac load flow have been discussed. It is found that the OOP based C++ load flow programs are as efficient as their non-OOP counterparts.

  10. Analysis and simulation tools for solar array power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongratananukul, Nattorn

    This dissertation presents simulation tools developed specifically for the design of solar array power systems. Contributions are made in several aspects of the system design phases, including solar source modeling, system simulation, and controller verification. A tool to automate the study of solar array configurations using general purpose circuit simulators has been developed based on the modeling of individual solar cells. Hierarchical structure of solar cell elements, including semiconductor properties, allows simulation of electrical properties as well as the evaluation of the impact of environmental conditions. A second developed tool provides a co-simulation platform with the capability to verify the performance of an actual digital controller implemented in programmable hardware such as a DSP processor, while the entire solar array including the DC-DC power converter is modeled in software algorithms running on a computer. This "virtual plant" allows developing and debugging code for the digital controller, and also to improve the control algorithm. One important task in solar arrays is to track the maximum power point on the array in order to maximize the power that can be delivered. Digital controllers implemented with programmable processors are particularly attractive for this task because sophisticated tracking algorithms can be implemented and revised when needed to optimize their performance. The proposed co-simulation tools are thus very valuable in developing and optimizing the control algorithm, before the system is built. Examples that demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodologies are presented. The proposed simulation tools are also valuable in the design of multi-channel arrays. In the specific system that we have designed and tested, the control algorithm is implemented on a single digital signal processor. In each of the channels the maximum power point is tracked individually. In the prototype we built, off

  11. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijaksono, Umar; Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-01

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  12. Design of virtual SCADA simulation system for pressurized water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wijaksono, Umar Abdullah, Ade Gafar; Hakim, Dadang Lukman

    2016-02-08

    The Virtual SCADA system is a software-based Human-Machine Interface that can visualize the process of a plant. This paper described the results of the virtual SCADA system design that aims to recognize the principle of the Nuclear Power Plant type Pressurized Water Reactor. This simulation uses technical data of the Nuclear Power Plant Unit Olkiluoto 3 in Finland. This device was developed using Wonderware Intouch, which is equipped with manual books for each component, animation links, alarm systems, real time and historical trending, and security system. The results showed that in general this device can demonstrate clearly the principles of energy flow and energy conversion processes in Pressurized Water Reactors. This virtual SCADA simulation system can be used as instructional media to recognize the principle of Pressurized Water Reactor.

  13. Explicit simulation of a midlatitude Mesoscale Convective System

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, G.D.; Cotton, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    We have explicitly simulated the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 23-24 June 1985 during PRE-STORM, the Preliminary Regional Experiment for the Stormscale Operational and Research and Meterology Program. Stensrud and Maddox (1988), Johnson and Bartels (1992), and Bernstein and Johnson (1994) are among the researchers who have investigated various aspects of this MCS event. We have performed this MCS simulation (and a similar one of a tropical MCS; Alexander and Cotton 1994) in the spirit of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Cloud Systems Study (GCSS), in which cloud-resolving models are used to assist in the formulation and testing of cloud parameterization schemes for larger-scale models. In this paper, we describe (1) the nature of our 23-24 June MCS dimulation and (2) our efforts to date in using our explicit MCS simulations to assist in the development of a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches. The paper is organized as follows. First, we discuss the synoptic situation surrounding the 23-24 June PRE-STORM MCS followed by a discussion of the model setup and results of our simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulation. We then discuss the use of our MCS simulations in developing a GCM parameterization for mesoscale flow branches and summarize our results.

  14. Hardware-in-the-loop tow missile system simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, G.S.; Wootton, J.R.; Hobson, G.L.; Holder, D.L.

    1993-07-06

    A missile system simulator is described for use in training people for target acquisition, missile launch, and missile guidance under simulated battlefield conditions comprising: simulating means for producing a digital signal representing a simulated battlefield environment including at least one target movable therewithin, the simulating means generating an infrared map representing the field-of-view and the target; interface means for converting said digital signals to an infrared image; missile system hardware including the missile acquisition, tracking, and guidance portions thereof, said hardware sensing the infrared image to determine the location of the target in a field-of-view; and, image means for generating an infrared image of a missile launched at the target and guided thereto, the image means imposing the missile image onto the field-of-view for the missile hardware to acquire the image of the missile in addition to that of the target, and to generate guidance signals to guide the missile image to the target image, wherein the interfacing means is responsive to a guidance signal from the hardware to simulate, in real-time, the response of the missile to the guidance signal, the image means including a blackbody, laser means for irradiating the blackbody to heat it to a temperature at which it emits infrared radiation, and optic means for integrating the radiant image produced by heating the blackbody into the infrared map.

  15. Dynamic simulation and validation of a satellite docking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Anthony B.; Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Pavlich, Jane C.; Wassick, Gregory

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, Michigan Aerospace has approached the problem of gentle autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking using a flexible soft-dock cable that is extended from the docking spacecraft to the target spacecraft. Because of the nature of a soft-dock cable, testing and validation of the technology is difficult in normal gravity. To properly emulate the behavior of this soft-dock cable, we have performed dynamic computer simulations so that the effects of micro-gravity could be simulated. The Autonomous Satellite Docking System (ASDS) was initially prototyped and tested at Marshall Space Flight Center"s air-bearing floor facility. The test data was compared to the simulations and used to validate the model. Once a good correlation between the simulation"s predicted results and the actual data was shown, the model was used to predict future performance of the ASDS mechanism on several potential spacecraft for the Orbital Express program. A new dynamic simulation model was created and compared to test data from a recent KC-135 flight test to further validate the modeling approach used. This paper will describe the methodology used in modeling and simulating the ASDS mechanism. Correlation between the models and the test data will be discussed.

  16. Biocellion: accelerating computer simulation of multicellular biological system models

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seunghwa; Kahan, Simon; McDermott, Jason; Flann, Nicholas; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biological system behaviors are often the outcome of complex interactions among a large number of cells and their biotic and abiotic environment. Computational biologists attempt to understand, predict and manipulate biological system behavior through mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Discrete agent-based modeling (in combination with high-resolution grids to model the extracellular environment) is a popular approach for building biological system models. However, the computational complexity of this approach forces computational biologists to resort to coarser resolution approaches to simulate large biological systems. High-performance parallel computers have the potential to address the computing challenge, but writing efficient software for parallel computers is difficult and time-consuming. Results: We have developed Biocellion, a high-performance software framework, to solve this computing challenge using parallel computers. To support a wide range of multicellular biological system models, Biocellion asks users to provide their model specifics by filling the function body of pre-defined model routines. Using Biocellion, modelers without parallel computing expertise can efficiently exploit parallel computers with less effort than writing sequential programs from scratch. We simulate cell sorting, microbial patterning and a bacterial system in soil aggregate as case studies. Availability and implementation: Biocellion runs on x86 compatible systems with the 64 bit Linux operating system and is freely available for academic use. Visit http://biocellion.com for additional information. Contact: seunghwa.kang@pnnl.gov PMID:25064572

  17. Current Water Deficit Stress Simulations in Selected Agricultural System Simulation Models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    System models, which adequately simulate plant water stress effects, are valuable tools for developing management practices with improved water use efficiency in agriculture. Plants experience water stress when its supply in the soil fails to meet the demand. Although it is easy to define the conc...

  18. Simulating rare events in equilibrium or nonequilibrium stochastic systems.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rosalind J; Frenkel, Daan; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2006-01-14

    We present three algorithms for calculating rate constants and sampling transition paths for rare events in simulations with stochastic dynamics. The methods do not require a priori knowledge of the phase-space density and are suitable for equilibrium or nonequilibrium systems in stationary state. All the methods use a series of interfaces in phase space, between the initial and final states, to generate transition paths as chains of connected partial paths, in a ratchetlike manner. No assumptions are made about the distribution of paths at the interfaces. The three methods differ in the way that the transition path ensemble is generated. We apply the algorithms to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a genetic switch and to Langevin dynamics simulations of intermittently driven polymer translocation through a pore. We find that the three methods are all of comparable efficiency, and that all the methods are much more efficient than brute-force simulation.

  19. Predictions of Cockpit Simulator Experimental Outcome Using System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Goka, T.

    1984-01-01

    This study involved predicting the outcome of a cockpit simulator experiment where pilots used cockpit displays of traffic information (CDTI) to establish and maintain in-trail spacing behind a lead aircraft during approach. The experiments were run on the NASA Ames Research Center multicab cockpit simulator facility. Prior to the experiments, a mathematical model of the pilot/aircraft/CDTI flight system was developed which included relative in-trail and vertical dynamics between aircraft in the approach string. This model was used to construct a digital simulation of the string dynamics including response to initial position errors. The model was then used to predict the outcome of the in-trail following cockpit simulator experiments. Outcome included performance and sensitivity to different separation criteria. The experimental results were then used to evaluate the model and its prediction accuracy. Lessons learned in this modeling and prediction study are noted.

  20. A Cryogenic Fluid System Simulation in Support of Integrated Systems Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, John P.; Johnston, Kyle B.; Daigle, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Simulations serve as important tools throughout the design and operation of engineering systems. In the context of sys-tems health management, simulations serve many uses. For one, the underlying physical models can be used by model-based health management tools to develop diagnostic and prognostic models. These simulations should incorporate both nominal and faulty behavior with the ability to inject various faults into the system. Such simulations can there-fore be used for operator training, for both nominal and faulty situations, as well as for developing and prototyping health management algorithms. In this paper, we describe a methodology for building such simulations. We discuss the design decisions and tools used to build a simulation of a cryogenic fluid test bed, and how it serves as a core technology for systems health management development and maturation.

  1. Duality quantum algorithm efficiently simulates open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Ruan, Dong; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-07-01

    Because of inevitable coupling with the environment, nearly all practical quantum systems are open system, where the evolution is not necessarily unitary. In this paper, we propose a duality quantum algorithm for simulating Hamiltonian evolution of an open quantum system. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality quantum algorithm, the time evolution of the open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally implemented in duality quantum computer. This duality quantum algorithm has two distinct advantages compared to existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations. Firstly, the query complexity of the algorithm is O(d3) in contrast to O(d4) in existing unitary simulation algorithm, where d is the dimension of the open quantum system. Secondly, By using a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, this duality quantum algorithm provides an exponential improvement in precision compared with previous unitary simulation algorithm.

  2. Duality quantum algorithm efficiently simulates open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Ruan, Dong; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-07-28

    Because of inevitable coupling with the environment, nearly all practical quantum systems are open system, where the evolution is not necessarily unitary. In this paper, we propose a duality quantum algorithm for simulating Hamiltonian evolution of an open quantum system. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality quantum algorithm, the time evolution of the open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally implemented in duality quantum computer. This duality quantum algorithm has two distinct advantages compared to existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations. Firstly, the query complexity of the algorithm is O(d(3)) in contrast to O(d(4)) in existing unitary simulation algorithm, where d is the dimension of the open quantum system. Secondly, By using a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, this duality quantum algorithm provides an exponential improvement in precision compared with previous unitary simulation algorithm.

  3. Dynamic simulation of sulfur-removal systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.H.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Henline, W.D.; Wilkins, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    A generalized computer simulation has been developed to predict the dynamic response of alternate gas absorption systems for selective removal of sulfur compounds or ammonia from fuel gas or synthesis gas produced from coal or other fossil fuels. The models use numerical methods based upon finite difference techniques to determine the spatial distribution of process variables within both the absorption and regeneration columns of such gas cleanup processes. The simulator may be applied to systems for selective gas absorption based on either chemical or physical principles. Examples of such systems include the Benfield process based on absorption by chemical reaction with an activated alkali carbonate solvent, and the Allied SELEXOL Solvent Process based on physical absorption as a result of partial pressure differences of the gas components above an organic solvent system. Simulations of either individual process units or an entire integrated plant can be performed. This computer program has specifically been structured to permit convenient flow sheet modification, as well as addition of new units. This research has emphasized the development of a general theoretical structure which can be easily modified by substituting alternate sets of data on the physicochemical properties of the appropriate liquid solvent. This model has been applied to Selexol Solvent Processes using both published and proprietary data on solvent properties. Test calculations have been performed to simulate open loop response of individual scrubber towers, and the complete system, to input composition and flow rate transients.

  4. The role of the research simulator in the systems development of rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, I. C.; Deel, A.

    1981-01-01

    The potential application of the research simulator to future rotorcraft systems design, development, product improvement evaluations, and safety analysis is examined. Current simulation capabilities for fixed-wing aircraft are reviewed and the requirements of a rotorcraft simulator are defined. The visual system components, vertical motion simulator, cab, and computation system for a research simulator under development are described.

  5. Synchronous Parallel System for Emulation and Discrete Event Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A synchronous parallel system for emulation and discrete event simulation having parallel nodes responds to received messages at each node by generating event objects having individual time stamps, stores only the changes to the state variables of the simulation object attributable to the event object and produces corresponding messages. The system refrains from transmitting the messages and changing the state variables while it determines whether the changes are superseded, and then stores the unchanged state variables in the event object for later restoral to the simulation object if called for. This determination preferably includes sensing the time stamp of each new event object and determining which new event object has the earliest time stamp as the local event horizon, determining the earliest local event horizon of the nodes as the global event horizon, and ignoring events whose time stamps are less than the global event horizon. Host processing between the system and external terminals enables such a terminal to query, monitor, command or participate with a simulation object during the simulation process.

  6. Synchronous parallel system for emulation and discrete event simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A synchronous parallel system for emulation and discrete event simulation having parallel nodes responds to received messages at each node by generating event objects having individual time stamps, stores only the changes to state variables of the simulation object attributable to the event object, and produces corresponding messages. The system refrains from transmitting the messages and changing the state variables while it determines whether the changes are superseded, and then stores the unchanged state variables in the event object for later restoral to the simulation object if called for. This determination preferably includes sensing the time stamp of each new event object and determining which new event object has the earliest time stamp as the local event horizon, determining the earliest local event horizon of the nodes as the global event horizon, and ignoring the events whose time stamps are less than the global event horizon. Host processing between the system and external terminals enables such a terminal to query, monitor, command or participate with a simulation object during the simulation process.

  7. From Butterflies to Galaxies: Testing Chaotic System Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, W.

    2005-05-01

    N-body simulations have become a mainstay in modern astrophysics. They have been used to garner understanding of such varied phenomena as chaos in the solar system, to clumping of matter in the early universe. However, even the earliest practitioners realized that the results of such simulations may be suspect, because the tiniest differences between two simulations (such as what machine the simulation is run on, or old-fashioned numerical errors) can lead to vastly different simulation results. Over the decades, enormous effort has been put into studying and minimizing such errors, and the consensus today is that, although the microscopic details of large simulations are almost certainly incorrect, certain macroscopic measures are valid. However, nobody is quite sure which measures are valid and under precisely what conditions; as such, the fundamental reliability of such simulations has yet to be conclusively demonstrated. In this talk I will review some past results of simulation reliability and then introduce the concept of shadowing, which was first applied to N-body systems by Quinlan & Tremaine in 1992. A shadow of a numerical integration is an exact solution that remains close to the numerical solution for a long time. As such, an integration which has a shadow can be viewed as an observation of an exact trajectory. Unfortunately, it turns out that the full phase-space integration of a large n-body system is not shadowable. Howewver, it appears that if one is willing to allow that only some particles have reliable trajectories, then we can demonstrate that the number of reliable particles decays exponentially with time, and that the decay becomes slower with increasing simulation accuracy. Unfortunately the decay is extremely rapid for collisional systems, so that all particles have become unshadowable after just a few crossing times. However, preliminary results for collisionless systems appear to indicate that a large majority of particles can be shadowed

  8. Phase control system concepts and simulations. [solar power satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsay, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    A phase control system concept for a solar power satellite is proposed which partitions the system into three major levels. The first level of phase control consists of a reference phase distribution system implemented in the form of phase distribution tree structure. The major purpose of the tree structure is to electronically compensate for the phase shift due to the transition path lengths from the center of the spacetenna to each phase control center located in each subarray. In the reference system, this is accomplished using the master slave returnable timing system technique. The second level of phase control consists of the beam steering and microwave power generating system which houses the power transponders. This transponder consists of a set of phase conjugation multipliers driven by the reference phase distribution system output and the output of a pilot spread spectrum receiver which accepts the received pilot via a diplexer connected to a separate receive horn or the subarray itself. The output of the phase conjugation circuits serve as inputs to the third level of the phase control system. The third level of phase control is associated with maintaining an equal and constant phase shift through the microwave power amplifier devices while minimizing the associated phase noise effects on the generated power beam. This is accomplished by providing a phase locked loop around each high power amplifier.

  9. Diffusion microscopist simulator: a general Monte Carlo simulation system for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chun-Hung; Schmitt, Benoît; Le Bihan, Denis; Li-Schlittgen, Jing-Rebecca; Lin, Ching-Po; Poupon, Cyril

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development and application of an integrated, generalized, and efficient Monte Carlo simulation system for diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI), named Diffusion Microscopist Simulator (DMS). DMS comprises a random walk Monte Carlo simulator and an MR image synthesizer. The former has the capacity to perform large-scale simulations of Brownian dynamics in the virtual environments of neural tissues at various levels of complexity, and the latter is flexible enough to synthesize dMRI datasets from a variety of simulated MRI pulse sequences. The aims of DMS are to give insights into the link between the fundamental diffusion process in biological tissues and the features observed in dMRI, as well as to provide appropriate ground-truth information for the development, optimization, and validation of dMRI acquisition schemes for different applications. The validity, efficiency, and potential applications of DMS are evaluated through four benchmark experiments, including the simulated dMRI of white matter fibers, the multiple scattering diffusion imaging, the biophysical modeling of polar cell membranes, and the high angular resolution diffusion imaging and fiber tractography of complex fiber configurations. We expect that this novel software tool would be substantially advantageous to clarify the interrelationship between dMRI and the microscopic characteristics of brain tissues, and to advance the biophysical modeling and the dMRI methodologies.

  10. Investigations into Distribution System Nitrification: Simulated Systems and Microelectrode Biofilm Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results from USEPA research investigating drinking water distribution system nitrification will be presented. The two research areas include: (1) microbial community and reactor performance data from simulated drinking water distribution system using annular reactors and (2) mi...

  11. Algorithm for Simulating Atmospheric Turbulence and Aeroelastic Effects on Simulator Motion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ercole, Anthony V.; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.; Houck, Jacob A.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence produces high frequency accelerations in aircraft, typically greater than the response to pilot input. Motion system equipped flight simulators must present cues representative of the aircraft response to turbulence in order to maintain the integrity of the simulation. Currently, turbulence motion cueing produced by flight simulator motion systems has been less than satisfactory because the turbulence profiles have been attenuated by the motion cueing algorithms. This report presents a new turbulence motion cueing algorithm, referred to as the augmented turbulence channel. Like the previous turbulence algorithms, the output of the channel only augments the vertical degree of freedom of motion. This algorithm employs a parallel aircraft model and an optional high bandwidth cueing filter. Simulation of aeroelastic effects is also an area where frequency content must be preserved by the cueing algorithm. The current aeroelastic implementation uses a similar secondary channel that supplements the primary motion cue. Two studies were conducted using the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator and Cockpit Motion Facility to evaluate the effect of the turbulence channel and aeroelastic model on pilot control input. Results indicate that the pilot is better correlated with the aircraft response, when the augmented channel is in place.

  12. Efficient simulation of open quantum system in duality quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-11-01

    Practical quantum systems are open systems due to interactions with their environment. Understanding the evolution of open systems dynamics is important for quantum noise processes , designing quantum error correcting codes, and performing simulations of open quantum systems. Here we proposed an efficient quantum algorithm for simulating the evolution of an open quantum system on a duality quantum computer. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality algorithm, the time evolution of open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally realized in duality quantum computing. Compared to the Lloyd's quantum algorithm [Science.273, 1073(1996)] , the dependence on the dimension of the open quantum system in our algorithm is decreased. Moreover, our algorithm uses a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, exponentially improving the performance on the precision compared with existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations.

  13. Tool Support for Parametric Analysis of Large Software Simulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Gundy-Burlet, Karen; Pasareanu, Corina; Menzies, Tim; Barrett, Tony

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of large and complex parameterized software systems, e.g., systems simulation in aerospace, is very complicated and time-consuming due to the large parameter space, and the complex, highly coupled nonlinear nature of the different system components. Thus, such systems are generally validated only in regions local to anticipated operating points rather than through characterization of the entire feasible operational envelope of the system. We have addressed the factors deterring such an analysis with a tool to support envelope assessment: we utilize a combination of advanced Monte Carlo generation with n-factor combinatorial parameter variations to limit the number of cases, but still explore important interactions in the parameter space in a systematic fashion. Additional test-cases, automatically generated from models (e.g., UML, Simulink, Stateflow) improve the coverage. The distributed test runs of the software system produce vast amounts of data, making manual analysis impossible. Our tool automatically analyzes the generated data through a combination of unsupervised Bayesian clustering techniques (AutoBayes) and supervised learning of critical parameter ranges using the treatment learner TAR3. The tool has been developed around the Trick simulation environment, which is widely used within NASA. We will present this tool with a GN&C (Guidance, Navigation and Control) simulation of a small satellite system.

  14. Parareal in Time for Dynamic Simulations of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrala, Gurunath; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Starke, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been significant developments in parallel algorithms and high performance parallel computing platforms. Parareal in time algorithm has become popular for long transient simulations (e.g., molecular dynamics, fusion, reacting flows). Parareal is a parallel algorithm which divides the time interval into sub-intervals and solves them concurrently. This paper investigates the applicability of the parareal algorithm to power system dynamic simulations. Preliminary results on the application of parareal for multi-machine power systems are reported in this paper. Two widely used test systems, WECC 3-generator 9-bus system, New England 10-generator 39- bus system, is used to explore the effectiveness of the parareal. Severe 3 phase bus faults are simulated using both the classical and detailed models of multi-machine power systems. Actual Speedup of 5-7 times is observed assuming ideal parallelization. It has been observed that the speedup factors of the order of 20 can be achieved by using fast coarse approximations of power system models. Dependency of parareal convergence on fault duration and location has been observed.

  15. Mean Line Pump Flow Model in Rocket Engine System Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veres, Joseph P.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    A mean line pump flow modeling method has been developed to provide a fast capability for modeling turbopumps of rocket engines. Based on this method, a mean line pump flow code PUMPA has been written that can predict the performance of pumps at off-design operating conditions, given the loss of the diffusion system at the design point. The pump code can model axial flow inducers, mixed-flow and centrifugal pumps. The code can model multistage pumps in series. The code features rapid input setup and computer run time, and is an effective analysis and conceptual design tool. The map generation capability of the code provides the map information needed for interfacing with a rocket engine system modeling code. The off-design and multistage modeling capabilities of the code permit parametric design space exploration of candidate pump configurations and provide pump performance data for engine system evaluation. The PUMPA code has been integrated with the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) code and an expander rocket engine system has been simulated. The mean line pump flow code runs as an integral part of the NPSS rocket engine system simulation and provides key pump performance information directly to the system model at all operating conditions.

  16. Modeling and Fault Simulation of Propellant Filling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunchun; Liu, Weidong; Hou, Xiaobo

    2012-05-01

    Propellant filling system is one of the key ground plants in launching site of rocket that use liquid propellant. There is an urgent demand for ensuring and improving its reliability and safety, and there is no doubt that Failure Mode Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a good approach to meet it. Driven by the request to get more fault information for FMEA, and because of the high expense of propellant filling, in this paper, the working process of the propellant filling system in fault condition was studied by simulating based on AMESim. Firstly, based on analyzing its structure and function, the filling system was modular decomposed, and the mathematic models of every module were given, based on which the whole filling system was modeled in AMESim. Secondly, a general method of fault injecting into dynamic system was proposed, and as an example, two typical faults - leakage and blockage - were injected into the model of filling system, based on which one can get two fault models in AMESim. After that, fault simulation was processed and the dynamic characteristics of several key parameters were analyzed under fault conditions. The results show that the model can simulate effectively the two faults, and can be used to provide guidance for the filling system maintain and amelioration.

  17. Simulation for a Coevolved System-of-Systems Meta-Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, George; Dagli, Cihan

    2016-08-15

    This paper describes a simulation of a system-of-systems for counter-smuggling. The simulation is described and results are provided. The results demonstrate the applicability of the agent based modeling paradigm to understand key factors influencing SoS performance.

  18. Simulated, Emulated, and Physical Investigative Analysis (SEPIA) of networked systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, David P.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; McDonald, Michael James; Onunkwo, Uzoma A.; Tarman, Thomas David; Urias, Vincent E.

    2009-09-01

    This report describes recent progress made in developing and utilizing hybrid Simulated, Emulated, and Physical Investigative Analysis (SEPIA) environments. Many organizations require advanced tools to analyze their information system's security, reliability, and resilience against cyber attack. Today's security analysis utilize real systems such as computers, network routers and other network equipment, computer emulations (e.g., virtual machines) and simulation models separately to analyze interplay between threats and safeguards. In contrast, this work developed new methods to combine these three approaches to provide integrated hybrid SEPIA environments. Our SEPIA environments enable an analyst to rapidly configure hybrid environments to pass network traffic and perform, from the outside, like real networks. This provides higher fidelity representations of key network nodes while still leveraging the scalability and cost advantages of simulation tools. The result is to rapidly produce large yet relatively low-cost multi-fidelity SEPIA networks of computers and routers that let analysts quickly investigate threats and test protection approaches.

  19. Reflectivity of the atmosphere-inhomogeneous surfaces system Laboratory simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekler, Y.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical two- and three-dimensional solutions of the radiative transfer equation have been applied to the earth-atmosphere system. Such solutions have not been verified experimentally. A laboratory experiment simulates such a system to test the theory. The atmosphere was simulated by latex spheres suspended in water and the ground by a nonuniform surface, half white and half black. A stable radiation source provided uniform illumination over the hydrosol. The upward radiance along a line orthogonal to the boundary of the two-halves field was recorded for different amounts of the hydrosol. The simulation is a well-defined radiative transfer experiment to test radiative transfer models involving nonuniform surfaces. Good agreement is obtained between the measured and theoretical results.

  20. A perspective on modeling and simulation of complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, K. J.

    2011-09-01

    There has been an amazing development of modeling and simulation from its beginning in the 1920s, when the technology was available only at a handful of University groups who had access to a mechanical differential analyzer. Today, tools for modeling and simulation are available for every student and engineer. This paper gives a perspective on the development with particular emphasis on technology and paradigm shifts. Modeling is increasingly important for design and operation of complex natural and man-made systems. Because of the increased use of model based control such as Kalman filters and model predictive control, models are also appearing as components of feedback systems. Modeling and simulation are multidisciplinary, it is used in a wide variety of fields and their development have been strongly influenced by mathematics, numerics, computer science and computer technology.

  1. Simulation program of nonlinearities applied to telecommunication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, C.

    1979-01-01

    In any satellite communication system, the problems of distorsion created by nonlinear devices or systems must be considered. The subject of this paper is the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (F.F.T.) in the prediction of the intermodulation performance of amplifiers, mixers, filters. A nonlinear memory-less model is chosen to simulate amplitude and phase nonlinearities of the device in the simulation program written in FORTRAN 4. The experimentally observed nonlinearity parameters of a low noise 3.7-4.2 GHz amplifier are related to the gain and phase coefficients of Fourier Service Series. The measured results are compared with those calculated from the simulation in the cases where the input signal is composed of two, three carriers and noise power density.

  2. Composite system reliability evaluation using sequential Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonnavithula, Annapoorani

    Monte Carlo simulation methods can be effectively used to assess the adequacy of composite power system networks. The sequential simulation approach is the most fundamental technique available and can be used to provide a wide range of indices. It can also be used to provide estimates which can serve as benchmarks against which other approximate techniques can be compared. The focus of this research work is on the reliability evaluation of composite generation and transmission systems with special reference to frequency and duration related indices and estimated power interruption costs at each load bus. One of the main objectives is to use the sequential simulation method to create a comprehensive technique for composite system adequacy evaluation. This thesis recognizes the need for an accurate representation of the load model at the load buses which depends on the mix of customer sectors at each bus. Chronological hourly load curves are developed in this thesis, recognizing the individual load profiles of the customers at each load bus. Reliability worth considerations are playing an ever increasing role in power system planning and operation. Different methods for bus outage cost evaluation are proposed in this thesis. It may not be computationally feasible to use the sequential simulation method with time varying loads at each bus in large electric power system networks. Time varying load data may also not be available at each bus. This research work uses the sequential methodology as a fundamental technique to calibrate other non sequential methods such as the state sampling and state transition sampling techniques. Variance reduction techniques that improve the efficiency of the sequential simulation procedure are investigated as a part of this research work. Pertinent features that influence reliability worth assessment are also incorporated. All the proposed methods in this thesis are illustrated by application to two reliability test systems. In addition

  3. Numeric Modified Adomian Decomposition Method for Power System Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Simunovic, Srdjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of numeric Wazwaz El Sayed modified Adomian Decomposition Method (WES-ADM) for time domain simulation of power systems. WESADM is a numerical method based on a modified Adomian decomposition (ADM) technique. WES-ADM is a numerical approximation method for the solution of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The non-linear terms in the differential equations are approximated using Adomian polynomials. In this paper WES-ADM is applied to time domain simulations of multimachine power systems. WECC 3-generator, 9-bus system and IEEE 10-generator, 39-bus system have been used to test the applicability of the approach. Several fault scenarios have been tested. It has been found that the proposed approach is faster than the trapezoidal method with comparable accuracy.

  4. Communication Systems Simulator with Error Correcting Codes Using MATLAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, C.; Gonzalez, J. E.; Pardo, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, the characteristics of a simulator for channel coding techniques used in communication systems, are described. This software has been designed for engineering students in order to facilitate the understanding of how the error correcting codes work. To help students understand easily the concepts related to these kinds of codes, a…

  5. The 3-axis Dynamic Motion Simulator (DMS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A three-axis dynamic motion simulator (DMS) consisting of a test table with three degrees of freedom and an electronics control system was designed, constructed, delivered, and tested. Documentation, as required in the Data Requirements List (DRL), was also provided.

  6. A review of numerical simulation of hydrothermal systems.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.

    1979-01-01

    Many advances in simulating single and two-phase fluid flow and heat transport in porous media have recently been made in conjunction with geothermal energy research. These numerical models reproduce system thermal and pressure behaviour and can be used for other heat-transport problems, such as high-level radioactive waste disposal and heat-storage projects. -Authors

  7. DBP FORMATION KINETICS IN A SIMULATED DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little is known about how the growth of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water is affected by time spent in a distribution system. Experiments were performed to compare the rate of trihalomethane and haloacetic acid production in a simulated pipe environmen...

  8. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of Slapper Initiation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J S; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    Although useful information can be gleaned from 2D and even 1D simulations of slapper type initiation systems, these systems are inherently three-dimensional and therefore require full 3D representation to model all relevant details. Further, such representation provides additional insight into optimizing the design of such devices from a first-principles perspective and can thereby reduce experimental costs. We discuss in this paper several ongoing efforts in modeling these systems, our pursuit of validation, and extension of these methods to other systems. Our results show the substantial dependence upon highly accurate global equations of state and resistivity models in these analyses.

  9. Modeling and Simulation of Fleet Air Defense Systems Using EADSIM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Value method, the simulation is run once using individual weapon kill probabilities, and a prediction is made with respect to the probability of...assigned to the track. This method is used to represent IFF system reliability , as no IFF system is always accurate. In simple scenarios, IFF may be...WEAPONS DIVISION ATTN DALE KNUTSEN CHINA LAKE CA 935556001 11 ARINC RESEARCH CORPORATION PCC: Elizabeth Thomson Addr. ARINC RESEARCH CORPORATION 2551

  10. Towards accurate quantum simulations of large systems with small computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations are important for many systems. In particular, various standard computer programs have been developed for solving the quantum Schrödinger equations. However, the accuracy of these calculations is limited by computer capabilities. In this work, an iterative method is introduced to enhance the accuracy of these numerical calculations, which is otherwise prohibitive by conventional methods. The method is easily implementable and general for many systems.

  11. Towards accurate quantum simulations of large systems with small computers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yonggang

    2017-01-24

    Numerical simulations are important for many systems. In particular, various standard computer programs have been developed for solving the quantum Schrödinger equations. However, the accuracy of these calculations is limited by computer capabilities. In this work, an iterative method is introduced to enhance the accuracy of these numerical calculations, which is otherwise prohibitive by conventional methods. The method is easily implementable and general for many systems.

  12. Technical Performance Measures and Distributed-Simulation Training Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Winter 2000 32 Piplani , L . K ., Mercer, J. G., & Roop, R. O. (1994). Systems acquisition manager’s guide for the use of models and simulations. Fort...tasks, moving on to learn advanced unit tasks, rein- forcement of p r e v i o u s l y learned tasks, and, finally, in- tegration of various combinations... Piplani , Mercer, and Roop, 1994), identifies numerous outcome-oriented, technical performance measures for use by acquisition managers of combat systems

  13. Towards accurate quantum simulations of large systems with small computers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations are important for many systems. In particular, various standard computer programs have been developed for solving the quantum Schrödinger equations. However, the accuracy of these calculations is limited by computer capabilities. In this work, an iterative method is introduced to enhance the accuracy of these numerical calculations, which is otherwise prohibitive by conventional methods. The method is easily implementable and general for many systems. PMID:28117366

  14. IUS/payload communication system simulator configuration definition study. [payload simulator for pcm telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udalov, S.; Springett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The requirements and specifications for a general purpose payload communications system simulator to be used to emulate those communications system portions of NASA and DOD payloads/spacecraft that will in the future be carried into earth orbit by the shuttle are discussed. For the purpose of on-orbit checkout, the shuttle is required to communicate with the payloads while they are physically located within the shuttle bay (attached) and within a range of 20 miles from the shuttle after they have been deployed (detached). Many of the payloads are also under development (and many have yet to be defined), actual payload communication hardware will not be available within the time frame during which the avionic hardware tests will be conducted. Thus, a flexible payload communication system simulator is required.

  15. Using simulation to evaluate warhead monitoring system effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Casey J.; Brigantic, Robert T.; Keating, Douglas H.; Liles, Karina R.; Meyer, Nicholas J.; Oster, Matthew R.; Waterworth, Angela M.

    2015-07-12

    There is a need to develop and demonstrate technical approaches for verifying potential future agreements to limit and reduce total warhead stockpiles. To facilitate this aim, warhead monitoring systems employ both concepts of operations (CONOPS) and technologies. A systems evaluation approach can be used to assess the relative performance of CONOPS and technologies in their ability to achieve monitoring system objectives which include: 1) confidence that a treaty accountable item (TAI) initialized by the monitoring system is as declared; 2) confidence that there is no undetected diversion from the monitoring system; and 3) confidence that a TAI is dismantled as declared. Although there are many quantitative methods that can be used to assess system performance for the above objectives, this paper focuses on a simulation perspective primarily for the ability to support analysis of the probabilities that are used to define operating characteristics of CONOPS and technologies. This paper describes a discrete event simulation (DES) model, comprised of three major sub-models: including TAI lifecycle flow, monitoring activities, and declaration behavior. The DES model seeks to capture all processes and decision points associated with the progressions of virtual TAIs, with notional characteristics, through the monitoring system from initialization through dismantlement. The simulation updates TAI progression (i.e., whether the generated test objects are accepted and rejected at the appropriate points) all the way through dismantlement. Evaluation of TAI lifecycles primarily serves to assess how the order, frequency, and combination of functions in the CONOPS affect system performance as a whole. It is important, however, to note that discrete event simulation is also capable (at a basic level) of addressing vulnerabilities in the CONOPS and interdependencies between individual functions as well. This approach is beneficial because it does not rely on complex mathematical

  16. The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation: A Multidisciplinary Design System for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytle, John K.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in computational technology and in physics-based modeling are making large scale, detailed simulations of complex systems possible within the design environment. For example, the integration of computing, communications, and aerodynamics has reduced the time required to analyze ma or propulsion system components from days and weeks to minutes and hours. This breakthrough has enabled the detailed simulation of major propulsion system components to become a routine part of design process and to provide the designer with critical information about the components early in the design process. This paper describes the development of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), a multidisciplinary system of analysis tools that is focussed on extending the simulation capability from components to the full system. This will provide the product developer with a "virtual wind tunnel" that will reduce the number of hardware builds and tests required during the development of advanced aerospace propulsion systems.

  17. An Integrated Simulation Module for Cyber-Physical Automation Systems.

    PubMed

    Ferracuti, Francesco; Freddi, Alessandro; Monteriù, Andrea; Prist, Mariorosario

    2016-05-05

    The integration of Wireless Sensors Networks (WSNs) into Cyber Physical Systems (CPSs) is an important research problem to solve in order to increase the performances, safety, reliability and usability of wireless automation systems. Due to the complexity of real CPSs, emulators and simulators are often used to replace the real control devices and physical connections during the development stage. The most widespread simulators are free, open source, expandable, flexible and fully integrated into mathematical modeling tools; however, the connection at a physical level and the direct interaction with the real process via the WSN are only marginally tackled; moreover, the simulated wireless sensor motes are not able to generate the analogue output typically required for control purposes. A new simulation module for the control of a wireless cyber-physical system is proposed in this paper. The module integrates the COntiki OS JAva Simulator (COOJA), a cross-level wireless sensor network simulator, and the LabVIEW system design software from National Instruments. The proposed software module has been called "GILOO" (Graphical Integration of Labview and cOOja). It allows one to develop and to debug control strategies over the WSN both using virtual or real hardware modules, such as the National Instruments Real-Time Module platform, the CompactRio, the Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA), etc. To test the proposed solution, we decided to integrate it with one of the most popular simulators, i.e., the Contiki OS, and wireless motes, i.e., the Sky mote. As a further contribution, the Contiki Sky DAC driver and a new "Advanced Sky GUI" have been proposed and tested in the COOJA Simulator in order to provide the possibility to develop control over the WSN. To test the performances of the proposed GILOO software module, several experimental tests have been made, and interesting preliminary results are reported. The GILOO module has been applied to a smart home

  18. : A Scalable and Transparent System for Simulating MPI Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2010-01-01

    is a scalable, transparent system for experimenting with the execution of parallel programs on simulated computing platforms. The level of simulated detail can be varied for application behavior as well as for machine characteristics. Unique features of are repeatability of execution, scalability to millions of simulated (virtual) MPI ranks, scalability to hundreds of thousands of host (real) MPI ranks, portability of the system to a variety of host supercomputing platforms, and the ability to experiment with scientific applications whose source-code is available. The set of source-code interfaces supported by is being expanded to support a wider set of applications, and MPI-based scientific computing benchmarks are being ported. In proof-of-concept experiments, has been successfully exercised to spawn and sustain very large-scale executions of an MPI test program given in source code form. Low slowdowns are observed, due to its use of purely discrete event style of execution, and due to the scalability and efficiency of the underlying parallel discrete event simulation engine, sik. In the largest runs, has been executed on up to 216,000 cores of a Cray XT5 supercomputer, successfully simulating over 27 million virtual MPI ranks, each virtual rank containing its own thread context, and all ranks fully synchronized by virtual time.

  19. Simulation of Benchmark Cases with the Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrodynamic core of the Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS) is evaluated against different benchmark cases. In the absence of closed form solutions for the equations governing atmospheric flows, the models are usually evaluated against idealized test cases. Over the years, various authors have suggested a suite of these idealized cases which have become standards for testing and evaluating the dynamics and thermodynamics of atmospheric flow models. In this paper, simulations of three such cases are described. In addition, the TASS model is evaluated against a test case that uses an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. The TASS results are compared against previously reported simulations of these benchmark cases in the literature. It is demonstrated that the TASS model is highly accurate, stable and robust.

  20. Simulation of Benchmark Cases with the Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Nash'at; Proctor, Fred

    2011-01-01

    The hydrodynamic core of the Terminal Area Simulation System (TASS) is evaluated against different benchmark cases. In the absence of closed form solutions for the equations governing atmospheric flows, the models are usually evaluated against idealized test cases. Over the years, various authors have suggested a suite of these idealized cases which have become standards for testing and evaluating the dynamics and thermodynamics of atmospheric flow models. In this paper, simulations of three such cases are described. In addition, the TASS model is evaluated against a test case that uses an exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. The TASS results are compared against previously reported simulations of these banchmark cases in the literature. It is demonstrated that the TASS model is highly accurate, stable and robust.

  1. Network Flow Simulation of Fluid Transients in Rocket Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Hamill, Brian; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Majumdar, Alok

    2011-01-01

    Fluid transients, also known as water hammer, can have a significant impact on the design and operation of both spacecraft and launch vehicle propulsion systems. These transients often occur at system activation and shutdown. The pressure rise due to sudden opening and closing of valves of propulsion feed lines can cause serious damage during activation and shutdown of propulsion systems. During activation (valve opening) and shutdown (valve closing), pressure surges must be predicted accurately to ensure structural integrity of the propulsion system fluid network. In the current work, a network flow simulation software (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) based on Finite Volume Method has been used to predict the pressure surges in the feed line due to both valve closing and valve opening using two separate geometrical configurations. The valve opening pressure surge results are compared with experimental data available in the literature and the numerical results compared very well within reasonable accuracy (< 5%) for a wide range of inlet-to-initial pressure ratios. A Fast Fourier Transform is preformed on the pressure oscillations to predict the various modal frequencies of the pressure wave. The shutdown problem, i.e. valve closing problem, the simulation results are compared with the results of Method of Characteristics. Most rocket engines experience a longitudinal acceleration, known as "pogo" during the later stage of engine burn. In the shutdown example problem, an accumulator has been used in the feed system to demonstrate the "pogo" mitigation effects in the feed system of propellant. The simulation results using GFSSP compared very well with the results of Method of Characteristics.

  2. Thermal simulation and economic assessment of unglazed transpired collector systems

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.N.; Mitchell, J.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.

    1996-10-01

    Unglazed transpired collectors (UTCs) have recently emerged as a new solar air heating technology. They are relatively inexpensive, efficient, and particularly suited to applications in which a high outdoor air requirement must be met. A TRNSYS model has been created for UTC systems. Annual simulations are performed for several representative buildings. The statewide economic potential of UTC systems is assessed for Wisconsin. UTC systems on existing buildings are competitive with electric heating systems but not with gas or oil heating. Electric heating is not widely used in most buildings that are well-suited for UTC systems, with the exception of large apartment buildings. Therefore, there is no significant statewide economic potential for retrofit of UTC systems on existing buildings except in the residential sector. However, UTC systems are cost effective for new buildings because their low first cost allows them to compete with gas and oil heating.

  3. Parallel Monte Carlo Simulation for control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Wolfgang M.

    1995-01-01

    The research during the 1993/94 academic year addressed the design of parallel algorithms for stochastic robustness synthesis (SRS). SRS uses Monte Carlo simulation to compute probabilities of system instability and other design-metric violations. The probabilities form a cost function which is used by a genetic algorithm (GA). The GA searches for the stochastic optimal controller. The existing sequential algorithm was analyzed and modified to execute in a distributed environment. For this, parallel approaches to Monte Carlo simulation and genetic algorithms were investigated. Initial empirical results are available for the KSR1.

  4. Control design and simulation of systems modeled using ADAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohoni, Vikram N.

    1989-01-01

    A technique for control design and simulation using the ADAMS software and a control design software package is presented. For design of control systems ADAMS generates a minimum realization linear time invariant (LTI), state space representation of multi-body models. This LTI representation can be produced in formats for input to several commercial control design packages. The user can exercise various design strategies in the control design software to arrive at a suitable compensator. The resulting closed loop model can then be simulated using ADAMS. This procedure is illustrated with two examples.

  5. Partical Simulation of Bounded 1D Plasma Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, William S.

    1989-02-01

    The physical and numerical problems of kinetic simulation of a bounded electrostatic plasma system in one planar dimension are examined, and solutions to them are presented. These problems include particle absorption, reflection and emission at boundaries, the solution of Poisson's equation under non-periodic boundary conditions, and the treatment of an external circuit connecting the boundaries. The methods which are described here are immlemented in a code named PDW1, which is available from Professor C. K. Birdsall, Plasma Theory and Simulation Group, Cory Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720.

  6. Evolutionary Development of the Simulation by Logical Modeling System (SIBYL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Helen

    1995-01-01

    Through the evolutionary development of the Simulation by Logical Modeling System (SIBYL) we have re-engineered the expensive and complex IBM mainframe based Long-term Hardware Projection Model (LHPM) to a robust cost-effective computer based mode that is easy to use. We achieved significant cost reductions and improved productivity in preparing long-term forecasts of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) hardware. The LHPM for the SSME is a stochastic simulation model that projects the hardware requirements over 10 years. SIBYL is now the primary modeling tool for developing SSME logistics proposals and Program Operating Plan (POP) for NASA and divisional marketing studies.

  7. Modeling and Simulation For A Variable Sprayerrate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan; Liang, Anbo; Yuan, Haibo; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Junlong

    Variable spraying technology is an important content and developing direction in current plant protection machinery, which can effectively save pesticide and lighten burden of ecological environment in agriculture according to characteristic of spraying targets and speed of aircraft crew. Paper established mathematic model and delivery function of variable spraying system based on designed hardware of variable spraying machine, making use of PID controlling algorithm to simulate in MATLAB. Simulating result explained that the model can conveniently control gushing amounts and can arrive at satisfied controlling.

  8. Modeling and Simulation For A Variable Sprayerrate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan; Liang, Anbo; Yuan, Haibo; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Junlong

    Variable spraying technology is an important content and developing direction in current plant protection machinery, which can effectively save pesticide and lighten burden of ecological environment in agriculture according to characteristic of spraying targets and speed of aircraft crew. Paper established mathematic model and delivery function of variable spraying system based on designed hardware of variable spraying machine, making use of PID controlling algorithm to simulate in matlab. Simulating result explained that the model can conveniently control gushing amounts and can arrive at satisfied controlling.

  9. Simulation of an enhanced TCAS 2 system in operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas, R. G.; Law, P.; Burnside, W. D.

    1987-01-01

    Described is a computer simulation of a Boeing 737 aircraft equipped with an enhanced Traffic and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS II). In particular, an algorithm is developed which permits the computer simulation of the tracking of a target airplane by a Boeing 373 which has a TCAS II array mounted on top of its fuselage. This algorithm has four main components: namely, the target path, the noise source, the alpha-beta filter, and threat detection. The implementation of each of these four components is described. Furthermore, the areas where the present algorithm needs to be improved are also mentioned.

  10. INTEGRATED SYSTEM SIMULATION IN X-RAY RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    T. KWAN; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    An integrated simulation capability is being developed to examine the fidelity of a dynamic radiographic system. This capability consists of a suite of simulation codes which individually model electromagnetic and particle transport phenomena and are chained together to model an entire radiographic event. Our study showed that the electron beam spot size at the converter target plays the key role in determining material edge locations. The angular spectrum is a relatively insensitive factor in radiographic fidelity. We also found that the full energy spectrum of the imaging photons must be modeled to obtain an accurate analysis of material densities.

  11. Parachute system design, analysis, and simulation tool. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, W.D.; McBride, D.D.; Gwinn, K.W.; Waye, D.E.; Hailey, C.E.

    1992-12-31

    For over twenty years designers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed various parachute simulation codes to model deployment, inflation, loading, trajectories, aircraft downwash and line sail. In addition to these codes, material property data bases have been acquired. Recently we have initiated project to integrate these codes and data bases into a single software tool entitled SPARSYS (Sandia PARachute SYstem Simulation). We have constructed a graphical user interface as the driver and framework for SPARSYS. In this paper we present a status report on SPARSYS describing progress in developing and incorporating independent modules, in developing an integrated trajectory package, and in developing a materials data base including high-rate-of-strain data.

  12. Simulation of Energy Management Systems in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P. G.; Torcellini, P. A.; Crawley, D.

    2008-01-01

    An energy management system (EMS) is a dedicated computer that can be programmed to control all of a building's energy-related systems, including heating, cooling, ventilation, hot water, interior lighting, exterior lighting, on-site power generation, and mechanized systems for shading devices, window actuators, and double facade elements. Recently a new module for simulating an EMS was added to the EnergyPlus whole-building energy simulation program. An essential part of the EMS module is the EnergyPlus Runtime Language (ERL), which is a simple programming language that is used to specify the EMS control algorithms. The new EMS controls and the flexibility of ERL allow EnergyPlus to simulate many novel control strategies that are not possible with the previous generation of building energy simulation programs. This paper surveys the standard controls in EnergyPlus, presents the new EMS features, describes the implementation of the module, and explores some of the possible applications for the new EMS capabilities in EnergyPlus.

  13. Simulations of Sea Level Rise Effects on Complex Coastal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedoroda, A. W.; Ye, M.; Saha, B.; Donoghue, J. F.; Reed, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    It is now established that complex coastal systems with elements such as beaches, inlets, bays, and rivers adjust their morphologies according to time-varying balances in between the processes that control the exchange of sediment. Accelerated sea level rise introduces a major perturbation into the sediment-sharing systems. A modeling framework based on a new SL-PR model which is an advanced version of the aggregate-scale CST Model and the event-scale CMS-2D and CMS-Wave combination have been used to simulate the recent evolution of a portion of the Florida panhandle coast. This combination of models provides a method to evaluate coefficients in the aggregate-scale model that were previously treated as fitted parameters. That is, by carrying out simulations of a complex coastal system with runs of the event-scale model representing more than a year it is now possible to directly relate the coefficients in the large-scale SL-PR model to measureable physical parameters in the current and wave fields. This cross-scale modeling procedure has been used to simulate the shoreline evolution at the Santa Rosa Island, a long barrier which houses significant military infrastructure at the north Gulf Coast. The model has been used to simulate 137 years of measured shoreline change and to extend these to predictions of future rates of shoreline migration.

  14. Simulation of Combustion Systems with Realistic g-Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mell, William E.; McGrattan, Kevin B.; Baum, Howard R.

    1999-01-01

    A number of facilities are available for microgravity combustion experiments: aircraft, drop tower, sounding rocket, space shuttle and, in the future, the international space station (ISS). Acceleration disturbances or g-jitter about the background level of reduced gravity exist in all the microgravity facilities. While g-jitter is routinely measured, a quantitative comparison of the quality of g-jitter among the different microgravity facilities has not been compiled. Low frequency g-jitter (< 1 Hz) has been repeatedly observed to disturb a number of combustion systems. Guidelines regarding tolerable levels of acceleration disturbances for a given combustion system have been developed for use in the design of ISS experiments. The validity of these guidelines, however, remains unknown. In this project, recently funded by NASA, a transient, fully three-dimensional simulation code will be developed to simulate the effects of realistic g-jitter on a number of combustion systems. Acceleration disturbances of realistic orientation, magnitude and time dependence will be included in the simulation. Since this is a newly funded project with code development just under-way no simulation results will be presented. Instead, first a short review of the relevant background concerning g-jitter will be given followed by a section on the proposed technical approach.

  15. Big Data Visual Analytics for Exploratory Earth System Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Shipman, Galen M.; Smith, Brian E.; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Dali; Shi, Xiaoying; Williams, Dean N.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called big data analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques are inadequate in dealing with the complexities of today s data. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a visual analytics system, called the Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment (EDEN), with specific application to the analysis of complex earth system simulation data sets. EDEN represents the type of interactive visual analysis tools that are necessary to transform data into insight, thereby improving critical comprehension of earth system processes. In addition to providing an overview of EDEN, we describe real-world studies using both point ensembles and global Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) simulations.

  16. Services oriented architecture (SOA)-based persistent ISR simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genshe; Blasch, Erik; Shen, Dan; Chen, Huimin; Pham, Khanh

    2010-04-01

    In the modern networked battlefield, network centric warfare (NCW) scenarios need to interoperate between shared resources and data assets such as sensors, UAVs, satellites, ground vehicles, and command and control (C2/C4I) systems. By linking and fusing platform routing information, sensor exploitation results, and databases (e.g. Geospatial Information Systems [GIS]), the shared situation awareness and mission effectiveness will be improved. Within the information fusion community, various research efforts are looking at open standard approaches to composing the heterogeneous network components under one framework for future modeling and simulation applications. By utilizing the open source services oriented architecture (SOA) based sensor web services, and GIS visualization services, we propose a framework that ensures the fast prototyping of intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) system simulations to determine an asset mix for a desired mission effectiveness, performance modeling for sensor management and prediction, and user testing of various scenarios.

  17. Digital simulation of dynamic processes in radiometer systems. [microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    The development and application of several computer programs for simulating different classes of microwave radiometers are described. The programs are dynamic in nature, and they may be used to determine the instantaneous behavior of system variables as a function of time. Some of the programs employ random variable models in the simulations so that the statistical nature of the results may be investigated. The programs have been developed to utilize either the Continuous System Modeling Program or the Advanced Continuous System Language. The validity of most of the programs was investigated using statistical tests, and the results show excellent correlation with theoretical predictions. The programs are currently being used in the investigation of new design techniques for microwave radiometers.

  18. Benchmarking of Advanced Control Strategies for a Simulated Hydroelectric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finotti, S.; Simani, S.; Alvisi, S.; Venturini, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses and develops the design of advanced control strategies for a typical hydroelectric plant during unsteady conditions, performed in the Matlab and Simulink environments. The hydraulic system consists of a high water head and a long penstock with upstream and downstream surge tanks, and is equipped with a Francis turbine. The nonlinear characteristics of hydraulic turbine and the inelastic water hammer effects were considered to calculate and simulate the hydraulic transients. With reference to the control solutions addressed in this work, the proposed methodologies rely on data-driven and model-based approaches applied to the system under monitoring. Extensive simulations and comparisons serve to determine the best solution for the development of the most effective, robust and reliable control tool when applied to the considered hydraulic system.

  19. Temperature fluctuations in canonical systems: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, J.; Mishin, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a quasiharmonic solid are conducted to elucidate the meaning of temperature fluctuations in canonical systems and validate a well-known but frequently contested equation predicting the mean square of such fluctuations. The simulations implement two virtual and one physical (natural) thermostat and examine the kinetic, potential, and total energy correlation functions in the time and frequency domains. The results clearly demonstrate the existence of quasiequilibrium states in which the system can be characterized by a well-defined temperature that follows the mentioned fluctuation equation. The emergence of such states is due to the wide separation of time scales between thermal relaxation by phonon scattering and slow energy exchanges with the thermostat. The quasiequilibrium states exist between these two time scales when the system behaves as virtually isolated and equilibrium.

  20. Simulation and modeling of high-energy laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, Donald J.; St. John, Richard

    2004-09-01

    Since the beginning of High Energy Laser systems, simulations have been used to predict performance, do parameter trades, and assist in troubleshooting. Today, simulations benefit from higher speed computers with more memory, but they are also being asked to do more. New types of HEL devices are being proposed, more hardware details are being incorporated, beam control systems are becoming more complex, innovative new systems are being designed to work under conditions of strong turbulence, and more types of targets are being considered. There are three types of physics level codes: resonator, beam control, and lethality. All three are slow running and require a high level of expertise to use. Scaling law codes are much easier to use and much faster running. These codes are based on analytical predictions and anchored to the wave optics simulations and to experiments. Scaling law codes can quickly predict performance, weight, and volume for various scenarios and conditions. Now that HEL systems are closer to reality, there is more interest in incorporating the scaling law codes into engagement codes, which predict overall system effectiveness in battle situations.

  1. UAS-Systems Integration, Validation, and Diagnostics Simulation Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, Catherine W.; Verstynen, Harry A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Phase 1 efforts of NASA's UAS-in-the-NAS Project a task was initiated to explore the merits of developing a system simulation capability for UAS to address airworthiness certification requirements. The core of the capability would be a software representation of an unmanned vehicle, including all of the relevant avionics and flight control system components. The specific system elements could be replaced with hardware representations to provide Hardware-in-the-Loop (HWITL) test and evaluation capability. The UAS Systems Integration and Validation Laboratory (UAS-SIVL) was created to provide a UAS-systems integration, validation, and diagnostics hardware-in-the-loop simulation capability. This paper discusses how SIVL provides a robust and flexible simulation framework that permits the study of failure modes, effects, propagation paths, criticality, and mitigation strategies to help develop safety, reliability, and design data that can assist with the development of certification standards, means of compliance, and design best practices for civil UAS.

  2. Power System Simulation for Policymaking and Making Policymakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Michael Ari

    Power system simulation is a vital tool for anticipating, planning for and ultimately addressing future conditions on the power grid, especially in light of contemporary shifts in power generation, transmission and use that are being driven by a desire to utilize more environmentally responsible energy sources. This dissertation leverages power system simulation and engineering-economic analysis to provide initial answers to one open question about future power systems: how will high penetrations of distributed (rooftop) solar power affect the physical and economic operation of distribution feeders? We find that the overall impacts of distributed solar power (both positive and negative) on the feeders we modeled are minor compared to the overall cost of energy, but that there is on average a small net benefit provided by distributed generation. We then describe an effort to make similar analyses more accessible to a non-engineering (high school) audience by developing an educational video game called "Griddle" that is based on the same power system simulation techniques used in the first study. We describe the design and evaluation of Griddle and find that it demonstrates potential to provide students with insights about key power system learning objectives.

  3. A system for designing and simulating particle physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żelazny, Roman; Strzałkowski, Piotr

    1987-01-01

    In view of the rapid development of experimental facilities and their costs, the systematic design and preparation of particle physics experiments have become crucial. A software system is proposed as an aid for the experimental designer, mainly for experimental geometry analysis and experimental simulation. The following model is adopted: the description of an experiment is formulated in a language (here called XL) and put by its processor in a data base. The language is based on the entity-relationship-attribute approach. The information contained in the data base can be reported and analysed by an analyser (called XA) and modifications can be made at any time. In particular, the Monte Carlo methods can be used in experiment simulation for both physical phenomena in experimental set-up and detection analysis. The general idea of the system is based on the design concept of ISDOS project information systems. The characteristics of the simulation module are similar to those of the CERN Geant system, but some extensions are proposed. The system could be treated as a component of a greater, integrated software environment for the design of particle physics experiments, their monitoring and data processing.

  4. Simulation Environment for Orion Launch Abort System Control Design Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMinn, J. Dana; Jackson, E. Bruce; Christhilf, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The development and use of an interactive environment to perform control system design and analysis of the proposed Crew Exploration Vehicle Launch Abort System is described. The environment, built using a commercial dynamic systems design package, includes use of an open-source configuration control software tool and a collaborative wiki to coordinate between the simulation developers, control law developers and users. A method for switching between multiple candidate control laws and vehicle configurations is described. Aerodynamic models, especially in a development program, change rapidly, so a means for automating the implementation of new aerodynamic models is described.

  5. Experimental Validation of a Closed Brayton Cycle System Transient Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul K.; Hervol, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) located at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio was used to validate the results of a computational code known as Closed Cycle System Simulation (CCSS). Conversion system thermal transient behavior was the focus of this validation. The BPCU was operated at various steady state points and then subjected to transient changes involving shaft rotational speed and thermal energy input. These conditions were then duplicated in CCSS. Validation of the CCSS BPCU model provides confidence in developing future Brayton power system performance predictions, and helps to guide high power Brayton technology development.

  6. SPS phase control system performance via analytical simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, W. C.; Kantak, A. V.; Chie, C. M.; Booth, R. W. D.

    1979-01-01

    A solar power satellite transmission system which incorporates automatic beam forming, steering, and phase control is discussed. The phase control concept centers around the notation of an active retrodirective phased array as a means of pointing the beam to the appropriate spot on Earth. The transmitting antenna (spacetenna) directs the high power beam so that it focuses on the ground-based receiving antenna (rectenna). A combination of analysis and computerized simulation was conducted to determine the far field performance of the reference distribution system, and the beam forming and microwave power generating systems.

  7. Large-scale simulations of complex physical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belić, A.

    2007-04-01

    Scientific computing has become a tool as vital as experimentation and theory for dealing with scientific challenges of the twenty-first century. Large scale simulations and modelling serve as heuristic tools in a broad problem-solving process. High-performance computing facilities make possible the first step in this process - a view of new and previously inaccessible domains in science and the building up of intuition regarding the new phenomenology. The final goal of this process is to translate this newly found intuition into better algorithms and new analytical results. In this presentation we give an outline of the research themes pursued at the Scientific Computing Laboratory of the Institute of Physics in Belgrade regarding large-scale simulations of complex classical and quantum physical systems, and present recent results obtained in the large-scale simulations of granular materials and path integrals.

  8. System Verification of MSL Skycrane Using an Integrated ADAMS Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Christopher; Antoun, George; Brugarolas, Paul; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Peng, Chia-Yen; Phan, Linh; San Martin, Alejandro; Sell, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will use the Skycrane architecture to execute final descent and landing maneuvers. The Skycrane phase uses closed-loop feedback control throughout the entire phase, starting with rover separation, through mobility deploy, and through touchdown, ending only when the bridles have completely slacked. The integrated ADAMS simulation described in this paper couples complex dynamical models created by the mechanical subsystem with actual GNC flight software algorithms that have been compiled and linked into ADAMS. These integrated simulations provide the project with the best means to verify key Skycrane requirements which have a tightly coupled GNC-Mechanical aspect to them. It also provides the best opportunity to validate the design of the algorithm that determines when to cut the bridles. The results of the simulations show the excellent performance of the Skycrane system.

  9. Real-time, interactive, visually updated simulator system for telepresence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schebor, Frederick S.; Turney, Jerry L.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    1991-01-01

    Time delays and limited sensory feedback of remote telerobotic systems tend to disorient teleoperators and dramatically decrease the operator's performance. To remove the effects of time delays, key components were designed and developed of a prototype forward simulation subsystem, the Global-Local Environment Telerobotic Simulator (GLETS) that buffers the operator from the remote task. GLETS totally immerses an operator in a real-time, interactive, simulated, visually updated artificial environment of the remote telerobotic site. Using GLETS, the operator will, in effect, enter into a telerobotic virtual reality and can easily form a gestalt of the virtual 'local site' that matches the operator's normal interactions with the remote site. In addition to use in space based telerobotics, GLETS, due to its extendable architecture, can also be used in other teleoperational environments such as toxic material handling, construction, and undersea exploration.

  10. Mathematical modeling and simulation of a thermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropoc, Mirela; Gavrila, Camelia; Frunzulica, Rodica; Toma, Petrica D.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present paper is the conception of a mathematical model and simulation of a system formed by a heatexchanger for domestic hot water preparation, a storage tank for hot water and a radiator, starting from the mathematical equations describing this system and developed using Scilab-Xcos program. The model helps to determine the evolution in time for the hot water temperature, for the return temperature in the primary circuit of the heat exchanger, for the supply temperature in the secondary circuit, the thermal power for heating and for hot water preparation to the consumer respectively. In heating systems, heat-exchangers have an important role and their performances influence the energy efficiency of the systems. In the meantime, it is very important to follow the behavior of such systems in dynamic regimes. Scilab-Xcos program can be utilized to follow the important parameters of the systems in different functioning scenarios.

  11. SIMWEST - A simulation model for wind energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edsinger, R. W.; Warren, A. W.; Gordon, L. H.; Chang, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive and efficient computer program for the modeling of wind energy systems with storage. The level of detail of SIMWEST (SImulation Model for Wind Energy STorage) is consistent with evaluating the economic feasibility as well as the general performance of wind energy systems with energy storage options. The software package consists of two basic programs and a library of system, environmental, and control components. The first program is a precompiler which allows the library components to be put together in building block form. The second program performs the technoeconomic system analysis with the required input/output, and the integration of system dynamics. An example of the application of the SIMWEST program to a current 100 kW wind energy storage system is given.

  12. Aerodynamic thermal simulation system. Part 1: Radiant array (instruction manual)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchar, A. F.; Steuffen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    An aerodynamic thermal simulation system (ATSS) is presented. The construction of the system, the maintenance, set up, and operations are reported. System description of the radiant array is given along with the array subsystems modular heating unit, adjustable stanchion frame, cooling water system, and the gaseous nitrogen cooling system. The array configuration procedure outlines the set up and the start up. Maintenance procedures involve both lamp maintenance and reflector maintenance along with weather protection. Drawing codes are included. Descriptions of the 36 zone ATSS controls are also given. Each zone is an independent closed loop temperature control circuit. Procedures are presented for starting and stopping the system. The DATA-TRAK programmer and its operation, instruction manuals for the temperature controller and the power regulator and discriptions of peripheral equipment are discussed.

  13. Generic solar photovoltaic system dynamic simulation model specification

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Behnke, Michael Robert; Elliott, Ryan Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This document is intended to serve as a specification for generic solar photovoltaic (PV) system positive-sequence dynamic models to be implemented by software developers and approved by the WECC MVWG for use in bulk system dynamic simulations in accordance with NERC MOD standards. Two specific dynamic models are included in the scope of this document. The first, a Central Station PV System model, is intended to capture the most important dynamic characteristics of large scale (> 10 MW) PV systems with a central Point of Interconnection (POI) at the transmission level. The second, a Distributed PV System model, is intended to represent an aggregation of smaller, distribution-connected systems that comprise a portion of a composite load that might be modeled at a transmission load bus.

  14. Development of walking pattern evaluation system for hypogravity simulation.

    PubMed

    Leães, R; Cambraia, R; Bacim, F; Dalmarco, G; Calder, A; De Azevedo, D F G; Pinho, M; Russomano, T

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a Walking Pattern Evaluation System during Hypogravity Simulation (SAMSH), which included the adaptation of a body suspension device, the instrumentation of a treadmill and the development of a virtual environment. SAMSH was developed using one subject. Kinematic analyses were performed whilst one individual was walking on the treadmill during body weight reduction simulating the gravitational forces of the Moon (reduction of 60%) and Mars (reduction of 30%) with and without virtual reality glasses (Head Mounted Display, HMD). The walking pattern was evaluated by means of knee and ankle electrogoniometers, foot switches placed on the front and back part of the plantar region, and five video cameras. Results showed that the body weight reduction during Moon simulation alter the walking pattern, including the increase in step time, contact time, step length and aerial time, and the decrease of walking cadence time (steps per minute). The findings of this study also suggested that hypogravity simulation reduces walking effort. The utilization of the HMD allowed the evaluation of the head position three-dimensionally during hypogravity simulation. The virtual environment reduced postural balance, due to the absence of visual input, which was evidenced by a protective extension reaction.

  15. A methodology for simulating biological systems using Microsoft Excel.

    PubMed

    Brown, A M

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this present study was to develop a simple, easily understood methodology for solving biologically based models using a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The method involves the use of in-cell formulas in which Rows and Columns of new data are generated from data typed into the spreadsheet, but does not require any programming skills or use of the macro language. The approach involves entering the key parameter values into the spreadsheet and conducting the simulation by solving a set of equations based on these parameter values. The examples used in this paper are firstly, a simple voltage clamp simulation in which initial parameter values are used to calculate a system in steady state. The second example is a current clamp simulation where steady state is not reached and the solution of the equations for each time increment is used as the input for the next time increment in the simulation. The calculations are based on the Hodgkin Huxley mathematical equations that describe the voltage dependence of ion channel behavior. The problems and flexibility of the method are briefly discussed. The methodology developed in this present study should help novice modelers to create simple simulations without the need to learn a programming language or purchase expensive software.

  16. Simulation system provides unique training method for the oilfield

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, K.; Schwendemann, K.

    1997-02-01

    Integrated services and turnkey operations are becoming the norm for the industry, and oilfield service companies are finding themselves linked with operators and contractors in long-term service contracts that would never have been considered in the 1980`s. In this paper, the authors discuss a unique simulator that can resolve the training needs that have surfaced as a result of the rapidly changing operational concepts in the oilfield environment. They will present the concepts of the equipment simulator and capabilities of the global simulator methodology, and they will use an actual case history to describe in detail how the equipment simulator was used offshore on a recent well-test job in the Gulf Coast area to introduce a new well-test tool and to train a new design engineer. With this information, the authors conclude that the use of the simulator will provide unparalleled training support for oilfield equipment and system applications and facilitate efficient development of integrated solutions for oilfield projects.

  17. Physical habitat simulation system reference manual: version II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, Robert T.; Updike, Marlys A.; Schneider, Diane M.

    1989-01-01

    There are four major components of a stream system that determine the productivity of the fishery (Karr and Dudley 1978). These are: (1) flow regime, (2) physical habitat structure (channel form, substrate distribution, and riparian vegetation), (3) water quality (including temperature), and (4) energy inputs from the watershed (sediments, nutrients, and organic matter). The complex interaction of these components determines the primary production, secondary production, and fish population of the stream reach. The basic components and interactions needed to simulate fish populations as a function of management alternatives are illustrated in Figure I.1. The assessment process utilizes a hierarchical and modular approach combined with computer simulation techniques. The modular components represent the "building blocks" for the simulation. The quality of the physical habitat is a function of flow and, therefore, varies in quality and quantity over the range of the flow regime. The conceptual framework of the Incremental Methodology and guidelines for its application are described in "A Guide to Stream Habitat Analysis Using the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology" (Bovee 1982). Simulation of physical habitat is accomplished using the physical structure of the stream and streamflow. The modification of physical habitat by temperature and water quality is analyzed separately from physical habitat simulation. Temperature in a stream varies with the seasons, local meteorological conditions, stream network configuration, and the flow regime; thus, the temperature influences on habitat must be analysed on a stream system basis. Water quality under natural conditions is strongly influenced by climate and the geological materials, with the result that there is considerable natural variation in water quality. When we add the activities of man, the possible range of water quality possibilities becomes rather large. Consequently, water quality must also be analysed on a

  18. Automated rendezvous and capture system development and simulation for NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Fred D.; Howard, Richard T.; Murphy, Leslie

    2004-09-01

    The United States does not have an Automated Rendezvous and Capture/Docking (AR&C) capability and is reliant on manned control for rendezvous and docking of orbiting spacecraft. This reliance on the labor intensive manned interface for control of rendezvous and docking vehicles has a significant impact on the cost of the operation of the International Space Station (ISS) and precludes the use of any U.S. expendable launch capabilities for Space Station resupply. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has conducted pioneering research in the development of an automated rendezvous and capture (or docking) (AR&C) system for U.S. space vehicles. This AR&C system was tested extensively using hardware-in-the-loop simulations in the Flight Robotics Laboratory, and a rendezvous sensor, the Video Guidance Sensor was developed and successfully flown on the Space Shuttle on flights STS-87 and STS-95, proving the concept of a video- based sensor. Further developments in sensor technology and vehicle and target configuration have lead to continued improvements and changes in AR&C system development and simulation. A new Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) with target will be utilized as the primary navigation sensor on the Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technologies (DART) flight experiment in 2004. Realtime closed-loop simulations will be performed to validate the improved AR&C systems prior to flight.

  19. The Development of A Human Systems Simulation Laboratory: Strategic Direction

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques Hugo; Katya le Blanc; David Gertman

    2012-07-01

    The Human System Simulation Laboratory (HSSL) at the Idaho National Laboratory is one of few facilities of its kind that allows human factors researchers to evaluate various aspects of human performance and human system interaction for proposed reactor designs and upgrades. A basic system architecture, physical configuration and simulation capability were established to enable human factors researchers to support multiple, simultaneous simulations and also different power plant technologies. Although still evolving in terms of its technical and functional architecture, the HSSL is already proving its worth in supporting current and future nuclear industry needs for light water reactor sustainability and small modular reactors. The evolution of the HSSL is focused on continual physical and functional refinement to make it a fully equipped, reconfigurable facility where advanced research, testing and validation studies can be conducted on a wider range of reactor technologies. This requires the implementation of additional plant models to produce empirical research data on human performance with emerging human-system interaction technologies. Additional beneficiaries of this information include system designers and HRA practitioners. To ensure that results of control room crew studies will be generalizable to the existing and evolving fleet of US reactors, future expansion of the HSSL may also include other SMR plant models, plant-specific simulators and a generic plant model aligned to the current generation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and future advanced reactor designs. Collaboration with industry partners is also proving to be a vital component of the facility as this helps to establish a formal basis for current and future human performance experiments to support nuclear industry objectives. A long-range Program Plan has been developed for the HSSL to ensure that the facility will support not only the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor

  20. Remote Sensing System Requirements Development: A Simulation-Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanoni, Vicki; Davis, Bruce; Ryan, Robert; Blonski, Slavomir; Gasser, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Earth science research and application requirements for multispectral data have often been driven by currently available remote sensing technology. Few parametric studies exist that specify data required for certain applications. Consequently, data requirements are often defined based on the best data available or on what has worked successfully in the past. Since properites such as spatial resolution, swath width, spectral bands, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), data quantization, and band-to-band registration drive sensor platform and spaceraft system architecture and cost, analysis of these criteria is important to objectively optimize system design. Remote sensing data requirements are also linked to calibration and characterization methods. Parameters such as spatial resolution, radiometric accuracy, and geopositional accuracy affect the complexity and cost of calibration methods. However, there are few studies that quantify the true accuracies required for specific problems. As calibration methods and standards are proposed, it is important that they be tied to well-known data requirements. The Application Research Toolbox (ART) developed at Stennis Space Center provides a simulation-based method for multispectral data requirements development. The ART produces simulated data sets from hyperspectral data through band synthesis. Parameters such as spectral band shape and width, SNR, data quantization, spatial resolution, and band-to-band registration can be varied to create many different simulated data products. Simulated data utility can then be assessed for different applications so that requirements can be better understood. This paper describes the ART and its applicability for rigorously deriving remote sensing data requirements.

  1. Measures for simulator evaluation of a helicopter obstacle avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demaio, Joe; Sharkey, Thomas J.; Kennedy, David; Hughes, Micheal; Meade, Perry

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) has developed a high-fidelity, full-mission simulation facility for the demonstration and evaluation of advanced helicopter mission equipment. The Crew Station Research and Development Facility (CSRDF) provides the capability to conduct one- or two-crew full-mission simulations in a state-of-the-art helicopter simulator. The CSRDF provides a realistic, full field-of-regard visual environment with simulation of state-of-the-art weapons, sensors, and flight control systems. We are using the CSRDF to evaluate the ability of an obstacle avoidance system (OASYS) to support low altitude flight in cluttered terrain using night vision goggles (NVG). The OASYS uses a laser radar to locate obstacles to safe flight in the aircraft's flight path. A major concern is the detection of wires, which can be difficult to see with NVG, but other obstacles--such as trees, poles or the ground--are also a concern. The OASYS symbology is presented to the pilot on a head-up display mounted on the NVG (NVG-HUD). The NVG-HUD presents head-stabilized symbology to the pilot while allowing him to view the image intensified, out-the-window scene through the HUD. Since interference with viewing through the display is a major concern, OASYS symbology must be designed to present usable obstacle clearance information with a minimum of clutter.

  2. A New Model to Simulate Energy Performance of VRF Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Pang, Xiufeng; Schetrit, Oren; Wang, Liping; Kasahara, Shinichi; Yura, Yoshinori; Hinokuma, Ryohei

    2014-03-30

    This paper presents a new model to simulate energy performance of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems in heat pump operation mode (either cooling or heating is provided but not simultaneously). The main improvement of the new model is the introduction of the evaporating and condensing temperature in the indoor and outdoor unit capacity modifier functions. The independent variables in the capacity modifier functions of the existing VRF model in EnergyPlus are mainly room wet-bulb temperature and outdoor dry-bulb temperature in cooling mode and room dry-bulb temperature and outdoor wet-bulb temperature in heating mode. The new approach allows compliance with different specifications of each indoor unit so that the modeling accuracy is improved. The new VRF model was implemented in a custom version of EnergyPlus 7.2. This paper first describes the algorithm for the new VRF model, which is then used to simulate the energy performance of a VRF system in a Prototype House in California that complies with the requirements of Title 24 ? the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The VRF system performance is then compared with three other types of HVAC systems: the Title 24-2005 Baseline system, the traditional High Efficiency system, and the EnergyStar Heat Pump system in three typical California climates: Sunnyvale, Pasadena and Fresno. Calculated energy savings from the VRF systems are significant. The HVAC site energy savings range from 51 to 85percent, while the TDV (Time Dependent Valuation) energy savings range from 31 to 66percent compared to the Title 24 Baseline Systems across the three climates. The largest energy savings are in Fresno climate followed by Sunnyvale and Pasadena. The paper discusses various characteristics of the VRF systems contributing to the energy savings. It should be noted that these savings are calculated using the Title 24 prototype House D under standard operating conditions. Actual performance of the VRF systems for real

  3. Research and simulation on the rollover system of corn harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shizhuang; Cao, Shukun

    2017-01-01

    The structural characteristics of our country's corn harvester are narrow-track, high centroid and existence of eccentric distance, so rollover accident is easily to occur when driving in mountainous and hilly regions. In order to improve the design quality of corn harvester and enhance the security of operation, it is of great significance to research the rollover prevention system of the corn harvester. Hydro-pneumatic suspension has powerful function of adjusting the balance of automobile body and good shock absorption function. In this paper, hydro-pneumatic suspension is applied to the rollover prevention system of the corn harvester to improve the ability of anti-rollover. At last using ADAMS simulation technology to simulate the roll stability of traditional corn harvester and the corn harvester with hydro pneumatic suspension, then calculating the heeling angle in both cases.

  4. Virtual reality robotic telesurgery simulations using MEMICA haptic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Bouzit, Mourad; Dolgin, Benjamin; Harm, Deborah L.; Kopchok, George E.; White, Rodney

    2001-01-01

    The authors conceived a haptic mechanism called MEMICA (Remote Mechanical Mirroring using Controlled stiffness and Actuators) that can enable the design of high dexterity, rapid response, and large workspace haptic system. The development of a novel MEMICA gloves and virtual reality models are being explored to allow simulation of telesurgery and other applications. The MEMICA gloves are being designed to provide intuitive mirroring of the conditions at a virtual site where a robot simulates the presence of a human operator. The key components of MEMICA are miniature electrically controlled stiffness (ECS) elements and electrically controlled force and stiffness (ECFS) actuators that are based on the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERF. In this paper the design of the MEMICA system and initial experimental results are presented.

  5. Simulating fast and slow dynamic effects in power systems

    SciTech Connect

    de Mello, F.P.; Feltes, J.W.; Laskowski, T.F.; Oppel, L.J. )

    1992-07-01

    Electric power systems comprise a nearly infinite number of devices, exhibiting dynamic characteristics in a wide range of bandwidths and with significant nonlinear effects. Historically, the nature of these devices, the robust configuration of the electric power system, and its loading were such that the interaction between devices became relatively unimportant in system performance several seconds after disturbances. Greater utilization of electric plant, through heavier system loadings, interconnections, and increasing use of controls, has at times necessitated predictions of system performance through simulation extending over a time range of tens of seconds to several minutes. The phenomena occurring over this extended time frame has been referred to as long-term dynamics. There are basically two classes of problems involving long-term dynamics. One is the problem of islanding with significant imbalances between load and generation where prime mover action in response to frequency deviations is significant. The other concerns problems of insufficient damping and/or synchronizing power, and voltage collapse.

  6. Performance monitor system functional simulator, environmental data, orbiter 101(HFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    Information concerning the environment component of the space shuttle performance monitor system simulator (PMSS) and those subsystems operational on the shuttle orbiter 101 used for horizontal flight test (HFT) is provided, along with detailed data for the shuttle performance monitor system (PMS) whose software requirements evolve from three basic PMS functions: (1) fault detection and annunciation; (2) subsystem measurement management; and (3) subsystem configuration management. Information relative to the design and operation of Orbiter systems for HFT is also presented, and the functional paths are identified to the lowest level at which the crew can control the system functions. Measurement requirements are given which are necessary to adequately monitor the health status of the system. PMS process requirements, relative to the measurements which are necessary for fault detection and annunciation of a failed functional path, consist of measurement characteristics, tolerance limits, precondition tests, and correlation measurements.

  7. Design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of a distributed energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cultura, Ambrosio B., II

    This dissertation presents the design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of distributed energy resources (DER) consisting of photovoltaics (PV), wind turbines, batteries, a PEM fuel cell and supercapacitors. The distributed energy resources installed at UMass Lowell consist of the following: 2.5kW PV, 44kWhr lead acid batteries and 1500W, 500W & 300W wind turbines, which were installed before year 2000. Recently added to that are the following: 10.56 kW PV array, 2.4 kW wind turbine, 29 kWhr Lead acid batteries, a 1.2 kW PEM fuel cell and 4-140F supercapacitors. Each newly added energy resource has been designed, modeled, simulated and evaluated before its integration into the existing PV/Wind grid-connected system. The Mathematical and Simulink model of each system was derived and validated by comparing the simulated and experimental results. The Simulated results of energy generated from a 10.56kW PV system are in good agreement with the experimental results. A detailed electrical model of a 2.4kW wind turbine system equipped with a permanent magnet generator, diode rectifier, boost converter and inverter is presented. The analysis of the results demonstrates the effectiveness of the constructed simulink model, and can be used to predict the performance of the wind turbine. It was observed that a PEM fuel cell has a very fast response to load changes. Moreover, the model has validated the actual operation of the PEM fuel cell, showing that the simulated results in Matlab Simulink are consistent with the experimental results. The equivalent mathematical equation, derived from an electrical model of the supercapacitor, is used to simulate its voltage response. The model is completely capable of simulating its voltage behavior, and can predict the charge time and discharge time of voltages on the supercapacitor. The bi-directional dc-dc converter was designed in order to connect the 48V battery bank storage to the 24V battery bank storage. This connection was

  8. Designing and Implementing Nervous System Simulations on LEGO Robots

    PubMed Central

    Blustein, Daniel; Rosenthal, Nikolai; Ayers, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to use the commercially available LEGO Mindstorms NXT robotics platform to test systems level neuroscience hypotheses. The first step of the method is to develop a nervous system simulation of specific reflexive behaviors of an appropriate model organism; here we use the American Lobster. Exteroceptive reflexes mediated by decussating (crossing) neural connections can explain an animal's taxis towards or away from a stimulus as described by Braitenberg and are particularly well suited for investigation using the NXT platform.1 The nervous system simulation is programmed using LabVIEW software on the LEGO Mindstorms platform. Once the nervous system is tuned properly, behavioral experiments are run on the robot and on the animal under identical environmental conditions. By controlling the sensory milieu experienced by the specimens, differences in behavioral outputs can be observed. These differences may point to specific deficiencies in the nervous system model and serve to inform the iteration of the model for the particular behavior under study. This method allows for the experimental manipulation of electronic nervous systems and serves as a way to explore neuroscience hypotheses specifically regarding the neurophysiological basis of simple innate reflexive behaviors. The LEGO Mindstorms NXT kit provides an affordable and efficient platform on which to test preliminary biomimetic robot control schemes. The approach is also well suited for the high school classroom to serve as the foundation for a hands-on inquiry-based biorobotics curriculum. PMID:23728477

  9. Simulation of a Production Facility with an Automated Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    ABRAMCZYK, GLENN

    2004-04-07

    A model was needed to assess material throughput and validate the conceptual design of a production facility, including equipment lists and layout. The initial desire was to use a commercially available discrete event simulation package. However, the available software was found to be too limited in capability. Database interface software was used to develop autonomous intelligent manufacturing workstations and material transporters. The initial Extend model used to assess material throughput and develop equipment lists for the preconceptual design effort was upgraded with software add-ons from Simulation Dynamics, Inc. (SDI). Use of the SDI database interface allowed the upgraded model to include: 1. a material mass balance at any level of detail required by the user, and 2. a transport system model that includes all transport system movements, time delays, and transfers between systems. This model will assist in evaluating transport system capacity, sensitive time delays in the system, and optimal operating strategies. An additional benefit of using the SDI database interface is dramatically improved run time performance. This allows significantly more runs to be completed to provide better statistics for overall plant performance. The model has all system and process parameters entered into sub-component accessible tables. All information for the manufactured items and process data is automatically generated and written to the database. The standard software is used for the movement of manufactured items between workstations, and for sequence and timing functions. Use of the database permits almost unlimited process control and data collection with an insignificant effect on run time.

  10. Simulation-Based Cryosurgery Intelligent Tutoring System Prototype.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Anjali; Keelan, Robert; Shimada, Kenji; Wilfong, Dona M; McCormick, James T; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-04-01

    As a part of an ongoing effort to develop computerized training tools for cryosurgery, the current study presents a proof of concept for a computerized tool for cryosurgery tutoring. The tutoring system lists geometrical constraints of cryoprobes placement, simulates cryoprobe insertion, displays a rendered shape of the prostate, enables distance measurements, simulates the corresponding thermal history, and evaluates the mismatch between the target region shape and a preselected planning isotherm. The quality of trainee planning is measured in comparison with a computer-generated planning, created for each case study by previously developed planning algorithms. The following two versions of the tutoring system have been tested in the current study: (1) an unguided version, where the trainee can practice cases in unstructured sessions and (2) an intelligent tutoring system, which forces the trainee to follow specific steps, believed by the authors to potentially shorten the learning curve. Although the tutoring level in this study aims only at geometrical constraints on cryoprobe placement and the resulting thermal histories, it creates a unique opportunity to gain insight into the process outside the operation room. Post-test results indicate that the intelligent tutoring system may be more beneficial than the nonintelligent tutoring system, but the proof of concept is demonstrated with either system.

  11. CLARREO shortwave observing system simulation experiments of the twenty-first century: Simulator design and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, D.R.; Algieri, C.A.; Ong, J.R.; Collins, W.D.

    2011-04-01

    Projected changes in the Earth system will likely be manifested in changes in reflected solar radiation. This paper introduces an operational Observational System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to calculate the signals of future climate forcings and feedbacks in top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectra. The OSSE combines simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report for the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to calculate reflectance spectra for simulations of current and future climatic conditions over the 21st century. The OSSE produces narrowband reflectances and broadband fluxes, the latter of which have been extensively validated against archived CCSM results. The shortwave reflectance spectra contain atmospheric features including signals from water vapor, liquid and ice clouds, and aerosols. The spectra are also strongly influenced by the surface bidirectional reflectance properties of predicted snow and sea ice and the climatological seasonal cycles of vegetation. By comparing and contrasting simulated reflectance spectra based on emissions scenarios with increasing projected and fixed present-day greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations, we find that prescribed forcings from increases in anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are detectable and are spatially confined to lower latitudes. Also, changes in the intertropical convergence zone and poleward shifts in the subsidence zones and the storm tracks are all detectable along with large changes in snow cover and sea ice fraction. These findings suggest that the proposed NASA Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission to measure shortwave reflectance spectra may help elucidate climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks.

  12. Simulation Utility Management System (SUMS): User’s Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    AL/HR-TP-1993-0031 AD-A270 975 A SIMULATION UTILITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (SUMS): USER’S MANUAL R M S Brice M. Stone T Kathryn L. Turner R Metrica ...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Metrica , Incorporated 3833 Texas Ave, Suite 207 Bryan TX 77802 9. SPONSORING,.MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...0251 (SBA 68822004) by Metrica , Inc. for the Manpower and Personnel Research Division of the Armstrong Laboratory Human Resources Directorate. The

  13. Dataflow Integration and Simulation Techniques for DSP System Design Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    the Autocoding Toolset. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 5.8 The ported SAR system in Ptolemy II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 5.9 SAR...simulation results in Ptolemy II and the Autocoding Toolset. . . 57 viii 6.1 DIF-to-C software synthesis framework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 6.2 A...LabVIEW from National Instruments, and Ptolemy II from U.C. Berkeley, to name a few. In model-based design methodolo- gies, design representations in terms

  14. Component and system simulation models for High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sozer, A.

    1989-08-01

    Component models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have been developed. The models are HFIR core, heat exchangers, pressurizer pumps, circulation pumps, letdown valves, primary head tank, generic transport delay (pipes), system pressure, loop pressure-flow balance, and decay heat. The models were written in FORTRAN and can be run on different computers, including IBM PCs, as they do not use any specific simulation languages such as ACSL or CSMP. 14 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Simulation system for understanding the lag effect in fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Matsubara, Kosuke; Iida, Hiroji; Sanada, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Real-time tumor tracking in external radiotherapy can be achieved by diagnostic (kV) X-ray imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). It is crucial to understand the effects of image lag for real-time tumor tracking. Our purpose in this study was to develop a lag simulation system based on the image lag properties of an FPD system. Image lag properties were measured on flat-field images both in direct- and indirect-conversion dynamic FPDs. A moving target with image lag was simulated based on the lag properties in all combinations of FPD types, imaging rates, exposure doses, and target speeds, and then compared with actual moving targets for investigation of the reproducibility of image lag. Image lag was simulated successfully and agreed well with the actual lag as well as with the predicted effect. In the indirect-conversion FPD, a higher dose caused greater image lag on images. In contrast, there were no significant differences among dose levels in a direct-conversion FPD. There were no relationships between target speed and amount of image blurring in either type of FPD. The maximum contour blurring and the rate of increase in pixel value due to image lag were 1.1 mm and 10.0 %, respectively, in all combinations of imaging parameters examined in this study. Blurred boundaries and changes in pixel value due to image lag were estimated under various imaging conditions with use of the simulation system. Our system would be helpful for a better understanding of the effects of image lag in fluoroscopic images.

  16. SYSTEM PLANNING WITH THE HANFORD WASTE OPERATIONS SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect

    CRAWFORD TW; CERTA PJ; WELLS MN

    2010-01-14

    At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, 216 million liters (57 million gallons) of nuclear waste is currently stored in aging underground tanks, threatening the Columbia River. The River Protection Project (RPP), a fully integrated system of waste storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal facilities, is in varying stages of design, construction, operation, and future planning. These facilities face many overlapping technical, regulatory, and financial hurdles to achieve site cleanup and closure. Program execution is ongoing, but completion is currently expected to take approximately 40 more years. Strategic planning for the treatment of Hanford tank waste is by nature a multi-faceted, complex and iterative process. To help manage the planning, a report referred to as the RPP System Plan is prepared to provide a basis for aligning the program scope with the cost and schedule, from upper-tier contracts to individual facility operating plans. The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulation and mass balance computer model, is used to simulate the current planned RPP mission, evaluate the impacts of changes to the mission, and assist in planning near-term facility operations. Development of additional modeling tools, including an operations research model and a cost model, will further improve long-term planning confidence. The most recent RPP System Plan, Revision 4, was published in September 2009.

  17. Simulation of a data archival and distribution system at GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedet, Jean-Jacques; Bodden, Lee; Dwyer, AL; Hariharan, P. C.; Berbert, John; Kobler, Ben; Pease, Phil

    1993-01-01

    A version-0 of a Data Archive and Distribution System (DADS) is being developed at GSFC to support existing and pre-EOS Earth science datasets and test Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) concepts. The performance of DADS is predicted using a discrete event simulation model. The goals of the simulation were to estimate the amount of disk space needed and the time required to fulfill the DADS requirements for ingestion (14 GB/day) and distribution (48 GB/day). The model has demonstrated that 4 mm and 8 mm stackers can play a critical role in improving the performance of the DADS, since it takes, on average, 3 minutes to manually mount/dismount tapes compared to less than a minute with stackers. With two 4 mm stackers and two 8 mm stackers, and a single operator per shift, the DADS requirements can be met within 16 hours using a total of 9 GB of disk space. When the DADS has no stacker, and the DADS depends entirely on operators to handle the distribution tapes, the simulation has shown that the DADS requirements can still be met within 16 hours, but a minimum of 4 operators per shift were required. The compression/decompression of data sets is very CPU intensive, and relatively slow when performed in software, thereby contributing to an increase in the amount of disk space needed.

  18. An event-based hydrologic simulation model for bioretention systems.

    PubMed

    Roy-Poirier, A; Filion, Y; Champagne, P

    2015-01-01

    Bioretention systems are designed to treat stormwater and provide attenuated drainage between storms. Bioretention has shown great potential at reducing the volume and improving the quality of stormwater. This study introduces the bioretention hydrologic model (BHM), a one-dimensional model that simulates the hydrologic response of a bioretention system over the duration of a storm event. BHM is based on the RECARGA model, but has been adapted for improved accuracy and integration of pollutant transport models. BHM contains four completely-mixed layers and accounts for evapotranspiration, overflow, exfiltration to native soils and underdrain discharge. Model results were evaluated against field data collected over 10 storm events. Simulated flows were particularly sensitive to antecedent water content and drainage parameters of bioretention soils, which were calibrated through an optimisation algorithm. Temporal disparity was observed between simulated and measured flows, which was attributed to preferential flow paths formed within the soil matrix of the field system. Modelling results suggest that soil water storage is the most important short-term hydrologic process in bioretention, with exfiltration having the potential to be significant in native soils with sufficient permeability.

  19. Simulation of an advanced techniques of ion propulsion Rocket system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    2016-07-01

    The ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of Deuterium,Argon gas and Hexagonal shape Magneto hydrodynamic(MHD) techniques because of the stimulation indirectly generated the power from ionization chamber,design of thrust range is 1.2 N with 40 KW of electric power and high efficiency.The proposed work is the study of MHD power generation through ionization level of Deuterium gas and combination of two gaseous ions(Deuterium gas ions + Argon gas ions) at acceleration stage.IPR consists of three parts 1.Hexagonal shape MHD based power generator through ionization chamber 2.ion accelerator 3.Exhaust of Nozzle.Initially the required energy around 1312 KJ/mol is carrying out the purpose of deuterium gas which is changed to ionization level.The ionized Deuterium gas comes out from RF ionization chamber to nozzle through MHD generator with enhanced velocity then after voltage is generated across the two pairs of electrode in MHD.it will produce thrust value with the help of mixing of Deuterium ion and Argon ion at acceleration position.The simulation of the IPR system has been carried out by MATLAB.By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results,if reaches that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with 40KW power for simulating the IPR system.

  20. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems.

    PubMed

    Toxvaerd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole J; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2012-06-14

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete "Verlet" algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence of a "shadow Hamiltonian" H [S. Toxvaerd, Phys. Rev. E 50, 2271 (1994)], i.e., a Hamiltonian close to the original H with the property that the discrete positions of the Verlet algorithm for H lie on the analytic trajectories of H. The shadow Hamiltonian can be obtained from H by an asymptotic expansion in the time step length. Here we use the first non-trivial term in this expansion to obtain an improved estimate of the discrete values of the energy. The investigation is performed for a representative system with Lennard-Jones pair interactions. The simulations show that inclusion of this term reduces the standard deviation of the energy fluctuations by a factor of 100 for typical values of the time step length. Simulations further show that the energy is conserved for at least one hundred million time steps provided the potential and its first four derivatives are continuous at the cutoff. Finally, we show analytically as well as numerically that energy conservation is not sensitive to round-off errors.

  1. Parallel methods for dynamic simulation of multiple manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Scott; Sadayappan, P.; Orin, David E.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, efficient dynamic simulation algorithms for a system of m manipulators, cooperating to manipulate a large load, are developed; their performance, using two possible forms of parallelism on a general-purpose parallel computer, is investigated. One form, temporal parallelism, is obtained with the use of parallel numerical integration methods. A speedup of 3.78 on four processors of CRAY Y-MP8 was achieved with a parallel four-point block predictor-corrector method for the simulation of a four manipulator system. These multi-point methods suffer from reduced accuracy, and when comparing these runs with a serial integration method, the speedup can be as low as 1.83 for simulations with the same accuracy. To regain the performance lost due to accuracy problems, a second form of parallelism is employed. Spatial parallelism allows most of the dynamics of each manipulator chain to be computed simultaneously. Used exclusively in the four processor case, this form of parallelism in conjunction with a serial integration method results in a speedup of 3.1 on four processors over the best serial method. In cases where there are either more processors available or fewer chains in the system, the multi-point parallel integration methods are still advantageous despite the reduced accuracy because both forms of parallelism can then combine to generate more parallel tasks and achieve greater effective speedups. This paper also includes results for these cases.

  2. DCMS: A data analytics and management system for molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Grupcev, Vladimir; Berrada, Meryem; Fogarty, Joseph C; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Zhu, Xingquan; Pandit, Sagar A; Xia, Yuni

    Molecular Simulation (MS) is a powerful tool for studying physical/chemical features of large systems and has seen applications in many scientific and engineering domains. During the simulation process, the experiments generate a very large number of atoms and intend to observe their spatial and temporal relationships for scientific analysis. The sheer data volumes and their intensive interactions impose significant challenges for data accessing, managing, and analysis. To date, existing MS software systems fall short on storage and handling of MS data, mainly because of the missing of a platform to support applications that involve intensive data access and analytical process. In this paper, we present the database-centric molecular simulation (DCMS) system our team developed in the past few years. The main idea behind DCMS is to store MS data in a relational database management system (DBMS) to take advantage of the declarative query interface (i.e., SQL), data access methods, query processing, and optimization mechanisms of modern DBMSs. A unique challenge is to handle the analytical queries that are often compute-intensive. For that, we developed novel indexing and query processing strategies (including algorithms running on modern co-processors) as integrated components of the DBMS. As a result, researchers can upload and analyze their data using efficient functions implemented inside the DBMS. Index structures are generated to store analysis results that may be interesting to other users, so that the results are readily available without duplicating the analysis. We have developed a prototype of DCMS based on the PostgreSQL system and experiments using real MS data and workload show that DCMS significantly outperforms existing MS software systems. We also used it as a platform to test other data management issues such as security and compression.

  3. Evaluating the STORE Reputation System in Multi-Agent Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrulis, Jonas; Haller, Jochen; Weinhardt, Christof; Karabulut, Yuecel

    In recent global business environments, collaborations among organisations raise an increased demand for swift establishment. Such collaborations are formed between organisations entering Virtual Organizations (VOs), crossing geographic borders and frequently without prior experience of the other partner’s previous performance. In VOs, every participant risks engaging with partners who may exhibit unexpected fraudulent or otherwise untrusted behaviour. In order to cope with this risk, the STochastic REputation system (STORE) was designed to provide swift, automated decision support for selecting partner organisations in the early stages of the VO’s formation. The contribution of this paper first consists of a multi-agent simulation framework design and implementation to evaluate the STORE reputation system. This framework is able to simulate dynamic agent behaviour, agents hereby representing organisations, and to capture the business context of different VO application scenarios. A configuration of agent classes is a powerful tool to obtain not only well or badly performing agents for simulation scenarios, but also agents which are specialized in particular VO application domains or even malicious agents, attacking the VO community. The second contribution comprises of STORE’s evaluation in two simulation scenarios, set in the VO application domains of Collaborative Engineering and Ad-hoc Service provisioning. Besides the ability to clearly distinguish between agents of different classes according to their reputation, the results prove STORE’s ability to take an agent’s dynamic behaviour into account. The simulation results show, that STORE solves the difficult task of selecting the most trustworthy partner for a particular VO application domain from a set of honest agents that are specialized in a wide spread of VO application domains.

  4. Laminar Flow Control Leading Edge Systems in Simulated Airline Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, R. D.; Maddalon, D. V.; Fisher, D. F.

    1988-01-01

    Achieving laminar flow on the wings of a commercial transport involves difficult problems associated with the wing leading edge. The NASA Leading Edge Flight Test Program has made major progress toward the solution of these problems. The effectiveness and practicality of candidate laminar flow leading edge systems were proven under representative airline service conditions. This was accomplished in a series of simulated airline service flights by modifying a JetStar aircraft with laminar flow leading edge systems and operating it out of three commercial airports in the United States. The aircraft was operated as an airliner would under actual air traffic conditions, in bad weather, and in insect infested environments.

  5. Numerical simulations of volume holographic imaging system resolution characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yajun; Jiang, Zhuqing; Liu, Shaojie; Tao, Shiquan

    2009-05-01

    Because of the Bragg selectivity of volume holographic gratings, it helps VHI system to optically segment the object space. In this paper, properties of point-source diffraction imaging in terms of the point-spread function (PSF) are investigated, and characteristics of depth and lateral resolutions in a VHI system is numerically simulated. The results show that the observed diffracted field obviously changes with the displacement in the z direction, and is nearly unchanged with displacement in the x and y directions. The dependence of the diffracted imaging field on the z-displacement provides a way to possess 3-D image by VHI.

  6. Mass balances for a biological life support system simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rumel, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Design decisions to aid the development of future space-based biological life support systems (BLSS) can be made with simulation models. Here the biochemical stoichiometry is developed for: (1) protein, carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and lignin production in the edible and inedible parts of plants; (2) food consumption and production of organic solids in urine, feces, and wash water by the humans; and (3) operation of the waste processor. Flux values for all components are derived for a steady-state system with wheat as the sole food source.

  7. Human habitat positioning system for NASA's space flight environmental simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.; Keas, P.

    1998-01-01

    Artificial gravity by centrifugation offers an effective countermeasure to the physiologic deconditioning of chronic exposure to microgravity; however, the system requirements of rotational velocity, radius of rotation, and resultant centrifugal acceleration require thorough investigation to ascertain the ideal human-use centrifuge configuration. NASA's Space Flight Environmental Simulator (SFES), a 16-meter (52-foot) diameter, animal-use centrifuge, was recently modified to accommodate human occupancy. This paper describes the SFES Human Habitat Positioning System, the mechanism that facilitates radius of rotation variability and alignment of the centrifuge occupants with the artificial gravity vector.

  8. Design analysis tracking and data relay satellite simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design and development of the equipment necessary to simulate the S-band multiple access link between user spacecraft, the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, and a ground control terminal are discussed. The core of the S-band multiple access concept is the use of an Adaptive Ground Implemented Phased Array. The array contains thirty channels and provides the multiplexing and demultiplexing equipment required to demonstrate the ground implemented beam forming feature. The system provided will make it possible to demonstrate the performance of a desired user and ten interfering sources attempting to pass data through the multiple access system.

  9. Modeling, simulation, and analysis of optical remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerekes, John Paul; Landgrebe, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Remote Sensing of the Earth's resources from space-based sensors has evolved in the past 20 years from a scientific experiment to a commonly used technological tool. The scientific applications and engineering aspects of remote sensing systems have been studied extensively. However, most of these studies have been aimed at understanding individual aspects of the remote sensing process while relatively few have studied their interrelations. A motivation for studying these interrelationships has arisen with the advent of highly sophisticated configurable sensors as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) proposed by NASA for the 1990's. Two approaches to investigating remote sensing systems are developed. In one approach, detailed models of the scene, the sensor, and the processing aspects of the system are implemented in a discrete simulation. This approach is useful in creating simulated images with desired characteristics for use in sensor or processing algorithm development. A less complete, but computationally simpler method based on a parametric model of the system is also developed. In this analytical model the various informational classes are parameterized by their spectral mean vector and covariance matrix. These class statistics are modified by models for the atmosphere, the sensor, and processing algorithms and an estimate made of the resulting classification accuracy among the informational classes. Application of these models is made to the study of the proposed High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HRIS). The interrelationships among observational conditions, sensor effects, and processing choices are investigated with several interesting results.

  10. Towards a Comprehensive Computational Simulation System for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsin

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop algorithms associated with a comprehensive computational simulation system for turbomachinery flow fields. This development is accomplished in a modular fashion. These modules includes grid generation, visualization, network, simulation, toolbox, and flow modules. An interactive grid generation module is customized to facilitate the grid generation process associated with complicated turbomachinery configurations. With its user-friendly graphical user interface, the user may interactively manipulate the default settings to obtain a quality grid within a fraction of time that is usually required for building a grid about the same geometry with a general-purpose grid generation code. Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline formulations are utilized in the algorithm to maintain geometry fidelity while redistributing grid points on the solid surfaces. Bezier curve formulation is used to allow interactive construction of inner boundaries. It is also utilized to allow interactive point distribution. Cascade surfaces are transformed from three-dimensional surfaces of revolution into two-dimensional parametric planes for easy manipulation. Such a transformation allows these manipulated plane grids to be mapped to surfaces of revolution by any generatrix definition. A sophisticated visualization module is developed to al-low visualization for both grid and flow solution, steady or unsteady. A network module is built to allow data transferring in the heterogeneous environment. A flow module is integrated into this system, using an existing turbomachinery flow code. A simulation module is developed to combine the network, flow, and visualization module to achieve near real-time flow simulation about turbomachinery geometries. A toolbox module is developed to support the overall task. A batch version of the grid generation module is developed to allow portability and has been extended to allow dynamic grid generation for pitch changing

  11. Noise simulation system for determining imaging conditions in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, R.; Ichikawa, K.; Matsubara, K.; Kawashima, H.

    2012-03-01

    Reduction of exposure dose and improvement in image quality can be expected to result from advances in the performance of imaging detectors. We propose a computerized method for determining optimized imaging conditions by use of simulated images. This study was performed to develop a prototype system for image noise and to ensure consistency between the resulting images and actual images. An RQA5 X-ray spectrum was used for determination of input-output characteristics of a flat-panel detector (FPD). The number of incident quantum to the detector per pixel (counts/pixel) was calculated according to the pixel size of the detector and the quantum number in RQA5 determined in IEC6220-1. The relationship among tube current-time product (mAs), exposure dose (C/kg) at the detector surface, the number of incident quanta (counts/pixel), and pixel values measured on the images was addressed, and a conversion function was then created. The images obtained by the FPD was converted into a map of incident quantum numbers and input into random-value generator to simulate image noise. In addition, graphic user interface was developed to observe images with changing image noise and exposure dose levels, which have trade-off relationship. Simulation images provided at different noise levels were compared with actual images obtained by the FPD system. The results indicated that image noise was simulated properly both in objective and subjective evaluation. The present system could allow us to determine necessary dose from image quality and also to estimate image quality from any exposure dose.

  12. Process simulation of a PEM fuel cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Ledjeff-Hey, K.; Roes, J.; Formanski, V.; Gieshoff, J.; Vogel, B.

    1996-01-01

    The thermodynamic performance of a PEM fuel cell system for producing electrical power from natural gas is investigated by considering the flows of energy and energy through the various steps of the whole system. The flows of energy are evaluated using a computer code for energy and energy analyses. The fuel cell system is designed to produce a hydrogen volumetric flow of nearly 5.0 m{sup 3} {sub NTP}/h, provided to the fuel cell at an absolute pressure of 2.9 bar. The fuel cell itself is working with an efficiency of about 60 % at an operating temperature of 65 - 75{degrees} C with an air ratio of four and provides a maximum electric power of 9 kW. Taking into consideration only the produced electric power as useful output of the fuel cell system a total efficiency of 42.2 % is calculated using the simulation results.

  13. Piloted Simulation of a Model-Predictive Automated Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, James (Yuan); Litt, Jonathan; Sowers, T. Shane; Owens, A. Karl; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes a model-predictive automatic recovery system for aircraft on the verge of a loss-of-control situation. The system determines when it must intervene to prevent an imminent accident, resulting from a poor approach. It estimates the altitude loss that would result from a go-around maneuver at the current flight condition. If the loss is projected to violate a minimum altitude threshold, the maneuver is automatically triggered. The system deactivates to allow landing once several criteria are met. Piloted flight simulator evaluation showed the system to provide effective envelope protection during extremely unsafe landing attempts. The results demonstrate how flight and propulsion control can be integrated to recover control of the vehicle automatically and prevent a potential catastrophe.

  14. Wind hybrid electrical supply system: behaviour simulation and sizing optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notton, G.; Cristofari, C.; Poggi, P.; Muselli, M.

    2001-04-01

    Using a global approach, a wind hybrid system operation is simulated and the evolution of several parameters is analysed, such as the wasted energy, the fuel consumption and the role of the wind turbine subsystem in the global production. This analysis shows that all the energies which take part in the system operation are more dependent on the wind turbine size than on the battery storage capacity. A storage of 2 or 3 days is sufficient, because an increase in storage beyond these values does not have a notable impact on the performance of the wind hybrid system. Finally, a cost study is performed to determine the optimal configuration of the system conducive to the lowest cost of electricity production.

  15. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  16. Mass balances for a biological life support system simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler; Rummel, John D.

    1987-01-01

    Design decisions to aid the development of future space based biological life support systems (BLSS) can be made with simulation models. The biochemistry stoichiometry was developed for: (1) protein, carbohydrate, fat, fiber, and lignin production in the edible and inedible parts of plants; (2) food consumption and production of organic solids in urine, feces, and wash water by the humans; and (3) operation of the waste processor. Flux values for all components are derived for a steady state system with wheat as the sole food source. The large scale dynamics of a materially closed (BLSS) computer model is described in a companion paper. An extension of this methodology can explore multifood systems and more complex biochemical dynamics while maintaining whole system closure as a focus.

  17. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Day, Christy M.; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  18. A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

    2008-06-18

    In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering

  19. General purpose simulation system of the data management system for space shuttle mission 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengtson, N. M.; Mellichamp, J. M.; Crenshaw, J.

    1975-01-01

    The simulation program of the science and engineering data management system for the space shuttle is presented. The programming language used was General Purpose Simulation System V (OS). The data flow was modeled from its origin at the experiments or subsystems to transmission from the space shuttle. Mission 18 was the particular flight chosen for simulation. First, the general structure of the program is presented and the trade studies which were performed are identified. Inputs required to make runs are discussed followed by identification of the output statistics. Some areas for model modifications are pointed out. A detailed model configuration, program listing and results are included.

  20. Expert performance on a virtual reality simulation system.

    PubMed

    Wierinck, Els R; Puttemans, Veerle; Swinnen, Stephan P; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if the essence of expert performance could be captured on a virtual reality simulation system. Six experts in operative dentistry, six experts in periodontology, and six novice dental students performed a Class II tooth preparation task on the lower left second premolar. All subjects performed a pre-test to assess the basic skill level of each group. During the (limited) training component of the study, the three groups practiced three tooth preparations and received augmented feedback. At both a one-minute and one-day interval, subjects performed a final test in the absence of augmented feedback. All preparations were graded by the simulation system. The results showed at pre-test a significantly better performance of the experts in operative dentistry as compared to the novices. During the practice (acquisition) phase, the experts in operative dentistry outperformed both the periodontologists and novices, whereas the experts in periodontology performed more accurately than the novices. After one minute and one day following practice, similar results were obtained. Retention performance was most accurate after a one-day delay. Based on these results, the simulator appears to be a valid and reliable tool to capture expert performance. It is an effective screening device for assessing the level of expert performance.

  1. Model for simulating scorpion substrate vibration and detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, B. A.; Aibinu, A. M.; Joseph, E.; Salau, H. B.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Scorpion stings are vital health issues which requires prompt attention to minimize the pain inflicted on victims and avert death. A possible solution in averting the sting is the capability of detecting its presence earlier before it stings. Scorpion like other arthropods have a specific kind of movement pattern called substrate vibration, which generates a specific signal that is used in recognizing and locating mates and preys. This paper aims at developing an intelligent scorpion detection system using vibration frequency detection technique. A six step model for simulating scorpion substrate vibration and detection has been proposed. The surrounding vibrating signal is acquired and passed through a band pass filter. The resulting signal is model using autoregressive modeling technique. Resulting co-efficients are further analyzed for activity detection. The frequency response of scorpion activities for mating behaviour was simulated, detected analysed using MATLAB environment. The resulting coefficients was also compared and analysed. Results obtained shows that the proposed technique is appropriate for model and simulating scorpion substrate vibration and detection system.

  2. Numerical Simulations of Binary Systems with Matter Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah

    2011-04-01

    With the advent of gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO, VIRGO, and LISA, a revolution in astronomy and relativistic astrophysics is about to begin. Compact objects---black holes (BHs), neutron stars (NSs), and white dwarfs (WDs)---in binary systems are among the most promising sources of gravitational radiation detectable by these interferometers. In addition, merging compact object binaries with matter companions may also emit a detectable electromagnetic counterpart, leading to an exciting possibility: a simultaneous detection of both gravitational and electromagnetic radiation. Such a detection could lead to breakthroughs in our understanding of matter under extreme conditions, as there are currently many competing ideas about how this matter should behave. Determining the correct one will require careful modeling of the gravitational and electromagnetic waves these systems emit through the late- inspiral, merger, and post-merger stages. During these stages, the effects of high-velocity, strong-field gravitation become paramount, and accurate modeling requires large-scale, fully general relativistic simulations. I will review some of the latest results from fully general relativistic simulations of compact object binaries with matter companions, including NSNSs, BHNSs, and WDNSs. These simulations examine the effects of mass ratio, BH spin, equations of state, and magnetic fields on the gravitational waveforms and possible electromagnetic counterparts. Future work will focus on producing longer gravitational waveforms, incorporating more physics, and inventing new algorithms to efficiently handle the disparate length and timescales.

  3. MOOSE: architecture of an object-oriented multimodeling simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubert, Robert M.; Goktekin, Tolga; Fishwick, Paul A.

    1997-06-01

    MOOSE (multimodel object oriented simulation environment) is an enabling environment for modeling and simulation, under construction at University of Florida, based on OOPM (object oriented physical modeling). OOPM extends object-oriented program design with visualization and a definition of system modeling that reinforces the relation of model to program. OOPM is a natural mechanism for modeling large-scale systems, and facilitates effective integration of disparate pieces of code into one simulation. Components of MOOSE are modeler, translator, engine, and scenario: (1) Modeler interacts with model author via GUI to capture model design; (2) Translator is a bridge between model design and model execution, reading Modeler output, building structures representing model, and emitting C++ (or potentially other) code for model; (3) Engine is a C++ program, composed of translator output plus runtime support, compiled and linked once, then repeatedly activated for model execution; (4) Scenario is a visualization-enabling GUI which activates and interacts with engine, and displays engine output in a form meaningful to user. Dynamic model types supported include finite state machine, functional block model, and equational constraint models; alternatively, model authors may create their own C++ 'code models;' model types may be freely combined; class libraries facilitate reuse. MOOSE emphasizes multimodeling, which glues together models of the same or different types, produced during model refinement, reflecting various abstraction perspectives, to adjust model fidelity, during development and during model execution. Underlying multimodeling is 'block' as fundamental object. Every model is built from blocks, expressed in a modeling assembly language.

  4. Focusing the research agenda for simulation training visual system requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Charles J.

    2014-06-01

    Advances in the capabilities of the display-related technologies with potential uses in simulation training devices continue to occur at a rapid pace. Simultaneously, ongoing reductions in defense spending stimulate the services to push a higher proportion of training into ground-based simulators to reduce their operational costs. These two trends result in increased customer expectations and desires for more capable training devices, while the money available for these devices is decreasing. Thus, there exists an increasing need to improve the efficiency of the acquisition process and to increase the probability that users get the training devices they need at the lowest practical cost. In support of this need the IDEAS program was initiated in 2010 with the goal of improving display system requirements associated with unmet user needs and expectations and disrupted acquisitions. This paper describes a process of identifying, rating, and selecting the design parameters that should receive research attention. Analyses of existing requirements documents reveal that between 40 and 50 specific design parameters (i.e., resolution, contrast, luminance, field of view, frame rate, etc.) are typically called out for the acquisition of a simulation training display system. Obviously no research effort can address the effects of this many parameters. Thus, we developed a defensible strategy for focusing limited R&D resources on a fraction of these parameters. This strategy encompasses six criteria to identify the parameters most worthy of research attention. Examples based on display design parameters recommended by stakeholders are provided.

  5. A Data Management System for International Space Station Simulation Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bradley J.; DelMundo, Rommel; Elcott, Sharif; McIntosh, Dawn; Niehaus, Brian; Papasin, Richard; Mah, Robert W.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Groups associated with the design, operational, and training aspects of the International Space Station make extensive use of modeling and simulation tools. Users of these tools often need to access and manipulate large quantities of data associated with the station, ranging from design documents to wiring diagrams. Retrieving and manipulating this data directly within the simulation and modeling environment can provide substantial benefit to users. An approach for providing these kinds of data management services, including a database schema and class structure, is presented. Implementation details are also provided as a data management system is integrated into the Intelligent Virtual Station, a modeling and simulation tool developed by the NASA Ames Smart Systems Research Laboratory. One use of the Intelligent Virtual Station is generating station-related training procedures in a virtual environment, The data management component allows users to quickly and easily retrieve information related to objects on the station, enhancing their ability to generate accurate procedures. Users can associate new information with objects and have that information stored in a database.

  6. A large scale software system for simulation and design optimization of mechanical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dopker, Bernhard; Haug, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of an advanced integrated, networked simulation and design system is outlined. Such an advanced system can be developed utilizing existing codes without compromising the integrity and functionality of the system. An example has been used to demonstrate the applicability of the concept of the integrated system outlined here. The development of an integrated system can be done incrementally. Initial capabilities can be developed and implemented without having a detailed design of the global system. Only a conceptual global system must exist. For a fully integrated, user friendly design system, further research is needed in the areas of engineering data bases, distributed data bases, and advanced user interface design.

  7. Simulation of Lidar System Performance in Terrestrial Mapping Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, R. T.; Fullmer, R. R.

    2003-12-01

    Anyone who has used terrestrial lidar data in physical science applications has likely observed both systematic and random errors in datasets. An understanding of the potential sources of error is important when applying post-mission filters that remove errors, artifacts and unwanted features - such as vegetation - from lidar "point-cloud" data sets. System error sources typically include, (1) range error associated with transceiver optoelectronics design and atmospheric transmission characteristics, (2) pointing error associated with scanner dynamics, platform instability and GPS/INS readouts. To better understand and anticipate lidar data phenomenology and quality when designing lidar systems and surveys, simulation software has been developed at Utah State University Center for Advanced Imaging Ladar. The simulation focuses on energy-detection lidars common in commercial airborne mapping applications. It accepts as inputs: laser power, pulse width, wavelength, beam divergence and pulse repetition frequency; optics including aperture, field-of-view, and transmission loss; detector characteristics including focal plane array geometry, quantum efficiency, noise-equivalent power, optical efficiency, optical pass band, noise bandwidth, and readout error; scanner dynamics including bandwidth and damping ratio; GPS/INS errors associated with various instrument grades; environmental parameters including aerosol type, visibility, and solar spectral irradiance; scene parameters including backscatter distribution and reflectivity; and trajectories including position, velocity, and attitude. The simulation is designed to be adaptable to a wide variety of lidar system types, environmental settings, and aircraft trajectories over specific terrain models. It was built in MATLAB/Simulink, a convenient environment for computation and data generation, and has many graphical interfaces. Principally funded by the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center at China Lake, California, it has been

  8. Feasibility study of sedimentary enhanced geothermal systems using reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Kyoung

    investigated. Especially, water density, viscosity and rock heat capacity play a significant role in reservoir performance. The Permian Lyons formation in the Denver Basin is selected for this preliminary study. Well log data around the area of interest are collected and borehole temperature data are analyzed to estimate the geothermal potential of the target area and it follows that the target formation has a geothermal gradient as high as 72 °C/km. Based on the well log data, hypothetical reservoir simulation models are build and tested to access the hydraulic and thermal performance. It turns out that the target formation is marginally or sub-marginally commercial in terms of its formation conductivity. Therefore, the target formation may require reservoir stimulation for commercially viable power generation. Lastly, reservoir simulation models with average petrophysical properties obtained from the well log analysis of the target formation are built. In order to account for overburden and underburden heat transfer for confined reservoirs, low permeability layers representing shale cap/bed rocks are attached to the top and bottom of the reservoir layers. The dual permeability concept is applied to the reservoir layers to model induced fracture networks by reservoir stimulation. The simulation models are tested by changing fracture conductivity and shape factor. The results show that a balance between hydraulic and thermal performance should be achieved to meet the target flow rate and sustainability of 30 years' uninterrupted operation of geothermal electricity power generation. Ineffective reservoir stimulation could result in failing to create a producing reservoir with appropriate productivity index or causing premature thermal breakthrough or short-circuiting which advances the end of geothermal systems. Therefore, Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) should be engineered to secure producing performance and operational sustainability simultaneously.

  9. A dynamic motion simulator for future European docking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brondino, G.; Marchal, PH.; Grimbert, D.; Noirault, P.

    1990-01-01

    Europe's first confrontation with docking in space will require extensive testing to verify design and performance and to qualify hardware. For this purpose, a Docking Dynamics Test Facility (DDTF) was developed. It allows reproduction on the ground of the same impact loads and relative motion dynamics which would occur in space during docking. It uses a 9 degree of freedom, servo-motion system, controlled by a real time computer, which simulates the docking spacecraft in a zero-g environment. The test technique involves and active loop based on six axis force and torque detection, a mathematical simulation of individual spacecraft dynamics, and a 9 degree of freedom servomotion of which 3 DOFs allow extension of the kinematic range to 5 m. The configuration was checked out by closed loop tests involving spacecraft control models and real sensor hardware. The test facility at present has an extensive configuration that allows evaluation of both proximity control and docking systems. It provides a versatile tool to verify system design, hardware items and performance capabilities in the ongoing HERMES and COLUMBUS programs. The test system is described and its capabilities are summarized.

  10. Simulation studies of vacuum system for Indus-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, S. K.; Kotaiah, S.

    2008-05-01

    Due to eight fold symmetry of lattice, the 172.4 meters circumference of Indus-2 was divided into eight unit cells. The location of vacuum pumps was restricted by location of more important components like magnets, beam diagnostic components etc. The minimum permissible beam aperture, restricted by apertures of magnets, rendered the vacuum envelope highly conductance limited. Main sources of gas loads viz the outgassing and the photon induced desorption (PID) were also highly location specific, because of location of photon absorbers, and the specific nature of vacuum components. Therefore, the computer simulation of a unit cell was important to have a feel for ultimate results obtained by a particular configuration of pump installation. The vacuum system for a unit cell was studied using electrical equivalent network for the vacuum system. The entire circuit was analyzed by using commercial software used for electronics circuit analysis. Since the synchrotron radiation leads to cleaning effect and the PID yield reduces with accumulated dose of beam current, system's behaviour with beam current was also studied by using computer program obtained from BESSY Berlin. This provided an estimate of dose necessary for achieving the specified operation of UHV system for Indus-2. The calculations also helped in optimizing the initial cleaning of chambers by glow discharge cleaning etc. This paper presents the results obtained by computer simulations of a unit cell of Indus-2, carried out by both the methods.

  11. Web-based system for surgical planning and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldeib, Ayman M.; Ahmed, Mohamed N.; Farag, Aly A.; Sites, C. B.

    1998-10-01

    The growing scientific knowledge and rapid progress in medical imaging techniques has led to an increasing demand for better and more efficient methods of remote access to high-performance computer facilities. This paper introduces a web-based telemedicine project that provides interactive tools for surgical simulation and planning. The presented approach makes use of client-server architecture based on new internet technology where clients use an ordinary web browser to view, send, receive and manipulate patients' medical records while the server uses the supercomputer facility to generate online semi-automatic segmentation, 3D visualization, surgical simulation/planning and neuroendoscopic procedures navigation. The supercomputer (SGI ONYX 1000) is located at the Computer Vision and Image Processing Lab, University of Louisville, Kentucky. This system is under development in cooperation with the Department of Neurological Surgery, Alliant Health Systems, Louisville, Kentucky. The server is connected via a network to the Picture Archiving and Communication System at Alliant Health Systems through a DICOM standard interface that enables authorized clients to access patients' images from different medical modalities.

  12. Optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Soobae; Overbye, Thomas J.

    2015-10-21

    Power system transient stability analysis requires an appropriate integration time step to avoid numerical instability as well as to reduce computational demands. For fast system dynamics, which vary more rapidly than what the time step covers, a fraction of the time step, called a subinterval, is used. However, the optimal value of this subinterval is not easily determined because the analysis of the system dynamics might be required. This selection is usually made from engineering experiences, and perhaps trial and error. This paper proposes an optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability analysis, which is based on modalmore » analysis using a single machine infinite bus (SMIB) system. Fast system dynamics are identified with the modal analysis and the SMIB system is used focusing on fast local modes. An appropriate subinterval time step from the proposed approach can reduce computational burden and achieve accurate simulation responses as well. As a result, the performance of the proposed method is demonstrated with the GSO 37-bus system.« less

  13. Optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soobae; Overbye, Thomas J.

    2015-10-21

    Power system transient stability analysis requires an appropriate integration time step to avoid numerical instability as well as to reduce computational demands. For fast system dynamics, which vary more rapidly than what the time step covers, a fraction of the time step, called a subinterval, is used. However, the optimal value of this subinterval is not easily determined because the analysis of the system dynamics might be required. This selection is usually made from engineering experiences, and perhaps trial and error. This paper proposes an optimal subinterval selection approach for power system transient stability analysis, which is based on modal analysis using a single machine infinite bus (SMIB) system. Fast system dynamics are identified with the modal analysis and the SMIB system is used focusing on fast local modes. An appropriate subinterval time step from the proposed approach can reduce computational burden and achieve accurate simulation responses as well. As a result, the performance of the proposed method is demonstrated with the GSO 37-bus system.

  14. Simulating forest landscape disturbances as coupled human and natural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wimberly, Michael; Sohl, Terry L.; Liu, Zhihua; Lamsal, Aashis

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic disturbances resulting from human land use affect forest landscapes over a range of spatial and temporal scales, with diverse influences on vegetation patterns and dynamics. These processes fall within the scope of the coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) concept, which has emerged as an important framework for understanding the reciprocal interactions and feedbacks that connect human activities and ecosystem responses. Spatial simulation modeling of forest landscape change is an important technique for exploring the dynamics of CHANS over large areas and long time periods. Landscape models for simulating interactions between human activities and forest landscape dynamics can be grouped into two main categories. Forest landscape models (FLMs) focus on landscapes where forests are the dominant land cover and simulate succession and natural disturbances along with forest management activities. In contrast, land change models (LCMs) simulate mosaics of different land cover and land use classes that include forests in addition to other land uses such as developed areas and agricultural lands. There are also several examples of coupled models that combine elements of FLMs and LCMs. These integrated models are particularly useful for simulating human–natural interactions in landscapes where human settlement and agriculture are expanding into forested areas. Despite important differences in spatial scale and disciplinary scope, FLMs and LCMs have many commonalities in conceptual design and technical implementation that can facilitate continued integration. The ultimate goal will be to implement forest landscape disturbance modeling in a CHANS framework that recognizes the contextual effects of regional land use and other human activities on the forest ecosystem while capturing the reciprocal influences of forests and their disturbances on the broader land use mosaic.

  15. USSOUTHCOM Counterdrug Modeling and Simulation System (CMASS) report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-31

    USSOUTHCOM, in conjunction with Los Alamos National Labs (LANL), is in its second year of development of CMASS (Counterdrug Modeling and Simulation System). The purpose of this project is to provide an opportunity for the multiple agencies involved in the war on drugs to cooperate to simulate the various activities that must be coordinated and performed to meet the mission. LANL is providing development of computer-based support data and models to assist in gaming and strategies. Other contractors provide technology and program management support. Section 1 of this report provides observations and recommendations based on: numerous conversations with representatives from the various participating agencies and services; observation of two iterations of wargames held at the Joint Warfare Center, Hurlburt Field, FL; and reading and reviewing briefings and literature as provided by the program management office and by various agencies. Section 2 compares and contrasts two delivery media currently available in the Department of Defense.

  16. USSOUTHCOM Counterdrug Modeling and Simulation System (CMASS) report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-31

    USSOUTHCOM, in conjunction with Los Alamos National Labs (LANL), is in its second year of development of CMASS (Counterdrug Modeling and Simulation System). The purpose of this project is to provide an opportunity for the multiple agencies involved in the war on drugs to cooperate to simulate the various activities that must be coordinated and performed to meet the mission. LANL is providing development of computer-based support data and models to assist in gaming and strategies. Other contractors provide technology and program management support. Section 1 of this report provides observations and recommendations based on: numerous conversations with representatives from the various participating agencies and services; observation of two iterations of wargames held at the Joint Warfare Center, Hurlburt Field, FL; and reading and reviewing briefings and literature as provided by the program management office and by various agencies. Section 2 compares and contrasts two delivery media currently available in the Department of Defense.

  17. Evaluating System Parameters on a Dragonfly using Simulation and Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatele, Abhinav; Jain, Nikhil; Livnat, Yarden; Pascucci, Valerio; Bremer, Peer-Timo

    2015-04-24

    The dragon y topology is becoming a popular choice for build- ing high-radix, low-diameter networks with high-bandwidth links. Even with a powerful network, preliminary experi- ments on Edison at NERSC have shown that for communica- tion heavy applications, job interference and thus presumably job placement remains an important factor. In this paper, we explore the e ects of job placement, job sizes, parallel workloads and network con gurations on network through- put to better understand inter-job interference. We use a simulation tool called Damsel y to model the network be- havior of Edison and study the impact of various system parameters on network throughput. Parallel workloads based on ve representative communication patters are used and the simulation studies on up to 131,072 cores are aided by a new visualization of the dragon y network.

  18. ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN COLLISIONLESS SYSTEMS. III. RESULTS FROM SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Eric I.; Egerer, Colin P. E-mail: egerer.coli@uwlax.edu

    2015-05-20

    The equilibria formed by the self-gravitating, collisionless collapse of simple initial conditions have been investigated for decades. We present the results of our attempts to describe the equilibria formed in N-body simulations using thermodynamically motivated models. Previous work has suggested that it is possible to define distribution functions for such systems that describe maximum entropy states. These distribution functions are used to create radial density and velocity distributions for comparison to those from simulations. A wide variety of N-body code conditions are used to reduce the chance that results are biased by numerical issues. We find that a subset of initial conditions studied lead to equilibria that can be accurately described by these models, and that direct calculation of the entropy shows maximum values being achieved.

  19. A system simulation development project: Leveraging resources through partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Owen, A. Karl; Davis, Milt W.

    1995-01-01

    Partnerships between government agencies are an intellectually attractive method of conducting scientific research; the goal is to establish mutually beneficial participant roles for technology exchange that ultimately pays-off in a stronger R&D program for each partner. Anticipated and current aerospace research budgetary pressures through the 90's provide additional impetus for Government research agencies to candidly assess their R&D for those simulation activities no longer unique enough to warrant 'going it alone,' or for those elements where partnerships or teams can offset development costs. This paper describes a specific inter-agency system simulation activity that leverages the development cost of mutually beneficial R&D. While the direct positive influence of partnerships on complex technology developments is our main thesis, we also address on-going teaming issues and hope to impart to the reader the immense indirect (sometimes immeasurable) benefits that meaningful interagency partnerships can produce.

  20. Numerical simulations of a diode laser BPH treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, V; London, R A; Papademetriou, S

    1999-02-23

    Numerical simulations are presented of the laser-tissue interaction of a diode laser system for treating benign prostate hyperplasia. The numerical model includes laser light transport, heat transport, cooling due to blood perfusion, thermal tissue damage, and enthalpy of tissue damage. Comparisons of the simulation results to clinical data are given. We report that a reasonable variation from a standard set of input data produces heating times which match those measured in the clinical trials. A general trend of decreasing damage volume with increasing heating time is described. We suggest that the patient-to- patient variability seen in the data can be explained by differences in fundamental biophysical properties such as the optical coefficients. Further work is identified, including the measurement and input to the model of several specific data parameters such as optical coefficients, blood perfusion cooling rate, and coagulation rates.